WorldWideScience

Sample records for helicobacter pylori-associated gastroduodenal

  1. Helicobacter pylori Associated Lymphocytic Gastritis in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Jeong; Eom, Dae Woon; Park, Kieyoung

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG) is a rare subtype of chronic gastritis. It is defined as dense proliferation of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) more than 25 lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells. The known major causes of LG are celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori associated LG (HpLG) has more enhanced cytotoxic and apoptotic tendencies than chronic H. pylori gastritis. A 12-year-old girl with postprandial epigastric pain was diagnosed HpLG on endoscopic biopsy. After the...

  2. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  3. HELICOBACTER PYLORI-ASSOCIATED INFLAMMATION IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Pavlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim – assessment of the prevalence of seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori infection and laboratory comparative study of the peripheralblood in patients depending on the course of coronary heart disease (CHD.Materials and methods. Observation of 100 patients with coronary artery disease and 40 control patients is presented. Investigation indicatorsof clinical blood tests, biochemical blood analysis and determination of immunoglobulin antibody titer against Helicobacter pylori.Results. In patients with coronary artery disease signs of systemic inflammation associated with the development of acute coronary syndrome are marked with increased antibody titers to infection Helicobacter pylori.Conclusion. A history of coronary artery disease in patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastroduodenal pathology should be considered as a factor that increases the likelihood of unstable coronary desease course. Detected in patients with coronary artery disease signs of systemic inflammation with an increase in titer of antibodies to Helicobacter pylori infection associated with development of acute coronary syndrome.

  4. Helicobacter Pylori associated global gastric cancer burden

    OpenAIRE

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Hisada, Michie; El-Omar, Emad M.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is ubiquitous, infecting close to one-half of the world's population, but its prevalence is declining in developed countries. Chronic H. pylori infection is etiologically linked to gastric adenocarcinoma, especially non-cardia type (63% of all stomach cancer or ∼5.5% of the global cancer burden: ∼25% of cancers associated with infectious etiology), and to gastric mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, which accounts for up to 8% of all non-Hodgkin ly...

  5. Helicobacter heilmannii-associated Gastritis: Clinicopathologic Findings and Comparison with Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Ji Eun; Chang, Sun Hee; Kim, Hanseong; Chi, Je G.; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Yang, Jeon Ho; Lee, June Sung; Moon, Young-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinicopathologic features of Helicobacter heilmannii-associated gastritis and to compare H. heilmannii-associated gastritis with H. pylori-associated gastritis. We reviewed 5,985 consecutive gastric biopsy specimens. All cases of chronic gastritis with Helicobacter infection were evaluated with the Updated Sydney System, and the grades of all gastritis variables were compared between H. heilmannii-associated gastritis and H. pylori-associated gastritis groups. There were 10 cases of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis (0.17%) and 3,285 cases of H. pylori-associated gastritis (54.9%). The organisms were superficially located within the mucous layer without adhesion to epithelial cells. Interestingly, in one case many intracytoplasmic H. heilmannii organisms were observed in parietal cells with cell damage. A case of low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma concomitant with H. heilmannii infection was detected. Compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis, H. heilmannii-associated gastritis showed less severe neutrophilic activity (pgastritis devoid of erosion or ulcer (p=0.0309). In conclusion, we present the detailed clinicopathologic findings of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis. H. heilmannii-associated gastritis is uncommon and milder than H. pylori-associated gastritis, however it may be noteworthy with respect to the development of MALT lymphoma. PMID:17297253

  6. No Helicobacter pylori, no Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all duodenal ulcers (DUs) and the vast majority of gastric ulcers (GUs) are the consequence of Helicobacter pylori-associated inflammation. In DUs, the inflammation is maximal in the antrum and is associated with gastric metaplasia in the bulb. Gastrin homeostasis is disturbed by H. pylori

  7. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world's population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  8. Helicobacter pylori associated gastric intestinal metaplasia: Treatment and surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kevin Sze-Hang; Wong, Irene Oi-Ling; Leung, Wai K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer related death in the world, particularly in East Asia. According to the Correa’s cancer cascade, non-cardia GC is usually developed through a series of mucosal changes from non-atrophic gastritis to atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Atrophic gastritis and IM are therefore generally considered to be pre-neoplastic gastric lesions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is an important...

  9. Evaluation of Clinicopathological and Risk Factors for Nonmalignant H. Pylori Associated Gastroduodenal Disorders in Iraqi Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ezzy, Ali Ibrahim Ali

    2015-12-15

    To determine the risk factors associated with H. pylori infection and possible correlation with clinicopathological parameters. Gastroduodenal biopsies were examined by rapid urease test and Gram staining. Cag A cytotoxin was detected by in situ hybridization. Risk of H. pylori acquisition reported as following: Males have 1.38 fold, rural residents have 0.63 fold, Nonsmokers have 0.39 fold, mild smokers have 18 fold, and moderate smokers have 1.4 fold while heavy smokers have 1 fold. A person who's in contact with animals has 1.52 fold risks. Illiterates and patients with primary education have 5.36 & 3 fold risk respectively. Patients under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy have 1.02 fold. Patients under NSAID therapy have 3.48 fold while nonalcoholic Patients have 0.75 fold. Patients using tap water have 0.45 fold risk. H. pylori infection positively correlated with age, weight loss, and heartburn. H. pylori inversely correlated with endoscopic diagnosis, Cag A positivity, and education level. Cag A positivity correlated with animal contact and NSAID usage. Several life style factors, education, animal contact, using of PPI, and NSAIDs increase the risk of H. pylori infection. Weight loss and heartburn cardinal signs for H. pylori infection. Endoscopic diagnosis and clinicopathological parameters not strictly associated with Cag A positivity.

  10. Helicobacter pylori-associated hypochlorhydria in children, and development of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul R; Serrano, Carolina A; Villagrán, Andrea; Walker, Marjorie M; Thomson, Melanie; Duarte, Ignacio; Windle, Henry J; Crabtree, Jean E

    2013-04-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with transient hypochlorhydria. In H pylori-associated atrophy, hypochlorhydria has a role in iron deficiency (ID) through changes in the physiology of iron-complex absorption. The aims were to evaluate the association between H pylori-associated hypochlorhydria and ID in children. Symptomatic children (n=123) were prospectively enrolled. Blood, gastric juice and gastric biopsies were taken, respectively, for haematological analyses, pH assessment and H pylori determination, and duodenal biopsies for exclusion of coeliac disease. Stool samples were collected for parasitology/microbiology. Thirteen children were excluded following parasitology and duodenal histopathology, and five due to impaired blood analysis. Ten children were hypochlorhydric (pH>4) and 33 were H pylori positive. In H pylori-positive children with pH>4 (n=6) serum iron and transferrin saturation levels % were significantly lower (p4, iron and transferrin saturation were not significantly different from children with pH≤4. Low serum iron and transferrin in childhood H pylori infection is associated with hypochlorhydria. In uninfected children, hypochlorhydria was not associated with altered serum iron parameters, indicating a combination of H pylori infection and/or inflammation, and hypochlorhydria has a role in the aetiology of ID. Although H pylori-associated hypochlorhydria is transient during acute gastritis, this alters iron homeostasis with clinical impact in developing countries with a high H pylori prevalence.

  11. From Bench to Bedside to Bug: An Update of Clinically Relevant Advances in the Care of Persons with Helicobacter pylori Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In-depth meetings of the XIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori led to the presentation and discussion of extensive new data on H pylori and its diseases. The mode of transmission of H pylori remains unclear, and it remains unknown why only a small proportion of infected individuals develop duodenal or gastric ulcer disease and even fewer develop gastric cancer. The role of H pylori eradication in persons with uninvestigated dyspepsia remains controversial. New clinical trials of H pylori treatment show symptom relief and improvement in the quality of life of persons with functional dyspepsia, especially in those with ulcer-like or reflux-like dyspepsia. Clearly the move is toward symptom-based management of persons with dyspepsia, with fewer endoscopies being needed in the otherwise healthy young dyspeptic patients. It remains controversial whether eradicating H pylori in duodenal ulcer or functional dyspepsia increases the risk of subsequent development of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The one-week proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimens remain the gold standard of H pylori therapy, but some of the ranitidine bismuth citrate plus two antibiotic regimens also achieve an 80% H pylori eradication rate on an intention-to-treat basis. While the urea breath test remains the noninvasive test of choice, interesting new data are available on the use of stool antigen testing to diagnose H pylori infection. The number of H pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases grows to include possible liver, vascular, immune and skin conditions.

  12. From bench to bedside to bug: an update of clinically relevant advances in the care of persons with Helicobacter pylori- associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, N; Thomson, A B; Sinclair, P

    2000-03-01

    In-depth meetings of the XIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori led to the presentation and discussion of extensive new data on H. pylori and its diseases. The mode of transmission of H. pylori remains unclear, and it remains unknown why only a small proportion of infected individuals develop duodenal or gastric ulcer disease and even fewer develop gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori eradication in persons with uninvestigated dyspepsia remains controversial. New clinical trials of H. pylori treatment show symptom relief and improvement in the quality of life of persons with functional dyspepsia, especially in those with ulcer-like or reflux-like dyspepsia. Clearly the move is toward symptom-based management of persons with dyspepsia, with fewer endoscopies being needed in the otherwise healthy young dyspeptic patients. It remains controversial whether eradicating H. pylori in duodenal ulcer or functional dyspepsia increases the risk of subsequent development of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The one-week proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimens remain the gold standard of H. pylori therapy, but some of the ranitidine bismuth citrate plus two antibiotic regimens also achieve an 80% H. pylori eradication rate on an intention-to-treat basis. While the urea breath test remains the noninvasive test of choice, interesting new data are available on the use of stool antigen testing to diagnose H. pylori infection. The number of H pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases grows to include possible liver, vascular, immune and skin conditions.

  13. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  14. Immunohistochemical evaluation of p53 expression and proliferative activity in children with Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Yesim; Ozer, Erdener; Lebe, Banu; Bekem, Ozlem; Buyukgebiz, Benal

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of p53 expression and proliferative activity of glandular epithelium and intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis of pediatric patients. The study included endoscopic gastric biopsies of 54 children with dyspeptic complaints. Immunohistochemistry was performed for evaluation of p53 expression and Ki-67 labeling index, an indicator of proliferative activity. Grading of H. pylori density, intestinal metaplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration were performed in histologic tissue sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and Alcian-blue. Of 54 children, 35 (64%) were infected by H. pylori. Positive immunostaining for p53 was observed in 11 of 54 cases (20.4%). H. pylori infection was found in 10 (91%) of the p53-positive patients. There was a positive correlation between H. pylori density and Ki-67 labeling index in H. pylori infected children. H. pylori density, Ki-67 labeling index and inflammatory cell infiltration in the p53-positive group were significantly higher than in the p53-negative group. Although intestinal metaplasia was more common in H. pylori infected children (n = 11; 31.4%), there was no difference in the rate of intestinal metaplasia between the p53-positive and p53-negative groups. The present study shows that p53 mutations and higher proliferative activity of glandular epithelium may be related to H. pylori associated gastritis in children. Because p53 mutation does not appear to be associated with intestinal metaplasia, a precursor for gastric cancer in adults, we think that H.pylori associated p53 alterations do not initiate and promote gastric cancer that may occur in adulthood.

  15. Gastrin (G) cells and somatostatin (D) cells in patients with dyspeptic symptoms: Helicobacter pylori associated and non-associated gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Vosmaer, G. D. C.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Xiao, S.-D.; ten Kate, F. J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Gastrin G cells and somatostatin D cells are important regulators of gastric acid secretion and alterations in their relative numbers may play a key role in gastroduodenal disease. Aim: To investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on the density of immunoreactive G and D

  16. A pro-inflammatory role for Th22 cells in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Xiao-fei; Peng, Liu-sheng; Li, Bo-sheng; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Na; Li, Wen-hua; Shi, Yun; Chen, Weisan; Pang, Ken C; Zeng, Ming; Mao, Xu-hu; Yang, Shi-ming; Guo, Hong; Guo, Gang; Liu, Tao; Zuo, Qian-fei; Yang, Hui-jie; Yang, Liu-yang; Mao, Fang-yuan; Lv, Yi-pin; Zou, Quan-ming

    2015-09-01

    Helper T (Th) cell responses are critical for the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis. Th22 cells represent a newly discovered Th cell subset, but their relevance to H. pylori-induced gastritis is unknown. Flow cytometry, real-time PCR and ELISA analyses were performed to examine cell, protein and transcript levels in gastric samples from patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Gastric tissues from interleukin (IL)-22-deficient and wild-type (control) mice were also examined. Tissue inflammation was determined for pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory protein production. Gastric epithelial cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were isolated, stimulated and/or cultured for Th22 cell function assays. Th22 cells accumulated in gastric mucosa of both patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Th22 cell polarisation was promoted via the production of IL-23 by dendritic cells (DC) during H. pylori infection, and resulted in increased inflammation within the gastric mucosa. This inflammation was characterised by the CXCR2-dependent influx of MDSCs, whose migration was induced via the IL-22-dependent production of CXCL2 by gastric epithelial cells. Under the influence of IL-22, MDSCs, in turn, produced pro-inflammatory proteins, such as S100A8 and S100A9, and suppressed Th1 cell responses, thereby contributing to the development of H. pylori-associated gastritis. This study, therefore, identifies a novel regulatory network involving H. pylori, DCs, Th22 cells, gastric epithelial cells and MDSCs, which collectively exert a pro-inflammatory effect within the gastric microenvironment. Efforts to inhibit this Th22-dependent pathway may therefore prove a valuable strategy in the therapy of H. pylori-associated gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-05-14

    To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0.231-30.800) and adenocarcinoma (2

  18. Can Diet Modulate Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastric Pathogenesis? An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Ahmed, Kanwal; Saeed, Sheikh Abdul; Khan, Usmanghani; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. The infection is prevalent in more than half of the world's population. Although the infection may lead to detrimental consequences, still the majority of the infected individuals only develop mild gastritis. Several factors are behind this paradoxical outcome including virulence of the infecting H. pylori strains, genetic background of the host, and factors related to lifestyle such as dietary habits. Among these, lifestyle including dietary factors was not in the limelight, until recently, as one of the important factors that could modulate H. pylori-linked gastric diseases. This review is directed to gather and elucidate the role of dietary components in augmenting or attenuating pathological processes initiated by H. pylori. Available evidence strongly supports the notion that the diet may play a critical role in defining the final outcome of H. pylori infection particularly if certain dietary components are taken on a regular basis for a long time. Despite a recent surge in research related to the role of dietary ingredients, further studies involving large-scale clinical trials are required to gain a better understanding of the precise role played by the dietary ingredients in H. pylori-associated pathogenesis.

  19. Helicobacter Pylori Associated Gastritis Increases Risk of Colorectal Polyps: a Hospital Based-Cross-Sectional Study in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are common in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. The present study aimed to determine any correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and colorectal polyps in the Thai population. A total of 303 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy with colonoscopy for investigation of chronic abdominal pain participated in this study from November 2014 to October 2015. A diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis was made if the bacteria were seen on histopathological examination and a rapid urease test was positive. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. Patient demographic data were analyzed for correlations. The prevalence of colorectal polyps was 77 (25.4%), lesions being found more frequently in Helicobacter pylori infected patients than non-infected subjects [38.4% vs. 12.5%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 2.26 (1.32 - 3.86), p gastritis were at high risk of having adenomas featuring dysplasia [OR (95% CI): 1.15 (1.16 - 7.99); P = 0.02]. There was no varaition in location of polyps, age group, sex and gastric lesions with respect to Helicobacter pylori status. This study showed that Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps, especially adenomas with dysplasia in the Thai population. Patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis may benefit from concurrent colonoscopy for diagnosis of colorectal polyps as a preventive and early treatment for colorectal cancer.

  20. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake to Regulate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastric Diseases as Nonantimicrobial Dietary Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs, commonly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, have been acknowledged as essential long-chain fatty acids imposing either optimal health promotion or the rescuing from chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and various inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies dealing with EPA and DHA have sparked highest interests because detailed molecular mechanisms had been documented with the identification of its receptor, G protein coupled receptor, and GPR120. In this review article, we have described clear evidences showing that n-3 PUFAs could reduce various Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori- associated gastric diseases and extended to play even cancer preventive outcomes including H. pylori-associated gastric cancer by influencing multiple targets, including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, inflammation, and metastasis. Since our previous studies strongly concluded that nonantimicrobial dietary approach for reducing inflammation, for instance, application of phytoceuticals, probiotics, natural products including Korean red ginseng, and walnut plentiful of n-3 PUFAs, might be prerequisite step for preventing H. pylori-associated gastric cancer as well as facilitating the rejuvenation of precancerous atrophic gastritis, these beneficial lipids can restore or modify inflammation-associated lipid distortion and correction of altered lipid rafts to send right signaling to maintain healthy stomach even after chronic H. pylori infection.

  1. Distribution of Helicobacter pylori virulence markers in patients with gastroduodenal diseases in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zubair

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is known to be associated with a spectrum of gastroduodenal diseases. We studied the association of H. pylori virulence markers cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA and vacuolating associated cytotoxin gene (vacA alleles in patients with non ulcer dyspepsia (NUD, gastric ulcer (GU, gastric carcinoma (GC and duodenal ulcer (DU. Methods H. pylori infection established by both rapid urease test and histology were studied. The cagA and vacA allelic status was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Sequencing of vacA i1 and i2 PCR product was carried out. Results Two hundred and twenty-four patients were included, 141 (63% were males with a mean age of 45 ± 16, range 16-83 years. The virulence marker cagA was associated with GU in 20(63% (p = 0.04, DU in 23(72% (p = 0.003 and GC in 29(73% (p = 0.001 compared to NUD in 51(42%. VacA s1am1 was associated with GU in 23(72% (p = 0.001, DU in 17(53% (p vacA s1bm1 was also associated with GU in 9(28% (p = 0.001, DU in 12(37% (p CagA in 55(45% (p = 0.037, vacA s1am1 in 51(51% (P s1bm1 in 25(56% (p = 0.002, s1am2 32(30% (p s1bm2 29(69% (p = 0.004 were also associated with moderately active chronic inflammation. Conclusion CagA was negative in majority of NUD patients with H. pylori infection. However, cagA was associated with peptic ulcer and GC. VacA allele's s1am1 and s1bm1 were associated with H. pylori associated diseases and inflammation.

  2. [Unpleasant Journey from Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastritis to Gastric Cancer: Cancer Prevention by Taking a Detour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hwan; Park, Jong Min; Han, Young Min; Ko, Weon Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2015-12-01

    As a commensal or a pathogen, Helicobacter pylori can change the balance of a complex interaction that exists among gastric epithelial cells, microbes, and their environment. Therefore, unraveling this complex relationship of these mixtures can be expected to help prevent cancer as well as troublesome unmet medical needs of H. pylori infection. Though gastric carcinogenesis is a multi-step process, precancerous lesion can be reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage before reaching the stage of no return. However, biomarkers to predict rejuvenation of precancerous atrophic gastritis have not been identified yet and gastric cancer prevention is still regarded as an impregnable fortress. However, when we take the journey from H. pylori-associated gastritis to gastric cancer, it provides us with the clue for prevention since there are two main preventive strategies: eradication and anti-inflammation. The evidence supporting the former strategy is now ongoing in Japan through a nation-wide effort to eradicate H. pylori in patients with chronic gastritis, but suboptimal apprehension to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient non-compliance still exists. The latter strategy has been continued in the author'sresearch center under siTRP (short-term intervention to revert premalignant lesion) strategy. By focusing on the role of inflammation in the development of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis, this review is intended to explain the connection between inflammation and gastric cancer. Strategies on H. pylori eradication, removal of inflammation, and reverting preneoplastic lesion will also be introduced. In the end, we expect to be able to prevent gastric cancer by take a detour from the unpleasant journey, i.e. from H. pylori-associated gastritis to gastric cancer.

  3. Alpha-defensin expression in the gastric tissue of children with Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Ozlem Bekem; Ozturk, Yesim; Ozer, Erdener

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the expression of alpha-defensin and its correlation with histological criteria in children with and without Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis. Forty-five children were included. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and the relationship between alpha-defensin immunoscoring and H. pylori status and histological criteria was evaluated. Expression of alpha-defensin was significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive group (P < 0.001) and it was significantly associated with higher grades of chronic inflammation and neutrophil density (P < 0.001 for both). Our data show that alpha-defensin expression is increased in H. pylori infection in childhood and is associated with inflammatory tissue damage.

  4. Helicobacter pylori-associated malignancies: Genetics, Epidemiology and Gastric Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Capelle (Lisette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori infection affects at least 50% of the world population. The chronic inflammation caused by H. pylori can progress to pre-malignant gastric lesions, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The widespread high prevalence of H. pylori explains that gastric

  5. Dietary prevention of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer with kimchi

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Park, Kun Young; Lee, Don Haeng; Yoo, Joon-Hwan; Cho, Joo Young; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-01-01

    To prove whether dietary intervention can prevent Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, we developed cancer preventive kimchi (cpKimchi) through special recipe and administered to chronic H. pylori-initiated, high salt diet-promoted, gastric tumorigenesis mice model. H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice were administered with cpKimchi mixed in drinking water up to 36 weeks. Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively and ex...

  6. From Bench to Bedside to Bug: An Update of Clinically Relevant Advances in the Care of Persons with Helicobacter pylori Associated Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chiba, N; ABR Thomson; Sinclair, P.

    2000-01-01

    In-depth meetings of the XIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori led to the presentation and discussion of extensive new data on H pylori and its diseases. The mode of transmission of H pylori remains unclear, and it remains unknown why only a small proportion of infected individuals develop duodenal or gastric ulcer disease and even fewer develop gastric cancer. The role of H pylori eradication in persons with uninvestigated dyspepsia remains controver...

  7. Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and dyspepsia. The influence on migrating motor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Rasmussen, L; Axelsson, C K

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with dyspepsia were included. In 19 patients with a median age of 48 (range, 20-72) years endoscopy and histologic examination of biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus of the stomach showed Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis as the only pathologic finding. In six...... patients with a median age of 42 (range, 32-56) years H. pylori-negative gastritis was found. After an overnight fast the patients underwent an ambulatory duodenal motility study for 6-8 h. Twenty-five young healthy men served as the control group. In patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis the duration...... (22-89 min) in the control group. The duration of phase III and the whole MMC cycle was similar in the two groups. However, in the patients with H. pylori-negative gastritis the values of the duration of the different phases of the MMC were similar to those of the patients with H. pylori...

  8. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis or ulcer disease and gastric emptying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Wang Shyhjen (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Chen Granhum (Div. of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Yeh Shinhwa (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1994-03-01

    Forty-five patients with Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastritis or ulcer disease were included in this study. Radionuclide-labelled solid meals were used to calculate gastric emptying times (GETs) and carbon-14 urea breath tests ([sup 14]C UBTs) were used to measure the HP colonies quantitatively. The patients were assessed according to the following two criteria: (a) the HP colony number (i.e. high or low) and (b) the recorded duration of the GET (i.e. long or short). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of abnormal GET between high and low [sup 14]C UBT patients or in the incidence of abnormal [sup 14]C UBT between long and short GET cases. In conclusion, no significant relationship between HP-associated gastritis or ulcer disease and GET was found in this study. (orig.)

  9. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Nian Shuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a Gram-negative microaerophilic, curved bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction between virulence factors, host genetic factors and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF-β regulates various biological processes, ranging from cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori. This review focuses on the potential etiologic role of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis.

  10. Polaprezinc combined with clarithromycin-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis: A prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bei; Luo, Han-Qing; Xu, Hong; Lv, Nong-Hua; Shi, Rui-Hua; Luo, He-Sheng; Li, Jian-Sheng; Ren, Jian-Lin; Zou, Yi-You; Li, Yan-Qing; Ji, Feng; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Qian, Jia-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of polaprezinc combined with triple therapy was compared with triple therapy alone in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. A randomized, parallel-group, open-label, controlled, prospective multicenter study was conducted in 11 cities in China. Treatment-naive patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis were randomly assigned to one of three arms for a 14-day treatment: Arm A triple therapy (omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1 g, and clarithromycin 500 mg, each twice daily) plus polaprezinc 75 mg twice daily; Arm B triple therapy plus polaprezinc 150 mg twice daily, or Arm C triple therapy alone. The rate of H. pylori eradication was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were symptom improvement and lower incidence of adverse events. 303 patients completed the study- 106, 96, and 101 patients in Arms A, B, and C, respectively. Intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis showed that the rate of H. pylori eradication was significantly higher for Arms A (77.0%) and B (75.9%) compared to Arm C (58.6%) (P P = 0.90). Per-protocol (PP) analysis showed that the rate of H. pylori eradication was significantly higher for Arms A (81.1%) and B (83.3%) compared to Arm C (61.4%) (P P = 0.62). All three groups reported significant symptom improvement at 7, 14, and 28 days after treatment, compared to baseline (P P = 0.04) and C (1.9%) (P = 0.02). There were no serious adverse events in any group. It appears that standard dose polaprezinc combined with triple therapy can significantly improve the H. pylori eradication rate, without an increase in toxicity.

  11. From Bench to Bedside and Back – Report on the European Helicobacter pylori Study Group Xth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The Xth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori was held in Lisbon, Portugal, from September 12 to 14, 1997. State-of-the-art reviews and research findings were presented to over 2000 participants. This review focuses on important new developments and serves as a rapid communication of clinically relevant material.

  12. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori does not reduce the incidence of gastroduodenal ulcers in patients on long-term NSAID treatment : Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, Helena T. J. I.; Steen, Kirsti S. S.; Lems, Willem F.; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; de Laar, Mart A. F. J. van; Huisman, A. Margriet; Vonkeman, Harald E.; Houben, Harry H. M. L.; Kadir, Sylvana W.; Kostense, Piet J.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Boers, Maarten; Dijkmans, Ben A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the major causes of gastroduodenal ulcers. Studies on the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in NSAID users yielded conflicting results. Objective: To investigate whether H. pylori eradication in patients on

  13. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori does not reduce the incidence of gastroduodenal ulcers in patients on long-term NSAID treatment: double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, Helena T.J.I.; Steen, Kirsti S.S.; Lems, Willem F.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Huisman, A. Margriet; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Houben, Harry H.M.L.; Kadir, Sylvana W.; Kostense, Piet J.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Boers, Maarten; Dijkmans, Ben A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the major causes of gastroduodenal ulcers. Studies on the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in NSAID users yielded conflicting results. Objective: To investigate whether H. pylori eradication in patients on

  14. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  15. Helicobacter pylori associated with breastfeeding, nutritional status and recurrent abdominal pain in healthy Nigerian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senbanjo, Idowu O; Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Njokanma, Olisamedua F

    2014-04-15

    There is limited knowledge about the associations of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the current prevalence and associations of H. pylori infection with breastfeeding practices, nutritional status, and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in a group of apparently healthy children and adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria. This was a prospective hospital-based study conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital that involved 118 children who came to the hospital for routine pediatric care. Seroprevalence status of the children was determined by measuring immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Seventy-five (63.6%) children were seropositive for H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased significantly from 40.4% in children less than five years of age to 85.1% at six to ten years of age (χ(2) = 20.9, p nutrition. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is high, particularly among children from low socioeconomic backgrounds in Lagos, Nigeria. It is associated with RAP. The effect of this infection on children's health requires further studies.

  16. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  17. Classification of histological severity of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis by confocal laser endomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Ji, Rui; Yu, Tao; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Cheng-Jun; Li, Chang-Qing; Li, Zhen; Li, Yan-Qing

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To classify the histological severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated gastritis by confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). METHODS: Patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms or individuals who were screened for gastric cancer were enrolled in this study. Histological severity of H. pylori infection-associated gastritis was graded according to the established CLE criteria. Diagnostic value of CLE for histological gastritis was investigated and compared with that of white light endoscopy (WLE). Targeted biopsies from the sites observed by CLE were performed. RESULTS: A total of 118 consecutive patients with H. pylori infection-associated gastritis were enrolled in this study. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of CLE were 82.9% and 90.9% for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, 94.6% and 97.4% for predicting gastric normal mucosa, 98.5% and 94.6% for predicting histological active inflammation, 92.9% and 95.2% for predicting glandular atrophy, 98.6% and 100% for diagnosing intestinal metaplasia, respectively. Post-CLE image analysis showed that goblet cells and absorptive cells were the two most common parameters on the CLE-diagnosed intestinal metaplasia (IM) images (P gastritis. Mapping IM by CLE has a rather good diagnostic accuracy. PMID:21049554

  18. Fermented foods: are they tasty medicines for Helicobacter pylori associated peptic ulcer and gastric cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mydhily Nair R B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases.

  19. Dietary prevention of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer with kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Park, Kun Young; Lee, Don Haeng; Yoo, Joon-Hwan; Cho, Joo Young; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-10-06

    To prove whether dietary intervention can prevent Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, we developed cancer preventive kimchi (cpKimchi) through special recipe and administered to chronic H. pylori-initiated, high salt diet-promoted, gastric tumorigenesis mice model. H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice were administered with cpKimchi mixed in drinking water up to 36 weeks. Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively and explored underlying molecular changes to explain efficacies. Cancer preventive actions of anti-inflammation and anti-mutagenesis were compared between standard recipe kimchi (sKimchi) and special recipe cpKimchi in in vitro H. pylori-infected cell model. The erythematous and nodular changes, mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions in the stomach were noted at 24th weeks, but cpKimchi administration significantly ameliorated. After 36th weeks, scattered nodular masses, some ulcers, and thin nodular gastric mucosa were noted in H. pylori-infected mice, whereas these gross lesions were significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. On molecular analysis, significant expressions of COX-2 and IL-6, activated NF-κB and STAT3, increased apoptosis, and marked oxidative stresses were noted in H. pylori-infected group relevant to tumorigenesis, but these were all significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. cpKimchi extracts imparted significant selective induction of apoptosis only in cancer cells, led to inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation, while no cytotoxicity through significant HO-1 induction in non-transformed gastric cells. In conclusion, daily dietary intake of cpKimchi can be an effective way either to rejuvenate H. pylori-atrophic gastritis or to prevent tumorigenesis supported with the concerted actions of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-mutagenic mechanisms.

  20. Helicobacter pylori among patients with symptoms of gastroduodenal ulcer disease in rural Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Tsongo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To meet key millennium development goals, the rural population needs to be reached for health assessment and service delivery. Gastroduodenal ulcer disease is a common ailment affecting the health of people in Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Bwera Hospital in Kasese district of western Uganda, to establish the prevalence and predisposing factors of Helicobacter pylori among gastroduodenal ulcer disease patients. Methods: A sample of 174 patients with symptoms of gastroduodenal ulcer disease was purposively obtained. Using two laboratory test methods, the prevalence of H. pylori among these patients was determined. A structured questionnaire was administered to participants to establish their demographic background and selected aspects of their lifestyle. Finally, the results obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunochromatographic rapid test (IRT were compared. Results: We established the prevalence of H. pylori as 29.9% (52/174 by ELISA and 37.4% (65/174 by IRT. Cigarette smoking, poor sanitation, and lack of formal education were the significant predisposing factors with p-values <0.05. The two tests gave identical results in 87.9% of the patients. Discussion: The prevalence of H. pylori by IRT and ELISA test methods was similar to what has been reported elsewhere in developed countries; but was lower than previously reported in developing countries including Uganda. The previous studies in Uganda were carried out in the urban population and on young children; and some used antibody-detection methods only, therefore leading to different prevalence as a result of difference in study population and methods.

  1. Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal pathology: New threats of the old friend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechi Leonardo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. It infects over 50% of the worlds' population, however, only a small subset of infected people experience H. pylori-associated illnesses. Associations with disease-specific factors remain enigmatic years after the genome sequences were deciphered. Infection with strains of Helicobacter pylori that carry the cytotoxin-associated antigen A (cagA gene is associated with gastric carcinoma. Recent studies revealed mechanisms through which the cagA protein triggers oncopathogenic activities. Other candidate genes such as some members of the so-called plasticity region cluster are also implicated to be associated with carcinoma of stomach. Study of the evolution of polymorphisms and sequence variation in H. pylori populations on a global basis has provided a window into the history of human population migration and co-evolution of this pathogen with its host. Possible symbiotic relationships were debated since the discovery of this pathogen. The debate has been further intensified as some studies have posed the possibility that H. pylori infection may be beneficial in some humans. This assumption is based on increased incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus following H. pylori eradication in some countries. The contribution of comparative genomics to our understanding of the genome organisation and diversity of H. pylori and its pathophysiological importance to human healthcare is exemplified in this review.

  2. Regional features of gastroduodenal disease, associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, in the North Ossetia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kornienko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the structure of gastroduodenal disorders, virulent feathers of Helicobacter pylori (HP strains and efficacy of eradication therapy in children of the North Ossetia (Alania. 1265 children from 4 till 18 years old were examined, НР was found in 84%. 53% of HP(+ atients had erosions and ulcers of the stomach and duodenum. Strains, resistant to clarithromycin, were revealed in 13% of the patients. We have estimated efficacy of 4 regimes of eradication therapy. Regimes, that included clarithromycin and metronidazole, had the lowest efficacy the worst compliance. The best results were observed in triple therapy, including PPI, amoxicillin and bismuth, and quadrotherapy with PPI amoxicillin, bismuth and nifuratel. The duration of therapy should not be shorter than 10 days.

  3. Helicobacter pylori genetic diversity and gastro-duodenal diseases in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Seevasant, Indran; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Laurence J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Goh, Khean Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-12-11

    Helicobacter pylori infection results in diverse clinical conditions ranging from chronic gastritis and ulceration to gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the multiethnic population of Malaysia, Indians consistently have a higher H. pylori prevalence as compared with Chinese and Malays. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori, Indians have a relatively low incidence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. In contrast, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease incidence is high in Chinese. H. pylori strains from Chinese strains predominantly belong to the hspEAsia subpopulation while Indian/Malay strains mainly belong to the hspIndia subpopulation. By comparing the genome of 27 Asian strains from different subpopulations, we identified six genes associated with risk of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. This study serves as an important foundation for future studies aiming to understand the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori-induced gastro-duodenal diseases.

  4. Gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bittencourt, Paulo F.S.; Gifone A Rocha; Penna,Francisco J.; Queiroz,Dulciene M M

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Apresentar aspectos relevantes relativos à úlcera péptica gastroduodenal e à infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori na criança e adolescente. FONTES DOS DADOS : Livros técnicos e bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS de 1966 a 2006. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS : A úlcera péptica na criança e adolescente pode ser primária, associada à infecção pelo H. pylori, ou secundária, na qual os mecanismos etiopatogênicos dependem da doença de base. A infecção é adquirida predominantemente na infância, com taxas de...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung L; Uchida, Tomohisa; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Trinh, Dung T; Ta, Long; Mai, Bang H; Le, Song H; Thai, Ky D; Ho, Dung D; Hoang, Hai H; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2010-09-30

    The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU) and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Methods Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU) and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Results Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusions H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh. PMID

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okimoto Tadayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Methods Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Results Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusions H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between

  8. Helicobacter Pylori and CagA: Relationships With Esophageal and Gastroduodenal Disorders in Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Teymournejad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The severity of Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with virulence factors of the bacteria and host immune response. H. pylori has several virulence factors which a number of them are essential to emerge clinical outcomes. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA is the most important H. pylori virulence factor. Objectives: The aim of our study was to assess a significant relationship between presence of cagA and severity of clinical manifestation in esophageal and gastroduodenal disorders. Patients and Methods: A total of 240 gastric biopsies were collected between March 2012 and August 2013 from Tehran's hospitals. Three sets of biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum and rapid urease tests, histological examination, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assay were performed on the biopsy specimens. Results: One hundred and eight (45% of biopsy specimens were positive with rapid urease test and ureC gene PCR. Moreover, thirty eight (35.1% of positive specimens had cagA gene. The rate of gastric and duodenum inflammation was more in patients who carried CagA positive H. pylori strains. Whereas less inflammation and sever lesions in esophagus were found in CagA negative H. pylori strains. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a strong relationship between CagA and esophageal and gastroduodenal disorders. The number of CagA negative H. pylori was larger than CagA positive in esophagus lesion grade A, C, and D. Therefore, cagA may have a protective effect on some esophageal diseases. In addition, the number of CagA positives was larger than CagA negative H. pylori in gastric antrum and duodenum ulcer. Thus, CagA play a role to emerge peptic and duodenal ulcers.

  9. High Serum Pepsinogen I and beta Helicobacter pylori Infection Are Risk Factors for Aspirin-Induced Gastroduodenal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Lei, Hongjun; Shi, Wei; Sun, Xiaobin; Tang, Yu; Ren, Chunrong

    2018-01-01

    Whether gastric hyperchlorhydria and Helicobacter pylori infection contribute to aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injury still lacks evidence. Because serum pepsinogens (PGs) and gastrin-17 (G17) can reflect gastric acid secretion, this study intended to elucidate whether serum PGs, serum G17, and H. pylori infection are associated with aspirin-induced gastrointestinal injury. A total of 60 patients taking low-dose aspirin for more than 1 month were enrolled in this study. Serum PG I, PG II, and G17 were determined using ELISA. A 14C-urea breath test was used for the detection of an H. pylori infection. The modified Lanza score was used to evaluate the degree of gastroduodenal injury under endoscopy. The median serum PG I level was significantly higher in the intensive gastroduodenal injury (IGI) group compared to that in the mild gastroduodenal injury group (155.0 vs. 116.6 ng/mL, p = 0.006). The H. pylori infection rate was significantly higher in the IGI group (73 vs. 40%, p = 0.037). Receiver operator characteristic curves analysis revealed that the cutoff value of PG I was 123 ng/mL, with 80% sensitivity and 61.4% specificity. H. pylori infection combined with PG I at >123 ng/mL had an OR (95% CI) of 15.8 (2.4 ± 104.5) for the prediction of aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injury. Key Messages: Serum PG I and H. pylori infection could be used to identify potential high-risk aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injury patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Gastroduodenal mucosal prostaglandin generation in patients with Helicobacter pylori before and after treatment with bismuth subsalicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avunduk, C; Suliman, M; Gang, D; Polakowski, N; Eastwood, G L

    1991-04-01

    To determine whether Helicobacter pylori has an effect on gastroduodenal mucosal prostaglandin generation, mucosal biopsies were obtained from the gastric body, antrum, and duodenal bulb of 30 patients who were undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for clinical indications. One biopsy from the gastric body and one from the antrum were tested for urease activity (urea broth) and one biopsy from each area including the duodenum was processed for histology. Two other biopsies form each area were incubated and the accumulation of prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha in the incubation medium was measured by radioimmunoassay. Twelve of the 17 H. pylori-positive patients and seven of the 13 H. pylori-negative patients agreed to take bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol) two tablets four times a day for four weeks. One week after treatment, these patients again underwent endoscopy and the above studies. This study indicates that: (1) mucosal PGE2 generation may be increased in the duodenum, gastric body, and antrum in H. pylori-positive patients compared to H. pylori-negative patients, and (2) treatment with bismuth subsalicylate for four weeks results in reduction of mucosal PGE2 in the duodenum, gastric body, and antrum of H. pylori-positive patients and fails to eradicate H. pylori or reduce gastric inflammation.

  11. Characteristics and Risk Factors of Helicobacter pylori Associated Gastritis: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Taweesak Tongtawee; Soraya Kaewpitoon; Natthawut Kaewpitoon; Chavaboon Dechsukhum; Wilairat Leeanansaksiri; Loyd, Ryan A.; Likit Matrakool; Sukij Panpimanmas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. Risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection are genetic susceptibility and poor living conditions. This study aimed to investigate the Mdm2 gene, clarithromycin resistance, and possible risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods. Risk factors and clinical characteristics were analyzed, including patient demographic data, patient income, personal history, possible source of transmission, patient symptoms, endoscopic findings, patterns of clarithromycin resis...

  12. Elevated risk of recurrent colorectal neoplasia with Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis: A follow-up study of patients with endoscopically resected colorectal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    INOUE, IZUMI; KATO, JUN; YOSHIMURA, NORIKO; MAEDA, YOSHIMASA; MORIBATA, KOSAKU; SHINGAKI, NAOKI; DEGUCHI, HISANOBU; ENOMOTO, SHOTARO; MAEKITA, TAKAO; UEDA, KAZUKI; IGUCHI, MIKITAKA; TAMAI, HIDEYUKI; FUJISHIRO, MITSUHIRO; YAMAMICHI, NOBUTAKE; TAKESHITA, TATSUYA; ICHINOSE, MASAO

    2013-01-01

    In a previous population-based case-control study, we demonstrated an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The present study investigated the effects of H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis on the development of colorectal neoplasia by analyzing the recurrence of colorectal neoplasia subsequent to endoscopic resection. Ninety-nine patients who had undergone endoscopic resection of colorectal neoplasia were monitored under colonoscopy, and the recurrence of colorectal neoplasia was prospectively investigated. The stage of H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis in each subject was evaluated using a combination of two serum tests: H. pylori antibody and pepsinogen. In the present cohort, colorectal neoplasia recurred at a rate of 15,296/100,000 person-years during the study period. After adjusting for the confounding factors, chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) was identified as an independent risk factor [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 2.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.33–5.57], while H. pylori-infected non-atrophic gastritis was not identified as an independent risk factor for recurrent colorectal neoplasia. Colorectal neoplasia recurred earlier and was significantly more frequent in patients with CAG (22,573/100,000 person-years) compared to patients without CAG (11,089/100,000 person-years; P=0.029, log-rank test). Patients with more extensive CAG showed a higher risk of recurrence. These results demonstrated a significant elevation of the risk of recurrent colorectal neoplasia with the establishment and progression of CAG, indicating the involvement of H. pylori infection in the development of colorectal neoplasia. The two serum tests were useful clinical markers for noninvasively evaluating the risk of each individual for recurrent colorectal neoplasia subsequent to endoscopic resection. PMID:24649126

  13. Characteristics and Risk Factors of Helicobacter pylori Associated Gastritis: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. Risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection are genetic susceptibility and poor living conditions. This study aimed to investigate the Mdm2 gene, clarithromycin resistance, and possible risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods. Risk factors and clinical characteristics were analyzed, including patient demographic data, patient income, personal history, possible source of transmission, patient symptoms, endoscopic findings, patterns of clarithromycin resistance, and patterns of Mdm2 SNIP309. Results. Ingestion of pickled fish (OR = 11.27, 95% CI = 4.31-29.45, p Papaya salad (OR = 8.73, 95% CI = 4.54-16.79, p Papaya salad are positive risk factors. There was high prevalence of clarithromycin resistance. The Mdm2 SNIP309 G/G homozygous genotype might be a risk factor for gastric cancer and the fact that it is infrequent in Thailand.

  14. Characteristics and Risk Factors of Helicobacter pylori Associated Gastritis: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweesak Tongtawee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection are genetic susceptibility and poor living conditions. This study aimed to investigate the Mdm2 gene, clarithromycin resistance, and possible risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods. Risk factors and clinical characteristics were analyzed, including patient demographic data, patient income, personal history, possible source of transmission, patient symptoms, endoscopic findings, patterns of clarithromycin resistance, and patterns of Mdm2 SNIP309. Results. Ingestion of pickled fish (OR = 11.27, 95% CI = 4.31–29.45, p<0.0001, salt crab (OR = 8.83, 95% CI = 1.99–39.14, p<0.001, and Papaya salad (OR = 8.73, 95% CI = 4.54–16.79, p<0.01. The prevalence of clarithromycin resistance was 56% (wild type, A2143/2142A, is 23.8%; mutation, A2143/2142CG, is 35.7%; wild type + mutation is 40.5%. The genetic polymorphisms of Mdm2 SNIP309 were SNIP309 T/T homozygous in 78%, SNIP309 G/T heterozygous in 19%, and SNIP309 G/G homozygous in 3%. Conclusion. Pickled fish, salt crab, and Papaya salad are positive risk factors. There was high prevalence of clarithromycin resistance. The Mdm2 SNIP309 G/G homozygous genotype might be a risk factor for gastric cancer and the fact that it is infrequent in Thailand.

  15. Effects of Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 on Helicobacter pylori-Associated Dyspepsia: A Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Atsushi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Uemura, Naomi; Nakajima, Shigemi; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Takashi; Ohtsu, Toshihiro; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Some Lactobacillus spp. suppress Helicobacter pylori in the stomach and have potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal conditions. In this study, the effects of Lactobacillus strains on functional dyspepsia associated with H. pylori infection were examined. Volunteers were screened using the (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) and H. pylori stool test, and 131 participants who met the selection criteria (mean age: 48.9 years) were randomly given L. gasseri OLL2716-containing yogurt or placebo yogurt once daily for 12 weeks. Gastrointestinal symptoms (epigastric pain, bloating, postprandial fullness, nausea, and heartburn) and the levels of serum pepsinogen (PG), (13)C-UBT, and H. pylori stool antigen were assessed. No significant differences were observed between the groups in UBT results, H. pylori stool antigens, or the serum PGI/II ratio. In the L. gasseri group, postprandial fullness was significantly lower at the end of the trial compared to the initial level (p 10 for bloating compared to the placebo group (p gasseri OLL2716-containing yogurt may effectively suppress dyspeptic symptoms in H. pylori-infected patients. This study was registered at the University Hospital Medical Network Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000016746).

  16. Effects of Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 on Helicobacter pylori-Associated Dyspepsia: A Multicenter Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some Lactobacillus spp. suppress Helicobacter pylori in the stomach and have potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal conditions. In this study, the effects of Lactobacillus strains on functional dyspepsia associated with H. pylori infection were examined. Volunteers were screened using the 13C-urea breath test (UBT and H. pylori stool test, and 131 participants who met the selection criteria (mean age: 48.9 years were randomly given L. gasseri OLL2716-containing yogurt or placebo yogurt once daily for 12 weeks. Gastrointestinal symptoms (epigastric pain, bloating, postprandial fullness, nausea, and heartburn and the levels of serum pepsinogen (PG, 13C-UBT, and H. pylori stool antigen were assessed. No significant differences were observed between the groups in UBT results, H. pylori stool antigens, or the serum PGI/II ratio. In the L. gasseri group, postprandial fullness was significantly lower at the end of the trial compared to the initial level (p10 for bloating compared to the placebo group (p<0.05. Dietary supplementation with L. gasseri OLL2716-containing yogurt may effectively suppress dyspeptic symptoms in H. pylori-infected patients. This study was registered at the University Hospital Medical Network Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000016746.

  17. Assessment of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of Helicobacter pylori-associated iron deficiency and anemia in children with dyspeptic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aziz Awad, Mohiee El-Deen; Amin, Saleh Mohamed; Abdou, Saied Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the diagnostic approaches of Helicobacter pylori (IP)-associated iron deficiency (ID) and anemia (IDA) in children with dyspeptic symptoms and evaluated the effect of simultaneous anti-H. pylori (anti-HIP) therapy and oral iron in comparison with each of anti? HP therapy and oral iron therapy alone, on iron status as assessed by serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) level. Two hundreds children with dyspeptic symptoms were subjected to clinical evaluation, stool examination, CBC, biochemical assays for serum iron parameters and measurements of serum IgG antibodies to HP and serum sTfR level by ELISA. Sixty children were found to have HP. associated ID or IDA and were randomly divided into 3 groups (20 children each). GA received 2-week anti-HP therapy plus 90-day oral iron, and GB received 2-week anti-HP therapy alone whereas group C received 90-day oral iron alone. Re-evaluation of the 3 groups was performed after 3 months of treatment initiation by repeat CBC and serum sTfR level. Children (45%) were HP-seropositive. The mean values of serum sTfR were significantly higher in HP-positive group and in HP-positive children with IDA than in HP-negative group and in HP-negative children with IDA although no significant differences were noted in hematologic variables and iron parameters between the corresponding groups and children. As regard treatment groups, there were significant improvements in the mean values of indices of IDA status (HIb, MCH, MCV, sTfR) and ID status (sTtRi) at 3 months of treatment initiation compared with their baseline values after. anti-HP triple therapy either with oral iron or without oral iron whereas the control children who were treated with oral iron alone showed insignificant changes despite oral iron administration. The improvements in these parameters were significantly greater in groups of children who received anti-HP therapy either combined with iron or alone, where compared with those who did not receive

  18. High Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori hopQ II Genotype Isolated from Iranian Patients with Gastroduodenal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi Bezmin Abadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and noncardia gastric cancer. Several putative virulence factors for H. pylori have been identified including vacA, babA, and iceA. HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. Due to the substantial geographic differences in the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors reported, the main purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQ alleles (types I and II and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. The presence of H. pylori and hopQ alleles in gastric biopsy specimens was identified by specific PCR assays. H. pylori type II hopQ was found to be significantly associated with gastric cancer patients (odds ratio: 3.47, 95% CI: 1.56–5.89. Information about the prevalence of H. pylori hopQ type II can be used for determining the high-risk diseases type which is actually colonized by H. pylori hopQ type II positive strains. The presence of H. pylori hopQ type II should be investigated in different geographical regions as confirmatory findings may provide a definite biomarker attributed to the pathogenesis of certain severe digestive diseases.

  19. [Mucosal immune response to Helicobacter pylori in children with gastroduodenal diseases and allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurina, S A; Ilintseva, N V; Gervazieva, V B

    2014-01-01

    In children with chronic gastritis/gastroduodenitis, erosions and ulcer of stomach and duodenum and associated allergic diseases (asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis) CagA, sIgA and IgE antibodies to the H. pylori were determined by ELISA in the supernatants of feces. H. pylori infection was determined according to "Maastricht IV". The frequency and contents of CagA did not differ among the groups we studied. However, in children with positive urease test the contents of CagA was significantly higher (p = 0.03) compared with other children. The highest levels of sIgA were found in the feces supernatants from non-allergic children with CG/CGD and were associated with H. pylori infection. The immune response in children with erosions and ulcer of stomach and duodenum and in children with allergy was presented the sIgE to H. pylori. Also, the negative correlation between the level sIgE to H. pylori and content sIgA was found in children with allergy. Thus, increased IgE indicates not only allergy, but also acts as a protective role in the development of anti-infective immunity.

  20. Prevalence of EPIYA motifs in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with gastroduodenal disorders in northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Ajami

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA-positive strains of Helicobacter pylori are associated with gastroduodenal diseases. Evidences have suggested that the type of H pylori CagA EPIYA motifs may be associated with specific disorders (i.e., gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer.  We investigated the prevalence of different EPIYA motifs (A, B, C, or D in H. pylori strains isolated from patients with recurrent dyspepsia who underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy. Materials and Methods: H. pylori strains were isolated from biopsy specimens of 220 patients with dyspepsia symptoms. The presence of glmM gene, as a housekeeping gene CagA and pattern of cagA EPIYA motifs were genotyped using by polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.The association between the type of motifs and disease state determined by the Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression.Results: CagA-positive H. pylori were identified in 125(57% of patients with gastrointestinal disorders, of whom 36(28.6% were isolated from gastritis, 31 (24.6% from duodenal ulcer, and 58 (46.4% from gastric cancer. The frequency of pattern of cagA EPIYA motifs were 39 (31.2% AB motifs, 54 (43.2% ABC motifs, and 32 (25.6% ABCC motifs and not detected D motifs. Gastric cancer risk was estimated to be 2.57 times higher in patients infected by strains with ABCC motif when compared with gastritis and duodenal ulcer patients (P=0.03. Moreover, patients with C- containing motifs were 2.27 times more likely to be affilicted with gastric cancer than duodenal ulcer. AB motif was more associated with gastritis and duodenal ulcer than ABC and ABCC motifs. Conclusion: The results suggested that cag-EPIYA ABCC might be associated with gastric cancer, while EPIYA-AB might be is associated with duodenal ulcer.

  1. Úlcera péptica gastroduodenal e infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori na criança e adolescente Gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo F. S. Bittencourt

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar aspectos relevantes relativos à úlcera péptica gastroduodenal e à infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori na criança e adolescente. FONTES DOS DADOS : Livros técnicos e bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS de 1966 a 2006. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS : A úlcera péptica na criança e adolescente pode ser primária, associada à infecção pelo H. pylori, ou secundária, na qual os mecanismos etiopatogênicos dependem da doença de base. A infecção é adquirida predominantemente na infância, com taxas de prevalência que variam de 56,8 a 83,1% nas crianças que vivem nas regiões mais pobres do Brasil e de aproximadamente 10% nas crianças abaixo de 10 anos de idade nos países desenvolvidos. A infecção pode ser diagnosticada por métodos invasivos, que investigam a presença da bactéria, ou de DNA, RNA ou produtos bacterianos em fragmentos de biópsia da mucosa gástrica obtida à endoscopia; também pode ser diagnosticada através de métodos não-invasivos, que compreendem a pesquisa de anticorpos anti-H. pylori em amostras de soro, urina ou saliva, a pesquisa de antígenos da bactéria nas fezes e o teste respiratório com uréia marcada com carbono-13. O método de escolha para o diagnóstico da úlcera péptica é a endoscopia digestiva alta, com a vantagem adicional de, durante o procedimento, permitir a obtenção de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica para o diagnóstico da infecção e estudo histopatológico. CONCLUSÕES: A infecção por H. pylori é a principal causa de úlcera péptica na infância. A erradicação da bactéria com antimicrobiano é acompanhada de cura da doença, sendo, portanto, indicada em todas as crianças H. pylori-positivas com úlcera péptica em atividade, recorrente, cicatrizada ou complicada.OBJECTIVE: To show important aspects of gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents. SOURCES: Technical textbooks and MEDLINE and LILACS databases including

  2. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 are not increased in dyspeptic patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Bayraktaroğlu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal cytokine overproduction has been clearly documented previously. The stomach has a large surface area and continuous spill-over of locally produced cytokines into the blood stream is a possibility. There are few and conflicting data on circulatory proinflammatory cytokine levels in patients with H. pylori infection.

  3. Dietary Intervention of Artemisia and Green Tea Extracts to Rejuvenate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Chronic Atrophic Gastritis and to Prevent Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Kangwan, Napapan; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Bok-Nam; Kim, Won-Hee; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-02-01

    As nonmicrobial dietary approach is capable of controlling Helicobacter pylori infection, we evaluated the efficacy of long-term dietary administration of Artemisia and/or green tea extracts on H. pylori-initiated, high-salt-promoted chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric tumorigenesis mouse model. Helicobacter pylori-infected and high-salt-diet-administered C57BL/6 mice were administered with Artemisia extracts (MP group) and/or green tea extracts (GT group) for 36 weeks in addition to the control group (ES group, gastroprotective drug, ecabet sodium 30 mg/kg, diet pellet). Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively, and their underlying molecular changes were measured in gastric homogenates. Detailed mechanisms were further evaluated in in vitro cell models. The erythematous and nodular changes and mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions were noted in the control group at 24 weeks. MP, GT, MPGT, and ES groups all showed significantly ameliorated pathologic lesion compared to the control group (p < .05). After the 36 weeks, scattered nodular masses with some central ulcers and thin gastric surface were noted in the control stomach, whereas no tumorous lesion and milder atrophic changes were observed in all MP, GT, and MPGT groups except ES group (p < .05). On molecular analysis, increased expressions of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, lipid peroxide, and activated STAT3 relevant to H. pylori infection were significantly decreased with MPGT administration (p < .01), whereas HSP70 was significantly increased. PGDH expressions, core tumor suppressor involved in carcinogenesis, were significantly decreased with H. pylori infection (p < .05), but significantly increased in MPGT group (p < .05). Increased mucosal apoptotic index noted in the control group was significantly decreased with MP and/or GT along with significantly preserved gastric gastroprotective mediators (p < .01) such as mucins, HSP27, and HSP70. H. pylori-induced serum

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein levels circulating in plasma and deposited in the tissues: comparison between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayo, Soichiro; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Naruko, Takahiko; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Hai, Eishu; Yoshimi, Noriko; Shirai, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Yoshiaki; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Ueda, Makiko

    2004-11-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is a key factor in the progression of atherosclerosis. We developed a sensitive method for measuring plasma ox-LDL levels using a novel anti-ox-LDL antibody. Recently, several studies have shown positive associations between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and coronary heart disease. Thus the question arises whether an increase in the plasma levels of ox-LDL occurs in patients with H pylori gastritis. We measured plasma ox-LDL levels in patients with H pylori gastritis (n = 27) and compared them with those in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 62) and stable angina pectoris (SAP; n = 63) and those in control subjects (n = 64). In addition, ox-LDL localization and the presence of macrophages and neutrophils were studied immunohistochemically in gastritis specimens and in coronary culprit lesions obtained from patients with AMI. Plasma ox-LDL levels in patients with AMI were significantly higher than those in patients with SAP (P gastritis (P Gastritis, 0.53 +/- 0.17; control, 0.57 +/- 0.23 ng/5 microg LDL protein). Immunohistochemically, H pylori gastritis specimens showed distinct infiltration of macrophages and myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils; however, ox-LDL localization was not detected. In contrast, coronary culprit plaques revealed strong positivity for ox-LDL in ruptured lipid cores with abundant macrophage-derived foam cells, and these plaques also contained myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils. Our results suggest that plasma ox-LDL levels do not seem to be associated with H pylori infection, but do relate to coronary plaque instability in AMI.

  5. Differences in Virulence Markers between Helicobacter pylori Strains from Iraq and Those from Iran: Potential Importance of Regional Differences in H. pylori-Associated Disease▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Nawfal R.; Mohammadi, Marjan; Talebkhan, Yeganeh; Doraghi, Masoumeh; Letley, Darren P.; Muhammad, Merdan K.; Argent, Richard H.; Atherton, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma; the latter is common in Iran but not in Iraq. We hypothesized that more virulent H. pylori strains may be found in Iran than in Iraq and so compared established and newly described virulence factors in strains from these countries. We studied 59 unselected dyspeptic patients from Iran and 49 from Iraq. cagA was found in similar proportions of strains from both countries (76% in Iran versus 71% in Iraq) and was significantly associated with peptic ulcer disease in Iraq (P ≤ 0.01) but not in Iran. cagA alleles encoding four or more tyrosine phosphorylation motifs were found in 12% of the Iranian strains but none of the Iraqi strains (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in the vacA signal-, middle-, or intermediate-region types between Iranian and Iraqi strains. Among the strains from Iran, vacA genotypes showed no specific peptic ulcer associations, but among the strains from Iraq, vacA i1 strains were associated with gastric ulcer (P ≤ 0.02), mimicking their previously demonstrated association with gastric cancer in Iran. dupA was found in similar proportions of Iranian and Iraqi strains (38% and 32%, respectively) and was associated with peptic ulceration in Iraqi patients (P ≤ 0.01) but not Iranian patients. H. pylori strains from Iraq and Iran possess virulence factors similar to those in Western countries. The presence of cagA with more phosphorylation motifs in Iranian strains may contribute to the higher incidence of gastric cancer. However, the association between strain virulence markers and disease in Iraq but not Iran suggests that other host and environmental factors may be more important in the disease-prone Iranian population. PMID:18353934

  6. High Frequency of vacA s1m2 Genotypes Among Helicobacter pylori Isolates From Patients With Gastroduodenal Disorders in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajavand, Hamid; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Mohajeri, Parviz; Bakhtyari, Somaye; Bashiri, Homayoon; Kalali, Behnam; Gerhard, Markus; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2015-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection and related diseases outcome are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial, host and environmental factors. Several distinct virulence factors of H. pylori have been shown to be associated with different clinical outcomes. Here we focused on vacA and cagA genotypes of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of two toxins and genotypes of VacA toxin in patients referred to a central hospital in the west of Iran (Imam Reza hospital, Kermanshah) during 2011 - 2012. Samples were collected from patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric biopsy specimens from the stomach antrum and corpus were cultured. PCR analysis was performed for genotyping H. pylori vacA and cagA genes. Helicobacter pylori was isolated from 48% (96/200) of patients with gastroduodenal disorders. In 81/96 (84%) cases, the cagA gene was present. Among different genotypes of vacA, two s1m2 and s2m2 genotypes were dominant with frequency of 39.5% and 50%, respectively. The frequency of the s1m1 genotype was 7.2% (7/96), which is much lower than elsewhere. H. pylori isolates with positive results for cagA gene and vacA s1m2 genotypes showed statistically significant correlation with peptic ulcer (s1m2 13/34 [38.2%] P = 0.003). However, isolates of H. pylori infection with cagA gene and vacA s2m2 genotypes were significantly associated with development of gastritis (s2m2 41/42 [97.6%] P = 0.000). About 90% of H. pylori strains potentially contained vacA s2m2 and s1m2 genotypes. Infection with H. pylori strain containing the cagA gene or the vacA s1m1 and s1m2 genotypes was associated with increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD).

  7. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load...... and cytokines which may improve knowledge concerning the outcome of gastric diseases caused by H. pylori. Antral biopsies from 42 dyspeptic patients including 27 H. pylori-positive and 15 H. pylori-negative patients were tested for apoptotic activity by the TUNEL assay, and immuno-histochemically for p53...... and the proliferative marker Ki-67. H. pylori infection, bacteria load and inflammatory activity were associated with increased cell turnover as judged by enhanced activities of TUNEL, p53 and Ki-67. Only p53 was significantly correlated to IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-10. The H. pylori-positive state was furthermore...

  8. Effect of dietary anti-Helicobacter pylori-urease immunoglobulin Y on Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Nomura, S; Masaoka, T; Goshima, H; Kamata, N; Kodama, Y; Ishii, H; Kitajima, M; Nomoto, K; Hibi, T

    2004-07-01

    Recently, chicken egg yolk was recognized as an inexpensive antibody source, and the therapeutic usefulness of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY) in oral passive immunization has been investigated. Although multiple antibiotic treatments eradicate most Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections, therapy fails in 10-15% of cases due to the development of drug resistance. Consequently, it is important that new, more broadly based therapies for the treatment of H. pylori infection should be identified. The present study evaluated the effect, on H. pylori infection, of IgY prepared from egg yolk of hens immunized with H. pylori urease (anti-HpU IgY). Seventeen asymptomatic volunteers diagnosed as H. pylori-positive by the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) were orally administered anti-HpU IgY for 4 weeks. Four weeks later, UBT values were significantly decreased although no case showed H. pylori eradication. An H. pylori-positive 53-year-old female gastritis patient administered anti-HpU IgY plus lansoprazole for 8 weeks showed a decrease in serum pepsinogen (PG) I and UBT values as well as an increase in the PG I/II ratio. In conclusion, anti-HpU IgY may mitigate H. pylori-associated gastritis and partially attenuate gastric urease activity. Furthermore, anti-HpU IgY combined with antacids appears to ameliorate gastric inflammation. These encouraging results may represent a novel approach to the management of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal disease.

  9. HELICOBACTER PYLORI SEROLOGY AND EVALUATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been strongly associated with various gastroduodenal diseases worldwide with only a few studies emanating from developing countries. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of serum Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and underlying gastroduodenal pathology in Nigerian ...

  10. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection and lifestyle habits in the development of gastroduodenal diseases in a population from the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Vilar-e-Silva, Adenielson; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2013-01-01

    Although more than half of the world's population is colonized with Helicobacter pylori, it remains unknown why this organism is able to produce severe disease in some hosts and be innocuous in others. The clinical outcome of infection is determined by several factors, including differences in the host response to bacterial stimulation, specific virulence factors of the organism and environmental influences, or a combination of these factors. This study compared the prevalence of H. pylori infection and risk factors (infection with CagA+ strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and inadequate eating habits) between patients with different gastrointestinal disorders and associated these risk factors with the histopathological findings. In a prospective study, samples were collected from 442 patients and a standardized questionnaire regarding lifestyle habits (excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and eating habits) was applied. The presence of H. pylori and of the cagA gene was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histological assessment. The frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, inadequate diet and infection with CagA+ H. pylori was higher among patients with peptic ulcer and adenocarcinoma when compared to those with gastritis. Gastric inflammation was more pronounced in patients infected with CagA+ strains. We conclude that infection with CagA+ H. pylori strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking and inadequate eating habits increase the risk of developing peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma.

  11. ROLE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AND LIFESTYLE HABITS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF GASTRODUODENAL DISEASES IN A POPULATION FROM THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira VINAGRE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Although more than half of the world's population is colonized with Helicobacter pylori, it remains unknown why this organism is able to produce severe disease in some hosts and be innocuous in others. The clinical outcome of infection is determined by several factors, including differences in the host response to bacterial stimulation, specific virulence factors of the organism and environmental influences, or a combination of these factors. Objectives This study compared the prevalence of H. pylori infection and risk factors (infection with CagA+ strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and inadequate eating habits between patients with different gastrointestinal disorders and associated these risk factors with the histopathological findings. Methods In a prospective study, samples were collected from 442 patients and a standardized questionnaire regarding lifestyle habits (excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and eating habits was applied. The presence of H. pylori and of the cagA gene was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Gastric biopsies were obtained for histological assessment. Results The frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, inadequate diet and infection with CagA+ H. pylori was higher among patients with peptic ulcer and adenocarcinoma when compared to those with gastritis. Gastric inflammation was more pronounced in patients infected with CagA+ strains. Conclusion We conclude that infection with CagA+ H. pylori strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking and inadequate eating habits increase the risk of developing peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma.

  12. Diagnostic value of blood urea and bilirubin levels determination in patients with gastroduodenal zone diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Zhakun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of relationships of urea and bilirubin blood levels in patients with Helicobacter pylori associated gastroduodenal pathology (HP-aGDP has the considerable relevance for clinicians, since these indicators represent the status and function of the gastroduodenal zone. The aim of this study was to estimate changes of bilirubin and urea blood levels in patients with HP-aGDP before and after treatment. Materials and methods. Our study has included 59 patients of the main group with different HP-aGDP and 40 patients of the control group with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Results. In patients with HP-aGDP the doubly severe reduction of urea concentration was observed in significantly greater number of patients, while half of the patients in the controls had an increase of its level by 10.4 %. The bilirubin concentration decrease was more pronounced (37.1 % vs. 3.5 % and significant (p < 0.05 in patients with HP-aGDP. Its rate depended on the dynamics of urea exactly in patients with HP-aGDP and it was more pronounced in case of urea reduction (p < 0.05. Thus, the revealed association of bilirubin and urea levels changes, namely their decrease owing to the treatment, was inherent only to patients with HP-aGDP unlike to the patients with CAD. We also determined the involvement of lipid, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, electrolytes, composition of blood in the processes of local and systemic inflammation caused by HP and its relationship with adaptive reactions, which generally depended on other individual characteristics of patients in the study group (age, duration of disease, ulcer size, etc.. Conclusions. The monitoring of urea and bilirubin blood levels in patients especially with HP-aGDP during the eradication has a specific diagnostic and prognostic value. The bilirubin level in such cases reflects the severity of cholestasis, inflammatory lesions of the duodenal mucosa, comorbid hepatobiliary disease, while the urea level

  13. Route of children at ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Олександрович Сокольник

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To elaborate the step-by-step differential algorithm of the motion of children with ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings. Methods. There were examined 45 patients with gastroduodenal bleeding of ulcerative genesis using clinical, sociometric, genealogic, immune-enzyme, biochemical, endoscopic, functional methods. In the complex treatment for stop bleeding 13 patients underwent argon-plasma coagulation and the other – irrigation with aminocapronic acid. An efficiency of treatment was evaluated using epidemiologic and statistical methods.Results. At presence of an appropriate clinical symptomatology, burdened genealogic anamnesis, laboratory changes it is necessary to carry out an emergency endoscopic examination. In the case of continuing bleeding or instable homeostasis it is recommended to carry out an endoscopic hemostasis using argon-plasma coagulation, in conditions of the high risk of relapse of bleeding – the repeated course of argon-plasma coagulation. After stabilization - an examination for helicobacter infection, conservative therapy and dynamic observation with detection of risk of relapse of bleeding and elaboration of individualized medioprophylactic program.Conclusions. The use of step-by-step differentiated diagnostic and treatment algorithm of the motion in patients with ulcerative disease complicated with gastroduodenal bleeding allows detect the main spectrum of diagnostic researches faster and choose the tactics of treatment and therefore improve an efficiency of medical help for patient and shorten the term of inpatient treatment. 

  14. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding ulcer disease: rapid urease test and histology Diagnóstico mediante endoscopia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en pacientes con úlcera gastroduodenal y hemorragia digestiva: test rápido de ureasa e histología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro-Fernández

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the endoscopic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer is limited by a decreased sensitivity in standard invasive tests, rapid urease test and histology. There is controversy about the convenience of using one, neither, or both diagnostic tests. Aims: to evaluate the results of simultaneously performed rapid urease test and histology in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection (H. pylori in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer. Patients and methods: we included 173 patients, 98 male and 75 female, with an average age of 62 years (18-88, with upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to duodenal ulcer (115 or gastric ulcer (58, diagnosed within 24 hours after hospital admission. None of the patients had received treatment for H. pylori, proton pump inhibitors or antibiotics in the two weeks prior to the upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode. H. pylori infection was investigated in all patients by two antral biopsy samples for histological study (hematoxilin-eosin and one or two antral biopsies for rapid urease test (Jatrox®-H.p.-test. In cases with a negative urease test and histology, a 13C urea breath test was performed. Infection was considered present when at least one invasive test or the breath test was positive, whereas both invasive tests and the breath test had to be negative to establish an absent infection. Results: 152 patients (88% showed H. pylori infection, 104 patients (90% with duodenal ulcer and 48 patients (83% with gastric ulcer. In all 119 cases (78% were diagnosed by the urease test and 112 cases (74% by histology. Both methods were used to diagnose 134 of 152 cases (88% (p Introducción: el diagnóstico de la infección por Helicobacter pylori, mediante endoscopia, en pacientes con úlcera gastroduodenal y hemorragia digestiva está limitado por la disminución de la sensibilidad de los métodos invasivos habituales, test de la ureasa e histología. Existen

  15. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces...

  16. helicobacter pylori serology and evaluation of gastroduodenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thology in Nigerian patients with dyspepsia and ascertain the usefulness of H. pylori lgG screening in decreasing endoscopic workload in ... serum H. pylori IgG cannot be used as a screening procedure to reduce endoscopic workload in Nige- rian patients with .... of the patients with gastric cancer. we. 133"“ l. Submucosal ...

  17. [Gastroduodenal system state and levels of gastro-intestinal peptides in workers exposed to fluor compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A A; Gromov, A S

    2007-01-01

    Studies in 45 cryolite production workers (facing chronic gastritis and gastroduodenitis) demonstrated that the diseases in them have moderate inflammatory activity, atrophy of gastric lining contaminated with Helicobacter pylori, hypergastrine mia, hypopancreozymine mia and hyposecretine mia in half of the examinees.

  18. Úlcera péptica gastroduodenal e infecção helicobacter pylori em crianças e adolescentes: fatores de risco do hospedeiro e da bactéria

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Fernando Souto Bittencourt

    2006-01-01

    Artigo de revisão Úlcera péptica gastroduodenal na criança e no adolescente Objetivo: o presente trabalho tem por objetivo rever as principais publicações sobre a úlcera péptica gastroduodenal na criança e no adolescente. Fontes dos dados: a pesquisa bibliográfica foi realizada nas bases de dados Medline, de 1966 a 2005 e no Lilacs, de 1979 a 2003, em português, espanhol e inglês, utilizando-se as palavras chave, úlcera, péptica, crianças, adolescentes. Síntese dos dados: as úlceras pép...

  19. Meta-analysis of the efficacy of lansoprazole and omeprazole for the treatment of H.pylori-associated duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Ye, Yutong; Liang, Desen; Guo, Chao; Li, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    To conduct a systematic evaluation of the efficacy of lansoprazole and omeprazole for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. Online databases, including CHKD, VIP, China Info, the National Digital Library of China, Google Scholar, PubMed, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, and Wiley Online Library were searched for related studies. The quality of the studies was evaluated in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and relevant information was extracted from them. The studies were subjected to meta-analysis using RevMan5.3 software, and qualitative analysis was performed for studies, in which the data could not be merged. A total of nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included, all of which presented the possibility of bias. Meta-analysis showed no significant differences between patients treated with lansoprazole combinations and omeprazole combinations in terms of DU healing rate (RR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.99~1.09, P = 0.93). There were significant differences between those treated by lansoprazole combination and omeprazole combination in terms of HP eradication rate (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.01~1.18, P = 0.04), and there was no serious adverse reaction during the treatment process for both lansoprazole and omeprazole. Lansoprazole and omeprazole exhibit similar efficacy in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori associated duodenal ulcers.

  20. the effect of some nigerian local herbs on helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four Nigerian medicinal plants commonly used in the treatment of bacterial infections were tested for antimicrobial activity against twenty local strains of Helicobacter pylori recovered from patients with gastro-duodenal ulcers and gastritis. In vitro agar diffusion assay revealed anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of ethanolic ...

  1. Identification of residues involved in nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933 from helicobacter pyloriby site-directed mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a well-known bacterial pathogen involved in the development of peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and other forms of gastric cancer. Evidence has suggested that certain strain-specific genes in the plasticity region may play key roles in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases. Therefore there is considerable interest in the strain-specific genes located in the plasticity regions of H. pylori. JHP933 is encoded by the gene in the plasticity region of H. pylori strain J99. Recently, the crystal structure of JHP933 has confirmed it as a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase superfamily protein and a putative active site has been proposed. However, no evidence from direct functional assay has been presented to confirm the active site and little is known about the functional mechanism of JHP933. Here, through superimposition with Cid1/NTP complex structures, we modelled the complex structures of JHP933 with different NTPs. Based on the models and using rational site-directed mutagenesis combined with enzymatic activity assays, we confirm the active site and identify several residues important for the nucleotidyl transferring function of JHP933. Furthermore, mutations of these active site residues result in the abolishment of the nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933. This work provides preliminary insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiological role in H. pylori infection of JHP933 as a novel NTase superfamily protein.

  2. adolescents with gastroduodenal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Maria Biernat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in children and its consequences in adulthood can lead to serious complications, including in particular the development of gastric cancer. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between the occurrence of selected genes such as cagA, vacA, iceA, and babA2 determining pathogenicity of H. pylori strains and clinical outcome in children.Material and methods: The study was performed on H. pylori strains isolated from biopsies taken from 130 children and adolescents with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD, gastric and duodenal ulcers (PUD and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Genes such as cagA, vacA (allelic variants: s1/ s2, m1/m2, iceA (allelic variants: iceA1, iceA2 and babA2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Results: The cagA gene was detected in 79/130 (60.8% H. pylori isolates. The presence of the cagA gene was significantly associated with duodenal ulcer (p<0.05. The vacAs1/m1 genotype as more frequent in children with ulcers than in other groups, whereas the vacAs2/m2 genotype was more frequent in patients with gastritis and GERD. The iceA1, iceA2 and babA2 genes were present in 59/130 (45.4%, 27/130 (21% and 30/130 (23.1% of the strains, respectively. The vacAs1/cagA+ genotype was most frequently observed in strains isolated from children with PUD. The predominant genotype in children with NUD and GERD was vacAs2/cagA-/iceA1+/babA2-.Conclusion: The study showed a high incidence of strains with increased virulence, possessing cagA, vacAs1 and iceA1 genes in symptomatic children with H. pylori infection.

  3. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure of eradicat......To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...

  4. [Risk factors associated with gastroduodenal lesions in a Douala referral hospital (Cameroon)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloumou Bagnaka, S A F; Luma Namme, H; Noah Noah, D; Essomba, N E; Malongue, A; Manga, A; Tzeuton, C; Biwole Sida, M

    2016-01-01

    The causes of gastroduodenal lesions are multifactorial, and few studies have assessed the impact of each of these factors in Africa. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the occurrence of gastroduodenal lesions in Cameroon. This prospective, analytical study took place over a 5-month period in the endoscopy unit of the Douala General Hospital. Lifestyle, medical history, demographic, and clinical variables were collected. Infection with Helicobacter pylori was determined with a rapid urease (CLO) test. Multivariate regression was used to determine risk factors. The study included 234 of 265 patients seen in the department over the study period. Gastroscopy was normal for 54.2% of the subjects. The prevalence of peptic ulcers was 17.1% and of inflammatory lesions 26.4%. Risk factors associated with a gastroduodenal lesion were: age greater than 60 years [OR age = 2.953; 95% CI: 1.399 to 6.231; p = 0.004], H. pylori infection [OR = 2.953; 95% CI: 1.399 to 6.231; p = 0.003] and regular NSAID use [OR = 0.912; 95% CI: 0.112 to 2.733; p = 0.044] either a month before the examination or over the long term. Age greater than 60 years, NSAID consumption, and H. pylori infection are associated with the occurrence of gastroduodenal lesions.

  5. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the D......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved...... serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  6. Biopsychosocial Model of Gastroduodenal Pathology in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.L. Lychkovska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available From the standpoint of the biopsychosocial model of medicine, the formation of gastroduodenal diseases occurs as a result of interaction of biological, psychoemotional and psychosocial factors. Contribution of each of them to the development of certain nosological entities of gastroduodenal pathology in children is not studied enough. Current study was aimed to investigate the contribution of biological, psychoemotional and psychosocial factors to the formation of various nosological entities of gastroduodenal pathology in children and correlation between them. Materials and methods. The study involved 83 children aged 6 to 11 years with gastroduodenal diseases. The control group consisted of 45 children who showed no somatic pathology. To analyze the value of certain factors in the development of gastroduodenal pathology in children, methods of multiple correlation and factor analysis were used. Results. The findings showed dominance of the role of psychoemotional and psychosocial factors in the formation of functional disorders of the stomach and duodenum and gastritis/gastroduodenitis, while in destructive forms of gastroduodenal pathology, contribution of biological factors was predominant. Heterogeneity of functional dyspepsia as nosologic entity was revealed — both risk factors for mucosal destruction and psychoemotional factors, which are typical for functional disorders, were of great value. This explains the different course of functional dyspepsia — in some cases it is non-progressive, when the disorder remains functional for decades, and in others — this is the first stage of the continuum «functional dyspepsia — gastritis/gastroduodenitis — ulcer». Conclusion. Formation of gastroduodenal diseases, their course, prognosis are determined by the combination of risk factors. Defining their role in each case will enable to individualize the treatment and prevention approaches and to increase their efficiency, perhaps by

  7. Successful selective angiographic embolisation of a gastroduodenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New endoscopic and endovascular therapies have revolutionised the management of complex traumatic visceral aneurysms. A pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery following penetrating abdominal trauma was successfully managed by selective angiographic embolisation.

  8. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sýkora, Josef; Rowland, Marion

    2011-09-01

    This article reviewed the important publications on Helicobacter pylori research with children between April 2010 and March 2011. The most interesting studies in the last year lend further weight to the evidence for vertical transmission of H. pylori. The discovery of a potential role for jhp0562, the gene which encodes for the cell envelope protein glycosyltransferase, in the progression to peptic ulcer disease is also very interesting as it may provide a novel way to distinguish children at risk of peptic ulcer disease from those who are not, and so determine those who requires treatment to eradicate H. pylori. The rise in non-H. pylori-associated ulcers and erosions continues to be reported with no apparent risk factors for these ulcers identified to date. High levels of treatment failure continue to be reported, and there remains an urgent need for more effective treatment regimes for children. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  10. Clinical correlates of helicobacter pylori infection in children seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is the commonest global chronic human bacterial infection. Data from developed countries show that acquisition occurs in childhood but manifestation of chronic gastroduodenal diseases occur more commonly in adulthood. H. pylori infection has however been associated ...

  11. Pattern of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach causes chronic active gastritis. The pattern of gastritis is related to the disease outcome. This study aimed to determine the predominant gastritis pattern in Nigerian dyspeptic patients with a view to predicting gastroduodenal disease outcomes. Methods: Patients referred ...

  12. Immune Responses to "Helicobacter pylori" Infection in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Rostami, Mahmoud Nateghi; Nikmanesh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Infection with "Helicobacter pylori" was assessed through serum "H. pylori" IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The sero-status of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) was determined as a risk determinant for severe "H. pylori"-associated diseases. In total, 210 children with ID were included…

  13. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...

  14. Detection of Helicobacter pylori vacA, cagA and iceA1 virulence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed El-Shenawy

    Mosaicism in · vacuolating cytotoxin alleles of Helicobacter pylori. Association of specific vacA · types with cytotoxin production and peptic ulceration. J Biol Chem · 1995;270:17771–7. [12] Cover TL. The vacuolatingcytotoxin of H. pylori. Mol Microbiol 1996;20:241–6. [13] Van Doorn LJ, Figueiredo C, Sanna R, Pena AS, ...

  15. Resultados en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la úlcera gastroduodenal perforada

    OpenAIRE

    Yandy Rodriguez Acosta; Rolando Delgado Figueredo; Reinaldo Jiménez Prendes; Jesús Iván González Batista; Daily Collazo Pérez; Dainelys Collazo Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Fundamento: En la actualidad el tratamiento de la úlcera gastroduodenal perforada ha experimentado importantes cambios; pues no sería indicado la cirugía antisecretora ni resectiva, ya que se puede conseguir el mismo efecto con los inhibidores de la bomba de protones y con la erradicación del Helicobacter pylori. La recidiva es infrecuente, aunque en ocasiones con la cirugía no definitiva los síntomas reaparecen y hasta surgen nuevas perforaciones. Objetivo: Describir los resultados obtenidos...

  16. Histopathological evaluation of H. Pylori associated gastric lesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endoscopic biopsy of the gastric mucosa allows early diagnosis, grading, staging and classification of gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori, has been recognized as a major aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis, benign gastric ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The loco-regional variability in the ...

  17. histopathological evaluation of h. pylori associated gastric lesions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-12

    Dec 12, 2012 ... Background: Endoscopic biopsy of the gastric mucosa allows early diagnosis, grading, staging and classification of gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori, has been recognized as a major aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis, benign gastric ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma.

  18. Pathogenetic Features of Gastroduodenal Peptic Ulcer Associated with Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Sitsinska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development and course of gastroduodenal peptic ulcer are associated with the strains of H.pylori (сagA+ vacA+, сagA+ vacА–, сagA– vacA+, сagA– vacA– that was found in patients in the presence of comorbidity and in its absence. In the group of patients with gastroduodenal peptic ulcer combined with hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2, сagA+ vacA+ strains were found in 14 individuals (45.16 %, сagA+ vacA– — in 4 (12.9 %, сagA– vacA+ — in 13 (41.43 %, and in patients with gastroduodenal peptic ulcer — in 4 (13.79 %, 8 (27.59 % and 16 (55.17 % persons, respectively. The impact of H.pylori strains is associated with the changes of proteolytic and fibrinolytic activity. Given the comorbidity and the role of strains in the development of underlying disease, there has been revealed a probable reduction in the level of albumin lysis, azocasein lysis and an increase in azocol lysis compared with reduced total fibrinolytic activity, non-enzymatic fibrinolytic enzyme activity and increased enzymatic fibrinolytic activity. The use of baseline anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy and probiotics (Lactobacterium, Bifidobacterium provides a positive result.

  19. Helicobacter pylori y dispepsia, un problema de salud comunitario

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual; Ludmila Concepción Izaguirre

    2002-01-01

    Mientras la relación causal entre el Helicobacter pylori y la gastritis crónica, así como la importante conexión entre esta infección, la úlcera gastroduodenal y el cáncer gástrico han sido bien establecidas, la asociación entre la infección por Helicobacter pylori y la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" es un problema que dista mucho de estar esclarecido. Hay autores que no dudan en utilizar tratamiento de erradicación en la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" con Helicobacter pylori, pero existen enfoques alterna...

  20. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as gastroduodenal intussusception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2012-08-01

    Gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumour is a very rare cause for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and intermittent. This article reports a case where the diagnosis was made preoperatively with abdominal imaging and was treated by a combination of endoscopic reduction and laparoscopic resection.

  2. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  4. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of Lycopodium cernuum (Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium is a major etiological agent in duodenal, peptic and gastric ulcers. In this study, gastric biopsy samples were obtained from patients presenting with gastroduodenal complications. H. pylori was isolated from the specimens following standard microbiology ...

  5. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a high prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease in sub Saharan Africa. Peptic ulcer disease in dyspeptic patients, 24.5%, was comparable to prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease among symptomatic individuals in developed countries (12 – 25%). Limited data exists regarding its associated risk ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori Infection Aggravates Diet-induced Insulin Resistance in Association With Gut Microbiota of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    He, Cong; Yang, Zhen; Cheng, Dandan; Xie, Chuan; Zhu, Yin; Ge, Zhongming; Luo, Zhijun; Lu, Nonghua

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with insulin resistance (IR) yet the underlying mechanisms are still obscure. The vital role of gut microbiota in triggering IR has been increasingly reported, however, no study has explored the correlation of gut microbiota and H. pylori-associated IR. Using H. pylori-infected mice model fed different diet structures, we demonstrated that H. pylori infection significantly aggravated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabo...

  7. [The causes of recurrent ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnitsky, E M; Alekberzade, A V; Gasanov, M R

    To explore microcirculatory changes within the first 48 hours after admission, to compare them with clinical manifestations of bleeding and to define the dependence of recurrent bleeding from the therapy. The study included 108 patients with ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding who were treated at the Clinical Hospital #71 for the period 2012-2014. There were 80 (74.1%) men and 28 (25.9%) women. Age ranged 20-87 years (mean 54.4±16.8 years). Patients younger than 45 years were predominant (33.4%). J. Forrest classification (1974) was used in endoscopic characterization of bleeding. Roccal Prognostic Scale for gastroduodenal bleeding was applied in all patients at admission to assess the risk of possible recurrence. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 53 (49.1%) patients without recurrent bleeding; group 2-55 (50.1%) patients who had recurrent bleeding within the first two days of treatment. Investigation of microcirculation showed the role of vegetative component including blood circulation centralization, blood flow slowing, blood cells redistribution providing sufficient blood oxygenation. By the end of the first day we observed pronounced hemodilution, decreased blood oxygenation, blood flow restructuring with its acceleration above 1 ml/s, violation of tissue oxygenation, signs of hypovolemia. These changes were significantly different from group 2 and associated with circulatory decentralization with possible pulmonary microcirculation disturbances and interstitial edema. This processes contribute to disruption of tissue oxygenation. We assume that recurrent bleeding in group 2 was caused by fluid therapy in larger volumes than it was necessary in this clinical situation. Infusion therapy should be significantly reduced for the debut of gastroduodenal ulcerative bleeding. Sedative therapy is advisable to reduce the influence of central nervous system.

  8. ULCERA GASTRODUODENAL EM CÃES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Assis Uma Costa

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available As ulcerações no sistema digestivo de cães são consideradas raras. São descritos dois casos de úlcera gastroduodenal em cães. O primeiro animal apresentou úlcera no duodeno próxima!. O segundo mostrou úlcera perfurada na região pilórica do estômago. Nenhum dos animais apresentou evidências de sangramento, mas as lesões eram profundas e arredondadas. Não houve evidência de patologias concorrentes.

  9. Detachable balloon embolization of an aneurysmal gastroduodenal arterioportal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defreyne, Luc; De Schrijver, Ignace; Vanlangenhove, Peter; Kunnen, Marc [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    Extrahepatic arteriovenous fistulas involving the gastroduodenal artery and the portal venous system are rare and almost always a late complication of gastric surgery. Secondary portal hypertension and mesenteric ischemia may provoke abdominal pain, upper and lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage, diarrhea, and weight loss. Until recently, surgical excision has been the therapy of choice with excellent results. The authors report a case of gastroduodenal arterioportal fistula with a rare large interpositioned aneurysm in a cardiopulmonary-compromised patient who was considered a non-surgical candidate. The gastroduodenal arterioportal fistula was occluded endovascularly by means of a detachable balloon. A survey of the literature of this rare type of arterioportal fistula is included. (orig.)

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Takeshi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tatematsu, Masae

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for gastric carcinogenesis in human. In carcinogen-treated Mongolian gerbils, H. pylori infection enhances stomach carcinogenesis, while infection alone induced severe hyperplasia called heterotopic proliferative glands. A high-salt diet or early acquisition of the bacteria exacerbates inflammation and carcinogenesis. Oxygen radical scavengers or anti-inflammatory chemicals as well as eradication of H. pylori are effective to prevent carcinogenesis. H. pylori-associated inflammation induces intestinal metaplasia and intestinalization of stomach cancers independently. It is necessary to control cancer development not only in H. pylori-positive cases but also in H. pylori-negative metaplastic gastritis.

  11. Risk factors for reintervention after surgery for perforated gastroduodenal ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselager, R B; Lohse, N; Duch, P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforated gastroduodenal ulcer carries a high mortality rate. Need for reintervention after surgical repair is associated with worse outcome, but knowledge on risk factors for reintervention is limited. The aim was to identify prognostic risk factors for reintervention after perforated...... gastroduodenal ulcer in a nationwide cohort. METHODS: All patients treated surgically for perforated gastroduodenal ulcer in Denmark between 2003 and 2014 were included using data from the Danish Clinical Register of Emergency Surgery. Potential risk factors for reintervention were assessed, and their crude...... and adjusted associations calculated by the competing risks subdistribution hazards approach. RESULTS: A total of 4086 patients underwent surgery for perforated gastroduodenal ulcer during the study interval. Median age was 71·1 (i.q.r. 59·6-81·0) years and the overall 90-day mortality rate was 30·8 per cent...

  12. "Estudo clínico e endoscópico em pacientes com úlcera péptica gastroduodenal após 1 ano de erradicação do Helicobater pylori. Avaliação da relação entre o surgimento da esofagite erosiva e a cepa do Helicobacter pylori erradicado"

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Alexandre Gonçalves Batista

    2006-01-01

    Atualmente, muitas são as diretrizes na literatura quanto à influência do Helicobacter pylori na Doença do Refluxo Gastroesofágico. Alguns autores acreditam que o H. pylori poderia ter um efeito protetor para o desenvolvimento na DRGE e outros até mesmo concluem que o agente possa ser um fator agravante na doença. Muitas publicações nos alertam para o desenvolvimento de sintomas da DRGE, ou mesmo da esofagite, em uma porcentagem razoável de pacientes erradicados pelo esquema tríplice para tra...

  13. Current Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Gold

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects approximately 50% of the world’s population and is a definitive cause of gastroduodenal disease (ie, gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers in children and adults. Four consensus conferences held around the globe have brought together clinicians, scientists, epidemiologists and health care economists to discuss the role of the gastric pathogen H pylori in human gastroduodenal disease. At each of these conferences, the overriding objective was to reach a consensus on the development of practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of H pylori-infected individuals. However, it was not until the Canadian H pylori Consensus Conference, held in November 1997, that the issues of H pylori infection in children were addressed. Therapies for H pylori infection in children, presented in part at the First Canadian Paediatric H pylori Consensus Conference, held in Victoria, British Columbia, November 1998, are reviewed in this paper.

  14. Effects of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Expressions and Functional Activities of Human Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Transport Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guorong; Jin, Hai; Deng, Shili; Xu, Jingyu; Liu, Xuemei; Xie, Rui; Tuo, Biguang

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced duodenal ulcerogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of H. pylori infection on the expressions and functional activities of human duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins and hope to further clarify the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. The experiments were performed in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, and H. pylori-negative healthy subjects. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion was measured by Ussing Chamber technology. The expressions of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and SLC26A6 (solute-linked carrier 26 gene A6), in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were markedly lower than those in healthy controls. Basal and both forskolin- and prostaglandin E2 -stimulated duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretions in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were also lower than those in healthy controls. After anti-H. pylori treatment for H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion and CFTR and SLC26A6 expressions in H. pylori-eradicated patients recovered to levels comparable to healthy controls, but those were found to be not significantly altered in non-H. pylori-eradicated patients. The further results showed that decreases in the H. pylori-induced CFTR and SLC26A6 expression were related to the severity and virulent factors of H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection impairs the expressions and functional activities of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR and SLC26A6, which contributes to the development of duodenal ulcer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Surgical approach of gastroduodenal neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrich, V; Bartsch, D K

    2016-04-01

    Gastroduodenal neuroendocrine tumors are rare but an increase in incidence has been recognized worldwide over the past 35 years. At the same time the prognosis of patients has substantially improved because the majority of these tumors can now be detected at an early stage. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the stomach are the most frequent neoplasms of neuroendocrine origin in the gastrointestinal tract. The therapeutic management of these tumors is complicated by the fact that they must be classified not only by staging and grading but also according to their pathophysiological background (types). These types differ in biological behavior and therefore have an influence on the therapeutic concept. Because more than 90 % of duodenal NENs are often asymptomatic and are as a rule identified at a curable stage, resection of the tumor should always be the first line of therapy. The therapeutic strategies vary from local endoscopic resection (duodenotomy with excision) up to pancreas retaining duodenectomy and pylorus retaining or classical Whipple procedures. This article presents the various surgical approaches to gastric and duodenal NENs.

  16. Síndrome de Rapunzel: tricobezoar gastroduodenal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Loja

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available El Síndrome de Rapunzel es una forma inusual de tricobezoar gástrico con extensión al intestino. Está compuesto de pelo, moco y fragmentos de alimentos en descomposición. Reportamos el caso de una adolescente de 18 años de edad que es admitida en nuestra institución con antecedente de depresión mayor, en tratamiento irregular en el año previo e historia de 5 meses de náuseas, vómitos y pérdida ponderal de 15 kg. Los hallazgos del examen incluyeron distensión y dolor abdominal. Tenía anemia severa y en la serie gastroduodenal mostró defecto de relleno gástrico. El diagnóstico fue confirmado con la gastroscopia. La gastrotomía reveló un gran tricobezoar con extensión duodenal, el que fue extraído. Fue dada de alta sin complicaciones.

  17. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  18. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention When to Call the Doctor Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria are a common cause of digestive illnesses, ... of adults are likely to have had an H. pylori infection — usually without any symptoms. Signs and Symptoms ...

  19. [Lactose tolerance in children with chronic gastroduodenal zone diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, L Ia

    2003-01-01

    We determined the dependence of the frequency of lactose intolerance, particular features of the clinical presentation and laboratory showings on lactase deficiency on the basis of a complex clinical, anamnestic and laboratory study of 149 children with chronic gastroduodenal pathologies. It was established that the prevalence of lactose intolerance in children with superficial gastroduodenitis amounts to 58.8%, in children with erosive gastroduodenitis--66.7% and in children with stomach ulcers--83.3%. During the oral lactose load and a subsequent laboratory study we revealed an impairment of the hydrolytic function of small intestines accompanied by an increase of fecal excretion of carbohydrates (lactose and monosaccharides) as well as a considerable enhancement of bacterial fermentation. The detection of fecal excretion of the total glycoprotein hexoses characterizes a disorder of the morphofunctional state of the gastrointestinal tract in children with intestinal enzymopathies.

  20. METABOLIC ASPECTS OF GASTRODUODENAL PATHOLOGY IN CHILDREN SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Vilyamovich Kasparov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In a review shown the main aspects of the research work on the study of metabolic issues of formation, progression and rehabilitation of gastroduodenal pathology in children of Siberia as one of the most important pathophysiological aspects, along with other equally important factors that determine the epidemiological situation of pathology in the region. Within the exposition of this issue is emphasized on special actuality of this direction for the Siberian region, and primarily for its northern territories. It was concluded that the population features of the gastroduodenal diseases course in children should be considered in their treatment and prevention, what, unfortunately, not taken into account.

  1. Gastric Autoantigenic Proteins in Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sook; Lee, Su-Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo; Yeom, Jeongsuk; Park, Eun-Sil; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Jun, Jin-Su; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study tried to identify novel gastric autoimmune antigens that might be involved in aggravating the atrophic gastritis among patients with Helicobacter pylori infection using two-dimensional immunoblotting analysis. Materials and Methods Proteins from gastric mucosal antrectomy specimens and AGS cells (gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines derived from a Caucasian patient who had received no prior therapy) were 2-dimensionally immunoblotted separately with a pool of 300 sera from H. pylroi-infected patients at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Results Thirty-eight autoantigenic proteins including alcohol dehydrogenase [NADP+], alpha enolase, gastrokine-1, gastric triacylglycerol lipase, heat shock 70 kDa protein 1, and peroxiredoxin-2 were identified in the gastric mucosal tissue. Fourteen autoantigenic proteins including programmed cell death 6-interacting protein, serum albumin and T-complex protein 1 subunit gamma were identified in the AGS cells. Albumin, alpha-enolase, annexin A3, cytoplasmic actin 1, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein and leukocyte elastase inhibitor were commonly observed autoantigenic proteins in both gastric mucosal tissue and AGS cells. Alpha-enolase, glutathione S-transferase P, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, heat shock 70 kDa protein 1, human mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATP) subunit beta, mitochondrial 60 kDa heat shock protein, peroxiredoxin-2, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein precursor, tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 11 and Tryptophan-Aspartic acid (WD) repeat-containing protein 1 showed 60% or higher amino acid positivity. Conclusion These newly identified gastric autoimmune antigens might be useful in the control and prevention of gastroduodenal disorders, and might be valuable in breaking the vicious circle that exists in gastroduodenal disorders if their pathophysiological roles could be understood in the progress of chronic atrophic gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers, intestinal

  2. Prevalence of gastroduodenal lesions in chronic nonsteroidal anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At endoscopy, only 10 (13.9%) patients had normal gastroduodenal mucosa. Gastritis was the most prevalent lesion occurring in 50% of the patients. Peptic ulcer disease had a point prevalence of 30.5% (duodenal ulcers 22.2%, and gastric ulcers 8.3%). Other lesions at endoscopy were duodenitis 16.7%, gastric erosions ...

  3. [Aspects of therapeutic approach in hemorrhage in gastroduodenal ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klucár, J; Hut'an, M; Korec, M

    1990-03-01

    The most dramatic complications of gastroduodenal ulcers are haemorrhage. According to the literature 20-25% of chronic ulcers bleed. The authors analyze a group of 71 patients treated on account of bleeding gastric or duodenal ulcers. In indications for operation the authors emphasize endoscopic criteria elaborated by Forrest.

  4. A rare case of Cystic artery arising from Gastroduodenal artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An uncommon anatomical variation in the origin and course of cystic artery was found during human cadaveric dissection in our laboratory. A blood vessel was seen arising from the gastroduodenal artery about 1 cm distal to its origin from the common hepatic artery. The vessel when traced towards its termination was found ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  7. Novel anti-Helicobacter pylori therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Sukhbir K

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a ubiquitous gastropathogen infecting more than half of the world population. It is associated with dyspepsia, gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers, mucus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. Current recommended therapy does not eradicate infection in all treated cases and at least 20% post-treatment patients continue to suffer. Salvage therapy helps some of these nonresponders, but resistance to available antibiotics is mounting. Hence, its treatment still remains a daunting task for the practicing physician. Novel medications with improved efficacy and tolerability and with less chances of resistance are required. The present review attempts to discuss the newer patents in this field, which demonstrate a promising future role in the management of H. pylori infection and its consequent problems.

  8. Root Cause Analysis of Gastroduodenal Ulceration After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Banerjee, Subhas [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Louie, John D.; Abdelmaksoud, Mohamed H. K. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (United States); Ennen, Rebecca E.; Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionA root cause analysis was performed on the occurrence of gastroduodenal ulceration after hepatic radioembolization (RE). We aimed to identify the risk factors in the treated population and to determine the specific mechanism of nontarget RE in individual cases. Methods: The records of 247 consecutive patients treated with yttrium-90 RE for primary (n = 90) or metastatic (n = 157) liver cancer using either resin (n = 181) or glass (n = 66) microspheres were reviewed. All patients who developed a biopsy-proven microsphere-induced gastroduodenal ulcer were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on baseline parameters and procedural data to determine possible risk factors in the total population. Individual cases were analyzed to ascertain the specific cause, including identification of the culprit vessel(s) leading to extrahepatic deposition of the microspheres. Results: Eight patients (3.2 %) developed a gastroduodenal ulcer. Stasis during injection was the strongest independent risk factor (p = 0.004), followed by distal origin of the gastroduodenal artery (p = 0.004), young age (p = 0.040), and proximal injection of the microspheres (p = 0.043). Prolonged administrations, pain during administration, whole liver treatment, and use of resin microspheres also showed interrelated trends in multivariate analysis. Retrospective review of intraprocedural and postprocedural imaging showed a probable or possible culprit vessel, each a tiny complex collateral vessel, in seven patients. Conclusion: Proximal administrations and those resulting in stasis of flow presented increased risk for gastroduodenal ulceration. Patients who had undergone bevacizumab therapy were at high risk for developing stasis.

  9. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Functional dyspepsia and dyspepsia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: Do they have different clinical characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, J L; Carmona-Sánchez, R

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes motor, secretory, and inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders and therefore the term "functional" has been questioned when referring to dyspepsia associated with this bacterium. Patients with dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection could have clinical characteristics that differentiate them a priori from those with true functional dyspepsia. To determine whether there are clinical differences between patients with functional dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia that enable their a priori identification and to know the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia. A total of 578 patients with dyspepsia with no significant lesions detectable through endoscopy were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of Helicobacter pylori. The clinical characteristics, medical history, comorbidities, and use of health resources were compared between the two groups. A sub-analysis pairing the groups by age and sex in a 1:1 ratio was carried out to reduce bias. A total of 336 patients infected with Helicobacter pylori were compared with 242 non-infected patients. The prevalence of infection in the patients with dyspeptic symptoms and no endoscopically detectable lesions was 58%. The initial analysis showed that the cases with dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection were more frequently associated with overweight, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, but the paired analysis nullified all these differences. The patients with dyspepsia infected with Helicobacter pylori had similar clinical characteristics to the non-infected patients and could not be differentiated a priori. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia was 58% and increased with age. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Association between Helicobacter pylori infection and the presence of anti-sperm antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrina K. Dimitrova-Dikanarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies and anti-sperm antibodies (ASA in patients with gastroduodenal diseases caused by H. pylori, infertile patients positive for ASA and healthy fertile blood donors as controls. Serum ASA were studied by sperm agglutination tests, sperm immobilization test and ELISA against sperm antigens (ELISAsp. Serum IgG anti-H. pylori antibodies were detected by ELISA (ELISAHp. The tests revealed significantly higher incidence of ASA in patients with gastroduodenal diseases compared to the controls (P < 0.0001. The median levels of both types of antibodies were significantly higher in infertile patients than in patients with upper gastroduodenal diseases in all tests applied (sperm agglutination and immobilization tests P < 0.0001; ELISAsp P = 0.006; ELISAHp, P = 0.0008. Significant linear correlation was found between anti-H. pylori antibodies and ASA detected by sperm immobilization test (r = 0.613, P = 0.05 in the group of patients with gastroduodenal disease, as well as a weak linear correlation was established between anti-H. pylori antibodies and ASA in ELISAsp (r = 0.275, P = 0.0051 in the same group. These results suggest that H. pylori infection may play a role in the induction of ASA.

  12. Gastroduodenal artery steal syndrome during liver transplantation: intraoperative diagnosis with Doppler ultrasound and management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nishida, Seigo; Kadono, Jun; DeFaria, Werviston; Levi, David M; Moon, Jang I; Tzakis, Andreas G; Madariaga, Juan R

    2005-01-01

    .... We present the recognized case of a gastroduodenal artery (GDA) steal syndrome that was diagnosed with intraoperative Doppler ultrasound and treated with GDA ligation during the liver transplantation...

  13. Helicobacter pylori y dispepsia, un problema de salud comunitario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Mientras la relación causal entre el Helicobacter pylori y la gastritis crónica, así como la importante conexión entre esta infección, la úlcera gastroduodenal y el cáncer gástrico han sido bien establecidas, la asociación entre la infección por Helicobacter pylori y la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" es un problema que dista mucho de estar esclarecido. Hay autores que no dudan en utilizar tratamiento de erradicación en la dispepsia "no ulcerosa" con Helicobacter pylori, pero existen enfoques alternativos a este problema. La realización de tratamiento de erradicación en los pacientes con dispepsia "no ulcerosa" pudiera beneficiar o no a los enfermos y a la comunidad, pero seguramente no puede dejar de beneficiar a las transnacionales productoras de medicamentos que cosechan cuantiosas ganancias con la comercialización de los bloqueadores de la bomba de protones y los antibióticos que se incluyen en cualquier esquema de terapia erradicadora de la infección por Helicobacter pylori. El alivio de los síntomas dispépticos como consecuencia del tratamiento de erradicación del Helicobacter pylori no ha sido comprobado. El problema de realizar tratamiento de erradicación de la infección a los pacientes con dispepsia "no ulcerosa" continúa siendo un dilema y, por tanto, no debe indicarse sistemáticamente.Although the causative relationship between Helicobacter pylori and chronic gastritis as well as the important connection of this infection with gastric-duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer are well established, the association of Helicobacter pylori infection and non-ulcer dispepsia is a problem that is still unclear. Some authors do not hesitate in using Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment in cases of non-ulcer dispepsia but there are other alternative approaches to this problem. The eradication treatment in patients with non-ulcer dispepsia may or may not benefit patients and the community, but will benefit for sure the big drug

  14. The role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheh, Alexander; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori overturned the conventional dogma that the stomach was a sterile organ and that pH valueshypochlorhydria, duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. It is now appreciated that the human stomach supports a bacterial community with possibly 100s of bacterial species that influence stomach homeostasis. Other bacteria colonizing the stomach may also influence H. pylori-associated gastric pathogenesis by creating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and modulating inflammatory responses. In this review, we summarize the available literature concerning the gastric microbiota in humans, mice, and Mongolian gerbils. We also discuss the gastric perturbations, many involving H. pylori, that facilitate the colonization by bacteria from other compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, and identify risk factors known to affect gastric homeostasis that contribute to changes in the microbiota.

  15. Cholangiohepatitis and pancreatitis secondary to severe gastroduodenal ulceration in a foal

    OpenAIRE

    Buote, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    A 2-month-old foal was presented with clinical signs of colic. Gastroduodenal ulceration was suspected. A poor response to medical treatment and signs of gastroduodenal obstruction led to celiotomy and an attempted bypass procedure. The foal was euthanized and postmortem examination revealed gastric ulceration, segmental duodenal stenosis, and severe chronic cholangiohepatitis and pancreatitis.

  16. Helicobacter spp. other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2010-09-01

    Over the last 12 months, new insights into the association of non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters with a range of human diseases in children and adults, including hepatobiliary disease, Crohn's disease, sepsis, and gastric disease were published. Studies investigating the presence of non-H. pylori Helicobacters in domestic animals reinforce previous findings that cats and dogs harbor gastric Helicobacter species and thus may be an important source of these organisms in humans. The confounding effect of enterohepatic Helicobacters on the outcome of biomedical research was investigated in several studies and led to recommendations that animals should be screened prior to performing experiments. A number of important and novel investigations regarding pathogenic mechanisms and immune responses to enterohepatic Helicobacters were conducted. Genomic advances in non-H. pylori Helicobacters included description of the complete genome of Helicobacter canadensis, delineation of two Helicobacter bilis genomospecies, and identification of a novel cis-regulatory RNA. New insights concerning growth conditions, biochemical characterization, and the effect of certain dietary compounds on Helicobacter spp. have also been reported. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the frequency increases...

  18. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Seong, Chang Kyu; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.

  19. Gastritis Cystica Polyposa with Gastroduodenal Intussuception: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Soon Hyuk; Bae, Il Hun; Park, Kil Sun; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Cho, Bum Sang; Kamg, Min Ho [Dept. of Radilogy, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dong Hee [Dept. of Surergy, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Chang [Dept. of Pathology, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Gastritis cystica polyposa is an uncommon benign lesion that normally occurs on the gastric side of a gastroenterostomy site but is rarely found in patients without a prior history of stomach surgery. We report a case of a 41-year-old woman with gastrodeuodenal intussusception due to gastritis cystica polyposa that developed in an unoperated stomach. CT revealed gastroduodenal intussusception and a cystic and solid mass with fat density in the second portion of the duodenum. Surgery and a pathologic examination confirmed gastritis cystica polyposa.

  20. Indomethacin decreases gastroduodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Bukhave, K

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cyclooxygenase inhibitors reduce mucosal bicarbonate secretion in the duodenum, but the evidence for their effect on bicarbonate secretion in the stomach remains controversial. We have, therefore, studied how indomethacin influences gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal...... release of prostaglandin (PG) E2 by means of a method that enables simultaneous measurements in the stomach and the duodenum. METHODS: Gastric and duodenal perfusions were performed twice in random order during control conditions or after pretreatment with indomethacin (100 mg intravenously) in eight...... basal and stimulated bicarbonate secretion, both in the stomach and in the duodenum....

  1. Helicobacter pylori: prospettive per un vaccino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Del Giudice

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most widespread infections worldwide: it affects more than 50% of the human population, and is responsible for serious gastric pathologies such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, atrophic gastritis and, in some individuals, gastric cancer. Current treatments with antibiotics are efficacious, but encounters several drawbacks at the level of compliance, side effects, antibiotic resistance, etc.The availability of vaccines could contribute in reducing the burden of H. pylori associated diseases. Several bacterial antigens have been identified as virulence factors and proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have been tested in experimental animal models of challenge with H. pylori. The experiments in animals have shown that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori is indeed feasible. Several open questions still remain concerning the understanding of the host-microbe relationship and the quality of the immune response which should be induced in order to confer protective immunity in man.The answers to these questions will be crucial in helping the preparation of appropriate vaccine formulations able to efficaciously protect humans both prophylactically and therapeutically. A few clinical trials have been carried out so far with still limited results. Other trials in humans are in progress and are planned for the next few years.The final hope is that these new vaccines will show the expected efficacy against H. pylori and will permit the elimination of this pathogen which has cohabited with humans for more than 100,000 years.

  2. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Genotypes May Determine Gastric Histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Cristina; Figueiredo, Céu; Carneiro, Fátima; Taveira Gomes, António; Barreira, Raul; Figueira, Paulo; Salgado, Céu; Belo, Luis; Peixoto, António; Bravo, Juan C.; Bravo, Luis E.; Realpe, Jose L.; Plaisier, Anton P.; Quint, Wim G. V.; Ruiz, Bernardo; Correa, Pelayo; van Doorn, Leen-Jan

    2001-01-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The present study aimed to investigate the gastric histopathology in Portuguese and Colombian patients infected with H. pylori and to assess its relationship with bacterial virulence-associated vacA, cagA, and iceA genotypes. A total of 370 patients from Portugal (n = 192) and Colombia (n = 178) were studied. Corpus and antrum biopsy specimens were collected from each individual. Histopathological features were recorded and graded according to the updated Sydney system. H. pylori vacA, cagA, and iceA genes were directly genotyped in the gastric biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction and reverse hybridization. Despite the significant differences between the Portuguese and Colombian patient groups, highly similar results were observed with respect to the relation between H. pylori genotypes and histopathology. H. pylori vacA s1, vacA m1, cagA+ genotypes were significantly associated with a higher H. pylori density, higher degrees of lymphocytic and neutrophilic infiltrates, atrophy, the type of intestinal metaplasia, and presence of epithelial damage. The iceA1 genotype was only associated with epithelial damage in Portuguese patients. These findings show that distinct H. pylori genotypes are strongly associated with histopathological findings in the stomach, confirming their relevance for the development of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology. PMID:11159201

  4. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Young Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jihye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Kwan, E-mail: kaarma@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young, E-mail: dyk1025@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  5. Misidentifying helicobacters: the Helicobacter cinaedi example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, P.; Harrington, C.S.; Jalava, K.

    2000-01-01

    of Helicobacter cinaedi and that Helicobacter sp. strain Mainz belongs to the same species. H. cinaedi occurs in various animal reservoirs, including hamsters, dogs, cats, rats, and foxes. Appropriate growth conditions and identification strategies will be required to establish the genuine significance...

  6. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  7. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Burkitt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems.

  8. COMBINATION OF SEVERE GASTRODUODENAL ULCER AND HEMOPHILIA B IN A CHILD. CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Dyakonova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroduodenal ulcer is less common and milder in children than in adults. Gastroduodenal ulcer complications, such as hemorrhage, penetration etc. are even less common. Recurrent ulcerous defect hemorrhage is a reason to expand diagnostic search and involve various specialists, primarily hematologists, into the diagnosis establishing process. The article presents a clinical case of a child with gastroduodenal ulcer complicated with recurrent hemorrhage not terminated with the standard therapy; thus, additional diagnostic testing was performed. This helped to detect a hematological disease and determine an optimal therapy amount.

  9. Transcatheter arterial embolization of a pseudoaneurysm of gastroduodenal artery: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Young Min; Kang, Sung Soo; Lee, Jeong Min; Chung, Jin Young; Lee, Sang Yong; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    Gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm is a relatively rare and potentionally life-threatening complication of chronic pancreatitis, which is thought to occur because of autodigestion of arterial walls by pancreatic enzymes. Embolotherapy should probably be the first method of treatment, since surgical treatment carries a high risk of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of 30-year-old male with gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis which was successfully treated by transcatheter embolization using Gianturco spring coils.

  10. Inflammation and foveolar hyperplasia are reduced by supplemental dietary glutamine during Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Susan J; Ohtani, Masa; Zhou, Jin-Rong; Taylor, Nancy S; Rickman, Barry H; Blackburn, George L; Fox, James G

    2009-05-01

    We recently showed that L-Gln protects cultured gastric cells from ammonia-induced cell death and predicted that Gln may also protect during Helicobacter pylori infection in vivo. Thus, the aim of this study was to test whether supplemental dietary Gln protects against H. pylori-associated pathology. For this, C57BL/6 mice were fed a purified diet consisting of 20.3% protein (1.9% Gln), 66% carbohydrate, and 5% fat or 25.3% protein (5% supplemental L-Gln; 6.9% total Gln), 61% carbohydrate, and 5% fat. After a 2-wk prefeeding period, mice were divided into sham-(uninfected) or H. pylori-infected groups. Body weight and food consumption were recorded weekly. Tissue histopathology, H. pylori colonization, serum IgG, and pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression were determined at 6, 12, and 20 wk postinfection (wkPI). Inflammation, antiinflammatory cytokine, and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression were significantly greater at 6 wkPI in H. pylori-infected mice fed supplemental Gln compared with those fed the control diet. At 20 wkPI, however, inflammation and foveolar hyperplasia were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected mice fed supplemental Gln compared with those fed the control diet. Body weight gain, food consumption, H. pylori colonization, and serum IgG did not differ in H. pylori-infected mice fed supplemental Gln compared with the control diet. Our data demonstrate that H. pylori-infected mice fed supplemental dietary Gln have reduced H. pylori-associated pathology in vivo that is accompanied by beneficial changes in the immune response to H. pylori early in infection. Thus, Gln supplementation may be an alternative therapy for reducing H. pylori-associated pathology.

  11. Rescue Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier P. Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After 30 years of experience in H. pylori treatment, however, the ideal regimen to treat this infection has still to be found. Nowadays, apart from having to know well first-line eradication regimens, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. In designing a treatment strategy, we should not only focus on the results of primary therapy alone but also on the final—overall—eradication rate. The choice of a “rescue” treatment depends on which treatment is used initially. If a first-line clarithromycin-based regimen was used, a second-line metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy may be used afterwards, and then a levofloxacin-based combination would be a third-line “rescue” option. Alternatively, it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based “rescue” therapy constitutes an encouraging 2nd-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, with the advantage of efficacy, simplicity and safety. In this case, quadruple regimen may be reserved as a 3rd-line “rescue” option. Even after two consecutive failures, several studies have demonstrated that H. pylori eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several “rescue” therapies are consecutively given.

  12. Helicobacter pylori: Su importancia como problema de salud en la comunidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel González-Carbajal Pascual

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo es una revisión de los anexos existentes entre el Helicobacter pylori y la gastritis crónica, la úlcera gastroduodenal, el cáncer gástrico, el linfoma de células B y algunos aspectos relacionados con la epidemiología y el tratamiento de esta infección. Se sugiere la posibilidad de que modelos de infección semejantes se asocien a otras enfermedades así como el hecho de que ésta, procedente de Europa, se haya introducido en América como consecuencia del encuentro de estas 2 culturasA review is made on the links existing between Helicobacter pylori and chronic gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer, stomach cancer, and B-cell lymphoma, as well as on some aspects connected with the epidemiology and treatment of this infection. It is suggested the possibility that similar models of infection be associated to other diseases, and that this infection original from Europe had been introduced in America as a result of the encounter between these two cultures

  13. Extragastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection--other Helicobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnick, Jay V; Franceschi, Francesco; Roccarina, D; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated a strong link between Helicobacter pylori and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and iron deficiency anemia. Interesting results have also been obtained for ischemic heart disease, though most putative associations between H. pylori infection and extragastric disease remain speculative. With regard to other Helicobacter species, Helicobacter felis has been shown to play a role in gastric carcinogenesis in mouse models. An increased susceptibility to cholesterol gallstone formation has been described in animals fed a lithogenic diet and infected with Helicobacter bilis, or co-infected with Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter rodentium. Finally, enterohepatic Helicobacter species have also been exploited to better understand inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Diagnóstico serológico de Helicobacter pylori en endoscopistas: Serología en endoscopistas Serologic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori in endoscopy personnel: Serology in endoscopists

    OpenAIRE

    C. Velasco Elizalde; M. A. Fernández Ferrer; N. Rodríguez Muñiz

    2007-01-01

    Objetivo: el Helicobacter pylori irrumpió en el ámbito médico-gastroenterológico, revolucionándo la fisiopatología y el tratamiento de la Ulcera Gastroduodenal. Esta infestación trae consigo una respuesta inmune, que se puede reconocer con las pruebas serológicas, las cuales son muy útiles en el reconocimiento de la infección, sobre todo entre los grupos de riesgo, tales como son las personas institucionalizados y el personal sanitario y, entre estos, principalmente los trabajadores de los De...

  15. Production of IL-12 in gastritis relates to infection with Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauditz, J; Ortner, M; Bierbaum, M; Niedobitek, G; Lochs, H; Schreiber, S

    1999-01-01

    Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8, has been demonstrated in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric mucosal inflammation. IL-12, a newly characterized cytokine, is thought to be a key mediator in host responses to bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in cytokine patterns between H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis and normal mucosa. Secretion of IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 was measured in 176 patients with chronic gastritis in whole biopsy cultures. Gastritis was graded for chronic inflammation or acute inflammatory activity, respectively, according to the Sydney system. Biopsies with similar scores were matched for analysis from H. pylori-infected and non-infected patients. Secretion of IL-12 was significantly increased in H. pylori-associated gastritis in comparison with H. pylori-negative gastritis (P gastritis by impairing clearance of the pathogen. PMID:10444264

  16. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Rural and Urban Dyspeptic Patients from Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Monica; Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Reyes, Nelson; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Rojas, Héctor; Michelangeli, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this work was to assess the Helicobacter pylori prevalence in a rural mestizo population and compare it to an urban population from Venezuela. The study was performed in gastric juice samples of 71 dyspeptic patients from Caracas (urban) and 39 from Tucupita (rural), in the Orinoco Delta region. Helicobacter pylori was detected by amplification of 16S rRNA, glmM, and ureA genes in 55.0% patients from urban and 87.2% from rural populations. cagA was found positive in 51% and 62% urban and rural patients, respectively. Non-H. pylori Helicobacter species were not detected in the urban population, but was found in 7.7% of patients in the rural study site. Frequency values of the 16S rRNA, glmM, and ureA genes were higher in the rural population. The odds ratio for each gene was 15.18 for 16S rRNA, 2.34 for glmM, 2.89 for ureA, and 1.53 cagA, showing significant differences except for cagA when gene frequency was compared in both populations. These results demonstrate a higher frequency of H. pylori and gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter infection in a rural mestizo population with low hygienic standards as compared with city dwellers, representing a potential risk for the development of gastroduodenal diseases. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. In vitro and in vivo effects of apple peel polyphenols against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastene, Edgar; Speisky, Hernán; García, Apolinaria; Moreno, Jessica; Troncoso, Miriam; Figueroa, Guillermo

    2010-06-23

    The inhibitory effects of a standarized apple peel polyphenol-rich extract (APPE) against Helicobacter pylori infection and vacuolating bacterial toxin (VacA) induced vacuolation were investigated. Apple peel polyphenols significantly prevented vacuolation in HeLa cells with an IC(50) value of 390 microg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. APPE also displayed an in vitro antiadhesive effect against H. pylori. A significant inhibition was observed with a 20-60% reduction of H. pylori attachment at concentrations between 0.250 and 5 mg of GAE/mL. In a short-term infection model (C57BL6/J mice), two levels of APPE doses (150 and 300 mg/kg/day) showed an inhibitory effect on H. pylori attachment. Orally administered apple peel polyphenols also showed an anti-inflammatory effect on H. pylori-associated gastritis, lowering malondialdehyde levels and gastritis scores.

  18. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastric malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojin Kim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is the world’s most common chronic bacterial infection, colonizing more than half of the population globally. Although all strains cause persistent gastric inflammation, most cases are asymptomatic; only 15% result in peptic ulcer disease and less than 2% of cases will develop gastric adenocarcinoma or the even rarer mucosa associated lymphoma (MALT. Considerable evidence implicates H. pylori in the pathogenesis of gastric malignancies - still a major burden in much of the world. Interactions between host factors, environmental factors and specific H. pylori constituents (or virulence factors are important in determining the outcome of infection. Despite the relative ease of eradicating H. pylori with 1–2 week course of proton pump inhibitors and antibiotics in individuals, whether to actively seek occult H. pylori infection at the population level to attempt to prevent the burden of H. pylori-associated gastric malignancy remains surprisingly controversial.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection Aggravates Diet-induced Insulin Resistance in Association With Gut Microbiota of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with insulin resistance (IR yet the underlying mechanisms are still obscure. The vital role of gut microbiota in triggering IR has been increasingly reported, however, no study has explored the correlation of gut microbiota and H. pylori-associated IR. Using H. pylori-infected mice model fed different diet structures, we demonstrated that H. pylori infection significantly aggravated high-fat diet (HFD-induced metabolic disorders at the early stage, the extent of which was close to the effect of long-term HFD. Interestingly, we observed dynamic alterations in gut microbiota that were consistent with the changes in the metabolic phenotype induced by H. pylori and HFD. There may be an interaction among H. pylori, diet and gut microbiota, which dysregulates the host metabolic homeostasis, and treatment of H. pylori may be beneficial to the patients with impaired glucose tolerance in addition to diet control.

  20. [Hemorrhagic stress lesions in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Incidence and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, D; Stojanović, D; Kalaba, J

    1995-01-01

    We have observed 428 patients with hemorrhages of the upper gastrointestinal tract; 7% of patients with stress lesions of the gastroduodenal mucosa being the cause of hemorrhages (4.9% were erosional stress hemorrhages and 2.1% were stress ulcera). Surgery is the most common cause of stress hemorrhages of the stomach and duodenum. They occur during the first 5 days after the surgery, whereas 70.59% (n = 12) occur during the first 72 hours. The localization of erosional hemorrhages of the stomach mucosa is mostly diffuse and that is why they are numerous (78.6% of the third degree) and hemorrhages are mostly heavy (the case with stress hemorrhages). Chronic peptic ulcera, especially duodenal (62.5% duodenal ulcera and 37.5% stomach ulcera) present an expressed risk factor for the occurrence of hemorrhagic erosions under the influence of the stress factor. The most common localization of the stress hemorrhagic ulcus is duodenum (66.7%) which is a potential danger for occurrence of the heaviest arterial hemorrhages. After major surgeries and during postoperative periods patients must be preventively protected by "antiulcus therapy" (especially patients with ulcera).

  1. Drug delivery strategies for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B R

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections, colonising an estimated half of all humans. It is associated with the development of serious gastroduodenal disease - including peptic ulcers, gastric lymphoma and acute chronic gastritis. Current recommended regimes are not wholly effective and patient compliance, side-effects and bacterial resistance can be problematic. Drug delivery to the site of residence in the gastric mucosa may improve efficacy of the current and emerging treatments. Gastric retentive delivery systems potentially allow increased penetration of the mucus layer and therefore increased drug concentration at the site of action. Proposed gastric retentive systems for the enhancement of local drug delivery include floating systems, expandable or swellable systems and bioadhesive systems. Generally, problems with these formulations are lack of specificity, limited to mucus turnover or failure to persist in the stomach. Gastric mucoadhesive systems are hailed as a promising technology to address this issue, penetrating the mucus layer and prolonging activity at the mucus-epithelial interface. This review appraises gastroretentive delivery strategies specifically with regard to their application as a delivery system to target Helicobacter. As drug-resistant strains emerge, the development of a vaccine to eradicate and prevent reinfection is an attractive proposition. Proposed prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines have been delivered using a number of mucosal routes using viral and non-viral vectors. The delivery form, inclusion of adjuvants, and delivery regime will influence the immune response generated.

  2. Mental vulnerability, Helicobacter pylori, and incidence of hospital-diagnosed peptic ulcer over 28 years in a population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levenstein, Susan; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Rosenstock, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    .4–2.8), Helicobacter pylori (HR 1.7, CI 1.2–2.3), smoking (HR 2.0, CI 1.3–3.1), heavy drinking (HR 1.6, CI 1.1–2.4), abstinence (HR 1.6, CI 1.1–2.5), non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (HR 2.1, CI 1.5–3.0), and sedentary lifestyle (HR 1.9, CI 1.4–2.7). Adjusted for all behavioral mediators, the HR for mental......: A vulnerable personality raises risk for hospital-diagnosed peptic ulcer, in part because of an association with health risk behaviors. Its impact is seen in ‘idiopathic’ and Helicobacter pylori-associated ulcers, and in acute surgical cases....

  3. Effect of sustained-release isosorbide dinitrate on post-prandial gastric emptying and gastroduodenal motility in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Rasmussen, S L; Linnet, J

    2004-01-01

    and gastroduodenal motility after a meal. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Each subject ingested 40 mg isosorbide dinitrate orally as a sustained-release formulation or oral placebo, in random order. Gastric emptying and gastroduodenal motility were...

  4. Clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori-negative drug-negative peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Chul; Jeon, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Bum; Sung, Hea Jung; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Lim, Eun Sun; Kim, Min-Ah; Oh, Jung Hwan

    2015-07-28

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of idiopathic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-negative and drug-negative] peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). A consecutive series of patients who experienced PUB between 2006 and 2012 was retrospectively analyzed. A total of 232 patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into four groups according to the etiologies of PUB: idiopathic, H. pylori-associated, drug-induced and combined (H. pylori-associated and drug-induced) types. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes between the groups. When the silver stain or rapid urease tests were H. pylori-negative, we obtained an additional biopsy specimen by endoscopic re-examination and performed an H. pylori antibody test 6-8 wk after the initial endoscopic examination. For a diagnosis of idiopathic PUB, a negative result of an H. pylori antibody test was confirmed. In all cases, re-bleeding was confirmed by endoscopic examination. For the risk assessment, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were calculated for all patients. For PUB, the frequency of H. pylori infection was 59.5% (138/232), whereas the frequency of idiopathic cases was 8.6% (20/232). When idiopathic PUB was compared to H. pylori-associated PUB, the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis during the hospital stay (30% vs 7.4%, P = 0.02). When idiopathic PUB was compared to drug-induced PUB, the patients in the idiopathic PUB group showed a higher rate of re-bleeding after initial hemostasis upon admission (30% vs 2.7%, P < 0.01). When drug-induced PUB was compared to H. pylori-associated PUB, the patients in the drug-induced PUB were older (68.49 ± 14.76 years vs 47.83 ± 15.15 years, P < 0.01) and showed a higher proportion of gastric ulcer (77% vs 49%, P < 0.01). However, the Blatchford and the Rockall scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Among the patients who experienced drug-induced PUB, no

  5. A Challenging Case of a Large Gastroduodenal Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Surgery of a Peptic Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Santos-Rancaño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 48-year-old man in whom a chronic postbulbar duodenal ulcer destroyed much of the back wall of the duodenum and gastroduodenal artery causing pseudoaneurysm. The lesion was found and evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (that revealed a large pseudoaneurysm of 83 mm × 75 mm in diameter and by angiography and then treated with transcatheter embolization leading to a complete resolution of the lesion. The case is rare and important for several reasons. First, we demonstrate that pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by a duodenal ulcer can occur and present a diagnostic challenge (as far as we know, only three cases have been reported previously in the literature. Second, this case report focuses on the importance of ligation of the gastroduodenal artery when bleeding of peptic ulcers occurs. Additionally, we present an overview of the relevant literature.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of a Gastroduodenal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Rupture after a Car Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Dutra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of a 39-year-old man with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis that was admitted in the emergency department after a car accident, complaining of abdominal pain and looking pale. The patient was hemodinamically unstable, requiring blood transfusions. He underwent computed tomography angiogram of the abdomen and pelvis, showing a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery and a hemoperitoneum. He was referred to our interventional radiology unit and submitted to endovascular treatment, consisting of ‘backdoor’ and ‘frontdoor’ embolization of the gastroduodenal artery and pseudoaneurysm neck with coils, with total exclusion in control angiography. With this case description we intend to highlight the rarity of the pseudoaneurysm rupture of the gastroduodenal artery and to emphasize the importance of an interventional radiology response that had a fundamental role in the endovascular treatment, in an emergency context.

  7. Gastroduodenal Intussusception Caused by a Peutz- Jeghers Polyp in a Young Child: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Jae Eun; Cho, Bum Sang; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Lee, Ho Chang; Koo, Ji Hae [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Gastroduodenal intussusception is a rare condition caused by the prolapse of a gastric tumor with subsequent invagination of a portion of the gastric wall into the duodenum. Various gastric lesions including adenoma, lipoma, leiomyoma, hamartoma, adenocarcinoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and as in our case a Peutz- Jeghers polyp, can serve as a lead point of intussusception. Only three cases of gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to a Peutz-Jeghers polyp have been reported. We experienced a case of gastroduodenal intussusception in a 36-month-old boy who presented with intermittent nonbilious vomiting, abdominal pain, and anemia. An abdominal ultrasound and contrast enhanced CT scan showed gastrointestinal intussusception and a mass-like lesion in the second portion of duodenum. A laparotomy revealed a 7x8 cm sized mass at the gastric body, which was pathologically confirmed as a Peutz-Jeghers polyp

  8. HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakFaktor risiko infeksi Helicobacter pylori adalah tinggal di negara berkembang, kondisi sosial ekonomi yang rendah, jumlah anggota keluarga yang banyak, etnik dan genetik. Tatalaksana dan diagnosis Helicobacter pylori belum memuaskan karena adanya resistensi antibiotik pada pasien Helicobacter pylori. Kami melaporkan seorang pasien perempuan usia 8 tahun 6 bulan yang terinfeksi Helicobacter pylori. Diagnosis ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis, pemeriksaan fisik, dan hasil laboratorium. Pasien diduga terinfeksi Helicobacter pylori karena mengalami nyeri perut berulang. Dari laboratorium didapatkan serologi IgG Helicobacter pylori positif. Pada hasil endoskopi biopsi ditemukan kuman Helicobacter pylori. Pasien mendapat therapi eradikasi lini pertama untuk infeksi Helicobacter pylori yaitu amoksisilin, klaritromisin dan omeprazol selama dua minggu. Setelah dua minggu pengobatan keluhan pasien tidak ada.Kata kunci: Helicobacter pylori, anak, nyeri perut berulangAbstractRisk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori infection include residency of developing country, poor socioeconomic conditions, crowded family, and possibly an ethnic or genetic as predispositions. The diagnosis and management Helicobacter pylori has not been satisfied yet, however, there is problem of increasing resistancy antibiotic due to Helicobacter pylori. Objective: We report a 8 year and 6 month old girl who suffered from Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis was based on history, clinical finding, and laboratory work-up. Suspicion on the presence of Helicobacter pylori was started when the girl had recurrent abdominal pain. Serology IgG Helicobacter pylori was positive and we had done endoscopic examination and biopsy. Therapy this patient was first line eradication Helicobacter pylori which give amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazole for two weeks. There are no sympthoms after two weeks therapyKey word: Helicobacter pylori, children, recurrent abdominal pain

  9. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Related Images View Sources Also Known As H. pylori antibody test, stool antigen, breath tests Urea breath test CLO test Rapid urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal Name Helicobacter pylori This article was last ...

  10. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Substances Chronic Inflammation Common Cancer Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Helicobacter pylori and Cancer On This Page What is ...

  11. Immunomodulation of Helicobacter Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Croitoru

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori leads to a chronic infection in humans that is associated with gastric inflammation and a vigorous immune response. Despite the humoral and cellular responses that can be detected in both human and animal models of helicobacter infection, the immune response fails to eliminate the organism. Eradication failure may be due to the niche in which H pylori confines itself, well away from direct contact with elements of the immune system. Alternatively, the general tendency of t...

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Hyperplastic Polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Bela; Pai, Rish K

    2016-12-01

    Hyperplastic polyps of the stomach are routinely encountered during upper endoscopy and often arise in the setting of abnormal surrounding mucosa, particularly Helicobacter pylori, autoimmune gastritis, and reactive gastropathy. Not infrequently gastroenterologists fail to biopsy the surrounding mucosa, thus determining the underlying etiology of the gastric hyperplastic polyp can be difficult. Recently, the Rodger C. Haggitt Gastrointestinal Pathology Society published guidelines on the use of special stains. The society guidelines indicate that H pylori are not usually present in hyperplastic polyps and special stains in this setting may have limited utility. We analyzed the histologic features of 32 gastric hyperplastic polyps in which the nonpolypoid mucosa demonstrated H pylori gastritis. A consecutive series of 50 hyperplastic polyps in which no surrounding mucosa was sampled was also analyzed. When H pylori are identified in biopsies of the nonpolypoid mucosa, it is also commonly present within the polyp tissue (22/32, 69%). The majority of H pylori organisms were identified on routine hematoxylin and eosin stain (16/22, 72%). In contrast, H pylori were only seen in 2/50 consecutive hyperplastic polyps in which the surrounding mucosa was not sampled. Compared with the hyperplastic polyps that lack the organisms, H pylori associated hyperplastic polyps more commonly had dense lymphoplasmacytic inflammation (P = .0001) and neutrophils within gastric epithelium (P = .036). Polyp location, number, size, and presence of intestinal metaplasia was not associated with H pylori These results provide empirical data to guide evaluation of hyperplastic polyps for H pylori. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. The Cost of an Upper Gastroduodenal Endoscopy: An Activity-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Crott

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost of medical procedures is often unknown, but is nevertheless crucial for setting reimbursement and health care policies. The cost of an upper gastroduodenal endoscopy was investigated in ambulatory adults in a large academic hospital in the province of Quebec, from the perspective of the hospital.

  14. Non-operative treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Justus-Martijn; Oddens, Jorg R; Van Royen, Barend J; Wever, Jan; Olsman, Jan G

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Clinical characteristics and complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration are well known. Gastro-intestinal involvement has also been recognised in these patients. However an acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer has not been documented up to now. Case presentation A 26-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer is treat...

  15. Comparison of IL-6, IL-8 Concentrations in H. pylori- and non-H. pylori-associated Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar Alamsyah Siregar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. The gastric mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6 and IL-8 have been reported to be increased in H. pylori infection, but the serum levels in H. pylori infection is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in H. pylori infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was done on eighty consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from May-October 2014. Histopathology was performed for the diagnosis of gastritis. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating IL-6 and IL-8. Univariate and bivariate analysis (independent t test were done. RESULTS: There were 41.25% patients infected with H. pylori. Circulatory IL-6 levels were significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected in an increased level of serum IL-6. Serum levels of IL-8 were not significantly different between H. pylori positive and negative. KEYWORDS: Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, IL-6, IL-8, cytokine.

  16. Relationship between headache and mucosal mast cells in pediatric Helicobacter pylori-negative functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jung Sook; Choi, Myung Bum; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Ji Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Ko, Gyung-Hyuck; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2013-04-01

    Although many patients with functional dyspepsia experience headache concurrently with dyspeptic symptoms, studies suggesting mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are limited. Herein, we explore the relationship between gastrointestinal inflammatory cells and presence of headache associated with dyspeptic symptoms in children with HELICOBACTER PYLORI -negative functional dyspepsia. Fifty-six patients with H. PYLORI -negative functional dyspepsia underwent upper endoscopy with biopsy to investigate recurrent epigastric pain or discomfort. Patients were divided into two groups according to self-reported presence of headache associated with dyspeptic symptoms. Inflammatory cells including mast cells, and enteroendocrine cells in the gastroduodenal mucosa were evaluated. Associations between headache presence and cellular changes in the gastroduodenal mucosa were examined. Headache was not associated with the grade of lymphocytes, neutrophil infiltration, or enteroendocrine cell density in the gastroduedenal mucosa. However, headache was significantly associated with high mast cell density in the body (27.81 ± 8.71 vs. 20.30 ± 8.16, P  headache associated with dyspeptic symptoms is strongly related to mucosal mast cell density in pediatric patients with H. PYLORI -negative functional dyspepsia. Thus, our results may help clinicians understand and treat headache during dyspeptic symptoms in such pediatric patients.

  17. Extragastric Helicobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Hynes, S.; Wadstrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Helicobacter has expanded at a rapid pace and no fewer than 31 species have been named since the proposal of the genus in 1989. Of these 31 species, 22 are principally associated with extragastric niches and there is increasing interest in the role of these taxa in diseases of humans...... and animals. Substantial evidence attests to certain species playing a role in the pathogenesis of enteric, hepatic and biliary disorders and some taxa demonstrate zoonotic potential. The importance of extragastric Helicobacters is likely to be an important topic for research in the near future. Here...

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in a Korean population without significant gastroduodenal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nayoung; Park, Young Soo; Cho, Sung-Il; Lee, Hye Seung; Choe, Gheeyoung; Kim, In Wook; Won, Yoo-Deok; Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2008-08-01

    The prevalence of gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection is unacceptably high in Korea. This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) and to identify their risk factors with respect to H. pylori virulence factors, and environmental and host factors, in Korean population without significant gastroduodenal disease. The study cohort consisted of 389 subjects (> or = 16 years). AG and IM were scored histologically using the Sydney classification in the antrum and body, respectively. Prevalences and bacterial factors (i.e. cagA, vacA m1, and oipA), environmental factors (i.e. smoking and alcohol), and host factors (i.e. genetic polymorphisms of IL-1B-511, IL-1RN, TNF-A-308, IL-10-592, IL-10-819, IL-10-1082, IL-8-251, IL-6-572, GSTP1, p53 codon 72, and ALDH2) were evaluated. Prevalences of AG in the antrum and body were 42.5% and 20.1%, and those of IM were 28.6% and 21.2%, respectively. The presences of AG and IM were significantly higher in H. pylori-positive than in the H. pylori-negative subjects. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for AG were H. pylori infection, age > or = 61 years, and cagA and vacA m1 positivity. For IM the risk factors were H. pylori infection, age > or = 61 years, a smoking history (rather than current smoking), strong spicy food, occupation (unemployed or nonprofessional vs. professional), and the presence of IL10-592 C/A as opposed to A/A. In addition, IL6-572 G carrier was found to have a protective effect against IM development as compared with C/C. H. pylori infection was most important risk factor of AG and IM. Bacterial factors were found to be important risk factor for AG but environmental and host factors were more important for IM.

  19. The utility of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test in managing dyspepsia: an experience from a low resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segamwenge, Innocent Lule; Kagimu, Magid; Ocama, Ponsiano; Opio, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Dyspepsia is defined as a chronic or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen. Endoscopy is the best strategy for confirming the cause of dyspepsia. Non- invasive strategies would be more appropriate in low resource countries where endoscopy is not readily available. However, there is concern that these strategies may miss serious disease like gastric cancer. One test that needs to be assessed in this regard is the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HPSAT). To determine the validity of the stool antigen test in predicting H. pylori associated disease among patients with dyspepsia. In this prospective study patients with dyspepsia attending Mulago Hospital were recruited consecutively. Helicobacter pylori was determined using the Rapid Strip HpSA ®, endoscopy and gastric mucosal biopsy were done. 167 patients with dyspepsia were recruited into the study. There were ninety six (57.5%) females and seventy one (42.5%) males with an average age of 48.1(±18.1) years. Patients presenting with dyspepsia in Mulago hospital were more likely to come from the Central 60 (36%) and western tribes 55 (33%). The commonest endoscopic finding was oesophagitis 25 (15%). Peptic ulcer disease was found in 32 (19.2%) and 54 (32.3%) had normal endoscopy findings. H pylori was found in 33.5% and 32.5% using the HPSAT and histology respectively. The validity of the HPSAT in predicting H.pylori associated diseases was generally low with an overall sensitivity of 55.8%, and specificity of 74.2%. However, the validity was higher in predicting the diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease with a sensitivity 59.4% and specificity 72.6%. The HPSAT may be used in the test and treat strategy for young patients with dyspepsia without alarm signs and symptoms in low resource settings. However, because of its low validity in predicting H.pylori associated disease, it is important to follow up patients so that if symptoms persist or recur endoscopy is performed.

  20. Age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemenkov Yu.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis. Material and Methods. Features of acidity in esophagus and cardial part of stomach was studied in 175 children aged 4 to 17 years with chronic gastroduodenitis by pH-monitoring. pH-monitoring was carried by «Gastroscan-24». Age and sex characteristics have been identified on examination results. Results. Children of preschool age experience the most unfavorable reflux from the stomach to the esophagus. Boys experience the pathological reflux more severely. Conclusions: Effectiveness of esophageal clearance is lower in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux progresses are more favorably in a standing position, especially in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux occurs more often in the supine position and has a longer and more aggressive course in preschool age boys.

  1. Immunomodulation of Helicobacter Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Croitoru

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori leads to a chronic infection in humans that is associated with gastric inflammation and a vigorous immune response. Despite the humoral and cellular responses that can be detected in both human and animal models of helicobacter infection, the immune response fails to eliminate the organism. Eradication failure may be due to the niche in which H pylori confines itself, well away from direct contact with elements of the immune system. Alternatively, the general tendency of the intestinal immune response to down- regulate reactivity to noninvasive luminal bacteria also may contribute to the failure to eliminate helicobacter infection. Results of vaccine studies in mouse models indicate that modulating the helper T cell response from a T helper cell type 1 to a T helper cell type 2 response likely is required for the prevention and elimination of helicobacter infection. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune response controls bacterial infections will allow for the design of novel strategies of immune modulation and the development of vaccines for both the treatment and prevention of H pylori.

  2. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds ... breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  3. Nationwide survey of Helicobacter pylori treatment for children and adolescents in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Masumi; Kikuchi, Shogo; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Osaki, Takako; Kamiya, Shigeru; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Kato, Mototsugu

    2017-01-01

    To prevent gastric cancer, a test-and-treat strategy for Helicobacter pylori has been proposed. This retrospective study assessed the clinical features, efficacy and safety of treatment for H. pylori infection in children and adolescents. Questionnaires concerning the clinical features and treatment of H. pylori in children and adolescents were sent to doctors in 2013. It included questions on patient background, H. pylori-associated disease, first- and second-line treatment, success or failure of eradication, resistance to antibiotics, and occurrence of adverse events. In 2014, serious adverse events associated with treatment were analyzed. Invitation letters and questionnaires were sent to 1097 doctors, of whom 409 (37.3%) participated. Finally, 332 patients (mean age, 11.6 ± 3.4 years; male, n = 200) treated from 1997 to 2013 were analyzed. H. pylori-associated gastritis, iron deficiency anemia, and duodenal ulcer occurred most frequently. Success rates for first- and second-line treatments were 73.1% and 79.6%, respectively. Seventy-six H. pylori strains were analyzed for resistance to amoxicillin (AMPC) and clarithromycin (CAM), and 64 were analyzed for resistance to metronidazole (MNZ). CAM resistance was most frequent, occurring in 43.4% of patients; that of MNZ was 21.9%. Adverse events were observed in 13.8% of cases. In total, 587 cases of H. pylori infection were analyzed and no serious adverse events were observed. Treatment for H. pylori in children and adolescents is safe, but further studies on treatment regimens should be conducted to improve eradication rates and monitor increasing CAM resistance. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicated by Gastroduodenal Obstruction: Palliative Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ye Jin; Kim, Jin Hyoung, E-mail: m1fenew@daum.net; Song, Ho-Young; Park, Jung-Hoon; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Fan, Yong [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of self-expandable metallic stents in seven patients with malignant gastroduodenal obstruction caused by inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: Seven patients with gastroduodenal obstruction caused by advanced HCC underwent metallic stent placement from 2003 to 2010. These patients had total dysphagia (n = 5) or were able to eat only liquids (n = 2) before stent placement. Patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scores of 2 or 3, and Child-Pugh classification B or C. Results: Stent placement was technically successful in all seven patients (100%) and clinically successful in six (86%). Five patients could eat a soft diet, and one patient tolerated regular diet after stent placement. Stent-related obstructive jaundice occurred in one patient. One patient had hematemesis 11 days after stent placement. Overall mean survival was 51 days (range, 10-119 days). Stent patency was preserved in six patients with clinical success until death. Conclusion: Placement of a covered self-expandable metallic stent may offer good palliation in patients with gastroduodenal obstruction due to advanced HCC.

  5. Enterohepatic Helicobacter other than Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mateos Muñoz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Helicobacter genus includes Gram negative bacteria which were originally considered to belong to the Campylobacter genus. They have been classified in a separate genus since 1989 because they have different biochemical characteristics, with more than 24 species having been identified and more still being studied. H. pylori is the best known. It has an important etiopathogenic role in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Enterohepatic Helicobacter s (EHH other than H. pylori colonize the bowel, biliary tree and liver of animals and human beings with pathogenic potential. The difficulties existing to correctly isolate these microorganisms limit the description of their true prevalence and of the diseases they cause. Many studies have tried to discover the different clinical implications of EHH. Diseases like chronic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hepatocarcinoma, autoimmune hepatobiliary disease, biliary lithiasis, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, Meckel's diverticulum, acute appendicitis and inflammatory bowel disease have been related with different EHH species with different results, although their prevalence is greater than in healthy subjects. However, these data are currently not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Finally, the best known role of EHH in bowel disease is production of acute and chronic diarrhea pictures initially referred to as Campylobacter. H. pullorum has been identified in patients with acute gastroenteritis. The correct identification of EHH as producers of infectious gastroenteritis is found in its antibiotic susceptibility. It is generally macrolide-susceptible and quinolone-resistant.

  6. Role of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Recovery in Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sheema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is a bleeding disorder in which the immune system destroys native platelets. In this condition an autoantibody is generated against a platelet antigen. ITP affects women more often than men and is more common in children than adults. Objective. To assess the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy (HPET on platelet count in Helicobacter pylori associated chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (chronic ITP in adult. Materials and Methods. It is an interventional prospective study conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, from 2014 to 2015. A set of 85 patients diagnosed with chronic ITP were included in the study via convenient sampling. Patients with platelets count 3 months were selected. They were posed to first-line investigations which comprised complete blood count (CBC and peripheral blood smear examination followed by second-line tests including bone marrow examination and Helicobacter pylori stool specific antigen (HpSA-EIA. Standard H. pylori eradication therapy was offered and the patients were assessed at regular intervals for 6 months. Results. Of the 85 study patients, 32 (37.6% were male and 53 (62.3% were female. Mean ages of H. pylori positive and negative subjects were 43.89 ± 7.06 and 44.75 ± 7.91 years, respectively. Bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis and excluded other related BM disorders. H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA was detected in 34 (40% patients and hence regarded as H. pylori positive; the rest were negative. Treatment with eradication therapy significantly improved the mean platelet counts from 48.56±21.7 × 109/l to 94.2±26.8 × 109/l. Conclusion. We concluded that the anti-H. pylori eradication therapy improves blood platelet counts in chronic immune thrombocytopenia.

  7. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  8. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  9. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-11-06

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication.

  10. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  11. Diagnóstico serológico de Helicobacter pylori en endoscopistas: Serología en endoscopistas Serologic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori in endoscopy personnel: Serology in endoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Velasco Elizalde

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: el Helicobacter pylori irrumpió en el ámbito médico-gastroenterológico, revolucionándo la fisiopatología y el tratamiento de la Ulcera Gastroduodenal. Esta infestación trae consigo una respuesta inmune, que se puede reconocer con las pruebas serológicas, las cuales son muy útiles en el reconocimiento de la infección, sobre todo entre los grupos de riesgo, tales como son las personas institucionalizados y el personal sanitario y, entre estos, principalmente los trabajadores de los Departamentos de Gastroenterología. Método: en el presente artículo realizamos un estudio prospectivo longitudinal en 38 trabajadores de los Departamentos de Gastroenterología de tres hospitales de Ciudad de La Habana, tomando como controles a 38 trabajadores de un hospital que no desempeñan actividad endoscópica digestiva. Pretendemos investigar la presencia entre ellos de anticuerpos contra el H. pylori. El personal analizado completó una encuesta diseñada al efecto y se consideraron los siguientes parámetros: edad, sexo, tiempo de trabajo como endoscopista, uso de medios de protección y antecedentes de patología gastroduodenal. Resultados: nuestro grupo de investigación constaba de 38 endoscopistas y 38 trabajadores de un centro asistencial, ajenos a esta actividad laboral, que presentaba las mismas características socioeconómicas que el grupo investigado. Veinticuatro en ambos grupos eran mujeres, (63,16% y 14 eran hombres (36,84%. El 39,47% de los endoscopistas fueron seropositivos mientras que esto ocurrió sólo en el 7,89% de los controles. Se analizó el tiempo que los endoscopistas llevaban en el trabajo y encontramos que los seropositivos llevaban más tiempo trabajando como endoscopistas que los seronegativos. Conclusiones: se demostró que los endoscopistas tienen un riesgo significativamente superior a los controles de infestarse por el Helicobacter pylori, y que los endoscopistas seropositivos presentaron sintomatolog

  12. Identification of pathways related to FAF1/H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis through an integrated approach based on iTRAQ quantification and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawei; Ge, Lianying; Liu, Aiqun; Yuan, Yanling; Ye, Jiaxiang; Zhong, Jianhong; Liu, Li; Chen, Xiaoni

    2016-01-10

    Previously we showed that down-regulation of tumor suppressor FAF1 mRNA, potentially caused by H. pylori, correlated with increasing tumor differentiation and distant metastasis in gastric cancer. To identify molecular details about how FAF1 and H. pylori contribute to gastric carcinogenesis, we used the iTRAQ labeling approach involving LC-MS/MS to perform proteomic analysis of HGC-27 gastric cancer cells stably transfected with an FAF1 transgene and/or infected with H. pylori. Of the 2926 proteins examined, proteomics identified 157 for which the expression was altered as a result of FAF1 expression, 500 with altered expression as a result of H. pylori infection, and 246 with altered expression as a combined result of FAF1 expression and H. pylori infection. A literature review identified 21 proteins as being differentially expressed in H. pylori-associated gastric cancer in at least two studies. These two complementary analyses were combined in Ingenuity Pathway software, which predicted that FAF1/H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis alters primarily biochemical pathways related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative phosphorylation, integrin signaling, cholesterol/leucine metabolism and G2/M checkpoint regulation. Differential expression of key proteins in several of these pathways was validated by immunoblotting in HGC-27 cells. This integrated approach combining proteomics and literature searching may prove fruitful for elucidating how FAF1 expression and H. pylori infection affect gastric carcinogenesis. We established, for the first time, the proteomics databases of gastric cancer cell HGC-27 overexpressing FAF1 and infected with H. pylori through an integrated approach based on iTRAQ quantification and literature review, this strategy responded to the call for greater focus on data integration in primary/previous proteomic studies; and provided an integrated picture of the reference pathways and networks behind FAF1/H. pylori-associated gastric

  13. Helicobacter pylori: Novel Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Drouin

    1999-01-01

    The ideal therapy for Helicobacter pylori would cure the infection without resulting in the development of antibiotic resistance. Current therapies have variable cure rates; the reasons for treatment failure include bacterial resistance and poor compliance. Some antibiotics, such as furazolidone, may be affordable agents to treat this infection worldwide. New proton pump inhibitors, such as rabeprazole, can potentiate antibiotics. Nutriceuticals and probiotics demonstrate interesting in vitro...

  14. PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    OpenAIRE

    Vandana; Vidya

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study was done at Christian Medical College an d Hospital, Ludhiana for the period of 5 years from January 2006 to December 2010 in the Department of Microbiology. A total of 306 endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens were collected from the suspected cases of the peptic ulcer and were subjected to rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori. This test has high sensitivity and cent percent specificity. The prevalen ce was determined to be 09.48...

  15. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Design Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. Results All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. Conclusions A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. PMID:26187502

  17. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron

    2016-02-01

    The ideal treatment regimen for the eradication Helicobacter pylori infection has yet to be identified. Probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces, have been suggested as adjuncts to antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori. There is in vitro evidence that probiotics dampen the Th1 response triggered by H. pylori, attenuate H. pylori associated hypochlorhydria and secrete bacteriocidal metabolites. Probiotics interact with the innate host immune system through adherence to the gastric epithelium and secretion of bacterial adhesins. In prospective human studies, probiotic monotherapy effectively decrease H. pylori density (expired (13)CO2) by 2.0%-64.0%. Probiotic monotherapy has also been shown to eradicate H. pylori in up to 32.5%, although subsequent recrudescence is likely. Eleven meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics as adjuvants to antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. The addition of a probiotic increased treatment efficacy, OR 1.12-2.07. This benefit is probably strain-specific and may only be significant with relatively ineffective antibiotic regimens. The pooled prevalence of adverse effects was 12.9%-31.5% among subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with 24.3%-45.9% among controls. Diarrhea in particular was significantly reduced in subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with controls (OR 0.16-0.47). A reduction in adverse events other than diarrhea is variable. Despite the apparent benefit on efficacy and side effects conferred by probiotics, the optimal probiotic species, dose and treatment duration has yet to be determined. Further studies are needed to identify the probiotic, antibiotic and patient factors which might predict benefit from probiotic supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-operative treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wever Jan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical characteristics and complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration are well known. Gastro-intestinal involvement has also been recognised in these patients. However an acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer has not been documented up to now. Case presentation A 26-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer is treated non-operatively with naso-gastric suction and intravenous medication. Gastrointestinal involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and therapeutic considerations in a high risk patient are discussed. Conclusion Non-surgical treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer should be considered in high risk patients, as is the case in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Patients must be carefully observed and operated on if non-operative treatment is unsuccessful.

  19. Non-operative treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Justus-Martijn; Oddens, Jorg R; Van Royen, Barend J; Wever, Jan; Olsman, Jan G

    2004-01-08

    Clinical characteristics and complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration are well known. Gastro-intestinal involvement has also been recognised in these patients. However an acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer has not been documented up to now. A 26-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer is treated non-operatively with naso-gastric suction and intravenous medication. Gastrointestinal involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and therapeutic considerations in a high risk patient are discussed. Non-surgical treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer should be considered in high risk patients, as is the case in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Patients must be carefully observed and operated on if non-operative treatment is unsuccessful.

  20. Lack of association between gastric cancer and hopQ alleles in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazemi Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors (such as cagA. The HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. This gene has been shown in two types. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQ alleles (types I and II and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies the of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+ genotypes were determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotypes hopQI+, hopQII+ and hopQI+ hopQII+.

  1. Gastro-duodenal perforations: conventional plain film, US and CT findings in 166 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Pinto, Antonio; Romano, Luigia

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: Gastro-duodenal perforations may be suspected in patients with history of ulceration, who present with acute pain and abdominal wall rigidity, but radiological findings in these cases may be unable to confirm a clinical diagnosis. The aim of our study was to report our experience in the diagnosis of gastro-duodenal perforation by conventional radiography, US and CT examinations. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 166 consecutive patients who presented in the last 2 years to our institutions with symptoms of acute abdomen and submitted to surgery at the Emergency Unit of the ''A.Cardarelli'' Hospital of Naples with a surgical finding of perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer. The evidence of free intraperitoneal air on abdominal plain film was considered as a direct or suggestive finding of perforation. Evidence of intraperitoneal free fluid and/or reduced intestinal peristalsis at sonographic examination were considered indirect signs of gastro-duodenal perforation. Evidence of free peritoneal gas at CT was considered as a direct evidence of gastro-duodenal perforation. Results: Twenty patients underwent immediate surgery with no preoperative imaging evaluation, in 10 of them the site of perforation was found in a juxta-pyloric region and in the others at level of duodenum. In 146 patients submitted to serial radiological investigations before surgery, the site of perforation was in 56 (38.3%) duodenal, in 52 (35.6%) juxta-pyloric, in 28 (19.1%) gastric and in 10 (6.8%) pyloric. The cause of perforation was in all cases gastric or duodenal ulceration, in seven cases involving pancreatic parenchyma. In 110 (75.4%) patients with direct findings of perforation, in 94 cases (85.5%) the correct diagnosis was established on abdominal plain film, in two (1.8%) with radiographic and sonographic examinations and in 14 (12.7%) on CT findings. In 36 (24,6%) patients with no direct findings of perforation, only 24

  2. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection Angiogénesis gástrica e infección por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  3. MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS OF A CHRONIC GASTRODUODENITIS AT PRESCHOOLERS WITH VARIOUS AMYLOLYTIC ACTIVITY OF THE MIXED SALIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ye. Sazanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to to estimate traits of the morphofunctional changes of a gastroduodenal mucous membrane at chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper digestive tract at preschoolers with various level of amylolytic activity of saliva. Patients and methods: 145 children at the age of 3–7 years with chronic inflammatory diseases of a stomach and duodenum are surveyed. The amylolytic activity of the mixed saliva by Smith-Roy-Ugolev amylolytic method was determined at patients. 2 clinical groups with account of median (the 50th percentile distribution of amylolytic activity of saliva are created: the first — with indicators below the median (n =72, the second — with indicators above or equal to the median (n =73. The endoscopic research (all children, histological research bioptates (n =63, morphometric analysis of a duodenum mucous membrane (n =26 were applied for the purpose of assessment of a morphofunctional condition of a stomach and duodenum. Results: It is established that predominant duodenum involvement, high frequency of isolated duodenitis, subatrophic and dystrophic changes of a duodenal mucous membrane, bigger intensity and depth of inflammatory process against lower level of nonspecific tissue protection, existence of signs of an allergic inflammation are characteristic for patients with low amylolytic activity of saliva. Conclusion: Determination of amylolytic activity of the mixed saliva at children with inflammatory diseases of a stomach and duodenum is available, noninvasive informative diagnostic test orienting in assessment of a character and extent of involvement of a gastroduodenal mucous membrane and allowing in due time to reveal the patients needing the profound inspection of gastroduodenal area and also to exclude food allergy.

  4. Periodic activity of secretory glands of stomach in ulcer erosion of gastro-duodenal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Rudenko

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available It was fixed, that development of atophanum-carbacholimun ulcer of the gastroduodenal zone invoked various changes of secretory activity of the stomach. The changes directly depend on a progress of pathological process. As this takes place the reaction of stomach secretory glands varies under the stimulation with histamine: the decrease of stomach secretory glands’ work capacity till 10th day and its increase after 10–15th day were observed. Disorders of the glands’ ultradian rhythms at initial stages of modeling of gastrointestinal nervous regulation disturbances testify to dependence of periodic activity of gastrointestinal tract on resistance of regulatory mechanisms correlation.

  5. [CD25-positivity and efficacy of roncoleukin in complex treatment of patients with gastroduodenal ulcers complicated by hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭvazova, K A; Gasanov, I A

    2011-08-01

    In 72 patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcer disease recombinant interleukin-2 (LL-2) Roncoleukin ("Biotech", Russia) was applied in complex of treatment. The main populations of immunocytes, containing cellular-tissue receptor IL-2 CD25, were investigated in specimen from various zones of gastroduodenal mucosa and peripheral blood. There was established the trustworthy hyperexpression of CD25 in patients while gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Roncoleukin inclusion into the complex of treatment of patients have promoted more effective normalization of affinity of various immunocytes type towards IL-2 receptors, clinical signs occurrence of the disease elimination and the ulcer defect epithelization acceleration.

  6. Helicobacter pylori: Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Drouin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal therapy for Helicobacter pylori would cure the infection without resulting in the development of antibiotic resistance. Current therapies have variable cure rates; the reasons for treatment failure include bacterial resistance and poor compliance. Some antibiotics, such as furazolidone, may be affordable agents to treat this infection worldwide. New proton pump inhibitors, such as rabeprazole, can potentiate antibiotics. Nutriceuticals and probiotics demonstrate interesting in vitro activity against H pylori. Children rarely have symptoms to this infection and, therefore, are a suitable group in which to assess different nonaggressive therapies.

  7. [The current problems of the surgical procedure in acute hemorrhages from gastroduodenal ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, R Z; Chirkov, Iu V

    1996-01-01

    The article presents results of treatment of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers in 1010 patients for 23 years. The active temporizing policy during the first 8 years resulted in 8.1% lethality while the active methods gave 8.24% lethality in six times greater number of patients. In the active policy urgent and emergency operations were performed on 43.6% of the patients with postoperative lethality 12.9%. Lethality among non-operated patients was 4.6%. Using the active surgical methods allowed lethality to be substantially decreased in the group of non-operated patients. The postoperative lethality was stabilized due to a less amount of recurrent bleedings and of "operations of despair". Recommendations are given to restrict the indications for Billroth-2 gastric resections because of a great risk of incompetent stump of the duodenum. Wider using the organ-saving operations is recommended, especially in elderly patients and against the background of haemorrhagic shock. The growing amount of patients with ulcerous gastroduodenal bleedings (which has become 2.4 times greater for the recent 15 years) makes further investigations in this direction very actual.

  8. Comparative analysis of assessment methods for operational and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to conduct a comparative analysis of methods of evaluation of surgical and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis ofthe extent of the surgical and anesthetic risks and results of treatment of 71 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding has been conducted in the study. To evaluate the surgical and anesthetic risks classification trees are used, scale ТА. Rockall and prognosis System of rebleeding (SPRK, proposed by N. V. Lebedev et al. in 2009, enabling to evaluate the probability of a fatal outcome. To compare the efficacy ofthe methods the following indicators are used: sensitivity, specificity and prediction of positive result. Results. The study compared the results ofthe risk assessment emergency operation by using these methods with the outcome ofthe operation. The comparison ofthe prognosis results in sensitivity leads to the conclusion that the scales ТА. Rockall and SPRK are worse than the developed method of classification trees in recognizing patients with poor outcome of surgery. Conclusion. The method of classification trees can be considered as the most accurate method of evaluation of surgical and anesthetic risks in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding.

  9. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  10. [Principal characteristics of the endoscopic programmed hemostasis in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings in patients with high operational-anesthesiological risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timen, L Ia; Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z

    2013-01-01

    Application of the endoscopic programmed hemostasis for patients with ulcer gastroduodenal bleedings and with high operational-anesthetic risk provided metabolic rehabilitation (5% solutions of glucose and ascorbic acid) for the purpose of prevention of recurrence of the bleedings which have arisen after a hemostasis at 5.5% of patients.

  11. Segmental embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a case of a perforated pseudoaneurysm and gastrointestinal bleeding; Segmentembolisation der Arteria gastroduodenalis bei perforiertem Pseudoaneurysma und gastrointestinaler Massivblutung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie der Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany); Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Cavallaro, A.; Bautz, W. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie der Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    We present the history of a woman suffering from an extensive gastrointestinal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis. Selective angiogram of the celiac artery revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by inflammatory wall penetration. The life-threatening hemorrhage was completely stopped by embolization with three stainless steel coils after microcatheter engagement of the gastroduodenal artery. The particularity of this case is the restricted embolization of the aneurysm vessel segment, so the collateral circulation of the gastroduodenal and pancreaticoduodenal artery could be preserved. (orig.)

  12. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis and its impact on Chinese clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Lu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis has had a great effect on the field of H. pylori studies worldwide. For the first time H. pylori gastritis was defined entirely as an infectious disease and H. pylori-associated dyspepsia as a new category of organic dyspepsia apart from functional dyspepsia, together with a proposed diagnostic algorithm. Accordingly, the report states that the eradication of H. pylori should be regarded as the first-line treatment for dyspepsia. Moreover, H. pylori eradication before the development of pre-neoplastic changes is recommended to reduce the risk of more serious complications of H. pylori gastritis. Despite the recommendations of this new global consensus, the task of transforming them into feasible and practical recommendations for individual countries will require them to become region-specific, which requires further discussion. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  16. Genipin-cross-linked fucose-chitosan/heparin nanoparticles for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lee, Che-Hsin; He, Zih Sian; Tseng, Guan-Chin

    2013-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a significant human pathogen that recognizes specific carbohydrate receptors, such as the fucose receptor, and produces the vacuolating cytotoxin, which induces inflammatory responses and modulates the cell-cell junction integrity of the gastric epithelium. The clinical applicability of topical antimicrobial agents was needed to complete the eradication of H. pylori in the infected fundal area. In the present study, we combined fucose-conjugated chitosan and genipin-cross-linking technologies in preparing multifunctional genipin-cross-linked fucose-chitosan/heparin nanoparticles to encapsulate amoxicillin of targeting and directly make contact with the region of microorganism on the gastric epithelium. The results show that the nanoparticles effectively reduced drug release at gastric acids and then released amoxicillin in an H. pylori survival situation to inhibit H. pylori growth and reduce disruption of the cell-cell junction protein in areas of H. pylori infection. Furthermore, with amoxicillin-loaded nanoparticles, a more complete H. pylori clearance effect was observed, and H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in an infected animal model was effectively reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the regression of gastric polyps in National Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Su Youn; Park, Bum Joon; Ryu, Kum Hei; Nam, Ji Hyung

    2017-12-14

    Western guidelines recommend Helicobacter pylori eradication in H. pylori-associated gastric polyps; however, there is no standard guideline in Korea. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of H. pylori eradication on the regression of gastric hyperplastic polyps in National Cancer Screening Cohort, representative of general population. Among participants in National Cancer Screening Program, subjects who had H. pylori positive gastric hyperplastic polyps less than 10 mm and underwent follow-up endoscopy and H. pylori testing were enrolled. The effect of H. pylori eradication on hyperplastic gastric polyps was estimated using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 183 H. pylori infected subjects with hyperplastic polyp at baseline underwent follow-up endoscopy and H. pylori test after mean of 2.2 years. Successful H. pylori eradication markedly induced the disappearance of hyperplastic polyps comparing to non-eradication group (83.7% vs. 34.1%, p = 0.001). Successful eradication increased the possibility of disappearance of hyperplastic polyps (adjusted OR, 5.56; 95% CI, 2.63 to 11.11). Polyp size was inversely related with the disappearance of hyperplastic polyps (adjusted OR, 59; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.71). Eradication of H. pylori infection may induce disappearance of gastric hyperplastic polyps in National Cancer Screening Cohort.

  18. Helicobacter pylori Infection Aggravates Diet-induced Insulin Resistance in Association With Gut Microbiota of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cong; Yang, Zhen; Cheng, Dandan; Xie, Chuan; Zhu, Yin; Ge, Zhongming; Luo, Zhijun; Lu, Nonghua

    2016-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with insulin resistance (IR) yet the underlying mechanisms are still obscure. The vital role of gut microbiota in triggering IR has been increasingly reported, however, no study has explored the correlation of gut microbiota and H. pylori-associated IR. Using H. pylori-infected mice model fed different diet structures, we demonstrated that H. pylori infection significantly aggravated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic disorders at the early stage, the extent of which was close to the effect of long-term HFD. Interestingly, we observed dynamic alterations in gut microbiota that were consistent with the changes in the metabolic phenotype induced by H. pylori and HFD. There may be an interaction among H. pylori, diet and gut microbiota, which dysregulates the host metabolic homeostasis, and treatment of H. pylori may be beneficial to the patients with impaired glucose tolerance in addition to diet control. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M; Washington, M Kay; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn P. Haley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world’s human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization.

  1. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Kathryn P; Gaddy, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world's human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization.

  2. Helicobacter pylori adhesin HopQ engages in a virulence-enhancing interaction with human CEACAMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Anahita; Kruse, Tobias; Moonens, Kristof; Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Debraekeleer, Ayla; Asche, Carmen I; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Kalali, Behnam; Bach, Nina C; Sieber, Stephan A; Hill, Darryl J; Königer, Verena; Hauck, Christof R; Moskalenko, Roman; Haas, Rainer; Busch, Dirk H; Klaile, Esther; Slevogt, Hortense; Schmidt, Alexej; Backert, Steffen; Remaut, Han; Singer, Bernhard B; Gerhard, Markus

    2016-10-17

    Helicobacter pylori specifically colonizes the human gastric epithelium and is the major causative agent for ulcer disease and gastric cancer development. Here, we identify members of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family as receptors of H. pylori and show that HopQ is the surface-exposed adhesin that specifically binds human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5 and CEACAM6. HopQ-CEACAM binding is glycan-independent and targeted to the N-domain. H. pylori binding induces CEACAM1-mediated signalling, and the HopQ-CEACAM1 interaction enables translocation of the virulence factor CagA into host cells and enhances the release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8. Based on the crystal structure of HopQ, we found that a β-hairpin insertion (HopQ-ID) in HopQ's extracellular 3+4 helix bundle domain is important for CEACAM binding. A peptide derived from this domain competitively inhibits HopQ-mediated activation of the Cag virulence pathway, as genetic or antibody-mediated abrogation of the HopQ function shows. Together, our data suggest the HopQ-CEACAM1 interaction to be a potentially promising novel therapeutic target to combat H. pylori-associated diseases.

  3. Nodular Gastritis and Pathologic Findings in Children and Young Adults with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hong; Noh, Tae-Woong; Baek, Seoung-Yon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the pathologic characteristics of nodular gastritis in children and young adults infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Materials and Methods A total of 328 patients were enrolled in this study, and the diagnosis of H. pylori infection was done with gastroduodenal endoscopy concomitant with a CLO™ test and pathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens. Diagnoses of normal, superficial gastritis, nodular gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease were made from the gastroduodenal endoscopic findings. The density of H. pylori organisms in the gastric mucosa was rated as normal, mild, moderate, or marked. The pathologic findings of nodular gastritis were based on the histopathologic findings of inflammation, immune activity, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Each of these findings was scored as either normal (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or marked (3) according to the updated Sydney system and using visual analog scales. The gastritis score was the sum of the four histopathologic scores. Results In this study, nodular gastritis (50.6%) was most common, and mild density (51.5%) H. pylori infection was also common upon microscopic examination. Intestinal metaplasia occurred in 9 patients (2.7%). Conclusion Logistic regression revealed a significant increase in the incidence of nodular gastritis with gastritis score (p = 0.008), but not an association with sex, age, or H. pylori density. Gastritis score was the only significant factor influencing the occurrence of nodular gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia, which was originally thought to be a pre-malignant lesion, occurred in 2.7% of the patients with H. pylori infection. PMID:17461522

  4. Úlcera gastroduodenal: problemática de la morbilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Fernández Machín

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, restrospectivo en 4 consultorios atendidos por Médicos de la Familia, pertenecientes al Policlínico "Plaza de la Revolución" para señalar los principales problemas de salud que afectan la morbilidad por úlcera gastroduodenal, en el período comprendido desde enero de 1996 hasta diciembre de 1997. El sexo masculino representó el 65,7 % de la muestra en estudio y los grupos de edades de mayor prevalencia fueron de 31 a 40 años y de 51 a 60. El 42,1 % de los pacientes que refirieron antecedentes patológicos familiares de afecciones gastroduodenales desarrollaron úlcera gastroduodenal. La localización duodenal se presentó en un 77,1 % de los casos. El café fue el más frecuente de los hábitos tóxicos, siguiéndole el alcohol; entre los medicamentos ingeridos, la aspirina representó el 17,1 % de los casos. Los esquemas de tratamiento más empleados fueron la cimetidina y otros medicamentos (74,3 %, los regímenes lácteos (65,7 % y los antiácidos (62,9 %. La endoscopia y la radiología (40 % asociada a la endoscopia fueron los métodos más frecuentes para el diagnóstico. Asimismo, el sangramiento digestivo alto fue la complicación más observada (28,6 %A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 4 family physician?s offices from the Plaza de la Revolución? Polyclinic to stress the main health problems affecting morbidity from peptic ulcer between January, 1996, and December, 1997. Males accounted for 65,7 % of the sample under study, whereas the highest prevalence was observed in the age groups 31-40 and 51-60. 42,1 % of the patients who had pathological family history of gastroduodenal disorders developed peptic ulcer.The duodenal localization was present in 77,1 % of the cases. Coffee was the most frequent of the toxic habits, followed by alcohol. Among the drugs taken by the patients, aspirin represented 17,1 % of the cases. The most used schemes of treatment were cimetidine and

  5. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  6. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic patients in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Shokrzadeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection has been known to be associated with several upper gastrointestinal disorders such as peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, the relationship between H. pylori infection and dyspeptic symptoms remains controversial. Furthermore, it is still not clear which factors are associated with H. pylori infection in the Iranian population. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients and factors associated with H. pylori infection in the Iranian population. In this cross-sectional study, 303 patients with dyspeptic symptoms underwent endoscopy. Clinical data and a questionnaire about gastrointestinal symptoms were collected from each patient. H. pylori status was evaluated by histological examination. Among the 303 patients, 263 (86.8% were found to be positive for H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly with age. There was no difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection between the patients with and those without a family history of gastroduodenal diseases. Among 250 patients with abdominal pain, 219 (87.6% were infected with H. pylori. Among 211 patients with epigastric abdominal pain, 185 (87.7% were infected with H. pylori. It was observed that belching was significantly associated with H. pylori infection (P = 0.03. Dyspepsia triggered by the consumption of tea was higher in H. pylori-positive patients than in H. pylori-negative patients (P = 0.03. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was quite high in Iran. Belching and dyspepsia triggered by tea consumption was related with H. pylori infection.

  7. BH3-only protein Bim is associated with the degree of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and is localized to the mitochondria of inflammatory cells in the gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Yuko; Matsuda, Katsuya; Isomoto, Hajime; Matsushima, Kayoko; Kido, Yoko; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Yamaghchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Moss, Joel; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    BH3-only protein, Bim, is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates mitochondria-dependent cell death. However, the role of Bim in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the cellular localization of Bim and its possible role in H. pylori-induced gastritis. The study was conducted on biopsy specimens obtained from 80 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (H. pylori-negative: n=30, positive: n=50). Association between Bim mRNA expression and severity of gastritis was evaluated and the localization of Bim was examined by immunofluorescence. Bim mRNA expression was positively correlated with the degree of gastritis, as defined by the Sydney system. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed increased Bim expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected mucosa in both humans and mice. Bim localized in myeloperoxidase- and CD138-positive cells of H. pylori-infected lamina propria and submucosa of the gastric tract, indicating that this protein is predominantly expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells. In contrast, Bim did not localize in CD20-, CD3-, or CD68-positive cells. Bim was expressed in the mitochondria, where it was partially co-localized with activated Bax and cleaved-PARP. In conclusion, Bim is expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it may participate in the termination of inflammatory response by causing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in specific leucocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters detected in the stomach of humans comprise several naturally occurring Helicobacter species in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, Margo; Pasmans, Frank; Flahou, Bram; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2009-04-01

    Besides the well-known gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, other Helicobacter species with a spiral morphology have been detected in a minority of human patients who have undergone gastroscopy. The very fastidious nature of these non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH) makes their in vitro isolation difficult. These organisms have been designated 'Helicobacter heilmannii'. However, sequencing of several genes detected in NHPH-infected tissues has shown that the 'H. heilmannii' group comprises at least five different Helicobacter species, all of them known to colonize the stomach of animals. Recent investigations have indicated that Helicobacter suis is the most prevalent NHPH species in human. This species has only recently been isolated in vitro from porcine stomach mucosa. Other NHPH that colonize the human stomach are Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, Helicobacter salomonis and 'Candidatus Helicobacter heilmannii'. In numerous case reports of human gastric NHPH infections, no substantial information is available about the species status of the infecting strain, making it difficult to link the species with certain pathologies. This review aims to clarify the complex nomenclature of NHPH species associated with human gastric disease and their possible animal origin. It is proposed to use the term 'gastric NHPH' to designate gastric spirals that are morphologically different from H. pylori when no identification is available at the species level. Species designations should be reserved for those situations in which the species is defined.

  9. Modulation of vagal tone enhances gastroduodenal motility and reduces somatic pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer, J B; Bergmann, S; Brock, C

    2016-01-01

    , using transcutaneous electrical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) and deep slow breathing (DSB) respectively, could increase musculoskeletal pain thresholds and enhance gastroduodenal motility in healthy subjects. METHODS: Eighteen healthy subjects were randomized to a subject-blinded, sham......-controlled, cross-over study with an active protocol including stimulation of auricular branch of the vagus nerve, and breathing at full inspiratory capacity and forced full expiration. Recording of cardiac derived parameters including cardiac vagal tone, moderate pain thresholds to muscle, and bone pressure......BACKGROUND: The parasympathetic nervous system, whose main neural substrate is the vagus nerve, exerts a fundamental antinociceptive role and influences gastrointestinal sensori-motor function. Our research question was to whether combined electrical and physiological modulation of vagal tone...

  10. Gastroduodenal intussusception due to gastric schwannoma treated by Billroth II distal gastrectomy: one case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Hua; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Zhi-Hua; Shu, Yu; Hong, Jun; Cao, Yi-Jun

    2015-02-21

    Schwannomas are rarely observed in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common symptoms of a gastric schwannoma are abdominal pain or dyspepsia, gastrointestinal bleeding, and an abdominal mass. Many gastric schwannomas are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally or at postmortem. The diagnosis of a schwannoma is based on immunohistochemical positivity for S-100 protein. We present a case report of a rare complication of gastric schwannoma causing gastroduodenal intussusception that was successfully managed by a Billroth II distal gastrectomy. In this rare case, the patient had intermittent, colicky abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting for over 4 wk accompanied by a weight loss. A diagnosis of gastric intussusception was made by computed tomography. A Billroth II distal gastrectomy was then performed, and complete en bloc removal (R0 resection) was achieved. Pathology confirmed a gastric schwannoma through positive immunohistochemical staining for S-100 protein.

  11. Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastroduodenal Disease by Acid Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Lad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One major cause of peptic ulceration is the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The precise mechanisms through which NSAIDs cause peptic ulceration are unknown, but the discovery that they reduce the production of ‘cytoprotective’ prostaglandins led to the hypothesis that coadministration of exogenous prostaglandins heals and prevents NSAID-induced gastroduodenal ulcers and other mucosal lesions. Studies using high doses of misoprostol have shown that it does have a protective effect; however, gastrointestinal intolerance of this prostaglandin E2 analogue is common. Early indications that acid suppression was effective in the management of NSAID-related peptic ulcers came from studies showing that gastric ulcers could be healed by omeprazole in patients who continued to take NSAIDs. Other studies suggested that acid suppression reduces the incidence of mucosal lesions but that standard dose ranitidine protects only against duodenal lesions. Subsequent studies reported that higher dose H2 receptor antagonist therapy can protect against both gastric and duodenal ulcers during continued NSAID therapy. An ideal therapeutic strategy would heal NSAID-related ulcers and prevent the development of new NSAID-related lesions and complications in patients who are unable to discontinue NSAID therapy. A number of recent studies indicate that effective acid-suppressive treatment with the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole can achieve these aims. Overall, data from recent studies show that acid suppression with the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole at a dose of 20 mg daily is the most effective means of healing NSAID-associated gastroduodenal lesions and that it is the most effective prophylactic therapy. In the long run, the role of omeprazole will have to be evaluated with respect to its cost effectiveness compared with other strategies and with respect to the development of less damaging NSAIDs.

  12. Treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction with using a newly designed complex expandable nitinol stent: initial experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi Hee; Ko, Ji Ho; Lee, Eun Jung; Oh, Kyeng Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Cho, Young Duk; Park, Seun Ja [College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gyoo Sik [Ulsan Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of a new type of a complex expandable nitinol stent that was designed to reduce the stent's propensity to migration during the treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstructions. Two types of expandable nitinol stent were constructed by weaving a single thread of 0.2mm nitinol wire in a tubular configuration: an uncovered stent 18mm in diameter and a covered stent 16mm in diameter. Both ends of the covered stent were fabricated by coaxially inserting the covered stent into the tubular uncovered stent and then attaching the two stents together with using nylon monofilament. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the stent was placed in 29 consecutive patients (20 men and 9 women, mean age: 65 years) who were suffering with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (n=20), duodenal obstruction (n=6) or combined obstruction (n=3). Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing the food intake capacity before and after the procedure. The complications were investigated during the follow up period. Stent placement was successful in all the patients. After stent placement, the symptoms improved in all but one patient. During the follow up, stent migration occurred in one patient (3%) at 34 days after the procedure. Despite the stent migration, the patient was able to resume a soft diet. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms of obstruction with tumor overgrowth at a mean of 145 days after the procedure; all the patients underwent coaxial placement of an additional stent with good results. One patient showed recurrence of obstruction due to tumor in-growth, and this was treated by placement of a second stent. Two patients with stent placement in the duodenum suffered from jaundice 26 days and 65 days, respectively, after their procedures. Placement of the newly designed complex expandable nitinol stent seems to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstructions. The new stent also seems to help overcome the

  13. Study of Relationship Between the Blood Supply of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct and Duct Supply Branches from Gastroduodenal Artery on Imaging and Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage acute or chronic hepatic disease. Bile duct complications are common events after liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the blood supply of the human bile duct and identify the underlying mechanisms of bile duct complications after liver transplantation. Methods: The duct supply branches from gastroduodenal artery and blood supply of extrahepatic bile duct system were re-evaluated through selective hepatic angiography from 600 patients. In addition, 33 cadavers were injected with latex casting material into the common hepatic artery, then the extrahepatic bile duct and the branches from the common hepatic artery were carefully dissected to visualize the gastroduodenal artery and its branching to the extrahepatic bile duct. Results: The bile duct artery arose from the branch of the gastroduodenal artery in 8.1% (49/600. Of these 49 individuals, the bile duct artery was supplied by the gastroduodenal artery (61.22%, 30/49, the proper hepatic artery (14.29%, 7/49, or both the gastroduodenal artery and the proper hepatic artery (24.49%, 12/49. In our study of 33 cadavers, the percentage that the bile duct artery arose from the gastroduodenal artery was 27.27%. The blood supply to the bile extrahepatic bile ducts was divided into different segments and formed longitudinal and arterial network anastomosed on the walls of the duct. Conclusions: There is a close relationship between the duct supply branches from gastroduodenal artery and the blood supplying patterns of the extrahepatic bile duct system. In liver transplant surgery, the initial part of the gastroduodenal artery is preferred to be preserved in the donor liver. It is of great significance to improve the success rate of operation and reduce complications.

  14. Study of Relationship Between the Blood Supply of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct and Duct Supply Branches from Gastroduodenal Artery on Imaging and Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jie; Wu, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Chun; Li, Hong-Jun; Chen, Ya-Liang; Liu, Guo-Zhen; Song, Yi-Zhi; Wu, Huan-Huan; Ding, Jin-Li; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background: Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage acute or chronic hepatic disease. Bile duct complications are common events after liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the blood supply of the human bile duct and identify the underlying mechanisms of bile duct complications after liver transplantation. Methods: The duct supply branches from gastroduodenal artery and blood supply of extrahepatic bile duct system were re-evaluated through selective hepatic angiography from 600 patients. In addition, 33 cadavers were injected with latex casting material into the common hepatic artery, then the extrahepatic bile duct and the branches from the common hepatic artery were carefully dissected to visualize the gastroduodenal artery and its branching to the extrahepatic bile duct. Results: The bile duct artery arose from the branch of the gastroduodenal artery in 8.1% (49/600). Of these 49 individuals, the bile duct artery was supplied by the gastroduodenal artery (61.22%, 30/49), the proper hepatic artery (14.29%, 7/49), or both the gastroduodenal artery and the proper hepatic artery (24.49%, 12/49). In our study of 33 cadavers, the percentage that the bile duct artery arose from the gastroduodenal artery was 27.27%. The blood supply to the bile extrahepatic bile ducts was divided into different segments and formed longitudinal and arterial network anastomosed on the walls of the duct. Conclusions: There is a close relationship between the duct supply branches from gastroduodenal artery and the blood supplying patterns of the extrahepatic bile duct system. In liver transplant surgery, the initial part of the gastroduodenal artery is preferred to be preserved in the donor liver. It is of great significance to improve the success rate of operation and reduce complications. PMID:25635427

  15. Patterns of Adherence of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates to Epithelial Cells, and its Association with Disease and with Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Jiménez, Flor Elizabeth; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Cerezo, Silvia Giono; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to the gastric epithelium is one of the most important steps of Helicobacter pylori to remain and cause disease. The aim of this study was to analyze whether H. pylori isolates from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases present differences in the pattern of adherence to gastric epithelial cells (AGS), in the ability to induce IL-8, and in the presence of virulence genes. We tested 75 H. pylori strains isolated from nonatrophic gastritis, gastric cancer, and duodenal ulcer patients. The adhesion pattern and IL-8 induction were determined in AGS cells, and invasion of AGS cells was studied using a gentamicin protection assay. The IL-8 levels induced were determined by ELISA. Helicobacter pylori strains presented diffuse adherence (DA) and localized (LA) adherence patterns, similar to those described for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), were observed in AGS cells. A DA pattern was observed in 57% and LA in 43% of the strains, and DA was more frequent in isolates from patients with gastric cancer (p = 0.044). Strains with a LA pattern induced higher levels of IL-8 (p = 0.042) in AGS cells. The adherence pattern was not associated with neither invasiveness nor with the presence of virulence genes. Our study shows that H. pylori strains present adherence patterns to AGS cells resembling those observed in EPEC and that these patterns may be associated with disease and with activity on AGS cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Endoscopia gastroduodenal após administração de nimesulida, monofenilbutazona e meloxicam em cães Gastroduodenal endoscopy after nimesulide, monophenylbutazone and meloxicam administration in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R.S. Costa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os aspectos da mucosa gastroduodenal em cães tratados experimentalmente com nimesulida, monofenilbutazona e meloxicam. Foram formados quatro grupos com oito cães. Os grupos 1, 2 e 3 receberam, respectivamente, tratamento com nimesulida, monofenilbutazona e meloxicam durante 21 dias, e o grupo 4 foi utilizado como controle. Todos os animais foram avaliados por exames endoscópicos do estômago e duodeno antes do experimento e aos 10 e 21 dias de tratamento. Os cães não manifestaram qualquer alteração clínica ou laboratorial durante o período de estudo. A avaliação endoscópica da mucosa gastroduodenal apresentou apenas lesões consideradas de baixo grau. Esses antiinflamatórios mostraram-se seguros para o trato gastrintestinal de cães clinicamente saudáveis.The gastroduodenal mucosa in dogs experimentally treated with nimesulide, monophenylbutazone and meloxicam was evaluated. There were four groups with eight dogs in each. Groups one, two and three were given nimesulide, monophenylbutazone and meloxicam, respectively, during 21 days and group four was used as control. All animals were evaluated by gastroduodenoscopy before the study and on the 10th and 21st days. The dogs did not show any clinical or laboratorial changes during the study. The endoscopic evaluation of gastroduodenal mucosa showed only low degree lesions. These anti-inflammatory drugs showed to be safe for the gastrointestinal tract in healthy dogs.

  17. Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter trogontum: infectious causes of abortion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, John; Haydon, Taryrn G; Rawdon, Thomas G; McFadden, Andrew M J; Ha, Hye-Jeong; Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Pang, Jassia; Swennes, Alton G; Paster, Bruce J; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Fox, James G; Spence, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the association of Helicobacter spp. that had flexispira morphology with ovine abortion, and to understand the importance of these organisms as a cause of ovine abortion in New Zealand. A retrospective diagnostic survey was carried out on laboratory submissions from ovine abortion outbreaks. A comparison was made of the proportion of laboratory submissions where Helicobacter spp. were detected from flocks that had no other agent identified (group A) with a group that had a known cause of abortion identified (group B). This latter group was considered to be a negative control, given the premise that Helicobacter spp. were not causing abortions and that Helicobacter spp. should be present at a lower rate in the group. Where no diagnosis had been made, aborted material was positive for Helicobacter spp. with flexispira morphology in 8 submissions (20%, 8/40) from 5 of the 31 survey farms (16%, 5/31). Helicobacter spp. were not detected in any of the 18 submissions from the 17 control farms (group B). Helicobacter spp. were confirmed by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing of 3 of the Helicobacter spp. isolated by culture from the livers of aborted sheep fetuses, and 7 of the 8 where samples were positive in a Helicobacter PCR assay. The Helicobacter spp. were identified as Helicobacter trogontum (Flexispira taxon 5 genotype) and Helicobacter bilis (Flexispira taxon 8 genotype). The findings support Helicobacter spp. being a probable causative agent of ovine abortions in New Zealand. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Life-threatening Duodenal Ulcer Bleeding from a Ruptured Gastroduodenal Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kyu Sung; Kim, Sunyong; Lim, Jun Uk; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Cha, Jae Myung; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il; Park, Jae Jun

    2015-09-01

    Vasculopathy is rarely reported in neurofibromatosis type 1, but when it occurs it primarily involves the aorta and its main branches. Among vasculopathies, aneurysmal dilatation is the most common form. Although several case reports concerning aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms of visceral arteries in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients have been reported, there are no reports describing gastroduodenal artery aneurysms associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. We experienced a case of life-threatening duodenal ulcer bleeding from a ruptured gastroduodenal artery aneurysm associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. We treated our patient by transarterial embolization after initial endoscopic hemostasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of its type. High levels of suspicion and prompt diagnosis are required to select appropriate treatment options for patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 experiencing upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Embolization of the involved arteries should be considered an essential treatment over endoscopic hemostasis alone to achieve complete hemostasis and to prevent rebleeding.

  19. relation between helicobacter pylori, inflammatory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Sept. 2008 Vol 11(3):270-274. RELATION BETWEEN HELICOBACTER PYLORI, INFLAMMATORY. (NEUTROPHIL) ACTIVITY, CHRONIC GASTRITIS, GASTRIC ATROPHY AND. INTESTINAL METAPLASIA. *M. N Tanko, *A. N Manasseh,*G.O Echejoh, *B. M. Mandong , **A. O Malu , **E. N Okeke, **N. Ladep , **E. I. Agaba.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection. A...

  1. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  2. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  3. Nickel Homeostasis in Helicobacter Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Stoof (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGastric Helicobacter species are adapted to colonize the acidic environment of the stomach. Colonization with H pylori is life long if untreated, and can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and eventually to gastric cancer. Although H pylori is sensitive to many antibiotics in vitro,

  4. Molecular Detection of Helicobacter pylori and its Antimicrobial Resistance in Brazzaville, Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontsira Ngoyi, Esther Nina; Atipo Ibara, Blaise Irénée; Moyen, Rachelle; Ahoui Apendi, Philestine Clausina; Ibara, Jean Rosaire; Obengui, O; Ossibi Ibara, Roland Bienvenu; Nguimbi, Etienne; Niama, Rock Fabien; Ouamba, Jean Maurille; Yala, Fidèle; Abena, Ange Antoine; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Goh, Khean Lee; Menard, Armelle; Benejat, Lucie; Sifre, Elodie; Lehours, Philippe; Megraud, Francis

    2015-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is involved in several gastroduodenal diseases which can be cured by antimicrobial treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its bacterial resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline in Brazzaville, Congo, by using molecular methods. A cross- sectional study was carried out between September 2013 and April 2014. Biopsy specimens were obtained from patients scheduled for an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and were sent to the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters where they were tested by molecular methods for detection of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance by real-time PCR using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-melting curve analysis (FRET-MCA) protocol, for detection of tetracycline resistance by real-time PCR on 16S rRNA genes (rrnA and rrnB), for detection of point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of H. pylori gyrA gene, associated with resistance to quinolones, by PCR and sequencing. This study showed a high H. pylori prevalence (89%), low rates of clarithromycin and tetracycline resistance (1.7% and 2.5%, respectively), and a high rate of quinolone resistance (50%). Therefore, the use of standard clarithromycin-based triple therapy is still possible as an empiric first-line treatment as well as prescription of bismuth-based quadruple therapy, which includes tetracycline, but not a levofloxacin-based triple therapy because of the high rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Platelet aggregation measurement for assessment of hemostasis failure mechanisms in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barinov E

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Edward Barinov,1 Oksana Sulaieva,1 Yuriy Lyakch,2 Vitaliy Guryanov,2 Petr Kondratenko,3 Yevgeniy Radenko3 1Department of Histology, Cytology, and Embryology, 2Department of Medical, Biological Physics, Medical Informatics, and Biostatistics, 3Department of Surgery and Endoscopy, M Gorky Donetsk National Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine Background: The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the risk of unsustainable hemostasis in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer bleeding by in vitro assessment of platelet reactivity using artificial neural networks. Methods: Patients with gastroduodenal ulcers complicated by bleeding were studied. Platelet aggregation was measured using aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate 5 µM, epinephrine 2.5 µM, 5-hydroxytryptophan 10 µM, collagen 1 µM, and thrombin 0.06 NIH Unit/mL as agonists. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent relationship between demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and laboratory data and in vitro assessment of platelet reactivity and local parameters of hemostasis in patients with ulcer bleeding. Results: Analysis of platelet aggregation in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding allowed the variability of platelet response to different agonists used in effective concentration which induces 50% platelet aggregation (EC50 to be established. The relationship between platelet aggregation and the spatial-temporal characteristics of ulcers complicated by bleeding was demonstrated. Adrenoreactivity of platelets was associated with time elapsed since the start of ulcer bleeding and degree of hemorrhage. The lowest platelet response to collagen and thrombin was detected in patients with active bleeding (P< 0.001 and unsustainable recent bleeding (P < 0.01. Decreased adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation in patients with ulcer bleeding was correlated with the platelet response to thrombin (r = 0.714, P < 0.001 and collagen (r

  6. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  7. Role of Probiotics in Managing of Helicobacter Pylori Infection: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafshdooz, Taiebeh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Majdi Seghinsara, Abbas; Pourhassan, Moghadam; Nasrabadi, Hamid Tayefi; Milani, Morteza

    2017-02-01

    Background:Helicobacter pylori is a prevalent pathogen which is considered as an etiological cause for gastroduodenal ulcers, and a substantial risk factor for gastric malignancies. The vital factor to take into account is that roughly half of the world's population is infected with this bacterium. However, most subjects colonized remain asymptomatic and do not require any treatment. Several antimicrobial agents such as amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole are used to eradicate the infection. However, these drug regiments do not eradicate H. pylori in all patients because of the anti-drug resistance. Aim: In this review we aim to discuss the role and mechanisms of probiotics, as supportive medicines, in management of H. pylori infection. Methods: We have reviewed the published articles in PubMed and Medline databases. Also, abstracts presented in international conferences on the management of H. pylori infections and treatment protocol, have been thoroughly reviewed. Results: The overall trend in the literature indicates the usefulness of probiotics in controlling H. pylori infection. This bacterium is among the most studied human pathogens regarding the efficacy of probiotics for treating its infection. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that probiotics do not efficiently eradicate H. pylori but retain the number of this bacterium at low levels inside the human stomach. Conclusion: The analyzed literature suggest that when probiotics are consumed in conjunction with antibiotics, the eradication rate may be improved through modulating the immune response and decreasing the adverse effects of routine drugs leading to gastroprotection. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Culturable Bacterial Microbiota of the Stomach of Helicobacter pylori Positive and Negative Gastric Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and respiratory diseases: actual data and directions for future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A; Repici, A; Hickman, I; Pellicano, R

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been conclusively related to several gastroduodenal diseases. The possible role of the bacterium in the development of extragastric manifestations has been investigated in the past few years. To identify all publications on the association between H. pylori and respiratory diseases, a MEDLINE search of all studies published in English from 1965 to 2013 was conducted. All data are based on case-control studies. Controversial findings of H. pylori seroprevalence have been obtained in patients with bronchial asthma, lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and bronchiectasis. At present, on epidemiological bases, there is no definite evidence of a causal relationship between H. pylori infection and respiratory diseases. There is a low consideration of confounding factors as poorer socioeconomic status and tobacco use. The activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by H. pylori might be a possible pathogenetic mechanism. However, there are no convincing data about the influence of H. pylori on the inflammatory changes of the bronchoepithelium so far. Further studies are needed on the impact of H. pylori eradication, on the prevention, development and natural history of these disorders.

  10. Effect of bacterial and host factors on Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotani, Takahiro; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    A clearer understanding of the factors affecting the cure rate of Helicobacter pylori infection might lead to the development of novel prevention strategies and therapeutic targets. This review covers two important issues that affect the eradication of H. pylori: bacterial and host factors. Several virulence factors have been shown to be predictors for gastroduodenal diseases. Successful treatment of H. pylori infection also depends on host genetic factors such as CYP2C19 and IL-1B. The latest evidence on host genetic factors is discussed. The authors identify three main targets for achieving effective eradication therapy. The first therapeutic target is to identify counter measures for antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains. Thus, antibiotic susceptibility should be checked in all patients, ideally, before the start of eradication treatment. The second therapeutic target is the inhibition of acid suppression. Maintaining a high intragastric pH for 24 h increases the effectiveness of some antibiotics and the eradication effects for H. pylori. The third therapeutic target is to identify high-risk groups; the CYP2C19 and IL-1B polymorphisms are candidates for significant risk factors. A personalized medical approach will likely increase the cure rate of H. pylori infection.

  11. Standardization and in-house ELISA setup for helicobacter pylori serologic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrestani T

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori is the most prominent causative agent of gastroduodenal diseases all over the world. Other manifestations such as urticaria and coronary heart diseases, also are suspected to be induced by H.pylori. Non invasive methods are preferred for diagnosis; and ELISA, because of its reliability, speed, sensitivity and specificity is widely preferred as diagnostic tool. Previously we have used IFA, and here, we report an indirect ELISA technique for H.pylori diagnosis. First, 9 strains, of H.pylori isolated from biopsies, were cultured, and the soluble crude antigen was used to coat ELISA plates. Antigen concentration and conjugated antiserum dilution were optimised using checker board method. In this study the gold standard was: rapid urease test, culture and direct smear. Patient serum dillution and the cut-off value was determind, using 22 negative and 30 positive confirmed samples according to ROC curve and the results were compared with a commercial kit. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were 93.2 percent and 95.4 percent respectively. A commercial ELISA Kit, was used and compared simultaneously. The sensitivity and specificity were 87.8 percent and 73 percent respectively. Therefore, regarding the acceptable sensitivity and specificity, ease of work of ELISA, being economical and non-invasive, it can be employed in diagnosis of H.pylori infection and also in epidemiological studies.

  12. Functional association between the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors VacA and CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Richard H; Thomas, Rachael J; Letley, Darren P; Rittig, Michael G; Hardie, Kim R; Atherton, John C

    2008-02-01

    The Helicobacter pylori virulence factors CagA and VacA are implicated in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. Most strains possessing CagA also possess the more virulent vacuolating form of VacA. This study assessed the significance of possession of both virulence factors in terms of their effect on gastric epithelial cells, using a set of minimally passaged, isogenic VacA, CagA and CagE mutants in H. pylori strains 60190 and 84-183. The cagA and cagE mutants were found to significantly increase VacA-induced vacuolation of epithelial cells, and the vacA mutants significantly increased CagA-induced cellular elongations, compared with wild-type strains, indicating that CagA reduces vacuolation and VacA reduces hummingbird formation. Although epithelial cells incubated with the wild-type H. pylori strains may display both vacuolation and hummingbird formation, it was found that (i) hummingbird length was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells compared with those without vacuolation; (ii) the number of vacuoles was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells with hummingbird formation compared with those without hummingbirds; and (iii) cells displaying extensive vacuolation did not subsequently form hummingbirds and vice versa. VacA did not affect the phosphorylation of CagA. These data show that VacA and CagA downregulate each other's effects on epithelial cells, potentially allowing H. pylori interaction with cells whilst avoiding excessive cellular damage.

  13. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Eyad M; Yar, Talay; Bamosa, Abdullah O; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Yasawy, Mohamed I; Alsulaiman, Raed M; Randhawa, Muhammad A

    2010-01-01

    A large number of diseases are ascribed to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), particularly chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Successful treatment of H. pylori infection with antimicrobial agents can lead to regression of H. pylori-associated disorders. Antibiotic resistance against H. pylori is increasing, and it is necessary to find new effective agents. Nigella sativa seed (NS), a commonly used herb, possesses in vitro anti-helicobacter activity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of NS in eradication of H. pylori infection in non-ulcer dyspeptic patients. The study was conducted on 88 adult patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, from 2007 to 2008, with dyspeptic symptoms and found positive for H. pylori infection by histopathology and urease test. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups, receiving i) triple therapy (TT) comprising of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole [n= 23], ii) 1 g NS + 40 mg omeprazole (OM) [n= 21], iii) 2 g NS + OM [n= 21] or iv) 3 g NS + OM [n= 23]. Negative H. pylori stool antigen test four weeks after end of treatment was considered as eradication. H. pylori eradication was 82.6, 47.6, 66.7 and 47.8% with TT, 1 g NS, 2 g NS and 3 g NS, respectively. Eradication rates with 2 g NS and TT were statistically not different from each other, whereas H. pylori eradication with other doses was significantly less than that with TT (P H. pylori activity, comparable to triple therapy. Further clinical studies combining N. sativa with antibiotics are suggested.

  14. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from northeastern Brazil with upper gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyssa Quezado de Figueiredo Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastric inflammation and significantly increases the risk of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and distal gastric carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from a Brazilian region where there is a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to investigate vacA mosaicism and cagA status in the gastric mucosa of 134 H. pylori-positive patients, including 76 with gastritis: 28 with peptic ulcer disease and 30 with gastric cancer. The s1m1 variant was the predominant vacA genotype observed, whereas the s1 allele was more frequently observed in patients with more severe diseases associated with H. pylori infection [p = 0.03, odds ratio (OR = 5.72, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-38.60]. Furthermore, all of the s1 alleles were s1b. Mixed vacA m1/m2 strains were found more frequently in patients with gastric cancer and a cagA-positive status was significantly associated with gastric cancer (p = 0.016, OR = 10.36, 95% CI = 1.35-217.31. Patients with gastric cancer (21/21, 100%, p = 0.006 or peptic ulcers (20/21, 95%, p = 0.02 were more frequently colonised by more virulent H. pylori strains compared to gastritis patients (41/61, 67.2%. In conclusion, in the northeastern of Brazil, which is one of the regions with the highest prevalence of gastric cancer in the country, infection with the most virulent H. pylori strains, carrying the cagA gene and s1m1 vacA alleles, predominates and is correlated with more severe H. pylori-associated diseases.

  15. Gastric mucin expression in Helicobacter pylori-related, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related and idiopathic ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron; Halpern, Marisa; Levi, Zohar; Vilkin, Alex; Morgenstern, Sara; Ho, Samuel B; Niv, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the pattern of secreted mucin expression in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related and idiopathic gastric ulcers. METHODS: We randomly selected 92 patients with H. pylori-associated (n = 30), NSAID-associated (n = 18), combined H. pylori and NSAID-associated gastric ulcers (n = 24), and patients with idiopathic gastric ulcers (n = 20). Immunohistochemistry for T-cell CD4/CD8, and for mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) and mucin 6 (MUC6), was performed on sections of the mucosa from the ulcer margin. Inflammation score was assessed according to the Sydney system. RESULTS: MUC5AC was expressed on the surface epithelium (98.9%) and neck glands (98.9%) with minimal expression in the deep glands (6.5%). MUC6 was strongly expressed in the deep glands (97.8%), variable in the neck glands (19.6%) and absent in the surface epithelium (0%). The pattern of mucin expression in idiopathic ulcer margins was not different from the expression in ulcers associated with H. pylori, NSAIDs, or combined H. pylori and NSAIDs. CD4/CD8 ratio was higher in H. pylori-positive patients (P = 0.009). Idiopathic ulcers are associated with hospitalized patients and have higher bleeding and mortality rates. CONCLUSION: Idiopathic ulcers have a unique clinical profile. Gastric mucin expression in idiopathic gastric ulcers is unchanged compared with H. pylori and/or NSAID-associated ulcers. PMID:22969235

  16. Braf, Kras and Helicobacter pylori epigenetic changes-associated chronic gastritis in Egyptian patients with and without gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Dina; Ahmed, Rasha; Abdalla, Sayed; Fathy, Wael; Eldemery, Ahmed; Elamir, Azza

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to study MLH1 and MGMT methylation status in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis in Egyptian patients with and without gastric cancer. 39 patients were included in our study. They were divided into 2 groups; patients without (group I) and with gastric adenocarcinoma (group II). Patients were subjected to clinical examination, abdominal ultrasound and upper endoscopy for gastric biopsy. Biopsies were subjected to urease test, histological examination, and DNA purification. H. pylori, Braf, Kras, MLH1 and MGMT methylation were assessed by quantitative PCR. DNA sequencing was performed to assess Braf and Kras genes mutation. qPCR of H. pylori was significantly higher in patients with adenocarcinoma (group II) than those without adenocarcinoma (group I); with a p gastritis patients. DNA sequence analysis of Braf (codon 12) and Kras (codon 600) had genes mutation in gastric adenocarcinoma versus chronic gastritis. H. pylori may cause epigenetic changes predisposing the patients to cancer stomach. Estimation of H. pylori by qPCR can be a good predictor to adenocarcinoma. Braf and Kras genes mutation were reveled in gastritis and adenocarcinoma patients.

  17. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases.

  18. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding procedure associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikuniene, Jurate; Staneviciute, Jurate; Adamonis, Kestutis; Serapinas, Danielius

    2014-06-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a special form of adult food allergy when allergic symptoms are elicited when triggering factor such as exercise is added after ingestion of wheat. Besides the molecular characteristics of wheat proteins, the gastric function is decisive for the allergenic potential. Alterations in the gastric milieu are frequently experienced during a lifetime either physiologically or as a result of gastrointestinal pathologies. Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to hypoacidity and enhance the sensitization risk for food allergens in adults. Gastric transit of food proteins and alterations in the gastric secretion can be disturbed after bariatric surgery such as the laparoscopic adjustable gastric binding (LAGB) procedure used commonly as therapy for morbid obesity. We report a case of WDEIA in a 42-year-old man with H. pylori positive gastritis, 2 years after bariatric surgery and no history of allergy previously. Our presented case strongly suggests that H. pylori-associated gastritis and gastric anatomy and functional changes after adjustable gastric banding lead to the alterations in gastric milieu and may contribute to a development of food allergy in previously non-sensitized patients.

  19. The functional interplay of Helicobacter pylori factors with gastric epithelial cells induces a multi-step process in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, Gernot; Backert, Steffen; Wessler, Silja

    2013-10-07

    Infections with the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) can lead to severe gastric diseases ranging from chronic gastritis and ulceration to neoplastic changes in the stomach. Development and progress of H. pylori-associated disorders are determined by multifarious bacterial factors. Many of them interact directly with host cells or require specific receptors, while others enter the host cytoplasm to derail cellular functions. Several adhesins (e.g. BabA, SabA, AlpA/B, or OipA) establish close contact with the gastric epithelium as an important first step in persistent colonization. Soluble H. pylori factors (e.g. urease, VacA, or HtrA) have been suggested to alter cell survival and intercellular adhesions. Via a type IV secretion system (T4SS), H. pylori also translocates the effector cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) and peptidoglycan directly into the host cytoplasm, where cancer- and inflammation-associated signal transduction pathways can be deregulated. Through these manifold possibilities of interaction with host cells, H. pylori interferes with the complex signal transduction networks in its host and mediates a multi-step pathogenesis.

  20. Periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori infection: a community-based study using serology and rapid urease test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, Krishnavilasom J; Nandakumar, Krishnankutty; Shenoy, Kottacherry T; Janam, Presanthila

    2016-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and their associations within a predefined Indian population. A community-based cross-sectional study of 500 selected individuals using a questionnaire, oral examination, rapid urease testing of dental plaque, and serological examination for immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori was carried out. Periodontal disease and H. pylori infection were prevalent in more than 50% of the population. Age, smoking, and diabetic status of the individuals were risk factors for periodontal disease after multivariate analysis, and a lack of proper sewage and waste disposal facilities were found to increase the risk of H. pylori infection. Although there was no association between periodontal disease and H. pylori seropositivity in the community, a highly-significant association was found between periodontal disease and colonization of H. pylori in dental plaque. Because periodontal disease is associated with the increased colonization of H. pylori, new treatment modalities, such as plaque control measures, should be employed for the complete management of H. pylori-associated gastric disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Gastroduodenal artery steal syndrome during liver transplantation: intraoperative diagnosis with Doppler ultrasound and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Seigo; Kadono, Jun; DeFaria, Werviston; Levi, David M; Moon, Jang I; Tzakis, Andreas G; Madariaga, Juan R

    2005-03-01

    Arterial steal syndrome (ASS) after liver transplantation has been reported. ASS causes arterial hypo-perfusion of the graft liver and devastating consequences. However, the diagnosis tends to be delayed. We present the recognized case of a gastroduodenal artery (GDA) steal syndrome that was diagnosed with intraoperative Doppler ultrasound and treated with GDA ligation during the liver transplantation. The patient had variation of hepatic artery anatomy (low bifurcation of the hepatic artery). Graft liver had the common hepatic artery and aberrant left hepatic artery. Doppler ultrasound of the liver was performed after the arterial reconstruction between the donor common hepatic artery and recipient right hepatic artery. It showed low hepatic arterial flow. There is no backflow bleeding from the donor aberrant left hepatic artery stump. After ligating big GDA, hepatic arterial waveform inside the liver drastically improved and strong backflow bleeding was recognized from the donor left aberrant hepatic artery stump. The current case should show the efficacy of intraoperative Doppler ultrasound of the liver on ASS and alert clinician to ligate GDA to prevent ASS if hepatic arterial flows are suboptimal.

  2. The Geographic Variance of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Europe and its Impact on the Incidence of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Nilüfer Özaydın

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Helicobacter pylori was hopeful as this agent was included in the list of ‘preventable- infectious carcinogens’, and many non-treatable gastroduodenal disorders with uncertain causes became treatable infectious diseases. Nevertheless, nowadays frequent antibiotic resistance is observed among H. pylori infections, sometimes as high as 95%. H. pylori is a bacteria that existed for a very long time, which was only recognised in the last 30 years. It can cause a variety of symptoms leading to gastroduodenal disorders from chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal system to non-cardia gastric cancer. It is acquired in the early years of life and infection is commonly lifelong. The accepted primary route of transmission is person-to-person contact because humans are the only known significant reservoir of H. pylori. The target cell of H. pylori is the gastric mucus secreting cell. The prevalence in Europe shows a huge variety with almost all studies showing a decreasing trend. During childhood the highest prevalence was from Turkey (56.6% and the lowest was from Czech Republic (4.8%. Among adults, the overall prevalence was found to be between 18.3% (Denmark and 82.5% (Turkey, with substantial country-to-country variations. The prevalence rate differs by socioeconomic lifestyle characteristics and also genomic structure; it is also higher in less developed countries/populations. While the more commonly used test to determine H. pylori infection is serology, immunoglobulin G by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the urea breath test (UBT, and stool antigen testing are non- invasive tests which are also recommended.

  3. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  5. [Peculiarities of constellation of parental pairs as risk factors and resistance-factors in the formation of gastroduodenal pathology in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychkovs'ka, O L; Hnateĭko, O Z; Kulachkovs'ka, I Iu; Semen, V D

    2014-01-01

    Current study is dedicated to determination of psychosocial factors of predisposition and resistance to the formation of upper gastrointestinal pathology in children. For the examination of parental pairs Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) questionnaire and genealogical method Family Study were used. There were revealed following risk-factors of the formation of gastroduodenal pathology in children: the dominant mother's position; passive and shun father's behavior; protracted conflicts; hidden hostility between the parents; poor support, emotional warmth, and unity in the family; available external control of the family. Described family constellation can promote basic conflict in patients with gastroduodenal pathology by F. Alexander. This could be an indication for the family psychological counselling, which can be regarded as a "reserve" for increasing of the effectiveness of treatment and prevention of gastroduodenal pathology in children.

  6. Rare case of Helicobacter pylori-related gastric ulcer: malignancy or pseudomorphism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Ting; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Lu; Wan, Jun

    2013-03-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen and the most frequent cause of gastric ulcers. There is also a close correlation between the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer. We present the case of a 38-year-old woman referred by her primary care physician for screening positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), which showed a nodular strong accumulation point with standardized uptake value 5.6 in the gastric fundus. Gastroscopy was then performed, and a single arched ulcer, 12 mm in size, was found in the gastric fundus. Histopathological examination of the lesion revealed chronic mucosal inflammation with acute inflammation and H. pylori infection. There was an obvious mitotic phase with widespread lymphoma. Formal anti-H. pylori treatment was carried out. One month later, a gastroscopy showed a single arched ulcer, measuring 10 mm in size in the gastric fundus. Histopathological examination revealed chronic mucosal inflammation with acute inflammation and a very small amount of H. pylori infection. The mitotic phase was 4/10 high power field, with some heterotypes and an obvious nucleolus. Follow-up gastroscopy 2 mo later showed the gastric ulcer in stage S2. The mucosal swelling had markedly improved. The patient remained asymptomatic, and a follow-up PET-CT was performed 6 mo later. The nodular strong accumulation point had disappeared. Follow-up gastroscopy showed no evidence of malignant cancer. H. pylori-associated severe inflammation can lead to neoplastic changes in histiocytes. This underscores the importance of eradicating H. pylori, especially in those with mucosal lesions, and ensuring proper follow-up to prevent or even reverse early gastric cancer.

  7. A changing gastric environment leads to adaptation of lipopolysaccharide variants in Helicobacter pylori populations during colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skoglund

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression.

  8. Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associates with an increased risk of colorectal polyps in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Hassan; Zahaf, Marwah; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Nouraie, Mehdi; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo I; Smoot, Duane T; Lee, Edward; Razjouyan, Hadie; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2014-04-28

    Gastric Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and colorectal polyps are more prevalent in African Americans than in the general population. We aimed to investigate whether gastric H. pylori infection is associated with colorectal polyps in African Americans. Medical records of African Americans, 40 years and older (n = 1256) who underwent bidirectional gastrointestinal endoscopy on the same day were reviewed. H. pylori status was assessed by immunohistochemistry on gastric specimens. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. A subset of serum samples from healthy and polyp-bearing patients (n = 163) were analyzed by ELISA for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA antibodies. The crude and adjusted effect of H. pylori on the risk of colorectal adenoma and polyp were computed by logistic regression models. The prevalence of colorectal polyps and adenomas were 456 (36%) and 300 (24%) respectively. Colorectal polyps were more prevalent in gastric H. pylori infected than non-infected subjects [43% vs. 34%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 1.5 (1.2-1.9), P = 0.001]. Patients with H. pylori-associated chronic active gastritis were at high risk to have adenomas [Unadjusted OR (95% CI): 1.3 (1.0-1.8); P = 0.04]. There was no difference in histopathology, size, or location of polyps with respect to H. pylori status. Gastric H. pylori infection, age, male gender and high risk clinical presentations were independent risk factors for colorectal polyps. Serological testing also revealed a higher prevalence of H. pylori and its toxin Cag-A in polyp patients vs. non polyp patients' sera, although in a non-statistically significant manner. This study showed that current gastric H. pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps in African Americans. Patients with H. pylori induced gastritis may benefit from early screening colonoscopy as a preventative measure for colorectal cancer.

  9. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  10. Helicobacter spp. other than H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2012-09-01

    Significant advances have been made over the last 12 months in the understanding of the biology of non-H. pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Several studies have investigated the association between NHPH and human disease, including Crohn's disease, lithiasis, liver disease, coronary disease, gastritis, and pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers. Novel Helicobacter taxa were identified in new vertebrate hosts, and new methodologies in the fields of identification of Helicobacter spp. and evaluation of antibiotic resistance were described. The genome of the first human-derived gastric NHPH strain (Helicobacter bizzozeronii CIII-1) was sequenced, and several studies elucidated functions of different genes in NHPH. A number of important investigations regarding pathogenesis and immunopathobiology of NHPH infections have been published including the description of a new urease in Helicobacter mustelae. Finally, the effects of the gut microbiota and probiotics on NHPH infections were investigated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. [Mucosal changes in the periulcer zone and endocrine system in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, M V

    2014-07-01

    Examination of patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage, was conducted, using clinical, microbiological, immunohistochemical methods and chromatomassspectrography. Enhanced activity of inducible NO-synthase, contamination of periulcer zone with microorganisms Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus beta-haemoliticus, enhancement of contents of catecholamines and serotonin in the blood serum were revealed. These changes are most expressed in severe blood loss, unstable local endoscopic hemostasis, high risk of a recurrent hemorrhage occurrence. The data obtained permit to prognosticate severity of a pathologic process course and to improve the treatment programe.

  12. Predictor of Severe Gastroduodenal Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Abdominopelvic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mskim@kcch.re.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul Koo; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Sang Yeob; Lee, Kyung-Nam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Han [CyberKnife Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Chul Ju; Yang, Ki Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Bum [Department of General Surgery, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the predictors for the development of severe gastroduodenal toxicity (GDT) in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2011, 202 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies were treated with curative-intent SBRT. Among these patients, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 40 patients with the eligibility criteria as follows: 3 fractionations, follow-up period {>=}1 year, absence of previous radiation therapy (RT) history or combination of external-beam RT and the presence of gastroduodenum (GD) that received a dose higher than 20% of prescribed dose. The median SBRT dose was 45 Gy (range, 33-60 Gy) with 3 fractions. We analyzed the clinical and dosimetric parameters, including multiple dose-volume histogram endpoints: V{sub 20} (volume of GD that received 20 Gy), V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, and D{sub max} (the maximum point dose). The grade of GDT was defined by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.0, and GDT {>=}grade 3 was defined as severe GDT. Results: The median time to the development of severe GDT was 6 months (range, 3-12 months). Severe GDT was found in 6 patients (15%). D{sub max} was the best dosimetric predictor for severe GDT. D{sub max} of 35 Gy and 38 Gy were respectively associated with a 5% and 10% probability of the development of severe GDT. A history of ulcer before SBRT was the best clinical predictor on univariate analysis (P=.0001). Conclusions: We suggest that D{sub max} is a valuable predictor of severe GDT after SBRT using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. A history of ulcer before SBRT should be carefully considered as a clinical predictor, especially in patients who receive a high dose to GD.

  13. Predictive factors for gastroduodenal toxicity based on endoscopy following radiotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, H. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Health Sciences and Technology; Oh, D.; Park, H.C.; Han, Y.; Lim, D.H. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kang, S.W. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiologic Science; Paik, S.W. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to determine predictive factors for gastroduodenal (GD) toxicity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Patients and methods: A total of 90 HCC patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) before and after RT were enrolled. RT was delivered as 30-50 Gy (median 37.5 Gy) in 2-5 Gy (median 3.5 Gy) per fraction. All endoscopic findings were reviewed and GD toxicities related to RT were graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The predictive factors for the {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity were investigated. Results: Endoscopic findings showed erosive gastritis in 14 patients (16 %), gastric ulcers in 8 patients (9 %), erosive duodenitis in 15 patients (17 %), and duodenal ulcers in 14 patients (16 %). Grade 2 toxicity developed in 19 patients (21 %) and grade 3 toxicity developed in 8 patients (9 %). V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum (volume receiving a RT dose of more than x Gy) were the most predictive factors for {>=} grade 2 toxicity. The gastric toxicity rate at 6 months was 2.9 % for V{sub 25} {<=} 6.3 % and 57.1 % for V{sub 25} > 6.3 %. The duodenal toxicity rate at 6 months was 9.4 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 % and 45.9 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 %. By multivariate analysis including the clinical factors, V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum were the significant factors. Conclusion: EGD revealed that GD toxicity is common following RT for HCC. V{sub 25} for the stomach and V{sub 35} for the duodenum were the significant factors to predict {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity. (orig.)

  14. An Assessment of Radiologically Inserted Transoral and Transgastric Gastroduodenal Stents to Treat Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bethany H. T., E-mail: bmiller@doctors.org.uk [Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Preston Hospital, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Ewen A., E-mail: Eagriffiths@doctors.org.uk [The New Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (United Kingdom); Pursnani, Kishore G., E-mail: Kish.Pursnani@lthtr.nhs.uk; Ward, Jeremy B., E-mail: Jeremy.Ward@lthtr.nhs.uk [Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Preston Hospital, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery (United Kingdom); Stockwell, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.Stockwell@lthtr.nhs.uk [Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Chorley and South Ribble Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionSelf-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are used to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and are useful in patients with limited life expectancy or severe medical comorbidity, which would preclude surgery. Stenting can be performed transorally or by a percutaneous transgastric technique. Our goal was to review the outcome of patients who underwent radiological SEMS insertion performed by a single consultant interventional radiologist. Methods: Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database held by one consultant radiologist. Data were retrieved from radiological reports, multidisciplinary team meetings, and the patients' case notes. Univariate survival analysis was performed. Results: Between December 2000 and January 2011, 100 patients (63 males, 37 females) had 110 gastroduodenal stenting procedures. Median age was 73 (range 39-89) years. SEMS were inserted transorally (n = 66) or transgastrically (n = 44). Site of obstruction was the stomach (n = 37), duodenum (n = 50), gastric pull-up (n = 10), or gastroenterostomy (n = 13). Seven patients required biliary stents. Technical success was 86.4 %: 83.3 % for transoral insertion, 90.9 % for transgastric insertion. Eleven patients developed complications. Median GOO severity score: 1 pre-stenting, 2 post-stenting (p = 0.0001). Median survival was 54 (range 1-624) days. Post-stenting GOO severity score was predictive of survival (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The technical success rate for insertion of palliative SEMS is high. Insertional technique can be tailored to the individual depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is possible to access the stomach percutaneously. Patients who have successful stenting and return to eating a soft/normal diet have a statistically significant increase in survival.

  15. Correction of Hypoxia and Free Radical Oxidation Processes in Gastroduodenal Hemorrhages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Morgunov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was to study the clinical efficacy of the substrate antihypoxant-antioxidant Reamberin used in the correction of tissue hypoxia and free radical oxidation (FRO in patients with severe blood loss of ulcerous etiology. The paper presents the results of the investigation of Reamberin used in the therapy of posthemorrhagic hypoxia, by simultaneously evaluating metabolism and the parameters of lipid peroxidation (LPO and the antioxidative system (AOS in patients with ulcerative gastroduodenal hemorrhage (UGDH.Materials and methods. Thirty-six patients with UGDH with a circulating blood volume (CBV deficit of 30—40% and a globular volume of 50—60% were examined. Systemic hemodynamics was examined by the integral body theography method by means of a Diamant rheoanalyzer. The values of blood oxygen-transport function were determined and calculated. For rapid expression and evaluation of the summary state of FRO, a procedure for the recording of activated H2O2 chemiluminescence was used in the presence of Fe2+. Metabolic disturbances were judged from the concentration of lactate and glucose.Results. Acute blood loss of ulcerous etiology has been found to cause significant systemic hemodynamic and microcirculatory disorders and impairments of metabolism, oxygen balance, and tissue perfusion and to intensify FRO and LPO processes, and the use of 1.5% Reamberin in a volume of 800 ml/day substantially reduces the degree of specific cell metabolic disturbances in critical conditions, such as tissue hypoxia, mitochondrial dysfunction, FRO activation, LPO-AOS imbalance.Conclusion. Inclusion of Reamberin in the intensive care of acute blood loss diminishes the manifestations of tissue hypoxia and improves oxygen delivery and consumption. The agent activates the antioxidative system, inhibits LPO processes in the ischemic tissues, and reduces the severity of pathological effects of hypoxia during reperfusion and reoxygenation. 

  16. A case of an unruptured hepatic aneurysm on the common hepatic artery at the junction of the gastroduodenal and proper hepatic arteries treated with transcatheter arterial embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yusuke; Hirooka, Masashi; Koizumi, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Takao; Yoshida, Osamu; Tokumoto, Yoshio; Takeshita, Eiji; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic aneurysms are rare, but can prove fatal once they rupture. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) is performed as a prophylactic treatment. The position of the aneurysm determines the degree of difficulty of TAE. Maintaining blood flow to the liver can become difficult, particularly when the aneurysm is at an arterial junction. The patient was a 72-year-old man diagnosed with a hepatic aneurysm. The aneurysm was situated on the common hepatic artery at the junction of the gastroduodenal and proper hepatic arteries. TAE was performed with framing, followed by coil embolization. Blood flow to the liver was maintained via the gastroduodenal artery. Appropriate framing is important for safe and efficient TAE.

  17. The Role of Bismuth in the Treatment of Gastroduodenal Pathology (Literature Review and Own Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the history of colloidal bismuth subcitrate and considers the basic mechanisms of its effects on the gastric mucosa, both cytoprotective and anti-helicobacter. The recent data of the worldwide researches are given on the use of the bismuth subcitrate as a component of antibacterial therapy in order to improve the effectiveness of the eradication, especially under the resistance to the basic drugs. The results of own researches are also shown, they are dedicated to the dynamics of structural adjustment of the gastric mucosa in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis for 3 years after the eradication of H.pylori. The use of first-line therapy with the addition of the drug De-Nol allowed to achieve eradication in 94.3 % of patients and positive microstructural changes of the gastric mucosa.

  18. Short report: evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication with bismuth sucralfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijers, M. H.; Noach, L. A.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    In a pilot study we have evaluated the clinical efficacy of bismuth sucralfate to eradicate H. pylori. Ten consecutive patients with chronic dyspepsia and H. pylori associated gastritis were treated with bismuth sucralfate (220 mg bismuth per tablet, 4 tablets per day for 4 weeks). If a 14C urea

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take......A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  20. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ‑9 years and in the 10‑19 years age group respectively.[6] There are many other etiological. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among. Patients Undergoing Upper Gastrointestinal. Endoscopy in a Medical College Hospital in Kerala,.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    ..., Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases...

  3. Doença de Crohn gastroduodenal ¾ relato de quatro casos e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABRAHÃO Jr Luiz João

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Racional -- A doença de Crohn pode acometer todo o tubo digestivo, porém o envolvimento gastroduodenal é classicamente descrito como raro (0,5% a 13%. Objetivos - Descrever os achados clínicos, radiológicos, endoscópicos e o tratamento de quatro pacientes com doença de de Crohn gastroduodenal e rever a literatura. Pacientes e Métodos - Quatro pacientes (um homem de 24 anos e três mulheres de 37, 66 e 74 anos com epigastralgia, emagrecimento e febre baixa foram acompanhados nos hospitais das Universidades Federais do Rio de Janeiro e Fluminense. Diarréia intermitente e artralgia/artrite estavam presentes em dois e uma paciente foi operada de urgência por síndrome de obstrução pilórica. Exames laboratoriais revelaram anemia em uma das pacientes, sendo normais nos demais. Os estudos baritados revelaram ulcerações aftóides no estômago e duodeno, assim como ulcerações em íleo terminal e deformidades em ambos. Os achados endoscópicos compreenderam úlceras aftóides e serpiginosas e lesões polipóides no antro gástrico e úlceras geográficas em duodeno. Colonoscopia foi realizada em dois pacientes, revelando ileíte ulcerada em um e pancolite ulcerada em outro. O exame histopatológico revelou processo inflamatório crônico inespecífico sem granulomas, sendo excluídas outras causas de doença granulomatosa gástrica. Instituído tratamento com prednisona e inibidores de bomba de prótons, com remissão da doença em dois pacientes e evolução para síndrome de estenose pilórica em um (submetido a gastroenteroanastomose. Conclusão - A doença de Crohn gastroduodenal possui características clínicas, terapêuticas e prognósticas distintas. O avanço da endoscopia digestiva e a adoção de novos critérios para o diagnóstico histopatológico tem demonstrado incidência maior (17 a 75% que a previamente relatada.

  4. Efficacy of Levofloxacin-Based Third-Line Therapy for the Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Song, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jae Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Han, Jae Pil; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Sun Moon; Chung, Il-Kwon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Heung Up; Lee, Joongyub; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The resistance rate of Helicobacter pylori is gradually increasing. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication in peptic ulcer disease. Methods Between 2002 and 2014, 110 patients in 14 medical centers received levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer disease. Of these, 88 were included in the study; 21 were excluded because of lack of follow-up and one was excluded for poor compliance. Their eradication rates, treatment regimens and durations, and types of peptic ulcers were analyzed. Results The overall eradiation rate was 71.6%. The adherence rate was 80.0%. All except one received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, and levofloxacin. One received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, and clarithromycin, and the eradication was successful. Thirty-one were administered the therapy for 7 days, 25 for 10 days, and 32 for 14 days. No significant differences were observed in the eradication rates between the three groups (7-days, 80.6% vs 10-days, 64.0% vs 14-days, 68.8%, p=0.353). Additionally, no differences were found in the eradiation rates according to the type of peptic ulcer (gastric ulcer, 73.2% vs duodenal/gastroduodenal ulcer, 68.8%, p=0.655). Conclusions Levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication showed efficacy similar to that of previously reported first/second-line therapies. PMID:27609487

  5. Clarithromycin versus metronidazole in first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication. Prospective randomized study of 85 Tunisian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmari, Hichem; Bdioui, Fethia; Bouhlel, Wided; Melki, Wissem; Hellara, Olfa; Ben Chaabane, Nabil; Safer, Leila; Zakhama, Abdelfettah; Saffar, Hamouda

    2012-01-01

    Although primary resistance to metronidazole remains high (56,8%), it is more widely used than clarithromycin as a firstline Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment in the common Tunisian practice. To compare the eradication rate in two protocols including clarithromycin versus metronidazole in Tunisian adults. From July 2005 to December 2007, 85 patients aged 18 to 75 years presenting with gastro-duodenal lesions with H. pylori infection and requiring its eradication were included in the study. They were randomized to receive alternatively a seven-day triple therapy including: Omeprazole + Amoxicillin + Clarithromycin (OAC group) or Metronidazole (OAM group) twice a day. A second endoscopy with new biopsies was carried out 6 weeks after treatment to control eradication. Eighty five patients finished the protocol. The OAC and OAM groups included 46 and 39 patients respectively. They were comparable with respect to age, gender, clinical presentation and initial lesions. The total eradication rate was 60%. It was significantly higher in the clarithromycin group (69.6%) than in the metronidazole group (48.7%): p < 0.05. Clarithromycin is more effective than metronidazole in H. pylori eradication. It should be made available in our hospital's nomenclature. This would prevent iterative eradication courses and probably reduce treatment cost.

  6. Efficacy of Levofloxacin-Based Third-Line Therapy for the Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Peptic Ulcer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Song, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jae Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Han, Jae Pil; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Sun Moon; Chung, Il-Kwon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Heung Up; Lee, Joongyub; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2017-03-15

    The resistance rate of Helicobacter pylori is gradually increasing. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication in peptic ulcer disease. Between 2002 and 2014, 110 patients in 14 medical centers received levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication therapy for peptic ulcer disease. Of these, 88 were included in the study; 21 were excluded because of lack of follow-up and one was excluded for poor compliance. Their eradication rates, treatment regimens and durations, and types of peptic ulcers were analyzed. The overall eradiation rate was 71.6%. The adherence rate was 80.0%. All except one received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, and levofloxacin. One received a proton-pump inhibitor, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, and clarithromycin, and the eradication was successful. Thirty-one were administered the therapy for 7 days, 25 for 10 days, and 32 for 14 days. No significant differences were observed in the eradication rates between the three groups (7-days, 80.6% vs 10-days, 64.0% vs 14-days, 68.8%, p=0.353). Additionally, no differences were found in the eradiation rates according to the type of peptic ulcer (gastric ulcer, 73.2% vs duodenal/gastroduodenal ulcer, 68.8%, p=0.655). Levofloxacin-based third-line H. pylori eradication showed efficacy similar to that of previously reported first/second-line therapies.

  7. Helicobacter pylori VacA toxin/subunit p34: targeting of an anion channel to the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazyna Domańska

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The vacuolating toxin VacA, released by Helicobacter pylori, is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers. VacA contains two subunits: The p58 subunit mediates entry into target cells, and the p34 subunit mediates targeting to mitochondria and is essential for toxicity. In this study we found that targeting to mitochondria is dependent on a unique signal sequence of 32 uncharged amino acid residues at the p34 N-terminus. Mitochondrial import of p34 is mediated by the import receptor Tom20 and the import channel of the outer membrane TOM complex, leading to insertion of p34 into the mitochondrial inner membrane. p34 assembles in homo-hexamers of extraordinary high stability. CD spectra of the purified protein indicate a content of >40% beta-strands, similar to pore-forming beta-barrel proteins. p34 forms an anion channel with a conductivity of about 12 pS in 1.5 M KCl buffer. Oligomerization and channel formation are independent both of the 32 uncharged N-terminal residues and of the p58 subunit of the toxin. The conductivity is efficiently blocked by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylaminobenzoic acid (NPPB, a reagent known to inhibit VacA-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that p34 essentially acts as a small pore-forming toxin, targeted to the mitochondrial inner membrane by a special hydrophobic N-terminal signal.

  8. The Development of Urease Inhibitors: What Opportunities Exist for Better Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif T. S. Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomach infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori causes severe gastroduodenal diseases in a large number of patients worldwide. The H. pylori infection breaks up in early childhood, persists lifelong if not treated, and is associated with chronic gastritis and an increased risk of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In recent years, the problem of drug-resistant strains has become a global concern that makes the treatment more complicated and the infection persistent at higher levels when the antibiotic treatment is stopped. Such problems have led to the development of new strategies to eradicate an H. pylori infection. Currently, one of the most important strategies for the treatment of H. pylori infection is the use of urease inhibitors. Despite the fact that large numbers of molecules have been shown to exert potent inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease, most of them were prevented from being used in vivo and in clinical trials due to their hydrolytic instability, toxicity, and appearance of undesirable side effects. Therefore, it is crucial to focus attention on the available opportunities for the development of urease inhibitors with suitable pharmacokinetics, high hydrolytic stability, and free toxicological profiles. In this commentary, we aim to afford an outline on the current status of the use of urease inhibitors in the treatment of an H. pylori infection, and to discuss the possibility of their development as effective drugs in clinical trials.

  9. Simultaneous determination of triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori in human plasma by reversed phase chromatography with online wavelength switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameh; Atia, Noha N.

    2015-02-01

    The infection of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori (HP) is an essential cofactor in the aetiology of gastroduodenal ulcer and gastric carcinoma. Because of the bacterial resistance, combination therapy containing omeprazole (OME), tinidazole (TNZ) and clarithromycin (CLA) is commonly used for eradication of HP. However, the simultaneous determination of the triple therapy in human plasma was not reported. A simple, reproducible, and selective HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the triple therapy mixture used for management of HP infections in human plasma. An HPLC procedure based on a liquid-liquid extraction, enrichment of the analytes and subsequent reversed-phase chromatography with UV detection was used. To enable sensitive and selective detection, the method involved the use of online wavelength switching detection, with two different detection wavelengths; 280 nm for detection of OME and TNZ and 210 nm for detection of CLA. Separations were performed on C18 analytical column with acetonitrile-10 mM phosphate buffer of pH = 3.0 at flow rate of 1.0 mL min-1. The linear ranges in human plasma were 0.05-10 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficients >0.9990. The detection limits in human plasma were 0.02-0.07 μg mL-1. Validation parameters were assessed in compliance with US-FDA guidelines. The method proved to be valuable for the therapeutic drug monitoring after oral administration of triple therapy tablets.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Induces Serine Phosphorylation of EGFR via Novel TAK1-p38 Activation Pathway in an HB-EGF-Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Refaat, Alaa; Zhou, Yue; Sualeh Muhammad, Jibran; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Saiki, Ikuo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of Helicobacter pylori with gastric epithelial cells can result in the activation of transcription factor NF-κB via TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). In this study, we have demonstrated the role of H. pylori in the activation of EGFR via TAK1-mediated phosphorylation of p38. Gastric epithelial AGS or MKN-45 cells were co-cultured with wild-type or cagA(-) H. pylori strains. H. pylori was added to the cells, and the activation of EGFR, p65 (NF-κB) subunit, p38, ERK, and TAK1 was examined by Western blotting. Infected cells were pretreated with or without ligands, chemical inhibitors, anti-HB-EGF antibody, and siRNAs to evaluate the effects on phosphorylation of various EGFR residues. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were performed to detect the internalization of EGFR. Incubating cells with wild-type and CagA(-) H. pylori strains resulted in the rapid and transient phosphorylation of serine residues of EGFR. RNAi experiments using siRNA against TAK1 and p38 pathways blocked the phosphorylation of serine residue. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry revealed that EGFR was internalized in H. pylori-infected cells after EGFR phosphorylation in a p38-dependent manner. In contrast, pretreatment with gefitinib and anti-HB-EGF antibody did not block both the phosphorylation and internalization of EGFR. Helicobacter pylori induces internalization of EGFR via novel TAK1-p38-serine activation pathway which is independent of HB-EGF. The interaction between TAK1 and EGFR in H. pylori-infected cells might open new dimensions in understanding H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Preparation of epigallocatechin gallate-loaded nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Feng, Chun-Lung; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Chen, Hao-Yun

    2014-08-01

    A variety of approaches have been proposed for overcoming the unpleasant side effects associated with antibiotics treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections. Research has shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major ingredient in green tea, has antibacterial activity for antiurease activity against H. pylori. Oral EGCG is not good because of its digestive instability and the fact that it often cannot reach the targeted site of antibacterial activity. To localize EGCG to H. pylori infection site, this study developed a fucose-chitosan/gelatin nanoparticle to encapsulate EGCG at the target and make direct contact with the region of microorganisms on the gastric epithelium. Analysis of a simulated gastrointestinal medium indicated that the proposed in vitro nanocarrier system effectively controls the release of EGCG, which interacts directly with the intercellular space at the site of H. pylori infection. Meanwhile, results of in vivo clearance assays indicated that our prepared fucose-chitosan/gelatin/EGCG nanoparticles had a significantly greater H. pylori clearance effect and more effectively reduced H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in the gastric-infected mouse model than the EGCG solution alone.

  12. Synthesis of 1,2,3-Triazolo[4,5-h]quinolone Derivatives with Novel Anti-Microbial Properties against Metronidazole Resistant Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abu-Sini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer, and the development of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. Treatment and eradication of H. pylori infection can prevent relapse and accelerate the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers as well as regression of malignancy. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates of H. pylori, alternative approaches using newly discovered antimicrobial agents in combination with the standard antibiotic regimens for the treatment of H. pylori are of major importance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of newly synthesized 8-amino 7-substituted fluoroquinolone and their correspondent cyclized triazolo derivatives when either alone or combined with metronidazole against metronidazole-resistant H. pylori. Based on standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and checkerboard titration assay, all of the tested compounds showed interesting antimicrobial activity against 12 clinical strains of H. pylori, with best in vitro effect for compounds 4b and 4c. Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC mean values showed synergistic pattern in all compounds of Group 5. In addition, additive activities of some of the tested compounds of Group 4 were observed when combined with metronidazole. In contrast, the tested compounds showed no significant urease inhibition activity. These results support the potential of new fluoroquinolone derivatives to be useful in combination with anti-H. pylori drugs in the management of H. pylori-associated diseases.

  13. Synthesis of 1,2,3-Triazolo[4,5-h]quinolone Derivatives with Novel Anti-Microbial Properties against Metronidazole Resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Sini, Mohammad; Mayyas, Amal; Al-Karablieh, Nehaya; Darwish, Rula; Al-Hiari, Yusuf; Aburjai, Talal; Arabiyat, Shereen; Abu-Qatouseh, Luay

    2017-05-20

    Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer, and the development of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Treatment and eradication of H. pylori infection can prevent relapse and accelerate the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers as well as regression of malignancy. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates of H. pylori, alternative approaches using newly discovered antimicrobial agents in combination with the standard antibiotic regimens for the treatment of H. pylori are of major importance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of newly synthesized 8-amino 7-substituted fluoroquinolone and their correspondent cyclized triazolo derivatives when either alone or combined with metronidazole against metronidazole-resistant H. pylori. Based on standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and checkerboard titration assay, all of the tested compounds showed interesting antimicrobial activity against 12 clinical strains of H. pylori, with best in vitro effect for compounds 4b and 4c. Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) mean values showed synergistic pattern in all compounds of Group 5. In addition, additive activities of some of the tested compounds of Group 4 were observed when combined with metronidazole. In contrast, the tested compounds showed no significant urease inhibition activity. These results support the potential of new fluoroquinolone derivatives to be useful in combination with anti-H. pylori drugs in the management of H. pylori-associated diseases.

  14. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori effects of medicinal mushroom extracts, with special emphasis on the Lion's Mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaodong; Tan, Qi; Liu, Ruina; Yu, Kangying; Li, Pingzuo; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Although the medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus is used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine to treat chronic superficial gastritis, the underlining pharmaceutical mechanism is yet to be fully understood. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of extracts prepared from the fruiting bodies of 14 mushroom species (H. erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, Cordyceps militaris, Pleurotus eryngii, P. ostreatus, Agrocybe aegerita, Lentinus edodes, Agaricus brasiliensis, A. bisporus, Coprinus comatus, Grifola frondosa, Phellinus igniarius, Flammulina velutipes, and Hypsizygus marmoreus) were determined against Helicobacter pylori using laboratory strains of ATCC 43504 and SS1 as well as 9 clinical isolates via an in vitro microplate agar diffusion assay. Ethanol extracts (EEs) of 12 mushrooms inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro, with MIC values 10 mg/mL). MIC values of ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of H. erinaceus against 9 clinical isolates of H. pylori ranged between 62.5 and 250 µg/mL. The bacteriostatic activity of EAFs was found to be concentration-dependant, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values for H. pylori ATCC 43504 were 73.0 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. The direct inhibitory effect of EEs and EAFs of H. erinaceus against H. pylori could be another pharmaceutical mechanism of medicinal mushrooms-besides the immunomodulating effect of polysaccharides, suggested previously-in the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal disorders. Further research to identify the active component(s) is currently undertaking in our laboratory.

  15. Synergistic upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils by a high-salt diet and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, T; Tsukamoto, T; Hirano, N; Mizoshita, T; Kato, S; Takasu, S; Ban, H; Tatematsu, M

    2008-05-01

    The intake of salt and salty food is known as a risk factor for gastric cancer. We have previously demonstrated that a high-salt diet dose-dependently enhances Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastritis and stomach carcinogenesis in Mongolian gerbils. In this study, we focused on the influence of excessive salt intake on the expression of inflammatory mediators involved in progression of H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis. A total of 45 stomach samples from Mongolian gerbils were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The animals were infected with H. pylori and fed basal (0.32%) or a high-salt (10%) diet, and sacrificed after 40 weeks. Proliferative activity and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in gastric mucosa were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected gerbils. The additional high-salt diet significantly up-regulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and COX-2 in H. pylori-infected groups (Pdiet on the expression of iNOS (Pdiet works synergistically with H. pylori infection to enhance iNOS and COX-2 expression in the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils, and support the hypothesis that excessive salt intake may be associated with progression of H. pylori-induced gastritis.

  16. The Ameliorating Effect of Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 on Functional Dyspepsia in Helicobacter pylori-Uninfected Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Toshihiro; Takagi, Atsushi; Uemura, Naomi; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Sekino, Hisakuni; Kawashima, Akihiro; Uchida, Masayuki; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics appear to improve Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia via an inhibitory effect on H. pylori; however, uncertainty exists regarding their effects in H. pylori-uninfected individuals. We evaluated the efficacy of Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 (L. gasseri OLL2716) on H. pylori-uninfected individuals with functional dyspepsia (FD). A double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, randomized, controlled trial was performed. Participants were randomly assigned to ingest L. gasseri OLL2716-containing yogurt (L. gasseri OLL2716 group) or L. gasseri OLL2716-free yogurt (placebo group) for 12 weeks. Participants completed questionnaires that dealt with a global assessment as well as symptom severity. The per-protocol (PP) population was evaluated for efficacy in accordance with a plan prepared beforehand. Randomization was performed on 116 individuals; the PP population consisted of 106 individuals (mean age 42.8 ± 9.0). The impressions regarding the overall effect on gastric symptoms were more positive in the L. gasseri OLL2716 group compared to that in the placebo group (statistical trend; p = 0.073). The elimination rate for major FD symptoms was 17.3 and 35.3% in the placebo and L. gasseri OLL2716 groups respectively (p = 0.048). L. gasseri OLL2716 has beneficial effects on FD without H. pylori involvement. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Helicobacter Infection Decreases Reproductive Performance of IL10-deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Julie M; Vanderford, Deborah A; Chichlowski, Maciej; Myles, Matthew H; Hale, Laura P

    2008-01-01

    Infections with a variety of Helicobacter species have been documented in rodent research facilities, with variable effects on rodent health. Helicobacter typhlonius has been reported to cause enteric disease in immunodeficient and IL10−/− mice, whereas H. rodentium has only been reported to cause disease in immunodeficient mice coinfected with other Helicobacter species. The effect of Helicobacter infections on murine reproduction has not been well studied. The reproductive performance of C5...

  18. Differences in Genome Content among Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Patients with Gastritis, Duodenal Ulcer, or Gastric Cancer Reveal Novel Disease-Associated Genes▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-González, Carolina; Salama, Nina R.; Burgeño-Ferreira, Juan; Ponce-Castañeda, Veronica; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori establishes a chronic infection in the human stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer, and more severe diseases are associated with virulence genes such as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The aim of this work was to study gene content differences among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in a Mexican-Mestizo patient population. H. pylori isolates from 10 patients with nonatrophic gastritis, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 9 patients with gastric cancer were studied. Multiple isolates from the same patient were analyzed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and strains with unique patterns were tested using whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We studied 42 isolates and found 1,319 genes present in all isolates, while 341 (20.5%) were variable genes. Among the variable genes, 127 (37%) were distributed within plasticity zones (PZs). The overall number of variable genes present in a given isolate was significantly lower for gastric cancer isolates. Thirty genes were significantly associated with nonatrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer, 14 (46.6%) of which were within PZs and the cag PAI. Two genes (HP0674 and JHP0940) were absent in all gastric cancer isolates. Many of the disease-associated genes outside the PZs formed clusters, and some of these genes are regulated in response to acid or other environmental conditions. Validation of candidate genes identified by aCGH in a second patient cohort allowed the identification of novel H. pylori genes associated with gastric cancer or duodenal ulcer. These disease-associated genes may serve as biomarkers of the risk for severe gastroduodenal diseases. PMID:19237517

  19. Рrediction risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children and adolescents with chronic gastroduodenal pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Boiarskа

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the modern literature gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is multifactorial illness. The main risk factors of its development are acid-peptic factor, Н.pylori, the autonomic nervous system dysfunction, rapid growth, heredity, burdened perinatal history, dysplasia of connective tissue structures (DCTS, environmental factors and lifestyle. Among the contradictory questions is intercurrent factors influence on the development and course of the disease. Aim of the work. To determine the risk factors for GERD in children and adolescents with chronic gastroduodenal pathology with the creation of mathematical forecasting model of the disease development and course. Materials and methods. The study involved 138 children with chronic gastroduodenal pathology who were treated inZaporozhyeCityPediatricHospital #5, aged 9 to 17 years. The main group consisted of 97 children with GERD (Group 1 - 46 children with GERD with esophagitis, Group 2 - GERD without esophagitis, comparison group comprised 41 children without clinical and endoscopic manifestations of the esophagus pathology. The following methods were conducted: clinical and medical history, instrumental - fibroesophagogastroduodenoscopy, intragastric pH-metry, ambulatory around-the clock pH monitoring in the esophagus, functional - Holter cardiac monitoring, respiratory HELIK urease test, mathematics and statistics - variational statistics, correlation analysis, binary logistic regression and multivariate regression analysis. Study results. According to the clinical and anamnestic analysis identified risk factors for GERD in children with chronic gastroduodenal pathology: hereditary predisposition (RR=1,79(1,27-2,66, р<0,05, abnormal pregnancy (ВР=1,62(1,31-1,81, р<0,05, early artificial feeding (RR = 1.31 (1,03-1,6, р<0,05, the presence of neurological symptoms during the first year life (RR = 1,32 (1,01-1,51, p <0.05, impaired diet (RR = 1,92 (1,24-2,82, p <0

  20. [Lung edema and erosive gastroduodenitis as a sequela of inappropriate use of an adrenaline dose aerosol after wasp sting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balda, B R; Ludwig, A

    1997-03-01

    Epinephrine (adrenaline) is an important drug in the treatment of severe anaphylactic reactions. Along with other drugs such as H1-antihistamines and glucocorticosteroids, it is found in every first aid kit for at-risk individuals, such as those who are allergic to insect stings. Subcutaneous or intramuscular injections if carried out by an untrained individual or the patient himself might give rise to potential problems. Therefore, it is common to prescribe epinephrine pressure aerosol as a safer alternative. If epinephrine aerosol is overused, it can cause serious problems. A patient developed by self-medication following a wasp sting lung edema as well as an erosive gastroduodenitis. She consumed two aerosol vials each of which contained about 73 mg of adrenaline. In order to avoid such incidents it is crucial that every doctor provides his or her patient with sufficient oral and written information regarding the correct use fo epinephrine inhalers.

  1. Úlcera gastroduodenal en caldas, comentarios a una estadística de cinco años

    OpenAIRE

    Campo Posada, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Revisión de las teorías etiopatogénicas de la úlcera gastroduodenal: 1a. Teoría gástrica; 2a. Teoría hiperclorhídrica; 3a. Teoría funcional; 4a. Teoría infecciosa; 5a. Teoría neurovegetativa; 6a. Teoría vascular; 7a. Teoría constitucional; 8a. Teoría de la carencia de aminoácidos; 9a. Teoría alérgia. Casos. Complicaciones. Tratamiento. Síntomas. Úlcera gástrica. Úlceras cancerizadas.

  2. Effects of oral 3% hydrogen peroxide used as an emetic on the gastroduodenal mucosa of healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwecki, Alicia H; Book, Bradley P; Lewis, Kristin M; Estep, J Scot; Hagan, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    To characterize the extent of mucosal injury on the upper gastrointestinal tract following oral administration of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) to induce emesis in normal dogs. Prospective clinical study. Specialty referral hospital. Seven staff-owned, healthy, adult dogs. Six dogs were assigned to the H2 O2 group and 1 dog was assigned as the apomorphine control. Dogs were anesthetized for gastroduodenoscopy with gross inspection and gastroduodenal biopsies at time 0 and 4 hours, 24 hours, 1 week, and 2 weeks following administration of oral 3% H2 O2 or subconjunctival apomorphine. Gross esophageal, gastric, and duodenal mucosal lesion scoring was performed by 2 blinded, experienced scorers. Biopsy samples were evaluated histologically by a veterinary pathologist. Grade I esophagitis was noted in 2 dogs at 4 hours and in 1 dog at 2 weeks, while grade III esophagitis was observed in 1 dog 1 week following H2 O2 administration. At 4 hours, gastric mucosal lesions were visualized in all dogs, and lesions worsened by 24 hours. Mild to moderate duodenal mucosal lesions were visualized up to 24 hours after administration. Histopathology identified the most severe gastric lesions at 4 hours as hemorrhage; at 24 hours as degeneration, necrosis, and mucosal edema; and at 1 week as inflammation. By 2 weeks, most visual and histopathologic lesions were resolved. No histopathologic lesions were identified at any time point in the dog administered apomorphine. Significant visual and histopathologic gastric lesions occurred following administration of 3% H2 O2 in all dogs. Less severe visual duodenal lesions were identified. As compared to H2 O2 dogs, minimal gross gastroduodenal lesions and normal histopathology were identified in the apomorphine control. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  3. The Relationship between Oral Hygiene Index and Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Positivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Önder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Helicobacter pylori (HP is a bacterial patho­gen that leads to gastroduodenal inflammation, gastric and duodenal ulcer and atrophic gastritis. Colonization of bacteria can be shown by using rapid-urease test during endoscopy. There are conflicting data about the route of transmission and reservoir. It’s thought to be transmitted primarily by oral route. Many studies showed results sup­porting that the presence of bacteria in dental plaques has effects on gastric colonization and eradication. There are data about the potential inhibitory effect of oral flora on HP. We aimed to analyze the association of simplified oral hygiene index -a possible representation of a healthy oral flora- with HP positivity. Methods: Patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy for symptoms of dyspepsia were as­sessed by a dentist for the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI. Patients were classified as good, poor and bad groups based on oral hygiene index scale. Pre-pyloric biopsy materials were assessed using rapid-urease test. Oral hygiene indexes were analyzed retrospectively, groups were compared for HP positivity. Results: 66 patients (30 females, 45.5% were included. Mean age of patients was 34.17±14.7 years. 11 (16.7%, 29 (43.9% and 26 (39.4% patients were classified as in good, poor and bad hygiene index groups, respectively. In patients with good OHI gastric HP positivity was less frequent. Conclusion: Decreased frequency in gastric HP may be observed with maintaining an ideal oral hygiene.

  4. MONITORING OF CASES WITH A CHRONIC PERSISTENT INFECTION WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miglena Stamboliyska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The patients with persistent forms of Helicobacter pylori (HP infection are refractory to eradication treatment. They receive unsuccessful therapies, experience frequent recurrences and re-infections. One of the main reasons for the development of persistent forms is an inadequate and insufficient treatment. The persistent forms of HP infection create conditions for the maintenance of activity and for the progression of the induced chronic gastritis. In this aspect these cases will be at a higher risk for the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study is: to monitor and analyze the cases with persistent HP infection and to establish an approach for their management. Clinical material and methods: The study includes 12 patients (8 female and 4 male at a middle age of 63,7, with a persistent HP infection, who have been observed for a period of five years. Two methods for the detection of HP infection are used – one invasive and one non-invasive. Upper endoscopy with morphological examination was performed. Results: In 9/12 patients HP was unsuccessfully treated for three times, in 2 patients – four times, and in 1 patient – five times. In all patients the initial treatment consisted of a standard triple therapy (STT. In 5 of them STT was conducted twice, with the same regimen for a period of seven days. Two patients received three courses of STT. In four patients an antibiotic resistance was established by means of a cultured assessment. In three cases an HP resistance to Clarithromycine and Metronidazole was demonstrated. Significant gastro-duodenal pathology with atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and hyperplastic polyposis was found in all patients. The persistent clinical symptoms had 9 patients. Conclusion: We believe that a devised and proposed step strategy which covers early detection of infection, reliable diagnosis, adequate and successful treatment, and dispensary monitoring, contributes to the

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Bushehr, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori is a spiral Gram negative bacterium that has been found to be related to various gastroduodenal diseases. The prevalence of H. pylori infection may vary greatly in different regions. In order to establish a suitable policy for disease control and prevention, it is necessary to perform epidemiologic studies in different geographical regions. This investigation aims to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and to study of some related factors among patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in Bushehr, Iran. Materials and Methods: Gastric biopsy samples were collected from 310 patients referred for endoscopy due to different upper gastrointestinal symptoms. FISH was used to detect H. pylori in the specimens. Logistic regression with calculation of odds ratio was used for statistical analysis. Results: The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 43.5%. There was a significant difference between the mean age of H. pylori positive (46.59±17.14 and H. pylori negative (42.35±17.3 patients (P= 0.033. There was significant association between H. pylori infection and age of 40 years or more (OR=1.63 P=0.036, employment (OR=1.91 P=0.047, smoking (OR= 2.16 P = 0.008, keeping domestic animals (OR=1.74 P=0.043, drinking tap water (OR=1.75 P= 0.025, and blood group O (OR=3.21 P=0.0001. Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is considerable in Bushehr. The present study shows that several factors are significantly associated with H. pylori infection in Bushehr, of which some factors are modifiable. It is probable that modification of these factors can lead to decrease the prevalence of H. pylori infection in community

  6. Correlation between virulence markers of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity and gastric biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Lucrecia MEDINA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with virulence factors. The presence of these factors is useful as molecular markers in the identification of the high risk for developing severe gastric pathologies. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the presence of virulence markers cagA and bab2A of H. pylori in oral and gastric biopsy samples. METHODS: An observational, prospective, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was carried out between September 2011 and September 2012. Patients suffering dyspepsia with indication for upper gastrointestinal video endoscopy who attended the Gastroenterology Service of the Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando were included. Epidemiological investigation was completed. To detect the bacteria and their virulence genes, samples of saliva, dental plaque and gastric biopsy were taken and processed by PCR. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were selected for this study (30 women and 31 men. H. pylori was detected in 31 gastric biopsies and 31 oral samples. Significant difference between oral and gastric samples was found in cagA genotype. Agreement between oral and gastric genotypes was found in 38.7% of samples from the same patient. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in provide information about the genotypes of the Argentinean Northeast H. pylori strains. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection, the most of patients had less virulent genotypes in oral cavity and gastric tissue. The cagA / babA2 combination was not frequent in the samples studied. There was not a statistical correlation between the virulence genes and gastroduodenal or oral diseases. Although in some patients the same genotype was found both in oral and gastric samples, it cannot be ensure that they corresponding to the same strain because a DNA sequencing was not performed.

  7. Relationship of interleukin-1B gene promoter region polymorphism with Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Ivy Bastos; Vianna, Júlia Silveira; Halicki, Priscila Cristina Bartolomeu; Lara, Caroline; Tadiotto, Thássia Fernanda; da Silva Maciel, João Batista; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; von Groll, Andrea; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida

    2015-09-29

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. The severity of damage is determined by the interplay between environmental/behavioral factors, bacterial pathogenicity genes and host genetic polymorphisms that can influence the secretion levels of inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, this study aimed to identify polymorphisms in the IL-1B and IL-1RN genes and their associations with H. pylori infection, cagA gene of H. pylori, and gastroduodenal diseases. Gastric biopsy samples from 151 patients infected with H. pylori and 76 uninfected individuals were analyzed. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by histology and PCR. Polymorphisms at positions -511, -31 and +3954 of the IL-1B gene were detected by PCR-RFLP, and an analysis of the VNTR polymorphism of the IL-1RN gene was performed by PCR. It was observed that the presence of the T/T genotype at position -511 and the C/C genotype at position -31 were associated with H. pylori infection and with an increased risk of gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients. Additionally, strains from patients H. pylori-positive carrying the cagA gene was significantly related with the T/T genotype at position -511 of IL-1B.  No association of polymorphisms at position +3954 of IL-1B and in the IL-1RN with H. pylori infection and with risk of severe gastric diseases was found. We demonstrated that polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-1B gene (at positions -511 and -31) are associated with an enhanced risk of H. pylori infection as well as gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients.

  8. Chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori in Mexican children: histopathological patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Nares-Cisneros, Jesús; Martínez-Ordaz, Verónica Araceli; Velasco-Rodríguez, Víctor Manuel; Márquez, Francisco Carlos López; Manríquez-Covarrubias, Luis Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the histopathological patterns of inflammation, distribution, severity, and degree of gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-infected children in Northern Mexico, as well as the correlation between colonization density and inflammation intensity. We carried out a cross-sectional study of gastric biopsies performed on children ranging from 2 to 17 years of age who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for diverse gastroduodenal disorders. This study includes only children who were found to be Hp carriers, with positive results for tests of Hp antigens in feces and in gastric biopsy studies. We studied 107 patients (age 8.2 ± 3.7 years). In 47.7% of patients, the density of Hp colonization was low; only 21.5% had a marked density. Mononuclear leukocyte infiltration showed a similar distribution. Thirty-seven percent of patients had follicular gastritis. An acute inflammatory response was absent in 65% and mild in 20.6% of patients. When inflammation was present, it was primarily located in the antrum (79%). There were no cases of intestinal metaplasia or atrophy. A link was found between Hp density and age, infiltration by mononuclear cells, the presence of follicular gastritis, and the level of neutrophil infiltration (P  =  0.001). Despite the high rates of Hp infection in the region, the histopathological findings in these children were mild and were limited primarily to the antral mucosa. These data indicate the need to study the behavior of this disease in children in diverse study populations to provide localized prevention and treatment strategies.

  9. DRUG RESISTANCE IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Silveira VIANNA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Helicobacter pylori has a worldwide distribution and is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases of the digestive system. Treatment to eradicate this microorganism involves the use of a combination of antimicrobials, such as amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin, combined with proton pump inhibitors. Although the current therapy is effective, a high rate of treatment failure has been observed, mainly because of the acquisition of point mutations, one of the major resistance mechanisms developed by H. pylori. This phenomenon is related to frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics. Conclusion This review reported an overview of the resistance to the main drugs used in the treatment of H. pylori, confirming the hypothesis that antibacterial resistance is a highly local phenomenon and genetic characteristics of a given population can influence which therapy is the most appropriate.

  10. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Scott, David R

    2016-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects about 50 % of the world's population, causing at a minimum chronic gastritis. A subset of infected patients will ultimately develop gastric or duodenal ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, or MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma. Eradication of H. pylori requires complex regimens that include acid suppression and multiple antibiotics. The efficacy of treatment using what were once considered standard regimens have declined in recent years, mainly due to widespread development of antibiotic resistance. Addition of bismuth to standard triple therapy regimens, use of alternate antibiotics, or development of alternative regimens using known therapies in novel combinations have improved treatment efficacy in specific populations, but overall success of eradication remains less than ideal. Novel regimens under investigation either in vivo or in vitro, involving increased acid suppression ideally with fewer antibiotics or development of non-antibiotic treatment targets, show promise for future therapy.

  11. Diet and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołubiuk, Łukasz; Imiela, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has accompanied man for thousands of years. In some infected patients, a complex and dynamic pathogen-host reaction triggers pathogenic pathways resulting in development, inter alia, of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (both gastric and duodenal), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Large-scale eradication therapy is associated with a rapid increase in antibiotic resistance, gut flora composition disturbances, and increased risk of development, inter alia, of paediatric infectious diarrhoeas, atopic diseases, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Our diet contains many substances with potent antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Dietary interventions enable a decrease in H. pylori colonisation and result in a decrease in gastritis prevalence, thus potentially lowering the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma development.

  12. Anti-inflammatory properties of gastric-derived Lactobacillus plantarum XB7 in the context of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiraworawong, Thien; Spinler, Jennifer K; Werawatganon, Duangporn; Klaikeaw, Naruemon; Venable, Susan F; Versalovic, James; Tumwasorn, Somying

    2014-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric epithelium induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) production and inflammation leading to host cell damage. We searched for gastric-derived Lactobacillus with the ability to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation. Conditioned media from gastric-derived Lactobacillus spp. were tested for the ability to suppress H. pylori-induced IL-8 production in AGS gastric epithelial cells. IL-8 protein and mRNA levels were measured by ELISA and qPCR, respectively. The changes on host cell signaling pathway were analyzed by Western blotting and the anti-inflammatory effect was tested in a Sprague-Dawley rat model. Conditioned media from L. salivarius B101, L. rhamnosus B103, and L. plantarum XB7 suppressed IL-8 production and IL-8 mRNA expression in H. pylori-induced AGS cells without inhibiting H. pylori growth. Conditioned media from LS-B101, LR-B103, and LP-XB7 suppressed the activation of NF-κB in AGS cells, while strain LP-XB7 also suppressed c-Jun activation. The anti-inflammatory effect of LP-XB7 was further assessed in vivo using a H. pylori-infected Sprague-Dawley rat model. Strain LP-XB7 contributed to a delay in the detection and colonization of H. pylori in rat stomachs, attenuated gastric inflammation, and ameliorated gastric histopathology. Additionally, the administration of LP-XB7 correlated with the suppression of TNF-α and CINC-1 in sera, and suppression of CINC-1 in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected rats. These results suggest that L. plantarum XB7 produces secreted factors capable of modulating inflammation during H. pylori infection, and this probiotic Lactobacillus strain shows promise as an adjunctive therapy for treating H. pylori-associated disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Capsaicin and Piperine on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Shi, Liang; Takasu, Shinji; Cho, Young-Man; Kiriyama, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Tatematsu, Masae; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Spices have been used for thousands of years, and recent studies suggest that certain spices confer beneficial effects on gastric disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible chemopreventive effects of spice-derived compounds on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastritis. We examined the inhibitory effects of curcumin, capsaicin, and piperine on H. pylori in vitro by determining the colony-forming units and real-time RT-PCR in H. pylori stimulated AGS gastric cancer cells. For in vivo analysis, 6-week-old SPF male Mongolian gerbils were infected with H. pylori, fed diets containing 5000 ppm curcumin, 100 ppm capsaicin, or 100 ppm piperine, and sacrificed after 13 weeks. All three compounds inhibited in vitro proliferation of H. pylori, with curcumin being the most effective. Infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was suppressed by piperine both in the antrum and corpus of H. pylori-infected gerbils. Capsaicin also decreased neutrophils in the antrum and corpus and mononuclear cell infiltration and heterotopic proliferative glands in the corpus. mRNA expression of Tnf-α and formation of phospho-IκB-α in the antrum were reduced by both capsaicin and piperine. In addition, piperine suppressed expression of Il-1β, Ifn-γ, Il-6, and iNos, while H. pylori UreA and other virulence factors were not significantly attenuated by any compounds. These results suggest that capsaicin and piperine have anti-inflammatory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in gerbils independent of direct antibacterial effects and may thus have potential for use in the chemoprevention of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebule, I A; Longdoh, A N; Paloheimo, I L

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and atrophic gastritis amongst dyspeptic patients and to compare the production of PGI and G-17 in the various atrophic stages. A total of 139 dyspeptic patients aged 46.68±15.50 years [females 106 aged47.23±15.51years, males 33 aged 44.48±14.62] were included during the one year period, March 2008-april 2009 at the district hospital Tombel. The degree of atrophy was determined by the levels of serum pepsinogen1, and gastrin-17 and the presence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies detected by an enzyme immunoassay. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori was 79.82% and that for atrophic gastritis was 6.6%. A decrease in mean serum levels of gastin-17 along with increasing antral atrophy was observed; the mean serum levels of pepsinogen1 were reduced during progression of corpus atrophy. A weak reverse correlation(r =-0.036) was found between Gastrin-17 and Helicobacter pylori antibodies.

  15. Helicobacter Infection Significantly Alters Pregnancy Success in Laboratory Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Tara C; Cooper, Caitlin A; Ali, Zil; Truong, Ha; Moore, Julie M

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter spp. are gram-negative, helically shaped bacteria that cause gastric and enterohepatic infections in mammalian species. Although Helicobacter infection frequently is implicated to interfere with reproductive success, few experimental data support these claims. We therefore retrospectively investigated the effect of Helicobacter infection on murine pregnancy outcome after the identification of endemic Helicobacter infection in an animal research facility. Multiplex conventional PCR analysis was used to characterize Helicobacter infection status in one inbred and 2 transgenic strains of mice in 2 self-contained rooms assigned to the same investigator. Outcomes of timed-mating experiments were compared among Helicobacter spp.-infected and uninfected mice of the same strain; Helicobacter infection was eradicated from the colony through fostering with uninfected dams. Although Helicobacter infection affected fecundity in only one strain of transgenic mouse, the total number of embryos per gravid uterus was significantly reduced in C57BL/6J mice that were infected with a single Helicobacter species, H. typhlonius. Helicobacter infection was also associated with a significant increase in the number of resorbing embryos per uterus and significant decreases in pregnancy-associated weight gain relative to uninfected mice in C57BL6/J mice and one transgenic strain. Helicobacter spp.-infected mice of all tested strains exhibited higher frequency of intrauterine hemorrhaging relative to uninfected mice. These results indicate that naturally-acquired Helicobacter infection not only reduces the productivity of a research animal breeding colony, but also negatively impacts embryo health. Despite these deleterious effects, these data suggest that colonies can be rederived to be Helicobacter-free by Cesarean section and fostering with uninfected dams. This paper provides the first evidence that H. typhlonius infection is sufficient to interfere with reproductive success

  16. Current management of mesenteric extrahepatic arterioportal fistulas: report of a case treated with a gastroduodenal artery stent graft and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Sonal; McPherson, Simon; Pine, James; Hayden, Jeremy

    2010-02-01

    Spontaneous arteriovenous fistulation of a pseudoaneurysm into superior mesenteric vein (SMV) has rarely been reported. We present the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with a post pancreatic arterioportal fistula (APF) that was successfully managed by stent graft (SG) placement in the gastroduodenal artery (GDA). We also review the published experience of the endovascular management of mesenteric extrahepatic APFs. This review demonstrates the evolution from open surgical to endovascular management for majority of these patients.

  17. Rosacea is associated with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders; Egeberg, A; Gideonsson, R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common skin disease characterized by facial erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. Helicobacter pylori infection has been suggested to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of rosacea. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and meta-analyse the relationship between...... rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori. METHODS: A literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Data extraction and analyses were performed on descriptive data. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Random-effects models with Der...... in the quantitative meta-analysis, comprising a total of 928 rosacea patients and 1527 controls. The overall association between Helicobacter pylori infection and rosacea was non-significant (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.00-2.84, P = 0.052), but analysis restricted to C-urea breath test showed a significant association (OR 3...

  18. Differential effects of DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography on the charge status of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yu-Chi; Pan, Timothy; Tzeng, Huey-Fen; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is involved in H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation. HP-NAP is also a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential diagnostic marker for H. pylori-associated diseases. Previously, we purified recombinant HP-NAP by one-step diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) negative mode chromatography by collecting the unbound fraction at pH 8.0 at 4°C. It remains unclear why HP-NAP does not bind to DEAE resins at the pH above its isoelectric point during the purification. To investigate how pH affects the surface net charge of HP-NAP and its binding to DEAE resins during the purification, recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Escherichia coli was subjected to DEAE negative mode chromatography at pH ranging from 7.0 to 9.0 at 25°C and the surface charge of purified HP-NAP was determined by capillary electrophoresis. A minimal amount of HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 8.5, whereas recombinant HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sephadex resin only at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The purified recombinant HP-NAP obtained from the unbound fractions was not able to bind to DEAE resins at pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the surface charge of the purified HP-NAP was neutral at pH 7.0 to 8.0 and was either neutral or slightly negative at pH 8.5 and 9.0. However, recombinant HP-NAP purified from gel-filtration chromatography was able to bind to DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 7.0 to 9.0 and DEAE Sephadex resin at pH 7.0. At pH 8.5 and 9.0, only the negatively charged species of HP-NAP were found. Thus, recombinant HP-NAP with different charge status can be differentially purified by DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Furthermore, the charge distribution on the surface of HP-NAP, the presence of impure proteins, and the overall net charge of the resins all affect the binding of HP-NAP to DEAE resins during the negative purification.

  19. Association of specific haplotype of TNFα with Helicobacter pylori ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006). Individuals with IL6-174 G/G have been shown to produce higher levels of IL6 than those with the C/C genotype, and the former genotype is associated with the high-mucosal levels of IL6 in H. pylori-associated gastri- tis (Lobo Gatti et al. 2005). Savage et al. (2004) reported that the homozygous polymorphic variants ...

  20. Epidemiological study of gastric Helicobacter spp. in dogs with gastrointestinal disease in Japan and diversity of Helicobacter heilmannii sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota-Aizawa, Sanae; Ohno, Koichi; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Ko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Mimuro, Hitomi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    Epidemiological and pathological studies of Helicobacter spp. in canine stomachs in Japan were performed to investigate strain specific pathogenicity. Gastric biopsies from 144 dogs with gastrointestinal diseases were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter spp. using genus and species specific PCRs for Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, Helicobacter heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.) and Helicobacter pylori. PCR indicated that 50/144 (34.7%) dogs were infected with Helicobacter spp. Of the genus positive samples, 21/50 could not be amplified by any of the species specific PCRs. To investigate Helicobacter at the species level, partial ureAB gene sequences from 48/50 genus positive samples were determined; 47 strains were identified. Thirty-five strains from 45 cases were closely related to H. heilmannii s.s. (89-99% sequence similarity), seven strains from seven cases were closely related to H. bizzozeronii (95-99% sequence similarity), three strains from three cases were closely related to Helicobacter felis (86%, 98% and 99% sequence similarity), one strain from one case was closely related to Helicobacter salomonis (99% sequence similarity) and one strain from one case was closely related to H. pylori (99% sequence similarity). Dogs infected with Helicobacter spp. most similar to H. heilmannii s.s. had a higher frequency of moderate to severe gastritis than dogs negative for Helicobacter spp. (P=0.044). In conclusion, the predominant Helicobacter spp. detected in canine stomachs in our study were most closely related to H. heilmannii s.s. and displayed substantial genetic diversity. Infection with Helicobacter spp. may be associated with more severe gastritis in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High Fluoroquinolone Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori in the Golden triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaichone, Ratha Korn; Ratanachu ek, Thawee; Gamnarai, Pornpen; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Uchida, Tomahisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mahachai, Varocha

    2017-02-01

    . pylori associated GI diseases in this particular part of the world. Creative Commons Attribution License

  2. Diversity of zoonotic enterohepatic Helicobacter species and detection of a putative novel gastric Helicobacter species in wild and wild-born captive chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flahou, B.; Modrý, D.; Pomajbíková, K.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Smet, A.; Ducatelle, R.; Pasmans, F.; Sá, R. M.; Todd, A.; Hashimoto, C.; Mulama, M.; Kiang, J.; Rossi, M.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 174, 1-2 (2014), s. 186-194 ISSN 0378-1135 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Enterohepatic Helicobacter species * Gastric Helicobacter species * Helicobacter cinaedi * Candidatus Helicobacter homininae * Chimpanzee * Gorilla Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.511, year: 2014

  3. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Helicobacter, Hygiene, Atopy, and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Nusi, Iswan A; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis links environmental and microbial exposures in early life to the prevalence of atopy, allergy, and asthma. Helicobacter pylori infection is typically acquired in childhood and acquisition of the infection is associated with poor household hygiene. Some population surveys have shown an inverse association between H. pylori infection and atopy, allergy, and asthma leading to the suggestion that H. pylori infection may be protective against disease; others consider it simply a biomarker for poor household hygiene. We review the relevant surveys, cohort studies, meta-analyses, and studies testing the protective hypothesis. Overall, the results of surveys and cohort studies are inconsistent, whereas meta-analyses show a significant but weak inverse correlation. In contrast, studies directly testing the protection hypothesis in relation to asthma in populations with poor hygiene and low H. pylori prevalence failed to confirm a protective effect. H. pylori is a major cause of human disease including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric malignancies. H. pylori infections most likely serve as a biomarker for poor hygienic conditions in childhood. We conclude that while synergistic interactions between environmental factors in childhood are important determinants of the pathogenesis of atopy, allergy, and asthma; H. pylori is inversely related to good hygiene and thus it's presence serves as a biomarker rather than for a specific prevention role for H. pylori or H. pylori antigens.

  5. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Wouter J; Sostres, Carlos; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel

    2013-09-01

    Declining Helicobacter pylori prevalence rates have resulted in a decrease of peptic ulcer bleeding incidence. Moreover, eradication reduces peptic ulcer recurrence rate. Newer studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Guidelines therefore advocate a test-and-treat strategy for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. There is mounting evidence that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment efficacy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Some studies observed an improvement of GERD complaints after H. pylori eradication, which underlines that H. pylori treatment is not contra-indicated in GERD patients. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. However, there is growing consensus that H. pylori-positive FD should be assessed as a separate entity. In these patients, eradication can be beneficial and appropriate. Finally, several studies suggest that H. pylori infection may also be associated with beneficial effects for the host. Epidemiologic studies showed an inverse relation between H. pylori infection and asthma and allergy, although data are conflicting and need to be expanded. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Helicobacter, Hygiene, Atopy, and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Miftahussurur

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hygiene hypothesis links environmental and microbial exposures in early life to the prevalence of atopy, allergy, and asthma. Helicobacter pylori infection is typically acquired in childhood and acquisition of the infection is associated with poor household hygiene. Some population surveys have shown an inverse association between H. pylori infection and atopy, allergy, and asthma leading to the suggestion that H. pylori infection may be protective against disease; others consider it simply a biomarker for poor household hygiene. We review the relevant surveys, cohort studies, meta-analyses, and studies testing the protective hypothesis. Overall, the results of surveys and cohort studies are inconsistent, whereas meta-analyses show a significant but weak inverse correlation. In contrast, studies directly testing the protection hypothesis in relation to asthma in populations with poor hygiene and low H. pylori prevalence failed to confirm a protective effect. H. pylori is a major cause of human disease including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric malignancies. H. pylori infections most likely serve as a biomarker for poor hygienic conditions in childhood. We conclude that while synergistic interactions between environmental factors in childhood are important determinants of the pathogenesis of atopy, allergy, and asthma; H. pylori is inversely related to good hygiene and thus it's presence serves as a biomarker rather than for a specific prevention role for H. pylori or H. pylori antigens.

  8. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-08-12

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. With half of the world's population being infected with H, pylori and only few antibiotics result in an effective eradication, a successful antibiotic driven worldwide eradication program seems unlikely. In addition, H. pylori eradication is not always beneficial as it has been described that eradication can be associated with an increased frequency of other disorders such as pediatric asthma, inflammatory bowel diseases and Barrett's Esophagus. We have to accept that eradication of this infection is a two-edged sword that is both useful and harmful and we should therefore focus our H. pylori eradication policy toward selectively identify and destroy only the virulent strains. In order to still be able to effectively treat H. pylori infections in the future we need an alternative diagnostic/treatment algorithm. This would involve a shift towards more precise and enhanced disease predicting diagnosis that tries to identify patients with chance of developing severe diseases such as gastric cancer, rather than the current regime that is geared towards find and destroy all H. pylori.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dietary Amelioration of Helicobacter Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jed W.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Wallace, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    We review herein the basis for using dietary components to treat and/or prevent Helicobacter pylori infection, with emphasis on: (a) work reported in the last decade, (b) dietary components for which there is mechanism-based plausibility, and (c) components for which clinical results on H. pylori amelioration are available. There is evidence that a diet-based treatment may reduce the levels and/or the virulence of H. pylori colonization without completely eradicating the organism in treated individuals. This concept was endorsed a decade ago by the participants in a small international consensus conference held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, and interest in such a diet-based approach has increased dramatically since then. This approach is attractive in terms of cost, treatment, tolerability and cultural acceptability. This review therefore highlights specific foods, food components, and food products, grouped as follows: bee products (e.g. honey and propolis), probiotics, dairy products, vegetables, fruits, oils, essential oils, and herbs, spices and other plants. A discussion of the small number of clinical studies that are available is supplemented by supportive in vitro and animal studies. This very large body of in vitro and pre-clinical evidence must now be followed up with rationally designed, unambiguous human trials. PMID:25799054

  11. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  12. Dietary amelioration of Helicobacter infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jed W; Stephenson, Katherine K; Wallace, Alison J

    2015-06-01

    We review herein the basis for using dietary components to treat and/or prevent Helicobacter pylori infection, with emphasis on (a) work reported in the last decade, (b) dietary components for which there is mechanism-based plausibility, and (c) components for which clinical results on H pylori amelioration are available. There is evidence that a diet-based treatment may reduce the levels and/or the virulence of H pylori colonization without completely eradicating the organism in treated individuals. This concept was endorsed a decade ago by the participants in a small international consensus conference held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, and interest in such a diet-based approach has increased dramatically since then. This approach is attractive in terms of cost, treatment, tolerability, and cultural acceptability. This review, therefore, highlights specific foods, food components, and food products, grouped as follows: bee products (eg, honey and propolis); probiotics; dairy products; vegetables; fruits; oils; essential oils; and herbs, spices, and other plants. A discussion of the small number of clinical studies that are available is supplemented by supportive in vitro and animal studies. This very large body of in vitro and preclinical evidence must now be followed up with rationally designed, unambiguous human trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  14. Molecular assessment of clarithromycin resistant Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular assessment of clarithromycin resistant Helicobacter pylori strains using rapid and accurate PCR-RFLP method in gastric specimens in Iran. ... Thirty nine (39) (23/78%) clarithromycin-resistant strains were detected which were identified as 15 (9.15%) A2143G, 15 (9.15%) A2142G and 9 (5.49%) mix strains.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and upper digestive diseases - diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori, which has been designated by the WHO as type I carcinogen, has a global prevalence of over 50%. The aim of this study was to determine the association between this bacterium and upper gastrointestinal problems in an endoscopy unit in Ouagadougou, using a molecular diagnostic method.

  16. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...

  17. Helicobacter Pylori : Serological Testing and Treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with dyspepsia and eradication of H. pylori after a non-invasive testing is an integral part of most management guidelines. This study evaluated the benefit of serological testing and treatment of H. pylori in Nigerian patients presenting with uninvestigated dyspepsia.

  18. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study assessed the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies among Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It also examines whether anti H. pylori seroprevalence was associated with the severity of the HIV infection or the antiretroviral treatment. Material and Methods: ...

  19. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  20. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebischer, Toni; Meyer, Thomas F; Andersen, Leif P

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori represents the major etiologic agent of gastritis, gastric, and duodenal ulcer disease and can cause gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue B-cell lymphoma. It is clear that the consequences of infection reflect diverse outcomes of the interaction of bacteria...

  1. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Adlekha, T Chadha, P Krishnan, B Sumangala. Abstract. Background: Helicobacter pylori related gastritis is a major health ailment in developing nations. There is ... Aim: To study the prevalence of H. pylori gastritis in patients undergoing endoscopy and its association with the development of gastrointestinal diseases.

  2. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  3. Relation Between Helicobacter Pylori, Inflammatory (neutrophil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To determine the relation of Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic inflammation, atrophy, activity level and intestinal metaplasia. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 100 consecutive patients with dyspepsia. These patients were fasted for 12 hours and gastroscopic biopsy specimens were ...

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Helicobacter pylori: Prevalence and antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing evidence links infection of the gastric mucosa by. Helicobacter pylori with the subsequent development of gastric pathologies. The incidence of H. pylori infection in Kenya is staggeringly high. An investigation into the prevalence of H. pylori in patients with dyspepsia and asymptomatic controls from the same ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Discussion. Helicobacter pylori-infection -infection causes acute gastritis in most infected individuals. In a certain number of patients with persistent infection, chronic active gastritis develops, leading finally to glandular atrophy, a risk factor for gastric adenoma and cancer7 . Correa 19928 postulated the paradigm of gastric.

  6. Magnitude of Helicobacter pylori among Dyspeptic patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is predominantly acquired in childhood from family members. The infection can cause dypepepsia, chronic and acute gastritis and gastric cancer. Dyspepsia is the most common illness in the Ethiopian population visiting outpatient department of health facilities, and it has ...

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori related gastritis is a major health ailment in developing nations. There is high morbidity and mortality ranging from chronic gastritis to gastric malignancies. Prevalence of H. pylori infection varies markedly from country to country and in a country, region to region. Aim: To study the prevalence ...

  8. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection involves interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is the most ubiquitous bacterial infection worldwide infecting at least 50% of the world's population. Scientific evidence abound on the age long cohabitation of H. pylori and humans. However, following infection, development of disease depends upon three main factors namely: the virulence of the ...

  9. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal

  10. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: a distinct entity unrelated to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genta, R M; Sonnenberg, A

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis is diagnosed when no organisms are detected in a gastric mucosa with typical features of Helicobacter gastritis (Hp-gastritis). If Helicobacter-negative gastritis consisted mostly of 'missed' Helicobacter infections, its prevalence should represent a constant percentage of these infections in a population, and their clinico-epidemiological features would overlap. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of Hp-positive and Hp-negative gastritis. From a pathology database, we extracted demographic, clinical and histopathological data from patients with gastric biopsies (1.2008-12.2013). We allocated patients to high (≥12%) and low (≤6%) H. pylori prevalence regions defined by ZIP code-based data. The prevalence of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis by sex, age and state were expressed as a per cent of the total study population stratified accordingly. Of 895 323 patients, 10.6% had Hp-gastritis and 1.5% Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Hp-gastritis, but not Helicobacter-negative gastritis, was more common in males than females (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.19). While Hp-gastritis was more prevalent in high than in low-prevalence areas (OR 3.65, 95% CI: 3.57-3.74), Helicobacter-negative gastritis was only minimally affected by the underlying H. pylori prevalence (1.7% vs. 1.5%). The age-specific prevalence of Hp-gastritis peaked in the 4th to 5th decades; Helicobacter-negative gastritis exhibited a low and relatively flat pattern. The geographic distribution of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis showed no significant correlation. Intestinal metaplasia was found in 13.0% of patients with Hp-gastritis and in 6.1% of those with Helicobacter-negative gastritis (OR 0.43, 95% CI: 0.40-0.47). These data suggest that Helicobacter-negative gastritis is, in the vast majority of cases, a nosologically and epidemiologically distinct entity that deserves further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Helicobacter pylori and cagA gene detected by polymerase chain reaction in gastric biopsies: correlation with histological findings, proliferation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Ramos Moreira Leite

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The virulence of Helicobacter pylori (HP in gastroduodenal disease is related to pathogenicity islands (cagPAI present in some strains. Infection with cagPAI induces IL-8 secretion, increases epithelial cell proliferation and may be important in carcinogenesis. Our objective was to detect HP and the cagA gene (cagPAI marker by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and to correlate these results to histological findings, epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective, at the Surgical and Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Hospital Sírio-Libanês. METHODS: DNA samples isolated from 164 gastric biopsies were used for HP detection by PCR. cagPAI+ was identified in HP+ cases by cagA gene amplification. All cases were submitted to immunohistochemistry to evaluate cell proliferation, and TUNEL to detect apoptosis. Statistical analysis was performed to compare results. RESULTS: HP was detected in 67.7% of the patients, with good correlation between HP infection and moderate to severe gastritis, gastric ulcer and MALT lymphoma. There was a correlation between cagPAI+ strains and severe gastric diseases including cancer. The risk of gastric ulcer, adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma was 8.8 times higher for cagPAI+ patients. cagPAI+ infection was related to higher proliferation rates. The proliferation/apoptosis index was significantly higher for cagPAI+ patients. CONCLUSION: Cell growth deregulation in cagPAI+ patients could be demonstrated by the difference in the proliferation index. We believe that this explains the carcinogenic role of Helicobacter pylori.

  12. Oxidant-antioxidant balance in the blood and tissues of gum of the rats with experimental gastroduodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanenko O.H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the initial changes in the periodontal tissues in diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, the study of the oxidant-antioxidant balance in the gum tissue and serum of rats with experimental gastro¬duo¬denitis was conducted. Increase in MDA in homogenates of the gums and blood serum by 1,5 and 2 times, and the level of catalase by the 3,9 and 1,6 times, respectively was registered. The level of superoxide dismutase in gin¬gival tissues and serum of rats with gastroduodenitis did not changeas com¬pared to control animals. Such changes are characteristic of hypoxia state. Activation of free radical oxidation of lipids in gum homogenates is not accompanied by increased oxidative modification of proteins, which is manifested by absence of significant changes in the main marker and aldehydphenilhydrazons ketonphenilhydrazons. When malondialdehyde content in the gum tissue a blood serum of rats increases in the experiment relative intensity and compensation of antiperoxid protection is observed, leading to the formation of endogenous oxygen that keeps cells activity in hypoxic conditions. With increase of intensity of oxidative stress, obviously, decompensation of antiperoxid protection and partial loss of the barrier function by epithelial cells occurs; this increases the possibility of inflammation development in the gums.

  13. Review of successful treatment for Helicobacter species in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerton, Angela; Warden, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Three variations of the amoxycillin-based triple therapy (amoxycillin, metronidazole and bismuth) were administered in the diet, by oral gavage or in the diet in conjunction with cross-fostering on to Helicobacter-free foster mothers to mice naturally infected with H. hepaticus and/or H. bilis. The presence of Helicobacter species was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of faecal pellets. Helicobacter infection was eliminated in 50% of strains of mice treated by oral gavage; 57% of strains of mice treated by medicated diet alone and 100% of strains of mice treated with the medicated diet in conjunction with cross-fostering on to Helicobacter-free foster mothers. Eight strains of mice were successfully treated for Helicobacter infection over a two-year period. The mouse colony has been maintained Helicobacter free, as determined by PCR analysis and has remained off treatment from December 2002 to March 2005.

  14. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Novel Insights into Fur Regulation in Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Schumann, E. M. Schneider, and K. Triantafilou. 2005. Lipopolysaccharides from Helicobacter pylori can act as antagonists for Toll -like receptor 4. Cell...lymphocyte receptor for the Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin. Cell Host Microbe 3:20-9. 142. Sharma, C. M., S. Hoffmann, F. Darfeuille, J...into Fur Regulation in Helicobacter pylori Name of Candidate: Jeremy Gilbreath Doctor of Philosophy Degree January 10, 2013 DISSERTATION AND

  17. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hashemi, Seyyed Hamid; Nadi, Ebrahim; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Seif-Rabiei, Mohammad-Ali; Roustaei, Uldoz

    2011-01-01

    There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases...

  18. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  19. EFICACIA DEL MÉTODO DE INMUNOCROMATOGRAFÍA EN HECES PARA EL DIAGNÓSTICO DE Helicobacter pylori EN PACIENTES CON DISPEPSIA: EVALUACIÓN PRELIMINAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Alonso Bayona-Rojas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is considered one of the most important emerging diseases of this century, which is closely related with gastroduodenal tract diseases and as a predisposing factor for gastric carcinoma. For diagnosis purpose, it have been used invasive and noninvasive tests, among the latter the fecal immunochromatography, which qualitatively detect pathogen’s antigens. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of this method for diagnosis of infection with H. pylori in dyspeptic patients from a hospital in Cundinamarca. Methods: We conducted a preliminary study to evaluate a diagnostic test, for which we used patients with dyspepsia history and gastric biopsy report in their medical record. Stool samples were evaluated and through the rapid test SD Bio Line H. pylori Ag™, we determined the presence of fecal H. pylori antigens. Results: We evaluated a total of 33 patients: 48.4% men and 51.5% women, the sensitivity was 30% and specificity of 84.62%. The positive predictive value calculated was 75% and the negative predictive value was 44%. Conclusion: The specificity calculated for the test is comparable to that found in the literature; however, due to the reliability index’s interval showed, it would take more evidence to increase the reliability of the results shown here.

  20. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase gene is present in most Helicobacter species including gastric non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters obtained from Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Masatomo; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Nakayama, Jun; Akamatsu, Taiji; Katsuyama, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Sagara, Junji

    2018-02-01

    Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPHs) besides H. pylori infect human stomachs and cause chronic gastritis and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Cholesteryl-α-glucosides have been identified as unique glycolipids present in H. pylori and some Helicobacter species. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of cholesteryl-α-glucosides, plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity of H. pylori. Therefore, it is important to examine αCgTs of NHPHs. Six gastric NHPHs were isolated from Japanese patients and maintained in mouse stomachs. The αCgT genes were amplified by PCR and inverse PCR. We retrieved the αCgT genes of other Helicobacter species by BLAST searches in GenBank. αCgT genes were present in most Helicobacter species and in all Japanese isolates examined. However, we could find no candidate gene for αCgT in the whole genome of Helicobacter cinaedi and several enterohepatic species. Phylogenic analysis demonstrated that the αCgT genes of all Japanese isolates show high similarities to that of a zoonotic group of gastric NHPHs including Helicobacter suis, Helicobacter heilmannii, and Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Of 6 Japanese isolates, the αCgT genes of 4 isolates were identical to that of H. suis, and that of another 2 isolates were similar to that of H. heilmannii and H. ailurogastricus. All gastric NHPHs examined showed presence of αCgT genes, indicating that αCgT may be beneficial for these helicobacters to infect human and possibly animal stomachs. Our study indicated that NHPHs could be classified into 2 groups, NHPHs with αCgT genes and NHPHs without αCgT genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Combination of Helicobacter pylori infection and the interleukin 8 -251 T > A polymorphism, but not the mannose-binding lectin 2 codon 54 G > A polymorphism, might be a risk factor of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young Woon; Oh, Chi Hyuk; Kim, Jung-Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Park, Mi Ju; Shim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Chang Kyun; Jang, Jae-Young; Dong, Seok Ho; Kim, Hyo Jong; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Byung-Ho

    2017-05-30

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) acts in the innate immune response to Helicobacter pylori. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) is a potent cytokine produced by gastric epithelial cells in response to H. pylori. We aimed to investigate whether polymorphisms in MBL2 and IL-8 influence susceptibility to H. pylori infection, and the associations of these polymorphisms with the risk of gastroduodenal diseases in a Korean population. We consecutively enrolled 176 H. pylori-negative control subjects, 221 subjects with H. pylori-positive non-atrophic gastritis, 52 mild atrophic gastritis (AG), 61 severe AG, 175 duodenal ulcer, and 283 gastric cancer (GC). Allele-specific PCR-RFLP was conducted for polymorphisms in MBL2 exon 1 (codon 52, 54, and 57) and IL-8 -251 T > A. IL-8 levels in gastric mucosal tissues and serum MBL levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MBL2 exon 1 polymorphic variants were found only in codon 54, and the allele frequencies did not differ significantly between the control and disease groups. Although serum MBL levels in codon 54 A/A mutants were markedly low, it did not influence susceptibility to H. pylori infection or the risk of gastroduodenal diseases. IL-8 levels were significantly different between T/T wild type, T/A heterozygote, and A/A mutant genotypes. IL-8 -251 A allele carriers (A/A + T/A) showed increased IL-8 levels, and were significantly associated with the risk of severe AG and GC. We suggest that a combination of H. pylori infection and the IL-8 -251 T > A polymorphism might increase the risk of severe AG and GC in a Korean population.

  2. Helicobacter pylori-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the main conclusions drawn from the presentations on Helicobacter pylori infection in Digestive Diseases Week, 2016. Despite the undeniable widespread reduction in the prevalence of this infection, infection rates continue to be high in developing countries. The prevalence of clarithromycin, metronidazole and quinolone resistance is markedly high in most countries and continues to rise. The management of H. pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcers still leaves much to be desired. Although H. pylori eradication reduces the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma, it does not completely avoid its appearance. The new rapid stool antigen tests show promising results. The efficacy of standard triple therapy is clearly inadequate and continues to decline, and cannot therefore be recommended. Vonoprazan, when associated with 2 antibiotics, is more effective than traditional proton pump inhibitors, especially in clarithromycin-resistant patients. Non-bismuth quadruple (concomitant) therapy achieves eradication rates of around 90% and has a good safety profile. Concomitant therapy is more effective and simpler than sequential therapy. Although some probiotics can increase the efficacy and tolerability of triple therapy, the utility of its association with quadruple concomitant therapy has not been established. If a first treatment with clarithromycin fails, both bismuth-containing quadruple therapy and levofloxacin-containing triple therapy achieve good-but still suboptimal-results. The combination of bismuth and levofloxacin in the same regimen increases the efficacy of rescue therapy. The management of H. pylori infection by European gastroenterologists is widely heterogeneous and the eradication rates achieved by them are generally unacceptable. In Spain, the highest first-line eradication rate is obtained with quadruple concomitant therapy in 14-day regimens and with double doses of proton pump inhibitors; in second-line therapy, the use of

  3. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  4. Plasticity Region Genes jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 of Helicobacter pylori in Isolates from Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-González, Carolina; Consuelo-Sánchez, Alejandra; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma; García-Zúñiga, Magdalena; Burgueño-Ferreira, Juan; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    The genes jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 belong to the plasticity region of the Helicobacter pylori genome. Due to their prevalence in isolates from patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer, they have been proposed as markers of gastroduodenal diseases. These genes are associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine induction through the NF-κB activation pathway. Nevertheless, the status of these genes is unknown in H. pylori isolates from children. The aim of the present work was to determine the frequency of the jhp0940-jhp0945-jhp0947-jhp0949 genes in H. pylori isolates from children. We identified the jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 genes and the relationship of each with the virulence factors cagA, cagPAI, and dupA by PCR in 49 isolates of H. pylori from children. The results were corroborated using dot blots. In addition, we compared the prevalence of these genes with the prevalence in adults. The prevalence of jhp0940 (53.1%), jhp0945 (44.9%), jhp0947 (77.6%), and jhp0949 (83.7%) was determined in the isolates from children, as was the prevalence of the virulence genes cagA (63.3%), cagPAI (71.4%), and dupA (37.5%). No association was found between the four genes of the plasticity region and the virulence genes. The presence of the intact locus integrated by jhp0940-jhp0945-jhp0947-jhp0949 was very common among the isolates from children. The genes jhp0940, jhp0947, and jhp0949 were present in more than 50% of the H. pylori isolates, and the joint presence of jhp0940-jhp0945-jhp0947-jhp0949 was very frequent. The frequency of these genes in isolates from children could contribute to the virulence of H. pylori and the evolution of the infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Gene expression profiling in gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected and uninfected patients undergoing chronic superficial gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Min Yang

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection reprograms host gene expression and influences various cellular processes, which have been investigated by cDNA microarray using in vitro culture cells and in vivo gastric biopsies from patients of the Chronic Abdominal Complaint. To further explore the effects of H. pylori infection on host gene expression, we have collected the gastric antral mucosa samples from 6 untreated patients with gastroscopic and pathologic confirmation of chronic superficial gastritis. Among them three patients were infected by H. pylori and the other three patients were not. These samples were analyzed by a microarray chip which contains 14,112 cloned cDNAs, and microarray data were analyzed via BRB ArrayTools software and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA website. The results showed 34 genes of 38 differentially expressed genes regulated by H. pylori infection had been annotated. The annotated genes were involved in protein metabolism, inflammatory and immunological reaction, signal transduction, gene transcription, trace element metabolism, and so on. The 82% of these genes (28/34 were categorized in three molecular interaction networks involved in gene expression, cancer progress, antigen presentation and inflammatory response. The expression data of the array hybridization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Taken together, these data indicated that H. pylori infection could alter cellular gene expression processes, escape host defense mechanism, increase inflammatory and immune responses, activate NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, disturb metal ion homeostasis, and induce carcinogenesis. All of these might help to explain H. pylori pathogenic mechanism and the gastroduodenal pathogenesis induced by H. pylori infection.

  6. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  7. Gene Expression Profiling in Gastric Mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-Infected and Uninfected Patients Undergoing Chronic Superficial Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wang, Ying-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection reprograms host gene expression and influences various cellular processes, which have been investigated by cDNA microarray using in vitro culture cells and in vivo gastric biopsies from patients of the Chronic Abdominal Complaint. To further explore the effects of H. pylori infection on host gene expression, we have collected the gastric antral mucosa samples from 6 untreated patients with gastroscopic and pathologic confirmation of chronic superficial gastritis. Among them three patients were infected by H. pylori and the other three patients were not. These samples were analyzed by a microarray chip which contains 14,112 cloned cDNAs, and microarray data were analyzed via BRB ArrayTools software and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) website. The results showed 34 genes of 38 differentially expressed genes regulated by H. pylori infection had been annotated. The annotated genes were involved in protein metabolism, inflammatory and immunological reaction, signal transduction, gene transcription, trace element metabolism, and so on. The 82% of these genes (28/34) were categorized in three molecular interaction networks involved in gene expression, cancer progress, antigen presentation and inflammatory response. The expression data of the array hybridization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Taken together, these data indicated that H. pylori infection could alter cellular gene expression processes, escape host defense mechanism, increase inflammatory and immune responses, activate NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, disturb metal ion homeostasis, and induce carcinogenesis. All of these might help to explain H. pylori pathogenic mechanism and the gastroduodenal pathogenesis induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:22438889

  8. Effectiveness of ranitidine bismuth citrate and proton pump inhibitor based triple therapies of Helicobacter pylori in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Iscan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma of the stomach. The reported prevalence of H. pylori in the adult population in Turkey is 67.6%–81.3%. A national meta-analysis showed that the average H. pylori eradication rate with proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimens in Turkey had decreased from 84% in 1997 to 55.3% in 2004, suggesting a need to evaluate alternative regimens. Materials and methods : The study was a prospective, single-center trial with a parallel group design. After the selection procedure, consecutive out-patients were assigned to one of six study groups using random sampling numbers. All patients received amoxicillin 1,000 mg b.i.d. and clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d. along with ranitidine bismuth citrate 400 mg b.i.d., or omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., or lansoprazole 30 mg b.i.d., or rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., or pantoprazole 40 mg b.i.d., or esomeprazole 40 mg b.i.d. for 14 days. Results : When we look at the eradication rates of the treatment groups, only two groups (ranitidine bismuth citrate and rabeprazole groups had eradication rates greater than 80%, both at intention to treat and per protocol analyses. The other four groups (omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, and esomeprazole groups showed statistically significant lower eradication rates both at intention to treat (between 57.6 and 66.7% and per protocol (between 60.3 and 72.1% analyses when compared with ranitidine bismuth citrate and rabeprazole groups (p<.05. Conclusion : Ranitidine bismuth citrate and/or rabeprazole based triple therapies must be preferred for the first-line treatment of H. pylori infection.

  9. Two Decades of Helicobacter pylori: A Review of the Fourth Western Pacific Helicobacter Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Fallone

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available From March 3 to 6, 2002, Helicobacter enthusiasts gathered in Perth, Australia for the Fourth Western Pacific Helicobacter Congress to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the modern discovery of this organism by Barry Marshall and Robin Warren. The meeting included state-of-the-art lectures highlighting the breakthroughs that have occurred since the discovery of this bacterium. As well, advances from the forefront of current Helicobacter pylori research were presented, particularly in the realm of genomics and molecular biology. A symposium about vaccines and trends for future H pylori research completed this congress. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the highlights from this conference, emphasizing new advances.

  10. [Comparative estimation of an acute gastroduodenal ulcers, complicated by hemorrhage according to indexes of enzymatic-biochemical spectrum of the blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkov, O V

    2004-07-01

    Comparative estimation of methods of endoscopic hemostasis and treatment of an acute gastroduodenal ulcers, complicated by hemorrhage, was done: in 22 patients the conventional methods were applied, in 41-endoscopic hemostasis, using flatorization with the help of ozone-oxygen mixture and subsequent ozone insufflations. For the treatment efficacy control the endoscopic monitoring was used, there were studied cytobiochemical indexes of the dehydrogenases complex activity and of peroxide oxygenation of lipids. It was established, that ozonotherapy, even applied solely, guarantees the erosions healing in 3 days on average with simultaneous approximation to the norm of cytobiochemical indexes investigated.

  11. Associations between gastric sensorimotor function, depression, somatization, and symptom-based subgroups in functional gastroduodenal disorders: are all symptoms equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauwaert, N; Jones, M P; Holvoet, L; Vandenberghe, J; Vos, R; Tack, J; Van Oudenhove, L

    2012-12-01

    Previous work indicated that psychosocial factors (depression and somatization) are more strongly associated with symptom severity and weight loss in functional dyspepsia (FD) than gastric sensorimotor function. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the association of these etiopathogenetic factors with Rome III symptom-based subgroups in FD [epigastric pain syndrome (EPS), postprandial distress syndrome (PDS)]. We aimed to test whether gastric sensitivity and emptying, depression, and somatization are differentially associated with empirically derived functional gastroduodenal disorders (FGD) symptom factors in one comprehensive model. In 259 tertiary care FD patients, we studied gastric sensorimotor function with barostat and gastric emptying breath test. Depression, somatization, and FGD symptoms were measured using self-report questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on 7 FGD symptoms was used to determine the fit of a latent variable structure based on Rome III symptom-based subgroups. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the putative relationships of the symptom factors with gastric sensorimotor function, depression, and somatization. The results of the CFA show a good fit [C(min) /DF = 1.54, CFI(comparative fit index) = 0.97] for the three-factor solution based on Rome III subgroups. The SEM also fitted the data well (C(min) /DF = 1.24, CFI = 0.98) and demonstrated that gastric sensitivity and depression are associated with PDS and nausea and vomiting. Gastric emptying is uniquely associated with EPS and somatization is strongly associated with all three symptom factors. Confirmatory factor analysis confirms the existence of three FGD symptom factors, corresponding to Rome III symptom-based subgroups. The SEM results suggest that different psychobiological mechanisms may play a role in these subgroups. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Emergency gastroduodenal artery embolization by sandwich technique for angiographically obvious and oblivious, endotherapy failed bleeding duodenal ulcers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anil, G., E-mail: ivyanil10@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiology, Changi General Hospital (Singapore); Tan, A.G.S.; Cheong, H.-W.; Ng, K.-S.; Teoh, W.-C. [Department of Radiology, Changi General Hospital (Singapore)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of adopting a standardized protocol for emergency transarterial embolization (TAE) of the gastroduodenal artery (GDA) with a uniform sandwich technique in endotherapy-failed bleeding duodenal ulcers (DU). Materials and methods: Between December 2009 and December 2010, 15 patients with endotherapy-failed bleeding DU were underwent embolization. Irrespective of active extravasation, the segment of the GDA supplying the bleeding DU as indicated by endoscopically placed clips was embolized by a uniform sandwich technique with gelfoam between metallic coils. The clinical profile of the patients, re-bleeding, mortality rates, and response time of the intervention radiology team were recorded. The angioembolizations were reviewed for their technical success, clinical success, and complications. Mean duration of follow-up was 266.5 days. Results: Active contrast-medium extravasation was seen in three patients (20%). Early re-bleeding was noted in two patients (13.33%). No patient required surgery. There was 100% technical success, while primary and secondary clinical success rates for TAE were 86.6 and 93.3%, respectively. Focal pancreatitis was the single major procedure-related complication. There was no direct bleeding-DU-related death. The response time of the IR service averaged 150 min (range 60-360 min) with mean value of 170 min. Conclusion: Emergency embolization of the GDA using the sandwich technique is a safe and highly effective therapeutic option for bleeding DUs refractory to endotherapy. A prompt response from the IR service can be ensured with an institutional protocol in place for such common medical emergencies.

  13. Embolisation of the Gastroduodenal Artery is Not Necessary in the Presence of Reversed Flow Before Yttrium-90 Radioembolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daghir, Ahmed A., E-mail: ahmeddaghir@doctors.net.uk [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Gungor, Hatice [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Oncology (United Kingdom); Haydar, Ali A. [Barts and the London NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Wasan, Harpreet S. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Oncology (United Kingdom); Tait, Nicholas P. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Introduction: The gastroduodenal artery (GDA) is usually embolised to avoid nontarget dispersal before yttrium-90 (Y{sup 90}) radioembolisation to treat liver metastases. In a minority of patients, there is retrograde flow in the GDA. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is any increased risk from maintaining a patent GDA in patients with reversed flow. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing Y{sup 90} radioembolisation at our institution. The incidence of toxicities arising from nontarget radioembolisation by way of the GDA (gastric/duodenal ulceration, gastric/duodenal bleeding, and pancreatitis) and death occurring within 2 months of treatment were compared between the reversed and the antegrade GDA groups. Results: Ninety-two patients underwent preliminary angiography. Reversed GDA flow was found on angiography in 14.1% of cases; the GDA was not embolised in these patients. The GDA was coiled in 55.7% of patients with antegrade GDA flow to prevent inadvertent dispersal of radioembolic material. There was no increased toxicity related to nontarget dispersal by way of the GDA, or increased early mortality, in patients with reversed GDA flow (P > 0.05). Conclusion: In patients with reversed GDA flow, maintenance of a patent GDA before administration of Y{sup 90} radioembolisation does not increase the risk of toxicity from nontarget dispersal. Therapeutic injection, with careful monitoring to identify early vascular stasis, may be safely performed beyond the origin of the patent GDA. A patent GDA with reversed flow provides forward drive for infused particles and may allow alternative access to the hepatic circulation.

  14. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  16. Role of probiotics in Helicobacter pylori infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cazzato, Immacolata Alessia; Candelli, Marcello; Nista, Enrico Celestino; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main causal agent of several gastrointestinal disturbances (e.g. chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer). Treatments based on a combination of antibiotics and proton pump inhibitors are currently used to eradicate the gastric infection. Despite the high eradication rate reached by standard therapies (_/80%), because of the high incidence of H. pylori-related diseases worldwide new options to improve the eradication rate are needed. Probiotics are defined as...

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection and pediatric asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  18. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Mandalari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  19. Acid-Adaptive Genes of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Yi; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Matrubutham, Uday; Gleeson, Martin A.; Scott, David R.; Sachs, George

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the only neutralophile that has been able to colonize the human stomach by using a variety of acid-adaptive mechanisms. One of the adaptive mechanisms is increased buffering due to expression of an acid-activated inner membrane urea channel, UreI, and a neutral pH-optimum intrabacterial urease. To delineate other possible adaptive mechanisms, changes in gene expression in response to acid exposure were examined using genomic microarrays of H. pylori exposed to different...

  20. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in gastric carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Sicheng; Moss, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the most important risk factor in the development of non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma; host genetic variability and dietary co-factors also modulate risk. Because most H. pylori infections do not cause cancer, H. pylori heterogeneity has been investigated to identify possible virulence factors. The strongest candidates are genes within the cag (cytotoxin associated antigen) pathogenicity island, including the gene encoding the CagA protein, as well as polymor...

  1. Acute symptomatic gastritis due to Helicobacter heilmannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamoudi, Waleed K; Alpert, Lesley; Szilagyi, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii is a Gram-negative spiral-shaped organism predominantly associated with zoonotic infection. Human pathology has also been described, but acute symptoms with complete resolution have been infrequently reported. We present a 50-year-old man in whom H. heilmannii gastritis presented as an acute febrile illness and was successfully treated with antibiotics and proton pump inhibitor. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of similar cases are reviewed.

  2. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    OpenAIRE

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermato...

  3. RESEARCH Helicobacter pylori eradication: A randomised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2006.102269]. 13. Laine L, Estrada R, Trujillo M, Fukanaga K, Neil G. Randomized comparison of differing periods of twice-a-day triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1996;10(6):1029-33. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2036.1996.111282000.x]. 14.

  4. Investigation of association of Helicobacter pylori and simple nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate a possible contribution of Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) in the etiopathogenesis of simple nasal polyps. Study Design: Prospective clinical trial. Methods: Twenty five patients with simple nasal polyps underwent nasal polypectomy were studied. Helicobacter pylori DNA was investigated for ...

  5. Bacteriologisch en serologisch onderzoek van Helicobacter species bij laboratoriummuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Root R; Admiraal J; Koedam MA; Thuis HCW; Veenema JL; LIS; LPI

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter soorten zijn spiraalvormige Gramnegatieve bacterien die voorkomen in het maagdarmkanaal van mens en dier. Helicobacter hepaticus koloniseert bij muizen o.a. het ileum en het cecum en is bij meerdere muizenstammen geassocieerd met chronische actieve hepatitis en bij de A/J stam met

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection and precancerous lesions of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziri, Adem; Juniku-Shkololli, Argjira; Gashi, Zaim; Berisha, Drita; Haziri, Avni

    2010-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, hereditary non-polyposos colon cancer, gastric dysplasia, gastric adenoma, Barrett esophagitis and familiar adenomatous polyposis are confirmed precancerous lesions of the stomach. Most of these conditions are correlated with long-term infections with Helicobacter pylori. Patients which were included in our study underwent gastro endoscopy with multiple biopsies from antrum and corpus ventricle, also urease test and histopathological examination, using special coloring for Helicobacter pylori. 802 patients entered this study, of which 369 female and 483 male. Among female patients 56.4% resulted Helicobacter pylori positive, whereas among male patients this was at a rate of 62.6%. The most affected age was 40-49 years, in which group Helicobacter pylori infection was 64.2%. In each precancerous lesion positivity of Helicobacter pylori infection was very high.-in patients with intestinal metaplasia: 71.7%, with gastric dysplasia: 71.4%, with gastric ulcer: 68.4%, with atrophic gastritis: 66.0% and with Barrett esophagitis: 55.0%. The main purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of Helicobacter pylori infection among patients with precancerous lesions, which resulted to be very high. The highest percentage of infection resulted in patients with intestinal metaplasia (71.7%). Precancerous lesions of stomach are associated with high percentage of Helicobacter pylori infection. This confirms once more the importance of Helicobacter pylori eradication in early stages and patient's surveillance.

  7. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with peptic ulcer disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection has been identified as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and is probably the most important cause of relapse in those previously treated for peptic ulcer disease. The aim of this study was to determine the association of Helicobacter pylori infection as ...

  8. A Biotin Biosynthesis Gene Restricted to Helicobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Jia, Jia; Cronan, John E.

    2016-01-01

    In most bacteria the last step in synthesis of the pimelate moiety of biotin is cleavage of the ester bond of pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester. The paradigm cleavage enzyme is Escherichia coli BioH which together with the BioC methyltransferase allows synthesis of the pimelate moiety by a modified fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. Analyses of the extant bacterial genomes showed that bioH is absent from many bioC-containing bacteria and is replaced by other genes. Helicobacter pylori lacks a gene encoding a homologue of the known pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester cleavage enzymes suggesting that it encodes a novel enzyme that cleaves this intermediate. We isolated the H. pylori gene encoding this enzyme, bioV, by complementation of an E. coli bioH deletion strain. Purified BioV cleaved the physiological substrate, pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester to pimeloyl-ACP by use of a catalytic triad, each member of which was essential for activity. The role of BioV in biotin biosynthesis was demonstrated using a reconstituted in vitro desthiobiotin synthesis system. BioV homologues seem the sole pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester esterase present in the Helicobacter species and their occurrence only in H. pylori and close relatives provide a target for development of drugs to specifically treat Helicobacter infections. PMID:26868423

  9. Special licorice extracts containing lowered glycyrrhizin and enhanced licochalcone A prevented Helicobacter pylori-initiated, salt diet-promoted gastric tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Min; Park, Sang-Ho; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Han, Young-Min; Jang, Sang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2014-06-01

    In spite of cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory actions, conventional licorice extracts (c-lico) were limitedly used due to serious side effects of glycyrrhizin. As our group had successfully isolated special licorice extracts (s-lico) lowering troublesome glycyrrhizin, but increasing licochalcone A, we have compared anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and cytoprotective actions of s-lico and c-lico against either in vitro or in vivo Helicobacter pylori infection. RT-PCR and Western blot were performed to check anti-inflammatory action and electron spin resonance (ESR) and DCFDA spectroscopy to check antioxidative action. s-lico or c-lico was pretreated 1 hours before H. pylori infection on AGS cells. Interleukin-10 deficient mice inoculated H. pylori and followed with high salt containing pallet diets to produce H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric tumors, during which s-lico or c-lico-containing pellet diets were administered up to 24 weeks. s-lico had fabulous efficacy on scavenging ROS which was further confirmed by DCFDA study and ESR measurement. The expressions of COX-2, iNOS, VEGF, and IL-8 were increased after H. pylori infection, of which levels were significantly decreased with s-lico in a dose-dependent manner. s-lico significantly ameliorated hypoxia-induced or H. pylori-induced angiogenic activities. s-lico significantly ameliorated H. pylori-induced gastric damages as well as gastritis. Our animal model showed significant development of gastric tumors including adenoma and dysplasia relevant to H. pylori infection, and s-lico administration significantly attenuated incidence of H. pylori-induced gastric tumorigenesis. Special licorice extracts can be anticipating substance afforded significant attenuation of either H. pylori-induced gastritis or tumorigenesis based on potent antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antimutagenic actions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Development of gastric cancer in nonatrophic stomach with highly active inflammation identified by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody together with endoscopic rugal hyperplastic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mika; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Yoshida, Takeichi; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Enomoto, Shotaro; Ueda, Kazuki; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Tekeshita, Tatsuya; Mohara, Osamu; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate groups at high risk of developing cancer among patients with serologically identified Helicobacter pylori infection and nonatrophic stomach. Annual endoscopy was performed for a mean of 5.4 years in 496 asymptomatic middle-aged men who were H. pylori antibody-positive and pepsinogen (PG) test-negative. Subjects were stratified according to the activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis measured by serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody, and/or by endoscopic findings of rugal hyperplastic gastritis (RHG), and cancer development was investigated. During the study period, seven cases of cancer developed in the cohort (incidence rate, 261/100,000 person-years), with 85.7% developing in the group showing a PGI/II ratio ≤ 3.0, reflecting active inflammation-based high PGII levels. Cancer incidence was significantly higher in this group (750/100,000 person-years) than in groups with less active gastritis. Furthermore, cancer incidence for this group was significantly higher in the subgroup with high H. pylori antibody titers than in the low-titer subgroup. Meanwhile, endoscopic findings revealed that 11.7% of subjects showed RHG reflecting localized highly active inflammation, and cancer risk was significantly higher in patients with RHG than in patients without. Combining the two serum tests and endoscopic examination for RHG allowed identification of subjects with more active gastritis and higher cancer risk. No cancer development was observed in these high-risk subjects after H. pylori eradication. Subjects with highly active gastritis identified by the two serological tests and endoscopic RHG constitute a group at high risk of cancer development with H. pylori-infected nonatrophic stomach. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  11. Relevance of Helicobacter pylori vacA 3'-end Region Polymorphism to Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Seyedeh Zahra; Latifi-Navid, Saeid; Mohammadi, Shiva; Zahri, Saber; Bakhti, Fatemeh Sadat; Feizi, Farideh; Yazdanbod, Abbas; Siavoshi, Farideh

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes play an important role in the pathogenesis of severe gastrointestinal disease. We identified a novel polymorphic site in the 3'-end region of H. pylori vacA gene, denoted by c1/-c2 (c1: with deletion of 15 bp), and examined associations of this and the previous four sites as well as cagA status with gastroduodenal diseases, in a total of 217 Iranian H. pylori isolates. Histopathologic evaluations were performed and patients with gastric cancer (GC) were further classified based on the anatomic site of tumor, including cardia and noncardia GC, and the histopathologic type of tumor, including intestinal- and diffuse-type GC. The vacA m1, i1, d1, c1, and cagA genotypes were significantly associated with an increased risk of GC, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 4.29 (2.03-9.08), 6.11 (2.63-14.19), 3.18 (1.49-6.76), 15.13 (5.86-39.01), and 2.59 (1.09-6.12), respectively. The vacA c1 genotype had an increased age- and sex-adjusted risk for GC by the multiple logistic regression analysis; the OR was 38.32 (95% CI, 6.60-222.29). This association was independent of and larger than the associations of the m-, i-, and d-type of vacA or cagA status with GC. No significant correlation was found between s1, whether independently or in combination, and the risk of GC or peptic ulcer disease (PUD). The vacA i1 and cagA genotypes were linked to an increased risk of PUD; the OR (95% CI) was 2.80 (1.45-5.40) and 2.62 (1.23-5.61), respectively. The presence of both the vacA i1 and cagA genotypes further increased the risk of PUD; the OR was 5.20 (95% CI, 1.92-14.03). The H. pylori vacA c1 genotype might therefore be one of the strongest risk predictors of GC in male patients aged ≥55 in Iran. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and microevolution in host and the clinical outcome: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Bakhti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the causative agent in development of gastroduode-nal diseases, such as chronic atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, mucosa associated lym-phoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer. H. pylori has been associated with inflammation in cardia, showing the fact that infection with this bacterium could also be a risk factor for gastric cardia cancer. Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. This is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, and ap-proximately 700,000 people succumb each year to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been estimated that 69% of the Iranian population currently harbor H. pylori infection. The prevalence of duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer is high in Iranian populations. However, this has been largely influenced by geographic and/or ethnic origin. Epidemi-ology studies have shown that host, environmental, and bacterial factors determine the outcome of H. pylori infection. The bacterium contains allelic diversity and high genet-ic variability into core- and virulence-genes and that this diversity is geographically and ethnically structured. The genetic diversity within H. pylori is greater than within most other bacteria, and its diversity is more than 50-fold higher than that of human DNA. The maintenance of high diversification makes this bacterium to cope with particular challenges in individual hosts. It has been reported that the recombination contributed to the creation of new genes and gene family. Furthermore, the microevolution in cagA and vacA genes is a common event, leading to a change in the virulence phenotype. These factors contribute to the bacterial survival in acidic conditions in stomach and protect it from host immune system, causing tissue damage and clinical disease. In this review article, we discussed the correlation between H. pylori virulence factors and clin-ical outcomes, microevolution of H. pylori virulence genes in a single host

  13. Emerging Helicobacter pylori levofloxacin resistance and novel genetic mutation in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-11-04

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic susceptibility in the Nepalese strains is untracked. We determined the antibiotic susceptibility for H. pylori and analyzed the presence of genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance in Nepalese strains. This study included 146 consecutive patients who underwent gastroduodenal endoscopy in Kathmandu, Nepal. Among 42 isolated H. pylori, there was no resistance to amoxicillin and tetracycline. In contrast, similar with typical South Asian patterns; metronidazole resistance rate in Nepalese strains were extremely high (88.1 %, 37/42). Clarithromycin resistance rate in Nepalese strains were modestly high (21.4 %, 9/42). Most of metronidazole resistant strains had highly distributed rdxA and frxA mutations, but were relative coincidence without a synergistic effect to increase the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Among strains with the high MIC, 63.6 % (7/11) were associated with frameshift mutation at position 18 of frxA with or without rdxA involvement. However, based on next generation sequencing data we found that one strain with the highest MIC value had a novel mutation in the form of amino acid substituted at Ala-212, Gln-382, Ile-485 of dppA and Leu-145, Thr-168, Glu-117, Val-121, Arg-221 in dapF aside from missense mutations in full-length rdxA. Mutations at Asn-87 and/or Asp-91 of the gyrA were predominantly in levofloxacin-resistant strains. The gyrB mutation had steady relationship with the gyrA 87-91 mutations. Although three (44.4 %) and two (22.2 %) of clarithromycin resistant strains had point mutation on A2143G and A2146G, we confirmed the involvement of rpl22 and infB in high MIC strains without an 23SrRNA mutation. The rates of resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole and levofloxacin were high in Nepalese strains, indicating that these antibiotics-based triple therapies are not useful as first-line treatment in Nepal. Bismuth or non-bismuth-based quadruple regimens

  14. Helicobacter marmotae and novel Helicobacter and Campylobacter species isolated from the livers and intestines of prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisele, Maike; Shen, Zeli; Parry, Nicola; Mobley, Melissa; Taylor, Nancy S.; Buckley, Ellen; Abedin, Mohammad Z.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2011-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are used to study the aetiology and prevention of gallstones because of the similarities of prairie dog and human bile gallstone composition. Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested a connection between infection with Helicobacter species and cholesterol cholelithiasis, cholecystis and gallbladder cancer. Ten of the 34 prairie dogs in this study had positive Helicobacter species identified by PCR using Helicobacter genus-specific primers. Ten of 34 prairie dogs had positive Campylobacter species identified in the intestine by PCR with Campylobacter genus-specific primers. Six Helicobacter sp. isolates and three Campylobacter sp. isolates were identified taxonomically by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The prairie dog helicobacters fell into three clusters adjacent to Helicobacter marmotae. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three strains in two adjacent clusters were included in the species H. marmotae. Three strains were only 97.1 % similar to the sequence of H. marmotae and can be considered a novel species with the provisional designation Helicobacter sp. Prairie Dog 3. The prairie dog campylobacters formed a single novel cluster and represent a novel Campylobacter sp. with the provisional designation Campylobacter sp. Prairie Dog. They branched with Campylobacter cuniculorum at 96.3 % similarity and had the greatest sequence similarity to Campylobacter helveticus at 97.1 % similarity. Whether H. marmotae or the novel Helicobacter sp. and Campylobacter sp. identified in prairie dogs play a role in cholesterol gallstones or hepatobiliary disease requires further studies. PMID:21546560

  15. Enterohepatic helicobacter in ulcerative colitis: potential pathogenic entities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Thomson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in bacterial populations termed "dysbiosis" are thought central to ulcerative colitis (UC pathogenesis. In particular, the possibility that novel Helicobacter organisms play a role in human UC has been debated but not comprehensively investigated. The aim of this study was to develop a molecular approach to investigate the presence of Helicobacter organisms in adults with and without UC.A dual molecular approach to detect Helicobacter was developed. Oligonucleotide probes against the genus Helicobacter were designed and optimised alongside a validation of published H. pylori probes. A comprehensive evaluation of Helicobacter genus and H. pylori PCR primers was also undertaken. The combined approach was then assessed in a range of gastrointestinal samples prior to assessment of a UC cohort. Archival colonic samples were available from 106 individuals for FISH analysis (57 with UC and 49 non-IBD controls. A further 118 individuals were collected prospectively for dual FISH and PCR analysis (86 UC and 32 non-IBD controls. An additional 27 non-IBD controls were available for PCR analysis. All Helicobacter PCR-positive samples were sequenced. The association between Helicobacter and each study group was statistically analysed using the Pearson Chi Squared 2 tailed test. Helicobacter genus PCR positivity was significantly higher in UC than controls (32 of 77 versus 11 of 59, p = 0.004. Sequence analysis indicated enterohepatic Helicobacter species prevalence was significantly higher in the UC group compared to the control group (30 of 77 versus 2 of 59, p<0.0001. PCR and FISH results were concordant in 74 (67.9% of subjects. The majority of discordant results were attributable to a higher positivity rate with FISH than PCR.Helicobacter organisms warrant consideration as potential pathogenic entities in UC. Isolation of these organisms from colonic tissue is needed to enable interrogation of pathogenicity against established criteria.

  16. Emergency Pancreatoduodenectomy with Preservation of Gastroduodenal Artery for Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Duodenal Metastasis by Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Patient with Celiac Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Neofytou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma is rare, and even rarer is a massive gastrointestinal bleeding from such tumours. Coeliac occlusive disease, although rarely symptomatic, can lead to ischaemic changes with anastomotic dehiscence and leaks when a patient undergoes pancreatoduodenectomy. A 41-year-old man with known metastasis to the adrenal glands and the second part of the duodenum close to the ampulla of Vater from clear cell renal cell carcinoma was admitted to our department due to massive gastrointestinal bleeding from the duodenal metastasis. Endoscopic control of the bleed was not possible, while the bleeding vessel embolization was able to control the haemorrhage only temporarily. An angiography during the embolization demonstrated the presence of stenosis of the coeliac artery and also hypertrophic inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries supplying the proper hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery (GDA. The patient underwent emergency pancreatoduodenectomy with preservation of the gastroduodenal artery. The patient had an uneventful recovery and did not experience further bleeding. Also the blood flow to the liver was compromised as shown by the normal liver function tests (LFTs postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a preservation of the GDA during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy.

  17. Short- and long-term results of transcatheter embolization for massive arterial hemorrhage from gastroduodenal ulcers not controlled by endoscopic hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffroy, Romaric; Guiu, Boris; Mezzetta, Lise; Minello, Anne; Michiels, Christophe; Jouve, Jean-Louis; Cheynel, Nicolas; Rat, Patrick; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Krausé, Denis

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Severe bleeding from gastrointestinal ulcers is a life-threatening event that is difficult to manage when endoscopic treatment fails. Transcatheter embolization has been suggested as an alternative treatment in this situation. The present study reports on the efficacy and long-term outcomes of transcatheter embolization after failed endoscopic treatments were assessed in high-operative-risk patients. METHODS: A retrospective review of 60 consecutive emergency embolization procedures in hemodynamically unstable patients (41 men, 19 women; mean [±SD] age 69.4±15 years) was conducted. Patients were referred for selective angiography between 1999 and 2008 after failed endoscopic treatment of massive bleeding from gastrointestinal ulcers. Mean follow-up was 22 months. RESULTS: Embolization was feasible and successful in 57 patients. Sandwich coiling of the gastroduodenal artery was used in 34 patients, and superselective occlusion of the terminal feeding artery (with glue, coils or gelatin particles) was used in 23 patients. Early rebleeding occurred in 16 patients and was managed with endoscopy (n=8), reembolization (n=3) or surgery (n=5). No major embolization-related complications occurred. Sixteen patients died within 30 days after embolization (including three who died from rebleeding) and 11 died thereafter. No late bleeding recurrences were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Selective angiographic embolization is safe and effective for controlling life-threatening bleeding from gastroduodenal ulcers. The procedure usually obviates the need for emergency surgery in these high-risk patients. Survival depends chiefly on underlying conditions. PMID:19214287

  18. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahara Shu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133, 98% (1,010/1,033, 58% (581/1,009, and 96% (248/259, respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness.

  19. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence.

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Bennedsen, Mads; On, Stephen L. W.; Ouis, Ibn-Sina; Vandamme, Peter; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Ljungh, Åsa; Wadström, Torkel

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter species are fastidious bacterial pathogens that are difficult to culture by standard methods. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique for detection and identification of different Helicobacter species was developed and evaluated. The method involves PCR detection of Helicobacter DNA by genus-specific primers that target 16S rDNA and subsequent differentiation of Helicobacter PCR products by use of DGGE. Strains are identified by comparing mobilities of ...

  20. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  1. Helicobacter infection decreases reproductive performance of IL10-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Julie M; Vanderford, Deborah A; Chichlowski, Maciej; Myles, Matthew H; Hale, Laura P

    2008-10-01

    Infections with a variety of Helicobacter species have been documented in rodent research facilities, with variable effects on rodent health. Helicobacter typhlonius has been reported to cause enteric disease in immunodeficient and IL10(-/-) mice, whereas H. rodentium has only been reported to cause disease in immunodeficient mice coinfected with other Helicobacter species. The effect of Helicobacter infections on murine reproduction has not been well studied. The reproductive performance of C57BL/6 IL10(-/-) female mice intentionally infected with H. typhlonius, H. rodentium, or both was compared with that of age-matched uninfected controls or similarly infected mice that received antihelicobacter therapy. The presence of Helicobacter organisms in stool and relevant tissues was detected by PCR assays. Helicobacter infection of IL10(-/-) female mice markedly decreased pregnancy rates and pup survival. The number of pups surviving to weaning was greatest in noninfected mice and decreased for H. rodentium > H. typhlonius > H. rodentium and H. typhlonius coinfected mice. Helicobacter organisms were detected by semiquantitative real-time PCR in the reproductive organs of a subset of infected mice. Treatment of infected mice with a 4-drug regimen consisting of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and omeprazole increased pregnancy rates, and pup survival and dam fecundity improved. We conclude that infection with H. typhlonius, H. rodentium, or both decreased the reproductive performance of IL10(-/-) mice. In addition, antihelicobacter therapy improved fecundity and enhanced pup survival.

  2. Polysaccharides as Bacterial Antiadhesive Agents and "Smart" Constituents for Improved Drug Delivery Systems Against Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchicchi, Bianca; Hensel, Andreas; Goycoolea, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    The standard eradication treatment of the hostile Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) stomach infection is facing increasing alarming antibiotic resistance worldwide and calls for alternative strategies to the use of antibiotics. One new perspective in this direction is cytoprotective compounds for targeted prevention of the adhesion of the bacteria to the stomach host cell and to inhibit the bacterial cell-cell communication via quorum sensing by specific inhibitors. Bacterial adhesion of H. pylori to the host cells is mainly mediated by carbohydrate-protein interactions. Therefore, the use of polyvalent carbohydrates, (e.g. plant-derived polysaccharides), as potential antiadhesive compounds, seems to be a promising tool to prevent the initial docking of the bacterium to the stomach cells. Polysaccharides are common constituents of daily food, either as starch or as dietary fiber and often also function as excipients for galenic drug-delivery formulations. In addition, polysaccharides with defined pharmacodynamics action against bacterial outer membrane proteins can have potential as therapeutic tools in the treatment of bacterial infections. Some polysaccharides are known to possess antibacterial properties against gram-positive bacteria, others to inhibit bacterial colonization by blocking specific carbohydrate receptors involved in host-bacteria interaction. This mode of action is advocated as alternative antiadhesion therapy. Ongoing research is also seeking for polysaccharide-based nanoformulations with potential for local drug delivery at the stomach as novel H. pylori therapies. These approaches pose challenges concerned with the stability of the nanomaterials in the harsh conditions of the gastric environment and their capacity to adhere to the stomach mucosa. In a global scenario, geographical diversity and social habits, namely lifestyle and dietary factors, influence the prevalence of the H. pylori-associated diseases and their severity. In this context

  3. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF GASTRIC MUCOSAL BIOPSIES IN CHRONIC GASTRITIS PATIENTS WITH SPECIAL CORRELATION TO HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AT RIMS HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Choudhury

    2016-07-01

    moderate Intestinal metaplasia (IM were found in gastritis cases. Correlation coefficient of neutrophilic activity with H. pylori density was 0.725 (p=0.000, which was statistically significant. CONCLUSION In our study, histopathological features of H. pylori associated chronic gastritis have shown H. pylori density, neutrophilic activity, mononuclear cell infiltration, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. We also have observed the association between neutrophilic activity and H. pylori density.

  4. [Role of Helicobacter species in hepatobiliary diseases]3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M.E.; Lauritsen, L.E.; Andersen, Leif Percival

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter species have been found in extragastric tissues of humans and mice, and it has been shown that hepatic infection with H. hepaticus causes chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in mice. 18 studies of humans with hepatobiliary diseases have been reviewed. In studies...... of patients with HCC the results imply a pathogen role of Helicobacter species. The same trend was not found in studies of humans with other hepatobiliary diseases. There is no evidence of the possible involvement of Helicobacter species in the development of diseases in the hepatobiliary system...

  5. Helicobacter canis colonization in sheep: a Zoonotic link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennes, Alton G; Turk, Michelle L; Trowel, Elise M; Cullin, Cassandra; Shen, Zeli; Pang, Jassia; Petersson, Katherine H; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Fox, James G

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter canis has been associated with hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal disease in dogs, cats, and humans. Infection has not been documented in other species. Sheep feces subjected to microaerobic culture. Isolates were characterized by genus-specific PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism, biochemical profiling, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Helicobacter canis was isolated from sheep feces and confirmed by the above methods. These isolates are distinct from other sheep-origin enterohepatic Helicobacter species previously isolated. This study identifies sheep as H. canis reservoirs potentially important in zoonotic or foodborne transmission. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  7. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Bennedsen, Mads; On, Stephen L W; Ouis, Ibn-Sina; Vandamme, Peter; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

    2003-09-01

    Helicobacter species are fastidious bacterial pathogens that are difficult to culture by standard methods. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique for detection and identification of different Helicobacter species was developed and evaluated. The method involves PCR detection of Helicobacter DNA by genus-specific primers that target 16S rDNA and subsequent differentiation of Helicobacter PCR products by use of DGGE. Strains are identified by comparing mobilities of unknown samples to those determined for reference strains; sequence analysis can also be performed on purified amplicons. Sixteen DGGE profiles were derived from 44 type and reference strains of 20 Helicobacter species, indicating the potential of this approach for resolving infection of a single host by multiple Helicobacter species. Some more highly related species were not differentiated whereas in highly heterogeneous species, sequence divergence was observed and more than one PCR-DGGE profile was obtained. Application of the PCR-DGGE method to DNA extracted from faeces of zoo animals revealed the presence of Helicobacter DNA in 13 of 16 samples; a correlation was seen between the mobility of PCR products in DGGE analysis and DNA sequencing. In combination, this indicated that zoo animals are colonized by a wide range of different Helicobacter species; seven animals appeared to be colonized by multiple Helicobacter species. By this approach, presumptive identifications were made of Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products ( approximately 400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results demonstrate the potential of PCR-DGGE-based analysis for identification of Helicobacter species in complex ecosystems, such as the gastrointestinal tract, and could contribute to

  8. Isolation and characterization of a novel Helicobacter species, Helicobacter jaachi sp. nov., from common marmosets (Callithrix jaachus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Sheh, Alexander; Everitt, Jeffrey; Bertram, Frederick; Paster, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose-bred common marmosets from domestic sources housed in a US research facility, and used in multiple drug discovery programmes, were noted to have a high incidence of spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease and sporadic cholecystitis and cholangiohepatitis. Inflammatory infiltrates increased in incidence and severity with age. Because Helicobacter spp. have been linked to gastrointestinal diseases, samples from the gastrointestinal tracts of 39 marmosets were screened for Helicobacter spp. by culture and PCR. Helicobacter spp. were frequently detected in marmosets; 28.2 % of the marmosets were positive for a proposed novel species, Helicobacter jaachi sp. nov., by culture, and 48.7 % were positive by Helicobacter genus-specific PCR. Seventeen strains of Helicobacter sp. from 11 marmosets were cultured from various gastrointestinal sites. Older animals (age 6–11 years) had a higher helicobacter prevalence rate (57.1 %) compared with younger animals (age 3–5 years), which had a 27.2 % prevalence rate. Cells of H. jaachi sp. nov. were catalase, urease and oxidase positive and had fusiform morphology, with periplasmic fibres and multiple bipolar, sheathed flagella. All isolates had similar 16S and 23S rRNA sequences, which clustered as representatives of a novel Helicobacter species closely related to ‘Helicobacter sanguini’ (97 %), a species isolated from cotton-top tamarins and ‘Helicobacter callitrichis’ (96 %) isolated previously from the faeces of common marmosets. The whole genome sequence of one of the liver isolates, H. jaachi sp. nov. MIT 09-6949T, had a 1.9 Mb genome length with a 41 mol% DNA G+C content. The type strain of Helicobacter jaachi sp. nov., MIT 09-6949T, has been deposited in the BCCM/LMG Bacteria Collection as LMG 28613T. These findings add to the increasing number of animal species with gastrointestinal disease in which novel enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. have been isolated. PMID:26297446

  9. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Soud, W.; Bennedsen, M.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter species are fastidious bacterial pathogens that are difficult to culture by standard methods. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique for detection and identification of different Helicobacter species was developed and evaluated. The method involves PCR...... bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products (similar to400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results...

  10. Helicobacter pylori Infection, Gastric Cancer and Gastropanel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loor Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is one of the most widespread types of cancer worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection has been clearly correlated with gastric carcinogenesis. At present and in the near future, the most important challenge is and will be the significant reduction of mortality due to GC. That goal can be achieved through the identification of higher-risk patients, such as those with atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. In this review we intend to discuss the importance of diagnosing H. pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis in preventing gastric cancer, using a new non-invasive test called GastroPanel. This test is a classification algorithm including four biochemical parameters pepsinogen I and II (PGI and PGII, gastrin-17 (G17, and anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies (Ig G anti-Hp measured in fasting sera, which allows to classify patients as having atrophic or non-atrophic gastritis and to find whether gastritis is associated or not with H. pylori infection. GastroPanel is not a “cancer test”, but it can and should be used in the screening and diagnosis of subjects with a high cancer risk; still, a careful diagnostic made by superior digestive endoscopy is compulsory to find possible precancerous or cancerous lesions at an early and curable stage.

  11. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  12. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaridou E

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Lazaridou,1 Chrysovalantis Korfitis,2 Christina Kemanetzi,1 Elena Sotiriou,1 Zoe Apalla,1 Efstratios Vakirlis,1 Christina Fotiadou,1 Aimilios Lallas,1 Demetrios Ioannides1 1First Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Dermatology, 401 General Army Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. Keywords: eradication, Helicobacter pylori, pathogenesis, rosacea

  13. Helicobacter pylori, HIV and Gastric Hypochlorhydria in the Malawian Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geraghty, Joe; Thumbs, Alexander; Kankwatira, Anstead; Andrews, Tim; Moore, Andrew; Malamba, Rose; Mtunthama, Neema; Hellberg, Kai; Kalongolera, Lughano; O'Toole, Paul; Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D Mark; Gordon, Melita

    2015-01-01

    HIV and Helicobacter pylori are common chronic infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Both conditions can predispose to gastric hypochlorhydria that may be a risk factor for enteric infections and reduced drug absorption...

  14. Epidemiological study on feline gastric Helicobacter spp. in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota-Aizawa, Sanae; Ohno, Koichi; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Ko; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Mimuro, Hitomi; Watanabe, Takayasu; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-05-18

    Epidemiological and pathological studies on Helicobacter spp. in feline stomachs in Japan were conducted using genus- and species-specific (H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto [s.s.] and H. pylori) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), ureAB gene sequencing and histopathology. PCR results showed that 28 of 56 cats were infected with Helicobacter spp., and H. heilmannii s.s. was the most prevalent species by both PCR (28/28) and ureAB gene sequencing (26/28). Some of the sequences showed high similarities with those from human patients with gastric diseases (99%). There were no significant differences between Helicobacter spp.-positive and -negative cats in the severity of chronic gastritis (P=0.69). This is the first extensive epidemiological study on feline gastric Helicobacter spp. in Japan.

  15. Gastric Helicobacter Spp. Infection in Captive Neotropical Brazilian Feline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz de Camargo, Pedro; Akemi Uenaka, Simone; Bette Motta, Maitê; Harumi Adania, Cristina; Yamasaki, Letícia; Alfieri, Amauri A.; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ten captive neotropical Brazilian feline were submitted to gastroscopic examination and samples of gastric mucosa from fundus, corpus and pyloric antrum were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter species. Warthin-Starry (WS) staining and PCR assay with species-specific primers and enzymatic cleavage were applied for bacterial detection and identification. Histological lesions were evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining. All animals showed normal gross aspect of gastric mucosa. Helicobacter heilmannii was confirmed in 100% of the samples by WS and PCR assay. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate in the lamina propria was observed in eight animals, mainly in the fundus region. Small lymphoid follicles were seen in three animals. No significant association between Helicobacter infection and histological findings was verified. These observations suggest that gastric Helicobacter spp. could be a commensal or a eventual pathogen to captive neotropical feline, and that procedures, way life, and stress level on the shelter apparently had no negative repercussion over the integrity of the stomach. PMID:24031634

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and fasting plasma glucose concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Peach, H; Barnett, N.

    2001-01-01

    Background—Helicobacter pylori infection raises basal and meal stimulated serum gastrin concentrations and lowers iron stores, which may in turn reduce fasting plasma glucose concentrations in the population.

  17. Evolution of the Selenoproteome in Helicobacter pylori and Epsilonproteobacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cravedi, Pietro; Mori, Giulia; Fischer, Frédéric; Percudani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    By competing for the acquisition of essential nutrients, Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to persist in the human stomach, also causing nutritional insufficiencies in the host. Although the H...

  18. Is Helicobacter Pylori a Possible Etiopathogenic Factor in Chronic Tonsillitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Elmas Ozgun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the major gastric pathogen which has an important role in the etiopathogenesis of chronic gastritis. We investigated the presence of Helicobacter pylori as an extragastric reservoir in the tonsillectomy specimens to display if it is an etiologic factor in the development of chronic tonsilitis. Material and Method: In the current study, 100 cases with chronic tonsilitis were examined in bilateral tonsillectomy specimens. The colonization of the microorganism have be...

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  20. Cholescintigraphy in the evaluation of gastroduodenal reflux in children with gastritis - preliminary report; Cholescyntygrafia w badaniu refluksu dwunastniczo-zoladkowego u dzieci z zapaleniem zoladka - doniesienie wstepne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lass, P.; Szarszewski, A.; Romanowicz, G.; Mizan, K.; Gumkowska-Kaminska, B.; Slominski, J.M. [Akademia Medyczna, Gdansk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    We assessed by means of Tc-99m-HEPIDA cholescintigraphy the gastroduodenal reflux in 28 children with endoscopic signs of gastric biliary reflux. Those children were selected from a group of 190 children who underwent endoscopy because of abdominal pain disorders. We found the positive cholescintigraphic test in 67% of children. In 6 control tests after 4-months treatment with cisapride we found the withdrawal of cholescintigraphic signs, which corresponded with the improvement of clinical signs. The authors consider the cholescintigraphic examination useful in evaluation of biliary reflux in children, for the sake of more non-invasive character in comparison to endoscopy and X-ray contrast imaging after catheterizing of duodenum. (author). 9 refs.

  1. Duodenal application of Li+ in a submaximal therapeutic dose inhibits exocrine pancreatic secretion and modulates gastro-duodenal myoelectrical activity in a conscious pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naughton, Violetta; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Naughton, Patrick Joseph

    2013-01-01

    for electromyography of smooth muscles, and with a pancreatic duct catheter and a duodenal T-cannula for collection and re-entrant flow of pancreatic juice. After the recovery period, on alternative days, each animal was tested once with an intraduodenal infusion of Li+ (100 mmol·L–1 C3H5LiO3, 10 mL·kg−1·h−1) for 1 h......This study tested whether duodenal application of lithium inhibits gastroduodenal motility, and whether it suppresses secretion from the exocrine pancreas. Five suckling pigs, 16–18 days old, were surgically fitted with 3 serosal electrodes on the wall of the gastric antrum and the duodenum...

  2. Gastroduodenal lipomatosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlies, F. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Hoe, L. van [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Leemans, A.M. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Ponette, E. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Paepe, I. de [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1997-04-01

    fomparison of CT studies performed in 1990 and 1995 revealed no progression. Endoscopic biopsies were obtained repeatedly; there were no signs of malignancy. Optical microscopy of the duodenal biopsies showed a well-preserved villous architecture, normal surface, and cryptic epithelial cells, and, in the lamina propria, a significant increase in inflammatory cells, focally infiltrating the surface epithelium. Besides this pattern of chronic duodenitis, an increased amount of mature adipocytes in the submucosa was found. Although the Brunner glands were still well preserved, they were, however, partially irregular because of the presence of adipocytes in the intervening stroma, The adipose tissue was indeed not incapsulated, nor well circumscribed, suggesting a lipomatosis, rather than a lipoma. The size of the samples did, however, not allow a proper distinction between those conditions. (orig./AJ). With 4 figs.

  3. Metal-responsive gene regulation and metal transport in Helicobacter species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Belzer (Clara); J. Stoof (Jeroen); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter species are among the most successful colonizers of the mammalian gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract. Colonization is usually lifelong, indicating that Helicobacter species have evolved intricate mechanisms of dealing with stresses encountered during colonization of

  4. Helicobacter species and common gut bacterial DNA in gallbladder with cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagin, Peren H; Stenram, Unne; Wadström, Torkel; Ljungh, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria in patients with cholecystitis. METHODS: A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), specific to 16S rRNA of Helicobacter spp. was performed on paraffin-embedded gallbladder samples of 100 cholecystitis and 102 control cases. The samples were also analyzed for some common gut bacteria by PCR. Positive samples were sequenced for species identification. RESULTS: Helicobacter DNA was found in seven out of 100 cases of acute and chronic cholecystitis. Sequence analysis displayed Helicobacter pullorum (H. pullorum) in six cases and Helicobacter pylori in one; H. pullorum was only found in cases with metaplasia. Control samples were negative for Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria. There was a significant difference (P = 0.007) between cholecystitis and control samples for Helicobacter DNA. CONCLUSION: A possible relationship was detected between Helicobacter DNA and cholecystitis. Further serological and immunohistochemical studies are needed to support these data. PMID:20939110

  5. Are Helicobacter Pylori and Other Helicobacter Species Infection Associated with Human Biliary Lithiasis? A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Di Zhou; Yong Zhang; Wei Gong; Sayid Omar Mohamed; Henry Ogbomo; Xuefeng Wang; Yingbin Liu; Zhiwei Quan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence interv...

  6. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: polymerase chain reaction for Helicobacter DNA is a valuable tool to elucidate the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, S; Zsikla, V; Frank, A; Willi, N; Cathomas, G

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis has been increasingly reported. Molecular techniques as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may detect bacterial DNA in histologically negative gastritis. To evaluate of Helicobacter PCR in gastric biopsies for the daily diagnostics of Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Over a 5-year period, routine biopsies with chronic gastritis reminiscent of Helicobacter infection, but negative by histology, were tested by using a H. pylori specific PCR. Subsequently, PCR-negative samples were re-evaluated using PCR for other Helicobacter species. Of the 9184 gastric biopsies, 339 (3.7%) with histological-negative gastritis and adequate material were forwarded to PCR analysis for H. pylori and 146 (43.1%) revealed a positive result. In 193 H. pylori DNA-negative biopsies, re-analysis using PCR primers for other Helicobacter species, revealed further 23 (11.9%) positive biopsies, including 4 (2.1%) biopsies with H. heilmannii sensu lato. PCR-positive biopsies showed a higher overall inflammatory score, more lymphoid follicles/aggregates and neutrophils (P gastritis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Analysis of the infection status of saliva Helicobacter pylori in Lanzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Che, Tuanjie; Ju, Jun; Yang, Sen; He, Xiangyi; Zhang, Ying

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of saliva Helicobacter pylori in Lanzhou and investigate Helicobacter pylori-related diseases. Helicobacter pylori was detected through bacterial culture, Gram stain microscopy, and urease test from saliva samples collected from 941 residents of Lanzhou. The infection rate and growth of Helicobacter pylori among the residents were analyzed in terms of different oral health conditions, oral disease, gender, urban and rural status, and age. The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva in Lanzhou was 42.72%. The status of Helicobacter pylori infection showed significant difference among subjects with different oral hygiene and oral diseases. The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva among females was 47.89%, which was greater compared with the rate among males (38.45%, P = 0.004, chi2 = 8.492). The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva in the town was 33.99%, which was less than the rate for the villages (50.93%, P = 0.000, chi2 = 27.551). The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva among residents aged 10 to 59 showed a flat trend with no significant differences. However, the rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva among residents over 60 years old showed a significant increase. No significant difference was found in the growth of saliva Helicobacter pylori (P = 0.086). The rate of Helicobacter pylori-positive saliva is related to the subjects' oral hygiene, oral disease, gender, age, and living conditions.

  8. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chemokines and antimicrobial peptides have a cag-dependent early response to Helicobacter pylori infection in primary human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Paris, Isabelle; Garcia, Magali; Tran, Cong Tri; Cremniter, Julie; Garnier, Martine; Faure, Jean-Pierre; Barthes, Thierry; Boneca, Ivo G; Morel, Franck; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Burucoa, Christophe; Bodet, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection systematically causes chronic gastric inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve toward more severe gastroduodenal pathologies, such as ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) of H. pylori allows translocation of the virulence protein CagA and fragments of peptidoglycan into host cells, thereby inducing production of chemokines, cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides. In order to characterize the inflammatory response to H. pylori, a new experimental protocol for isolating and culturing primary human gastric epithelial cells was established using pieces of stomach from patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. Isolated cells expressed markers indicating that they were mucin-secreting epithelial cells. Challenge of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori B128 underscored early dose-dependent induction of expression of mRNAs of the inflammatory mediators CXCL1 to -3, CXCL5, CXCL8, CCL20, BD2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In AGS cells, significant expression of only CXCL5 and CXCL8 was observed following infection, suggesting that these cells were less reactive than primary epithelial cells. Infection of both cellular models with H. pylori B128ΔcagM, a cag PAI mutant, resulted in weak inflammatory-mediator mRNA induction. At 24 h after infection of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori, inflammatory-mediator production was largely due to cag PAI substrate-independent virulence factors. Thus, H. pylori cag PAI substrate appears to be involved in eliciting an epithelial response during the early phases of infection. Afterwards, other virulence factors of the bacterium take over in development of the inflammatory response. Using a relevant cellular model, this study provides new information on the modulation of inflammation during H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Rosacea and Helicobacter pylori: links and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Elizabeth; Korfitis, Chrysovalantis; Kemanetzi, Christina; Sotiriou, Elena; Apalla, Zoe; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Fotiadou, Christina; Lallas, Aimilios; Ioannides, Demetrios

    2017-01-01

    Rosacea is a chronic skin disease characterized by facial erythema and telangiectasia. Despite the fact that many hypotheses have been proposed, its etiology remains unknown. In the present review, the possible link and clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of rosacea are being sought. A PubMed and Google Scholar search was performed using the terms “rosacea”, “H.pylori”, “gastrointestinal disorders and H.pylori”, “microorganisms and rosacea”, “pathogenesis and treatment of rosacea”, and “risk factors of rosacea”, and selected publications were studied and referenced in text. Although a possible pathogenetic link between H. pylori and rosacea is advocated by many authors, evidence is still interpreted differently by others. We conclude that further studies are needed in order to fully elucidate the pathogenesis of rosacea. PMID:28848358

  12. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  13. Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Hoffman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is most frequently associated with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Antimicrobial intervention, together with proton pump inhibitors, has become the standard therapy for treating this disease. Resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole, two of the most commonly used antimicrobials for treatment of H pylori infections, is often associated with treatment failures and relapse of infection. Clarithromycin resistance arises through mutations leading to base changes in 23S ribosomal RNA subunits, while resistance to metronidazole is due to mutations in the rdxA gene, which encodes a novel nitroreductase that is responsible for reductive activation of the drug. Products of metronidazole activation are mutagenic and can be demonstrated to increase both the mutation frequency and the frequency at which antibiotic resistance arises in H pylori.

  14. Effects of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Curcumin is a well-established natural molecule with significant biological and pharmaceutical effects. Its effects on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been repeatedly confirmed both in animal and human models. This study directly compared five different samples to evaluate if the effects are general or if they differ among samples. Using a mouse model, we studied the effects of curcumin on lipid peroxide (LPO) level, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and urease activity, number of colonized bacteria, levels of anti-H. pylori antibodies, biofilm formation, IFN-γ, IL-4, gastrin and somatostatin levels in serum, and minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, we evaluated the effects on biofilm production and antibacterial antibody response. In all tests, one sample (Sabinsa) was consistently the most active. All curcumin samples showed some anti-H. pylori effects, but only some of the tested samples had significant activity.

  15. Effects of Community Screening for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, Maria; Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication improves the prognosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), dyspepsia, and possibly gastric cancer. Hp screening tests are accurate and eradication therapy is effective. Hp population screening seems attractive. The aim of this study was to evaluate...... the long-term effect of Hp population screening and eradication on dyspepsia prevalence and the incidence of PUD, and as secondary outcomes to assess the effect on health-care consumption and quality of life. METHODS: At baseline in 1998-1999 20,011 individuals aged 40-65 years were randomized to Hp...... screening and eradication or a control group with no screening. Both groups received a questionnaire on dyspepsia and quality of life. Register data were obtained for all randomized individuals. RESULTS: Baseline questionnaire response rate was 63%. Of the 5,749 screened, 1,007 (17.5%) individuals were Hp...

  16. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...... degree relatives to patients with gastric cancer, in NSAID-naive patients, who need long-term NSAID therapy, and in patients presenting with dyspepsia and no alarm symptoms. Non-endoscoped patients can be tested with a urea-breath test or a faecal antigen test. Endoscoped patients can be tested...... with a rapid urease test. Proton pump inhibitor therapy should be stopped at least 1 week prior to Hp testing. All infected patients should be offered Hp eradication therapy. First-line treatment is 7-day triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and clarithromycine in combination with metronidazole...

  18. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Anthony; Gisbert, Javier P; McNamara, Deirdre; O'Morain, Colm

    2011-09-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães; Amaral, Fabrício-Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford's Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and clarithromycin resistance patterns of Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Vietnam [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Quek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that causes several gastroduodenal disorders such as peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.  Eradication efforts of H. pylori are often hampered by antimicrobial resistance in many countries, including Vietnam.  Here, the study aimed to investigate the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among H. pylori clinical isolates across 13 hospitals in Vietnam.  The study further evaluated the clarithromycin resistance patterns of H. pylori strains.  In order to address the study interests, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, epsilometer test and PCR-based sequencing were performed on a total of 193 strains isolated from patients, including 136 children (3–15 years of age and 57 adults (19–69 years of age.  Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that the overall resistance to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole, and tetracycline was 10.4%, 85.5%, 24.4%, 37.8%, and 23.8% respectively.  The distribution of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of clarithromycin-resistant strains was 85.5% with MIC >0.5 μg/mL.  The majority of the clarithromycin resistant isolates (135 of 165 subjects have MICs ranging from 2 μg/mL to 16 μg/mL.  Furthermore, sequencing detection of mutations in 23S rRNA gene revealed that strains resistant and susceptible to clarithromycin contained both A2143G and T2182C mutations.  Of all isolates, eight clarithromycin-resistant isolates (MIC >0.5 μg/mL had no mutations in the 23S rRNA gene.  Collectively, these results demonstrated that a proportion of clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori strains, which are not related to the 23S rRNA gene mutations, could be potentially related to other mechanisms such as the presence of an efflux pump or polymorphisms in the CYP2C19 gene.  Therefore, the present study suggests that providing susceptibility testing prior to treatment or alternative screening strategies for antimicrobial resistance is important

  1. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    HajiFattahi, Farnaz; Hesari, Maryam; Zojaji, Homayoun; Sarlati, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection with halitosis. Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years). The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe periodontitis, coated tongue, dry mouth or poor oral hygiene. Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT) and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT) during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests. Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91%) out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32%) (P<0.001). Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to internists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI) complications and probable malignancies. PMID:26622273

  2. Association between Helicobacter spp. infections and hepatobiliary malignancies: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-López, Fany Karina; Güitrón-Cantú, Alfredo; Torres, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatobiliary cancers are highly lethal cancers that comprise a spectrum of invasive carcinomas originating in the liver hepatocellular carcinoma, the bile ducts intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, the gallbladder and the ampulla of Vater (collectively known as biliary tract cancers). These tumors account for approximately 13% of all annual cancer-related deaths worldwide and for 10%-20% of deaths from hepatobiliary malignancies. Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease that displays a poor survival rate for which few therapeutic options are available. Population genetics, geographical and environmental factors, cholelithiasis, obesity, parity, and endemic infection with liver flukes have been identified as risk factors that influence the development of biliary tract tumors. Other important factors affecting the carcinogenesis of these tumors include chronic inflammation, obstruction of the bile ducts, and impaired bile flow. It has been suggested that CCA is caused by infection with Helicobacter species, such as Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus, in a manner that is similar to the reported role of Helicobacter pylori in distal gastric cancer. Due to the difficulty in culturing these Helicobacter species, molecular methods, such as polymerase chain reaction and sequencing, or immunologic assays have become the methods of choice for diagnosis. However, clinical studies of benign or malignant biliary tract diseases revealed remarkable variability in the methods and the findings, and the use of uniform and validated techniques is needed. PMID:25663761

  3. [Helicobacter pylori infection in children with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimpu, Silvia; Bozomitu, Laura; Cârdei, E; Oltean, Carmen; Burlacu, M; Anton, Dana; Trandafir, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina; Moraru, D

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate symptomatology, endoscopic and histopathologic changes of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis lesions without Helicobacter pylori infection on children diagnosed with celiac disease. 15 children under gluten-free diet were selected and, because of the recurrence of the dyspeptic syndrome, an upper digestive endoscopy associated with histopathologic exam was performed. Considering the histopathologic result we made two groups: first group (8 children with celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection) and second group (7 children with celiac disease without Helicobacter pylori infection, but associated with gastritis lesions). The main symptom was diffuse abdominal pain in both groups. The endoscopic antrum aspects were congestive with striped aspect (first group--12.5%, second group--42.9%) and congestive with nodulation (first group--25%, second group--14.3%). The histopathologic diagnosis were: moderate active chronic pangastritis (first group--25%, second group--14.3%) moderate active chronic gastritis (first group--25%,second group--14.3%), lymphocytic gastritis (first group--12.5%, second group--14.3%). The histopathologic exam remains the gold standard for celiac disease, gastritis lesions and Helicobacter pylori infection.

  4. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections.

  5. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandre; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Prestes, Manoel Alberto; Costa, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa. The raised erosion and mucosa in mosaic in the body

  6. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Case report: Helicobacter suis infection in a pig veterinarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Myrthe; Flahou, Bram; Meyns, Tom; Smet, Annemieke; Arts, Joris; De Cooman, Lien; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2013-10-01

    This study describes a non-Helicobacter (H.) pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) infection in a pig veterinarian. The patient suffered from reflux esophagitis and general dyspeptic symptoms and was referred to the hospital for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Histologic examination of corpus and antrum biopsies revealed a chronic gastritis. Large spiral-shaped non-H. pylori helicobacters could be visualized and were identified as H. suis by PCR. The patient was treated with a triple therapy, consisting of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and pantoprazole for 10 days. Successful eradication was confirmed after a follow-up gastrointestinal endoscopy and PCR 10 weeks after treatment. A mild chronic gastritis was, however, still observed at this point in time. This case report associates porcine H. suis strains with gastric disease in humans, thus emphasizing the zoonotic importance of H. suis bacteria from pigs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Rare Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genotypes in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunari, Osamu; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-03-02

    Both the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer are high in Bhutan. The high incidence of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer suggest the phylogeographic origin of an infection with a more virulent strain of H. pylori. More than 90% of Bhutanese strains possessed the highly virulent East Asian-type CagA and all strains had the most virulent type of vacA (s1 type). More than half also had multiple repeats in East Asian-type CagA, which are rare in other countries and are reported characteristictly found in assciation with atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer consistent with Bhutanese strains having multiple H. pylori virulence factors associated with an increase in gastric cancer risk. Phylogeographic analyses showed that most Bhutanese strains belonged to the East Asian population type with some strains (17.5%) sharing East Asian and Amerindian components. Only 9.5% belonged to the European type consistant with H. pylori in Bhutan representing an intermediate evolutionary stage between H. pylori from European and East Asian countries.

  9. Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy Itzel; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos Felipe; Romero, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a successful pathogen that can persist in the stomach of an infected person for their entire life. It provokes chronic gastric inflammation that leads to the development of serious gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is known that these ailments can be avoided if the infection by the bacteria can be prevented or eradicated. Currently, numerous antibiotic-based therapies are available. However, these therapies have several inherent problems, including the appearance of resistance to the antibiotics used and associated adverse effects, the risk of re-infection and the high cost of antibiotic therapy. The delay in developing a vaccine to prevent or eradicate the infection has furthered research into new therapeutic approaches. This review summarises the most relevant recent studies on vaccine development and new treatments using natural resources such as plants, probiotics and nutraceuticals. In addition, novel alternatives based on microorganisms, peptides, polysaccharides, and intragastric violet light irradiation are presented. Alternative therapies have not been effective in eradicating the bacteria but have been shown to maintain low bacterial levels. Nevertheless, some of them are useful in preventing the adverse effects of antibiotics, modulating the immune response, gastroprotection, and the general promotion of health. Therefore, those agents can be used as adjuvants of allopathic anti-H. pylori eradication therapy. PMID:24587621

  10. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Molecular mimicry in Helicobacter pylori infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gonciarz, Weronika

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize gastric mucosa in humans and increase the risk of serious diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, stomach cancers and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of several extragastric diseases has been suggested including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and dermatological disorders. Also neurological diseases and even lung cancer have attracted researchers concern. The relation between H. pylori infection and a growth retardation in children has also been suggested. Many mechanisms of molecular mimicry between H. pylori and the host have been proposed as a pathogen strategy to manipulate the immune system of the host in order to remain unrecognized and avoid eradication. A lot of effort has been put into the demonstration of homologous sequences between H. pylori and host compounds. However, knowledge about how often autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes induced during H. pylori infections cause pathological disorders is insufficient. This review provides data on H. pylori antigenic mimicry and possible deleterious effects due to the induction of immune response to the components common to these bacteria and the host. PMID:28652651

  13. Helicobacter pylori DNA in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victória, Júnia Maria Netto; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Silva, Jeane de Fátima Correia; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2003-04-01

    Considering not only the fact that recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and stomach ulcers are immunologically mediated ulcers associated with Helicobacter pylori, but also the recent evidence that anaemia can be associated with both diseases, and the discovery of H. pylori in the oral mucosa led us to hypothesize that this bacteria may be related to RAS pathogenesis. Thirty-six consecutive subjects affected by minor and major forms of RAS and 48 healthy volunteers were included in the present study. The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect the presence of H. pylori in the oral lesion, the normal contralateral mucosa of patients affected by RAS and the oral mucosa of control subjects. The chi2- and Fisher's tests were used for statistical analysis. No association between RAS lesions and H. pylori was observed. However, 14 out of 36 (38.9%) of the patients with RAS were found to show the presence of H. pylori DNA in the lesion and/or contralateral mucosa. Sixteen out of 48 (33.3%) of the patients without RAS (control subjects) were positive (P > 0.05). The present study does not give support to the assumption that H. pylori could be involved in RAS development.

  14. Occurrence of Helicobacter pullorum in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Piva, Silvia; Rossi, Mirko; Pasquali, Frédérique; Lucchi, Alex; De Cesare, Alessandra; Manfreda, Gerardo

    2011-05-05

    In order to investigate the occurrence of Helicobacter pullorum in turkeys, caecum contents collected at the slaughterhouse from 55 animals intensively reared in 11 farms were sampled. Gram-negative curved rod bacteria were isolated by a modified Steele and McDermott filter technique and further identified as H. pullorum by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eleven and 31 isolates, randomly selected from each positive farm, underwent phenotypic (biochemical and antibiotic susceptibility tests) and genotypic characterization (PFGE and AFLP analysis), respectively. Forty-two out of 55 animals (76.4%) and all the 11 farms sampled were positive for H. pullorum. Isolates showed similar biochemical characteristics and whole cell protein profiles but showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Ten out of 11 isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics with erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid resistance being the most frequently detected. This is the first description of H. pullorum in turkeys. H. pullorum is a frequent intestinal colonizer in turkeys; therefore, attention should be given to clarify the food-borne risk linked to carcass contamination. Antibiotic resistance is a concern since high values of resistance rates were observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Paediatric Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ayse Esra; Bilici, Meki; Tonbul, Alparslan; Karabel, Musemma; Dogan, Guzide; Tas, Tugba

    2012-01-01

    To compare the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection by stool antigen test in children with and without halitosis. Comparative study. Department of Paediatrics, Fatih University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between December 2008 and June 2009. Fifty-three patients aged between 3-15 years who presented to paediatrics outpatient clinic with halitosis and 55 healthy children aged between 4-15 years without halitosis were included in the study. Halitosis was confirmed with organoleptic test. Stool antigen test was performed in both groups. Intergroup proportions were compared using chisquare and Fisher exact tests with significance at p halitosis and 12 of 55 healthy controls (21.8%). The rate of positive H. pylori stool antigen test results were similar between two groups (p > 0.05). Twoweeks eradication treatment was administered to 11 patients with H. pylori infection and halitosis. After treatment, the symptoms of 8 patients with halitosis (72.7%) completely resolved and persisted in 3 patients (27.3%). Seven of the 11 patients who were administered eradication treatment also had abdominal pain along with halitosis. Both symptoms completely resolved in all those patients after treatment. Although no statistically significant difference existed between the rate of H. pylori infections among those with and without halitosis. Eradication treatment was found beneficial in the treatment of children with halitosis and positive H. pylori stool antigen test.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection - recent developments in diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Isabel; Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Considering the recommended indications for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy and the broad spectrum of available diagnostic methods, a reliable diagnosis is mandatory both before and after eradication therapy. Only highly accurate tests should be used in clinical practice, and the sensitivity and specificity of an adequate test should exceed 90%. The choice of tests should take into account clinical circumstances, the likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests, the cost-effectiveness of the testing strategy and the availability of the tests. This review concerns some of the most recent developments in diagnostic methods of H. pylori infection, namely the contribution of novel endoscopic evaluation methodologies for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, such as magnifying endoscopy techniques and chromoendoscopy. In addition, the diagnostic contribution of histology and the urea breath test was explored recently in specific clinical settings and patient groups. Recent studies recommend enhancing the number of biopsy fragments for the rapid urease test. Bacterial culture from the gastric biopsy is the gold standard technique, and is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility test. Serology is used for initial screening and the stool antigen test is particularly used when the urea breath test is not available, while molecular methods have gained attention mostly for detecting antibiotic resistance. PMID:25071324

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in hyperemesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hosein Khedmat

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vomiting is one of the most common problems during pregnancy periods which happens in 50% of the pregnant women. Hyperemesis gravidarum is a rare status that 1 out of 500 pregnant women suffer from it. Although the reason of HG is unknown, but several studies indicate a relationship between HG and helicobacter pylori . So the aim of this study was to assess the relation between H.pylori infection and hyperemesis gravidarum and to compare it with healthy ones. Materials and Methods : In this case control study 100 pregnant women with HG and 100 pregnant controls , at the same gestational weeks , referred to the city clinics were studied. Then H.pylori serum immunoglobulin IgG concentration was determined in the case and control groups by ELIZA method and serologic tests and analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: Results showed that the prevalence of H.pylori infection was significantly higher in patients with HG (79.8% than in controls (46.8% with a P<0.001 . There were no significant differences in maternal age , gestational age and social economic status between case and control groups . Conclusion : Results of this study indicate that H. pylori can play an important role for etiology of hyperemesis gravidarum.

  18. Helicobacter pylori: From Infection to Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 380 abstracts, presentations and posters of recent advances were highlighted at the European and International Helicobacter pylori meeting held July 7 to 9, 1995 in Edinburgh, Scotland. New advances abound, with major interest focusing on the simple, safe, inexpensive new `gold standard’ for H pylori eradication therapy: a single week of tid omeprazole 20 mg, metronidazole 400 mg and clarithromycin 250 mg, or omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1000 mg and clarithromycin 500 mg. To avoid false negative results, two biopsies must be taken from the antrum and two from the gastric body at least four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, and ideally should be supplemented with at least one further H pylori test such as a biopsy for urease activity or culture, or a urea breath test. While most patients with a gastric or duodenal ulcer (DU who do not consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are infected with H pylori, the association is much less apparent in those with a DU who present with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. H pylori eradication for nonulcer dyspepsia is not widely recommended, and the patient with a DU given effective H pylori eradication who presents with dyspepsia likely has erosive esophagitis rather than recurrent DU or H pylori. Gastroenterologists are at increased risk of H pylori infection, particularly older gastroenterologists who are very busy endoscopists.

  19. The Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Gubina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to Helicobacter pylori involves different mechanisms that are both protective and damaging to the host. The innate and the adaptive immune responses lead to inflammatory as well as anti-inflammatory responses, allowing for persistence of many infections. Thus, developing new therapeutics and effective vaccines against H. pylori has proven to be arduous. Despite many immunisation experiments, using various routes of immunisation with classical as well as recombinant H. pylori vaccines (urease, CagA, HP-NAP, HspA, DNA, chimeric molecules, live vectors, microspheres, no effective vaccine is currently available for humans. New directions for successful vaccine construction should follow a profound knowledge of immunopathological events during natural H. pylori infection and factors leading to resolution of infection: mandatory is a new knowledge about the interplay of the innate response to H. pylori, mucosal inflammation, H. pylori virulence factors inducing immune responses, regulation of the adaptive responses to H. pylori as well as construction of novel vaccine platforms for achieving a broad immune response, leading to a sterilizing immunity.

  20. Is Helicobacter pylori always a "bad guy"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojsak, Iva; Kolacek, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Various clinical presentations have been ascribed to Helicobacter (H.) pylori. Most importantly, H. pylori is considered the leading cause of gastric cancer worldwide and because of that, in adult population, it is listed as a number one carcinogen. However, children are less prone to develop H. pylori related serious diseases such as peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and cases of malignancy are only sporadically reported. On the other hand, there is an increasing level of evidence suggesting that H. pylori in children could also have a beneficial effect. Recently, several data confirmed previously described inverse relationship of H. pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that an increased prevalence of allergic diseases could be, at least partially, explained by the decreased incidence of H. pylori infection. H. pylori can, to some degree, influence immunological response. It has an ability to promote high proinflammatory cytokine expression in the gastric mucosa shifting immunity towards Th1 response, which could be a plausible explanation for the down-regulated clinical expression of allergies (including asthma) in patients with H. pylori gastritis. Based on these findings the aim of this review is to present "pros and cons" for H. pylori eradication in children.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Abdullah; Fakhimi-Derakhshan, Koroush; Imanzadeh, Farid; Rezaei, Mohamad; Cavoshzadeh, Zahra; Maham, Saeid

    2013-06-01

    Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and H. pylori infection was compared between the two groups according to the urea breath test results. Urea breath test was positive in 18 asthmatic (18.36) and 23 (23.36) healthy subjects but was not significantly different between the case and controls (p = 0.380). Further analysis in the asthmatic group revealed association of H. pylori infection withage (p asthma (p = 0.010). However, no significant correlation was found between sex, severity of asthma, controled asthma or abnormal pulmonary function tests with H. pylori infection (p= 0.804, 0.512, 0.854 and 0.292, respectively). Given the results of the study, H. pylori infection was not significantly different between asthmatic and healthy children. In asthmatic patients, there was no significant association between H. pylori infection and sex, severity of disease, control status of disease and normal or abnormal pulmonary function tests. H. Pylori infection had a significant association with increasing age and duration of asthma.

  2. Investigation of Helicobacter pylori in Laryngeal Papillomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadije Moridi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP is a motile, gram negative, catalase and oxidase positive bacteria that produce strong urease. H. pylori has been recognized as an etiologic agent of gastritis, gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric MALT lamphoma. H. pylori infections have been correlated with many throat and larynx disease. More recently it is introduced as group 1 carcinogen. The existence of H. pylori within bouccal cavity and dental plaque has been reported. The nasal cavity can be colonized easily with H. pylori. Objectives: The aim of this Study is to report the result of an investigation of H. pylori genome within the larynx popilomatosis biopsy samples. Materials and Methods: 41 biopsy samples were provided from papillomatosis cases during therapeutic surgery. The biopsy samples were preserved at -80°C until use. The DNA extractions were achieved by the phenole- chloroform method. The cagA of H. pylori were amplified by specific primer sets. Results: H. pylori DNA were detected from 3 out of 41 (0.7% papilloma samples. Conclusions: This result is in agree with another reports about correlation between laryngeal papilomatosis and H. pylori infections

  3. Living Conditions and Helicobacter pylori in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odete Amaral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infection by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is transmissible and is considered a public health issue which affects people of all ages. The objective of this study was to identify factors (lifestyles, dietary factors, and hygiene conditions related to the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Methods. We carried out an observational cross-sectional study with a community sample of adults from the municipalities of Viseu and Sátão, Portugal. The final sample resulted in 166 adults. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire with questions regarding sociodemographic aspects and lifestyles. H. pylori infection was identified using the 13C-urea breath test. Results. No association was found between the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the use of tobacco, alcohol, or coffee or dietary factors. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in adults who reported higher consumption of fried food and lower consumption of vegetables and fruit. H. pylori infection was significant for the variables of lower frequency of handwashing before going to the bathroom (p=0.02 and well water consumption (p=0.05. Conclusion. A significant association was found for H. pylori infection with the lower frequency of handwashing before going to the bathroom and the consumption of well water.

  4. Metalloregulation of Helicobacter pylori physiology and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Angeline Gaddy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium that colonizes over half of the world’s population. Chronic H. pylori infection is associated with increased risk for numerous disease outcomes including gastritis, dysplasia, neoplasia, B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and invasive adenocarcinoma. The complex interactions that occur between pathogen and host are dynamic and exquisitely regulated, and the relationship between the H. pylori and its human host are no exception. To successfully colonize, and subsequently persist, within the human stomach H. pylori must temporally regulate numerous genes to ensure localization to the gastric lumen and coordinated expression of virulence factors to subvert the host’s innate and adaptive immune response. H. pylori achieves this precise gene regulation by sensing subtle environmental changes including host-mediated alterations in nutrient availability and responding with dramatic global changes in gene expression. Recent studies revealed that the presence or absence of numerous metal ions encountered in the lumen of the stomach, or within host tissues, including nickel, iron, copper and zinc, can influence regulatory networks to alter gene expression in H. pylori. These expression changes modulate the deployment of bacterial virulence factors that can ultimately influence disease outcome. In this review we will discuss the environmental stimuli that are detected by H. pylori as well as the trans regulatory elements, specifically the transcription regulators and transcription factors, that allow for these significant transcriptional shifts.

  5. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  6. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  7. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    It is accepted that the success of Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment using standard triple therapy is declining. Resistance, particularly to clarithromycin, has been shown in numerous countries to be rising to a level where the use of standard triple therapy in its current form may no longer be justified. The two major factors influencing resistance are prior exposure to the antibiotic and compliance with therapy. Regimes based on bismuth and levofloxacin, which had previously been mainly second-line options, are now emerging as superior first-line options. Trials of sequential and concomitant therapies are also showing the usefulness of these treatments in different populations. Options for third and subsequent line therapies include furazolidone and rifabutin-based regimes. Susceptibility testing should be performed to maintain accurate data on resistance levels, and has also clinical utility in difficult to eradicate cases. None of these, however, will be successful unless compliance is improved upon. If compliance is assured and eradication confirmation pursued, it has been repeatedly illustrated that near full eradication is achievable.

  8. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardo, P G; Tugnait, A; Hassan, F; Lynch, D A; West, A P; Mapstone, N P; Quirke, P; Chalmers, D M; Kowolik, M J; Axon, A T

    1995-01-01

    Sixty two patients (mean age 45.6 years) were assessed for oral hygiene and periodontal disease by dental examination before endoscopy. Information about oral care, smoking, and dentures was obtained and samples of dental plaque collected. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in plaque as sought by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gastric antral biopsy specimens were taken for histological examination. Although H pylori was detected in the antral specimens of 34 patients (54%) all of the cultures of dental plaque were negative, and PCR was only positive from the dentures of one patient. Smokers had poor oral hygiene, visited their dentist less often, and brushed their teeth less frequently. There was no correlation of H pylori gastritis with either dental hygiene or periodontal disease. These results suggest that dental plaque or dentures are not an important reservoir for H pylori and are probably not a significant factor in transmission of the organism. The conflicting results in published works may be caused by differences in sample collection, culture techniques, or oral contamination from gastric juice as a result of gastro-oesophageal reflux at the time of endoscopy. PMID:7672679

  10. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  11. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection 2013.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    This review summarizes important studies regarding Helicobacter pylori therapy published from April 2012 up to March 2013. To begin with, the updated European Consensus Guidelines were published last year, highlighting the role of bismuth and nonbismuth quadruple regimen as first-line treatments. Cure rates for standard triple therapy remain acceptable in quite a few settings nowadays, and some reports on innovative triple therapies look promising. One study evaluating bismuth quadruple therapy as first-line therapy was reported. Regarding nonbismuth quadruple regimens, there is a trend of superiority emerging for the "concomitant" therapy over the "sequential" regimen. "Hybrid" therapy, a combination of sequential and concomitant therapy, has also shown advantage over sequential therapy. Levofloxacin-based therapies appear to be useful and versatile in second- and third-line therapies, with interesting results for newer generation quinolones, which may partially overcome antibiotic resistance. Some promising works have been reported for bismuth-based rescue therapy, using individualized therapies upon antimicrobial information, as well as for rifabutin fourth-line therapy. Probiotics appear to have an effect in terms of reducing side effects and improving compliance, but data on improvement of eradication rates remain controversial.

  12. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pullorum infections in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Liesbeth M; Decostere, Annemie; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Maes, Dominiek; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2007-05-10

    Four groups of 23 one-day-old broiler chickens were each inoculated by gavage with a different Helicobacter pullorum strain isolated from humans or poultry. As a control, a fifth group of eight animals was inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Faecal samples were collected weekly and tested for the presence of H. pullorum DNA using PCR. At 1, 8, 15, 22 and 42 days postinoculation, birds were euthanized and samples from the liver and intestinal tract were histologically, immunohistochemically and bacteriologically examined. The samples were also tested for the presence of H. pullorum DNA by PCR. All animals remained clinically healthy throughout the experiment although mild lesions in the caeca were present in animals inoculated with H. pullorum. In all H. pullorum-inoculated groups, DNA of this bacterium was detected in faecal samples until 42 days postinoculation. The main site of colonization was the caecum. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the bacterium was closely associated with the caecal epithelial cells. It was concluded that H. pullorum may colonize the caecum of broilers and is excreted in their faeces until slaughter age. This implies that chicken meat might constitute a source of infection for human beings.

  13. Phylogenomics of ColombianHelicobacter pyloriisolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Escobar, Andrés Julián; Trujillo, Esperanza; Acevedo, Orlando; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    During the Spanish colonisation of South America, African slaves and Europeans arrived in the continent with their corresponding load of pathogens, including Helicobacter pylori . Colombian strains have been clustered with the hpEurope population and with the hspWestAfrica subpopulation in multilocus sequence typing (MLST) studies. However, ancestry studies have revealed the presence of population components specific to H. pylori in Colombia. The aim of this study was to perform a thorough phylogenomic analysis to describe the evolution of the Colombian urban H. pylori isolates. A total of 115 genomes of H. pylori were sequenced with Illumina technology from H. pylori isolates obtained in Colombia in a region of high risk for gastric cancer. The genomes were assembled, annotated and underwent phylogenomic analysis with 36 reference strains. Additionally, population differentiation analyses were performed for two bacterial genes. The phylogenetic tree revealed clustering of the Colombian strains with hspWestAfrica and hpEurope, along with three clades formed exclusively by Colombian strains, suggesting the presence of independent evolutionary lines for Colombia. Additionally, the nucleotide diversity of horB and vacA genes from Colombian isolates was lower than in the reference strains and showed a significant genetic differentiation supporting the hypothesis of independent clades with recent evolution. The presence of specific lineages suggest the existence of an hspColombia subtype that emerged from a small and relatively isolated ancestral population that accompanied crossbreeding of human population in Colombia.

  14. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-09-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases.

  15. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin A and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassow Joachim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract VacA, the vacuolating cytotoxin A of Helicobacter pylori, induces apoptosis in epithelial cells of the gastic mucosa and in leukocytes. VacA is released by the bacteria as a protein of 88 kDa. At the outer surface of host cells, it binds to the sphingomyelin of lipid rafts. At least partially, binding to the cells is facilitated by different receptor proteins. VacA is internalized by a clathrin-independent mechanism and initially accumulates in GPI-anchored proteins-enriched early endosomal compartments. Together with early endosomes, VacA is distributed inside the cells. Most of the VacA is eventually contained in the membranes of vacuoles. VacA assembles in hexameric oligomers forming an anion channel of low conductivity with a preference for chloride ions. In parallel, a significant fraction of VacA can be transferred from endosomes to mitochondria in a process involving direct endosome-mitochondria juxtaposition. Inside the mitochondria, VacA accumulates in the mitochondrial inner membrane, probably forming similar chloride channels as observed in the vacuoles. Import into mitochondria is mediated by the hydrophobic N-terminus of VacA. Apoptosis is triggered by loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, recruitment of Bax and Bak, and release of cytochrome c.

  16. Identification of cholelithogenic enterohepatic helicobacter species and their role in murine cholesterol gallstone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Kirk J; Ihrig, Melanie M; Rogers, Arlin B; Ng, Vivian; Bouchard, Guylaine; Leonard, Monika R; Carey, Martin C; Fox, James G

    2005-04-01

    Helicobacter spp are common inhabitants of the hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals and cause a variety of well-described diseases. Recent epidemiologic results suggest a possible association between enterohepatic Helicobacter spp and cholesterol cholelithiasis, chronic cholecystitis, and gallbladder cancer. To test this, we prospectively investigated the effects of Helicobacter spp infection in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis in the highly susceptible C57L/J mouse model. Helicobacter spp-free adult male C57L mice were infected with several different enterohepatic Helicobacter spp or left uninfected and fed either a lithogenic diet or standard mouse chow for 8 and 18 weeks. At the conclusion of the study, bile was examined microscopically and diagnostic culture and polymerase chain reaction were performed. Mice infected with Helicobacter bilis or coinfected with Helicobacter hepaticus and Helicobacter rodentium and fed a lithogenic diet developed cholesterol gallstones at 80% prevalence by 8 weeks compared with approximately 10% in uninfected controls. Monoinfections with H hepaticus , Helicobacter cinaedi , and H rodentium gave a cholesterol gallstone prevalence of 40%, 30%, and 20%, respectively; the latter 2 groups did not differ significantly from uninfected animals. Neither infected nor uninfected mice fed a chow diet developed cholesterol gallstones. These findings, along with prior epidemiologic studies, suggest that Helicobacter spp play a major role in the pathophysiology of cholesterol gallstone formation in mice and perhaps humans.

  17. A cultured strain of "Helicobacter heilmannii," a human gastric pathogen, identified as H-bizzozeronii: Evidence for zoonotic potential of Helicobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalava, K.; On, Stephen L.W.; Harrington, Clare S.

    2001-01-01

    We compared the characteristics of a cultured human "Helicobacter heilmannii" isolate with those of other helicobacters found in animals. Phenotypic, protein profile, 16S rDNA sequence, and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses identified the human strain as H. bizzozeronii, a species frequently found i...... in dogs. Thus, H. bizzozeronii may have zoonotic potential....

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  19. Helicobacter urease: Niche construction at the single molecule level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... The urease of the human pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, is essential for pathogenesis. The ammonia produced by the enzyme neutralizes stomach acid; thereby modifying its environment. The dodecameric enzyme complex has high affinity for its substrate, urea. We compared urease sequences and ...

  20. Anti- Helicobacter pylori Effects Of The Methanol Extracts Of Allium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bulb is of considerable importance in African cooking and in salads . Various species have been reported to have anti-diabetic, hypocholesterolaemic, fibrinolytic, anti-ulcer and diuretic potentials. Crude methanol extracts of Allium ascalonicum bulb was screened against three strains of Helicobacter pylori (UCH 97001, ...

  1. Helicobacter pylori in childhood : aspects of prevalence, diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad-Baars, Petronella Elisabeth Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation we present the results of our research on Helicobacter pylori infections in childhood, focusing on the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of the infection. Our studies were conducted in the Netherlands, Europe and Indonesia. We discuss diagnostic tests, therapeutic regimens,

  2. Comparative study of methods of diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Diagnostic tests currently in use for the detection of Helicobacter pylori have been classified into either non-invasive or invasive categories, with each having its merits and demerits, as well as superiority over the other depending on the clinical setting. This study compared the accuracy of the ...

  3. Changing patterns of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) discovered in 1982, has strongly been associated with multiple clinical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. This study described the prevalence of H. pylori among large numbers of patients over two different time periods in Accra, Ghana. Methods: It was a retrospective records ...

  4. SURVIVAL OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN A NATURAL FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode by which Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of most gastric ulcers, is transmitted remains undetermined. Epidemiological evidence suggests these organisms are waterborne; however, H. pylori has rarely been grown from potential water sources. This may be due to th...

  5. Seroprevalance of Helicobacter pylori amongst anti retroviral naive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives: HIV Infection at any stage alters patients' immunity. The pattern of several diseases including incidence and prevalence has changed due to the HIV pandemic. Infections, infestations and malignancies present more frequently and often in an unusual pattern. Helicobacter pylori is the main cause ...

  6. Influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori infection is widespread in our environment. However, whether this fact has any bearing on the prevalence and pattern of symptoms referable to the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system in our population of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients has not been much studied. Aim: We ...

  7. Correlation of Serum Anti- Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin A (IGA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies has been reported to vary among populations and in relation to strains of Helicobacter pylori bacterium. However, there has been conflicting reports on the association between IgA serological status and the histological variables of chronic gastritis. This study ...

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis | Ebule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. Objectives: To determine the ...

  9. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugano (Kentaro); J. Tack (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); D.Y. Graham (David Y.); E. El-Omar; S. Miura (Soichiro); K. Haruma (Ken); M. Asaka (Masahiro); N. Uemura (Naomi); P. Malfertheiner

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate

  10. correlation of serum anti-helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin a (iga)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. It is now established that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which is believed to be the commonest bacterial infection of man, is the major causative agent of chronic gastritis.1 This chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa which is histologically characterized by mucosal infiltration by plasma cells has been ...

  11. Therapeutic options after failed Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. W.; Weel, J. F.; van der Ende, A.; ten Kate, F. J.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many of the currently used Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens fail to cure 5-20% of the patients. Those patients will remain at risk of developing a potentially fatal complication of peptic ulcer disease. Therefore, a new attempt to cure H. pylori infection after initial failure of

  12. Helicobacter pylori among preschool children and their parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Berg, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    This study assessed the role of parental infection status in the transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in a large population-based sample of preschool-aged children. The subjects, who lived in Ulm, Germany, and in two nearby communities, were screened for school fitness between January...

  13. The impact of Helicobacter pylori on atopic disorders in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); A.J. Vila (Anne J.); D. Caudri (Daan); C.M. den Hoed (Caroline); G.I. Perez; M.J. Blaser (Martin J.); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Western populations has steadily decreased. This has been suggested as one of the factors involved in the recent increase of asthma and allergy. Some studies have reported a negative association between H. pylori and asthma and

  14. Role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of infantile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    between infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) and Helicobacter pylori infection. Materials and. Methods: In a case-control study, 20 infants with confirmed IHPS (Group 1) and 30 age-matched healthy infants (Group 2) were enrolled for the assessment of H. pylori infection. Serological testing of anti-H. pylori antibody ...

  15. Gastric Helicobacter spp. infection in captive neotropical Brazilian feline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz de Camargo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ten captive neotropical Brazilian feline were submitted to gastroscopic examination and samples of gastric mucosa from fundus, corpus and pyloric antrum were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter species. Warthin-Starry (WS staining and PCR assay with species-specific primers and enzymatic cleavage were applied for bacterial detection and identification. Histological lesions were evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining. All animals showed normal gross aspect of gastric mucosa. Helicobacter heilmannii was confirmed in 100% of the samples by WS and PCR assay. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate in the lamina propria was observed in eight animals, mainly in the fundus region. Small lymphoid follicles were seen in three animals. No significant association between Helicobacter infection and histological findings was verified. These observations suggest that gastric Helicobacter spp. could be a commensal or a eventual pathogen to captive neotropical feline, and that procedures, way life, and stress level on the shelter apparently had no negative repercussion over the integrity of the stomach.

  16. Is Helicobacter Pylori a Possible Etiopathogenic Factor in Chronic Tonsillitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmas Ozgun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Helicobacter pylori is the major gastric pathogen which has an important role in the etiopathogenesis of chronic gastritis. We investigated the presence of Helicobacter pylori as an extragastric reservoir in the tonsillectomy specimens to display if it is an etiologic factor in the development of chronic tonsilitis. Material and Method: In the current study, 100 cases with chronic tonsilitis were examined in bilateral tonsillectomy specimens. The colonization of the microorganism have been evaluated with hematoxylin-eosin and giemsa stains under the light microscope.Results: Helicobacter pylori has been detected in 33 cases (33% on one side of the bilateral tonsillectomy specimens while it has been seen in 15 cases (15% on both sides which demonstrated positivity in 48 cases (48% in total. No colonization has been observed in the remaining 52 cases (52%. Discussion: Due to the considerable positivity in our study, the histopathologic evaluation of tonsillary Helicobacter pylori colonization may be instrumental in the etiologic association with chronic tonsillitis.

  17. (Nutmeg) on Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis in albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activities of dichloromethane and methanol extracts of Myristica fragrans Houtt. seed (nutmeg) was studied to authenticate traditional use in gastrointestinal disorder. Anti-H. pylori activities using the agar dilution method was investigated in 39 strains of H. pylori comprising 38 clinical ...

  18. Serum bactericidal activity against Helicobacter pylori in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desar, I. M. E.; van Deuren, M.; Sprong, T.; Jansen, J. B. M. J.; Namavar, F.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M.; van der Meer, J. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    The two major primary antibody deficiency disorders are X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). CVID patients have an elevated risk for gastric cancer and extra-nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Both diseases are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  19. Assessment of Helicobacter pylori eredication in patients on NSAID treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; de Leest, H.T.J.I.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van Baarlen, J.; Steen, K.S.S.; Lems, W.F.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Kuipers, E.J.; Houben, H.H.M.L.; Janssen, M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In this post-hoc analysis of a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial, we measured the sensitivity and specificity of Helicobacter pylori IgG-antibody titer changes, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, immunohistochemical (IHC) stains and culture results in NSAID using

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by