WorldWideScience

Sample records for helical peptides diphytanoyl

  1. Diphytanoyl lipids as model systems for studying membrane-active peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Sezgin; Afonin, Sergii; Babii, Oleg; Tkachenko, Anton N; Komarov, Igor V; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-10-01

    The branched chains in diphytanoyl lipids provide membranes with unique properties, such as high chemical/physical stability, low water permeability, and no gel-to-fluid phase transition at ambient temperature. Synthetic diphytanoyl phospholipids are often used as model membranes for electrophysiological experiments. To evaluate whether these sturdy lipids are also suitable for solid-state NMR, we have examined their interactions with a typical amphiphilic peptide in comparison with straight-chain lipids. First, their phase properties were monitored using 31 P NMR, and the structural behaviour of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa was studied by 19 F NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples. Only lipids with choline headgroups (DPhPC) were found to form stable lipid bilayers in oriented samples, while DPhPG, DPhPE and DPhPS display non-lamellar structures. Hence, the experimental temperature and hydration are crucial factors when using supported diphytanoyl lipids, as both parameters must be maintained in an appropriate range to avoid the formation of non-bilayer structures. For the same reason, a high content of other diphytanoyl lipids besides DPhPC in mixed lipid systems is not favourable. Unlike the situation in straight-chain membranes, we found that the α-helical PGLa was not able to insert into the tightly packed fluid bilayer of DPhPC but remained in a surface-bound state even at very high peptide concentration. This behaviour can be explained by the high cohesivity and the negative spontaneous curvature of the diphytanoyl lipids. These characteristic features must therefore be taken into consideration, both, in electrophysiological studies, and when interpreting the structural behaviour of membrane-active peptides in such lipid environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of helicity on the anticancer mechanism of action of cationic-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Bing; He, Li-Yan; Jiang, Hong-Yu; Chen, Yu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the 26-residue amphipathic α-helical peptide A12L/A20L (Ac-KWKSFLKTFKSLKKTVLHTLLKAISS-amide) with strong anticancer activity and specificity was used as the framework to study the effects of helicity of α-helical anticancer peptides on biological activities. Helicity was systematically modulated by introducing d-amino acids to replace the original l-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix. Peptide helicity was measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy and was demonstrated to correlate with peptide hydrophobicity and the number of d-amino acid substitutions. Biological studies showed that strong hemolytic activity of peptides generally correlated with high hydrophobicity and helicity. Lower helicity caused the decrease of anti-HeLa activity of peptides. By introducing d-amino acids to replace the original l-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix, we improved the therapeutic index of A12L/A20L against HeLa cells by 9-fold and 22-fold, respectively. These results show that the helicity of anticancer peptides plays a crucial role for biological activities. This specific rational approach of peptide design could be a powerful method to improve the specificity of anticancer peptides as promising therapeutics in clinical practices.

  3. Role of Helicity on the Anticancer Mechanism of Action of Cationic-Helical Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xin Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the 26-residue amphipathic α-helical peptide A12L/A20L (Ac-KWKSFLKTFKSLKKTVLHTLLKAISS-amide with strong anticancer activity and specificity was used as the framework to study the effects of helicity of α-helical anticancer peptides on biological activities. Helicity was systematically modulated by introducing D-amino acids to replace the original L-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix. Peptide helicity was measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy and was demonstrated to correlate with peptide hydrophobicity and the number of D-amino acid substitutions. Biological studies showed that strong hemolytic activity of peptides generally correlated with high hydrophobicity and helicity. Lower helicity caused the decrease of anti-HeLa activity of peptides. By introducing D-amino acids to replace the original L-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix, we improved the therapeutic index of A12L/A20L against HeLa cells by 9-fold and 22-fold, respectively. These results show that the helicity of anticancer peptides plays a crucial role for biological activities. This specific rational approach of peptide design could be a powerful method to improve the specificity of anticancer peptides as promising therapeutics in clinical practices.

  4. α-Peptide-Oligourea Chimeras: Stabilization of Short α-Helices by Non-Peptide Helical Foldamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremaux, Juliette; Mauran, Laura; Pulka-Ziach, Karolina; Kauffmann, Brice; Odaert, Benoit; Guichard, Gilles

    2015-08-17

    Short α-peptides with less than 10 residues generally display a low propensity to nucleate stable helical conformations. While various strategies to stabilize peptide helices have been previously reported, the ability of non-peptide helical foldamers to stabilize α-helices when fused to short α-peptide segments has not been investigated. Towards this end, structural investigations into a series of chimeric oligomers obtained by joining aliphatic oligoureas to the C- or N-termini of α-peptides are described. All chimeras were found to be fully helical, with as few as 2 (or 3) urea units sufficient to propagate an α-helical conformation in the fused peptide segment. The remarkable compatibility of α-peptides with oligoureas described here, along with the simplicity of the approach, highlights the potential of interfacing natural and non-peptide backbones as a means to further control the behavior of α-peptides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Hydrophobicity and Helicity Regulate the Antifungal Activity of 14-Helical β-Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most prevalent fungal pathogens, causing both mucosal candidiasis and invasive candidemia. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), part of the human innate immune system, have been shown to exhibit antifungal activity but have not been effective as pharmaceuticals because of low activity and selectivity in physiologically relevant environments. Nevertheless, studies on α-peptide AMPs have revealed key features that can be designed into more stable structures, such as the 14-helix of β-peptide-based oligomers. Here, we report on the ways in which two of those features, hydrophobicity and helicity, govern the activity and selectivity of 14-helical β-peptides against C. albicans and human red blood cells. Our results reveal both antifungal activity and hemolysis to correlate to hydrophobicity, with intermediate levels of hydrophobicity leading to high antifungal activity and high selectivity toward C. albicans. Helical structure-forming propensity further influenced this window of selective antifungal activity, with more stable helical structures eliciting specificity for C. albicans over a broader range of hydrophobicity. Our findings also reveal cooperativity between hydrophobicity and helicity in regulating antifungal activity and specificity. The results of this study provide critical insight into the ways in which hydrophobicity and helicity govern the activity and specificity of AMPs and identify criteria that may be useful for the design of potent and selective antifungal agents. PMID:24837702

  6. Peptide tessellation yields micrometre-scale collagen triple helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, I. Caglar; Forticaux, Audrey; Jin, Song; Raines, Ronald T.

    2016-11-01

    Sticky-ended DNA duplexes can associate spontaneously into long double helices; however, such self-assembly is much less developed with proteins. Collagen is the most prevalent component of the extracellular matrix and a common clinical biomaterial. As for natural DNA, the ~103-residue triple helices (~300 nm) of natural collagen are recalcitrant to chemical synthesis. Here we show how the self-assembly of short collagen-mimetic peptides (CMPs) can enable the fabrication of synthetic collagen triple helices that are nearly a micrometre in length. Inspired by the mathematics of tessellations, we derive rules for the design of single CMPs that self-assemble into long triple helices with perfect symmetry. Sticky ends thus created are uniform across the assembly and drive its growth. Enacting this design yields individual triple helices that, in length, match or exceed those in natural collagen and are remarkably thermostable, despite the absence of higher-order association. The symmetric assembly of CMPs provides an enabling platform for the development of advanced materials for medicine and nanotechnology.

  7. Insulin mimetic peptide S371 folds into a helical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2017-06-05

    Insulin plays a crucial physiological role in glucose control by initiating a number of signaling events on binding and activating its cell surface receptor. Insulin mimics have, therefore, become promising agents for treating diabetes and to probe the mechanism of interaction of insulin with its receptor. Specifically, many insulin-mimetic peptide sequences have been discovered and found to selectively function as agonists and antagonists, but their structures and the mechanistic details of their interactions with the receptor remain challenging to characterize. In this work, we have studied the folding properties and structure of a Site 1 insulin mimetic peptide S371 that has sequence similarities with the insulin B-chain as well as with a critical hormone-binding element of the receptor known as the C-terminal (CT) peptide. We first validated our simulation approaches by predicting the known solution structure of the insulin B-chain helix and then applied them to study the folding of the mimetic peptide S371. Our data predict a helical fold for the first 16 residues of S371 that has a resemblance to the helical motifs in the insulin B-chain and CT. We also propose receptor-bound models of S371 that provide mechanistic explanations for competing binding properties of S371 and CT to the Site 1 of IR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Antimicrobial peptides: the role of hydrophobicity in the alpha helical structure

    OpenAIRE

    Pandurangan Perumal; Vijaya P. Pandey

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of molecule obtained from plants, insects, animals, and humans. These peptides have been classified into five categories: 1. Anionic peptide, 2. Linear alpha helical cationic peptide, 3. Cationic peptide, 4. Anionic and cationic peptides with disulphide bonds, and 5. Anionic and cationic peptide fragments of larger proteins. Factors affecting AMPs are sequence, size, charge, hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, structure and conformation. Synthesis of ...

  9. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, Mark D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an α-helix, a "scaffold" region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of λ Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of λ Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an α-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded βsheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of 15N NMR relaxation properties.

  10. Hexagonally Ordered Arrays of α-Helical Bundles Formed from Peptide-Dendron Hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkley, Deborah A. [Department; Rokhlenko, Yekaterina [Department; Marine, Jeannette E. [Department; David, Rachelle [Department; Sahoo, Dipankar [Department; Watson, Matthew D. [Department; Koga, Tadanori [Department; Department; Osuji, Chinedum O. [Department; Rudick, Jonathan G. [Department

    2017-10-24

    Combining monodisperse building blocks that have distinct folding properties serves as a modular strategy for controlling structural complexity in hierarchically organized materials. We combine an α-helical bundle-forming peptide with self-assembling dendrons to better control the arrangement of functional groups within cylindrical nanostructures. Site-specific grafting of dendrons to amino acid residues on the exterior of the α-helical bundle yields monodisperse macromolecules with programmable folding and self-assembly properties. The resulting hybrid biomaterials form thermotropic columnar hexagonal mesophases in which the peptides adopt an α-helical conformation. Bundling of the α-helical peptides accompanies self-assembly of the peptide-dendron hybrids into cylindrical nanostructures. The bundle stoichiometry in the mesophase agrees well with the size found in solution for α-helical bundles of peptides with a similar amino acid sequence.

  11. Helical peptide-polyamine and -polyether conjugates as synthetic ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Monica; Francescon, Marco; Fregonese, Massimo; Gennaro, Renato; Pengo, Paolo; Rossi, Paola; Scrimin, Paolo; Tecilla, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Two new synthetic ionophores in which the hydrophobic portion is represented by a short helical Aib-peptide (Aib=α-amino-isobutyric acid) and the hydrophilic one is a poly-amino (1a) or a polyether (1b) chain have been prepared. The two conjugates show a high ionophoric activity in phospholipid membranes being able to efficiently dissipate a pH gradient and, in the case of 1b, to transport Na(+) across the membrane. Bioactivity evaluation of the two conjugates shows that 1a has a moderate antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of microorganisms and it is able to permeabilize the inner and the outer membrane of Escherichia coli cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Handedness preference and switching of peptide helices. Part II: Helices based on noncoded α-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisma, Marco; De Zotti, Marta; Formaggio, Fernando; Peggion, Cristina; Moretto, Alessandro; Toniolo, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    In this second part of our review article on the preferred screw sense and interconversion of peptide helices, we discuss the most significant computational and experimental data published on helices formed by the most extensively investigated categories of noncoded α-amino acids. They are as follows: (i) N-alkylated Gly residues (peptoids), (ii) C(α) -alkylated α-amino acids, (iii) C(α,β) -sp(2) configurated α-amino acids, and (iv) combinations of residues of types (ii) and (iii). With confidence, the large body of interesting papers examined and classified in this editorial effort will stimulate the development of helical peptides in many diverse areas of biosciences and nanosciences. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Exploring the Changes in the Structure of α-Helical Peptides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sathish

    Exploring the Changes in the Structure of α-Helical Peptides. Adsorbed onto Carbon and Boron Nitride based Nanomaterials. Dr. V. Subramanian. Chemical Laboratory, IPC Division. CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-600 020. 1 ...

  14. Antimicrobial peptides: the role of hydrophobicity in the alpha helical structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandurangan Perumal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a class of molecule obtained from plants, insects, animals, and humans. These peptides have been classified into five categories: 1. Anionic peptide, 2. Linear alpha helical cationic peptide, 3. Cationic peptide, 4. Anionic and cationic peptides with disulphide bonds, and 5. Anionic and cationic peptide fragments of larger proteins. Factors affecting AMPs are sequence, size, charge, hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, structure and conformation. Synthesis of these peptides is convenient by using solid phase peptide synthesis by using FMOC chemistry protocol. The secondary structures of three synthetic peptides were determined by circular dichroism. Also, it was compared the stability of the α-helical structure and confirmed the percentage of helix of these peptides by using circular dichroism. Some of these AMPs show therapeutic properties like antimicrobial, antiviral, contraceptive, and anticancer. The formulations of some peptides have been entered into the phase I, II, or III of clinical trials. This article to review briefly the sources, classification, factors affecting AMPs activity, synthesis, characterization, mechanism of action and therapeutic concern of AMPs and mainly focussed on percentage of α-helical structure in various medium.

  15. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    categories (Segrest et al. 1990; Phoenix et al. 1998; Phoenix and Harris 2002). Helices that cause membrane lysis belong to class L and those that bind to lipids but are not lytic, such as those occurring in apolipoproteins, are classified as class. A. Interest in amphipathic helices has further stemmed from the observation that ...

  16. Analysis of concentration response curves to describe and compare tha antimicrobial activity anof model cationic alpha-helical peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rautenbach, M.; Gerstner, G.D.; Vlok, N.M.; Kulenkampff, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    To assess and compare different model Leu-Lys-containing cationic α-helical peptides, their antimicrobial activities were tested against Escherichia coli as target organism over a broad peptide concentration range. The natural cationic α-helical peptides magainin 2 and PGLa and the cyclic cationic

  17. Buckwheat trypsin inhibitor with helical hairpin structure belongs to a new family of plant defence peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, Peter B; Mineev, Konstantin S; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Arseniev, Alexander S; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2012-08-15

    A new peptide trypsin inhibitor named BWI-2c was obtained from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds by sequential affinity, ion exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The peptide was sequenced and found to contain 41 amino acid residues, with four cysteine residues involved in two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Recombinant BWI-2c identical to the natural peptide was produced in Escherichia coli in a form of a cleavable fusion with thioredoxin. The 3D (three-dimensional) structure of the peptide in solution was determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing two antiparallel α-helices stapled by disulfide bonds. Together with VhTI, a trypsin inhibitor from veronica (Veronica hederifolia), BWI-2c represents a new family of protease inhibitors with an unusual α-helical hairpin fold. The linker sequence between the helices represents the so-called trypsin inhibitory loop responsible for direct binding to the active site of the enzyme that cleaves BWI-2c at the functionally important residue Arg(19). The inhibition constant was determined for BWI-2c against trypsin (1.7×10(-1)0 M), and the peptide was tested on other enzymes, including those from various insect digestive systems, revealing high selectivity to trypsin-like proteases. Structural similarity shared by BWI-2c, VhTI and several other plant defence peptides leads to the acknowledgement of a new widespread family of plant peptides termed α-hairpinins.

  18. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The composition of amino acids on the polar face of the helix in the peptides is considerably different. The peptides show variations in their ability to permeabilise zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles. Whereas increased net positive charge favours greater permeabilisation, the distribution of charged residues in the polar ...

  19. Molecular Structure of a Helical ribbon in a Peptide Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Marini, Davide; Kamm, Roger D.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the molecular structure of nanometer scale helical ribbons observed during self-assembly of the peptide KFE8 (amino acid sequence: FKFEFKFE) (NanoLetters (2002, in press)). By analyzing the hydrogen bonding patterns between neighboring peptide backbones, we constructed a number of possible β-sheets. Using all possible combinations of these, we built helical ribbons with dimensions close to those found experimentally and performed molecular dynamics simulations to identify the most stable structure. Solvation effects were implemented by the analytic continuum electrostatics (ACE) model developed by Schaefer and Karplus (J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1578 (1996)). By applying electrostatic double layer theory, we incorporated the effect of pH by scaling the amount of charge on the sidechains. Our results suggest that the helical ribbon is comprised of a double β-sheet where the inner and the outer helices have distinct hydrogen bonding patterns. Our approach has general applicability to the study of helices formed by the self-assembly of β-sheet forming peptides with various amino acid sequences.

  20. Alpha-helical cationic anticancer peptides: a promising candidate for novel anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yibing; Feng, Qi; Yan, Qiuyan; Hao, Xueyu; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a serious concern in public health. Harmful side effects and multidrug resistance of traditional chemotherapy have prompted urgent needs for novel anticancer drugs or therapeutic approaches. Anticancer peptides (ACPs) have become promising molecules for novel anticancer agents because of their unique mechanism and several extraordinary properties. Most α-helical ACPs target the cell membrane, and interactions between ACPs and cell membrane components are believed to be the key factor in the selective killing of cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the exploitation of the structure and function of α-helical ACPs, including the distinction between cancer and normal cells, the proposed anticancer mechanisms, and the influence of physicochemical parameters of α-helical ACPs on the biological activities and selectivity against cancer cells. In addition, the design and modification methods to optimize the cell selectivity of α-helical ACPs are considered. Furthermore, the suitability of ACPs as cancer therapeutics is discussed.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 in a zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine micelle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a 40-ns all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 (OVIS) in a zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelle. The DPC micelle serves as an economical and effective model for a cellular membrane owing to the presence of a choline headg...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of helical antimicrobial peptides in SDS micelles: what do point mutations achieve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2005-01-01

    We report long time scale simulations of the 18-residue helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 and its analogs novispirin-G10 and novispirin-T7 in SDS micelles. The SDS micelle serves as an economical and effective model for a cellular membrane. Ovispirin, which is initially placed along a mic...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of anticancer action and cell selectivity of short α-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuixia; Hu, Jing; Zeng, Ping; Pan, Fang; Yaseen, Mohammed; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2014-02-01

    Development of functional biomaterials and drugs with good biocompatibility towards host cells but with high potency against cancer cells is a challenging endeavor. By drawing upon the advantageous features of natural antimicrobial peptides and α-helical proteins, we have designed a new class of short α-helical peptides G(IIKK)(n)I-NH2 (n = 1-4) with different potency and high selectivity against cancer cells. We show that the peptides with n = 3 and 4 kill cancer cells effectively whilst remaining benign to the host cells at their working concentrations, through mechanistic processes similar to their bactericidal effects. The high cell selectivity could stem from their preferential binding to the outer cell membranes containing negative charges and high fluidity. In addition to rapid membrane-permeabilizing capacities, the peptides can also induce the programmed cell death of cancer cells via both mitochondrial pathway and death receptor pathway, without inducing non-specific immunogenic responses. Importantly, these peptides can also inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model without eliciting side effects. Whilst this study reveals the clinical potential of these peptides as potent drugs and for other medical and healthcare applications, it also points to the significance of fundamental material research in the future development of highly selective peptide functional materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antiviral activity of α-helical stapled peptides designed from the HIV-1 capsid dimerization domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowburn David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C-terminal domain (CTD of HIV-1 capsid (CA, like full-length CA, forms dimers in solution and CTD dimerization is a major driving force in Gag assembly and maturation. Mutations of the residues at the CTD dimer interface impair virus assembly and render the virus non-infectious. Therefore, the CTD represents a potential target for designing anti-HIV-1 drugs. Results Due to the pivotal role of the dimer interface, we reasoned that peptides from the α-helical region of the dimer interface might be effective as decoys to prevent CTD dimer formation. However, these small peptides do not have any structure in solution and they do not penetrate cells. Therefore, we used the hydrocarbon stapling technique to stabilize the α-helical structure and confirmed by confocal microscopy that this modification also made these peptides cell-penetrating. We also confirmed by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, sedimentation equilibrium and NMR that these peptides indeed disrupt dimer formation. In in vitro assembly assays, the peptides inhibited mature-like virus particle formation and specifically inhibited HIV-1 production in cell-based assays. These peptides also showed potent antiviral activity against a large panel of laboratory-adapted and primary isolates, including viral strains resistant to inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease. Conclusions These preliminary data serve as the foundation for designing small, stable, α-helical peptides and small-molecule inhibitors targeted against the CTD dimer interface. The observation that relatively weak CA binders, such as NYAD-201 and NYAD-202, showed specificity and are able to disrupt the CTD dimer is encouraging for further exploration of a much broader class of antiviral compounds targeting CA. We cannot exclude the possibility that the CA-based peptides described here could elicit additional effects on virus replication not directly linked to their ability to bind

  5. Helical 1:1 α/Sulfono-γ-AA Heterogeneous Peptides with Antibacterial Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Fengyu; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Teng, Peng; Su, Ma; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-05-09

    As one of the greatest threats facing in 21st century, antibiotic resistance is now a major public health concern. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer an alternative approach to combat emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria. It is known that helical HDPs such as magainin 2 and its analogs adopt cationic amphipathic conformations upon interaction with bacterial membranes, leading to membrane disruption and subsequent bacterial cell death. We have previously shown that amphipathic sulfono-γ-AApeptides could mimic magainin 2 and exhibit bactericidal activity. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that amphipathic helical 1:1 α/sulfono-γ-AA heterogeneous peptides, in which regular amino acids and sulfono-γ-AApeptide building blocks are alternatively present in a 1:1 pattern, display potent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) suggests that the lead sequences adopt defined helical structures. The subsequent studies including 2 fluorescence microscopy and time-kill experiments indicate that these hybrid peptides exert antimicrobial activity by mimicking the mechanism of HDPs. Our findings may lead to the development of HDP-mimicking antimicrobial peptidomimetics that combat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. In addition, our results also demonstrate the effective design of a new class of helical foldamer, which could be employed to interrogate other important biological targets such as protein-protein interactions in the future.

  6. Constrained Unfolding of a Helical Peptide: Implicit versus Explicit Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailey R Bureau

    Full Text Available Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD has been seen to provide the potential of mean force (PMF along a peptide unfolding pathway effectively but at significant computational cost, particularly in all-atom solvents. Adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD has been seen to provide a significant computational advantage by limiting the spread of the trajectories in a staged approach. The contraction of the trajectories at the end of each stage can be performed by taking a structure whose nonequilibrium work is closest to the Jarzynski average (in naive ASMD or by relaxing the trajectories under a no-work condition (in full-relaxation ASMD--namely, FR-ASMD. Both approaches have been used to determine the energetics and hydrogen-bonding structure along the pathway for unfolding of a benchmark peptide initially constrained as an α-helix in a water environment. The energetics are quite different to those in vacuum, but are found to be similar between implicit and explicit solvents. Surprisingly, the hydrogen-bonding pathways are also similar in the implicit and explicit solvents despite the fact that the solvent contact plays an important role in opening the helix.

  7. Helical structure of basic proteins from spermatozoa. Comparison with model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer, N; Perelló, M; Palau, J; Subirana, J A

    1993-06-15

    We describe structural studies carried out with some basic proteins found in association with DNA in the spermatozoa of molluscs and echinoderms. We have studied proteins related to histone H1 as well as protamines. Structural prediction methods show that these proteins have a strong helical potential and contain several turns, mainly of the SPKK type. No beta structures were found. Strong structural similarities have been detected between distantly related species. The presence of helical regions is confirmed by circular dichroism in trifluoroethanol solution. The influence of the SPKK turns is also evident in the CD spectra. In proteins which contain a high percentage of arginine we conclude that conventional prediction methods should be modified in order to allow for a higher helical potential for this amino acid residue. Synthetic peptides with a sequence present in the C-terminal region of histone H1 have also been studied. It was found that octapeptides may only acquire a small amount of structure, whereas hexadecapeptides are 50-60% helical. These studies strongly suggest that both protamines and proteins related to the C-terminal part of histone H1 interact with DNA mainly in the alpha-helical conformation.

  8. Molecular architecture with carbohydrate functionalized β-peptides adopting 314-helical conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin J. Pawar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate recognition is essential in cellular interactions and biological processes. It is characterized by structural diversity, multivalency and cooperative effects. To evaluate carbohydrate interaction and recognition, the structurally defined attachment of sugar units to a rigid template is highly desired. β-Peptide helices offer conformationally stable templates for the linear presentation of sugar units in defined distances. The synthesis and β-peptide incorporation of sugar-β-amino acids are described providing the saccharide units as amino acid side chain. The respective sugar-β-amino acids are accessible by Michael addition of ammonia to sugar units derivatized as α,β-unsaturated esters. Three sugar units were incorporated in β-peptide oligomers varying the sugar (glucose, galactose, xylose and sugar protecting groups. The influence of sugar units and the configuration of sugar-β-amino acids on β-peptide secondary structure were investigated by CD spectroscopy.

  9. Shortening and modifying the 1513 MSP-1 peptide's alpha-helical region induces protection against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Fabiola; Bermúdez, Adriana; Torres, Elizabeth; Urquiza, Mauricio; Rodríguez, Raúl; López, Yolanda; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-03-05

    Immunogenic and protective peptide sequences are of prime importance in the search for an anti-malarial vaccine. The MSP-1 conserved and semi-conserved sequences have been shown to contain red blood cell (RBC) membrane high affinity binding peptides (HABP). HABP 1513 sequence ((42)GYSLFQKEKMVLNEGTSGTA(61)), from this protein's N-terminal, has been shown to possess a T-epitope; however, it did not induce a humoral immune response or complete protection when evaluated in Aotus monkeys. Analogue peptides with critical binding residues replaced by amino acids with similar mass but different charge were synthesised and tested for immunogenicity and protectivity in monkey. NMR studies correlated structural behaviour with biological function. Non-immunogenic and non-protective 1513 native peptide presented a helical fragment between residues L(4) and E(14). C-terminal, 5-residue-shorter, non-immunogenic, non-protective peptide 17894 contained an alpha-helix from Q(6) to L(12) residues. Immunogenic and protective peptide 13946 presented a shorter alpha-helix between K(7) to N(13) residues. These data suggest that changing certain residues permits better peptide fit within the MHC class II-peptide-TCR complex, thus activating the immune system and inducing a protective immune response.

  10. Antifungal Activity of 14-Helical β-Peptides against Planktonic Cells and Biofilms of Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Raman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungal infections and treatment is further complicated by the formation of drug resistant biofilms, often on the surfaces of implanted medical devices. In recent years, the incidence of fungal infections by other pathogenic Candida species such as C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis has increased. Amphiphilic, helical β-peptide structural mimetics of natural antimicrobial α-peptides have been shown to exhibit specific planktonic antifungal and anti-biofilm formation activity against C. albicans in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that β-peptides are also active against clinically isolated and drug resistant strains of C. albicans and against other opportunistic Candida spp. Different Candida species were susceptible to β-peptides to varying degrees, with C. tropicalis being the most and C. glabrata being the least susceptible. β-peptide hydrophobicity directly correlated with antifungal activity against all the Candida clinical strains and species tested. While β-peptides were largely ineffective at disrupting existing Candida biofilms, hydrophobic β-peptides were able to prevent the formation of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis biofilms. The broad-spectrum antifungal activity of β-peptides against planktonic cells and in preventing biofilm formation suggests the promise of this class of molecules as therapeutics.

  11. Building a bridge between peptide chemistry and organic chemistry: intramolecular macrocyclization reactions and supramolecular chemistry with helical peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Alessandro; Crisma, Marco; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    In our ongoing efforts to build a bridge between peptide chemistry and organic chemistry, we are currently investigating: (1) two types of intramolecular macrocyclization reactions in 3(10)-helical peptides, and (2) a peptido[2]rotaxane molecular machine as a supramolecular tool using a 3(10)-helical peptide as the axle. More specifically, we studied the following two reactions: (a) the intramolecular ring-closing olefin metathesis between two amino acid residues with side chains bearing an allyl group, and (b) the intramolecular Paternò-Yang photoreaction, using a benzophenone-based amino acid as a photoaffinity reagent for a Met residue. Both reactions involve formation of a new C--C bond. As for the supramolecular system examined, we were able to identify the two stations of a new peptido[2]rotaxane characterized by an -(Aib)(6)- axle and to reversibly switch the aromatic tetramide macrocyclic wheel from one station to the next. This article summarizes the information available in the literature from other groups and the published/unpublished data originated from our laboratory on these research areas. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Aggregation of Chameleon Peptides: Implications of α-Helicity in Fibril Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongkeun; Do, Thanh D; Hayden, Eric Y; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-07-07

    We investigate the relationship between the inherent secondary structure and aggregation propensity of peptides containing chameleon sequences (i.e., sequences that can adopt either α or β structure depending on context) using a combination of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, ion-mobility mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, and transmission electron microscopy. We focus on an eight-residue long chameleon sequence that can adopt an α-helical structure in the context of the iron-binding protein from Bacillus anthracis (PDB id 1JIG ) and a β-strand in the context of the baculovirus P35 protein (PDB id 1P35 ). We show that the isolated chameleon sequence is intrinsically disordered, interconverting between α-helical and β-rich conformations. The inherent conformational plasticity of the sequence can be constrained by addition of flanking residues with a given secondary structure propensity. Intriguingly, we show that the chameleon sequence with helical flanking residues aggregates rapidly into fibrils, whereas the chameleon sequence with flanking residues that favor β-conformations has weak aggregation propensity. This work sheds new insights into the possible role of α-helical intermediates in fibril formation.

  13. Tryptophan as a Probe to Study the Anticancer Mechanism of Action and Specificity of α-Helical Anticancer Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirong Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a single tryptophan, as a fluorescence probe, was shifted from the N-terminus to the middle and to the C-terminus of a 26-residue α-helical anticancer peptide sequence to study the mechanism of action and specificity. The hydrophobicity of peptides, as well as peptide helicity and self-associating ability, were slightly influenced by the position change of tryptophan in the peptide sequence, while the hemolytic activity and anticancer activity of the peptide analogs remained the same. The tryptophan fluorescence experiment demonstrated that peptide analogs were more selective against LUVs mimicking cancer cell membranes than LUVs mimicking normal cell membranes. During the interaction with target membranes, the N-terminus of an anticancer peptide may be inserted vertically or tilted into the hydrophobic components of the phospholipid bilayer first. The thermodynamic parameters of the peptides PNW and PCW, when interacting with zwitterionic DMPC or negatively charged DMPS, were determined by ITC. DSC experiments showed that peptide analogs significantly altered the phase transition profiles of DMPC, but did not dramatically modify the phase transition of DMPS. It is demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions are the main driving force for peptides interacting with normal cell membranes, whilst, electrostatic interactions dominate the interactions between peptides and cancer cell membranes. Utilizing tryptophan as a fluorescence probe molecule appears to be a practicable approach to determine the interaction of peptides with phospholipid bilayers.

  14. Tryptophan as a probe to study the anticancer mechanism of action and specificity of α-helical anticancer peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guirong; Huang, Yibing; Feng, Qi; Chen, Yuxin

    2014-08-13

    In the present study, a single tryptophan, as a fluorescence probe, was shifted from the N-terminus to the middle and to the C-terminus of a 26-residue α-helical anticancer peptide sequence to study the mechanism of action and specificity. The hydrophobicity of peptides, as well as peptide helicity and self-associating ability, were slightly influenced by the position change of tryptophan in the peptide sequence, while the hemolytic activity and anticancer activity of the peptide analogs remained the same. The tryptophan fluorescence experiment demonstrated that peptide analogs were more selective against LUVs mimicking cancer cell membranes than LUVs mimicking normal cell membranes. During the interaction with target membranes, the N-terminus of an anticancer peptide may be inserted vertically or tilted into the hydrophobic components of the phospholipid bilayer first. The thermodynamic parameters of the peptides PNW and PCW, when interacting with zwitterionic DMPC or negatively charged DMPS, were determined by ITC. DSC experiments showed that peptide analogs significantly altered the phase transition profiles of DMPC, but did not dramatically modify the phase transition of DMPS. It is demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions are the main driving force for peptides interacting with normal cell membranes, whilst, electrostatic interactions dominate the interactions between peptides and cancer cell membranes. Utilizing tryptophan as a fluorescence probe molecule appears to be a practicable approach to determine the interaction of peptides with phospholipid bilayers.

  15. TAT Modification of Alpha-Helical Anticancer Peptides to Improve Specificity and Efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyu Hao

    Full Text Available HPRP-A1 is an amphipathic α-helical anticancer peptide (ACP derived from the N-terminus of ribosomal protein L1 (RpL1 of Helicobacter pylori. In our previously study, HPRP-A1 has been reported that induced HeLa cell apoptosis in a caspase-dependent approach and involved both by the death receptor 'extrinsic' pathway and the mitochondria 'intrinsic' pathway. Here we report the construction of a new hybrid peptide, HPRP-A1-TAT, comprising the cell-permeating peptide TAT linked to the C-terminus of HPRP-A1. This peptide exhibits higher anticancer activity against HeLa cells with lower toxicity against human RBC than HPRP-A1. Two FITC-labeled peptides, FITC-HPRP-A1 and FITC-HPRP-A1-TAT, were used to investigate and compare the cellular uptake mechanism using fluorescence spectra and flow cytometry. Compared with HPRP-A1, HPRP-A1-TAT quickly crossed cell, entered the cytoplasm via endocytosis, and disrupted the cell membrane integrity. HPRP-A1-TAT exhibited stronger anticancer activity than HPRP-A1 at the same concentration by increasing early apoptosis of HeLa cells and inducing caspase activity. Notably, after 24 h, the cellular concentration of HPRP-A1-TAT was higher than that of HPRP-A1. This result suggests that TAT protects HPRP-A1 against degradation, likely due to its high number of positively charged amino acids or the further release of peptides into cancer cells from endocytotic vesicles. We believe that this TAT modification approach may provide an effective new strategy for improving the therapeutic index and anticancer activity of ACPs for clinical use.

  16. TAT Modification of Alpha-Helical Anticancer Peptides to Improve Specificity and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xueyu; Yan, Qiuyan; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wenren; Huang, Yibing; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    HPRP-A1 is an amphipathic α-helical anticancer peptide (ACP) derived from the N-terminus of ribosomal protein L1 (RpL1) of Helicobacter pylori. In our previously study, HPRP-A1 has been reported that induced HeLa cell apoptosis in a caspase-dependent approach and involved both by the death receptor 'extrinsic' pathway and the mitochondria 'intrinsic' pathway. Here we report the construction of a new hybrid peptide, HPRP-A1-TAT, comprising the cell-permeating peptide TAT linked to the C-terminus of HPRP-A1. This peptide exhibits higher anticancer activity against HeLa cells with lower toxicity against human RBC than HPRP-A1. Two FITC-labeled peptides, FITC-HPRP-A1 and FITC-HPRP-A1-TAT, were used to investigate and compare the cellular uptake mechanism using fluorescence spectra and flow cytometry. Compared with HPRP-A1, HPRP-A1-TAT quickly crossed cell, entered the cytoplasm via endocytosis, and disrupted the cell membrane integrity. HPRP-A1-TAT exhibited stronger anticancer activity than HPRP-A1 at the same concentration by increasing early apoptosis of HeLa cells and inducing caspase activity. Notably, after 24 h, the cellular concentration of HPRP-A1-TAT was higher than that of HPRP-A1. This result suggests that TAT protects HPRP-A1 against degradation, likely due to its high number of positively charged amino acids or the further release of peptides into cancer cells from endocytotic vesicles. We believe that this TAT modification approach may provide an effective new strategy for improving the therapeutic index and anticancer activity of ACPs for clinical use.

  17. Peptide Targeted by Human Antibodies Associated with HIV Vaccine-Associated Protection Assumes a Dynamic α-Helical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyegbo, Mohammed S; Shmelkov, Evgeny; Dominguez, Lorenzo; Goger, Michael; Battacharya, Shibani; deCamp, Allan C; Gilbert, Peter B; Berman, Phillip W; Cardozo, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The only evidence of vaccine-induced protection from HIV acquisition in humans was obtained in the RV144 HIV vaccine clinical trial. One immune correlate of risk in RV144 was observed to be higher titers of vaccine-induced antibodies (Abs) reacting with a 23-mer non-glycosylated peptide with the same amino acid sequence as a segment in the second variable (V2) loop of the MN strain of HIV. We used NMR to analyze the dynamic 3D structure of this peptide. Distance restraints between spatially proximate inter-residue protons were calculated from NOE cross peak intensities and used to constrain a thorough search of all possible conformations of the peptide. α-helical folding was strongly preferred by part of the peptide. A high-throughput structure prediction of this segment in all circulating HIV strains demonstrated that α-helical conformations are preferred by this segment almost universally across all subtypes. Notably, α-helical conformations of this segment of the V2 loop cluster cross-subtype-conserved amino acids on one face of the helix and the variable amino acid positions on the other in a semblance of an amphipathic α-helix. Accordingly, some Abs that protected against HIV in RV144 may have targeted a specific, conserved α-helical peptide epitope in the V2 loop of HIV's surface envelope glycoprotein.

  18. α-Helical Peptide-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrids: Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizaki, Kin-Ya; Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Tsukamoto, Naoyuki; Imai, Takahito

    2017-12-13

    Gold nanoparticles are promising nanomaterials for catalytic reactions, sensing/imaging systems, photonic/plasmonic devices, and electronics because of their unique physical and chemical properties. To date, significant catalytic activities of gold nanoparticles have been reported for reactions such as carbon monooxide oxidation and 4-nitrophenol reduction, and diverse gold nanoparticle morphologies such as nanospheres, wires, rods, and cubes have been achieved using a variety of capping/stabilizing organic molecules. Very recently, we designed a -sheet-forming peptide that accommodates HAuCl4 in the cavities of peptide self-assemblies and provided ultrathin gold nanoribbons 50-100 nm wide, several nanometers high, and microns long, without the need for external reductants in the aqueous medium. However, there are few reports on the simultaneous assembly of peptides forming secondary structures and metallic nanoparticles into peptide-metallic particle hybrids under mild aqueous conditions and demonstration of their use as catalysts. Furthermore, the gold nanoribbon surfaces are covered with -sheet structures, disrupting the access of substrates to the active sites, thereby possibly inhibiting their catalytic activity. We here report (i) the design, synthesis, and characterization of a new template peptide, RU025, that tends to form an -helical conformation and self-assembles into network nanoarchitectures in aqueous solution through possibly hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, (ii) the characterization of gold seed crystals synthesized by mixing RU025 and HAuCl4, (iii) the characterization of peptide-gold nanoparticle hybrids directed by crystal growth with NaBH4 and showing its dependence on the conditions used for nucleation, and (iv) the catalytic activities of the hybrids towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of excess NaBH4. The size and morphology of gold nanoparticles can be tuned in the nanometer range by

  19. Downsizing the BAD BH3 peptide to small constrained α-helices with improved ligand efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Nicholas E; Harrison, Rosemary S; Ruiz-Gomez, Gloria; Abbenante, Giovanni; Mason, Jody M; Fairlie, David P

    2016-11-22

    Bcl2 Homology (BH) proteins can either trigger or prevent programmed cell death or apoptosis. Deregulation of the BH protein family network leads to evasion of apoptosis, uncontrolled proliferation and is a hallmark of cancer. Inhibition of pro-survival BH proteins is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy for certain cancers. We have examined whether helix-constrained peptides based on the BAD BH3 domain (residues 103-127) can be downsized to much smaller more drug-like peptides. We report the preparation, structural characterisation, in vitro Bcl-xL inhibition and leukemic T-cell killing ability of 45 linear, mono-, bi- and tricyclic helical peptidomimetics between 8- and 19-residues in length. We show that the BAD BH3 can be downsized to 8-14 residues and still maintain appreciable affinity for Bcl-xL. In addition, the binding efficiency indices (BEI) of the downsized mimetics are significantly higher than the BAD BH3 and similar stapled BH3 mimetics, approaching drug-like molecules. This suggests that bicyclic and monocyclic mimetics based on BH3 domains are much more efficient binding ligands than the longer peptides which they mimic.

  20. Production of phytotoxic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides in plant cells using inducible promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Company

    Full Text Available Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes.

  1. Anti-plasmodial action of de novo-designed, cationic, lysine-branched, amphipathic, helical peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Naveen K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lack of vaccine and rampant drug resistance demands new anti-malarials. Methods In vitro blood stage anti-plasmodial properties of several de novo-designed, chemically synthesized, cationic, amphipathic, helical, antibiotic peptides were examined against Plasmodium falciparum using SYBR Green assay. Mechanistic details of anti-plasmodial action were examined by optical/fluorescence microscopy and FACS analysis. Results Unlike the monomeric decapeptides {(Ac-GXRKXHKXWA-NH2 (X = F,ΔF (Fm, ΔFm IC50 >100 μM}, the lysine-branched,dimeric versions showed far greater potency {IC50 (μM Fd 1.5 , ΔFd 1.39}. The more helical and proteolytically stable ΔFd was studied for mechanistic details. ΔFq, a K-K2 dendrimer of ΔFm and (ΔFm2 a linear dimer of ΔFm showed IC50 (μM of 0.25 and 2.4 respectively. The healthy/infected red cell selectivity indices were >35 (ΔFd, >20 (ΔFm2 and 10 (ΔFq. FITC-ΔFd showed rapid and selective accumulation in parasitized red cells. Overlaying DAPI and FITC florescence suggested that ΔFd binds DNA. Trophozoites and schizonts incubated with ΔFd (2.5 μM egressed anomalously and Band-3 immunostaining revealed them not to be associated with RBC membrane. Prematurely egressed merozoites from peptide-treated cultures were found to be invasion incompetent. Conclusion Good selectivity (>35, good resistance index (1.1 and low cytotoxicity indicate the promise of ΔFd against malaria.

  2. Peptoids that mimic the structure, function, and mechanism of helical antimicrobial peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chongsiriwatana, Nathaniel P.; Patch, James A.; Czyzewski, Ann M.; Dohm, Michelle T.; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Barron, Annelise E. (IIT); (NWU); (LBNL)

    2008-04-02

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their mimics are emerging as promising antibiotic agents. We present a library of 'ampetoids' (antimicrobial peptoid oligomers) with helical structures and biomimetic sequences, several members of which have low-micromolar antimicrobial activities, similar to cationic AMPs like pexiganan. Broad-spectrum activity against six clinically relevant BSL2 pathogens is also shown. This comprehensive structure-activity relationship study, including circular dichroism spectroscopy, minimum inhibitory concentration assays, hemolysis and mammalian cell toxicity studies, and specular x-ray reflectivity measurements shows that the in vitro activities of ampetoids are strikingly similar to those of AMPs themselves, suggesting a strong mechanistic analogy. The ampetoids' antibacterial activity, coupled with their low cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, make them a promising class of antimicrobials for biomedical applications. Peptoids are biostable, with a protease-resistant N-substituted glycine backbone, and their sequences are highly tunable, because an extensive diversity of side chains can be incorporated via facile solid-phase synthesis. Our findings add to the growing evidence that nonnatural foldamers will emerge as an important class of therapeutics.

  3. IR-induced conformational isomerization of a helical peptide in a cold ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaiby, Caroline; Zabuga, Aleksandra V.; Svendsen, Annette; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use laser-induced population transfer techniques to study the conformational isomerization of a helical peptide, Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-LysH+, in a cold ion trap. In one scheme, called IR-UV hole-filling spectroscopy, a single conformation is selectively excited with an IR pump laser via a distinct NH stretch vibration. After giving the vibrationally excited ions sufficient time to isomerize and re-cool in the trap, the new conformational redistribution is detected by UV photofragment spectroscopy. While we clearly observe a redistribution of the conformer populations due to isomerization, only those conformations that initially have population participate in this redistribution—we do not form conformers that were not initially present in the trap. In a second scheme, called IR-induced population transfer spectroscopy, we determine the fractional populations of the four stable conformations of Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-LysH+ by scanning the IR laser while selectively detecting a specific conformation using UV photofragment spectroscopy.

  4. Ratio of ellipticities between 192 and 208 nm (R1): An effective electronic circular dichroism parameter for characterization of the helical components of proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Raja; Sheet, Tridip

    2017-11-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy represents an important tool for characterization of the peptide and protein secondary structures that mainly arise from the conformational disposition of the peptide backbone in solution. In 1991 Manning and Woody proposed that, in addition to the signal intensity, the ratio between [θ]nπ* and [θ]ππ*ǁ ((R 2 ) ≅ [θ] 222 /[θ] 208 ), along with [θ]ππ*⊥ and [θ]ππ*ǁ ((R 1 ) ≅ [θ] 192 /[θ] 208 ), may be utilized towards identifying the peptide/protein conformation (especially 3 10 - and α-helices). However, till date the use of the ratiometric ellipticity component for helical structure analysis of peptides and proteins has not been reported. We studied a series of temperature dependent CD spectra of a thermally stable, model helical peptide and its related analogs in water as a function of added 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) in order to explore their landscape of helicity. For the first time, we have experimentally shown here that the R 1 parameter can characterize better the individual helices, while the other parameter R 2 and the signal intensity do not always converge. We emphasize the use of the R 1 ratio of ellipticities for helical characterization because of the common origin of these two bands (exciton splitting of the amide π→ π* transition in a helical polypeptide). This approach may become worthwhile and timely with the increasing accessibility of CD synchrotron sources. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Exploring biological effects of MoS{sub 2} nanosheets on native structures of α-helical peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zonglin; Li, Weifeng, E-mail: wfli@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: ruhong@us.ibm.com [School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hong, Linbi [Computational Biological Center, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: wfli@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: ruhong@us.ibm.com [School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Computational Biological Center, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    Recent reports of mono- and few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}), a representative transition metal dichacogenide (TMD), as antibacterial and anticancer agents have shed light on their potential in biomedical applications. To better facilitate these promising applications, one needs to understand the biological effects of these TMDs as well, such as their potential adverse effects on protein structure and function. Here, we sought to understand the interaction of MoS{sub 2} nanosheets with peptides using molecular dynamics simulations and a simple model polyalanine with various lengths (PA{sub n}, n = 10, 20, 30, and 40; mainly α − helices). Our results demonstrated that MoS{sub 2} monolayer has an exceptional capability to bind all peptides in a fast and strong manner. The strong attraction from the MoS{sub 2} nanosheet is more than enough to compensate the energy needed to unfold the peptide, regardless of the length, which induces drastic disruptions to the intra-peptide hydrogen bonds and subsequent secondary structures of α − helices. This universal phenomenon may point to the potential nanotoxicity of MoS{sub 2} when used in biological systems. Moreover, these results aligned well with previous findings on the potential cytotoxicity of TMD nanomaterials.

  6. Design of cyclic RGD-conjugated Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptides for targeted delivery of small interfering RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shun-Ichi; Iwata, Masashi; Ozaki, Yuka; Ozaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Junsuke; Urata, Hidehito

    2016-09-15

    To achieve the targeted delivery of siRNA, five conjugates of Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptides with mono-, di-, and trivalent cRGDfC [cyclo(-Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Phe-Cys-)], which is known to bind to αVβ3 integrin, at several positions of the amphipathic helical peptide were designed and synthesized. Among the five conjugates, the monovalent cRGDfC conjugating at position 20 of the amino acid sequence of the helical peptide through the formation of a disulfide bond (PI) and the divalent cRGDfC conjugating at positions 2 and 14 of the amino acid sequence of the helical peptide through the formation of disulfide bonds (PIII) significantly enhanced the delivery of fluorescence-labeled siRNA into A549 cells as the peptide/siRNA complex formed by electrostatic interaction. The cellular uptake of the PI/siRNA complex was mediated by both endocytic and non-endocytic pathways, whereas that of the PIII/siRNA complex was enabled by endocytosis. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of the PI/siRNA complex might involve specific interactions of the RGD group with the αVβ3 integrin receptor. Next, the RNAi effect of the peptide/siRNA complex on luciferase expression in A549-Luc cells was examined. Luciferase expression was significantly decreased in the presence of the complex at the concentration of 1.0μM PI/10nM siRNA. In contrast, the PIII/siRNA complex did not show the RNAi effect under the same conditions. However, extending the incubation time led to the suppression of the luciferase expression in the presence of the PIII/siRNA complex. Considering that the cellular uptake of the PIII/siRNA complex is mediated by the endocytic pathway, the release of siRNA from the endosome into the cytosol might require a long time. We present herein a useful and unique tool for the delivery of siRNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure-activity relationship study of Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptide-cyclic RGD conjugates as carriers for siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shun-Ichi; Takesada, Anna; Nagamura, Yurie; Sogabe, Eri; Ohki, Rieko; Hayashi, Junsuke; Urata, Hidehito

    2017-12-15

    The conjugation of Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptide with cyclo(-Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Phe-Cys-) (cRGDfC) at the C-terminus of the helix peptide (PI) has been reported to be useful for constructing a carrier for targeted siRNA delivery into cells. In order to explore structure-activity relationships for the development of potential carriers for siRNA delivery, we synthesized conjugates of Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptide with cRGDfC at the N-terminus (PII) and both the N- and C-termini (PIII) of the helical peptide. Furthermore, to examine the influence of PI helical chain length on siRNA delivery, truncated peptides containing 16 (PIV), 12 (PV), and 8 (PVI) amino acid residues at the N-terminus of the helical chain were synthesized. PII and PIII, as well as PI, could deliver anti-luciferase siRNA into cells to induce the knockdown of luciferase stably expressed in cells. In contrast, all of the truncated peptides were unlikely to transport siRNA into cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Short peptide nucleic acids bind strongly to homopurine tract of double helical RNA at pH 5.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks

    2010-06-30

    The important role that noncoding RNA plays in cell biology makes it an attractive target for molecular recognition. However, the discovery of small molecules that bind double helical RNA selectively and may serve as biochemical probes and potential drug leads has been relatively slow. Herein, we show that peptide nucleic acids, as short as six nucleobases, bind very strongly (K(a) > 10(7)) and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA at pH 5.5. The isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism experiments suggest that the binding mode may be a sequence selective triple helix formation. Our results have implications for development of biochemical probes to study function of noncoding RNAs and design of compounds with potential antibacterial and antiviral activity.

  9. Studies of the Minimum Hydrophobicity of α-Helical Peptides Required To Maintain a Stable Transmembrane Association with Phospholipid Bilayer Membranes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R. N. A. H.; Liu, F.; Krivanek, R.; Rybar, P.; Hianik, T.; Flach, C. R.; Mendelsohn, R.; Chen, Y.; Mant, C. T.; Hodges, R. S.; McElhaney, R. N.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the hydrophobicity and the distribution of hydrophobic residues on the surfaces of some designed α-helical transmembrane peptides (acetyl-K2-Lm-An-K2-amide, where m + n = 24) on their solution behavior and interactions with phospholipids were examined. We find that although these peptides exhibit strong α-helix forming propensities in water, membrane-mimetic media, and lipid model membranes, the stability of the helices decreases as the Leu content decreases. Also, their binding to reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography columns is largely determined by their hydrophobicity and generally decreases with decreases in the Leu/Ala ratio. However, the retention of these peptides by such columns is also affected by the distribution of hydrophobic residues on their helical surfaces, being further enhanced when peptide helical hydrophobic moments are increased by clustering hydrophobic residues on one side of the helix. This clustering of hydrophobic residues also increases peptide propensity for self-aggregation in aqueous media and enhances partitioning of the peptide into lipid bilayer membranes. We also find that the peptides LA3LA2 [acetyl-K2-(LAAALAA)3LAA-K2-amide] and particularly LA6 [acetyl-K2-(LAAAAAA)3LAA-K2-amide] associate less strongly with and perturb the thermotropic phase behavior of phosphatidylcholine bilayers much less than peptides with higher L/A ratios. These results are consistent with free energies calculated for the partitioning of these peptides between water and phospholipid bilayers, which suggest that LA3LA2 has an equal tendency to partition into water and into the hydrophobic core of phospholipid model membranes, whereas LA6 should strongly prefer the aqueous phase. We conclude that for α-helical peptides of this type, Leu/Ala ratios of greater than 7/17 are required for stable transmembrane associations with phospholipid bilayers. PMID:17240988

  10. Self-Assembling Peptide Surfactants A6K and A6D Adopt a-Helical Structures Useful for Membrane Protein Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furen Zhuang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of membrane protein structures have been greatly hampered by difficulties in producing adequately large quantities of the functional protein and stabilizing them. A6D and A6K are promising solutions to the problem and have recently been used for the rapid production of membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. We propose that despite their short lengths, these peptides can adopt α-helical structures through interactions with micelles formed by the peptides themselves. These α-helices are then able to stabilize α-helical motifs which many membrane proteins contain. We also show that A6D and A6K can form β-sheets and appear as weak hydrogels at sufficiently high concentrations. Furthermore, A6D and A6K together in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS can form expected β-sheet structures via a surprising α-helical intermediate.

  11. The crystal structure of the calcium-bound con-G[Q6A] peptide reveals a novel metal-dependent helical trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cnudde, Sara E.; Prorok, Mary; Jia, Xaofei; Castellino, Francis J.; Geiger, James H. (MSU); (Notre)

    2012-02-15

    The ability to form and control both secondary structure and oligomerization in short peptides has proven to be challenging owing to the structural instability of such peptides. The conantokin peptides are a family of {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid containing peptides produced in the venoms of predatory sea snails of the Conus family. They are examples of short peptides that form stable helical structures, especially in the presence of divalent cations. Both monomeric and dimeric conantokin peptides have been identified and represent a new mechanism of helix association, 'the metallozipper motif' that is devoid of a hydrophobic interface between monomers. In the present study, a parallel/antiparallel three-helix bundle was identified and its crystal structure determined at high resolution. The three helices are almost perfectly parallel and represent a novel helix-helix association. The trimer interface is dominated by metal chelation between the three helices, and contains no interfacial hydrophobic interactions. It is now possible to produce stable monomeric, dimeric, or trimeric metallozippers depending on the peptide sequence and metal ion. Such structures have important applications in protein design.

  12. Design, synthesis and characterization of bio/electroactive hybrids: Confining chromophores in dilute solutions using a helical peptide template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Onur Y.

    In the organic electroactive materials field one of the most important parameters that governs structure/property relationships is the intermolecular interactions between molecules. They in turn determine the optoelectronic properties of the semiconductor devices made out of thin films of those materials such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaics (PVs). Therefore, the road to achieve high efficiencies in all of these devices pass through thorough understand of these electronic intermolecular interactions. These distances range from angstrom scales to approximately around 10nm and precise control over these small distances present a great challenge. A smart approach to attain control over sub-nanometer length scales is template based molecular assembly. In this thesis the unique method of using highly helical peptides as scaffolds for confining chromophores is discussed. Inspired by the Nature's way of organization at the molecular level in proteins, highly helical peptides bearing non-natural amino acids were synthesized. Through the functionalities on the non-natural amino acids, electroactive side chains were coupled to them via Heck reaction. Via peptide engineering and due to the unique pitch length in the peptide helices, intermolecular distance and relative orientation of these electroactive sidechains were accurately controlled by using the same templates. Changes in the optoelectronic properties were measured by varying those parameters in a systematic fashion. Our results indicate that interactions of the conjugated side chains can be altered depending on the way they are presented on the template. The energy minimized molecular simulations performed displayed tremendous similarities with the experimental CD, EC-CD, PL, PLE and NMR findings. It was concluded that pi-orbital interactions at the molecular level are very sensitive to intermolecular distance and orientation. These sub-nanometer critical distances

  13. Consequences of non-uniformity in the stoichiometry of component fractions within one and two loops models of alpha-helical peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoms in biomolecular structures like alpha helices contain an array of distances and angles which include abundant multiple patterns of redundancies. Thus all peptides backbones contain the three atom sequence N-C*C, whereas the repeating set of a four atom sequences (N-C*C-N, C*-C-N-C*, and C-N-C...

  14. Two hits are better than one: synergistic anticancer activity of α-helical peptides and doxorubicin/epirubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Huang, Yibing; Liu, Dong; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-01-30

    This study explored combinational anticancer therapy using α-helical peptides HPRP-A1/HPRP-A2 with the chemical drugs doxorubicin (DOX) and epirubicin (EPI). The in vitro activity of these drugs against different cancer cell lines was synergistically increased, as was their activity in a HeLa xenograft model in BALB/c nude mice. We delineated the mechanism of this synergy by studying the apoptosis pathway and morphologic changes in the HeLa cell membrane. The mechanism of the HPRP-A1/DOX combination was found to involve enhanced apoptosis, which seemed to be caspase-dependent and involved both the extrinsic and intrinsic parts of the caspase cascade in HeLa cells. Combined application of HPRP-A1 and DOX at low concentrations was significantly more effective than either drug alone against HeLa tumors in the mouse xenograft model. This type of combination therapy appears to have great clinical potential.

  15. Conformational flexibility determines selectivity and antibacterial, antiplasmodial, and anticancer potency of cationic α-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Louic S; Lan, Yun; Abbate, Vincenzo; Ruh, Emrah; Bui, Tam T; Wilkinson, Louise J; Kanno, Tokuwa; Jumagulova, Elmira; Kozlowska, Justyna; Patel, Jayneil; McIntyre, Caitlin A; Yam, W C; Siu, Gilman; Atkinson, R Andrew; Lam, Jenny K W; Bansal, Sukhvinder S; Drake, Alex F; Mitchell, Graham H; Mason, A James

    2012-10-05

    We used a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopies in conjunction with size exclusion chromatography to help rationalize the relative antibacterial, antiplasmodial, and cytotoxic activities of a series of proline-free and proline-containing model antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in terms of their structural properties. When compared with proline-free analogs, proline-containing peptides had greater activity against Gram-negative bacteria, two mammalian cancer cell lines, and intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum, which they were capable of killing without causing hemolysis. In contrast, incorporation of proline did not have a consistent effect on peptide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In membrane-mimicking environments, structures with high α-helix content were adopted by both proline-free and proline-containing peptides. In solution, AMPs generally adopted disordered structures unless their sequences comprised more hydrophobic amino acids or until coordinating phosphate ions were added. Proline-containing peptides resisted ordering induced by either method. The roles of the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids and the positioning of the proline residues were also investigated. Careful positioning of proline residues in AMP sequences is required to enable the peptide to resist ordering and maintain optimal antibacterial activity, whereas varying the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids can attenuate hemolytic potential albeit with a modest reduction in potency. Maintaining conformational flexibility improves AMP potency and selectivity toward bacterial, plasmodial, and cancerous cells while enabling the targeting of intracellular pathogens.

  16. Conformational Flexibility Determines Selectivity and Antibacterial, Antiplasmodial, and Anticancer Potency of Cationic α-Helical Peptides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Lan, Yun; Abbate, Vincenzo; Ruh, Emrah; Bui, Tam T.; Wilkinson, Louise J.; Kanno, Tokuwa; Jumagulova, Elmira; Kozlowska, Justyna; Patel, Jayneil; McIntyre, Caitlin A.; Yam, W. C.; Siu, Gilman; Atkinson, R. Andrew; Lam, Jenny K. W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Drake, Alex F.; Mitchell, Graham H.; Mason, A. James

    2012-01-01

    We used a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopies in conjunction with size exclusion chromatography to help rationalize the relative antibacterial, antiplasmodial, and cytotoxic activities of a series of proline-free and proline-containing model antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in terms of their structural properties. When compared with proline-free analogs, proline-containing peptides had greater activity against Gram-negative bacteria, two mammalian cancer cell lines, and intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum, which they were capable of killing without causing hemolysis. In contrast, incorporation of proline did not have a consistent effect on peptide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In membrane-mimicking environments, structures with high α-helix content were adopted by both proline-free and proline-containing peptides. In solution, AMPs generally adopted disordered structures unless their sequences comprised more hydrophobic amino acids or until coordinating phosphate ions were added. Proline-containing peptides resisted ordering induced by either method. The roles of the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids and the positioning of the proline residues were also investigated. Careful positioning of proline residues in AMP sequences is required to enable the peptide to resist ordering and maintain optimal antibacterial activity, whereas varying the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids can attenuate hemolytic potential albeit with a modest reduction in potency. Maintaining conformational flexibility improves AMP potency and selectivity toward bacterial, plasmodial, and cancerous cells while enabling the targeting of intracellular pathogens. PMID:22869378

  17. AP-4F, antennapedia peptide linked to an amphipathic alpha helical peptide, increases the efficiency of Lipofectamine-mediated gene transfection in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jingsong; Geiger, Tracy; Ou, Zhijun; Ackerman, Allan W; Oldham, Keith T; Pritchard, Kirkwood A

    2003-06-06

    Typically, endothelial cells are difficult to transfect. In this study, we report that antennapedia peptide (AP) linked to L-4F, a water-soluble, amphipathic alpha helical peptide that avidly binds lipids (AP-4F) increases Lipofectamine 2000-mediated transfection of bovine coronary endothelial cell cultures. Transfection efficiency was monitored by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Lipofectamine 2000 transfection of endothelial cell cultures with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-DNA typically yields transfection efficiencies of 35.4+/-3.3% with low levels of cell death (8.1+/-1.0%). Pre-treatment of the Lipofectamine 2000-GFP-DNA complexes with AP-4F for 5 min increased transfection to 58.2+/-2.8% without increasing cell death. AP-4F increases Lipofectamine 2000-mediated transfection in a time-dependent fashion (within 10-20 min). Systematic studies reveal that the individual components of AP-4F, i.e., AP and L-4F alone, are ineffective in increasing Lipofectamine 2000-mediated transfection and that AP-4F must be directly associated with DNA liposomes prior to transfection for optimal uptake by endothelial cells. These observations demonstrate that AP-4F may be useful for increasing the transfection efficiency of endothelial cell cultures with standard commercially available reagents.

  18. Rational Design of Alpha-Helical Antimicrobial Peptides: Do's and Don'ts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Lars Erik; Poulsen, Tanja Juul; Munk, Jens Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates for battling multiresistant bacteria. Despite extensive research, structure–activity relationships of AMPs are not fully understood, and there is a lack of structural data relating to AMPs in lipids. Here we present the NMR structure of anopl...

  19. Effects of Single Amino Acid Substitution on the Biophysical Properties and Biological Activities of an Amphipathic α-Helical Antibacterial Peptide Against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Tan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An antimicrobial peptide, known as V13K, was utilized as the framework to study the effects of charge, hydrophobicity and helicity on the biophysical properties and biological activities of α-helical peptides. Six amino acids (Lys, Glu, Gly, Ser, Ala, and Leu were individually used to substitute the original hydrophobic valine at the selected sixteenth location on the non-polar face of V13K. The results showed that the single amino acid substitutions changed the hydrophobicity of peptide analogs as monitored by RP-HPLC, but did not cause significant changes on peptide secondary structures both in a benign buffer and in a hydrophobic environment. The biological activities of the analogs exhibited a hydrophobicity-dependent behavior. The mechanism of peptide interaction with the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. We demonstrated that this single amino acid substitution method has valuable potential for the rational design of antimicrobial peptides with enhanced activities.

  20. Secondary structure of Ac-Ala$_n$-LysH$^+$ polyalanine peptides ($n$=5,10,15) in vacuo: Helical or not?

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, M; Kupser, P; von Helden, G; Bierau, F; Pagel, K; Meijer, G; Scheffler, M

    2010-01-01

    The polyalanine-based peptide series Ac-Ala_n-LysH+ (n=5-20) is a prime example that a secondary structure motif which is well-known from the solution phase (here: helices) can be formed in vacuo. We here revisit this conclusion for n=5,10,15, using density-functional theory (van der Waals corrected generalized gradient approximation), and gas-phase infrared vibrational spectroscopy. For the longer molecules (n=10,15) \\alpha-helical models provide good qualitative agreement (theory vs. experiment) already in the harmonic approximation. For n=5, the lowest energy conformer is not a simple helix, but competes closely with \\alpha-helical motifs at 300K. Close agreement between infrared spectra from experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics (including anharmonic effects) supports our findings.

  1. Synthetic peptide-containing surfactants--evaluation of transmembrane versus amphipathic helices and surfactant protein C poly-valyl to poly-leucyl substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, G; Gustafsson, M; Vandenbussche, G; Veldhuizen, E; Griffiths, W J; Sjövall, J; Haagsman, H P; Ruysschaert, J M; Robertson, B; Curstedt, T; Johansson, J

    1998-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C. With the aim of identifying synthetic SP-B and SP-C substitutes for replacement therapy of respiratory distress syndromes, we have studied two transmembrane peptides and two amphipathic peptides that are located in the plane of a phospholipid bilayer. One amphipathic peptide was designed by changing the amino acid sequence, but not the composition or size, of the 21-residue peptide KL4. This peptide, designated KL(2,3) from its spacing of nonpolar and polar residues, exhibited similar alpha-helical content as KL4 but was oriented along a phospholipid bilayer plane, in contrast to the transmembrane orientation of KL4 in the same environment. The second amphipathic peptide analyzed was succinyl-LLEKLLEWLK-amide (WMAP10). KL4 more efficiently accelerated the spreading of a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (Pam2GroPCho)/phosphatidylglycerol (PtdGro)/palmitic acid (PamOH), 68:22:9 (by mass), at an air/water interface than did any of the amphipathic peptides. Similarly, KL4, but not KL(2,3), when present in an interfacial monolayer composed of Pam2GroPCho/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol, 7:3 (by mass), increased lipid insertion from subphase vesicles. An SP-C analogue, SP-C(Leu), with all helical valyl residues in native SP-C replaced with Leu and the palmitoylcysteines at positions 5 and 6 replaced with Ser, but otherwise with essentially the same primary structure as the native peptide, was analyzed. SP-C(Leu) exhibited similar alpha-helical content as native SP-C and a transmembrane orientation and, in contrast to poly-valyl-containing synthetic peptides, it folds into a helical conformation after acid-induced denaturation. SP-C(Leu) accelerated the spreading of Pam2GroPCho/PtdGro/PamOH, 68:22:9 (by mass), almost identically to native SP-C, and lowered the surface tension during rapid cyclic film compressions in a pulsating bubble surfactometer to near zero

  2. Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles Induce Amyloid Formation of the PrP(110-136 Peptide via an α-Helical Metastable Conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sauvé

    Full Text Available A peptide encompassing the conserved hydrophobic region and the first β-strand of the prion protein (PrP(110-136 shown to interact with the surface of dodecylphosphocholine micelles adopts an α-helical conformation that is localized below the head-group layer. This surface-bound peptide has a half-life of one day, and readily initiates the formation of amyloid fibrils. The presence of the latter was confirmed using birefringence microscopy upon Congo red binding and thioflavin T-binding induced fluorescence. The observation of this metastable α-helical conformer provides a unique snapshot of the early steps of the inter-conversion pathway. These findings together with the body of evidence from the prion literature allowed us to propose a mechanism for the conversion of PrPC to amyloid material.

  3. Order through disorder: hyper-mobile C-terminal residues stabilize the folded state of a helical peptide. a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi K Patapati

    Full Text Available Conventional wisdom has it that the presence of disordered regions in the three-dimensional structures of polypeptides not only does not contribute significantly to the thermodynamic stability of their folded state, but, on the contrary, that the presence of disorder leads to a decrease of the corresponding proteins' stability. We have performed extensive 3.4 µs long folding simulations (in explicit solvent and with full electrostatics of an undecamer peptide of experimentally known helical structure, both with and without its disordered (four residue long C-terminal tail. Our simulations clearly indicate that the presence of the apparently disordered (in structural terms C-terminal tail, increases the thermodynamic stability of the peptide's folded (helical state. These results show that at least for the case of relatively short peptides, the interplay between thermodynamic stability and the apparent structural stability can be rather subtle, with even disordered regions contributing significantly to the stability of the folded state. Our results have clear implications for the understanding of peptide energetics and the design of foldable peptides.

  4. Enthalpic and entropic stages in alpha-helical peptide unfolding, from laser T-jump/UV Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Gurusamy; Hu, Ying; Bender, Gretchen M; Getahun, Zelleka; DeGrado, William F; Spiro, Thomas G

    2007-10-24

    The alpha-helix is a ubiquitous structural element in proteins, and a number of studies have addressed the mechanism of helix formation and melting in simple peptides. However, fundamental issues remain to be resolved, particularly the temperature (T) dependence of the rate. In this work, we report application of a novel kHz repetition rate solid-state tunable NIR (pump) and deep UV Raman (probe) laser system to study the dynamics of helix unfolding in Ac-GSPEA3KA4KA4-CO-D-Arg-CONH2, a peptide designed for helix stabilization in aqueous solution. Its T-dependent UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra, excited at 197 nm for optimal enhancement of amide vibrations, were decomposed into variable contributions from helix and coil spectra. The helix fractions derived from the UVRR spectra and from far UV CD spectra were coincident at low T but deviated increasingly at high T, the UVRR curve giving higher helix content. This difference is consistent with the greater sensitivity of UVRR spectra to local conformation than CD. After a laser-induced T-jump, the UVRR-determined helix fractions defined monoexponential decays, with time-constants of approximately 120 ns, independent of the final T (Tf = 18-61 degrees C), provided the initial T (Ti) was held constant (6 degrees C). However, there was also a prompt loss of helicity, whose amplitude increased with increasing Tf, thereby defining an initial enthalpic phase, distinct from the subsequent entropic phase. These phases are attributed to disruption of H-bonds followed by reorientation of peptide links, as the chain is extended. When Ti was raised in parallel with Tf (10 degrees C T-jumps), the prompt phase merged into an accelerating slow phase, an effect attributable to the shifting distribution of initial helix lengths. Even greater acceleration with rising Ti has been reported in T-jump experiments monitored by IR and fluorescence spectroscopies. This difference is attributable to the longer range character of these probes

  5. N-capping motifs promote interaction of amphipathic helical peptides with hydrophobic surfaces and drastically alter hydrophobicity values of individual amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Vic; Lao, Ying W; Shamshurin, Dmitry; Ezzati, Peyman; Wilkins, John A; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2014-12-02

    Capping rules, which govern interactions of helical peptides with hydrophobic surfaces, were never established before due to lack of methods for the direct measurement of polypeptide structure on the interphase boundary. We employed proteomic techniques and peptide retention modeling in reversed-phase chromatography to generate a data set sufficient for amino acid population analysis at helix ends. We found that interactions of amphipathic helical peptides with a hydrophobic C18 phase are induced by a unique motif featuring hydrophobic residues in the N1 and N2 positions adjacent to the N-cap (Asn, Asp, Ser, Thr, Gly), followed by Glu, Gln, or Asp in position N3 to complete a capping box. A favorable N-capping arrangement prior to amphipathic helix may result in the highest hydrophobicity (retention on C18 columns) of Asp/Asn (or Glu/Gln) peptide analogues among all naturally occurring amino acids when placed in N-cap or N3 position, respectively. These results contradict all previously reported hydrophobicity scales and provide new insights into our understanding of the phenomenon of hydrophobic interactions.

  6. Effect of disulphide bond position on salt resistance and LPS-neutralizing activity of α-helical homo-dimeric model antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Shin, Song Yub

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effects of disulphide bond position on the salt resistance and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing activity of α-helical homo-dimeric antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), we synthesized an α-helical model peptide (K6L4W1) and its homo-dimeric peptides (di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-N, di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-M, and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-C) with a disulphide bond at the N-terminus, the central position, and the C-terminus of the molecules, respectively. Unlike (6)L(4)W(1) and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-M, the antimicrobial activity of di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-N and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-C was unaffected by 150 mM NaCl. Both di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-N and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-C caused much greater inhibitory effects on nitric oxide (NO) release in LPS-induced mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, compared to di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-M. Taken together, our results indicate that the presence of a disulphide bond at the N- or C-terminus of the molecule, rather than at the central position, is more effective when designing salt-resistant α-helical homo-dimeric AMPs with potent antimicrobial and LPS-neutralizing activities. [BMB reports 2011; 44(11): 747-752].

  7. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Functional variety in SAMs control covalent binding of proteins to surfaces. • Peptide density on Au(111) surfaces controlled by SAM functional groups. • Affinity between biomolecule and SAM surface follows a Langmuir isotherm. • Surface chemistry can mimic functional group diversity in proteins and peptides. - Abstract: Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH{sub 3}-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer through peptide-based self-assembled monolayers chemisorbed on gold electrodes: directing the flow-in and flow-out of electrons through peptide helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzi, Mariano; Gatto, Emanuela; Caruso, Mario; Porchetta, Alessandro; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio

    2014-08-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) experiments have been carried out on peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAM) chemisorbed on a gold substrate. The oligopeptide building block was exclusively formed by C(α)-tetrasubstituted α-aminoisobutyric residues to attain a helical conformation despite the shortness of the peptide chain. Furthermore, it was functionalized at the C-terminus by a pyrene choromophore to enhance the UV photon capture cross-section of the compound and by a lipoic group at the N-terminus for linking to gold substrates. Electron transfer across the peptide SAM has been studied by photocurrent generation experiments in an electrochemical cell employing a gold substrate modified by chemisorption of a peptide SAM as a working electrode and by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in solution and on a gold-coated glass. The results show that the electronic flow through the peptide bridge is strongly asymmetric; i.e., PET from the C-terminus to gold is highly favored with respect to PET in the opposite direction. This effect arises from the polarity of the Au-S linkage (Au(δ+)-S(δ-), junction effect) and from the electrostatic field generated by the peptide helix.

  9. Study of the interaction of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide with phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes by means of densimetry and ultrasound velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybar, Peter; Krivanek, Roland; Samuely, Tomas; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McElhaney, Ronald N; Hianik, Tibor

    2007-06-01

    We applied precise densimetry and ultrasound velocimetry methods to study the interaction of a synthetic alpha-helical transmembrane peptide, acetyl-K(2)-L(24)-K(2)-amide (L(24)), with model bilayer lipid membranes. The large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) utilized were composed of a homologous series of n-saturated diacylphosphatidylcholines (PCs). PCs whose hydrocarbon chains contained from 13 to 16 carbon atoms, thus producing phospholipid bilayers of different thicknesses and gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperatures. This allowed us to analyze how the difference between the hydrophobic length of the peptide and the hydrophobic thickness of the lipid bilayer influences the thermodynamical and mechanical properties of the membranes. We showed that the incorporation of L(24) decreases the temperature and cooperativity of the main phase transition of all LUVs studied. The presence of L(24) in the bilayer also caused an increase of the specific volume and of the volume compressibility in the gel state bilayers. In the liquid crystalline state, the peptide decreases the specific volume at relatively higher peptide concentration (mole ratio L(24):PC=1:50). The overall volume compressibility of the peptide-containing lipid bilayers in the liquid-crystalline state was in general higher in comparison with pure membranes. There was, however, a tendency for the volume compressibility of these lipid bilayers to decrease with higher peptide content in comparison with bilayers of lower peptide concentration. For one lipid composition, we also compared the thermodynamical and mechanical properties of LUVs and large multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) with and without L(24). As expected, a higher cooperativity of the changes of the thermodynamical and mechanical parameters took place for MLVs in comparison with LUVs. These results are in agreement with previously reported DSC and (2)H NMR spectroscopy study of the interaction of the L(24) and structurally related peptides

  10. Folding control in cyclic peptides through N-methylation pattern selection: formation of antiparallel beta-sheet dimers, double reverse turns and supramolecular helices by 3alpha,gamma cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorín, Manuel; Castedo, Luis; Granja, Juan R

    2008-01-01

    Peptide foldamers constitute a growing class of nanomaterials with potential applications in a wide variety of chemical, medical and technological fields. Here we describe the preparation and structural characteristics of a new class of cyclic peptide foldamers (3alpha,gamma-CPs) that, depending on their backbone N-methylation patterns and the medium, can either remain as flat rings that dimerize through arrays of hydrogen bonds of antiparallel beta-sheet type, or can fold into twisted double reverse turns that, in the case of double gamma-turns, associate in nonpolar solvents to form helical supramolecular structures. A 3alpha,gamma-CP consists of a number of multiples of a repeat unit made up of four amino acid residues of alternating chirality: three corresponding to alpha-amino acids and one to a gamma-amino acid (a cis-3-aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid).

  11. Self-assembly of peptide-amphiphile forming helical nanofibers and in situ template synthesis of uniform mesoporous single wall silica nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahnawaz; Mondal, Julfikar Hassan; Behera, Nibedita; Das, Debapratim

    2013-11-19

    A lysine based peptide amphiphile (PA) is designed and synthesized for efficient water immobilization. The PA with a minimum gelation concentration (MGC) of 1% w/v in water shows prolonged stability and can also efficiently immobilize aqueous mixtures of some other organic solvents. The presence of a free amine induced pH dependency of the gelation as the PA could form hydrogel at a pH range of 1-8 but failed to do so above that pH. Various spectroscopic and microscopic experiments such as steady state fluorescence, NMR, IR, CD, and FESEM reveal the presence of hydrophobic interaction, hydrogen bond, and π-π stacking interaction in the self-assembly process. The self-aggregation has been correlated with the design of the molecule to show the involvement of supramolecular forces and the hierarchical pathway. While the L analogue formed left-handed helical nanofibers, the other enantiomer showed opposite helicity. Interestingly the equimolar mixture of the isomers failed to form any fibrous aggregate. Although fibers formed at a subgel concentration, no helical nature was observed at this stage. The length and thickness of the fibers increased with increase in the gelator concentration. The nanofibers formed by the gelator are used as a template to prepare mesoporous single wall silica nanotubes (SWSNTs) in situ in plain water without the requirement of any organic solvent as well as any external hydrolyzing agent. The SWSNTs formed are open at both ends, are few micrometers in length, and have an average diameter of ~10 nm. The BET isotherm showed a type IV hysteresis loop suggesting mesoporous nature of the nanotubes.

  12. First evidence for helical transitions in supercoiled DNA by amyloid Beta Peptide (1-42) and aluminum: a new insight in understanding Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Anitha, Suram; Latha, Kallur S; Mustak, Mohammed S; Stein, Reuven; Ravid, Rivka; Rao, K S Jagannatha

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we evidenced a B --> Z helical change in Alzheimer's brain genomic DNA, leading to a hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease (AD) etiological factors such as aluminum (Al), amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, and Tau might play a role in modulating DNA topology. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of Al and Abeta with DNA. Our results show that Abeta(1-42) could induce a B --> Psi (Psi) conformational change in pUC 18 supercoiled DNA (scDNA), Abeta(1-16) caused an altered B-form, whereas Al induced a complex B-C-A mixed conformation. Ethidium bromide binding and agarose gel electrophoresis studies revealed that Al uncoiled the DNAto a fully relaxed form, whereas Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-16) effected a partial uncoiling and also showed differential sensitivity toward chloroquine-induced topoisomer separation. Our findings show for the first time that Abeta and Al modulate both helicity and superhelicity in scDNA. A new hypothetical model explaining the potential toxicity of Abeta and Al in terms of their DNA binding properties leading to DNA conformational alteration is proposed.

  13. The PDB database is a rich source of alpha-helical anti-microbial peptides to combat disease causing pathogens [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic potential of α-helical anti-microbial peptides (AH-AMP to combat pathogens is fast gaining prominence. Based on recently published open access software for characterizing α-helical peptides (PAGAL, we elucidate a search methodology (SCALPEL that leverages the massive structural data pre-existing in the PDB database to obtain AH-AMPs belonging to the host proteome. We provide in vitro validation of SCALPEL on plant pathogens (Xylella fastidiosa, Xanthomonas arboricola and Liberibacter crescens by identifying AH-AMPs that mirror the function and properties of cecropin B, a well-studied AH-AMP. The identified peptides include a linear AH-AMP present within the existing structure of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC20, and an AH-AMP mimicing the properties of the two α-helices of cecropin B from chitinase (CHITI25. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these peptides are comparable to that of cecropin B, while anionic peptides used as control failed to show any inhibitory effect on these pathogens. Substitute therapies in place of conventional chemotherapies using membrane permeabilizing peptides like these might also prove effective to target cancer cells. The use of native structures from the same organism could possibly ensure that administration of such peptides will be better tolerated and not elicit an adverse immune response. We suggest a similar approach to target Ebola epitopes, enumerated using PAGAL recently, by selecting suitable peptides from the human proteome, especially in wake of recent reports of cationic amphiphiles inhibiting virus entry and infection.

  14. Helicity scalings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [ISTerre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lessinnes, T; Carati, D [Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Stepanov, R, E-mail: Franck.Plunian@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Science, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-22

    Using a helical shell model of turbulence, Chen et al. (2003) showed that both helicity and energy dissipate at the Kolmogorov scale, independently from any helicity input. This is in contradiction with a previous paper by Ditlevsen and Giuliani (2001) in which, using a GOY shell model of turbulence, they found that helicity dissipates at a scale larger than the Kolmogorov scale, and does depend on the helicity input. In a recent paper by Lessinnes et al. (2011), we showed that this discrepancy is due to the fact that in the GOY shell model only one helical mode (+ or -) is present at each scale instead of both modes in the helical shell model. Then, using the GOY model, the near cancellation of the helicity flux between the + and - modes cannot occur at small scales, as it should be in true turbulence. We review the main results with a focus on the numerical procedure needed to obtain accurate statistics.

  15. A test of AMBER force fields in predicting the secondary structure of α-helical and β-hairpin peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Zhang, Chaomin; Wang, Xianwei; Zhu, Tong

    2017-07-01

    We tested the ability of some current AMBER force fields, namely, AMBER03, AMBER99SB, AMBER99SB-ildn, AMBER99SB-nmr, AMBER12SB, AMBER14SB, and AMBER14ipq, with implicit solvent model in reproducing the folding behavior of two peptides by REMD simulations. AMBER99SB-nmr force field provides the most reliable performance. After a novel polarized hydrogen bond charge model is considered, the α-helix successfully folded to its native state, while the further folding of the β-hairpin is not observed. This study strongly suggests that polarization effect and correct torsional term are important to investigate dynamic and conformational properties of peptides with different secondary structures.

  16. Evaluation of a Triple-Helical Peptide with Quenched Fluorophores for Optical Imaging of MMP-2 and MMP-9 Proteolytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP 2 and 9, the gelatinases, have consistently been associated with tumor progression. The development of gelatinase-specific probes will be critical for identifying in vivo gelatinoic activity to understand the molecular role of the gelatinases in tumor development. Recently, a self-assembling homotrimeric triple-helical peptide (THP, incorporating a sequence from type V collagen, with high substrate specificity to the gelatinases has been developed. To determine whether this THP would be suitable for imaging protease activity, 5-carboxyfluorescein (5FAM was conjugated, resulting in 5FAM3-THP and 5FAM6-THP, which were quenched up to 50%. 5FAM6-THP hydrolysis by MMP-2 and MMP-9 displayed kcat/KM values of 1.5 × 104 and 5.4 × 103 M−1 s−1, respectively. Additionally 5FAM6-THP visualized gelatinase activity in gelatinase positive HT-1080 cells, but not in gelatinase negative MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the fluorescence in the HT-1080 cells was greatly attenuated by the addition of a MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitor, SB-3CT, indicating that the observed fluorescence release was mediated by gelatinase proteolysis and not non-specific proteolysis of the THPs. These results demonstrate that THPs fully substituted with fluorophores maintain their substrate specificity to the gelatinases in human cancer cells and may be useful in in vivo molecular imaging of gelatinase activity.

  17. Development of Cell-Permeable, Non-Helical Constrained Peptides to Target a Key Protein-Protein Interaction in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmann, Mareike M; Tan, Yaw Sing; Wu, Yuteng; Aibara, Shintaro; Xu, Wenshu; Sore, Hannah F; Verma, Chandra S; Itzhaki, Laura; Stewart, Murray; Brenton, James D; Spring, David R

    2017-01-09

    There is a lack of current treatment options for ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and the cancer is often resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy. Hence there is an urgent need for novel therapeutics. The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is ubiquitously overexpressed in CCC and is seen as an attractive therapeutic target. This was validated through shRNA-mediated knockdown of the target protein, HNF1β, in five high- and low-HNF1β-expressing CCC lines. To inhibit the protein function, cell-permeable, non-helical constrained proteomimetics to target the HNF1β-importin α protein-protein interaction were designed, guided by X-ray crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations. In this way, we developed the first reported series of constrained peptide nuclear import inhibitors. Importantly, this general approach may be extended to other transcription factors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  19. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13CO to Lipid 31P Proximities Support Similar Partially Inserted Membrane Locations of the α Helical and β Sheet Peptide Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Charles M.; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the -25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of -HFP-, i.e., a -25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was 13CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly 13CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric - sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP 13CO nuclei and 31P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct 13CO shifts for the α helical and - sheet structures so that the proximities to 31P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the 13CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. -HFPmn- was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. -HFPmn_V2E- contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and infection. The

  20. AMPs and OMPs: Is the folding and bilayer insertion of β-stranded outer membrane proteins governed by the same biophysical principles as for α-helical antimicrobial peptides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Erik; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-09-01

    The folding and function of membrane proteins is controlled not only by specific but also by unspecific interactions with the constituent lipids. In this review, we focus on the influence of the spontaneous lipid curvature on the folding and insertion of peptides and proteins in membranes. Amphiphilic α-helical peptides, as represented by various antimicrobial sequences, are compared with β-barrel proteins, which are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It has been shown that cationic amphiphilic peptides are always surface-bound in lipids with a negative spontaneous curvature like POPC, i.e. they are oriented parallel to the membrane plane. On the other hand, in lipids like DMPC with a positive curvature, these peptides can get tilted or completely inserted in a transmembrane state. Remarkably, the folding and spontaneous membrane insertion of β-barrel outer membrane proteins also proceeds more easily in lipids with a positive intrinsic curvature, while it is hampered by negative curvature. We therefore propose that a positive spontaneous curvature of the lipids promotes the ability of a surface-bound molecule to insert more deeply into the bilayer core, irrespective of the conformation, size, or shape of the peptide, protein, or folding intermediate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of positively charged residues on the polar and non-polar faces of amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptides on specificity and selectivity for Gram-negative pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziqing; Mant, Colin T; Vasil, Michael; Hodges, Robert S

    2018-01-01

    We have designed de novo and synthesized eight 26-residue all D-conformation amphipathic α-helical cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), four with "specificity determinants" which provide specificity for prokaryotic cells over eukaryotic cells and four AMPs without specificity determinants. The eight AMPs contain six positively charged Lys residues on the polar face in four different arrangements to understand the role of these residues have on antimicrobial activity against 14 Acinetobacter baumannii strains, seven of which were resistant to polymyxin B and colistin; six diverse Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains and 17 Staphylococcus aureus strains, nine of which were methicillin-sensitive, and eight of which were methicillin-resistant. The four AMPs without specificity determinants are extremely hemolytic. In contrast, the four AMPs with specificity determinants had dramatic improvements in therapeutic indices showing the importance of specificity determinants in removing eukaryotic cell toxicity. The specificity determinants combined with the location of positively charged residues on the polar face provide Gram-negative pathogen selectivity between A. baumannii and S. aureus. Specificity determinants maintain excellent antimicrobial activity in the presence of human sera, whereas the AMPs without specificity determinants were inactive. This study clearly shows the potential of amphipathic α-helical AMPs with specificity determinants as therapeutics to replace existing antibiotics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. From helical supramolecular arrays to gel-forming networks: lattice restructuring and aggregation control in peptide-based sulfamides to integrate new functional attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghava, Saripalli V; Srivastava, Bhartendu K; Ramshad, Kalluruttimmal; Antharjanam, Sudhadevi; Varghese, Babu; Muraleedharan, Kannoth M

    2018-03-02

    While supramolecular organisation is central to both crystallization and gelation, the latter is more complex considering its dynamic nature and multifactorial dependence. This makes the rational design of gelators an extremely difficult task. In this report, the assembly preference of a group of peptide-based sulfamides was modulated by making them part of an acid-amine two-component system to drive the tendency from crystallization to gelation. Here, the peptide core directed the assembly while the long-chain amines, introduced through salt-bridges, promoted layering and anisotropic development of primary aggregates. This proved to be very successful, leading to gelation of a number of solvents. Apart from this, it was possible to fine-tune their aggregation using an amphiphilic polymer like F-127 as an additive to get honey-comb-like 3D molecular architectures. These gels also proved to be excellent matrices for entrapping silver nanoparticles with superior emissive properties.

  3. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood–Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hung Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB. In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide. GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s.

  4. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood–Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s). PMID:27916828

  5. Cascades in helical turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, P D

    2001-01-01

    The existence of a second quadratic inviscid invariant, the helicity, in a turbulent flow leads to coexisting cascades of energy and helicity. An equivalent of the four-fifth law for the longitudinal third order structure function, which is derived from energy conservation, is easily derived from helicity conservation cite{Procaccia,russian}. The ratio of dissipation of helicity to dissipation of energy is proportional to the wave-number leading to a different Kolmogorov scale for helicity than for energy. The Kolmogorov scale for helicity is always larger than the Kolmogorov scale for energy so in the high Reynolds number limit the flow will always be helicity free in the small scales, much in the same way as the flow will be isotropic and homogeneous in the small scales. A consequence is that a pure helicity cascade is not possible. The idea is illustrated in a shell model of turbulence.

  6. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  7. The prediction of amphiphilic alpha-helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, D A; Harris, F; Daman, O A; Wallace, J

    2002-04-01

    A number of sequence-based analyses have been developed to identify protein segments, which are able to form membrane interactive amphiphilic alpha-helices. Earlier techniques attempted to detect the characteristic periodicity in hydrophobic amino acid residues shown by these structure and included the Molecular Hydrophobic Potential (MHP), which represents the hydrophobicity of amino acid residues as lines of isopotential around the alpha-helix and analyses based on Fourier transforms. These latter analyses compare the periodicity of hydrophobic residues in a putative alpha-helical sequence with that of a test mathematical function to provide a measure of amphiphilicity using either the Amphipathic Index or the Hydrophobic Moment. More recently, the introduction of computational procedures based on techniques such as hydropathy analysis, homology modelling, multiple sequence alignments and neural networks has led to the prediction of transmembrane alpha-helices with accuracies of the order of 95% and transmembrane protein topology with accuracies greater than 75%. Statistical approaches to transmembrane protein modeling such as hidden Markov models have increased these prediction levels to an even higher level. Here, we review a number of these predictive techniques and consider problems associated with their use in the prediction of structure / function relationships, using alpha-helices from G-coupled protein receptors, penicillin binding proteins, apolipoproteins, peptide hormones, lytic peptides and tilted peptides as examples.

  8. Helicity of the Neutrino

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Helicity for a particle is defined as the projection of the particle's spin along its direction of motion. For a massive particle, the sign of its helicity depends on the frame of reference ... A team of three scientists at Brookhaven National Lab- oratory, M Goldhaber, L Grodzins and A W Sunyar set about to rectify the situation.

  9. Effect of Fatty Acid Conjugation on Antimicrobial Peptide Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu-Kung, Alexander F; Bozzelli, Kristen N; Nguyen, Rose; Tirrell, Matthew V

    2004-01-01

    ... or the conjugate of the nonamphipathic peptide, KAK. The induction of helicity corresponds to a significant improvement in antimicrobial activity as measured by a minimum bactericidal concentration test...

  10. Magnetic helical micromachines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyer, Kathrin E; Tottori, Soichiro; Qiu, Famin; Zhang, Li; Nelson, Bradley J

    2013-01-02

    Helical microrobots have the potential to be used in a variety of application areas, such as in medical procedures, cell biology, or lab-on-a-chip. They are powered and steered wirelessly using low-strength rotating magnetic fields. The helical shape of the device allows propulsion through numerous types of materials and fluids, from tissue to different types of bodily fluids. Helical propulsion is suitable for pipe flow conditions or for 3D swimming in open fluidic environments. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Sarkosyl-Induced Helical Structure of an Antimicrobial Peptide GW-Q6 Plays an Essential Role in the Binding of Surface Receptor OprI in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Wang, Shih-Han; Chang, Ting-Wei; Wei, Hung-Mu; Wang, Yu-June; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Liao, You-Di; Chen, Chinpan

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant microbial strains has become a public health issue and there is an urgent need to develop new anti-infective molecules. Although natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can exert bactericidal activities, they have not shown clinical efficacy. The limitations of native peptides may be overcome with rational design and synthesis. Here, we provide evidence that the bactericidal activity of a synthetic peptide, GW-Q6, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is mediated ...

  12. Formation of functional super-helical assemblies by constrained single heptad repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Lipstman, Sophia; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the key role of super-helical motifs in molecular self-organization, several tandem heptad repeat peptides were used as building blocks to form well-ordered supramolecular nano-assemblies. However, the need for stable helical structures limits the length of the smallest described units to three heptad repeats. Here we describe the first-ever self-assembling single heptad repeat module, based on the ability of the non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid to stabilize very short peptides in helical conformation. A conformationally constrained peptide comprised of aromatic, but not aliphatic, residues, at the first and fourth positions formed helical fibrillar assemblies. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the peptide demonstrates super-helical packing in which phenylalanine residues formed an `aromatic zipper' arrangement at the molecular interface. The modification of the minimal building block with positively charged residues results in tight DNA binding ascribed to the combined factors of helicity, hydrophobicity and charge. The design of these peptides defines a new direction for assembly of super-helical nanostructures by minimal molecular elements.

  13. Large Helical Device project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    In this book, the results of the scientific research on the design, trial manufacture and manufacturing processes of the Large Helical Device which was constructed in National Institute for Fusion Science are summarized. The LHD is the largest helical device in the world, and the largest superconducting system in the world. It possesses the following features: the optimization of heliotron magnetic field coordination, the adoption of superconducting magnets for 2 helical magnetic field coils and 6 poloidal coils, the adoption of helical diverter which enables steady plasma experiment, the flexible specification as the experimental facility and so on. The construction has been carried out smoothly, and in March, 1998, first plasma was generated. The outline of the Large Helical Device project, the physical design, the equipment design, the research and development of superconductivity and low temperature system, the design and manufacture of the superconducting and low temperature systems, the design and manufacture of the power source and superconducting bus-line, vacuum vessel and others, electron cyclotron heating, neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron RF heating, measurement system, control and data processing, safety management, the theory and analysis of LHD plasma, the visualization of the result of theoretical analysis, the analysis of the experimental data, and the experiment plan are described. (K.I.)

  14. Helical plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, A. D., E-mail: bekl@bk.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  15. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  16. Helical CT for lumbosacral spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of helical CT for lumbosacral pathology. We performed helical CT with multiplanar reconstruction, including the formation of oblique transaxial and coronal images, in 62 patients with various lumboscral disorders, including 32 non-enhanced CT and 36 CT after myelography. We correlated the appearance of the stenotic spinal canal and neoplastic disease with the findings on MRI obtained at nearly the same time. We obtained helical CT images in all cases in about 30 seconds. The diagnostic ability of helical CT was roughly equal to that of MRI in patients with spondylosis deformans, spondylolisthesis and herniated nucleus pulposus. There was no significant difference in diagnostic value for degenerative lumbosacral disease with canal and foraminal stenosis between non-enhanced and post-myelography helical CT. However, non-enhanced helical CT could not clearly demonstrate neoplastic disease because of the poor contrast resolution. Helical CT was useful in evaluating degenerative disorder and its diagnostic value was nearly equal to that of MRI. We considered that helical CT may be suitable for the assessment of patients with severe lumbago owing to the markedly shortened examination time. However, if helical CT is used as a screening method for lumbosacral disease, one must be careful of its limitations, for example, poor detectability of neoplastic disease, vascular anomalies and so on. (author)

  17. Acetone-Linked Peptides: A Convergent Approach for Peptide Macrocyclization and Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Naila; Ferreira, David J; Wolan, Dennis W; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-20

    Macrocyclization is a broadly applied approach for overcoming the intrinsically disordered nature of linear peptides. Herein, it is shown that dichloroacetone (DCA) enhances helical secondary structures when introduced between peptide nucleophiles, such as thiols, to yield an acetone-linked bridge (ACE). Aside from stabilizing helical structures, the ketone moiety embedded in the linker can be modified with diverse molecular tags by oxime ligation. Insights into the structure of the tether were obtained through co-crystallization of a constrained S-peptide in complex with RNAse S. The scope of the acetone-linked peptides was further explored through the generation of N-terminus to side chain macrocycles and a new approach for generating fused macrocycles (bicycles). Together, these studies suggest that acetone linking is generally applicable to peptide macrocycles with a specific utility in the synthesis of stabilized helices that incorporate functional tags. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Magnetic helicity and higher helicity invariants as constraints for dynamo action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, Dmitry; Akhmetyev, Peter; Illarionov, Egor

    2018-01-01

    We consider classical magnetic helicity (a Gauss invariant of magnetic lines) and higher helicity invariants as nonlinear constraints for dynamo action. We argue that the Gauss invariant has several properties absent from higher helicity invariants which prevents use of the latter to constrain dynamo action. We consider other helicities (hydrodynamic helicity and cross helicity) in the context of the dynamo problem.

  19. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Considering a coordinate-free formulation of helical symmetry rather than more traditional definitions based on coordinates, we discuss basic properties of helical vector fields and compare results from the literature obtained with other approaches. In particular, we discuss the role of the stream...

  20. Helicity in dynamic atmospheric processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    An overview on the helicity of the velocity field and the role played by this concept in modern research in the field of geophysical fluid dynamics and dynamic meteorology is given. Different (both previously known in the literature and first presented) formulations of the equation of helicity balance in atmospheric motions (including those with allowance for effects of air compressibility and Earth's rotation) are brought together. Equations and relationships are given which are valid in different approximations accepted in dynamic meteorology: Boussinesq approximation, quasi-static approximation, and quasi-geostrophic approximation. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of helicity budget in large-scale quasi-geostrophic systems of motion; a formula for the helicity flux across the upper boundary of the nonlinear Ekman boundary layer is given, and this flux is shown to be exactly compensated for by the helicity destruction inside the Ekman boundary layer.

  1. Cross-Linked Collagen Triple Helices by Oxime Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentzen, Nina B; Smeenk, Linde E J; Witek, Jagna; Riniker, Sereina; Wennemers, Helma

    2017-09-13

    Covalent cross-links are crucial for the folding and stability of triple-helical collagen, the most abundant protein in nature. Cross-linking is also an attractive strategy for the development of synthetic collagen-based biocompatible materials. Nature uses interchain disulfide bridges to stabilize collagen trimers. However, their implementation into synthetic collagen is difficult and requires the replacement of the canonical amino acids (4R)-hydroxyproline and proline by cysteine or homocysteine, which reduces the preorganization and thereby stability of collagen triple helices. We therefore explored alternative covalent cross-links that allow for connecting triple-helical collagen via proline residues. Here, we present collagen model peptides that are cross-linked by oxime bonds between 4-aminooxyproline (Aop) and 4-oxoacetamidoproline placed in coplanar Xaa and Yaa positions of neighboring strands. The covalently connected strands folded into hyperstable collagen triple helices (Tm ≈ 80 °C). The design of the cross-links was guided by an analysis of the conformational properties of Aop, studies on the stability and functionalization of Aop-containing collagen triple helices, and molecular dynamics simulations. The studies also show that the aminooxy group exerts a stereoelectronic effect comparable to fluorine and introduce oxime ligation as a tool for the functionalization of synthetic collagen.

  2. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  3. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  4. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices.

  5. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-09-10

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices.

  6. Molecular modeling of biomembranes and their complexes with protein transmembrane α-helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Smirnov, Kirill V.; Antonov, Mikhail Yu.; Nikolaev, Ivan N.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2017-11-01

    Helical segments are common structural elements of membrane proteins. Dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane (TM) α-helices provides the framework for spatial structure formation and protein-protein interactions. The membrane itself also takes part in the protein functioning. There are some examples of the mutual influence of the lipid bilayer properties and embedded membrane proteins. This work aims at the detail investigation of protein-lipid interactions using model systems: TM peptides corresponding to native protein segments. Three peptides were considered corresponding to TM domains of human glycophorin A (GpA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and proposed TM-segment of human neuraminidase-1 (Neu1). A computational analysis of structural and dynamical properties was performed using molecular dynamics method. Monomers of peptides were considered incorporated into hydrated lipid bilayers. It was confirmed, that all these TM peptides have stable helical conformation in lipid environment, and the mutual adaptation of peptides and membrane was observed. It was shown that incorporation of the peptide into membrane results in the modulation of local and mean structural properties of the bilayer. Each peptide interacts with lipid acyl chains having special binding sites on the surface of central part of α-helix that exist for at least 200 ns. However, lipid acyl chains substitute each other faster occupying the same site. The formation of a special pattern of protein-lipid interactions may modulate the association of TM domains of membrane proteins, so membrane environment should be considered when proposing new substances targeting cell receptors.

  7. Optical helices and spiral interference fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.; Hill, C. A.; Vaughan, J. M.

    1994-03-01

    Very pure optical helices have been generated in an argon ion laser of low Fresnel number. The beam character, with continuous cophasal surface of helical form, is clearly demonstrated by spiral interference fringes produced in a novel interferometric arrangement. In addition to single-start helices the multistart fringe patterns establish both two-start and three-start helices (of pitch two and three wavelengths, respectively), and also the state of helicity (i.e. rotational hand) of the beams.

  8. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  9. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  10. Helical peptaibol mimics are better ionophores when racemic than when enantiopure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Sarah J; Jones, Jennifer E; Raftery, James; Clayden, Jonathan; Webb, Simon J

    2015-10-07

    Helical peptide foldamers rich in α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) act as peptaibol-mimicking ionophores in the phospholipid bilayers of artificial vesicles. Racemic samples of these foldamers are more active than their enantiopure counterparts, which was attributed to differing propensities to form aggregates with crystal-like features in the bilayer.

  11. Stability of helical Janus clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Connor L.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent experimental and computational work has elucidated the importance of kinetic pathways in the formation of helical structures by hydrophobic-charged Janus particles.ootnotetextQ. Chen, J.K. Whitmer, et al., Science 331, 199 (2011). Motivated by these findings, we perform free-energy calculations to investigate the equilibrium structure and relative stability of helical aggregates as a function of cluster size and Janus balance. These results simultaneously aid in the interpretation of experimental observations and in the design of building blocks for specific structures.

  12. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...... of the vorticity field are addressed. These included some of the problems related to vortex breakdown, instability of far wakes behind rotors and vortex theory of ideal rotors....

  13. ICRF heating on helical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

  14. ICRF heating on helical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

  15. Synthesis of cyclic tryptathionine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, G; Beijer, B; Wieland, T

    1987-09-01

    The helicity of the tryptathionine moiety of the phallotoxins has been recognized by comparison with cyclic tryptathionine tripeptides. In order to investigate the influence of the configuration of the component amino acids on the conformation of the cyclic peptides, six analogue thioether tripeptides containing L- and D-alanine and L- and D-cysteine, respectively, have been synthesized. The CD spectra of the peptides are very similar to each other, showing mirror images of the CD of phalloidin and, therefore, negative helicity. The spectra of the D-cysteine containing compounds differ from the L-cysteine containing compounds by their weakly positive ellipticity values around 270 nm. The cyclization reaction of Boc-Hpi-D-Ala-D-Cys(STrt)OCH3, along with the cyclic tripeptide, afforded a cyclic hexapeptide by dimerization. The CD spectrum of the dimer is very similar to that of phalloidin, thus pointing to a positive helicity of its two tryptathionine moieties. The dimeric thioether peptide forms a rather strong complex with Cu2+ ions.

  16. Folding Topology of a Short Coiled-Coil Peptide Structure Templated by an Oligonucleotide Triplex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Christensen, Niels Johan; Martos Maldonado, Manuel Cristo

    2017-01-01

    The rational design of a well-defined protein-like tertiary structure formed by small peptide building blocks is still a formidable challenge. By using peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POC) as building blocks, we present the self-assembly of miniature coiled-coil α-helical peptides guided...

  17. Constraining cyclic peptides to mimic protein structure motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Timothy A.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Diness, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins exert their biological activities through small exposed surface regions called epitopes that are folded peptides of well-defined three-dimensional structures. Short synthetic peptide sequences corresponding to these bioactive protein surfaces do not form thermodynamically stable...... protein-like structures in water. However, short peptides can be induced to fold into protein-like bioactive conformations (strands, helices, turns) by cyclization, in conjunction with the use of other molecular constraints, that helps to fine-tune three-dimensional structure. Such constrained cyclic...... peptides can have protein-like biological activities and potencies, enabling their uses as biological probes and leads to therapeutics, diagnostics and vaccines. This Review highlights examples of cyclic peptides that mimic three-dimensional structures of strand, turn or helical segments of peptides...

  18. Molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of anionic and zwitterionic interfaces on antimicrobial peptides' structure: implications for peptide toxicity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of three related helical antimicrobial peptides have been carried out in zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelles and anionic sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. These systems can be considered as model mammalian and bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively....

  19. Modular Design of Self-Assembling Peptide-Based Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Natasha C; Sharp, Thomas H; Thomas, Franziska; Wood, Christopher W; Thomson, Andrew R; Zaccai, Nathan R; Brady, R Leo; Serpell, Louise C; Woolfson, Derek N

    2015-08-26

    An ability to design peptide-based nanotubes (PNTs) rationally with defined and mutable internal channels would advance understanding of peptide self-assembly, and present new biomaterials for nanotechnology and medicine. PNTs have been made from Fmoc dipeptides, cyclic peptides, and lock-washer helical bundles. Here we show that blunt-ended α-helical barrels, that is, preassembled bundles of α-helices with central channels, can be used as building blocks for PNTs. This approach is general and systematic, and uses a set of de novo helical bundles as standards. One of these bundles, a hexameric α-helical barrel, assembles into highly ordered PNTs, for which we have determined a structure by combining cryo-transmission electron microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction, and model building. The structure reveals that the overall symmetry of the peptide module plays a critical role in ripening and ordering of the supramolecular assembly. PNTs based on pentameric, hexameric, and heptameric α-helical barrels sequester hydrophobic dye within their lumens.

  20. MemBrain: improving the accuracy of predicting transmembrane helices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Shen

    Full Text Available Prediction of transmembrane helices (TMH in alpha helical membrane proteins provides valuable information about the protein topology when the high resolution structures are not available. Many predictors have been developed based on either amino acid hydrophobicity scale or pure statistical approaches. While these predictors perform reasonably well in identifying the number of TMHs in a protein, they are generally inaccurate in predicting the ends of TMHs, or TMHs of unusual length. To improve the accuracy of TMH detection, we developed a machine-learning based predictor, MemBrain, which integrates a number of modern bioinformatics approaches including sequence representation by multiple sequence alignment matrix, the optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest neighbor prediction algorithm, fusion of multiple prediction window sizes, and classification by dynamic threshold. MemBrain demonstrates an overall improvement of about 20% in prediction accuracy, particularly, in predicting the ends of TMHs and TMHs that are shorter than 15 residues. It also has the capability to detect N-terminal signal peptides. The MemBrain predictor is a useful sequence-based analysis tool for functional and structural characterization of helical membrane proteins; it is freely available at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemBrain/.

  1. Baryon helicity in B decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko [Department of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The unexpectedly large transverse polarization measured in the decay B {yields} {phi}K* poses the question whether it is accounted for as a strong interaction effect or possibly points to a hidden nonstandard weak interaction. We extend here the perturbative argument to the helicity structure of the two-body baryonic decay and discuss qualitatively on how the baryonic B decay modes might help us in understanding the issue raised by B {yields} {phi}K*. We find among others that the helicity +1/2 amplitude dominates the leading order in the B(b-barq) decay and that unlike the B {yields} VV decay the dominant amplitude is sensitive to the right-handed b {yields} s current, if any, in the penguin interaction.

  2. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  3. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  4. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  5. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Büßer, K.; Colberg, T.; Demirörs, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Eversheim, P. D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Nähle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H. J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.; EDDA Collaboration

    1999-07-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9°⩽ Θ⩽72° and 0°⩽ ϕ⩽360° in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes.

  6. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  7. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptides from Australian frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David I; Gehman, John D; Separovic, Frances

    2009-08-01

    The membrane interactions of four antimicrobial peptides, aurein 1.2, citropin 1.1, maculatin 1.1 and caerin 1.1, isolated from Australian tree frogs, are reviewed. All four peptides are amphipathic alpha-helices with a net positive charge and range in length from 13 to 25 residues. Despite several similar sequence characteristics, these peptides compromise the integrity of model membrane bilayers via different mechanisms; the shorter peptides exhibit a surface interaction mechanism while the longer peptides may form pores in membranes.

  9. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Céspedes

    Full Text Available Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum were identified in the P. vivax genome. The peptides identified in silico were chemically synthesized; circular dichroism studies indicated partial or high α-helical content. Antigenicity was evaluated using human sera samples from malaria-endemic areas of Colombia and Papua New Guinea. Eight of these fragments were selected and used to assess immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. ELISA assays indicated strong reactivity of serum samples from individuals residing in malaria-endemic regions and sera of immunized mice, with the α-helical coiled coil structures. In addition, ex vivo production of IFN-γ by murine mononuclear cells confirmed the immunogenicity of these structures and the presence of T-cell epitopes in the peptide sequences. Moreover, sera of mice immunized with four of the eight antigens recognized native proteins on blood-stage P. vivax parasites, and antigenic cross-reactivity with three of the peptides was observed when reacted with both the P. falciparum orthologous fragments and whole parasites. Results here point to the α-helical coiled coil peptides as possible P. vivax malaria vaccine candidates as were observed for P. falciparum. Fragments selected here warrant further study in humans and non-human primate models to assess their protective efficacy as single components or assembled as hybrid linear epitopes.

  10. Maximin H5 is an anticancer peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Dennison, SR; Harris, F; Phoenix, DA

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the first major example of anionic amphibian host defence peptides (HDPs) with anticancer activity. Maximin H5 is a C-terminally amidated, anionic host defence peptide (MH5N) from toads of the Bombina genus, which was shown to possess activity against the glioma cell line, T98G (EC50 = 125 μM). The peptide adopted high levels of α-helical structure (57.3%) in the presence of model cancer membranes (DMPC:DMPS in a molar ratio of 10:1). MH5N also showed a strong ability to penetr...

  11. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  12. A self-replicating peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David H.; Granja, Juan R.; Martinez, Jose A.; Severin, Kay; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    1996-08-01

    THE production of amino acids and their condensation to polypeptides under plausibly prebiotic conditions have long been known1,2. But despite the central importance of molecular self-replication in the origin of life, the feasibility of peptide self-replication has not been established experimentally3-6. Here we report an example of a self-replicating peptide. We show that a 32-residue α-helical peptide based on the leucine-zipper domain of the yeast transcription factor GCN4 can act autocatalytically in templating its own synthesis by accelerating the thioester-promoted amide-bond condensation of 15- and 17-residue fragments in neutral, dilute aqueous solutions. The self-replication process displays parabolic growth pattern with the initial rates of product formation correlating with the square-root of initial template concentration.

  13. On the helical arrangements of protein molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    Helical structures are prevalent in biology. In the PDB, there are many examples where protein molecules are helically arranged, not only according to strict crystallographic screw axes but also according to approximate noncrystallographic screws. The preponderance of such screws is rather striking as helical arrangements in crystals must preserve an integer number of subunits per turn, while intuition and simple packing arguments would seem to favor fractional helices. The article provides insights into such questions, based on stereochemistry, trigonometry, and topology, and illustrates the findings with concrete PDB structures. Updated statistics of Sohncke space groups in the PDB are also presented. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  15. Beta sheets with a twist: the conformation of helical polyisocyanopeptides determined by using vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Erik; Liégeois, Vincent; Koepf, Matthieu; Bodis, Pavol; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Brocorens, Patrick; Beljonne, David; Nolte, Roeland J M; Rowan, Alan E; Woutersen, Sander; Champagne, Benoît

    2013-09-23

    Detailed information on the architecture of polyisocyanopeptides based on vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy in combination with DFT calculations is presented. It is demonstrated that the screw sense of the helical polyisocyanides can be determined directly from the C=N-stretch vibrational region of the VCD spectrum. Analysis of the VCD signals associated with the amide I and amide II modes provides detailed information on the peptide side-chain arrangement in the polymer and indicates the presence of a helical β-sheet architecture, in which the dihedral angles are slightly different to those of natural β-sheet helices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Adsorption, structural alteration and elution of peptides at pendant PEO layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangming; Ryder, Matthew P; McGuire, Joseph; Schilke, Karl F

    2013-12-01

    An experimentally based, quantitative understanding of the entrapment and function of small peptides within PEO brush layers does not currently exist. Earlier work provided a rationale for expecting that an ordered, compact peptide will enter the PEO phase more readily than a peptide of similar size that adopts a less ordered, less compact form, and that amphiphilicity will promote peptide retention within the hydrophobic region of the PEO brush. Here we more deliberately describe criteria for peptide integration and structural change within the PEO brush, and discuss the reversibility of peptide entrapment with changing solvent conditions. For this purpose, circular dichroism (CD) was used to record the adsorption and conformational changes of (amphiphilic) WLBU2 and (non-amphiphilic) polyarginine peptides at uncoated (hydrophobic) and PEO-coated silica nanoparticles. Peptide conformation was controlled between disordered and α-helical forms by varying the concentration of perchlorate ion. We show an initially more ordered (α-helical) structure promotes peptide adsorption into the PEO layer. Further, a partially helical peptide undergoes an increase in helicity after entry, likely due to concomitant loss of capacity for peptide-solvent hydrogen bonding. Peptide interaction with the PEO chains resulted in entrapment and conformational change that was irreversible to elution with changing solution conditions in the case of the amphiphilic peptide. In contrast, the adsorption and conformational change of the non-amphiphilic peptide was reversible. These results indicate that responsive drug delivery systems based on peptide-loaded PEO layers can be controlled by modulation of solution conditions and peptide amphiphilicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  18. Self-association of transmembrane alpha-helices in model membranes: Importance of helix orientation and role of hydrophobic mismatch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, E.; Ash, W.L.; Nazarov, P.V.; Rijkers, D.T.S.; Hemminga, M.A.; Tieleman, D.P.; Kilian, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between transmembrane helices play a key role in almost all cellular processes involving membrane proteins. We have investigated helix-helix interactions in lipid bilayers with synthetic tryptophan-flanked peptides that mimic the membrane spanning parts of membrane proteins. The

  19. Antimicrobial peptides design by evolutionary multiobjective optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosí, Riccardo; Cardarelli, Francesco; Signore, Giovanni; Boccardi, Claudia; Bifone, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18) was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues.

  20. Antimicrobial peptides design by evolutionary multiobjective optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maccari

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18 was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues.

  1. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  2. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  3. Self-assembling monolayers of helical oligopeptides with applications in molecular electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, A E

    1997-01-01

    prepared. Transformation of the two (Trt)Cys residues of the resin-bound peptide to the intramolecular disulphide by iodine was achieved in acetonitrile but not in DMF. CD suggested that the conformation of this peptide was a mixture of helix and random coil. Films of the peptide-disulphide and the peptide-dithiol adsorbed from protic solvents were characterised as multilayers by ellipsometry. However CV and ellipsometry showed that a monolayer was successfully prepared from acetonitrile. Future targets for improving and extending this method to form monolayers of linked disulphides are presented. The aim of this project was to develop a generic method of preparing a 'molecular architecture' containing functional groups on a surface at predetermined relative positions several nm apart. This would be of great utility in molecular electronics, chemical sensors and other fields. It was proposed that such an architecture could be prepared on gold using linked, helical oligopeptides that contained the components o...

  4. Lipid-peptide-polymer conjugates and nanoparticles thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Dong, He; Shu, Jessica

    2015-06-02

    The present invention provides a conjugate having a peptide with from about 10 to about 100 amino acids, wherein the peptide adopts a helical structure. The conjugate also includes a first polymer covalently linked to the peptide, and a hydrophobic moiety covalently linked to the N-terminus of the peptide, wherein the hydrophobic moiety comprises a second polymer or a lipid moiety. The present invention also provides helix bundles form by self-assembling the conjugates, and particles formed by self-assembling the helix bundles. Methods of preparing the helix bundles and particles are also provided.

  5. Conformational behavior of ionic self-complementary peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, M; Lee, P; Rich, A; Zhang, S

    2000-06-01

    Several de novo designed ionic peptides that are able to undergo conformational change under the influence of temperature and pH were studied. These peptides have two distinct surfaces with regular repeats of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic side chains. This permits extensive ionic and hydrophobic interactions resulting in the formation of stable beta-sheet assemblies. The other defining characteristic of this type of peptide is a cluster of negatively charged aspartic or glutamic acid residues located toward the N-terminus and positively charged arginine or lysine residues located toward the C-terminus. This arrangement of charge balances the alpha-helical dipole moment (C --> N), resulting in a strong tendency to form stable alpha-helices as well. Therefore, these peptides can form both stable alpha-helices and beta-sheets. They are also able to undergo abrupt structural transformations between these structures induced by temperature and pH changes. The amino acid sequence of these peptides permits both stable beta-sheet and alpha-helix formation, resulting in a balance between these two forms as governed by the environment. Some segments in proteins may also undergo conformational changes in response to environmental changes. Analyzing the plasticity and dynamics of this type of peptide may provide insight into amyloid formation. Since these peptides have dynamic secondary structure, they will serve to refine our general understanding of protein structure.

  6. Evidence for α-helices in the gas phase: a case study using Melittin from honey bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florance, Hannah V; Stopford, Andrew P; Kalapothakis, Jason M; McCullough, Bryan J; Bretherick, Andrew; Barran, Perdita E

    2011-09-07

    Gas phase methodologies are increasingly used to study the structure of proteins and peptides. A challenge to the mass spectrometrist is to preserve the structure of the system of interest intact and unaltered from solution into the gas phase. Small peptides are very flexible and can present a number of conformations in solution. In this work we examine Melittin a 26 amino acid peptide that forms the active component of honey bee venom. Melittin is haemolytic and has been shown to form an α-helical tetrameric structure by X-ray crystallography [M. Gribskov et al., The RCSB Protein Data Bank, 1990] and to be helical in high concentrations of methanol. Here we use ion mobility mass spectrometry, molecular dynamics and gas-phase HDX to probe its structure in the gas phase and specifically interrogate whether the helical form can be preserved. All low energy calculated structures possess some helicity. In our experiments we examine the peptide following nano-ESI from solutions with varying methanol content. Ion mobility gives collision cross sections (CCS) that compare well with values found from molecular modelling and from other reported structures, but with inconclusive results regarding the effect of solvent. There is only a slight increase in CCS with charge, showing minimal coloumbically driven unfolding. HDX supports preservation of some helical content into the gas phase and again shows little difference in the exchange rates of species sprayed from different solvents. The [M + 3H](3+) species has two exchanging populations both of which exhibit faster exchange rates than observed for the [M + 2H](2+) species. One interpretation for these results is that the time spent being analysed is sufficient for this peptide to form a helix in the 'ultimate' hydrophobic environment of a vacuum.

  7. Helicity Evolution at Small x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Michael; Kovchegov, Yuri; Pitonyak, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We construct small- x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of ln2(1 / x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of ln(1 / x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc &Nf limits. After solving the large-Nc equations numerically we obtain the following small- x asymptotics for the flavor-singlet g1 structure function along with quarks hPDFs and helicity TMDs (in absence of saturation effects): g1S(x ,Q2) ΔqS(x ,Q2) g1L S(x ,kT2) (1/x) > αh (1/x) 2.31√{αsNc/2 π. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin may be at small x and what impact this has on the so-called ``spin crisis.'' Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-SC0004286 (YK), the RIKEN BNL Research Center, and TMD Collaboration (DP), and DOE Contract No. DE-SC0012704 (MS).

  8. Comprehensive analysis of the numbers, lengths and amino acid compositions of transmembrane helices in prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral integral membrane proteins of high-resolution structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2017-02-15

    We report a comprehensive analysis of the numbers, lengths and amino acid compositions of transmembrane helices in 235 high-resolution structures of integral membrane proteins. The properties of 1551 transmembrane helices in the structures were compared with those obtained by analysis of the same amino acid sequences using topology prediction tools. Explanations for the 81 (5.2%) missing or additional transmembrane helices in the prediction results were identified. Main reasons for missing transmembrane helices were mis-identification of N-terminal signal peptides, breaks in α-helix conformation or charged residues in the middle of transmembrane helices and transmembrane helices with unusual amino acid composition. The main reason for additional transmembrane helices was mis-identification of amphipathic helices, extramembrane helices or hairpin re-entrant loops. Transmembrane helix length had an overall median of 24 residues and an average of 24.9 ± 7.0 residues and the most common length was 23 residues. The overall content of residues in transmembrane helices as a percentage of the full proteins had a median of 56.8% and an average of 55.7 ± 16.0%. Amino acid composition was analysed for the full proteins, transmembrane helices and extramembrane regions. Individual proteins or types of proteins with transmembrane helices containing extremes in contents of individual amino acids or combinations of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties were identified and linked to structure and/or function. In addition to overall median and average values, all results were analysed for proteins originating from different types of organism (prokaryotic, eukaryotic, viral) and for subgroups of receptors, channels, transporters and others.

  9. Design of potent, non-toxic anticancer peptides based on the structure of the antimicrobial peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Che; Lang, Lei; Zhou, Yang; Wang, He; Shang, De-Jing

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the search for novel anticancer agents have indicated that the positively charged antimicrobial peptides have emerged as promising agents offering several advantages over the conventional anticancer drugs. As a naturally occurring, cationic, α-helical antimicrobial peptide, temproin-1CEa has been proved to exhibit a potent anticancer effect and a moderate hemolytic activity. In order to reduce the hemolytic activity of temporin-1CEa and improve its anticancer potency towards a range of human breast cancer cells, in the present study, six analogs of temporin-1CEa were rationally designed and synthesized. The amphipathicity levels and α-helical structural patterns of peptides were reserved, while their cationic property and hydrophobicity were changed. The results of MTT and hemolysis assay indicated that the analog peptides displayed an improved anticancer activity and showed an overall optimized therapeutic index. The hydrophobicity of peptides was positively correlated with their hemolytic and antitumor activities. Moreover, the data suggest a strategy of increasing the cationicity while maintaining the moderate hydrophobicity of naturally occurring amphipathic α-helical peptides to generate analogs with improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells but decreased activity against non-neoplastic cells such as human erythrocytes. This work highlights the potential for rational design and synthesis of improved antimicrobial peptides that have the capability to be used therapeutically for treatment of cancers.

  10. A New Methodology for Incorporating Chiral Linkers into Stapled Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Juan C; Sipthorp, James; Xu, Wenshu; Itzhaki, Laura S; Ley, Steven V

    2017-06-19

    Stapled peptides have arisen as a new class of chemical probe and potential therapeutic agents for modulating protein-protein interactions. Here, we report the first two-component i,i+7 stapling methodology that makes use of two orthogonal, on-resin stapling reactions to incorporate linkers bearing a chiral centre into a p53-derived stapled peptide. Post-stapling modifications to the chain were performed on-resin and enabled rapid access to various peptide derivatives from a single staple. The stapled peptides have increased helicity, protease stability and in vitro binding affinities to MDM2 compared to the equivalent unstapled peptide. This approach can be used to generate a library of diverse stapled peptides with different properties starting from a single stapled peptide, with scope for much greater functional diversity than that provided by existing stapling methodologies. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Forces between hydrophilic surfaces adsorbed with apolipoprotein AII alpha helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S; Campos-Terán, J; Mas-Oliva, J; Nylander, Tommy; Castillo, R

    2008-08-19

    To provide better understanding of how a protein secondary structure affects protein-protein and protein-surface interactions, forces between amphiphilic alpha-helical proteins (human apolipoprotein AII) adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface (mica) were measured using an interferometric surface force apparatus (SFA). Forces between surfaces with adsorbed layers of this protein are mainly composed of electrostatic double layer forces at large surface distances and of steric repulsive forces at small distances. We suggest that the amphiphilicity of the alpha-helix structure facilitates the formation of protein multilayers next to the mica surfaces. We found that protein-surface interaction is stronger than protein-protein interaction, probably due to the high negative charge density of the mica surface and the high positive charge of the protein at our experimental conditions. Ellipsometry was used to follow the adsorption kinetics of this protein on hydrophilic silica, and we observed that the adsorption rate is not only controlled by diffusion, but rather by the protein-surface interaction. Our results for dimeric apolipoprotein AII are similar to those we have reported for the monomeric apolipoprotein CI, which has a similar secondary structure but a different peptide sequence and net charge. Therefore, the observed force curves seem to be a consequence of the particular features of the amphiphilic alpha-helices.

  12. Secondary structure of fluorescence labelled synthetic peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A S

    2000-01-01

    A series of eight synthetic oligopeptides has been prepared and their secondary structures investigated using various techniques. The project represents a continuation of an investigation into thermally induced changes in secondary structure. Following the previously reported results, the change in structure was initially thought to represent a change from an alpha-helix at low temperature to 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix at high temperature. However, the results reported herein suggest the peptides retain an alpha-helical configuration at all temperatures studied, but that this helix can adopt at least two related forms. The difference in the structures relates to the nature of the H-bonds which may or may not involve an additional interaction from water molecules or side-chains. The peptides were encouraged to adopt a helical configuration by the inclusion of alpha- aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Also, modified forms of glutamic acid were included in the sequences. These had pendant donor (4-methoxy naphthalen...

  13. Thermally activated helicity reversals of skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X. Z.; Shibata, K.; Koshibae, W.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kimoto, K.; Taguchi, Y.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic bubbles with winding number S =1 are topologically equivalent to skyrmions. Here we report the discovery of helicity (in-plane magnetization-swirling direction) reversal of skyrmions, while keeping their hexagonal lattice form, at above room temperature in a thin hexaferrite magnet. We have observed that the frequency of helicity reversals dramatically increases with temperature in a thermally activated manner, revealing that the generation energy of a kink-soliton pair for switching helicity on a skyrmion rapidly decreases towards the magnetic transition temperature.

  14. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  15. Investigation of backfire monofilar helical antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Thomas Gunst; Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Gothelf, Ulrich Vesterager

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the electromagnetic properties of the backfire monofilar helical antenna. The current distribution along the helical conductor, the input impedance, and the front-to-back ratio are calculated and analyzed for the backfire operation of the antenna. ....... A parametric study of the helical geometry and the resulting antenna characteristics will be described and discussed. The currents and fields are calculated using the simulation software AWAS based on the Method of Moments with a wire representation of the ground plane....

  16. Spin versus helicity in processes involving transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We construct the spin formalism in order to deal in a direct and natural way with processes involving transversity which are now of increasing popularity. The helicity formalism which is more appropriate for collision processes of definite helicity has been so far used also to manage processes with transversity, but at the price of computing numerous helicity amplitudes generally involving unnecessary kinematical variables.In a second step we work out the correspondence between both formalisms and retrieve in another way all results of the helicity formalism but in simpler forms.We then compute certain processes for comparison.A special process:the quark dipole magnetic moment is shown to be exclusively treated within the spin formalism as it is directly related to the transverse spin of the quark inside the baryon.

  17. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  18. Exact solutions for helical magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villata, M. (Istituto di Fisica Generale, Universita di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)); Tsinganos, K. (Department of Physics, University of Crete and Research Center of Crete, GR-71409, Heraklion, Crete (Greece))

    1993-07-01

    Three novel classes of exact solutions of the generalized Grad--Shafranov equation for helically symmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria are presented. The first two classes may be applied to helical MHD equilibria for plasma confined between two coaxial cylinders, while the third one to the modeling of helicoidal magnetic fields and flows in several recently observed astrophysical jets. The same solutions can be also used for the testing of sophisticated numerical codes. It is also shown that all helically symmetric MHD equilibria can be treated by the same general method which is employed to generate exact MHD solutions for systems possessing an ignorable coordinate in a system of three orthogonal basis vectors, although in the case of helical symmetry an [ital orthogonal] ignorable coordinate does not exist, contrary to what happens in the well-known cases of axial and translational symmetries.

  19. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    In most numerical simulations of the Earth's core the dynamo resides outside the tangent cylinder and may be crudely classified as being of the α2 type. In this region the flow comprises a sea of thin columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, taking the form of alternating cyclones and anticyclones. The dynamo is thought to be driven by these columnar vortices within which the flow is observed to be highly helical, helicity being a crucial ingredient of planetary dynamos. As noted in Davidson, one of the mysteries of this dynamo cartoon is the origin of the helicity, which is observed to be positive in the south and negative in the north. While Ekman pumping at the mantle can induce helicity in some of the overly viscous numerical simulations, it is extremely unlikely to be a significant source within planets. In this paper we return to the suggestion of Davidson that the helicity observed in the less viscous simulations owes its existence to helical wave packets, launched in and around the equatorial plane where the buoyancy flux is observed to be strong. Here we show that such wave packets act as a potent source of planetary helicity, constituting a simple, robust mechanism that yields the correct sign for h north and south of the equator. Since such a mechanism does not rely on the presence of a mantle, it can operate within both the Earth and the gas giants. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that helical wave packets dispersing from the equator produce a random sea of thin, columnar cyclone/anticyclone pairs, very like those observed in the more strongly forced dynamo simulations. We examine the local dynamics of helical wave packets dispersing from the equatorial regions, as well as the overall nature of an α2-dynamo driven by such wave packets. Our local analysis predicts the mean emf induced by helical waves, an analysis that rests on a number of simple approximations which are consistent with our numerical experiments, while our global

  20. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  1. Multiple helical modes of vortex breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2011-01-01

    Experimental observations of vortex breakdown in a rotating lid-driven cavity are presented. The results show that vortex breakdown for cavities with high aspect ratios is associated with the appearance of stable helical vortex multiplets. By using results from stability theory generalizing Kelvin......’s problem on vortex polygon stability, and systematically exploring the cavity flow, we succeeded in identifying two new stable vortex breakdown states consisting of triple and quadruple helical multiplets....

  2. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  3. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  4. MHD Gauge Fields: Helicities and Casimirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Webb, G. M.; Zank, G. P.; Anco, S.

    2016-12-01

    Clebsch potential gauge field theory for magnetohydrodynamics is developed based in part on the theory of Calkin (1963). It is shown how the polarization vector P in Calkin's approach, naturally arises from the Lagrange multiplier constraint equation for Faraday's equation for the magnetic induction B, or alternatively from the magnetic vector potential form of Faraday's equation. Gauss's equation, (divergence of Bis zero), is incorporated in the variational principle by means of a Lagrange multiplier constraint. Noether's theorem, and gauge symmetries are used to derive the conservation laws for (a) magnetic helicity (b) cross helicity, (c) fluid helicity for non-magnetized fluids, and (d) a class of conservation laws associated with curl and divergence equations, which applies to Faraday's equation and Gauss's equation. The magnetic helicity conservation law is due to a gauge symmetry in MHD and not due to a fluid relabelling symmetry. The analysis is carried out for a non-barotropic gas. The cross helicity and fluid helicity conservation are nonlocal conservation laws, that reduce to local conservation laws for the case of a barotropic gas. The connections between gauge symmetries, Clebsch potentials and Casimirs are developed. It is shown that the gauge symmetry functionals in the work of Henyey (1982) satisfy the Casimir equations.

  5. Non-protein amino acids in peptide design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein amino acids in peptide design ... illustrate the use -aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in the construction of helices, D-amino acids in the design of helix termination segments and DPro-Xxx segments for nucleating of -hairpin structures. - and ...

  6. DNA-like double helix formed by peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittung, P; Nielsen, Peter E.; Buchardt, O

    1994-01-01

    Although the importance of the nucleobases in the DNA double helix is well understood, the evolutionary significance of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone and the contribution of this chemical entity to the overall helical structure and stability of the double helix is not so clear. Peptide nucleic...

  7. A REVIEW ON HEAT TRANSFER THROUGH HELICAL COIL HEAT EXCHANGERS

    OpenAIRE

    Surendra Vishvakarma*, Sanjay Kumbhare, K. K. Thakur

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a brief review of heat transfer through helical coil heat exchangers. Helical coils of circular cross section have been used in wide variety of applications due to simplicity in manufacturing. Enhancement in heat transfer due to helical coils has been reported by many researchers. While the heat transfer characteristics of double pipe helical heat exchangers are available in the literature, there exists no published experimental or theoretical analysis of a helically coile...

  8. A Conserved Cross Helicity for Non-Barotropic MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalom, A

    2016-01-01

    Cross helicity is not conserved in non-barotropic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) (as opposed to barotropic or incompressible MHD). Here we show that variational analysis suggests a new kind of cross helicity which is conserved in the non barotropic case. The non barotropic cross helicity reduces to the standard cross helicity under barotropic assumptions. The new cross helicity is conserved even for topologies for which the variational principle does not apply.

  9. Peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Keval; Batterham, Rachel

    2008-02-01

    This review discusses recent studies examining the effects of peptide YY on energy homeostasis, highlights the emerging hedonic effects of peptide YY and evaluates the therapeutic potential of the peptide YY system. A role for exogenous PYY3-36 as an anorectic agent in obese humans and rodents has been established and weight loss effects demonstrated in obese rodents. New lines of evidence support a role for endogenous peptide YY in regulating energy homeostasis. The NPY-Y2 receptor mediates the anorectic actions of PYY3-36 with rodent studies implicating the hypothalamus, vagus and brainstem as key target sites. Functional imaging in humans has confirmed that PYY3-36 activates brainstem and hypothalamic regions. The greatest effects, however, were observed within the orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region involved in reward processing. Further evidence for a hedonic role for PYY3-36 is supported by rodent studies showing that PYY3-36 decreases the motivation to seek high-fat food. Rodent studies using selective Y2 agonists and strategies combining PYY3-36/Y2 agonists with other anorectic agents have revealed increased anorectic and weight-reducing effects. Peptide YY plays a role in the integrative regulation of metabolism. The emerging hedonic effects of peptide YY together with the weight-reducing effects observed in obese rodents suggest that targeting the peptide YY system may offer a therapeutic strategy for obesity.

  10. Determinants of recombinant production of antimicrobial cationic peptides and creation of peptide variants in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Falla, T; Wu, M; Fidai, S; Burian, J; Kay, W; Hancock, R E

    1998-06-29

    Cationic peptides possessing antibacterial activity are virtually ubiquitous in nature, and offer exciting prospects as new therapeutic agents. We had previously demonstrated that such peptides could be produced by fusion protein technology in bacteria and several carrier proteins had been tested as fusion partners including glutathione-S-transferase, S. aureus protein A, IgG binding protein and P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprF. However these fusion partners, while successfully employed in peptide expression, were not optimized for high level production of cationic peptides (Piers, K., Brow, M. L., and Hancock, R. E. W. 1993, Gene 137, 7-13). In this paper we took advantage of a small replication protein RepA from E. coli and used its truncated version to construct fusion partners. The minimal elements required for high level expression of cationic peptide were defined as a DNA sequence encoding a fusion protein comprising, from the N-terminus, a 68 amino acid carrier region, an anionic prepro domain, a single methionine and the peptide of interest. The 68 amino acid carrier region was a block of three polypeptides consisting of a truncated RepA, a synthetic cellulose binding domain and a hexa histidine domain. The improved system showed high level expression and simplified downstream purification. The active peptide could be yielded by CNBr cleavage of the fusion protein. This novel vector was used to express three classes of cationic peptides including the alpha-helical peptide CEMA, the looped peptide bactenecin and the extended peptide indolicidin. In addition, mutagenesis of the peptide gene to produce peptide variants of CEMA and indolicidin using the improved vector system was shown to be successful.

  11. Binding of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 with different BH3 peptides: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Liu, Huihui; Cui, Jinglan

    2018-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations are utilized to study how different BH3 peptides originating from Bax, Bim, Bik and Noxa interact with Bcl-2, one of the main members of anti-apoptotic proteins. The effects of peptide length, sequence and helical content on the binding affinity are discussed, on which a novel BH3-like peptide is designed in silico with an improved binding property.

  12. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain is an amphipathic helical hairpin that functions by inducing membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrt, Sean T; Draney, Adrian W; Lorieau, Justin L

    2015-01-02

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Right-Handed Helical Foldamers Consisting of De Novo d -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Peng; Ma, Ning; Cerrato, Darrell Cole; She, Fengyu; Odom, Timothy; Wang, Xiang; Ming, Li-June; van der Vaart, Arjan; Wojtas, Lukasz; Xu, Hai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2017-05-16

    New types of foldamer scaffolds are formidably challenging to design and synthesize, yet highly desirable as structural mimics of peptides/proteins with a wide repertoire of functions. In particular, the development of peptidomimetic helical foldamers holds promise for new biomaterials, catalysts, and drug molecules. Unnatural l-sulfono-γ-AApeptides were recently developed and shown to have potential applications in both biomedical and material sciences. However, d-sulfono-γ-AApeptides, the enantiomers of l-sulfono-γ-AApeptides, have never been studied due to the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional structures to guide structure-based design. Herein, we report the first synthesis and X-ray crystal structures of a series of 2:1 l-amino acid/d-sulfono-γ-AApeptide hybrid foldamers, and elucidate their folded conformation at the atomic level. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography indicates that this class of oligomers folds into well-defined right-handed helices with unique helical parameters. The helical structures were consistent with data obtained from solution 2D NMR, CD studies, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings are expected to inspire the structure-based design of this type of unique folding biopolymers for biomaterials and biomedical applications.

  14. The study of single anticancer peptides interacting with HeLa cell membranes by single molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yuping; Huang, Jinfeng; Tan, Juanjuan; Gao, Gui; Liu, Shuheng; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of biophysical parameters (e.g. charge, hydrophobicity, helicity) of peptides on the mechanism of anticancer activity, we applied a single molecule technique--force spectroscopy based on atomic force microscope (AFM)--to study the interaction force at the single molecule level. The activity of the peptide and analogs against HeLa cells exhibited a strong correlation with the hydrophobicity of peptides. Our results indicated that the action mode between α-helical peptides and cancer cells was largely hydrophobicity-dependent.To determine the effects of biophysical parameters (e.g. charge, hydrophobicity, helicity) of peptides on the mechanism of anticancer activity, we applied a single molecule technique--force spectroscopy based on atomic force microscope (AFM)--to study the interaction force at the single molecule level. The activity of the peptide and analogs against HeLa cells exhibited a strong correlation with the hydrophobicity of peptides. Our results indicated that the action mode between α-helical peptides and cancer cells was largely hydrophobicity-dependent. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Peptide design, biophysical properties, biological activities and experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11541g

  15. Helicity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Koprov, Boris; Koprov, Victor; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2017-04-01

    An overview is presented of recent direct field measurements at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station of A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Moscow of turbulent helicity (and potential vorticity) using four acoustic anemometers positioned, within the atmospheric surface-adjacent boundary layer, in the vertices of a rectangular tetrahedron, with an approximate 5 m distance between the anemometers and a 5.5 m elevation of the tetrahedron base above the ground surface (Koprov, Koprov, Kurgansky and Chkhetiani. Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol.51, 565-575). The same ideology was applied in a later field experiment in Tsimlyansk with the tetrahedron's size of 0.7 m and variable elevation over the ground from 3.5 to 25 m. It is illustrated with examples of the statistical distribution of instantaneous (both positive and negative) turbulent helicity values. A theory is proposed that explains the measured mean turbulent helicity sign, including the sign of contribution to helicity from the horizontal and vertical velocity & vorticity components, respectively, and the sign of helicity buoyant production term. By considering a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and a jet-like wind profile that mimics a shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated Earth surface, a possible explanation is provided, why the measured mean turbulent helicity sign is negative. The pronounced breeze circulation over the Tsimlyansk polygon which is located nearby the Tsimlyansk Reservoir was, indeed, observed during the measurements period. Whereas, essentially positive helicity is injected into the boundary layer from the free atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. MH(2)c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B; Frommlet, F; Schreiner, W; Knapp, B

    2012-07-01

    Major histocompatibility proteins share a common overall structure or peptide binding groove. Two binding groove domains, on the same chain for major histocompatibility class I or on two different chains for major histocompatibility class II, contribute to that structure that consists of two α-helices ("wall") and a sheet of eight anti-parallel beta strands ("floor"). Apart from the peptide presented in the groove, the major histocompatibility α-helices play a central role for the interaction with the T cell receptor. This study presents a generalized mathematical approach for the characterization of these helices. We employed polynomials of degree 1 to 7 and splines with 1 to 2 nodes based on polynomials of degree 1 to 7 on the α-helices projected on their principal components. We evaluated all models with a corrected Akaike Information Criterion to determine which model represents the α-helices in the best way without overfitting the data. This method is applicable for both the stationary and the dynamic characterization of α-helices. By deriving differential geometric parameters from these models one obtains a reliable method to characterize and compare α-helices for a broad range of applications. Program title: MH(2)c (MH helix curves) Catalogue identifier: AELX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 327 565 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 433 656 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab Computer: Personal computer architectures Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed) RAM: Depends on the trajectory size, min. 1 GB (Matlab) Classification: 2.1, 4.9, 4.14 External routines: Curve Fitting

  17. MH2c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B.; Frommlet, F.; Schreiner, W.; Knapp, B.

    2012-07-01

    Major histocompatibility proteins share a common overall structure or peptide binding groove. Two binding groove domains, on the same chain for major histocompatibility class I or on two different chains for major histocompatibility class II, contribute to that structure that consists of two α-helices (“wall”) and a sheet of eight anti-parallel beta strands (“floor”). Apart from the peptide presented in the groove, the major histocompatibility α-helices play a central role for the interaction with the T cell receptor. This study presents a generalized mathematical approach for the characterization of these helices. We employed polynomials of degree 1 to 7 and splines with 1 to 2 nodes based on polynomials of degree 1 to 7 on the α-helices projected on their principal components. We evaluated all models with a corrected Akaike Information Criterion to determine which model represents the α-helices in the best way without overfitting the data. This method is applicable for both the stationary and the dynamic characterization of α-helices. By deriving differential geometric parameters from these models one obtains a reliable method to characterize and compare α-helices for a broad range of applications. Catalogue identifier: AELX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 327 565 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 433 656 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab Computer: Personal computer architectures Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed) RAM: Depends on the trajectory size, min. 1 GB (Matlab) Classification: 2.1, 4.9, 4.14 External routines: Curve Fitting Toolbox and Statistic Toolbox of

  18. A theoretical analysis of secondary structural characteristics of anticancer peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Sarah R; Harris, Frederick; Bhatt, Tailap; Singh, Jaipaul; Phoenix, David A

    2010-01-01

    Here, cluster analysis showed that a database of 158 anticancer peptides formed 21 clusters based on net positive charge, hydrophobicity and amphiphilicity. In general, these clusters showed similar median toxicities (P = 0.176) against eukaryotic cell lines and no single combination of these properties was found optimal for efficacy. The database contained 14 peptides, which showed selectivity for tumour cell lines only (ACP(CT)), 123 peptides with general toxicity to eukaryotic cells (ACP(GT)) and 21 inactive peptides (ACP(I)). Hydrophobic arc size analysis showed that there was no significant difference across the datasets although peptides with wide hydrophobic arcs (>270 degrees) appeared to be associated with decreased toxicity. Extended hydrophobic moment plot analysis predicted that over 50% of ACP(CT) and ACP(GT) peptides would be surface active, which led to the suggestion that amphiphilicity is a key driver of the membrane interactions for these peptides but probably plays a role in their efficacy rather than their selectivity. This analysis also predicted that only 14% of ACP(CT) peptides compared to 45% of ACP(GT) peptides were candidates for tilted peptide formation, which led to the suggestion that the absence of this structure may support cancer cell selectivity. However, these analyses predicted that ACP(I) peptides, which possess no anticancer activity, would also form surface active and tilted alpha-helices, clearly showing that other factors are involved in determining the efficacy and selectivity of ACPs.

  19. Metallofoldamers supramolecular architectures from helicates to biomimetics

    CERN Document Server

    Maayan, Galia

    2013-01-01

    Metallofoldamers are oligomers that fold into three-dimensional structures in a controlled manner upon coordination with metal ions. Molecules in this class have shown an impressive ability to form single-handed helical structures and other three-dimensional architectures. Several metallofoldamers have been applied as sensors due to their selective folding when binding to a specific metal ion, while others show promise for applications as responsive materials on the basis of their ability to fold and unfold upon changes in the oxidation state of the coordinated metal ion, and as novel catalysts. Metallofoldamers: From Helicates to Biomimetic Architectures describes the variety of interactions between oligomers and metal species, with a focus on non-natural synthetic molecules. Topics covered include: the major classes of foldamers and their folding driving force metalloproteins and metalloenzymes helicates: self-assembly, structure and applications abiotic metallo-DNA metallo-PNA and iDNA metallopeptides inte...

  20. Trefoil knot timescales for reconnection and helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional images of evolving numerical trefoil vortex knots are used to study the growth and decay of the enstrophy and helicity. Negative helicity density (hpreserved through the first reconnection, as suggested theoretically (Laing et al 2015 Sci. Rep. 5 9224) and observed experimentally (Scheeler et al 2014a Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 111 15350–5). Next, to maintain the growth of the enstrophy and positive helicity within the trefoil while { H } is preserved, hgood correspondence between the evolution of the simulated vortices and the reconnecting experimental trefoil of Kleckner and Irvine (2017 Nat. Phys. 9 253–8) when time is scaled by their respective nonlinear timescales t f . The timescales t f are based upon by the radii r f of the trefoils and their circulations Γ, so long as the strong camber of the experimental hydrofoil models is used to correct the published experimental circulations Γ that use only the flat-plate approximation.

  1. Primary structure and conformational analysis of peptide methionine-tyrosine, a peptide related to neuropeptide Y and peptide YY isolated from lamprey intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conlon, J M; Bjørnholm, B; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1991-01-01

    A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Asp-Asn-......A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met......%) or with pig pancreatic polypeptide (42%). Molecular modelling and dynamic simulation, based upon sequence similarity with turkey pancreatic polypeptide, indicates that the conformations of the polyproline-helix-like region (residues 1-8) and the alpha-helical region (residues 15-30) in turkey pancreatic...... polypeptide are conserved in peptide methionine-tyrosine, and that non-bonded interactions between these domains have preserved the overall polypeptide fold in the molecule. The substitution of the otherwise totally conserved Gly9 residue by serine in lamprey peptide methionine-tyrosine, however, results...

  2. Role of Charge and Solvation in the Structure and Dynamics of Alanine-Rich Peptide AKA2 in AOT Reverse Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Anna Victoria; Małolepsza, Edyta; Domínguez, Laura; Lu, Qing; Straub, John E

    2015-07-23

    The propensity of peptides to form α-helices has been intensely studied using theory, computation, and experiment. Important model peptides for the study of the coil-to-helix transition have been alanine-lysine (AKA) peptides in which the lysine residues are placed on opposite sides of the helix avoiding charge repulsion while enhancing solubility. In this study, the effects of capped versus zwitterionic peptide termini on the secondary structure of alanine-rich peptides in reverse micelles are explored. The reverse micelles are found to undergo substantial shape fluctuations, a property observed in previous studies of AOT reverse micelles in the absence of solvated peptide. The peptides are observed to interact with water, as well as the AOT surfactant, including interactions between the nonpolar residues and the aliphatic surfactant tails. Computation of IR spectra for the amide I band of the peptide allows for direct comparison with experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that capped AKA2 peptides form more stable α helices than zwitterionic AKA2 peptides in reverse micelles. The rotational anisotropy decay of water is found to be distinctly different in the presence or absence of peptide within the reverse micelle, suggesting that the introduction of peptide significantly alters the number of free waters within the reverse micelle nanopool. However, neither the nature of the peptide termini (capped or charged) nor the degree of peptide helicity is found to significantly alter the balance of interactions between the peptides and the environment. Observed changes in the degree of helicity in AKA2 peptides in bulk solution and in reverse micelle environments result from changes in peptide confinement and hydration as well as direct nonpolar and polar interactions with the water-surfactant interface.

  3. Kinetics of Peptide Folding in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Smith-Dupont, Kathryn B.; Markiewicz, Beatrice N.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive understanding of water-soluble protein folding kinetics, much less is known about the folding dynamics and mechanisms of membrane proteins. However, recent studies have shown that for relatively simple systems, such as peptides that form a transmembrane α-helix, helical dimer, or helix-turn-helix, it is possible to assess the kinetics of several important steps, including peptide binding to the membrane from aqueous solution, peptide folding on the membrane surface, helix insertion into the membrane, and helix-helix association inside the membrane. Herein, we provide a brief review of these studies and also suggest new initiation and probing methods that could lead to improved temporal and structural resolution in future experiments. PMID:25808575

  4. The Source of Helicity in Perfluorinated N-Alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Seung Soon; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William A.; Caldwell, Gregg; Ross, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    The well-known helical conformations of double stranded DNA and poly(alanine) are stabilized by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, respectively. Perfluorinated n-alkanes also exhibit stable helical conformations, with ordered chiralities at low temperatures. In the absence of hydrogen bonds, one may ask what forces stabilize perfluorinated n-alkane helices. We combine ab initio and empirical data to study the likely classical source of this helical behavior. Past studies point to bad s...

  5. Review of the helicity formalism; Revision del formalismo de helicidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, F.; Cerrada, M.; Fernandez, E.

    1972-07-01

    Our purpose in these notes has been to present a brief and general review of the helicity formalism. We begin by discussing Lorentz invariance, spin and helicity ideas, in section 1 . In section 2 we deal with the construction of relativistic states and scattering amplitudes in the helicity basis and we study their transformation properties under discrete symmetries. Finally we present some more sophisticated topics like kinematical singularities of helicity amplitudes, kinematical constraints and crossing relations 3, 4, 5 respectively. (Author) 8 refs.

  6. Artificial, parallel, left-handed DNA helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan; Li, Xiang; Li, Yingmei; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2012-12-19

    This communication reports an engineered DNA architecture. It contains multiple domains of half-turn-long, standard B-DNA duplexes. While each helical domain is right-handed and its two component strands are antiparallel, the global architecture is left-handed and the two component DNA strands are oriented parallel to each other.

  7. Helical chirality induction of expanded porphyrin analogues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Helical porphyrin analogues. 1163. References. 1. (a) Jasat A and Dolphin A 1997 Chem. Rev. 97 2267;. (b) Sessler J L, Gebauer A and Weghorn S J 2000 in The porphyrin handbook, vol. 2, K M Kadish, K M Smith,. R Guilard (eds) (San Diego: Academic Press) pp55;. (c) Sessler J L and Seidel D 2003 Angew. Chem. Int.

  8. Fermion Helicity Flip Induced by Torsion Field

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; Iovane, G.; Lambiase, G.; Stornaiolo, C.

    1999-01-01

    We show that in theories of gravitation with torsion the helicity of fermion particles is not conserved and we calculate the probability of spin flip, which is related to the anti-symmetric part of affine connection. Some cosmological consequences are discussed.

  9. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  10. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  11. Numerical modelling of pullout of helical soil nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Rawat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the pullout response of helical soil nail using finite element subroutine Plaxis 2D is presented. The numerical modelling of actual pullout response is achieved by axisymmetric and horizontal loading condition. The effect of varying number of helical plates, helical plate spacing and helical plate diameter is studied to understand the pullout capacity behaviour. The failure surfaces for various helical soil nail configurations and their pullout mechanisms are also analysed and discussed. The pullout capacity is found to increase with increase in number of helical plates. The helical plate spacing ratio (s/Dh and diameter ratio (Dh/Ds are found to increase the pullout only up to a critical value. The response of helical soil nail using axisymmetric finite element simulation is found similar to the uplift behaviour of helical piles and helical soil anchors. In the absence of literature regarding numerical modelling of helical soil nail, simulation results are validated with uplift responses of helical piles and soil anchors. A good agreement in their comparative study for pullout response is also observed.

  12. Modeling of high gain helical antenna for improved performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modeling of High Gain Helical Antenna structure is subdivided into three sections : introduction of helical structures ,Numerical analysis, modeling and simulation based on the parameters of helical antenna. The basic foundation software for the research paper is Matlab technical computing software, the modeling were ...

  13. Observation of glycine zipper and unanticipated occurrence of ambidextrous helices in the crystal structure of a chiral undecapeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramagopal Udupi A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The de novo design of peptides and proteins has recently surfaced as an approach for investigating protein structure and function. This approach vitally tests our knowledge of protein folding and function, while also laying the groundwork for the fabrication of proteins with properties not precedented in nature. The success of these studies relies heavily on the ability to design relatively short peptides that can espouse stable secondary structures. To this end, substitution with α, β-dehydroamino acids, especially α, β-dehydrophenylalanine (ΔPhe comes in use for spawning well-defined structural motifs. Introduction of ΔPhe induces β-bends in small and 310-helices in longer peptide sequences. Results The present report is an investigation of the effect of incorporating two glycines in the middle of a ΔPhe containing undecapeptide. A de novo designed undecapeptide, Ac-Gly1-Ala2-ΔPhe3-Leu4-Gly5-ΔPhe6-Leu7-Gly8-ΔPhe9-Ala10-Gly11-NH2, was synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Circular Dichroism spectroscopic methods. Crystallographic studies suggest that, despite the presence of L-amino acid (L-Ala and L-Leu residues in the middle of the sequence, the peptide adopts a 310-helical conformation of ambidextrous screw sense, one of them a left-handed (A and the other a right-handed (B 310-helix with A and B being antiparallel to each other. However, CD studies reveal that the undecapeptide exclusively adopts a right-handed 310-helical conformation. In the crystal packing, three different interhelical interfaces, Leu-Leu, Gly-Gly and ΔPhe-ΔPhe are observed between the helices A and B. A network of C-H...O hydrogen bonds are observed at ΔPhe-ΔPhe and Gly-Gly interhelical interfaces. An important feature observed is the occurrence of glycine zipper motif at Gly-Gly interface. At this interface, the geometric pattern of interhelical interactions seems to resemble those observed between helices in

  14. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding derivatives of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide BP100: impact on rice host plant fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Nadal Anna; Montero Maria; Company Nuri; Badosa Esther; Messeguer Joaquima; Montesinos Laura; Montesinos Emilio; Pla Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Biopeptide BP100 is a synthetic and strongly cationic α-helical undecapeptide with high, specific antibacterial activity against economically important plant-pathogenic bacteria, and very low toxicity. It was selected from a library of synthetic peptides, along with other peptides with activities against relevant bacterial and fungal species. Expression of the BP100 series of peptides in plants is of major interest to establish disease-resistant plants and facilitate m...

  15. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  16. Time-Mean Helicity Distribution in Turbulent Swirling Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicity offers an alternative approach to investigations of the structure of turbulent flows. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of the time-mean component of helicity is the starting point. Yet very little is known even about basic cases in which Helicity plays important role, such as the case of a swirling jet. This is the subject of the present investigations, based mainly on numerical flowfield computations. The region of significantly large time-mean helicity density is found only in a rather small region reaching to several nozzle diameters downstream from the exit. The most important result is the similarity of the helicity density profiles. 

  17. α-Helix peptides designed from EBV-gH protein display higher antigenicity and induction of monocyte apoptosis than the native peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Guevara, Tatiana; Echeverria, Ignacia; Rodriguez, Isabel C.; Vanegas, Magnolia; Amzel, Mario; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that stabilizing α-helix of Epstein–Barr virus gH-derived peptide 11438 used for binding human cells will increase its biological activity. Non-stable α-helix of peptide 11438 was unfolded in an entropy-driven process, despite the opposing effect of the enthalpy factor. Adding and/or changing amino acids in peptide 11438 allowed the designing of peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210; peptides 33208 and 33210 displayed higher helical content due to a decreased unfolding entropy change as was determined by AGADIR, molecular dynamics and circular dichroism analysis. Peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210 inhibited EBV invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and displayed epitopes more similar to native protein than peptide 11438; these peptides could be useful for detecting antibodies induced by native gH protein since they displayed high reactivity with anti-EBV antibodies. Anti-peptide 33207 antibodies showed higher reactivity with EBV than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies being useful for inducing antibodies against EBV. Anti-peptide 33210 antibodies inhibit EBV invasion of epithelial cells better than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies. Peptide 33210 bound to normal T lymphocytes and Raji cells stronger than peptide 11438 and also induced apoptosis of monocytes and Raji cells but not of normal T cells in a similar way to EBV-gH. Peptide 33210 inhibited the monocytes’ development toward dendritic cells better than EBV and peptide 11438. In conclusion, stabilizing the α-helix in peptides 33208 and 33210 designed from peptide 11438 increased the antigenicity and the ability of the antibodies induced by peptides of inhibiting EBV invasion of host cells. PMID:20473772

  18. α-Helix peptides designed from EBV-gH protein display higher antigenicity and induction of monocyte apoptosis than the native peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Guevara, Tatiana; Echeverria, Ignacia; Rodriguez, Isabel C; Vanegas, Magnolia; Amzel, Mario; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2010-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that stabilizing α-helix of Epstein-Barr virus gH-derived peptide 11438 used for binding human cells will increase its biological activity. Non-stable α-helix of peptide 11438 was unfolded in an entropy-driven process, despite the opposing effect of the enthalpy factor. Adding and/or changing amino acids in peptide 11438 allowed the designing of peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210; peptides 33208 and 33210 displayed higher helical content due to a decreased unfolding entropy change as was determined by AGADIR, molecular dynamics and circular dichroism analysis. Peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210 inhibited EBV invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and displayed epitopes more similar to native protein than peptide 11438; these peptides could be useful for detecting antibodies induced by native gH protein since they displayed high reactivity with anti-EBV antibodies. Anti-peptide 33207 antibodies showed higher reactivity with EBV than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies being useful for inducing antibodies against EBV. Anti-peptide 33210 antibodies inhibit EBV invasion of epithelial cells better than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies. Peptide 33210 bound to normal T lymphocytes and Raji cells stronger than peptide 11438 and also induced apoptosis of monocytes and Raji cells but not of normal T cells in a similar way to EBV-gH. Peptide 33210 inhibited the monocytes' development toward dendritic cells better than EBV and peptide 11438. In conclusion, stabilizing the α-helix in peptides 33208 and 33210 designed from peptide 11438 increased the antigenicity and the ability of the antibodies induced by peptides of inhibiting EBV invasion of host cells.

  19. Optically pure, water-stable metallo-helical ‘flexicate’ assemblies with antibiotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Suzanne E.; Bolhuis, Albert; Brabec, Viktor; Clarkson, Guy J.; Malina, Jaroslav; Rodger, Alison; Scott, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The helicates—chiral assemblies of two or more metal atoms linked by short or relatively rigid multidentate organic ligands—may be regarded as non-peptide mimetics of α-helices because they are of comparable size and have shown some relevant biological activity. Unfortunately, these beautiful helical compounds have remained difficult to use in the medicinal arena because they contain mixtures of isomers, cannot be optimized for specific purposes, are insoluble, or are too difficult to synthesize. Instead, we have now prepared thermodynamically stable single enantiomers of monometallic units connected by organic linkers. Our highly adaptable self-assembly approach enables the rapid preparation of ranges of water-stable, helicate-like compounds with high stereochemical purity. One such iron(II) ‘flexicate’ system exhibits specific interactions with DNA, promising antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA252), but also, unusually, a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli, MC4100), as well as low toxicity towards a non-mammalian model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans).

  20. Weyl spinors and the helicity formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Cruz, J Lorenzo; Meza-Aldama, O; Perez, Jonathan Reyes

    2015-01-01

    In this work we give a review of the original formulation of the relativistic wave equation for particles with spin one-half. Traditionally \\`a la Dirac, it's proposed that the ``square root'' of the Klein-Gordon (K-G) equation involves a 4 component (Dirac) spinor and in the non-relativistic limit it can be written as 2 equations for two 2 component spinors. On the other hand, there exists Weyl's formalism, in which one works from the beginning with 2 component Weyl spinors, which are the fundamental objects of the helicity formalism. In this work we rederive Weyl's equations directly, starting from K-G equation. We also obtain the electromagnetic interaction through minimal coupling and we get the interaction with the magnetic moment. As an example of the use of that formalism, we calculate Compton scattering using the helicity methods.

  1. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  2. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  3. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  4. Laser modes with helical wave fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.; Hill, C. A.; Tapster, P. R.; Vaughan, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    We report the operation of an argon-ion laser in pure (single-frequency) ``doughnut'' modes of order m=1, 2, and 3. The phase discontinuity at the center of these modes leads to striking two-beam interference patterns that clearly demonstrate the existence of a helical cophasal surface (wave front). The doughnut mode with m=1 (usually called TEM*01) displays a forking interference fringe pattern characteristic of a pure single helix. The m=2 mode shows a pattern with four extra prongs, establishing that the cophasal surface is a two-start or double helix; the m=3 mode is a triple helix with a six-extra-pronged pattern. Each pure doughnut mode is shown to have two possible states corresponding to output wave fronts of opposite helicity.

  5. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  6. Studies on mechanism of action of anticancer peptides by modulation of hydrophobicity within a defined structural framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Bing; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Hong-Ye; Liu, Yu; Chen, Yuxin

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, the hydrophobicity of a 26-residue α-helical peptide (peptide P) was altered to study the effects of peptide hydrophobicity on the mechanism of action of cationic anticancer peptides. Hydrophobicity of the nonpolar face of the peptides was shown to correlate with peptide helicity. The self-association ability of peptides in aqueous environment, determined by the reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography temperature profiling, showed strong influence on anticancer activity. The peptide analogues with greater hydrophobicity showed stronger anticancer activity determined by IC(50) values with a necrotic-like membrane disruption mechanism. Peptide analogues exhibited high specificity against cancer cells and much higher anticancer activity than widely-used anticancer chemical drugs. The mechanism of action of anticancer peptides was also investigated. The hydrophobicity of peptides plays a crucial role in the mechanism of action against cancer cells, which could present a way, using a de novo design approach, to create anticancer peptides as potential therapeutics in clinical practices. ©2011 AACR.

  7. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We develop a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along non-convex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implement the...

  8. Anion Recognition by Aliphatic Helical Oligoureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Vincent; Fischer, Lucile; Kauffmann, Brice; Guichard, Gilles

    2016-10-24

    Anion binding properties of neutral helical foldamers consisting of urea type units in their backbone have been investigated. (1) H NMR titration studies in various organic solvents including DMSO suggest that the interaction between aliphatic oligoureas and anions (CH3 COO(-) , H2 PO4(-) , Cl(-) ) is site-specific, as it largely involves the urea NHs located at the terminal end of the helix (positive pole of the helix), which do not participate to the helical intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network. This mode of binding parallels that found in proteins in which anion-binding sites are frequently found at the N-terminus of an α-helix. (1) H NMR studies suggest that the helix of oligoureas remains largely folded upon anion binding, even in the presence of a large excess of the anion. This study points to potentially useful applications of oligourea helices for the selective recognition of small guest molecules. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Propulsion of microorganisms by a helical flagellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenborn, Bruce; Chen, Chih-Hung; Swinney, Harry L; Liu, Bin; Zhang, H P

    2013-01-29

    The swimming of a bacterium or a biomimetic nanobot driven by a rotating helical flagellum is often interpreted using the resistive force theory developed by Gray and Hancock and by Lighthill, but this theory has not been tested for a range of physically relevant parameters. We test resistive force theory in experiments on macroscopic swimmers in a fluid that is highly viscous so the Reynolds number is small compared to unity, just as for swimming microorganisms. The measurements are made for the range of helical wavelengths λ, radii R, and lengths L relevant to bacterial flagella. The experiments determine thrust, torque, and drag, thus providing a complete description of swimming driven by a rotating helix at low Reynolds number. Complementary numerical simulations are conducted using the resistive force theories, the slender body theories of Lighthill and Johnson, and the regularized Stokeslet method. The experimental results differ qualitatively and quantitatively from the predictions of resistive force theory. The difference is especially large for and/or , parameter ranges common for bacteria. In contrast, the predictions of Stokeslet and slender body analyses agree with the laboratory measurements within the experimental uncertainty (a few percent) for all λ, R, and L. We present code implementing the slender body, regularized Stokeslet, and resistive force theories; thus readers can readily compute force, torque, and drag for any bacterium or nanobot driven by a rotating helical flagellum.

  10. Superconducting Helical Snake Magnet for the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Willen, Erich; Escallier, John; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Jain, Animesh K; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Marone, Andrew; Muratore, Joseph F; Okamura, Masahiro; Plate, Stephen R; Roser, Thomas; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wanderer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This "partial Snake" magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that t...

  11. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION FOR THE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN HELICAL CONE COILS OVER ORDINARY HELICAL COILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. ABO ELAZM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This numerical research is introducing the concept of helical cone coils and their enhanced heat transfer characteristics compared to the ordinary helical coils. Helical and spiral coils are known to have better heat and mass transfer than straight tubes, which is attributed to the generation of a vortex at the helical coil known as Dean Vortex. The Dean number which is a dimensionless number used to describe the Dean vortex is a function of Reynolds number and the square root of the curvature ratio, so varying the curvature ratio for the same coil would vary the Dean number. Two scenarios were adopted to study the effect of changing the taper angle (curvature ratio on the heat transfer characteristics of the coil; the commercial software FLUENT was used in the investigation. It was found that Nusselt number increased with increasing the taper angle. A MATLAB code was built based on empirical correlation of Manlapaz and Churchill for ordinary helical coils to calculate the Nusselt number at each coil turn, and then calculate the average Nusselt number for the entire coil turns, the CFD simulation results were found acceptable when compared with the MATLAB results.

  12. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity Parameters and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    The hemispheric preference for negative/positive helicity to occur in the northern/southern solar hemisphere provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. Previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulence. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning 2006-2013, we studied the effects of two spatial smoothing tests that imitate atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We studied in detail the effects of atmospheric seeing on the helicity distributions across various field strengths for active regions (ARs) NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, in addition to studying the average helicities of 179 ARs with and without smoothing. We found that, rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, spatial smoothing modified existing trends by reducing random noise and by regressing outliers toward the mean, or removing them altogether. Furthermore, the average helicity parameter values of the 179 ARs did not conform to the hemisphere rule: independent of smoothing, the weak-vertical-field values tended to be negative in both hemispheres, and the strong-vertical-field values tended to be positive, especially in the south. We conclude that spatial smoothing does not significantly affect the overall statistics for space-based data, and thus seeing from atmospheric turbulence seems not to have significantly affected previous studies’ ground-based results on the hemisphere rule.

  13. Hydrodynamic studies of CNT nanofluids in helical coil heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babita; Sharma, S. K.; Mital Gupta, Shipra; Kumar, Arinjay

    2017-12-01

    Helical coils are extensively used in several industrial processes such as refrigeration systems, chemical reactors, recovery processes etc to accommodate a large heat transfer area within a smaller space. Nanofluids are getting great attention due to their enhanced heat transfer capability. In heat transfer equipments, pressure drop is one of the major factors of consideration for pumping power calculations. So, the present work is aimed to study hydrodynamics of CNT nanofluids in helical coils. In this study, pressure drop characteristics of CNT nanofluid flowing inside horizontal helical coils are investigated experimentally. The helical coil to tube diameter was varied from 11.71 to 27.34 keeping pitch of the helical coil constant. Double distilled water was used as basefluid. SDBS and GA surfactants were added to stablilize CNT nanofluids. The volumetric fraction of CNT nanofluid was varied from 0.003 vol% to 0.051 vol%. From the experimental data, it was analyzed that the friction factor in helical coils is greater than that of straight tubes. Concentration of CNT in nanofluids also has a significant influence on the pressure drop/friction factor of helical coils. At a constant concentration of CNT, decreasing helical coil to tube diameter from 27.24 to 11.71, fanning friction factor of helical coil; f c increases for a constant value of p/d t. This increase in the value of fanning friction factor can be attributed to the secondary flow of CNT nanofluid in helical coils.

  14. Magnetic helicity balance at Taylor relaxed states sustained by AC helicity injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Makoto; Morrison, Philip J.; Horton, Wendell; Hattori, Yuji

    2017-10-01

    Magnitudes of Taylor relaxed states that are sustained by AC magnetic helicity injection (also known as oscillating field current drive, OFCD) are investigated numerically in a cylindrical geometry. Compared with the amplitude of the oscillating magnetic field at the skin layer (which is normalized to 1), the strength of the axial guide field Bz 0 is shown to be an important parameter. The relaxation process seems to be active only when Bz 0 Neill et al., where the helicity injection rate is directly equated with the dissipation rate at the Taylor states. Then, the bifurcation to the helical Taylor state is predicted theoretically and the estimated magnitudes of the relaxed states reasonably agree with numerical results as far as Bz 0 < 1 . This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K05627.

  15. Nonequilibrium transport between helical Luttinger liquids leads or helical Majorana modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Sung Po; Silotri, Salman; Chung, Chung Hou

    2014-03-01

    We study a steady state non-equilibrium transport between (i) two interacting helical edge states of a two dimensional topological insulator, described by helical Luttinger liquids, through a quantum dot or tunneling junction. (ii) one Luttinger liquids lead and a helical Majorana modes lead connected by tunneling junction(s). We find the metal-to-insulator quantum phase transition for attractive or repulsive interactions in the leads when the magnitude of the interaction strength characterized by a charge sector Luttinger parameter goes beyond a critical value. The authors acknowledge NSC grant No.101-2628-M-009-001-MY3, the MOE-ATU program, the CTS of NCTU, the NCTS and NTHU of Taiwan, R.O.C.

  16. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  17. Peptide amphiphile self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscen, Aysenur; Schatz, George C.

    2017-08-01

    Self-assembly is a process whereby molecules organize into structures with hierarchical order and complexity, often leading to functional materials. Biomolecules such as peptides, lipids and DNA are frequently involved in self-assembly, and this leads to materials of interest for a wide variety of applications in biomedicine, photonics, electronics, mechanics, etc. The diversity of structures and functions that can be produced provides motivation for developing theoretical models that can be used for a molecular-level description of these materials. Here we overview recently developed computational methods for modeling the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PA) into supramolecular structures that form cylindrical nanoscale fibers using molecular-dynamics simulations. Both all-atom and coarse-grained force field methods are described, and we emphasize how these calculations contribute insight into fiber structure, including the importance of β-sheet formation. We show that the temperature at which self-assembly takes place affects the conformations of PA chains, resulting in cylindrical nanofibers with higher β-sheet content as temperature increases. We also present a new high-density PA model that shows long network formation of β-sheets along the long axis of the fiber, a result that correlates with some experiments. The β-sheet network is mostly helical in nature which helps to maintain strong interactions between the PAs both radially and longitudinally. Contribution to Focus Issue Self-assemblies of Inorganic and Organic Nanomaterials edited by Marie-Paule Pileni.

  18. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-07

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  19. A proline-hinge alters the characteristics of the amphipathic α-helical AMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Kook; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Park, Seong-Cheol; Ko, Hyun Sook; Kim, Yangmee; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2013-01-01

    HP (2-20) is a 19-aa, amphipathic, α-helical peptide with antimicrobial properties that was derived from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1. We previously showed that increasing the net hydrophobicity of HP (2-20) by substituting Trp for Gln(17) and Asp(19) (Anal 3) increased the peptide's antimicrobial activity. In hydrophobic medium, Anal 3 forms an amphipathic structure consisting of an N-terminal random coil region (residues 2-5) and an extended helical region (residues 6-20). To investigate the structure-activity relationship of Anal 3, we substituted Pro for Glu(9) (Anal 3-Pro) and then examined the new peptide's three-dimensional structure, antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action. Anal 3-Pro had an α-helical structure in the presence of trifluoroethanol (TFE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). NMR spectroscopic analysis of Anal 3-Pro's tertiary structure in SDS micelles confirmed that the kink potential introduced by Pro(10) was responsible for the helix distortion. We also found that Anal 3-Pro exhibited about 4 times greater antimicrobial activity than Anal 3. Fluorescence activated flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that incorporating a Pro-hinge into Anal 3 markedly reduced its membrane permeability so that it accumulated in the cytoplasm without remaining in the cell membrane. To investigate the translocation mechanism, we assessed its ability to release of FITC-dextran. The result showed Anal 3-Pro created a pore <1.8 nm in diameter, which is similar to buforin II. Notably, scanning electron microscopic observation of Candida albicans revealed that Anal 3-Pro and buforin II exert similar effects on cell membranes, whereas magainin 2 exerts a different, more damaging, effect. In addition, Anal 3-Pro assumed a helix-hinge-helix structure in the presence of biological membranes and formed micropores in both bacterial and fungal membranes, through which it entered the cytoplasm and tightly bound to

  20. Effects of glycosylated (2S,4R)-hydroxyproline on the stability and assembly of collagen triple helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei-Wen; Chang, Juyn-Ming; Horng, Jia-Cherng

    2016-12-01

    Functionalized collagen-mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been widely used in the preparation of collagen-related biomaterials. Among the reported results, the induced noncovalent interactions between the implanted functional groups or moieties were frequently the key elements to promote the self-assembly of small CMPs. In this work, we designed and synthesized a series of glycosylated CMPs in which 4-O-[β-D-galactopyranosyl]-(2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp(Gal)) was incorporated to explore the effects of glycosylation on the stability and assembly of collagen triple helices. Circular dichroism measurements showed that glycosylation of hydroxyproline slightly destabilized the collagen triple helices, but did not reduce their refolding rate. Compared to non-glycosylated CMPs, the incorporation of Hyp(Gal) speeded up the assembly of CMPs, indicating that this modification could assist the self-assembly of CMPs into higher-order structures, such as fibrils. O-Galactosylation of hydroxyproline imposes contrary effects on the triple helix stability and the self-assembly rate of collagen triple helices, exhibiting a piece of important and useful information for designing collagen-related biomaterials. Our finding also suggests that instead of stabilizing the triple helical conformation of CMPs, installing additional forces between CMPs could be a crucial factor to promote the assembly of CMPs into large-scale constructs.

  1. Downsizing Proto-oncogene cFos to Short Helix-Constrained Peptides That Bind Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Daniel; Perry, Samuel R; Hill, Timothy A; Kok, W Mei; Zaccai, Nathan R; Brady, R Leo; Fairlie, David P; Mason, Jody M

    2017-08-18

    The oncogenic transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) is a DNA-binding protein that assembles through dimerization of Fos and Jun protein subunits, their leucine-rich helical sequences entwining into a coiled-coil structure. This study reports on downsizing the proto-oncogene cFos protein (380 residues) to shorter peptides (37-25 residues) modified with helix-inducing constraints to enhance binding to Jun. A crystal structure is reported for a 37-residue Fos-derived peptide (FosW) bound to Jun. This guided iterative downsizing of FosW to shorter peptide sequences that were constrained into stable water-soluble α-helices by connecting amino acid side chains to form cyclic pentapeptide components. Structural integrity in the presence and absence of Jun was assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy, while the thermodynamics of binding to cFos was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. A 25-residue constrained peptide, one-third shorter yet 25% more helical than the structurally characterized 37-residue Fos-derived peptide, retained 80% of the binding free energy as a result of preorganization in a Jun-binding helix conformation, with the entropy gain (TΔS = +3.2 kcal/mol) compensating for the enthalpy loss. Attaching a cell-penetrating peptide (TAT48-57) and a nuclear localization signal (SV40) promoted cell uptake, localization to the nucleus, and inhibition of the proliferation of two breast cancer cell lines.

  2. One pathogen two stones: are Australian tree frog antimicrobial peptides synergistic against human pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Carne, Siobhan; Overall, Sarah A; Poulhazan, Alexandre; Separovic, Frances

    2017-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) may act by targeting the lipid membranes and disrupting the bilayer structure. In this study, three AMPs from the skin of Australian tree frogs, aurein 1.2, maculatin 1.1 and caerin 1.1, were investigated against Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and vesicles that mimic their lipid compositions. Furthermore, equimolar mixtures of the peptides were tested to identify any synergistic interactions in antimicrobial activity. Minimum inhibition concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration assays showed significant activity against S. aureus but not against E. coli. Aurein was the least active while maculatin was the most active peptide and some synergistic effects were observed against S. aureus. Circular dichroism experiments showed that, in the presence of phospholipid vesicles, the peptides transitioned from an unstructured to a predominantly helical conformation (>50%), with greater helicity for POPG/TOCL compared to POPE/POPG vesicles. The helical content, however, was less in the presence of live E. coli and S. aureus, 25 and 5%, respectively. Equimolar concentrations of the peptides did not appear to form greater supramolecular structures. Dye release assays showed that aurein required greater concentration than caerin and maculatin to disrupt the lipid bilayers, and mixtures of the peptides did not cooperate to enhance their lytic activity. Overall, aurein, maculatin, and caerin showed moderate synergy in antimicrobial activity against S. aureus without becoming more structured or enhancement of their membrane-disrupting activity in phospholipid vesicles.

  3. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...... to peptide transporters, as well as their role in drug delivery and in potential future drug design and targeted tissue delivery of peptides and peptidomimetics....

  4. Interferometric measurement of the helical mode of a single photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, E J; Coyle, L E; Johnson, E; Reschovsky, B J, E-mail: egalvez@colgate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    We present measurements of the helical mode of single photons and do so by sending heralded photons through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that prepares the light in a helical mode with topological charge one, and interferes it with itself in the fundamental non-helical mode. Masks placed after the interferometer were used to diagnose the amplitude and phase of the mode of the light. Auxiliary measurements verified that the light was in a non-classical state. The results are in good agreement with theory. The experiments demonstrate in a direct way that single photons carry the entire spatial helical-mode information.

  5. Transmembrane helices can induce domain formation in crowded model membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Domański, Jan; Marrink, Siewert J; Schäfer, Lars V

    2012-01-01

    We studied compositionally heterogeneous multi-component model membranes comprised of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and a-helical TM protein models using coarse-grained molecular...

  6. Inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar angular-momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2017-04-01

    Coupled with mean absolute vorticity Ω∗ (rotation and mean relative vorticity), inhomogeneous turbulent helicity is expected to contribute to the generation of global flow structure against the linear and angular momentum mixing due to turbulent or eddy viscosity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect was originally derived in Yokoi & Yoshizawa (1993) [1], and recently has been validated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of rotating helical turbulence [2]. Turbulence effect enters the mean-vorticity equation through the turbulent vortexmotive force ⟨u'×ω'⟩ [u': velocity fluctuation, ω'(= ∇× u'): vorticity fluctuation], which is the vorticity counterpart of the electromotive force ⟨u'× b'⟩ (b': magnetic fluctuation) in the mean magnetic-field induction. The mean velocity induction δU is proportional to the vortexmotive force. According to the theoretical result [1,2], it is expressed as δU = -νT∇×Ω∗-ηT(∇2H)Ω∗, where ηT is the transport coefficient, H = ⟨u'ṡω'⟩ the turbulent helicity, and Ω∗ the mean absolute vorticity. The first term corresponds to the enhanced diffusion due to turbulent viscosity νT. The second term expresses the large-scale flow generation due to inhomogeneous helicity. Since helicity is self-generated in rotating stratified turbulence [3], an inhomogeneous helicity distribution is expected to exist in the solar convection zone. A rising flow with expansion near the surface of the Sun generates a strongly negative helicity there [4]. This spatial distribution of helicity would lead to a positive Laplacian of turbulent helicity (∇2H > 0) in the subsurface layer of the Sun. In the combination with the large-scale vorticity associated with the meridional circulation, the inhomogeneous helicity effect works for accelerating the mean velocity in the azimuthal direction. The relevance of this inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar convection zone is discussed further. References [1] Yokoi, N. and

  7. The formation of helical mesoporous silica nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Xiaobing; Pei Xianfeng; Zhao Huanyu; Chen Yuanli; Guo Yongmin; Li Baozong; Yang Yonggang [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Suzhou (Soochow) University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hanabusa, Kenji [Department of Functional Polymer Science, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan)], E-mail: ygyang@suda.edu.cn

    2008-08-06

    Three chiral cationic gelators were synthesized. They can form translucent hydrogels in pure water. These hydrogels become highly viscous liquids under strong stirring. Mesoporous silica nanotubes with coiled pore channels in the walls were prepared using the self-assemblies of these gelators as templates. The mechanism of the formation of this hierarchical nanostructure was studied using transmission electron microscopy at different reaction times. The results indicated that there are some interactions between the silica source and the gelator. The morphologies of the self-assemblies of gelators changed gradually during the sol-gel transcription process. It seems that the silica source directed the organic self-assemblies into helical nanostructures.

  8. Helical CT findings in mesenteric ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Won Jae; Choi, Sang Hee; Lee, Soon Jin; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Kyung Ah; Lee, Yon Ok [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine. Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    Ischemic bowel disease is one of the common causes of acute abdomen, which results from insufficient blood flow to the small bowel and colon caused by arterial or venous occlusion or mesenteric vasoconstriction. Early diagnosis by clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings is often difficult and delay in adequate therapy results in substantial morbidity and mortality. CT is known to be useful for the evaluation of patients with suspected bowel ischemia or infarction. This study describes the spectrum of helical CT findings in acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia due to various causes, and explains the value of CT findings for specific diagnosis.

  9. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  10. Specific Amyloid Binding of Polybasic Peptides In Vivo Is Retained by β-Sheet Conformers but Lost in the Disrupted Coil and All D-Amino Acid Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Jonathan S; Williams, Angela; Richey, Tina; Stuckey, Alan; Wooliver, Craig; Christopher Scott, J; Donnell, Robert; Martin, Emily B; Kennel, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    The heparin-reactive, helical peptide p5 is an effective amyloid imaging agent in mice with systemic amyloidosis. Analogs of p5 with modified secondary structure characteristics exhibited altered binding to heparin, synthetic amyloid fibrils, and amyloid extracts in vitro. Herein, we further study the effects of peptide helicity and chirality on specific amyloid binding using a mouse model of systemic inflammation-associated (AA) amyloidosis. Peptides with disrupted helical structure [p5(coil) and p5(Pro3)], with an extended sheet conformation [p5(sheet)] or an all-D enantiomer [p5(D)], were chemically synthesized, radioiodinated, and their biodistribution studied in WT mice as well as transgenic animals with severe systemic AA amyloidosis. Peptide binding was assessed qualitatively by using small animal single-photon emission computed tomography/x-ray computed tomography imaging and microautoradiography and quantitatively using tissue counting. Peptides with reduced helical propensity, p5(coil) and p5(Pro3), exhibited significantly reduced binding to AA amyloid-laden organs. In contrast, peptide p5(D) was retained by non-amyloid-related ligands in the liver and kidneys of both WT and AA mice, but it also bound AA amyloid in the spleen. The p5(sheet) peptide specifically bound AA amyloid in vivo and was not retained by healthy tissues in WT animals. Modification of amyloid-targeting peptides using D-amino acids should be performed cautiously due to the introduction of unexpected secondary pharmacologic effects. Peptides that adopt a helical structure, to align charged amino acid side chains along one face, exhibit specific reactivity with amyloid; however, polybasic peptides with a propensity for β-sheet conformation are also amyloid-reactive and may yield a novel class of amyloid-targeting agents for imaging and therapy.

  11. Analytical tools for solitons and periodic waves corresponding to phonons on Lennard-Jones lattices in helical proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'ovidio, Francesco; Bohr, Henrik; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2005-01-01

    We study the propagation of solitons along the hydrogen bonds of an alpha helix. Modeling the hydrogen and peptide bonds with Lennard-Jones potentials, we show that the solitons can appear spontaneously and have long lifetimes. Remarkably, even if no explicit solution is known for the Lennard......-Jones potential, the solitons can be characterized analytically with a good quantitative agreement using formulas for a Toda potential with parameters fitted to the Lennard-Jones potential. We also discuss and show the robustness of the family of periodic solutions called cnoidal waves, corresponding to phonons....... The soliton phenomena described in the simulations of alpha helices may help to explain recent x-ray experiments on long alpha helices in Rhodopsin where a long lifetime of the vibrational modes has been observed....

  12. Numerical analysis of helical dielectric elastomer actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang Ho; Nair, Saurabh; Kim, Daewon

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are known for its capability of experiencing extreme strains, as it can expand and contract based on specific actuation voltage applied. On contrary, helical DEA (HDEA) with its unique configuration does not only provide the contractile and extendable capabilities, but also can aid in attaining results for bending and torsion. The concept of HDEA embraces many new techniques and can be applied in multiple disciplines. Thus, this paper focuses on the simulation of HDEA with helical compliant electrodes that is a major factor prior to its application. The attributes of the material used to build the structure plays a vital role in the behavior of the system. For numerical analysis of HDEA, the material characteristics are input into a commercial grade software, and then the appropriate analysis is performed to retrieve its outcome. Applying the material characteristics into numerical analysis modeling, the functionality of HDEA for various activations can be achieved, which is used to test and comply with the fabricated final product.

  13. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  14. The architecture of parallel beta-helices and related folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J; Pickersgill, R

    2001-10-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been determined of a large number of proteins characterized by a repetitive fold where each of the repeats (coils) supplies a strand to one or more parallel beta-sheets. Some of these proteins form superfamilies of proteins, which have probably arisen by divergent evolution from a common ancestor. The classical example is the family including four families of pectinases without obviously related primary sequences, the phage P22 tailspike endorhamnosidase, chrondroitinase B and possibly pertactin from Bordetella pertusis. These show extensive stacking of similar residues to give aliphatic, aromatic and polar stacks such as the asparagine ladder. This suggests that coils can be added or removed by duplication or deletion of the DNA corresponding to one or more coils and explains how homologous proteins can have different numbers of coils. This process can also account for the evolution of other families of proteins such as the beta-rolls, the leucine-rich repeat proteins, the hexapeptide repeat family, two separate families of beta-helical antifreeze proteins and the spiral folds. These families need not be related to each other but will share features such as relative untwisted beta-sheets, stacking of similar residues and turns between beta-strands of approximately 90 degrees often stabilized by hydrogen bonding along the direction of the parallel beta-helix.Repetitive folds present special problems in the comparison of structures but offer attractive targets for structure prediction. The stacking of similar residues on a flat parallel beta-sheet may account for the formation of amyloid with beta-strands at right-angles to the fibril axis from many unrelated peptides.

  15. Amphiphilic cationic peptides mediate cell adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, D C; Lambert, M; Kendall, D A; Moe, G R; Osterman, D G; Tao, H P; Weinstein, I B; Kaiser, E T

    1985-09-01

    Four amphiphilic peptides, each with net charges of +2 or more at neutrality and molecular weights under 4 kilodaltons, were found to mediate the adhesion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts to polystyrene surfaces. Two of these peptides, a model for calcitonin (peptide 1, MCT) and melittin (peptide 2, MEL), form amphiphilic alpha-helical structures at aqueous/nonpolar interfaces. The other two, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone model (peptide 3, LHM) and a platelet factor model (peptide 4, MPF) form beta-strand structures in amphiphilic environments. Although it contains only 10 residues, LHM mediated adhesion to surfaces coated with solutions containing as little as 10 pmoles/ml of peptide. All four of these peptides were capable of forming monolayers at air-buffer interfaces with collapse pressures greater than 20 dynes/cm. None of these four peptides contains the tetrapeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which has been associated with fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Ten polypeptides that also lacked the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser but were nonamphiphilic and/or had net charges less than +2 at neutrality were all incapable of mediating cell adhesion (Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti, 1984). The morphologies of NRK cells spread on polystyrene coated with peptide LHM resemble the morphologies on fibronectin-coated surfaces, whereas cells spread on surfaces coated with MCT or MEL exhibit strikingly different morphologies. The adhesiveness of MCT, MEL, LHM, and MPF implies that many amphiphilic cationic peptides could prove useful as well defined adhesive substrata for cell culture and for studies of the mechanism of cell adhesion.

  16. Peptides that form β-sheets on hydrophobic surfaces accelerate surface-induced insulin amyloidal aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nault, Laurent; Vendrely, Charlotte; Bréchet, Yves; Bruckert, Franz; Weidenhaupt, Marianne

    2013-05-02

    Interactions between proteins and material or cellular surfaces are able to trigger protein aggregation in vitro and in vivo. The human insulin peptide segment LVEALYL is able to accelerate insulin aggregation in the presence of hydrophobic surfaces. We show that this peptide needs to be previously adsorbed on a hydrophobic surface to induce insulin aggregation. Moreover, the study of different mutant peptides proves that its sequence is less important than the secondary structure of the adsorbed peptide on the surface. Indeed, these pro-aggregative peptides act by providing stable β-sheets to incoming insulin molecules, thereby accelerating insulin adsorption locally and facilitating the conformational changes required for insulin aggregation. Conversely, a peptide known to form α-helices on hydrophobic surfaces delays insulin aggregation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial peptides in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the magainin MG-H2 peptide interacting with a model phospholipid membrane have been used to investigate the mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides act. Multiple copies of the peptide were randomly placed in solution close to the membrane. The peptide readily

  18. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos (2013) to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the system. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of, for example, a bipolar active region. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, coronal loops having opposite helicity do not reconnect, whereas loops having the same sense of helicity do reconnect. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  19. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renormalized viscosity, renormalized resistivity, and various energy fluxes are calculated for helical magnetohydrodynamics using perturbative field theory. The calculation is of first-order in perturbation. Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, but they induce an inverse cascade of ...

  20. Relative magnetic helicity as a diagnostic of solar eruptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, E.; Leake, J. E.; Valori, G.; Linton, M. G.; Zuccarello, F. P.; Dalmasse, K.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The discovery of clear criteria that can deterministically describe the eruptive state of a solar active region would lead to major improvements on space weather predictions. Aims: Using series of numerical simulations of the emergence of a magnetic flux rope in a magnetized coronal, leading either to eruptions or to stable configurations, we test several global scalar quantities for the ability to discriminate between the eruptive and the non-eruptive simulations. Methods: From the magnetic field generated by the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we compute and analyze the evolution of the magnetic flux, of the magnetic energy and its decomposition into potential and free energies, and of the relative magnetic helicity and its decomposition. Results: Unlike the magnetic flux and magnetic energies, magnetic helicities are able to markedly distinguish the eruptive from the non-eruptive simulations. We find that the ratio of the magnetic helicity of the current-carrying magnetic field to the total relative helicity presents the highest values for the eruptive simulations, in the pre-eruptive phase only. We observe that the eruptive simulations do not possess the highest value of total magnetic helicity. Conclusions: In the framework of our numerical study, the magnetic energies and the total relative helicity do not correspond to good eruptivity proxies. Our study highlights that the ratio of magnetic helicities diagnoses very clearly the eruptive potential of our parametric simulations. Our study shows that magnetic-helicity-based quantities may be very efficient for the prediction of solar eruptions.

  1. Experimental investigation of solar powered diaphragm and helical pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    For several years, many types of solar powered water pumping systems were evaluated, and in this paper, diaphragm and helical solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water pumping systems are discussed. Data were collected on diaphragm and helical pumps which were powered by different solar PV arrays at mul...

  2. Two new twisted helical nickel (II) and cobalt (III) octahedral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 6. Two new twisted helical nickel(II) and cobalt(III) octahedral monomer complexes: Synthesis and structural characterization. Malay Dolai ... Keywords. Coordination chemistry; nickel(II); cobalt(III); Schiff base; twisted helicity; supramolecular interactions.

  3. Space vehicle electromechanical system and helical antenna winding fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Guenther, David; Enemark, Donald; Seitz, Daniel; Martinez, John; Storms, Steven

    2017-12-26

    A space vehicle electromechanical system may employ an architecture that enables convenient and practical testing, reset, and retesting of solar panel and antenna deployment on the ground. A helical antenna winding fixture may facilitate winding and binding of the helical antenna.

  4. Micro helical polymeric structures produced by variable voltage direct electrospinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shariatpanahi, S.P.; Iraji zad, A.; Abdollahzadeh, I.; Shirsavar, R.; Bonn, D.; Ejtehadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct near field electrospinning is used to produce very long helical polystyrene microfibers in water. The pitch length of helices can be controlled by changing the applied voltage, allowing the production of both microsprings and microchannels. Using a novel high frequency variable voltage

  5. Coronary artery angioplasty with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurbel, PA; Anderson, RD; vanBoven, AJ; denHeijer, P

    The initial in-hospital and long-term clinical experience with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter in the treatment of coronary artery disease is reported, This new catheter design allows blood to flow passively around the inflated balloon through a protected helical channel molded into the

  6. Effect of sequence and stereochemistry reversal on p53 peptide mimicry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Atzori

    Full Text Available Peptidomimetics effective in modulating protein-protein interactions and resistant to proteolysis have potential in therapeutic applications. An appealing yet underperforming peptidomimetic strategy is to employ D-amino acids and reversed sequences to mimic a lead peptide conformation, either separately or as the combined retro-inverso peptide. In this work, we examine the conformations of inverse, reverse and retro-inverso peptides of p53(15-29 using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In order to obtain converged ensembles for the peptides, we find enhanced sampling is required via the replica exchange molecular dynamics method. From these replica exchange simulations, the D-peptide analogues of p53(15-29 result in a predominantly left-handed helical conformation. When the parent sequence is reversed sequence as either the L-peptide and D-peptide, these peptides display a greater helical propensity, feature reflected by NMR and CD studies in TFE/water solvent. The simulations also indicate that, while approximately similar orientations of the side-chains are possible by the peptide analogues, their ability to mimic the parent peptide is severely compromised by backbone orientation (for D-amino acids and side-chain orientation (for reversed sequences. A retro-inverso peptide is disadvantaged as a mimic in both aspects, and further chemical modification is required to enable this concept to be used fruitfully in peptidomimetic design. The replica exchange molecular simulation approach adopted here, with its ability to provide detailed conformational insights into modified peptides, has potential as a tool to guide structure-based design of new improved peptidomimetics.

  7. Helicity transport and creation in the solar convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcope, D.; Pevtsov, A.

    Magnetic helicity provides a theoretical tool for characterizing the solar dynamo and the evolution of the coronal field. The magnetic helicity may be inferred from several types of observation including vector magnetograms of the photospehric magnetic fields. The helicty of an active region reflects, to some degree, that produced by the solar cycle dyanmo which is believed to be operating at the base of the convection zone, where the Rossby number is small. The helicty of the active region is affected by the turbulence through which it rises, and this process must be taken into account when interpreting helicity observations. The subsequent dispersal of the active region magnetic field will further affect the observed helicty of the photospheric field. This transport process suggests an observational method of identifying, through helicty measurements, the source of quiet Sun field from either a surface (non-helical) dynamo or the fragmentation of helical active region fields.

  8. Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Supratik

    2016-01-01

    Besides total energy, three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses two inviscid invariants which are the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. New exact relations are derived for homogeneous (non-isotropic) stationary Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) with non-zero helicities and in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments. It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding invariant flux. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations.

  9. Broadband circularly polarizing dichroism with high efficient plasmonic helical surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingpei; Zhao, Xiaonan; Li, Ruibin; Zhu, Aijiao; Chen, Linghua; Lin, Yu; Cao, Bing; Zhu, Xiaojun; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-05-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband and high efficient circularly polarizing dichroism using a simple single-cycle and single-helical plasmonic surface array arranged in square lattice. Two types of helical surface structures (partially or completely covered with a gold film) are investigated. It is shown that the circular polarization dichroism in the mid-IR range (3µm - 5µm) can reach 80% (when the surface is partially covered with gold) or 65% (when the surface is completely covered with gold) with a single-cycle and single-helical surface. Experimental fabrications of the proposed helical plasmonic surface are implemented with direct 3D laser writing followed by electron beam evaporation deposition of gold. The experimental evaluations of the circular polarization dichroism are in excellent agreement with the simulation. The proposed helical surface structure is of advantages of easy-fabrication, high-dichroism and scalable to other frequencies as a high efficient broadband circular polarizer.

  10. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  11. A molecular leverage for helicity control and helix inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akine, Shigehisa; Hotate, Sayaka; Nabeshima, Tatsuya

    2011-09-07

    The helical tetranuclear complex [LZn(3)La(OAc)(3)] having two benzocrown moieties was designed and synthesized as a novel molecular leverage for helicity control and helix inversion. Short alkanediammonium guests H(3)N(+)(CH(2))(n)NH(3)(+) (n = 4, 6, 8) preferentially stabilized the P-helical isomer of [LZn(3)La(OAc)(3)], while the longer guest H(3)N(+)(CH(2))(12)NH(3)(+) caused a helix inversion to give the M-helical isomer as the major isomer. The differences in the molecular lengths were efficiently translated into helical handedness via the novel molecular leverage mechanism using the gauche/anti conversion of the trans-1,2-disubstituted ethylenediamine unit.

  12. Helicity conservation and twisted Seifert surfaces for superfluid vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Hayder

    2017-04-01

    Starting from the continuum definition of helicity, we derive from first principles its different contributions for superfluid vortices. Our analysis shows that an internal twist contribution emerges naturally from the mathematical derivation. This reveals that the spanwise vector that is used to characterize the twist contribution must point in the direction of a surface of constant velocity potential. An immediate consequence of the Seifert framing is that the continuum definition of helicity for a superfluid is trivially zero at all times. It follows that the Gauss-linking number is a more appropriate definition of helicity for superfluids. Despite this, we explain how a quasi-classical limit can arise in a superfluid in which the continuum definition for helicity can be used. This provides a clear connection between a microscopic and a macroscopic description of a superfluid as provided by the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations. This leads to consistency with the definition of helicity used for classical vortices.

  13. Ab initio folding of extended α-helix: a theoretical study about the role of electrostatic polarization in the folding of helical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazim, Raudah; Wei, Caiyi; Sun, Tiedong; Zhang, Dawei

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we report the ab initio folding of three different extended helical peptides namely 2khk, N36, and C34 through conventional molecular dynamics simulation at room temperature using implicit solvation model. Employing adaptive hydrogen bond specific charge (AHBC) scheme to account for the polarization effect of hydrogen bonds established during the simulation, the effective folding of the three extended helices were observed with best backbone RMSDs in comparison to the experimental structures over the helical region determined to be 1.30 Å for 2khk, 0.73 Å for N36 and 0.72 Å for C34. In this study, 2khk will be used as a benchmark case serving as a means to compare the ability of polarized (AHBC) and nonpolarized force field in the folding of an extended helix. Analyses conducted revealed the ability of the AHBC scheme in effectively folding the extended helix by promoting helix growth through the stabilization of backbone hydrogen bonds upon formation during the folding process. Similar observations were also noted when AHBC scheme was employed during the folding of C34 and N36. However, under Amber03 force field, helical structures formed during the folding of 2khk was not accompanied by stabilization thus highlighting the importance of electrostatic polarization in the folding of helical structures. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-03

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  15. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  16. Construction of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, P. E.; Gu, P.; Hamp, W. T.; Izzo, V. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Rogers, J. A.

    2001-10-01

    HIT-SI is a ``bow tie'' spheromak designed to implement Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI). The engineering requirements of SIHI lead to several unique design features, including a multiply connected electrically insulating o-ring seal and a close-fitting passive flux conserver that is electrically insulated from the plasma. Prototype tests have been performed to verify the performance of the o-ring seal and the plasma sprayed zirconia insulation. An engineering test of the new HIT-SI front end will be done before it replaces the present HIT-II front end on HIT. Startup and one millisecond of sustainment will be done to test breakdown and verify power supply requirements. The power supplies and external coils are designed to provide 20 MW at 5 kHz to 50 kHz for 1 ms to the helicity injection circuits for this test. Progress in the construction and assembly of HIT-SI will be presented.

  17. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Yuanhui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We develop a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along non-convex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implement the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of non-convex trajectories, thereby opening up a new route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical ap...

  18. Helical Locomotion in a Granular Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Ibarra, Alejandro; Melo, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    The physical mechanisms that bring about the propulsion of a rotating helix in a granular medium are considered. A propulsive motion along the axis of the rotating helix is induced by both symmetry breaking due to the helical shape, and the anisotropic frictional forces undergone by all segments of the helix in the medium. Helix dynamics is studied as a function of helix rotation speed and its geometrical parameters. The effect of the granular pressure and the applied external load were also investigated. A theoretical model is developed based on the anisotropic frictional force experienced by a slender body moving in a granular material, to account for the translation speed of the helix. A good agreement with experimental data is obtained, which allows for predicting the helix design to propel optimally within granular media. These results pave the way for the development of an efficient sand robot operating according to this mode of locomotion.

  19. Equilibrium Reconstruction on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel A. Lazerson, D. Gates, D. Monticello, H. Neilson, N. Pomphrey, A. Reiman S. Sakakibara, and Y. Suzuki

    2012-07-27

    Equilibrium reconstruction is commonly applied to axisymmetric toroidal devices. Recent advances in computational power and equilibrium codes have allowed for reconstructions of three-dimensional fields in stellarators and heliotrons. We present the first reconstructions of finite beta discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The plasma boundary and magnetic axis are constrained by the pressure profile from Thomson scattering. This results in a calculation of plasma beta without a-priori assumptions of the equipartition of energy between species. Saddle loop arrays place additional constraints on the equilibrium. These reconstruction utilize STELLOPT, which calls VMEC. The VMEC equilibrium code assumes good nested flux surfaces. Reconstructed magnetic fields are fed into the PIES code which relaxes this constraint allowing for the examination of the effect of islands and stochastic regions on the magnetic measurements.

  20. Chiral Spin Pairing in Helical Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Shigeki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2007-07-01

    A concept of chiral spin pairing is introduced to describe a vector-chiral liquid-crystal order in frustrated spin systems. It is found that the chiral spin pairing is induced by the coupling to phonons through the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the four-spin exchange interaction of the Coulomb origin under the edge-sharing network of magnetic and ligand ions. This produces two successive second-order phase transitions upon cooling: an O(2) chiral spin nematic, i.e., spin cholesteric, order appears with an either parity, and then the O(2) symmetry is broken to yield a helical magnetic order. Possible candidate materials are also discussed as new multiferroic systems.

  1. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We developed a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along nonconvex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implemented the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of nonconvex trajectories, thereby opening up a route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical applications.

  2. Pressure effect on the amide I frequency of the solvated {alpha}-helical structure in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takekiyo, T [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Shimizu, A [Department of Environmental Engineering for Symbiosis Factory of Engineering, Soka University, 1-326 Tanjincho, Hachioji, Tokyo, 192-8577 (Japan); Koizumi, T [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Kato, M [Department of Applied Chemistry, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Taniguchi, Y [Department of Applied Chemistry, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan)

    2007-10-24

    As a model system of the pressure dependence of the amide I mode of the solvated {alpha}-helical structure in a helical peptide, we have calculated the frequency shifts of the amide I modes as a function of the distance between trans-N-methylacetamide (t-NMA) dimer and a water molecule (d{sub C=O{center_dot}}{sub {center_dot}}{sub {center_dot}}{sub H-O}) by the density-functional theory (DFT) method at the B3LYP/6-31G++(d,p) level. Two amide I frequencies at 1652 and 1700 cm{sup -1} were observed under this calculation. The former is ascribed to the amide I mode forming the intermolecular hydrogen bond (H-bond) between t-NMA and H{sub 2}O in addition to the intermolecular H-bond in the t-NMA dimer. The latter is due to the amide I mode forming only the intermolecular H-bond in the t-NMA dimer. We have found that the amide I frequency at 1652 cm{sup -1} shifts to a lower frequency with decreasing d{sub C=O{center_dot}}{sub {center_dot}}{sub {center_dot}}{sub H-O}) (i.e., increasing pressure), whereas that at 1700 cm{sup -1} shifts to a higher frequency. The amide I frequency shift of 1652 cm{sup -1} is larger than that of 1700 cm{sup -1} by the intermolecular H-bond. Thus, our results clearly indicate that the pressure-induced amide I frequency shift of the solvated {alpha}-helical structure correlates with the change in d{sub C=O{center_dot}}{sub {center_dot}}{sub {center_dot}}{sub H-O})

  3. Ultrasmall Peptides Self-Assemble into Diverse Nanostructures: Morphological Evaluation and Potential Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A.E. Hauser

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures.

  4. Helical bottleneck effect in 3D homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of modelling the development of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a large-scale source of energy and a source of helicity distributed over scales. We use the shell model for numerical simulation of the turbulence at high Reynolds number. The results show that the helicity injection leads to a significant change in the behavior of the energy and helicity spectra in scales larger and smaller than the energy injection scale. We suggest the phenomenology for direct turbulent cascades with the helicity effect, which reduces the efficiency of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that non-linear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. It can be interpreted as the ‘helical bottleneck effect’ which, depending on the parameters of the injection helicity, reminds one of the well-known bottleneck effect at the end of inertial range. Simulations which included the infrared part of the spectrum show that the inverse cascade hardly develops under distributed helicity forcing.

  5. Theoretical model of chirality-induced helical self-propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Sano, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    We recently reported the experimental realization of a chiral artificial microswimmer exhibiting helical self-propulsion [T. Yamamoto and M. Sano, Soft Matter 13, 3328 (2017), 10.1039/C7SM00337D]. In the experiment, cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) droplets dispersed in surfactant solutions swam spontaneously, driven by the Marangoni flow, in helical paths whose handedness is determined by the chirality of the component molecules of CLC. To study the mechanism of the emergence of the helical self-propelled motion, we propose a phenomenological model of the self-propelled helical motion of the CLC droplets. Our model is constructed by symmetry argument in chiral systems, and it describes the dynamics of CLC droplets with coupled time-evolution equations in terms of a velocity, an angular velocity, and a tensor variable representing the symmetry of the helical director field of the droplet. We found that helical motions as well as other chiral motions appear in our model. By investigating bifurcation behaviors between each chiral motion, we found that the chiral coupling terms between the velocity and the angular velocity, the structural anisotropy of the CLC droplet, and the nonlinearity of model equations play a crucial role in the emergence of the helical motion of the CLC droplet.

  6. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  7. Structure analysis of the membrane-bound dermcidin-derived peptide SSL-25 from human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Strandberg, Erik; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-12-01

    SSL-25 (SSLLEKGLDGAKKAVGGLGKLGKDA) is one of the shortest peptides present in human sweat and is produced after the proteolytic processing of the parent peptide dermcidin. Both peptides are reported to have antimicrobial function. To determine the structure of SSL-25 in lipid bilayers, a series of 19 F-labeled SSL-25 analogs were synthesized. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that SSL-25 and all of its analogs formed α-helices in the presence of lipid vesicles, thus allowing a detailed analysis via oriented CD and solid-state NMR. The results suggest that SSL-25 resides on the membrane surface with a slight helix tilt angle. A detailed 19 F NMR analysis revealed that SSL-25 does not form a continuous helix. The α-helical structure of the N-terminal part of the peptide was preserved in membranes of different lipid compositions and at various peptide-to-lipid molar ratios, but the C-terminus was disordered and did not fold into a well-defined α-helical conformation. Furthermore, the NMR results showed that SSL-25 resides on the membrane surface and does not re-orient into the membrane in response to changes in either peptide concentration or membrane composition. SSL-25 does not aggregate and remains fully mobile within the membrane bilayer, as shown by 19 F NMR. SSL-25 has a high binding affinity toward bilayers mimicking bacterial lipid compositions, but does not bind to mammalian model membranes containing cholesterol. These observations may explain the selectivity of this peptide for bacterial membranes, and they are also in line with basic biophysical considerations on spontaneous lipid curvature and the general effect of cholesterol on peptide/lipid interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation. The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static mixers, but in porous media.

  9. Inducing achiral aliphatic oligoureas to fold into helical conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsel, Romina; Maury, Julien; Fremaux, Juliette; France, Scott P; Guichard, Gilles; Clayden, Jonathan

    2014-12-11

    The ability of urea-linked oligomers of achiral diamines (achiral analogues of the well-established chiral oligourea foldamers) to adopt helical conformations was explored spectroscopically. Up to four achiral units were ligated either to a well-formed helical trimer or to a single chiral diamine, and the extent to which they adopted a screw-sense preference was determined by NMR and CD. In the best performing cases, a trimeric chiral oligourea and even a single cis-cyclohexanediamine monomer induced folding into a helical conformation.

  10. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    . The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static......Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation...

  11. Helicity-Dependent Showers and Matching with VINCIA

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present an antenna-shower formalism that includes helicity dependence for massless partons. The formalism applies to both traditional (global) showers and to sector-based variants. We combine the shower with VINCIA's multiplicative approach to matrix-element matching, generalized to operate on each helicity configuration separately. The result is a substantial gain in computational speed for high parton multiplicities. We present an implementation of both sector and global showers, with min and max variations, and helicity-dependent tree-level matching applied for vector bosons or Higgs decay to q qbar plus up to 4 gluons and for Higgs decay to up to 5 gluons.

  12. Investigations of peripheral dose for helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissner, Steffen; Schubert, Kai; Sterzing, Florian; Herfarth, Klaus; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Wiezorek, Tilo [University Hospital Jena (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Whenever treating a patient with percutaneous radiotherapy, a certain amount of dose is inevitably delivered to healthy tissue. This is mainly due to beam's entry and exit in the region of the target volume. In regions distant from the target volume, dose is delivered by leakage from the MLC and head scatter from the accelerator head and phantom scatter from the target volume (peripheral dose). Helical tomotherapy is a form of radiation therapy with a uniquely designed machine and delivery pattern which influence the peripheral dose. The goal of this work was to investigate peripheral dose in helical tomotherapy. The experiments were used to establish a complex characterization of the peripheral dose. Materials and methods: A 30*30*60cm{sup 3} slab phantom and TLD-100 (Lithium fluoride) were used for the experiments. Treatment procedures were generated with the tomotherapy planning system (TPS). Additionally, procedures were created on the Operator Station of the tomotherapy system without a calculation of the dose distribution. The peripheral dose which was produced by a typical tomotherapy treatment plan was measured. Furthermore, these procedures were used to differentiate the parts of the peripheral dose in phantom scatter dose and head scatter and leakage dose. Additionally, the relation between peripheral dose and treatment time and between peripheral dose and delivered dose was investigated. Additionally, the peripheral dose was measured in an Alderson phantom. Results: Distances of 30cm or more resulted in a decrease of the peripheral dose to less than 0.1% of the target dose. The measured doses have an offset of approximately 1cGy in comparison to the calculated doses from the TPS. The separated head scatter and leakage dose was measured in the range of 1cGy for typical treatments. Furthermore, the investigations show a linear correlation between head scatter leakage dose and treatment time and between scatter dose parts and delivered dose. A

  13. Helical CT of the urinary organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, H.H.; Uggowitzer, M.M.; Ruppert-Kohlmayr, A. [Graz Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-03-01

    Despite of the diagnostic potential of conventional CT (CCT), limitations being inherent in this technology reduce its diagnostic confidence and limit clinical CT applications as 3D imaging. Helical CT (HCT) has far overcome the limitations of CCT and has become the standard CT technology. After a short overview on the technique of HCT and its advantages over CCT, the impact of HCT on the detection of disorders of the urinary organs is discussed. Due to the high quality of 3D reconstructions, vessels are visualized free of artefacts resulting in a dramatic improvement and acceptance of CT angiography, which has become a clinically important examination in the evaluation of obstructive renal artery disease. Fast HCT provides a precise assessment of the three phases of the nephrogram and it is a prerequisite for an improved depiction of abnormal vascular perfusion and impaired tubule transit of contrast material. Helical CT enables an improved characterization of cystic mass lesions reducing the diagnosis of indeterminate masses and thus facilitating a better therapeutic management. The diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) has improved due to an increased sensitivity in detecting small RCCs, and an increased specificity in the diagnosis of neoplastic lesions. Improved staging of RCCs is the result of accurate assessment of venous tumour extension. When planning nephron-sparing surgery 3D display of the renal tumour helps to determine the resectability of the mass depicting its relation to major renal vessels and the renal collecting system. In the evaluation of renal trauma HCT provides shorter scanning time and thus fewer artefacts in the examination of traumatized patients who cannot cooperate adequately. Three-dimensional postprocessing modalities allow the assessment of the renal vascular pedicel by CT angiography and improve the demonstration of complex lacerations of the renal parenchyma. In the evaluation of the upper urinary tract unenhanced HCT has

  14. In silico design of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosì, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The rapid spread of drug-resistant pathogenic microbial strains has created an urgent need for the development of new anti-infective molecules, having different mechanism of action in comparison to existing drugs. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a novel class of molecules with a broad spectrum of activity and a low rate in inducing bacterial resistance. In particular, linear alpha-helical cationic antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement of the innate defense against microbes. However, until now, many AMPs have failed in clinical trials because of several drawbacks that strongly limit their applicability such as degradation, cytotoxicity, and high production cost. Thus, to overcome the limitations of native peptides, a rational in silico approach to AMPs design becomes a promising strategy that drastically reduce production costs and the time required for evaluation of activity and toxicity. This chapter focuses on the strategies and methods for de novo design of potentially active AMPs. In particular, statistical-based design strategies and MD methods for modelling AMPs are elucidated.

  15. Solution NMR studies of amphibian antimicrobial peptides: linking structure to function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Evan F; Hunter, Howard N; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Vogel, Hans J

    2009-08-01

    The high-resolution three-dimensional structure of an antimicrobial peptide has implications for the mechanism of its antimicrobial activity, as the conformation of the peptide provides insights into the intermolecular interactions that govern the binding to its biological target. For many cationic antimicrobial peptides the negatively charged membranes surrounding the bacterial cell appear to be a main target. In contrast to what has been found for other classes of antimicrobial peptides, solution NMR studies have revealed that in spite of the wide diversity in the amino acid sequences of amphibian antimicrobial peptides (AAMPs), they all adopt amphipathic alpha-helical structures in the presence of membrane-mimetic micelles, bicelles or organic solvent mixtures. In some cases the amphipathic AAMP structures are directly membrane-perturbing (e.g. magainin, aurein and the rana-box peptides), in other instances the peptide spontaneously passes through the membrane and acts on intracellular targets (e.g. buforin). Armed with a high-resolution structure, it is possible to relate the peptide structure to other relevant biophysical and biological data to elucidate a mechanism of action. While many linear AAMPs have significant antimicrobial activity of their own, mixtures of peptides sometimes have vastly improved antibiotic effects. Thus, synergy among antimicrobial peptides is an avenue of research that has recently attracted considerable attention. While synergistic relationships between AAMPs are well described, it is becoming increasingly evident that analyzing the intermolecular interactions between these peptides will be essential for understanding the increased antimicrobial effect. NMR structure determination of hybrid peptides composed of known antimicrobial peptides can shed light on these intricate synergistic relationships. In this work, we present the first NMR solution structure of a hybrid peptide composed of magainin 2 and PGLa bound to SDS and DPC

  16. Antimicrobial peptides derived from goose egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasirirak, Sompong; Pukcothanung, Yuwatida; Preecharram, Sutthidech; Daduang, Sakda; Patramanon, Rina; Fukamizo, Tamo; Araki, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    Peptide fragments possessing antimicrobial activity were obtained by protease digestion of goose egg white lysozyme. Digested peptide purified from RP-HPLC which showed no lysozyme activity exhibited bactericidal activity toward Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. LC/MS-MS and automated Edman degradation revealed the amino acid sequence to be Thr-Ala-Lys-Pro-Glu-Gly-Leu-Ser-Tyr. This sequence corresponds to amino acid positions 20-28, located at the N-terminal outer part of goose lysozyme. The peptide acted on bacterial membrane as shown by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism of action could be explained from a helical structure that may be formed by the centered Pro residue and the terminal Lys residue after the peptide attaches to a cell membrane. This is the first study to report that a peptide derived from the protease digests of G-type lysozyme possesses antimicrobial activity with broad spectrum activity. Our result is comparative to the previous reports of Chicken lysozyme and T4 phage lysozyme, which showed antimicrobial activity after digestion with protease. These results might contribute to the usage of antimicrobial peptides engineered by genetic or chemical synthesis.

  17. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  19. TRH-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, R; Bičíková, M; Šafařík, L

    2011-01-01

    TRH-like peptides are characterized by substitution of basic amino acid histidine (related to authentic TRH) with neutral or acidic amino acid, like glutamic acid, phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, leucin, valin, aspartic acid and asparagine. The presence of extrahypothalamic TRH-like peptides was reported in peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract, placenta, neural tissues, male reproductive system and certain endocrine tissues. Work deals with the biological function of TRH-like peptides in different parts of organisms where various mechanisms may serve for realisation of biological function of TRH-like peptides as negative feedback to the pituitary exerted by the TRH-like peptides, the role of pEEPam such as fertilization-promoting peptide, the mechanism influencing the proliferative ability of prostatic tissues, the neuroprotective and antidepressant function of TRH-like peptides in brain and the regulation of thyroid status by TRH-like peptides.

  20. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  1. Hydroxyproline-induced Helical Disruption in Conantokin Rl-B Affects Subunit-selective Antagonistic Activities toward Ion Channels of N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Shailaja; Yuan, Yue; Balsara, Rashna D.; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Castellino, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Conantokins are ∼20-amino acid peptides present in predatory marine snail venoms that function as allosteric antagonists of ion channels of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). These peptides possess a high percentage of post-/co-translationally modified amino acids, particularly γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla). Appropriately spaced Gla residues allow binding of functional divalent cations, which induces end-to-end α-helices in many conantokins. A smaller number of these peptides additionally contain 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp). Hyp should prevent adoption of the metal ion-induced full α-helix, with unknown functional consequences. To address this disparity, as well as the role of Hyp in conantokins, we have solved the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of a Gla/Hyp-containing 18-residue conantokin, conRl-B, by high field NMR spectroscopy. We show that Hyp10 disrupts only a small region of the α-helix of the Mn2+·peptide complex, which displays cation-induced α-helices on each terminus of the peptide. The function of conRl-B was examined by measuring its inhibition of NMDA/Gly-mediated current through NMDAR ion channels in mouse cortical neurons. The conRl-B displays high inhibitory selectivity for subclasses of NMDARs that contain the functionally important GluN2B subunit. Replacement of Hyp10 with N8Q results in a Mg2+-complexed end-to-end α-helix, accompanied by attenuation of NMDAR inhibitory activity. However, replacement of Hyp10 with Pro10 allowed the resulting peptide to retain its inhibitory property but diminished its GluN2B specificity. Thus, these modified amino acids, in specific peptide backbones, play critical roles in their subunit-selective inhibition of NMDAR ion channels, a finding that can be employed to design NMDAR antagonists that function at ion channels of distinct NMDAR subclasses. PMID:26048991

  2. OGlcNAcylation and Phosphorylation Have Similar Structural Effects in α-Helices: Post-Translational Modifications as Inducible Start and Stop Signals in α-Helices, with Greater Structural Effects on Threonine Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    OGlcNAcylation and phosphorylation are the major competing intracellular post-translational modifications of serine and threonine residues. The structural effects of both post-translational modifications on serine and threonine were examined within Baldwin model α-helical peptides (Ac-AKAAAAKAAAAKAAGY-NH2 or Ac-YGAKAAAAKAAAAKAA-NH2). At the N-terminus of an α-helix, both phosphorylation and OGlcNAcylation stabilized the α-helix relative to the free hydroxyls, with a larger induced structure for phosphorylation than for OGlcNAcylation, for the dianionic phosphate than for the monoanionic phosphate, and for modifications on threonine than for modifications on serine. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine resulted in peptides more α-helical than alanine at the N-terminus, with dianionic phosphothreonine the most α-helix-stabilizing residue here. In contrast, in the interior of the α-helix, both post-translational modifications were destabilizing with respect to the α-helix, with the greatest destabilization seen for threonine OGlcNAcylation at residue 5 and threonine phosphorylation at residue 10, with peptides containing either post-translational modification existing as random coils. At the C-terminus, both OGlcNAcylation and phosphorylation were destabilizing with respect to the α-helix, though the induced structural changes were less than in the interior of the α-helix. In general, the structural effects of modifications on threonine were greater than the effects on serine, because of both the lower α-helical propensity of Thr and the more defined induced structures upon modification of threonine than serine, suggesting threonine residues are particularly important loci for structural effects of post-translational modifications. The effects of serine and threonine post-translational modifications are analogous to the effects of proline on α-helices, with the effects of phosphothreonine being greater than those of proline throughout the α-helix. These

  3. The generic geometry of helices and their close-packed structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    with values from the literature for helical polypeptide backbone structures, the alpha-, pi-. 3-10-, and gamma-helices. The alpha-helices are close to being optimally packed in the sense of efficient use of space, i.e. close-packed. They are more densely packed than the other three types of helices...

  4. Targeted correction of a thalassemia-associated beta-globin mutation induced by pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kuan, Jean Y

    2009-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures...

  5. Analysis on sliding helices and strands in protein structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-16

    Holm ... enable identification of conserved core of a protein fold it is not clear if the quality of .... Percentage of pairs of secondary structural elements for various SCOP classes (a) alpha helices (b) beta strands. Number of pairs.

  6. 3D printing of a multifunctional nanocomposite helical liquid sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuang-Zhuang; Yang, Xuelu; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Therriault, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    A multifunctional 3D liquid sensor made of a PLA/MWCNT nanocomposite and shaped as a freeform helical structure was fabricated by solvent-cast 3D printing. The 3D liquid sensor featured a relatively high electrical conductivity, the functionality of liquid trapping due to its helical configuration, and an excellent sensitivity and selectivity even for a short immersion into solvents.A multifunctional 3D liquid sensor made of a PLA/MWCNT nanocomposite and shaped as a freeform helical structure was fabricated by solvent-cast 3D printing. The 3D liquid sensor featured a relatively high electrical conductivity, the functionality of liquid trapping due to its helical configuration, and an excellent sensitivity and selectivity even for a short immersion into solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00278h

  7. Microfabricated, 94 GHz, 25 W, Helical Traveling Wave Tube Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Teraphysics Corporation completed the Phase I objectives for the electrical design of a 94 GHz, 26 W TWT with 53% overall efficiency, including the helical circuit...

  8. On the viscosity influence on a helical vortex flament evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agafontseva M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical vortices whose parameters have a strong influence on the efficiency of the apparatus is often occur in technical devices using swirling flow (cyclones, separators, etc.. To date the internal structure of such vortices is poorly understood. In [1] a model of helical vortex with uniform vorticity distribution in the core is proposed. Vortices arising in real flow always have a smooth vorticity distribution due to the viscosity action. The problem on steady moving helical vortices with the vortex core of small size in an inviscid fluid was solved in [2]. The non-orthogonal ‘helical’ coordinate system was introduced that allowed author to reduce the problem to two dimensional one. However, the velocity of the vortex motion was written only in the form of a quadratures computation of which is difficult. This paper presents first attempt for research on the diffusion and dynamics of a viscous helical vortex.

  9. Design study of a normal conducting helical snake for AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Junpei; Okamura, Masahiro; Roser, Thomas; MacKay, William W; Luccio, Alfredo U; Takano, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A new normal conducting snake magnet is being fabricated for the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project, a superconducting type helical dipole magnets had been developed and it performed successfully in high-energy polarized proton acceleration. The new AGS helical snake has the same basic magnetic structure but is more complicated. To achieve no beam shift and no beam deflection in one magnetic device, helical pitches and rotating angles were carefully calculated. Compared to a superconducting magnet, a normal warm magnet must have a large cross- sectional area of conductors which make it difficult to design a magnet with large helical pitch. We developed a modified window frame structure to accommodate the large number of conductors. Its three dimensional magnetic field was simulated by using OPERA3D/TOSCA. 3 Refs.

  10. Perfect spin filtering effect in ultrasmall helical zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Yue, E-mail: zzy8423@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2017-02-05

    The spin-polarized transport properties of helical zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that although all helical ZGNRs have similar density of states and edge states, they show obviously different transport characteristics depending on the curling manners. ZGNRs curled along zigzag orientation exhibit perfect spin filtering effect with a large spin-split gap near the Fermi level, while ZGNRs curled along armchair orientation behave as conventional conductors for both two spin channels. The spin filtering effect will be weakened with the increase of either ribbon width or curling diameter. The results suggest that ultrasmall helical ZGNRs have important potential applications in spintronics and flexible electronics. - Highlights: • Perfect spin filtering effect has been found in helical ZGNRs. • The effect strongly depends on the curling manners of ZGNRs. • Different transport properties do not induced by distinct electronic properties. • The effect may be weakened with increasing either ribbon width or curling diameter.

  11. Topological states and quantized current in helical organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2017-04-01

    We report a theoretical study of electron transport along helical organic molecules subject to an external electric field which is perpendicular to molecular helix axis. Our results reveal that topological states can appear in single-helical molecules as well as double-stranded DNA under the perpendicular electric field. In particular, a topological charge pumping can be realized by rotating the electric field in the transverse plane, where during each pumping cycle, an integer number of electrons can transport across the helical molecules at zero bias voltage, with pumped current being quantized. The quantized current constitutes multiple plateaus by scanning the Fermi energy as well as the bias voltage, and holds for various model parameters, since the edge states are topologically protected. These results could pave the way to explore topological states and quantized current in the biological systems and the helical molecules, and help in designing stable molecular devices.

  12. Helical vortices: linear stability analysis and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, C.; Delbende, I.; Rossi, M.

    2018-02-01

    We numerically investigate, within the context of helical symmetry, the dynamics of a regular array of two or three helical vortices with or without a straight central hub vortex. The Navier–Stokes equations are linearised to study the instabilities of such basic states. For vortices with low pitches, an unstable mode is extracted which corresponds to a displacement mode and growth rates are found to compare well with results valid for an infinite row of point vortices or an infinite alley of vortex rings. For larger pitches, the system is stable with respect to helically symmetric perturbations. In the nonlinear regime, we follow the time-evolution of the above basic states when initially perturbed by the dominant instability mode. For two vortices, sequences of overtaking events, leapfrogging and eventually merging are observed. The transition between such behaviours occurs at a critical ratio involving the core size and the vortex-separation distance. Cases with three helical vortices are also presented.

  13. Packing of Helices: Is Chirality the Highest Crystallographic Symmetry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Gautier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chiral structures resulting from the packing of helices are common in biological and synthetic materials. Herein, we analyze the noncentrosymmetry (NCS in such systems using crystallographic considerations. A comparison of the chiral structures built from helices shows that the chirality can be expected for specific building units such as 31/32 or 61/65 helices which, in hexagonal arrangement, will more likely lead to a chiral resolution. In these two systems, we show that the highest crystallographic symmetry (i.e., the symmetry which can describe the crystal structure from the smallest assymetric unit is chiral. As an illustration, we present the synthesis of two materials ([Zn(2,2’-bpy3](NbF62 and [Zn(2,2’-bpy3](TaF62 in which the 3n helices pack into a chiral structure.

  14. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  18. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  1. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weisenberger, J. (2013 March) Why Does a C-Peptide Test Matter? Diabetes Forecast [On-line information]. Available online at http:// ... Updated). What is c-peptide? What do c-peptide levels mean? Misc.health.diabetes, diabetes FAQ [On-line information from newsgroup]. Available ...

  2. Contribution of iron yoke on helical coils for RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tominaka, T; Katayama, T

    2002-01-01

    In order to estimate the field contribution due to an axially symmetric iron yoke for a helical magnet, a three-dimensional magnetic scalar potential problem with helical symmetry is solved. It is confirmed that the asymptotic forms for potential and field coincide with those for the two-dimensional magnet, in the limit of large twist pitch length. Then, it is also confirmed that the obtained analytical expression for the magnetic field is consistent with the numerical field calculation. (8 refs).

  3. Comparison between helical computed tomography angiography and intraoperative findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abijit Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Helical CT is important in delineating the arterial, venous, and ureteral anatomy and can show the important incidental findings. Left renal donors and males have more variations in their renal anatomy. Technically challenging laparoscopic nephrectomy on the multiple-vessel-side donor is possible with the aid of helical CT. The importance of the CT in evaluating donor renal anatomy for a technically challenging laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is commendable.

  4. Supramolecular helical porphyrin arrays using DNA as a scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Bouamaied, Imenne; Nguyen, ThaoNguyen; Ruhl, Thomas; Stulz, Eugen

    2008-01-01

    A diphenyl porphyrin substituted nucleotide was incorporated site specifically into DNA, leading to helical stacked porphyrin arrays in the major groove of the duplexes. The porphyrins show an electronic interaction which is significantly enhanced compared to the analogous tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) as shown in the large exciton coupling of the porphyrin B-band absorbance. Analogous to the TPP-DNA, an induced helical secondary structure is observed in the single strand porphyrin-DNA. The mod...

  5. Tokamak startup using point-source dc helicity injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D J; Bongard, M W; Fonck, R J; Redd, A J; Sontag, A C

    2009-06-05

    Startup of a 0.1 MA tokamak plasma is demonstrated on the ultralow aspect ratio Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using three localized, high-current density sources mounted near the outboard midplane. The injected open field current relaxes via helicity-conserving magnetic turbulence into a tokamaklike magnetic topology where the maximum sustained plasma current is determined by helicity balance and the requirements for magnetic relaxation.

  6. Helical containers with classical and quantum fluids in rotating frame

    OpenAIRE

    Okulov, A. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The examples of the classical liquids confined by rotating helical boundaries are considered and these examples are compared with rotating helical reservoir filled by ultracold bosonic ensemble. From the point of view of observer who co-rotates with classical liquid trapped by reservoir the quantum fluid will move translationally alongside rotation axis while in laboratory frame the quantum fluid will stay in rest. This behavior of quantum ensemble which is exactly opposite to the classical c...

  7. Helicity decomposition of ghost-free massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-11-01

    We perform a helicity decomposition in the full Lagrangian of the class of Massive Gravity theories previously proven to be free of the sixth (ghost) degree of freedom via a Hamiltonian analysis. We demonstrate, both with and without the use of nonlinear field redefinitions, that the scale at which the first interactions of the helicity-zero mode come in is {Λ_{{3}}} = {left( {{M_{text{Pl}}}{m^{{2}}}} right)^{{{1}/{3}}}} , and that this is the same scale at which helicity-zero perturbation theory breaks down. We show that the number of propagating helicity modes remains five in the full nonlinear theory with sources. We clarify recent misconceptions in the literature advocating the existence of either a ghost or a breakdown of perturbation theory at the significantly lower energy scales, {Λ_{{5}}} = {left( {{M_{text{Pl}}}{m^{{4}}}} right)^{{{1}/{5}}}} or {Λ_{{4}}} = {left( {{M_{text{Pl}}}{m^{{3}}}} right)^{{{1}/{4}}}} , which arose because relevant terms in those calculations were overlooked. As an interesting byproduct of our analysis, we show that it is possible to derive the Stückelberg formalism from the helicity decomposition, without ever invoking diffeomorphism invariance, just from a simple requirement that the kinetic terms of the helicity-two, -one and -zero modes are diagonalized.

  8. Kinetically Trapped Liquid-State Conformers of a Sodiated Model Peptide Observed in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Markus; Masellis, Chiara; Rizzo, Thomas; Baldauf, Carsten

    2017-09-14

    We investigate the peptide AcPheAla5LysH+, a model system for studying helix formation in the gas phase, in order to fully understand the forces that stabilize the helical structure. In particular, we address the question of whether the local fixation of the positive charge at the peptide's C-terminus is a prerequisite for forming helices by replacing the protonated C-terminal Lys residue by Ala and a sodium cation. The combination of gas-phase vibrational spectroscopy of cryogenically cooled ions with molecular simulations based on density-functional theory (DFT) allows for detailed structure elucidation. For sodiated AcPheAla6, we find globular rather than helical structures, as the mobile positive charge strongly interacts with the peptide backbone and disrupts secondary structure formation. Interestingly, the global minimum structure from simulation is not present in the experiment. We interpret that this is due to high barriers involved in rearranging the peptide-cation interaction that ultimately result in kinetically trapped structures being observed in the experiment.

  9. Divorcing folding from function: how acylation affects the membrane-perturbing properties of an antimicrobial peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Brian Stougaard; Thomsen, Line Aagot Hede; Bertelsen, Kresten

    2010-01-01

    Many small cationic peptides, which are unstructured in aqueous solution, have antimicrobial properties. These properties are assumed to be linked to their ability to permeabilize bacterial membranes, accompanied by the transition to an alpha-helical folding state. Here we show that there is no d......Many small cationic peptides, which are unstructured in aqueous solution, have antimicrobial properties. These properties are assumed to be linked to their ability to permeabilize bacterial membranes, accompanied by the transition to an alpha-helical folding state. Here we show...... that there is no direct link between folding of the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin (Nc) and its membrane permeabilization. N-terminal acylation with C8-C16 alkyl chains and the inclusion of anionic lipids both increase Nc's ability to form alpha-helical structure in the presence of vesicles. Nevertheless, both acylation...... and anionic lipids reduce the extent of permeabilization of these vesicles and lead to slower permeabilization kinetics. Furthermore, acylation significantly decreases antimicrobial activity. Although acyl chains of increasing length also increase the tendency of the peptides to aggregate in solution...

  10. Human ribosomal protein L7 binds RNA with an alpha-helical arginine-rich and lysine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerich, P; Bosbach, S; von Mikecz, A; Krawinkel, U

    1997-05-01

    In this study we mapped the RNA-binding domain of human ribosomal protein L7 and characterized its conformation-dependent RNA-binding specificity. Binding competition assays demonstrated preferential binding of L7 to mRNAs and rRNA, but not to tRNA. The ribohomopolymer poly(G) is bound with high affinity whereas poly(U), poly(C), or poly(A) show low affinity to L7. Furthermore, L7 binds to double-stranded but not to single-stranded DNA. Deletion mapping showed that the RNA-binding domain of L7 is represented by an arginine-rich and lysine-rich oligopeptide (ELKIKRLRKKFAQKMLRKARRK), which is reminiscent of the arginine-rich motif (ARM) found in one family of RNA-binding proteins. The isolated RNA-binding domain is capable of high-affinity binding to the Rev-responsive element (RRE) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vitro. Circular dichroic studies demonstrated a concentration-dependent and ligand-induced alpha-helical transition of a synthetic peptide carrying the arginine-lysine-rich RNA-binding domain of protein L7. Peptides carrying a mutation that destroys the alpha-helical conformation do not bind RNA.

  11. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides are two classes of positively charged membrane active peptides with several properties in common. The challenge is to combine knowledge about the membrane interaction mechanisms and structural properties of the two classes to design peptides with membrane-specific actions, useful either as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances. Membrane active peptides are commonly rich in arginine and tryptophan. We have previously designed a series of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations assay (MIC), circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD). The results show that the arg/trp peptides inhibit the growth of the two gram positive strains Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes, with some individual variations depending on the position of the tryptophans. No inhibition of the gram negative strains Proteus mirabilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noticed. CD indicated that when bound to lipid vesicles one of the peptides forms an α-helical like structure, whereas the other five exhibited rather random coiled structures. LD indicated that all six peptides were somehow aligned parallel with the membrane surface. Our results do not reveal any obvious connection between membrane interaction and antimicrobial effect for the studied peptides. By contrast cell-penetrating properties can be coupled to both the secondary structure and the degree of order of the peptides. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Helical Birods: An Elastic Model of Helically Wound Double-Stranded Rods

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Christopher

    2014-03-11

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. We consider a geometrically accurate model for a helically wound rope constructed from two intertwined elastic rods. The line of contact has an arbitrary smooth shape which is obtained under the action of an arbitrary set of applied forces and moments. We discuss the general form the theory should take along with an insight into the necessary geometric or constitutive laws which must be detailed in order for the system to be complete. This includes a number of contact laws for the interaction of the two rods, in order to fit various relevant physical scenarios. This discussion also extends to the boundary and how this composite system can be acted upon by a single moment and force pair. A second strand of inquiry concerns the linear response of an initially helical rope to an arbitrary set of forces and moments. In particular we show that if the rope has the dimensions assumed of a rod in the Kirchhoff rod theory then it can be accurately treated as an isotropic inextensible elastic rod. An important consideration in this demonstration is the possible effect of varying the geometric boundary constraints; it is shown the effect of this choice becomes negligible in this limit in which the rope has dimensions similar to those of a Kirchhoff rod. Finally we derive the bending and twisting coefficients of this effective rod.

  13. Close mimicry of lung surfactant protein B by “clicked” dimers of helical, cationic peptoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, Michelle T.; Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Seo, Jiwon; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Barron, Annelise E.

    2009-01-01

    A family of peptoid dimers developed to mimic SP-B is presented, where two amphipathic, cationic helices are linked by an achiral octameric chain. SP-B is a vital therapeutic protein in lung surfactant replacement therapy, but its large-scale isolation or chemical synthesis is impractical. Enhanced biomimicry of SP-B’s disulfide-bonded structure has been previously attempted via disulfide-mediated dimerization of SP-B1-25 and other peptide mimics, which improved surface activity relative to the monomers. Herein, the effects of disulfide- or ‘click’-mediated (1,3-dipolar cycloaddition) dimerization, as well as linker chemistry, on the lipid-associated surfactant activity of a peptoid monomer are described. Results revealed that the ‘clicked’ peptoid dimer enhanced in vitro surface activity in a DPPC:POPG:PA lipid film relative to its disulfide-bonded and monomeric counterparts in both surface balance and pulsating bubble surfactometry studies. On the pulsating bubble surfactometer, the film containing the ‘clicked’ peptoid dimer outperformed all presented peptoid monomers and dimers, and two SP-B derived peptides, attaining an adsorbed surface tension of 22 mN m−1, and maximum and minimum cycling values of 42 mN m−1 and near-zero, respectively. PMID:19777571

  14. Rational design of helical nanotubes from self-assembly of coiled-coil lock washers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunfu; Liu, Rui; Mehta, Anil K; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Wright, Elizabeth R; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Morris, Kyle; Serpell, Louise C; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wall, Joseph S; Conticello, Vincent P

    2013-10-16

    Design of a structurally defined helical assembly is described that involves recoding of the amino acid sequence of peptide GCN4-pAA. In solution and the crystalline state, GCN4-pAA adopts a 7-helix bundle structure that resembles a supramolecular lock washer. Structurally informed mutagenesis of the sequence of GCN4-pAA afforded peptide 7HSAP1, which undergoes self-association into a nanotube via noncovalent interactions between complementary interfaces of the coiled-coil lock-washer structures. Biophysical measurements conducted in solution and the solid state over multiple length scales of structural hierarchy are consistent with self-assembly of nanotube structures derived from 7-helix bundle subunits. The dimensions of the supramolecular assemblies are similar to those observed in the crystal structure of GCN4-pAA. Fluorescence studies of the interaction of 7HSAP1 with the solvatochromic fluorophore PRODAN indicated that the nanotubes could encapsulate shape-appropriate small molecules with high binding affinity.

  15. α-Helical coiled-coil peptide materials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaoying; Collier, Joel H

    2017-03-01

    Self-assembling coiled coils, which occur commonly in native proteins, have received significant interest for the design of new biomaterials-based medical therapies. Considerable effort over recent years has led to a detailed understanding of the self-assembly process of coiled coils, and a diverse collection of strategies have been developed for designing functional materials using this motif. The ability to engineer the interface between coiled coils allows one to achieve variously connected components, leading to precisely defined structures such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, networks, gels, and combinations of these. Currently these materials are being developed for a range of biotechnological and medical applications, including drug delivery systems for controlled release, targeted nanomaterials, 'drug-free' therapeutics, vaccine delivery systems, and others. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1424. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1424 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  17. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Suns magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure filament channels is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  18. Ponericins, new antibacterial and insecticidal peptides from the venom of the ant Pachycondyla goeldii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orivel, J; Redeker, V; Le Caer, J P; Krier, F; Revol-Junelles, A M; Longeon, A; Chaffotte, A; Dejean, A; Rossier, J

    2001-05-25

    The antimicrobial, insecticidal, and hemolytic properties of peptides isolated from the venom of the predatory ant Pachycondyla goeldii, a member of the subfamily Ponerinae, were investigated. Fifteen novel peptides, named ponericins, exhibiting antibacterial and insecticidal properties were purified, and their amino acid sequences were characterized. According to their primary structure similarities, they can be classified into three families: ponericin G, W, and L. Ponericins share high sequence similarities with known peptides: ponericins G with cecropin-like peptides, ponericins W with gaegurins and melittin, and ponericins L with dermaseptins. Ten peptides were synthesized for further analysis. Their antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains were analyzed together with their insecticidal activities against cricket larvae and their hemolytic activities. Interestingly, within each of the three families, several peptides present differences in their biological activities. The comparison of the structural features of ponericins with those of well-studied peptides suggests that the ponericins may adopt an amphipathic alpha-helical structure in polar environments, such as cell membranes. In the venom, the estimated peptide concentrations appear to be compatible with an antibacterial activity in vivo. This suggests that in the ant colony, the peptides exhibit a defensive role against microbial pathogens arising from prey introduction and/or ingestion.

  19. Stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Zhen [College of Science, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121001 (China); Liu, Chun-Jian [College of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Lv, Hang [Institute of New Energy, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Liu, Bing-Bing, E-mail: liubb@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2016-08-12

    The helicity of stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic interaction energy. Our results present clear images of stable double helical structures inside SWCNTs. The optimum helical radius and helical angle increase and decrease with increasing diameter, respectively. The tube's diameter plays a leading role in the helicity of encapsulated structures, while the tube's chirality may induce different metastable structures. This study indicates that the observed double helical iodine chains in experiments are not necessarily the optimum structures, but may also be metastable structures. - Highlights: • The stable double helical iodine chain inside single-walled carbon nanotubes is proposed. • The influence of tube's diameter and chirality on the stability of encapsulated iodine chains is studied. • The metastable double helical structures may be co-existence with the stable structure but not in the same tubes.

  20. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  1. Emergence of helicity +/- 2 modes (gravitons) from qbit models

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Zheng-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that photons (i.e. helicity $\\pm 1$ gapless excitations) can emerge from a qbit model (i.e. a quantum spin model) on a 3D lattice. In this paper, we study the possibility of the emergence of helicity $\\pm 2$ gapless excitations (i.e. the gravitons) from two quantum spin models. In the first quantum spin model (called the L-type model), the helicity $\\pm 2$ gapless excitations are shown to appear as the only type of low energy excitations. Within a perturbative calculation, the dispersion of the gapless helicity $\\pm 2$ is found to be $\\eps_{\\v{k}} \\propto |\\v{k}|^3$. The appearance of the gapless helicity $\\pm2$ modes suggests that the ground state of the quantum spin model is a new state of matter. In the second model (called the N-type model) the collective modes are strongly interacting and there is no reliable approach to understand its low energy dynamics. Using a spin-wave/quantum-freeze approach (which is shown to reproduce the correct emergent U(1) gauge theory in a quantum rotor model), ...

  2. Controlling skyrmion helicity via engineered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián A; Troncoso, Roberto E

    2016-10-26

    Single magnetic skyrmion dynamics in chiral magnets with a spatially inhomogeneous Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is considered. Based on the relation between DMI coupling and skyrmion helicity, it is argued that the latter must be included as an extra degree of freedom in the dynamics of skyrmions. An effective description of the skyrmion dynamics for an arbitrary inhomogeneous DMI coupling is obtained through the collective coordinates method. The resulting generalized Thiele equation is a dynamical system for the center of mass position and helicity of the skyrmion. It is found that the dissipative tensor and hence the Hall angle become helicity dependent. The skyrmion position and helicity dynamics are fully characterized by our model in two particular examples of engineered DMI coupling: half-planes with opposite-sign DMI and linearly varying DMI. In light of the experiment of Shibata et al (2013 Nat. Nanotechnol. 8 723) on the magnitude and sign of the DMI, our results constitute the first step toward a more complete understanding of the skyrmion helicity as a new degree of freedom that could be harnessed in future high-density magnetic storage and logic devices.

  3. Generation of Subwavelength Plasmonic Nanovortices via Helically Corrugated Metallic Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changming; Chen, Xianfeng; Oladipo, Abiola O; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-08-17

    We demonstrate that plasmonic helical gratings consisting of metallic nanowires imprinted with helical grooves or ridges can be used efficiently to generate plasmonic vortices with radius much smaller than the operating wavelength. In our proposed approach, these helical surface gratings are designed so that plasmon modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers (topological charge) are phase-matched, thus allowing one to generate optical plasmonic vortices with arbitrary topological charge. The general principles for designing plasmonic helical gratings that facilitate efficient generation of such plasmonic vortices are derived and their applicability to the conversion of plasmonic vortices with zero angular momentum into plasmonic vortices with arbitrary angular momentum is illustrated in several particular cases. Our analysis, based both on the exact solutions for the electromagnetic field propagating in the helical plasmonic grating and a coupled-mode theory, suggests that even in the presence of metal losses the fundamental mode with topological charge m = 0 can be converted to plasmon vortex modes with topological charge m = 1 and m = 2 with a conversion efficiency as large as 60%. The plasmonic nanovortices introduced in this study open new avenues for exciting applications of orbital angular momentum in the nanoworld.

  4. Microscopic Processes in Global Relativistic Jets Containing Helical Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Nishikawa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study of relativistic jets one of the key open questions is their interaction with the environment on the microscopic level. Here, we study the initial evolution of both electron–proton ( e − – p + and electron–positron ( e ± relativistic jets containing helical magnetic fields, focusing on their interaction with an ambient plasma. We have performed simulations of “global” jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI and the Mushroom instability (MI. In our initial simulation study these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. In the e − – p + jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed. In the e ± jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by a kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without helical magnetic field. Simulations using much larger systems are required in order to thoroughly follow the evolution of global jets containing helical magnetic fields.

  5. Structural Interplay - Tuning Mechanics in Peptide-Polyurea Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korley, Lashanda

    Utilizing cues from natural materials, we have been inspired to explore the hierarchical arrangement critical to energy absorption and mechanical enhancement in synthetic systems. Of particular interest is the soft domain ordering proposed as a contributing element to the observed toughness in spider silk. Multiblock copolymers, are ideal and dynamic systems in which to explore this approach via variations in secondary structure of nature's building blocks - peptides. We have designed a new class of polyurea hybrids that incorporate peptidic copolymers as the soft segment. The impact of hierarchical ordering on the thermal, mechanical, and morphological behavior of these bio-inspired polyurethanes with a siloxane-based, peptide soft segment was investigated. These peptide-polyurethane/urea hybrids were microphase segregated, and the beta-sheet secondary structure of the soft segment was preserved during polymerization and film casting. Toughness enhancement at low strains was achieved, but the overall extensibility of the peptide-incorporated systems was reduced due to the unique hard domain organization. To decouple the secondary structure influence in the siloxane-peptide soft segment from mechanics dominated by the hard domain, we also developed non-chain extended peptide-polyurea hybrids in which the secondary structure (beta sheet vs. alpha helix) was tuned via choice of peptide and peptide length. It was shown that this structural approach allowed tailoring of extensibility, toughness, and modulus. The sheet-dominant hybrid materials were typically tougher and more elastic due to intermolecular H-bonding facilitating load distribution, while the helical-prevalent systems generally exhibited higher stiffness. Recently, we have explored the impact of a molecular design strategy that overlays a covalent and physically crosslinked architecture in these peptide-polyurea hybrids, demonstrating that physical constraints in the network hybrids influences peptide

  6. Peptidomic analysis of skin secretions of the Mexican burrowing toad Rhinophrynus dorsalis (Rhinophrynidae): Insight into the origin of host-defense peptides within the Pipidae and characterization of a proline-arginine-rich peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Guilhaudis, Laure; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Attoub, Samir; Jouenne, Thierry; King, Jay D

    2017-11-01

    The Mexican burrowing toad Rhinophrynus dorsalis is the sole extant representative of the Rhinophrynidae. United in the superfamily Pipoidea, the Rhinophrynidae is considered to be the sister-group to the extant Pipidae which comprises Hymenochirus, Pipa, Pseudhymenochirus and Xenopus. Cationic, α-helical host-defense peptides of the type found in Hymenochirus, Pseudhymenochirus, and Xenopus species (hymenochirins, pseudhymenochirins, magainins, and peptides related to PGLa, XPF, and CPF) were not detected in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of R. dorsalis. Skin secretions of representatives of the genus Pipa also do not contain cationic α-helical host-defense peptides which suggest, as the most parsimonious hypothesis, that the ability to produce such peptides by frogs within the Pipidae family arose in the common ancestor of (Hymenochirus+Pseudhymenochirus)+Xenopus after divergence from the line of evolution leading to extant Pipa species. Peptidomic analysis of the R. dorsalis secretions led to the isolation of rhinophrynin-27, a proline-arginine-rich peptide with the primary structure ELRLPEIARPVPEVLPARLPLPALPRN, together with rhinophrynin-33 containing the C-terminal extension KMAKNQ. Rhinophrynin-27 shows limited structural similarity to the porcine multifunctional peptide PR-39 but it lacks antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Like PR-39, the peptide adopts a poly-l-proline helix but some changes in the circular dichroism spectrum were observed in the presence of anionic sodium dodecylsulfate micelles consistent with the stabilization of turn structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Circular dichroism and UV resonance Raman study of the impact of alcohols on the Gibbs free energy landscape of an α-helical peptide†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kan; Asher, Sanford A

    2010-01-01

    We used CD and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy to study the impact of alcohols on the conformational equilibria and relative Gibbs free energy landscapes along the Ramanchandran Ψ-coordinate of a mainly poly-ala peptide, AP of sequence AAAAA(AAARA)3A. 2,2,2-trifluroethanol (TFE) most stabilizes the α-helical-like conformations, followed by ethanol, methanol and pure water. The π-bulge conformation is stabilized more than the α-helix, while the 310-helix is destabilized due to the alcohol increased hydrophobicity. Turns are also stabilized by alcohols. We also found that while TFE induces more α-helices, it favors multiple, shorter helix segments. PMID:20225890

  8. Effects of multiple-helicity fields on ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gigu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    Effects of multiple-helicity magnetic fields on ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD) are studied by means of the linear gyrokinetic theory. Especially, dependence of the real frequency, growth rate, and the eigenfunction of the ITG mode on sideband-helicity fields added to the main helical component is investigated. Comparison between multiple-helicity effects on the ITG mode with those on the neoclassical ripple transport is presented, and optimization of the magnetic configuration for better plasma confinement is discussed. (author)

  9. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  11. Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2000-02-22

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  12. Electrostatic braiding and homologous pairing of DNA double helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Lee, Dominic J; Leikin, Sergey

    2011-08-17

    Homologous pairing and braiding (supercoiling) have crucial effects on genome organization, maintenance, and evolution. Generally, the pairing and braiding processes are discussed in different contexts, independently of each other. However, analysis of electrostatic interactions between DNA double helices suggests that in some situations these processes may be related. Here we present a theory of DNA braiding that accounts for the elastic energy of DNA double helices as well as for the chiral nature of the discrete helical patterns of DNA charges. This theory shows that DNA braiding may be affected, stabilized, or even driven by chiral electrostatic interactions. For example, electrostatically driven braiding may explain the surprising recent observation of stable pairing of homologous double-stranded DNA in solutions containing only monovalent salt. Electrostatic stabilization of left-handed braids may stand behind the chiral selectivity of type II topoisomerases and positive plasmid supercoiling in hyperthermophilic bacteria and archea. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Geometric scalings for the electrostatically driven helical plasma state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Cihan; Finn, John M.; Nebel, Richard A.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2017-12-01

    A new plasma state has been investigated [Akcay et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052503 (2017)], with a uniform applied axial magnetic field in a periodic cylinder of length L = 2 π R , driven by helical electrodes. The drive is single helicity, depending on m θ + k z = m θ - n ζ , where ζ = z / R and k = - n / R . For strong ( m , n ) = ( 1 , 1 ) drive, the state was found to have a strong axial mean current density, with a mean-field safety factor q 0 ( r ) just above the pitch of the electrodes m / n = 1 in the interior. This state has possible applications to DC electrical transformers and tailoring of the current profile in tokamaks. We study two geometric issues of interest for these applications: (i) scaling of properties with the plasma length or aspect ratio and (ii) behavior for different helicities, specifically ( m , n ) = ( 1 , n ) for n > 1 and ( m , n ) = ( 2 , 1 ) .

  14. Helical Nanomachines for Fast Mechanical Mapping of Heterogeneous Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Artificial micro and nano machines have been envisioned and demonstrated as potential candidates for variety of applications, ranging from targeted drug or gene delivery, cell manipulation, environmental sensing and many more. Here, we demonstrate the application of helical nanomachines that can measure and map the local rheological properties of a complex heterogeneous environment. The position of the helical nanomachine was controlled precisely using magnetic fields, while the instantaneous orientation provided an estimation of the viscosity of the surrounding medium with high spatial and temporal accuracy. Apart from providing viscosity estimates in purely viscous and viscoelastic media with shear rate independent viscosity (Boger fluids), their motion was also found to be extremely sensitive to fluid elasticity. Taken together we report a promising new technique of mapping the rheological properties of a complex fluidic environment by helical nanomachines with high spatial and temporal resolutions, a func...

  15. MAGNETIC HELICITY REVERSALS IN A CYCLIC CONVECTIVE DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Zhang, Mei [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Augustson, Kyle C., E-mail: miesch@ucar.edu [CEA/DRF/IRFU Service d’Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, Batiment 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2016-06-10

    We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in promoting cyclic magnetic activity in a global, 3D, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo. This simulation is characterized by coherent bands of toroidal field that exist within the convection zone, with opposite polarities in the northern hemisphere (NH) and southern hemisphere (SH). Throughout most of the cycle, the magnetic helicity in these bands is negative in the NH and positive in the SH. However, during the declining phase of each cycle, this hemispheric rule reverses. We attribute this to a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that is induced by the interaction of the bands across the equator. This band interaction appears to be ultimately responsible for, or at least associated with, the decay and subsequent reversal of both the toroidal bands and the polar fields. We briefly discuss the implications of these results within the context of solar observations, which also show some potential evidence for toroidal band interactions and helicity reversals.

  16. The large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a non-local inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic fields. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero-flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  17. Fabrication of a magnetic helical mesostructured silica rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang Qiao, Shi; Cheng, Lina; Yan, Zifeng; Qing Lu, Gao Max

    2008-10-01

    We report a one-step synthesis of magnetic helical mesostructured silica (MHMS) by self-assembly of an achiral surfactant, magnetic nanocrystals with stearic acid ligands and silicate. This core-shell structured material consists of an Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanocrystal core and a highly ordered periodic helical mesoporous silica shell. We propose that the formation of the helical structure is induced by the interaction between the surfactant and dissociated stearic acid ligands. The MHMS obtained possesses superparamagnetism, uniform mesostructure, narrow pore size distribution, high surface area, and large pore volume. Furthermore, the drug release process is demonstrated using aspirin as a drug model and MHMS as a drug carrier in a sodium phosphate buffer solution.

  18. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  19. Swimming of helically-undulating rings in a Stokes fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauci, Lisa; Nguyen, Hoa; Ortiz, Ricardo; Cortez, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Dinoflagellates swim due to the action of two eucaryotic flagella - a trailing, longitundinal flagellum that propagates planar waves, and a transverse flagellum that propagates helical waves. The transverse flagellum wraps around the cell in a plane perpendicular to the trailing flagellum, and is thought to provide both forward thrust along with rotational torque. Motivated by the intriguing function of this transverse flagellum, we study the fundamental fluid dynamics of a helically-undulating ring in a Stokes fluid. We use slender-body theory to compute the steady-state transverse and rotational swimming velocities of the ring in free- space, due to an imposed helical traveling wave. In addition, we study the dynamics of an undulating, elastic ring moving in both free-space and near a plane wall using the method of regularized Stokeslets.

  20. Comparison of Helical tomotherapy and Cyberknife in Spine Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Nam; Yoon, Se Chul; Chi, Byung Ok; Jng, Hong Suk; Sohn, Suk Hyun [Seoul ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gee Young; Shin, Heon Ju; Choi, Ilbong; Gea, Cheol Seong [Incheon ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study is planning comparison of helicaltomotherapy and Cyber knife in spine radiosurgery. Spine radiosurgery is an alternative to invasive spine surgery. The tomotherapy is megavoltage CT(MVCT) based image guided helical IMRT delivery system. The cyberknife using robotic arm and image guided based fiducial marker killo voltage X-ray image. The helical tomotherapy is modulated by a 64-multileaf collimator that has paired, pneumatically driven, 6.25-mm-wide leaves calculated to open or close at approximately every 7 .deg. of LINAC rotation, or 51 times per gantry rotation. But cyber knife use 100 or more than bean path. Although, cord maximum dose in CKP is lower than HTP, target homogeneity in HTP is better than CKP. Target coverage is 85% in CKP, 92% in HTP. It was benefit of helical radiation therapy. Tomotheapy and cyberknife are useful equipment to spine radiosurgery.

  1. Helical liquid and the edge of quantum spin Hall systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Congjun; Bernevig, B Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2006-03-17

    The edge states of the recently proposed quantum spin Hall systems constitute a new symmetry class of one-dimensional liquids dubbed the "helical liquid," where the spin orientation is determined by the direction of electron motion. We prove a no-go theorem which states that a helical liquid with an odd number of components cannot be constructed in a purely 1D lattice system. In a helical liquid with an odd number of components, a uniform gap in the ground state can appear when the time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken by interactions. On the other hand, a correlated two-particle backscattering term by an impurity can become relevant while keeping the time-reversal invariance.

  2. Cooperative polymerization of α-helices induced by macromolecular architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Ryan; Fu, Hailin; Song, Ziyuan; Lin, Yao; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-07-01

    Catalysis observed in enzymatic processes and protein polymerizations often relies on the use of supramolecular interactions and the organization of functional elements in order to gain control over the spatial and temporal elements of fundamental cellular processes. Harnessing these cooperative interactions to catalyse reactions in synthetic systems, however, remains challenging due to the difficulty in creating structurally controlled macromolecules. Here, we report a polypeptide-based macromolecule with spatially organized α-helices that can catalyse its own formation. The system consists of a linear polymeric scaffold containing a high density of initiating groups from which polypeptides are grown, forming a brush polymer. The folding of polypeptide side chains into α-helices dramatically enhances the polymerization rate due to cooperative interactions of macrodipoles between neighbouring α-helices. The parameters that affect the rate are elucidated by a two-stage kinetic model using principles from nucleation-controlled protein polymerizations; the key difference being the irreversible nature of this polymerization.

  3. Solution structures, dynamics, and ice growth inhibitory activity of peptide fragments derived from an antarctic yeast protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hussinien H Shah

    Full Text Available Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities.

  4. Solution structures, dynamics, and ice growth inhibitory activity of peptide fragments derived from an antarctic yeast protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Hussinien H; Kar, Rajiv K; Asmawi, Azren A; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A; Murad, Abdul Munir A; Mahadi, Nor M; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A; Salleh, Abu B; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities.

  5. Structure and Membrane Interactions of the Antibiotic Peptide Dermadistinctin K by Multidimensional Solution and Oriented 15N and 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça; Resende, Jarbas M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C.L.; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    DD K, a peptide first isolated from the skin secretion of the Phyllomedusa distincta frog, has been prepared by solid-phase chemical peptide synthesis and its conformation was studied in trifluoroethanol/water as well as in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles or small unilamellar vesicles. Multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy indicates an α-helical conformation in membrane environments starting at residue 7 and extending to the C-terminal carboxyami...

  6. Variation in the helical structure of native collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available The structure of collagen has been a matter of curiosity, investigation, and debate for the better part of a century. There has been a particularly productive period recently, during which much progress has been made in better describing all aspects of collagen structure. However, there remain some questions regarding its helical symmetry and its persistence within the triple-helix. Previous considerations of this symmetry have sometimes confused the picture by not fully recognizing that collagen structure is a highly complex and large hierarchical entity, and this affects and is effected by the super-coiled molecules that make it. Nevertheless, the symmetry question is not trite, but of some significance as it relates to extracellular matrix organization and cellular integration. The correlation between helical structure in the context of the molecular packing arrangement determines which parts of the amino acid sequence of the collagen fibril are buried or accessible to the extracellular matrix or the cell. In this study, we concentrate primarily on the triple-helical structure of fibrillar collagens I and II, the two most predominant types. By comparing X-ray diffraction data collected from type I and type II containing tissues, we point to evidence for a range of triple-helical symmetries being extant in the molecules native environment. The possible significance of helical instability, local helix dissociation and molecular packing of the triple-helices is discussed in the context of collagen's supramolecular organization, all of which must affect the symmetry of the collagen triple-helix.

  7. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, Szilard N.; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J.

    2014-07-01

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00324a

  8. Anticancer activity of CopA3 dimer peptide in human gastric cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dong-chul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-01-01

    CopA3 is a homodimeric α-helical peptide derived from coprisin which is a defensin-like antimicrobial peptide that was identified from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus. CopA3 has been reported to have anticancer activity against leukemia cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of CopA3 in human gastric cancer cells. CopA3 reduced cell viability and it was cytotoxic to gastric cancer cells in the MTS and LDH release assay, respectively. CopA3 was shown to...

  9. Helicity Selection Rules and Non-Interference for BSM Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Machado, Camila S.; Riva, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Precision studies of scattering processes at colliders provide powerful indirect constraints on new physics. We study the helicity structure of scattering amplitudes in the SM and in the context of an effective Lagrangian description of BSM dynamics. Our analysis reveals a novel set of helicity selection rules according to which, in the majority of 2 to 2 scattering processes at high energy, the SM and the leading BSM effects do not interfere. In such situations, the naive expectation that dimension-6 operators represent the leading BSM contribution is compromised, as corrections from dimension-8 operators can become equally (if not more) important well within the validity of the effective field theory approach.

  10. Radiation Field of a Square, Helical Beam Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Lottrup

    1952-01-01

    Rigorous formulas have been derived for the field from a square, helical antenna with a uniformly progressing current wave of constant amplitude. These formulas that have the advantage of great simplicity are of direct use for helical antennas in the meter band, where for practical reasons only...... with the results obtained from the rigorous formulas. A statement to the contrary made recently in the literature is shown to rest on a trivial error. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  11. Helical CT of calcaneal fractures: technique and imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, R.J.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Karasick, D.; Deely, D.M.; Morrison, W. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 111 South 11th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Since the degree of comminution, fracture alignment, and articular congruity of intra-articular calcaneal fractures are important determinants in surgical treatment and patient prognosis, we review helical computed tomographic (CT) technique and features for detecting and assessing the extent of acute calcaneal fractures. Helical CT can be used to classify these fractures and facilitate the surgeon`s understanding of the anatomy and position of the fracture components in all orthogonal planes independently of the patient`s condition, foot placement in the CT gantry, or other injuries. (orig.) With 13 figs., 13 refs.

  12. Fiber-guided modes conversion using superposed helical gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yancheng; Fang, Liang; Wu, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Optical fibers can support various modal forms, including vector modes, linear polarization (LP) modes, and orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes, etc. The modal correlation among these modes is investigated via Jones matrix, associated with polarization and helical phase corresponding to spin angular momentum (SAM) and OAM of light, respectively. We can generate different modal forms by adopting superposed helical gratings (SHGs) with opposite helix orientations. Detailed analysis and discussion on mode conversion is given as for mode coupling in optical fibers with both low and high contrast index, respectively. Our study may deepen the understanding for various fiber-guided modes and mode conversion among them via fiber gratings.

  13. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara

    2013-01-01

    . Our experiments focused on the production and development of catalysts for the synthesis of helically coiled CNTs (carbon nanotubes). The catalysts were tested in the decomposition of acetylene by CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) method. The carbon deposit was imaged by TEM (Transmission......Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenner...

  14. Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity: Efficacy and action mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiaobao; Zhou, Chuncai; Li, Peng [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 Singapore (Singapore); Xu, Weixin [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, 637551 Singapore (Singapore); Cao, Ye; Ling, Hua; Ning Chen, Wei; Ming Li, Chang; Xu, Rong [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 Singapore (Singapore); Lamrani, Mouad [Menicon Co., Ltd. Immeuble Espace Cordeliers, 2, rue President Carnot, 69002 Lyon (France); Mu, Yuguang, E-mail: ygmu@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, 637551 Singapore (Singapore); Leong, Susanna Su Jan [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 Singapore (Singapore); Wook Chang, Matthew, E-mail: matthewchang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 Singapore (Singapore); Chan-Park, Mary B., E-mail: mbechan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Short antimicrobial peptides with nine and eleven residues were developed. {yields} These peptides show strong bactericidal activity against clinically important bacterial and fungal pathogens. {yields} These peptides exhibit high stability in the presence of salts, and low cytotoxicity. {yields} These peptides exert their action by disrupting membrane lipids. -- Abstract: Short antimicrobial peptides with nine and eleven residues were developed against several clinically important bacterial and fungal pathogens (specifically Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and Fusarium solani). Twelve analogues of previously reported peptides BP76 (KKLFKKILKFL) and Pac-525 (KWRRWVRWI) were designed, synthesized, and tested for their antimicrobial activities. Two of our eleven amino acid peptides, P11-5 (GKLFKKILKIL) and P11-6 (KKLIKKILKIL), have very low MICs of 3.1-12.5 {mu}g ml{sup -1} against all five pathogens. The MICs of these two peptides against S. aureus, C. albicans and F. solani are four to ten times lower than the corresponding MICs of the reference peptide BP76. P9-4 (KWRRWIRWL), our newly designed nine-amino acid analogue, also has particularly low MICs of 3.1-6.2 {mu}g ml{sup -1} against four of the tested pathogens; these MICs are two to eight times lower than those reported for Pac-525 (6.2-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1}).These new peptides (P11-5, P11-6 and P9-4) also exhibit improved stability in the presence of salts, and have low cytotoxicity as shown by the hemolysis and MTT assays. From the results of field-emission scanning electron microscopy, membrane depolarization and dye-leakage assays, we propose that these peptides exert their action by disrupting membrane lipids. Molecular dynamics simulation studies confirm that P11-6 peptide maintains relatively stable helical structure and exerts more perturbation action on the order of acyl tail of lipid bilayer.

  15. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits antibacterial activity against E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpakala Sainath Rao

    Full Text Available Emergence of drug resistant strains to currently available antibiotics has resulted in the quest for novel antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are receiving attention as alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, we used phage-display random peptide library to identify peptides binding to the cell surface of E. coli. The peptide with sequence RLLFRKIRRLKR (EC5 bound to the cell surface of E. coli and exhibited certain features common to AMPs and was rich in Arginine and Lysine residues. Antimicrobial activity of the peptide was tested in vitro by growth inhibition assays and the bacterial membrane permeabilization assay. The peptide was highly active against gram-negative organisms and showed significant bactericidal activity against E. coli and P. aeruginosa resulting in a reduction of 5 log(10 CFU/ml. In homologous plasma and platelets, incubation of EC5 with the bacteria resulted in significant reduction of E. coli and P. aeruginosa, compared to the peptide-free controls. The peptide was non-hemolytic and non-cytotoxic when tested on eukaryotic cells in culture. EC5 was able to permeabilize the outer membrane of E. coli and P. aeruginosa causing rapid depolarization of cytoplasmic membrane resulting in killing of the cells at 5 minutes of exposure. The secondary structure of the peptide showed a α-helical conformation in the presence of aqueous environment. The bacterial lipid interaction with the peptide was also investigated using Molecular Dynamic Simulations. Thus this study demonstrates that peptides identified to bind to bacterial cell surface through phage-display screening may additionally aid in identifying and developing novel antimicrobial peptides.

  16. Spatial structure and activity mechanism of a novel spider antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovskii, Peter V; Volynsky, Pavel E; Polyansky, Anton A; Chupin, Vladimir V; Efremov, Roman G; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2006-09-05

    Latarcins (Ltc), linear peptides (ca. 25 amino acid long) isolated from the venom of the Lachesana tarabaevi spider, exhibit a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, most likely acting on the bacterial plasmatic membrane. We study the structure-activity relationships in the series of these compounds. At the first stage, we investigated the spatial structure of one of the peptides, Ltc2a, and its mode of membrane perturbation. This was done by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. The approach includes (i) structural study of the peptide by CD spectroscopy in phospholipid liposomes and by (1)H NMR in detergent micelles, (ii) determination of the effect on the liposomes by a dye leakage fluorescent assay and (31)P NMR spectroscopy, (iii) refinement of the NMR-derived spatial structure via Monte Carlo simulations in an implicit water-octanol slab, and (iv) calculation of the molecular hydrophobicity potential. The molecule of Ltc2a was found to consist of two helical regions (residues 3-9 and 13-21) connected via a poorly ordered fragment. The effect of the peptide on the liposomes suggests the carpet mechanism of the membrane deterioration. This is also supported by the analysis of hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristics of Ltc2a and homologous antimicrobial peptides. These peptides exhibiting a helix-hinge-helix structural motif are characterized by a distinct and feebly marked amphiphilicity of their N- and C-terminal helices, respectively, and by a hydrophobicity gradient along the peptide chain. The approach we suggested may be useful in studying not only other latarcins but also a wider class of membrane-active peptides.

  17. The Relation Between Thermodynamic and Structural Properties and Cellular Uptake of Peptides Containing Tryptophan and Arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shirani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are used for delivering drugs and other macromolecular cargo into living cells. In this paper, we investigated the relationship between the structural/physicochemical properties of four new synthetic peptides containing arginine-tryptophan in terms of their cell membrane penetration efficiency. Methods: The peptides were prepared using solid phase synthesis procedure using FMOC protected amino acids. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence imaging were used to evaluate uptake efficiency. Prediction of the peptide secondary structure and estimation of physicochemical properties was performed using the GOR V method and MPEx 3.2 software (Wimley-White scale, helical wheel projection and total hydrophobic moment. Results: Our data showed that the uptake efficiency of peptides with two tryptophans at the Cand N-terminus were significantly higher (about 4-fold than that of peptides containing three tryptophans at both ends. The distribution of arginine at both ends also increased the uptake efficiency 2.52- and 7.18-fold, compared with arginine distribution at the middle of peptides. Conclusion: According to the obtained results the value of transfer free energies of peptides from the aqueous phase to membrane bilayer could be a good predictor for the cellular uptake efficiency of CPPs.

  18. HDL apolipoprotein-related peptides in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, G S; Wool, G D; Reardon, C A

    2010-01-01

    Elevations of HDL levels or modifying the inflammatory properties of HDL are being evaluated as possible treatment of atherosclerosis, the underlying mechanism responsible for most cardiovascular diseases. A promising approach is the use of small HDL apoprotein-related mimetic peptides. A number of peptides mimicking the repeating amphipathic α-helical structure in apoA-I, the major apoprotein in HDL, have been examined in vitro and in animal models. Several peptides have been shown to reduce early atherosclerotic lesions, but not more mature lesions unless coadministered with statins. These peptides also influence the vascular biology of the vessel wall and protect against other acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The biologically active peptides are capable of reducing the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL and HDL, likely due to their high affinity for oxidized lipids. They are also capable of influencing other processes, including ABCA1 mediated activation of JAK-2 in macrophages, which may contribute to their anti-atherogenic function. The initial studies involved monomeric 18 amino acid peptides, but tandem peptides are being investigated for their anti-atherogenic and anti-inflammatory properties as they more closely resemble the repeating structure of apoA-I. Peptides based on other HDL associated proteins such as apoE, apoJ and SAA have also been studied. Their mechanism of action appears to be distinct from the apoA-I based mimetics.

  19. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  20. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  1. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve the synthesis of peptides with asparagine and glutamine residues, various carboxamide ... protecting groups in solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method eliminates all .... to the filtrate, the solution was washed with three 9 mL portions of 5% aqueous citric acid, three 12 mL portions of 5% ...

  2. Multidimensional Design of Anticancer Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lin YC; Lim YF; Russo E.; Schneider P; Bolliger L; Edenharter A; Altmann KH; Halin C; Hiss JA; Schneider G

    2015-01-01

    The computer assisted design and optimization of peptides with selective cancer cell killing activity was achieved through merging the features of anticancer peptides cell penetrating peptides and tumor homing peptides. Machine learning classifiers identified candidate peptides that possess the predicted properties. Starting from a template amino acid sequence peptide cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines was systematically optimized while minimizing the effects on primary human e...

  3. Designer lipid-like peptides: a class of detergents for studying functional olfactory receptors using commercial cell-free systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available A crucial bottleneck in membrane protein studies, particularly G-protein coupled receptors, is the notorious difficulty of finding an optimal detergent that can solubilize them and maintain their stability and function. Here we report rapid production of 12 unique mammalian olfactory receptors using short designer lipid-like peptides as detergents. The peptides were able to solubilize and stabilize each receptor. Circular dichroism showed that the purified olfactory receptors had alpha-helical secondary structures. Microscale thermophoresis suggested that the receptors were functional and bound their odorants. Blot intensity measurements indicated that milligram quantities of each olfactory receptor could be produced with at least one peptide detergent. The peptide detergents' capability was comparable to that of the detergent Brij-35. The ability of 10 peptide detergents to functionally solubilize 12 olfactory receptors demonstrates their usefulness as a new class of detergents for olfactory receptors, and possibly other G-protein coupled receptors and membrane proteins.

  4. Roles of effective helical ripple rates in nonlinear stability of externally induced magnetic islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic islands are externally produced by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in toroidal plasmas. Spontaneous annihilation of RMP-induced magnetic islands called self-healing has been observed in helical systems. A possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by helical ripple-induced neoclassical flows, which give rise to neoclassical viscous torques. In this study, effective helical ripple rates in multi-helicity helical systems are revisited, and a multi-helicity effect on the self-healing is investigated, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands. It is confirmed that effective helical ripple rates are sensitive to magnetic axis positions. It is newly found that self-healing thresholds also strongly depend on magnetic axis positions, which is due to dependence of neoclassical viscous torques on effective helical ripple rates.

  5. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    Oral administration of therapeutic peptides could benefit millions of chronically ill people worldwide, through easier and less stigmatized therapy, and likely improve the long-term effects of currently widespread disease mismanagement. However, oral peptide delivery is a formidable task due......, but it is not widely studied in an oral context. As acylation furthermore increases interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells, it offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation...... to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation...

  6. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  7. What Helicity Can Tell Us about Solar Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Later, the concept was successfully applied in studies of different solar processes from solar dynamo to flare and CME phenomena. Although no silver bullet, helicity has proven to be a very useful “tool” in answering many still-puzzling questions about origin and evolution of solar magnetic fields. I present an overview of ...

  8. Mechanics of tunable helices and geometric frustration in biomimetic seashells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaohang; Chen, Zi; Li, Wei; Dai, Pinqiang; Ren, Kun; Lin, Junjie; Taber, Larry A.; Chen, Wenzhe

    2014-03-01

    Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and engineering, ranging from DNA molecules to plant tendrils, from sea snail shells to nanoribbons. While the helical shapes in natural and engineered systems often exhibit nearly uniform radius and pitch, helical shell structures with changing radius and pitch, such as seashells and some plant tendrils, add to the variety of this family of aesthetic beauty. Here we develop a comprehensive theoretical framework for tunable helical morphologies, and report the first biomimetic seashell-like structure resulting from mechanics of geometric frustration. In previous studies, the total potential energy is everywhere minimized when the system achieves equilibrium. In this work, however, the local energy minimization cannot be realized because of the geometric incompatibility, and hence the whole system deforms into a shape with a global energy minimum whereby the energy in each segment may not necessarily be locally optimized. This novel approach can be applied to develop materials and devices of tunable geometries with a range of applications in nano/biotechnology.

  9. Alpha-Effect, Current and Kinetic Helicities for Magnetically Driven ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam, Germany. *e-mail: gbelvedere @alpha4. ct. astro. it. Key words. Sun—dynamo, helicity, turbulent convection. Extended abstract. Recent numerical simulations lead to the result that turbulence is much more mag- netically driven than believed.

  10. Helicity of Solar Active Regions from a Dynamo Model Piyali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    above need not be mutually exclusive: both may be simultaneously operative. A careful comparison between observational data and detailed theoretical models will be needed to ascertain the relative importance of these two effects. We present here calculations of helicity based on our two-dimensional kinematic.

  11. Field-theoretic calculation of kinetic helicity flux

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bulence and compute the fluxes of energy and kinetic helicity. The renormalized viscosity computed using RG procedure is used in the calculation. Contrast this with the arbitrary constant used in EDQNM calculation. In addition, the EDQNM calculations require numerical integration of energy equation, which is not required.

  12. Performance of Upgraded Cooling System for Lhd Helical Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Obana, T.; Yanagi, N.; Moriuchi, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Oba, K.; Mito, T.; Motojima, O.; Okamura, T.; Semba, T.; Yoshinaga, S.; Wakisaka, H.

    2008-03-01

    Helical coils of the Large Helical Device (LHD) are large scale superconducting magnets for heliotron plasma experiments. The helical coils had been cooled by saturated helium at 4.4 K, 120 kPa until 2005. An upgrade of the cooling system was carried out in 2006 in order to improve the cryogenic stability of the helical coils and then it has been possible to supply the coils with subcooled helium at 3.2 K, 120 kPa. A designed mass flow of the supplied subcooled helium is 50 g/s. The subcooled helium is generated at a heat exchanger in a saturated helium bath. A series of two centrifugal cold compressors with gas foil bearing is utilized to lower the helium pressure in the bath. The supplied helium temperature is regulated by rotational speed of the cold compressors and power of a heater in the bath. The mass flow of the supplied helium is also controlled manually by a supply valve and its surplus is evaporated by ten heaters at the outlet above the coils. In the present study, the performance of the cooling system has been investigated and a stable operating method has also developed. As the result, it was confirmed that the performance of the upgraded cooling system satisfies the requirements.

  13. The Hemispheric Sign Rule of Current Helicity during the Rising ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We compute the signs of two different current helicity parameters (i.e., best and ) for 87 active regions during the rise of cycle 23. The results indicate that 59% of the active regions in the northern hemisphere have negative best and 65% in the southern hemisphere have positive. This is consistent with that of the cycle ...

  14. Helical Phase Inflation and Monodromy in Supergravity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study helical phase inflation which realizes “monodromy inflation” in supergravity theory. In the model, inflation is driven by the phase component of a complex field whose potential possesses helicoid structure. We construct phase monodromy based on explicitly breaking global U(1 symmetry in the superpotential. By integrating out heavy fields, the phase monodromy from single complex scalar field is realized and the model fulfills natural inflation. The phase-axion alignment is achieved from explicitly symmetry breaking and gives super-Planckian phase decay constant. The F-term scalar potential provides strong field stabilization for all the scalars except inflaton, which is protected by the approximate global U(1 symmetry. Besides, we show that helical phase inflation can be naturally realized in no-scale supergravity with SU(2,1/SU(2×U(1 symmetry since the supergravity setup needed for phase monodromy is automatically provided in the no-scale Kähler potential. We also demonstrate that helical phase inflation can be reduced to another well-known supergravity inflation model with shift symmetry. Helical phase inflation is free from the UV-sensitivity problem although there is super-Planckian field excursion, and it suggests that inflation can be effectively studied based on supersymmetric field theory while a UV-completed framework is not prerequisite.

  15. Instability of helical tip vortices in rotor wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    The conditions for the appearance of instabilities in systems of helical vortices constitute an intriguing problem that still remains partly unsolved. The experimental study of Felli, Camussi & Di Felice (J. Fluid Mech., this issue, vol. 682, 2011, pp. 5-53) has shed new light on some of the basi...

  16. Generation of hypermagnetic helicity and leptogenesis in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semikoz, V. B.; Smirnov, A. Yu.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2016-05-01

    We study hypermagnetic helicity and lepton asymmetry evolution in the plasma of the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition accounting for chirality flip processes via inverse Higgs decays and sphaleron transitions which violate the left lepton number and wash out the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (BAU). In the scenario where the right electron asymmetry supports the BAU alone through the conservation law B /3 -Le R=const at temperatures T >TRL≃10 TeV , the following Universe cooling leads to the production of a nonzero left lepton (electrons and neutrinos) asymmetry. This is due to the Higgs decays becoming faster when entering the equilibrium at T =TRL, with the Universe expansion, ΓRL˜T >H ˜T2 , resulting in the parallel evolution of the right and left electron asymmetries at T helicity evolution proceeds in a self-consistent way with the lepton asymmetry growth. The role of sphaleron transitions in decreasing the left lepton number turns out to be negligible in a given scenario. The hypermagnetic helicity plays a key role in lepto-/baryogenesis in our scenario, and the more hypermagnetic field gets closer to the maximum helical one the faster the BAU grows to the observable value, Bobs˜1 0-10 .

  17. Numerical investigations of turbulent flow characteristics in helically finned pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygârd, F.; Andersson, H. I.

    2011-12-01

    A helical fin in a circular pipe is a means to generate swirling flow and the swirling motion will in turn modulate the turbulence field. This paper reports on a direct numerical simulation aimed to explore such flow phenomena. The full Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a cylindrical coordinate system are integrated numerically in time and the helical fin is embedded in the structured grid by means of an immersed boundary method. The statistically steady three-dimensional flow field exhibits a helical symmetry with an azimuthal mean velocity which amounts to about 50% of the axial mean velocity component. The variation of the mean flow over the cross-sections can be explained by the variations of the nine non-zero components of the Reynolds stress tensor. Particular attention is paid to the contribution of the Reynolds stresses to the skin-friction coefficient. Appreciable levels of fluctuating helicity are observed in the vicinity of the pipe wall and reflect that the swirling motion breaks the structural symmetry in conventional pipe flow.

  18. One-dimensional helical transport in topological insulator nanowire interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Sae; Zhang, Yi; Cha, Judy J; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-14

    The discovery of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators opens a gateway to generate unusual phases and particles made of the helical surface electrons, proposing new applications using unusual spin nature. Demonstration of the helical electron transport is a crucial step to both physics and device applications of topological insulators. Topological insulator nanowires, of which spin-textured surface electrons form 1D band manipulated by enclosed magnetic flux, offer a unique nanoscale platform to realize quantum transport of spin-momentum locking nature. Here, we report an observation of a topologically protected 1D mode of surface electrons in topological insulator nanowires existing at only two values of half magnetic quantum flux (±h/2e) due to a spin Berry's phase (π). The helical 1D mode is robust against disorder but fragile against a perpendicular magnetic field breaking-time-reversal symmetry. This result demonstrates a device with robust and easily accessible 1D helical electronic states from 3D topological insulators, a unique nanoscale electronic system to study topological phenomena.

  19. Helical rays in two-dimensional resonant wave conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Allan N.; Tracy, Eugene R.; Brizard, Alain J.

    2004-09-14

    The process of resonant wave conversion (often called linear mode conversion) has traditionally been analyzed with a spatially one-dimensional slab model, for which the rays propagate in a two-dimensional phase space. However, it has recently been shown [E.R. Tracy and A.N. Kaufman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 130402 (2003)] that multidimensional rays have a helical structure for conversion in two or more spatial dimensions (if their dispersion matrix is generic). In that case, a one-dimensional model is inadequate; a correct analysis requires two spatial dimensions and, thus, four-dimensional phase space. In this paper we show that a cold plasma model will exhibit ray helicity in conversion regions where the density and magnetic field gradients are significantly non-parallel. For illustration, we examine a model of the poloidal plane of a deuterium-tritium tokamak plasma, and identify such a region. In this region, characterized by a six-sector topology, rays in the sector for incident and reflected magnetosonic waves exhibit significant helicity. We introduce a ''symmetric-wedge'' model, to develop a detailed analytic and numerical study of helical rays in this sector.

  20. Helical rays in two-dimensional resonant wave conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Allan N.; Tracy, Eugene R.; Brizard, Alain J.

    2004-12-08

    The process of resonant wave conversion (often called linear mode conversion) has traditionally been analyzed with a spatially one-dimensional slab model, for which the rays propagate in a two-dimensional phase space. However, it has recently been shown [E.R. Tracy and A.N. Kaufman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 130402 (2003)] that multidimensional rays have a helical structure for conversion in two or more spatial dimensions (if their dispersion matrix is generic). In that case, a one-dimensional model is inadequate; a correct analysis requires two spatial dimensions and, thus, four-dimensional phase space. In this paper we show that a cold plasma model will exhibit ray helicity in conversion regions where the density and magnetic field gradients are significantly non-parallel. For illustration, we examine a model of the poloidal plane of a deuterium-tritium tokamak plasma, and identify such a region. In this region, characterized by a six-sector topology, rays in the sector for incident and reflected magnetosonic waves exhibit significant helicity. We introduce a ''symmetric-wedge'' model, to develop a detailed analytic and numerical study of helical rays in this sector.

  1. Shape selection and multi-stability in helical ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q.; Mehta, A. K.; Grover, M. A.; Chen, W.; Lynn, D. G.; Chen, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Helical structures, almost ubiquitous in biological systems, have inspired the design and manufacturing of helical devices with applications in nanoelecromechanical systems, morphing structures, optoelectronics, micro-robotics, and drug delivery devices. Meanwhile, multi-stable structures, represented by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelet, have attracted increasing attention due to their applications in making artificial muscles, bio-inspired robots, deployable aerospace components, and energy harvesting devices. Here we show that the mechanical anisotropy pertinent to helical deformation, together with geometric nonlinearity associated with multi-stability, can lead to a selection principle of the geometric shape and multi-stability in spontaneous helical ribbons. Simple table-top experiments were also performed to illustrate the working principle. Our work will promote understanding of spontaneous curling, twisting, wrinkling of thin objects, and their instabilities. The proposed theoretical framework can also serve as a tool for developing functional structures and devices featuring tunable, morphing geometries and smart actuation mechanisms that can be applied in a spectrum of areas.

  2. Numerical investigation of elastic modes of propagation in helical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treyssède, Fabien

    2007-06-01

    Steel multi-wire cables are widely employed in civil engineering. They are usually made of a straight core and one layer of helical wires. In order to detect material degradation, nondestructive evaluation methods based on ultrasonics are one of the most promising techniques. However, their use is complicated by the lack of accurate cable models. As a first step, the goal of this paper is to propose a numerical method for the study of elastic guided waves inside a single helical wire. A finite element (FE) technique is used based on the theory of wave propagation inside periodic structures. This method avoids the tedious writing of equilibrium equations in a curvilinear coordinate system yielding translational invariance along the helix centerline. Besides, no specific programming is needed inside a conventional FE code because it can be implemented as a postprocessing step of stiffness, mass and damping matrices. The convergence and accuracy of the proposed method are assessed by comparing FE results with Pochhammer-Chree solutions for the infinite isotropic cylinder. Dispersion curves for a typical helical waveguide are then obtained. In the low-frequency range, results are validated with a helical Timoshenko beam model. Some significant differences with the cylinder are observed.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies on a novel helical architecture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel two-dimensional (2D), layered, helical supramolecular architecture constructed via cooperative hydrogen bond and halogen bonds was synthesized and characterized: [(BMBA)₂(TPB)]n (1) [BMBA= 3-bromo-2-methylbenzoic acid, TPB = 1,2,3,4-tetra-(4-pyridyl)-butane]. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations ...

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies on a novel helical architecture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Helical supramolecular architecture; crystal structure; hydrogen bond; halogen bond; photoluminescence. 1. Introduction. As is well-known, crystal engineering comprises of an understanding of specific intermolecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonding (HB), halogen bonding (XB), electrostatic interaction and van der ...

  5. Position and Trajectrories of helical microswimmers inside circular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldag, Hakan; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2015-11-01

    This work reports the position and orientation of helical mm-sized microswimmers in circular channels obtained by image processing of recorded images. Microswimmers are biologically inspired structures with huge potential for medical practices such as delivery of potent drugs into tissues. In order to understand the hydrodynamic effects of confinement on the velocity and stability of trajectories of swimmers, we developed helical microswimmers with a magnetic head and a rigid helical tail, similar to those of E. coli bacteria. The experiments are recorded using a digital camera, which is placed above the experimental setup that consists of three Helmholtz pairs, generating a rotating magnetic field. A channel containing the microswimmer is placed along the axis of the innermost coil. Image processing tools based on contrast-enhancement are used to obtain the centroid of the head of the swimmer and orientation of the whole swimmer in the channel. Swimmers that move in the direction of the head, i.e. pushed kinematically by the tail, has helical trajectories, which are more unstable in the presence of Poiesuille flow inside the channel; and the swimmers that are pulled by the tail, have trajectories that stabilize at the centerline of the channel.

  6. Experimental observation of discrete helical modes in imploding cylindrical liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Zhang, P.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Campbell, P. C.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    The 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver at the University of Michigan was used to implode ultrathin (400 nm thick) cylindrical aluminum liners1 that were pre-embedded with externally applied, axial magnetic fields of Bz = 0.2 - 2.0 T. Using 12-frame laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission, helical striations were found that increased in pitch angle during the implosion and decreased in angle during the later time explosion, despite the relatively large, peak azimuthal magnetic field exceeding 40 T. The results are interpreted as a discrete, non-axisymmetric eigenmode of a helical instability that persists from implosion to explosion. The helical pitch angle φ was found to obey the simple relation φ = m / kR , where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius of the helical instability. Analytic growth rates2 for experimental parameters are presented, and show that early in the current pulse, axisymmetric modes (m = 0) are completely stabilized while non-axisymmetric modes (m > 1) are found to be unstable. This research was supported by DOE Award DE-SC0012328, Sandia National Laboratories, and the NSF. The fast framing camera was supported by AFOSR Grant #FA9550-15-1-0419.

  7. Locally Enhanced and Tunable Optical Chirality in Helical Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Philipp; Burger, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of optical chirality. Intertwined gold helices illuminated with plane waves concentrate right and left circularly polarized electromagnetic field energy to sub-wavelength regions. These spots of enhanced chirality can be smoothly shifted in position and magnitude by varying illumination parameters, allowing for the control of light-matter interactions on a nanometer scale.

  8. Experimental evaluation of helically coiled tube flocculators for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The constant need to improve water treatment techniques allows for the emergence of new technologies for obtaining adequate water, both in terms of quality and quantity. In order to obtain an efficient, rapid and low-cost clarification system, this study proposes the use of helically coiled tubes (HCTs) as a ...

  9. Geometrical influence on mixing in helical porous membrane microcontactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jani, J.M.; Jani, Jigar M.; Wessling, Matthias; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of gas–liquid micromixing has led to develop various kinds of passive micromixer configurations, which can be used for many microfluidics applications. This work details gas–liquid contacting using porous helical microchannels. An experimental and numerical design methodology for different

  10. The Hemispheric Sign Rule of Current Helicity during the Rising ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    S. D. Bao*, G. X. Ai & H. Q. Zhang, Beijing Astronomical Observatory/National. Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100 012, China. *e mail: bshd@sunl0.bao.ac.cn. Abstract. We compute the signs of two different current helicity para meters (i.e., α best and H c) for 87 active regions during the ...

  11. In situ control of polymer helicity with a non-covalently bound photoresponsive molecular motor dopant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Heideman, G Henrieke; Zhao, Depeng; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-06-13

    The transfer of chirality from a molecular motor to a dynamic helical polymer via ionic interactions was investigated. A dopant with photoswitchable chirality was able to induce a preferred helicity in a poly(phenylacetylene) polymer and the helicity is inverted upon irradiation. The findings described herein will advance the development of functional and responsive polymeric systems.

  12. Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helical channels are widely applied in different application areas. In a converging diverging nozzle, helical channels are mainly used for cooling of its wall. The characteristics of fluid flow and heat transfer inside helical duct for a converging diverging nozzle is not commonly dealt in present literatures. In this paper CFD ...

  13. A Lennard-Jones-like perspective on first order transitions in biological helices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskolkov, Nikolay N.; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Helical structures with Lennard-Jones self-interactions are studied for optimal conformations. For this purpose, their self-energy is analyzed for extrema with respect to the geometric parameters of the helices. It is found that Lennard-Jones helices exhibit a first order phase transition from a ...

  14. Self-Assembly of Aβ40, Aβ42 and Aβ43 Peptides in Aqueous Mixtures of Fluorinated Alcohols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjai Kumar Pachahara

    Full Text Available Fluorinated alcohols such as hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP and trifluoroethanol (TFE have the ability to promote α-helix and β-hairpin structure in proteins and peptides. HFIP has been used extensively to dissolve various amyloidogenic proteins and peptides including Aβ, in order to ensure their monomeric status. In this paper, we have investigated the self-assembly of Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ43 in aqueous mixtures of fluorinated alcohols from freshly dissolved stock solutions in HFIP. We have observed that formation of fibrillar and non-fibrillar structures are dependent on the solvent composition. Peptides form fibrils with ease when reconstituted in deionized water from freshly dissolved HFIP stocks. In aqueous mixtures of fluorinated alcohols, either predominant fibrillar structures or clustered aggregates were observed. Aqueous mixtures of 20% HFIP are more favourable for Aβ fibril formation as compared to 20% TFE. When Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ43 stocks in HFIP are diluted in 50% aqueous mixtures in phosphate buffer or deionized water followed by slow evaporation of HFIP, Aβ peptides form fibrils in phosphate buffer and deionized water. The clustered structures could be off-pathway aggregates. Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ43 showed significant α-helical content in freshly dissolved HFIP stocks. The α-helical conformational intermediate in Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ43 could favour the formation of both fibrillar and non-fibrillar aggregates depending on solvent conditions and rate of α-helical to β-sheet transition.

  15. Fluid-magnetic helicity in axisymmetric stationary relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-10-01

    The present work is intended to gain a fruitful insight into the understanding of the formations of magneto-vortex configurations and their role in the physical processes of mutual exchange of energies associated with fluid's motion and the magnetic fields in an axisymmetric stationary hydromagnetic system subject to strong gravitational field (e.g., neutron star/magnetar). It is found that the vorticity flux vector field associated with vorticity 2-form is a linear combination of fluid's vorticity vector and of magnetic vorticity vector. The vorticity flux vector obeys Helmholtz's flux conservation. The energy equation associated with the vorticity flux vector field is deduced. It is shown that the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces contributes to the formation of vorticity flux vector field. The dynamo action for the generation of toroidal components of vorticity flux vector field is described in the presence of meridional circulations. It is shown that the stretching of twisting magnetic lines due to differential rotation leads to the breakdown of gravitational isorotation in the absence of meridional circulations. An explicit expression consists of rotation of vorticity flux surface, energy and angular momentum per baryon for the fluid-magnetic helicity current vector is obtained. The conservation of fluid-magnetic helicity is demonstrated. It is found that the fluid-magnetic helicity displays the energy spectrum arising due to the interaction between the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces and the fluid's motion obeying Euler's equations. The dissipation of a linear combination of modified fluid helicity and magnetic twist is shown to occur due to coupled effect of frame dragging and meridional circulation. It is found that the growing twist of magnetic lines causes the dissipation of modified fluid helicity in the absence of meridional circulations.

  16. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, Richard Wood [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by 31P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 Å of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an α-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  17. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  18. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereau, Tristan, E-mail: bereau@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Bennett, W. F. Drew [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Pfaendtner, Jim [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Deserno, Markus [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Karttunen, Mikko [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science & Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, MetaForum, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-12-28

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA){sub n} (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide’s insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum—in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  19. Effects of magnetic and kinetic helicities on the growth of magnetic fields in laminar and turbulent flows by helical-Fourier decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz; McKay, Mairi; Berera, Arjun; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical and analytical study of incompressible homogeneous conducting fluids using a Fourier-helical representation. We analytically study both small- and large-scale dynamo properties, as well as the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, in the most general minimal subset of interacting velocity and magnetic fields on a closed Fourier triad. We mainly focus on the dependency of magnetic field growth as a function of the distribution of kinetic and magnetic helicities among the three interacting wavenumbers. By combining direct numerical simulations of the full magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations with the Fourier-helical decomposition we numerically confirm that in the kinematic dynamo regime the system develops a large-scale magnetic helicity with opposite sign compared to the small-scale kinetic helicity, a sort of triad-by-triad $\\alpha$-effect in Fourier space. Concerning the small-scale perturbations, we predict theoretically and confirm numerically that the largest instability is achived...

  20. Contribution of the empirical dispersion correction on the conformation of short alanine peptides obtained by gas-phase QM calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyze the effect of the inclusion of an empirical dispersion term to standard DFT (DFT-D) in the prediction of the conformational energy of the alanine dipeptide (Ala2) and in assessing the relative stabilities of short polyala-nine peptides in helical conformations, i.e., α and 310 helices, from Ala4 to Ala16. The Ala2 conformational energies obtained with the dispersion-corrected GGA functional B97-D are compared to previously published high level MP2 data. Meanwhile, the B97-D performance on larger polyalanine peptides is compared to MP2, B3LYP and RHF calculations obtained at a lower level of theory. Our results show that electron correlation affects the conformational energies of short peptides with a weight that increases with the peptide length. Indeed, while the contribution of vdW forces is significant for larger peptides, in the case of Ala2 it is negligible when compared to solvent effects. Even for short peptides, the inclusion of an empirical dispersion term greatly improves accuracy of DFT methods, providing results that correlate very well with the MP2 reference at no additional computational cost. PMID:25418993

  1. Chiral Plasmonic Nanochains via the Self-Assembly of Gold Nanorods and Helical Glutathione Oligomers Facilitated by Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Chang, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Ning-Ning; Wei, Ying; Li, Ai-Ju; Tai, Jia; Xue, Yao; Wang, Zhao-Yi; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Li; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Liu, Kun

    2017-04-25

    Gold nanorods are excellent anisotropic building blocks for plasmonic chiral nanostructures. The near-infrared plasmonic band of nanorods makes them highly desirable for biomedical applications such as chiral bioimaging and sensing, in which a strong circular dichroism (CD) signal is required. Chiral assemblies of gold nanorods induced by self-associating peptides are especially attractive for this purpose as they exhibit plasmonic-enhanced chiroptical activity. Here, we showed that the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles in a gold nanorod solution promoted the self-association of l-/d-glutathione (GSH) and significantly enhanced the chirality of the resulting plasmonic nanochains. Chiroptical signals for the ensemble in the presence of CTAB micelles were 20 times greater than those obtained below the critical micelle concentration of CTAB. The strong optical activity was attributed to the formation of helical GSH oligomers in the hydrophobic core of the CTAB micelles. The helical GSH oligomers led the nanorods to assemble in a chiral, end-to-end crossed fashion. The CD signal intensities were also proportional to the fraction of nanorods in the nanochains. In addition, finite-difference time-domain simulations agreed well with the experimental extinction and CD spectra. Our work demonstrated a substantial effect from the CTAB micelles on gold nanoparticle assemblies induced by biomolecules and showed the importance of size matching between the inorganic nanobuilding blocks and the chiral molecular templates (i.e., the GSH oligomers in the present case) in order to attain strong chiroptical activities.

  2. The α-Helical Structure of Prodomains Promotes Translocation of Intrinsically Disordered Neuropeptide Hormones into the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirndorfer, Daniela; Seidel, Ralf P.; Nimrod, Guy; Miesbauer, Margit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Engelhard, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Tatzelt, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Different neuropeptide hormones, which are either too small to adopt a stable conformation or are predicted to be intrinsically disordered, are synthesized as larger precursors containing a prodomain in addition to an N-terminal signal peptide. We analyzed the biogenesis of three unstructured neuropeptide hormones and observed that translocation of these precursors into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is critically dependent on the presence of the prodomain. The hormone domains could be deleted from the precursors without interfering with ER import and secretion, whereas constructs lacking the prodomain remained in the cytosol. Domain-swapping experiments revealed that the activity of the prodomains to promote productive ER import resides in their ability to adopt an α-helical structure. Removal of the prodomain from the precursor did not interfere with co-translational targeting of the nascent chain to the Sec61 translocon but with its subsequent productive translocation into the ER lumen. Our study reveals a novel function of prodomains to enable import of small or intrinsically disordered secretory proteins into the ER based on their ability to adopt an α-helical conformation. PMID:23532840

  3. Helical Oligourea Foldamers as Powerful Hydrogen Bonding Catalysts for Enantioselective C-C Bond-Forming Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécart, Diane; Diemer, Vincent; Salaün, Arnaud; Oiarbide, Mikel; Nelli, Yella Reddy; Kauffmann, Brice; Fischer, Lucile; Palomo, Claudio; Guichard, Gilles

    2017-09-13

    Substantial progress has been made toward the development of metal-free catalysts of enantioselective transformations, yet the discovery of organic catalysts effective at low catalyst loadings remains a major challenge. Here we report a novel synergistic catalyst combination system consisting of a peptide-inspired chiral helical (thio)urea oligomer and a simple tertiary amine that is able to promote the Michael reaction between enolizable carbonyl compounds and nitroolefins with excellent enantioselectivities at exceptionally low (1/10 000) chiral catalyst/substrate molar ratios. In addition to high selectivity, which correlates strongly with helix folding, the system we report here is also highly amenable to optimization, as each of its components can be fine-tuned separately to increase reaction rates and/or selectivities. The predictability of the foldamer secondary structure coupled to the high level of control over the primary sequence results in a system with significant potential for future catalyst design.

  4. Signal-3L 2.0: A Hierarchical Mixture Model for Enhancing Protein Signal Peptide Prediction by Incorporating Residue-Domain Cross-Level Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Ze; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2017-04-24

    Signal peptides play key roles in targeting and translocation of integral membrane proteins and secretory proteins. However, signal peptides present several challenges for automatic prediction methods. One challenge is that it is difficult to discriminate signal peptides from transmembrane helices, as both the H-region of the peptides and the transmembrane helices are hydrophobic. Another is that it is difficult to identify the cleavage site between signal peptides and mature proteins, as cleavage motifs or patterns are still unclear for most proteins. To solve these problems and further enhance automatic signal peptide recognition, we report a new Signal-3L 2.0 predictor. Our new model is constructed with a hierarchical protocol, where it first determines the existence of a signal peptide. For this, we propose a new residue-domain cross-level feature-driven approach, and we demonstrate that protein functional domain information is particularly useful for discriminating between the transmembrane helices and signal peptides as they perform different functions. Next, in order to accurately identify the unique signal peptide cleavage sites along the sequence, we designed a top-down approach where a subset of potential cleavage sites are screened using statistical learning rules, and then a final unique site is selected according to its evolution conservation score. Because this mixed approach utilizes both statistical learning and evolution analysis, it shows a strong capacity for recognizing cleavage sites. Signal-3L 2.0 has been benchmarked on multiple data sets, and the experimental results have demonstrated its accuracy. The online server is available at www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/Signal-3L/ .

  5. Evaluation of sequence variability in HIV-1 gp41 C-peptide helix-grafted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Rachel L; Walker, Susanne N; Ikeda, Terumasa; Harris, Reuben S; McNaughton, Brian R

    2017-08-01

    Many therapeutically-relevant protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have been reported that feature a helix and helix-binding cleft at the interface. Given this, different approaches to disrupting such PPIs have been developed. While short peptides (<15 amino acids) typically do not fold into a stable helix, researchers have reported chemical approaches to constraining helix structure. However, these approaches rely on laborious, and often expensive, chemical synthesis and purification. Our premise is that protein-based solutions that stabilize a therapeutically-relevant helix offer a number of advantages. In contrast to chemically constrained helical peptides, or minimal/miniature proteins, which must be synthesized (at great expense and labor), a protein can be expressed in a cellular system (like all current protein therapeutics). If selected properly, the protein scaffold can stabilize the therapeutically-relevant helix. We recently reported a protein engineering strategy, which we call "helix-grafted display", and applied it to the challenge of suppressing HIV entry. We have reported helix-grafted display proteins that inhibit formation of an intramolecular PPI involving HIV gp41 C-peptide helix, and HIV gp41 N-peptide trimer, which contain C-peptide helix-binding clefts. Here, we used yeast display to screen a library of grafted C-peptide helices for N-peptide trimer recognition. Using 'hits' from yeast display library screening, we evaluated the effect helix mutations have on structure, expression, stability, function (target recognition), and suppression of HIV entry. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Recombinant expression and solution structure of antimicrobial peptide aurelin from jellyfish Aurelia aurita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Panteleev, Pavel V.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gizatullina, Albina K.; Altukhov, Dmitry A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kokryakov, Vladimir N. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Academica Pavlova str., 12, 197376 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin compact structure encloses helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin binds to the anionic lipid vesicles, but does not interact with zwitterionic ones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin binds to DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two helical regions. -- Abstract: Aurelin is a 40-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide isolated from the mezoglea of a scyphoid jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Aurelin and its {sup 15}N-labeled analogue were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. Aurelin represents a compact globule, enclosing one 3{sub 10}-helix and two {alpha}-helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. The peptide binds to anionic lipid (POPC/DOPG, 3:1) vesicles even at physiological salt concentration, it does not interact with zwitterionic (POPC) vesicles and interacts with the DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two {alpha}-helical regions. Although aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones, its surface does not possess the 'functional dyad' required for the high-affinity interaction with the K{sup +}-channels. The obtained data permit to correlate the modest antibacterial properties and membrane activity of aurelin.

  7. Insulin C-peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  8. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  9. Innovative Therapeutics: Designer Natriuretic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meems, Laura M G; Burnett, John C

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous natriuretic peptides serve as potent activators of particulate guanylyl cyclase receptors and the second messenger cGMP. Natriuretic peptides are essential in maintenance of volume homeostasis, and can be of myocardial, renal and endothelial origin. Advances in peptide engineering have permitted the ability to pursue highly innovative drug discovery strategies. This has resulted in designer natriuretic peptides that go beyond native peptides in efficacy, specificity, and resistance to enzymatic degradation. Together with recent improvements in peptide delivery systems, which have improved bioavailability, further advances in this field have been made. Therefore, designer natriuretic peptides with pleotropic actions together with strategies of chronic delivery have provided an unparalleled opportunity for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we report the conceptual framework of peptide engineering of the natriuretic peptides that resulted in designer peptides for cardiovascular disease. We specifically provide an update on those currently in clinical trials for heart failure and hypertension, which include Cenderitide, ANX042 and ZD100.

  10. In vitro susceptibility of the Streptococcus milleri group to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartie, K L; Devine, D A; Wilson, M J; Lewis, M A O

    2008-07-01

    To determine the susceptibility of strains of the Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) to commercially available antimicrobial peptides. Thirty strains of SMG from a range of sources were assessed for their susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial peptides of either human, animal or insect origin, using a double layer diffusion assay. The majority of the test strains were sensitive to the amidated peptides, mastoparan (100%; n = 30), magainin 2 amide (95%; n = 21) and indolicin (91%; n = 23). Some strains were susceptible to cecropin B (30%; n = 30) and histatin (10%; n = 30), whilst no activity was observed for the defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2, histatin 8, cecropin P1 and magainin 2. The majority of strains were resistant to the human derived peptides. The ability to resist such peptides may be a factor in the colonisation of the oral cavity and the survival and initiation of infection in the pulp and root canal environment. Interestingly, the present study indicated that amidated and alpha helical peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity against SMG. Structural modification of these peptides may allow a targeted approach for the development of these substances as preventative or therapeutic agents.

  11. Tethering a laminin peptide to a crosslinked collagen scaffold for biofunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Gopinath; Collighan, Russell; Griffin, Martin; Pandit, Abhay

    2009-06-15

    Cell adhesion peptide regulates various cellular functions like proliferation, attachment, and spreading. The cellular response to laminin peptide (PPFLMLLKGSTR), a motif of laminin-5 alpha3 chain, tethered to type I collagen, crosslinked using microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) was investigated. mTGase is an enzyme that initiates crosslinking by reacting with the glutamine and lysine residues on the collagen fibers stabilizing the molecular structure. In this study that tethering of the laminin peptide in a mTGase crosslinked collagen scaffold enhanced cell proliferation and attachment. Laminin peptide tethered crosslinked scaffold showed unaltered cell morphology of 3T3 fibroblasts when compared with collagen and crosslinked scaffold. The triple helical structure of collagen remained unaltered by the addition of laminin peptide. In addition a dose-dependent affinity of the laminin peptide towards collagen was seen. The degree of crosslinking was measured by amino acid analysis, differential scanning calorimeter and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Increased crosslinking was observed in mTGase crosslinked group. mTGase crosslinking showed higher shrinkage temperature. There was alteration in the fibrillar architecture due to the crosslinking activity of mTGase. Hence, the use of enzyme-mediated linking shows promise in tethering cell adhesive peptides through biodegradable scaffolds. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Controlling Peptide Self-Assembly through a Native Chemical Ligation/Desulfurization Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Konda, Maruthi; Biswas, Sagar; Das, Apurba K

    2016-03-18

    Self-assembled peptides were synthesized by using a native chemical ligation (NCL)/desulfurization strategy that maintained the chemical diversity of the self-assembled peptides. Herein, we employed oxo-ester-mediated NCL reactions to incorporate cysteine, a cysteine-based dipeptide, and a sterically hindered unnatural amino acid (penicillamine) into peptides. Self-assembly of the peptides resulted in the formation of self-supporting gels. Microscopy analysis indicated the formation of helical nanofibers, which were responsible for the formation of gel matrices. The self-assembly of the ligated peptides was governed by covalent and non-covalent interactions, as confirmed by FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopy, and MS (ESI) analyses. Peptide disassembly was induced by desulfurization reactions with tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) and glutathione at 80 °C. Desulfurization reactions of the ligated peptides converted the Cys and penicillamine functionalities into Ala and Val moieties, respectively. The self-supporting gels showed significant shear-thinning and thixotropic properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and anti-cancer activity of a peptide nucleolipid bioconjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Niki; Huang, Suiying; Patel, Pradeepkumar; Samuni, Uri; Sabatino, David

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis, characterization and anti-cancer activity of a novel peptide nucleolipid bioconjugate is reported in this study. The prerequisite 5'-carboxy derived nucleolipid was synthesized following a five-step solution-phase approach and then coupled to the cytotoxic D-(KLAKLAK)2 sequence by solid-phase bioconjugation. The biophysical and structural properties of the peptide-nucleolipid bioconjugate were evaluated and compared to the peptide controls. These characterization studies revealed that the amphiphilic peptides favored helical-type secondary structures and well-defined nanoparticle formulations that were found to be contributive towards their biological activity. The peptide-nucleolipid bioconjugate displayed greater lethality in comparison to the native D-(KLAKLAK)2AK sequence when treated within the human A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line. Thus, the amphiphilic peptide-nucleolipid forms a new class of anti-cancer peptides that may be developed into promising leads in the fight against cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...... a group consisting of naturally-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases, including 2,6-diaminopurine, attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain alkyl amine side chains....

  15. Fluid-dynamic optimal design of helical vascular graft for stenotic disturbed flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Ha

    Full Text Available Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn* of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft.

  16. Fluid-dynamic optimal design of helical vascular graft for stenotic disturbed flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Choi, Woo-Rak; Baek, Jehyun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn*) of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft.

  17. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41 contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs.

  18. The conservation of helicity in hurricane Andrew (1992) and the formation of the spiral rainband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yamei; Wu, Rongsheng

    2003-11-01

    The characteristics of helicity in a hurricane are presented by calculating the MM5 model output in addition to theoretical analysis. It is found that helicity in a hurricane mainly depends on its horizontal component, whose magnitude is about 100 to 1000 times larger than its vertical component. It is also found that helicity is approximately conserved in the hurricane. Since the fluid has the intention to adjust the wind shear to satisfy the conservation of helicity, the horizontal vorticity is even larger than the vertical vorticity, and the three-dimensional vortices slant to the horizontal plane except in the inner eye. There are significant horizontal vortices and inhomogeneous helical flows in the hurricane. The formation of the spiral rainband is discussed by using the law of horizontal helical flows. It is closely related to the horizontal strong vortices and inhomogeneous helical flows.

  19. A numerical study on helical vortices induced by a short twisted tape in a circular pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Helical vortices, as one kind of secondary flows, are recently observed downstream of the short twisted tape. The behaviors of vortices, which have significant effects on the efficiency of twisted tape, are not well understood. As such, the formation and development of helical vortices induced by the short twisted tape are studied numerically. The results show that two symmetrical stable helical vortices are present downstream of the twisted tape. The values of radial velocities cannot be neglected due to the presence of the vortices. The vortices form in the twisted tape and remain the structure downstream of the twisted tape. Torsion promotes the formation of helical vortices. The intensities of helical vortices decay along the streamwise direction. With the increasing Reynolds numbers, the intensities of helical vortices increase, and the trend is in agreement with the swirl intensities. The intensities of helical vortices decay slowly compared with the intensities of swirling flow.

  20. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  1. Platform technology to generate broadly cross-reactive antibodies to α-helical epitopes in hemagglutinin proteins from influenza a viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziqing; Gera, Lajos; Mant, Colin T; Hirsch, Brooke; Yan, Zhe; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V; Shortt, Jonathan A; Pollock, David D; Hodges, Robert S

    2016-01-21

    We have utilized a de novo designed two-stranded α-helical coiled-coil template to display conserved α-helical epitopes from the stem region of hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins of influenza A. The immunogens have all the surface-exposed residues of the native α-helix in the native HA protein of interest displayed on the surface of the two-stranded α-helical coiled-coil template. This template when used as an immunogen elicits polyclonal antibodies which bind to the α-helix in the native protein. We investigated the highly conserved sequence region 421-476 of HA by inserting 21 or 28 residue sequences from this region into our template. The cross-reactivity of the resulting rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared to these immunogens was determined using a series of HA proteins from H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7 and H7N9 virus strains which are representative of Group 1 and Group 2 virus subtypes of influenza A. Antibodies from region 449-476 were Group 1 specific. Antibodies to region 421-448 showed the greatest degree of cross-reactivity to Group 1 and Group 2 and suggested that this region has a great potential as a "universal" synthetic peptide vaccine for influenza A. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Analysis of Eyring-Powell Fluid in Helical Screw Rheometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Siddiqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the flow of an incompressible, isothermal Eyring-Powell fluid in a helical screw rheometer. The complicated geometry of the helical screw rheometer is simplified by “unwrapping or flattening” the channel, lands, and the outside rotating barrel, assuming the width of the channel is larger as compared to the depth. The developed second order nonlinear differential equations are solved by using Adomian decomposition method. Analytical expressions are obtained for the velocity profiles, shear stresses, shear at wall, force exerted on fluid, volume flow rates, and average velocity. The effect of non-Newtonian parameters, pressure gradients, and flight angle on the velocity profiles is noticed with the help of graphical representation. The observation confirmed the vital role of involved parameters during the extrusion process.

  3. Analysis of Eyring-Powell fluid in helical screw rheometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, A M; Haroon, T; Zeb, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to study the flow of an incompressible, isothermal Eyring-Powell fluid in a helical screw rheometer. The complicated geometry of the helical screw rheometer is simplified by "unwrapping or flattening" the channel, lands, and the outside rotating barrel, assuming the width of the channel is larger as compared to the depth. The developed second order nonlinear differential equations are solved by using Adomian decomposition method. Analytical expressions are obtained for the velocity profiles, shear stresses, shear at wall, force exerted on fluid, volume flow rates, and average velocity. The effect of non-Newtonian parameters, pressure gradients, and flight angle on the velocity profiles is noticed with the help of graphical representation. The observation confirmed the vital role of involved parameters during the extrusion process.

  4. Fluid motion and mixing in helical static mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. Casey; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2001-11-01

    Helical static mixers are used for mixing in a variety of industrial settings under a wide range of flow conditions. To obtain a more fundamental understanding of how these mixers operate, a detailed computational fluid dynamics model study of the helical static mixer was performed using a second-order accurate method for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on fine computational grids. We investigate the fluid structure in the mixers as a function the Reynolds number and the number of mixer elements. The Reynolds number was varied from 100 to 500, and the number of elements was varied from two to six. Mixing was investigated by applying dynamical systems techniques to the trajectories of a large number of particles released from the inlet of the mixer. We also consider closely two numerical issues: the length of the inlet and outlet sections attached to the mixer and the periodicity of the flow field within the mixer sections.

  5. Equilibrium reconstruction for Single Helical Axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, Emilio; Momo, Barbara; Terranova, David; Zanca, Paolo; Alfier, Alberto; Bonomo, Federica; Canton, Alessandra; Fassina, Alessandro; Franz, Paolo; Innocente, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Single Helical Axis (SHAx) configurations are emerging as the natural state for high current reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft X-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  6. Helicity operators for mesons in flight on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Christopher E; Dudek, Jozef J

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the desire to construct meson-meson operators of definite relative momentum in order to study resonances in lattice QCD, we present a set of single-meson interpolating fields at non-zero momentum that respect the reduced symmetry of a cubic lattice in a finite cubic volume. These operators follow from the subduction of operators of definite helicity into irreducible representations of the appropriate little groups. We show their effectiveness in explicit computations where we find that the spectrum of states interpolated by these operators is close to diagonal in helicity, admitting a description in terms of single-meson states of identified J^{PC}. The variationally determined optimal superpositions of the operators for each state give rapid relaxation in Euclidean time to that state, ideal for the construction of meson-meson operators and for the evaluation of matrix elements at finite momentum.

  7. Equilibrium reconstruction for single helical axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E; Lorenzini, R; Momo, B; Terranova, D; Zanca, P; Alfier, A; Bonomo, F; Canton, A; Fassina, A; Franz, P; Innocente, P, E-mail: emilio.martines@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Single helical axis configurations are emerging as the natural state for high-current reversed field pinch plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth-order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first-order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft x-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  8. Compensating Faraday Depolarization by Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Ashurova, Mohira B. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Jabbari, Sarah, E-mail: brandenb@nordita.org [School of Mathematical Sciences and Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2017-08-20

    A turbulent dynamo in spherical geometry with an outer corona is simulated to study the sign of magnetic helicity in the outer parts. In agreement with earlier studies, the sign in the outer corona is found to be opposite to that inside the dynamo. Line-of-sight observations of polarized emission are synthesized to explore the feasibility of using the local reduction of Faraday depolarization to infer the sign of helicity of magnetic fields in the solar corona. This approach was previously identified as an observational diagnostic in the context of galactic magnetic fields. Based on our simulations, we show that this method can be successful in the solar context if sufficient statistics are gathered by using averages over ring segments in the corona separately for the regions north and south of the solar equator.

  9. The velocity field induced by a helical vortex tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, Valery

    2005-01-01

    The influence of finite-core thickness on the velocity field around a vortex tube is addressed. An asymptotic expansion of the Biot-Savart law is made to a higher order in a small parameter, the ratio of core radius to curvature radius, which consists of the velocity field due to lines of monopoles...... and dipoles arranged on the centerline of the tube. The former is associated with an infinitely thin core and is featured by the circulation alone. The distribution of vorticity in the core reflects on the strength of dipole. This result is applied to a helical vortex tube, and the induced velocity due...... to a helical filament of the dipoles is obtained in the form of the Kapteyn series, which augments Hardin's [Phys. Fluids 25, 1949 (1982)] solution for the monopoles. Using a singularity-separation technique, a substantial part of the series is represented in a closed form for both the mono- and the dipoles...

  10. Small-x Asymptotics of the Quark Helicity Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D

    2017-02-03

    We construct a numerical solution of the small-x evolution equations derived in our recent work [J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 072.JHEPFG1029-847910.1007/JHEP01(2016)072] for the (anti)quark transverse momentum dependent helicity TMDs and parton distribution functions (PDFs) as well as the g_{1} structure function. We focus on the case of large N_{c}, where one finds a closed set of equations. Employing the extracted intercept, we are able to predict directly from theory the behavior of the quark helicity PDFs at small x, which should have important phenomenological consequences. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin carried by the quarks may be at small x and what impact this has on the spin puzzle.

  11. Helical liquids and Majorana bound states in quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreg, Yuval; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2010-10-22

    We show that the combination of spin-orbit coupling with a Zeeman field or strong interactions may lead to the formation of a helical electron liquid in single-channel quantum wires, with spin and velocity perfectly correlated. We argue that zero-energy Majorana bound states are formed in various situations when such wires are situated in proximity to a conventional s-wave superconductor. This occurs when the external magnetic field, the superconducting gap, or, most simply, the chemical potential vary along the wire. These Majorana states do not require the presence of a vortex in the system. Experimental consequences of the helical liquid and the Majorana states are also discussed.

  12. A 3D printed helical antenna with integrated lens

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2015-10-26

    A novel antenna configuration comprising a helical antenna with an integrated lens is demonstrated in this work. The antenna is manufactured by a unique combination of 3D printing of plastic material (ABS) and inkjet printing of silver nano-particle based metallic ink. The integration of lens enhances the gain by around 7 dB giving a peak gain of about 16.4 dBi at 9.4 GHz. The helical antenna operates in the end-fire mode and radiates a left-hand circularly polarized (LHCP) pattern. The 3-dB axial ratio (AR) bandwidth of the antenna with lens is 3.2 %. Due to integration of lens and fully printed processing, this antenna configuration offers high gain performance and requires low cost for manufacturing.

  13. Symmetry analysis of transport properties in helical superconductor junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Yinhan; Zhang, Kunhua; Jin, Biao; Zhang, Changlian

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete symmetries satisfied by helical p-wave superconductors with the d-vectors [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] and the transformations brought by symmetry operations to ferromagnet and spin-singlet superconductors, which show intimate associations with the transport properties in heterojunctions, including helical superconductors. In particular, the partial symmetries of the Hamiltonian under spin-rotation and gauge-rotation operations are responsible for the novel invariances of the conductance in tunnel junctions and the new selection rules for the lowest current and peculiar phase diagrams in Josephson junctions, which were reported recently. The symmetries of constructed free energies for Josephson junctions are also analyzed, and are consistent with the results from the Hamiltonian.

  14. Compensating Faraday Depolarization by Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Ashurova, Mohira B.; Jabbari, Sarah

    2017-08-01

    A turbulent dynamo in spherical geometry with an outer corona is simulated to study the sign of magnetic helicity in the outer parts. In agreement with earlier studies, the sign in the outer corona is found to be opposite to that inside the dynamo. Line-of-sight observations of polarized emission are synthesized to explore the feasibility of using the local reduction of Faraday depolarization to infer the sign of helicity of magnetic fields in the solar corona. This approach was previously identified as an observational diagnostic in the context of galactic magnetic fields. Based on our simulations, we show that this method can be successful in the solar context if sufficient statistics are gathered by using averages over ring segments in the corona separately for the regions north and south of the solar equator.

  15. Propulsion by a Helical Flagellum in a Capillary Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    We study the microscale propulsion of a rotating helical filament confined by a cylindrical tube, using a boundary-element method for Stokes flow that accounts for helical symmetry. We determine the effect of confinement on swimming speed and power consumption. Except for a small range of tube radii at the tightest confinements, the swimming speed at fixed rotation rate increases monotonically as the confinement becomes tighter. At fixed torque, the swimming speed and power consumption depend only on the geometry of the filament centerline, except at the smallest pitch angles for which the filament thickness plays a role. We find that the `normal' geometry of \\textit{Escherichia coli} flagella is optimized for swimming efficiency, independent of the degree of confinement. The efficiency peaks when the arc length of the helix within a pitch matches the circumference of the cylindrical wall. We also show that a swimming helix in a tube induces a net flow of fluid along the tube.

  16. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was

  17. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition ($\\mathrm{Rm}_c$) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers ($\\mathrm{Pm}$). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo stat...

  18. Optimal bundling of transmembrane helices using sparse distance constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Sale, Ken; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Genetha A. Gray; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-step approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only sparse distance constraints, such as those derived from chemical cross-linking, dipolar EPR and FRET experiments. In Step 1, using an algorithm, we developed, the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching a set of distance constraints is explored to provide initial structures for local conformational searches. In Step 2, these structures refined against ...

  19. New Classes of Quasi-helically Symmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-08-09

    New classes of quasi-helically symmetric stellarators with aspect ratios ≤ 10 have been found which are stable to the perturbation of magnetohydrodynamic modes at plasma pressures of practical interest. These configurations have large rotational transform and good quality of flux surfaces. Characteristics of some selected examples are discussed in detail. The feasibility of using modular coils for these stellarators has been investigated. It is shown that practical designs for modular coils can be achieved.

  20. Cylindrical Taylor states conserving total absolute magnetic helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, B. C.; Fang, F.

    2014-09-01

    The Taylor state of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field in an upright cylindrical domain V is derived from first principles as an extremum of the total magnetic energy subject to a conserved, total absolute helicity Habs. This new helicity [Low, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052901 (2011)] is distinct from the well known classical total helicity and relative total helicity in common use to describe wholly-contained and anchored fields, respectively. A given field B, tangential along the cylindrical side of V, may be represented as a unique linear superposition of two flux systems, an axially extended system along V and a strictly transverse system carrying information on field-circulation. This specialized Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation defines Habs and permits a neat formulation of the boundary-value problem (BVP) for the Taylor state as a constant-α force-free field, treating 3D wholly-contained and anchored fields on the same conceptual basis. In this formulation, the governing equation is a scalar integro-partial differential equation (PDE). A family of series solutions for an anchored field is presented as an illustration of this class of BVPs. Past treatments of the constant-α field in 3D cylindrical geometry are based on a scalar Helmholtz PDE as the governing equation, with issues of inconsistency in the published field solutions discussed over time in the journal literature. The constant-α force-free equation reduces to a scalar Helmholtz PDE only as special cases of the 3D integro-PDE derived here. In contrast, the constant-α force-free equation and the scalar Helmholtz PDE are absolutely equivalent in the spherical domain as discussed in Appendix. This theoretical study is motivated by the investigation of the Sun's corona but the results are also relevant to laboratory plasmas.

  1. Centering devices for drilling wells by helical face motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, I.K.; Bogomazov, L.D.; Dudkin, M.P.; Kaplun, V.A.; Remizov, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    Substantiation is provided for developing centering devices in drilling wells by helical face motors. Designs and operating principals are presented for the centering devices with changing diameter, pin centering device, centering device with spherical lock and spring loaded centering device, with recommendations for their assembly and disassembly. The described designs of centering devices can be used with other types of face motors in inclined directional drilling.

  2. Conformational analysis by theoretical calculations of distinctin, an antimicrobial peptide isolated from Phyllomedusa distincta; Analise conformacional por calculos teoricos da distinctina, peptideo antimicrobiano isolado de anuros da especie Phyllomedusa distincta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munhoz, Victor H. de Oliveira; Alcantara, Antonio F. de Carvalho; Pilo-Veloso, Dorila [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: dorila@qui.ufmg.br

    2008-07-01

    Various studies demonstrate that different frog species produce distinct classes of biologically active peptides. These peptides can act as alternative agents against pathogenic bacteria and fungi by membrane permeability. Although studies have recently demonstrated that this process is utterly related to the secondary structure adopted by the peptide (in this case, the {alpha}-helical structure) when in contact with the bacterial membrane, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In this work we describe a conformational analysis of distinctin, a heterodimeric peptide isolated from the skin of Phyllomedusa distincta, an anuran found in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. The study yielded a stable geometry with a high content of the {alpha}-helical structure both in chains 1 and 2 of distinctin, showing strong interaction between them. (author)

  3. Flexibility of LHD configuration with multi-layer helical coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Motojima, Osamu; Yamazaki, Kozo; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao

    1995-11-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) is a heliotron device with two helical coils, each of which has a structure of three current layers. It is designed so that the current in each layer should be controlled independently. By changing the combination of the coil current in the layers, it is possible to vary the effective minor radius of the helical coils, which enlarges the flexibility of the configuration. The properties of the plasmas for several combinations of the layers are investigated numerically. In the vacuum configuration, it is obtained that the combination of the layers corresponding to a large effective coil radius has a large outermost surface. In this case, the rotational transform decreases and the magnetic hill is reduced compared with the configuration with all three layers. The large Shafranov shift which is due to the small rotational transform enhances the magnetic well and the magnetic shear to stabilize the Mercier mode, however, it degrades the equilibrium beta limit. In the case of the combination for a small effective coil radius, the Mercier mode is destabilized, because the magnetic hill is enhanced. The effect on the bootstrap current is also studied. (author).

  4. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  5. Silica biomineralization via the self-assembly of helical biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zhehao; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2015-01-21

    The biomimetic synthesis of relevant silica materials using biological macromolecules as templates via silica biomineralization processes attract rapidly rising attention toward natural and artificial materials. Biomimetic synthesis studies are useful for improving the understanding of the formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures found in living organisms (such as diatoms and sponges) and for promoting significant developments in the biotechnology, nanotechnology and materials chemistry fields. Chirality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and is an inherent feature of biomolecular components in organisms. Helical biomolecules, one of the most important types of chiral macromolecules, can self-assemble into multiple liquid-crystal structures and be used as biotemplates for silica biomineralization, which renders them particularly useful for fabricating complex silica materials under ambient conditions. Over the past two decades, many new silica materials with hierarchical structures and complex morphologies have been created using helical biomolecules. In this review, the developments in this field are described and the recent progress in silica biomineralization templating using several classes of helical biomolecules, including DNA, polypeptides, cellulose and rod-like viruses is summarized. Particular focus is placed on the formation mechanism of biomolecule-silica materials (BSMs) with hierarchical structures. Finally, current research challenges and future developments are discussed in the conclusion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  7. Modeling and Navigation of Artificial Helical Swimmers in Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Acemoglu, Alperen; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments in micro/nanotechnology and manufacturing techniques make use of micro robots for biomedical applications realizable. Controlled in-channel navigation of swimming micro robots is necessary for medical applications performed in conduits and vessels in living bodies. Successful design and control of micro swimmers can be achieved with full understanding of hydrodynamic behavior inside channels and their interaction with channel walls and resultant flows. We performed experimental and modeling studies on untethered mm-sized magnetic helical swimmers inside glycerol-filled rectangular channels. In experiments it is observed that rotation of swimmers in the direction of helical axis leads to forward motion due to fluidic propulsion and lateral motion due to traction forces near the wall. Effects of surface roughness, swimming direction and rotation frequency on the swimmers' speed are analyzed. The flow induced by the tail motion is visualized using micro-particle image velocimetry and analyzed at different radial positions using Computational Fluid Dynamics models. Results indicate that at low frequencies traction forces are effective, however as frequency increases fluid forces become dominant and fluid flow is affecting the swimming motion of helical swimmers. We acknowledge the support from TUBITAK (Techonological & Research Council of Turkey) under the grant no: 111M376.

  8. Theory of helical structures of tilted chiral lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang Zhong-Can; Liu Jixing

    1991-06-01

    Analogous to the theory of cholesteric liquid crystal, a theory for tilted chiral lipid bilayers (TCLB) [briefly reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1679 (1990)] is developed. The tilt equation and the surface-shape-equilibrium equation have been derived. Application of the theory shows that on a cylindrical surface, the field of tilt directions of TCLB molecules forms a right-handed helix with a 45° gradient angle for k2>0 or a left-handed helix with -45° gradient angle for k2cholesteric liquid crystal. In addition, there exists another type of helical structure that looks like twisted strips or helicoids. It is also shown that on a spherical surface, the tilt field has at least two singular points. Based on these results, the succession of transitions from a vesicular dispersion to a phase involving helical structures and then to tubes observed in several laboratories can be reasonably explained. The general formula that explains the aggregation of narrow and prolate ribbon structures is derived. By including more terms of elasticity free energy into the theory, the size of the helical structure is obtained and is shown to agree with experimental observations.

  9. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe [Physics Department, FUNDP, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein {alpha}-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  10. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amand A.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  11. Helical instability in film blowing process: Analogy to buckling instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Sung; Kwon, Ilyoung; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2017-12-01

    The film blowing process is one of the most important polymer processing operations, widely used for producing bi-axially oriented film products in a single-step process. Among the instabilities observed in this film blowing process, i.e., draw resonance and helical motion occurring on the inflated film bubble, the helical instability is a unique phenomenon portraying the snake-like undulation motion of the bubble, having the period on the order of few seconds. This helical instability in the film blowing process is commonly found at the process conditions of a high blow-up ratio with too low a freezeline position and/or too high extrusion temperature. In this study, employing an analogy to the buckling instability for falling viscous threads, the compressive force caused by the pressure difference between inside and outside of the film bubble is introduced into the simulation model along with the scaling law derived from the force balance between viscous force and centripetal force of the film bubble. The simulation using this model reveals a close agreement with the experimental results of the film blowing process of polyethylene polymers such as low density polyethylene and linear low density polyethylene.

  12. Enhanced Control for Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierren, C.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Perry, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Local helicity injection (LHI) experiments on Pegasus rely upon programmable control of a 250 MVA modular power supply system that drives the electromagnets and helicity injection systems. Precise control of the central solenoid is critical to experimental campaigns that test the LHI Taylor relaxation limit and the coupling efficiency of LHI-produced plasmas to Ohmic current drive. Enhancement and expansion of the present control system is underway using field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology for digital logic and control, coupled to new 10 MHz optical-to-digital transceivers for semiconductor level device communication. The system accepts optical command signals from existing analog feedback controllers, transmits them to multiple devices in parallel H-bridges, and aggregates their status signals for fault detection. Present device-level multiplexing/de-multiplexing and protection logic is extended to include bridge-level protections with the FPGA. An input command filter protects against erroneous and/or spurious noise generated commands that could otherwise cause device failures. Fault registration and response times with the FPGA system are 25 ns. Initial system testing indicates an increased immunity to power supply induced noise, enabling plasma operations at higher working capacitor bank voltage. This can increase the applied helicity injection drive voltage, enable longer pulse lengths and improve Ohmic loop voltage control. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  13. Multi-dimensional charge transport in supramolecular helical foldamer assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Ardoy, Alejandro; Markandeya, Nagula; Li, Xuesong; Tsai, Yu-Tang; Pecastaings, Gilles; Buffeteau, Thierry; Maurizot, Victor; Muccioli, Luca; Castet, Frédéric; Huc, Ivan; Bassani, Dario M

    2017-10-01

    Aromatic foldamers are bioinspired architectures whose potential use in materials remains largely unexplored. Here we report our investigation of vertical and horizontal charge transport over long distances in helical oligo-quinolinecarboxamide foldamers organized as single monolayers on Au or SiO2. Conductive atomic force microscopy showed that vertical conductivity is efficient and that it displays a low attenuation with foldamer length (0.06 Å-1). In contrast, horizontal charge transport is found to be negligible, demonstrating the strong anisotropy of foldamer monolayers. Kinetic Monte Carlo calculations were used to probe the mechanism of charge transport in these helical molecules and revealed the presence of intramolecular through-space charge transfer integrals approaching those found in pentacene and rubrene crystals, in line with experimental results. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of charge hopping along the foldamer chain evidence the strong contribution of multiple 1D and 3D pathways in these architectures and their dependence on conformational order. These findings show that helical foldamer architectures may provide a route for achieving charge transport over long distance by combining multiple charge transport pathways.

  14. Hydroxyproline-induced Helical Disruption in Conantokin Rl-B Affects Subunit-selective Antagonistic Activities toward Ion Channels of N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Shailaja; Yuan, Yue; Balsara, Rashna D; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Castellino, Francis J

    2015-07-17

    Conantokins are ~20-amino acid peptides present in predatory marine snail venoms that function as allosteric antagonists of ion channels of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). These peptides possess a high percentage of post-/co-translationally modified amino acids, particularly γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla). Appropriately spaced Gla residues allow binding of functional divalent cations, which induces end-to-end α-helices in many conantokins. A smaller number of these peptides additionally contain 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp). Hyp should prevent adoption of the metal ion-induced full α-helix, with unknown functional consequences. To address this disparity, as well as the role of Hyp in conantokins, we have solved the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of a Gla/Hyp-containing 18-residue conantokin, conRl-B, by high field NMR spectroscopy. We show that Hyp(10) disrupts only a small region of the α-helix of the Mn(2+)·peptide complex, which displays cation-induced α-helices on each terminus of the peptide. The function of conRl-B was examined by measuring its inhibition of NMDA/Gly-mediated current through NMDAR ion channels in mouse cortical neurons. The conRl-B displays high inhibitory selectivity for subclasses of NMDARs that contain the functionally important GluN2B subunit. Replacement of Hyp(10) with N(8)Q results in a Mg(2+)-complexed end-to-end α-helix, accompanied by attenuation of NMDAR inhibitory activity. However, replacement of Hyp(10) with Pro(10) allowed the resulting peptide to retain its inhibitory property but diminished its GluN2B specificity. Thus, these modified amino acids, in specific peptide backbones, play critical roles in their subunit-selective inhibition of NMDAR ion channels, a finding that can be employed to design NMDAR antagonists that function at ion channels of distinct NMDAR subclasses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  16. Granin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troger, Josef; Theurl, Markus; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Pasqua, Teresa; Tota, Bruno; Angelone, Tommaso; Cerra, Maria C; Nowosielski, Yvonne; Mätzler, Raphaela; Troger, Jasmin; Gayen, Jaur R; Trudeau, Vance; Corti, Angelo; Helle, Karen B

    2017-07-01

    The granin family comprises altogether 7 different proteins originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system and elements of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The family is dominated by three uniquely acidic members, namely chromogranin A (CgA), chromogranin B (CgB) and secretogranin II (SgII). Since the late 1980s it has become evident that these proteins are proteolytically processed, intragranularly and/or extracellularly into a range of biologically active peptides; a number of them with regulatory properties of physiological and/or pathophysiological significance. The aim of this comprehensive overview is to provide an up-to-date insight into the distribution and properties of the well established granin-derived peptides and their putative roles in homeostatic regulations. Hence, focus is directed to peptides derived from the three main granins, e.g. to the chromogranin A derived vasostatins, betagranins, pancreastatin and catestatins, the chromogranin B-derived secretolytin and the secretogranin II-derived secretoneurin (SN). In addition, the distribution and properties of the chromogranin A-derived peptides prochromacin, chromofungin, WE14, parastatin, GE-25 and serpinins, the CgB-peptide PE-11 and the SgII-peptides EM66 and manserin will also be commented on. Finally, the opposing effects of the CgA-derived vasostatin-I and catestatin and the SgII-derived peptide SN on the integrity of the vasculature, myocardial contractility, angiogenesis in wound healing, inflammatory conditions and tumors will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. How does bone sialoprotein promote the nucleation of hydroxyapatite? A molecular dynamics study using model peptides of different conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Cui, Qiang; Sahai, Nita

    2010-06-15

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a highly phosphorylated, acidic, noncollagenous protein in bone matrix. Although BSP has been proposed to be a nucleator of hydroxyapatite (Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH), the major mineral component of bone, no detailed mechanism for the nucleation process has been elucidated at the atomic level to date. In the present work, using a peptide model, we apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the conformational effect of a proposed nucleating motif of BSP (a phosphorylated, acidic, 10 amino-acid residue sequence) on controlling the distributions of Ca(2+) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) ions in solution, and specifically, we explore whether a nucleating template for orientated hydroxyapatite could be formed in different peptide conformations. Both the alpha-helical conformation and the random coil structure have been studied, and inorganic solutions without the peptide are simulated as reference. Ca(2+) distributions around the peptide surface and interactions between Ca(2+) and Pi in the presence of the peptide are examined in detail. From the MD simulations, although in some cases for the alpha-helical conformation, we observe that a Ca(2+) equilateral triangle forms around the surface of peptide, which matches the distribution of Ca(2+) ions on the (001) face of the hydroxyapatite crystal, we do not consistently find a stable nucleating template formation in general for either the helical conformation or the random coil structure. Therefore, independent of conformations, the BSP nucleating motif is more likely to help nucleate an amorphous calcium phosphate cluster, which ultimately converts to crystalline hydroxyapatite.

  19. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Kunda

    Full Text Available Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR. We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+. Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+. Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+ (iCa(2+ influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/- and GluN2B(-/- mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/--derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/--mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133, suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+ entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+ influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  20. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Shailaja; Cheriyan, John; Hur, Michael; Balsara, Rashna D; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con) Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+). Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+). Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+) (iCa(2+)) influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/-) and GluN2B(-/-) mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/-)-derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/-)-mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133), suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+) entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+) influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  1. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged...... as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...... incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, that can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access...

  2. Peptides at Membrane Surfaces and their Role in the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All ancestors of contemporary cells (protocells) had to transport ions and organic matter across membranous walls, capture and utilize energy and transduce environmental signals. In modern organisms, all these functions are preformed by membrane proteins. We make the parsimonious assumption that in the protobiological milieu the same functions were carried out by their simple analogs - peptides. This, however, required that simple peptides could self-organize into ordered, functional structures. In a series of detailed, molecular-level computer simulations we demonstrated how this is possible. One example is the peptide (LSLLLSL)3 which forms a trameric bundle capable of transporting protons across membranes. Another example is the transmembrane pore of the influenza M2 protein. This aggregate of four identical alpha-helices, each built of 25 amino acids, forms an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel. Our simulations explain the gating mechanism in this channel. The channel can be re-engineered into a simple proton pump.

  3. Anionic Host Defence Peptides from the Plant Kingdom: Their Anticancer Activity and Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frederick; Prabhu, Saurabh; Dennison, Sarah R; Snape, Timothy J; Lea, Robert; Mura, Manuela; Phoenix, David A

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that plants ranging across the plant kingdom produce anionic host defence peptides (AHDPs) with potent activity against a wide variety of human cancers cells. In general, this activity involves membrane partitioning by AHDPs, which leads to membranolysis and / or internalization to attack intracellular targets such as DNA. Several models have been proposed to describe these events including: the toroidal pore and Shai-Matsuzaki-Huang mechanisms but, in general, the mechanisms underpinning the membrane interactions and anticancer activity of these peptides are poorly understood. Plant AHDPs with anticancer activity can be conveniently discussed with reference to two groups: cyclotides, which possess cyclic molecules stabilized by cysteine knot motifs, and other ADHPs that adopt extended and α-helical conformations. Here, we review research into the anticancer action of these two groups of peptides along with current understanding of the mechanisms underpinning this action.

  4. α-Helical to β-Helical Conformation Change in the C-Terminal of the Mammalian Prion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jesse; Whitford, Paul; Hayre, Natha; Cox, Daniel; Onuchic, José.

    2011-03-01

    We employ all-atom structure-based models with mixed basis contact maps to explore whether there are any significant geometric or energetic constraints limiting conjectured conformational transitions between the alpha-helical (α H) and the left handed beta helical (LHBH) conformations for the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. The LHBH structure has been proposed to describe infectious oligomers and one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self- templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Our results confirm that the kinetics of the conformation change are not strongely limited by large scale geometry modification and there exists an overall preference for the LHBH conformation.

  5. Use of Synthetic Peptides to Study Structure-Function Relationships of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel-Arnett, Sarah Joann

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc proteinases that is collectively capable of degrading the major components of the extracellular matrix. A variety of synthetic peptides has been prepared which are models for the human MMP and their substrates to study structure -function relationships in this enzyme-substrate system. To elucidate the sequence specificity of the MMP, the k _{cat}/K_ M values for the hydrolysis of over 50 synthetic octapeptides has been investigated. Similarities, as well as distinct differences have been found between the individual MMP with the largest differences occurring at subsites P_1, P_1^' and P_3 ^'. Based on these data, quenched -fluorescence substrates with optimized sequences have been developed for five human MMP. The key features of these heptapeptides are a tryptophan on the P_ n^' side and a dinitrophenol quenching group on the amino terminus. To assess the role of the triple helical conformation in the collagenase-collagen system, a series of triple helical peptides has been prepared and shown to compete with collagen in collagenase assays. This provides evidence for the existence of a triple helical recognition site distinct from the active site. All of the MMP are secreted as zymogens and it has been postulated that the portion of the propeptide surrounding a critical cysteine is responsible for maintaining latency. Conformational energy calculations and mutagenesis studies have suggested that this region adopts a specific conformation that stabilizes the latent form. Peptide models of this region of the propeptide have been prepared and shown to inhibit the MMP. CD and NMR studies, however, have failed to provide evidence for the predicted peptide conformation. Thus, the observed inhibition may reflect their propensity to adopt the propeptide conformation upon binding to the enzyme.

  6. The gp41659 - 671 HIV-1 antibody epitope: a structurally challenging small peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Sagui, Celeste

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of extensive Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the tridecapeptide corresponding to residues 659-671 of the envelope glycoprotein gp41 of HIV-1, which spans the 2F5 monoclonal antibody epitope ELDKWA. The most recent AMBER force fields ff99SB and ff12SB in both implicit and explicit solvents have been used for a cumulative time longer than 7.2 μs . We have analyzed the conformational ensembles of the peptide both with and without applied tensile restraints, and found that: (1) The amount of helical populations is important in aqueous solution, but this structure forms part of a flexible conformational ensemble with a rugged free energy landscape with shallow minima, which agrees well with the bulk of the experimental observations; (2) our results are more consistent with the experimental results than those from previous simulations; (3) under uniaxial tension, the disordered peptide first becomes fully helical before melting into turns, loops and 310-helices.

  7. CD and NMR structural characterization of ceratotoxins, natural peptides with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, L; Molinari, H; Zetta, L; Longhi, R; Marchini, D; Dallai, R; Bernini, L F; Lozzi, L; Scarselli, M; Niccolai, N

    1996-11-01

    Antibacterial properties of the secretion from the female reproductive accessory glands of medfly Ceratitis capitata are mostly ascribed to the presence of two peptides, ceratotoxin A and B, which exhibit a strong activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains, and show sequence and function homology with cecropins, melittin, and magainins. CD experiments performed in different solvents indicate the presence of a significant content of helical structures in organic solvent. Two-dimensional nmr results for ceratotoxin A in methanol show a helical behavior for the 8-25 region of the peptide. A ramachandran classification of each residue for the structures obtained from distance geometry calculations lead to the definition of four structural families in which the central segment 10-19 is always helical and differences refer to residues 8-9 and 19-23. A sequence analysis of the two ceratotoxins and a systematic search on the protein data bank revealed the occurrence of a KX-hydrophobic-hydrophobic-P motif that seems to be important for helix stabilization.

  8. Experiments on helical modes in magnetized thin foil-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, David

    2017-10-01

    This paper gives an in-depth experimental study of helical features on magnetized, ultrathin foil-plasmas driven by the 1-MA linear transformer driver at University of Michigan. Three types of cylindrical liner loads were designed to produce: (a) pure magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes (defined as being void of the acceleration-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability, MRT) using a non-imploding geometry, (b) pure kink modes using a non-imploding, kink-seeded geometry, and (c) MRT-MHD coupled modes in an unseeded, imploding geometry. For each configuration, we applied relatively small axial magnetic fields of Bz = 0.2-2.0 T (compared to peak azimuthal fields of 30-40 T). The resulting liner-plasmas and instabilities were imaged using 12-frame laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission on a fast framing camera. The azimuthal mode number was carefully identified with a tracking algorithm of self-emission minima. Our experiments show that the helical structures are a manifestation of discrete eigenmodes. The pitch angle of the helix is simply m / kR , from implosion to explosion, where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius of the helical instability. Thus, the pitch angle increases (decreases) during implosion (explosion) as R becomes smaller (larger). We found that there are one, or at most two, discrete helical modes that arise for magnetized liners, with no apparent threshold on the applied Bz for the appearance of helical modes; increasing the axial magnetic field from zero to 0.5 T changes the relative weight between the m = 0 and m = 1 modes. Further increasing the applied axial magnetic fields yield higher m modes. Finally, the seeded kink instability overwhelms the intrinsic instability modes of the plasma. These results are corroborated with our analytic theory on the effects of radial acceleration on the classical sausage, kink, and higher m modes. Work supported by US DOE award DE-SC0012328, Sandia National Laboratories

  9. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan A.S.

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme, appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase, with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of ..beta..-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% ..cap alpha..-helix, 38% ..beta..-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possible due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% ..cap alpha..-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% ..beta..-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformation changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assess by CD.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  11. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. How to improve the maps of magnetic helicity injection in active regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, Etienne; Démoulin, Pascal; Nindos, Alexander

    Magnetic helicity, a topological quantity which measures the twist, the writhe and the shear of a magnetic field, has recently appeared as a key quantity to understand some mechanisms of the solar activity such as Coronal Mass Ejections and flare onset. It is thus becoming of major importance to be able to compute magnetic helicity in active regions. Computing photospheric maps of the injection of magnetic helicity provides new spatial information that helps us to understand basic properties of solar activity, such as where and how magnetic helicity is injected. Several helicity flux density maps have been published for different active regions. Unfortunately, the classical helicity flux density is not a correct physical quantity and it does induce spurious signals (fake polarities) which mask the real injection of helicity. To map the real helicity injection, the knowledge of the complete connectivity of the field lines is fundamental. Even without the connectivity, improved helicity flux density maps can be derived. They have fake polarities which are lower by more than a factor 10 than the previous incorrect maps. Rather than a mixture of negative and positive injection patterns, they show almost unipolar injection on the active region scale. This leads to a completely new way of understanding the dynamics of active regions, in the frame of magnetic helicity studies.

  13. Recombinant production of the therapeutic peptide lunasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Stuart

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lunasin is a chemopreventive peptide produced in a number of plant species. It comprises a helical region with homology to a region of chromatin binding proteins, an Arg-Gly-Asp cell adhesion motif and eight aspartic acid residues. In vitro studies indicate that lunasin suppresses chemical and oncogene driven transformation of mammalian cells. We have explored efficient recombinant production of lunasin by exploiting the Clostridium thermocellum CipB cellulose binding domain (CBD as a fusion partner protein. Results We used a pET28 vector to express a CBD-lunasin fusion with a hexahistidine tag and Tobacco Etch Virus protease site, to allow protease-mediated release of native lunasin. Autoinduction in E. coli BL21 (DE3 Star cells achieved expression of 3.35 g/L of CBD-lunasin fusion protein. The final yield of lunasin was 210 mg/L corresponding to 32% of the theoretical yield. Purification by cellulose binding and nickel affinity chromatography were tested with the latter proving more satisfactory. The effects of CBD-lunasin expression on growth and morphology of the E. coli cells were examined by light and electron microscopy revealing an altered morphology in a proportion of cells. Cell division appeared to be inhibited in these cells resulting in elongated, non-septated cells. Conclusions The use of CBD as a fusion partner gave high protein yields by autoinduction, with lunasin release by TEV protease cleavage. With some optimisation this approach could provide a potentially valuable route for production of this therapeutic peptide. Over-expression in the host cells manifest as a cell division defect in a population of the cells, presumably mimicking some aspect of the chemopreventive function observed in mammalian cells.

  14. Hydrogen recycling and transport in the helical divertor of TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clever, Meike

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the hydrogen recycling at the target plates of the helical divertor in TEXTOR and by this the capability of this divertor configuration to access such favourable operational regimes. In order to study the different divertor density regimes in TEXTOR, discharges were performed in which the total plasma density was increased continuously up to the density limit. The recycling was investigated in a fixed helical divertor structure where four helical strike points with a poloidal width of about 8-10 cm are created at the divertor target plates. The experimental investigation of the hydrogen recycling was carried out using mainly spectroscopic methods supplemented by Langmuir probe, interferometric and atomic beam measurements. In the framework of this thesis a spectroscopic multi camera system has been built that facilitates the simultaneous observation of four different spectral lines, recording images of the divertor target plates and the plasma volume close to the target. The system facilitates the simultaneous measurement of the poloidal and toroidal pattern of the recycling flux at the divertor target without the need for sweeping the plasma structure. The simultaneous observation of different spectral lines reduces the uncertainty in the analysis based on several lines, as the contribution from uncertainties in the reproducibility of plasma parameters in different discharges are eliminated and only the uncertainty of the measurement method limits the accuracy. The spatial resolution of the system in poloidal and toroidal direction (0.8 mm{+-}0.01 mm) is small compared to the separation of the helical strike points, the capability of the measurement method to resolve these structures is therefore limited by the line-of-sight integration and the penetration depth of the light emitting species. The measurements showed that the recycling flux increases linearly with increasing plasma density, a high recycling regime is not

  15. Structural and functional characterization of a multifunctional alanine-rich peptide analogue from Pleuronectes americanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Migliolo

    Full Text Available Recently, defense peptides that are able to act against several targets have been characterized. The present work focuses on structural and functional evaluation of the peptide analogue Pa-MAP, previously isolated as an antifreeze peptide from Pleuronectes americanus. Pa-MAP showed activities against different targets such as tumoral cells in culture (CACO-2, MCF-7 and HCT-116, bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2 and fungi (Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019, Trichophyton mentagrophytes (28d&E and T. rubrum (327. This peptide did not show toxicity against mammalian cells such as erythrocytes, Vero and RAW 264.7 cells. Molecular mechanism of action was related to hydrophobic residues, since only the terminal amino group is charged at pH 7 as confirmed by potentiometric titration. In order to shed some light on its structure-function relations, in vitro and in silico assays were carried out using circular dichroism and molecular dynamics. Furthermore, Pa-MAP showed partial unfolding of the peptide changes in a wide pH (3 to 11 and temperature (25 to 95°C ranges, although it might not reach complete unfolding at 95°C, suggesting a high conformational stability. This peptide also showed a conformational transition with a partial α-helical fold in water and a full α-helical core in SDS and TFE environments. These results were corroborated by spectral data measured at 222 nm and by 50 ns dynamic simulation. In conclusion, data reported here show that Pa-MAP is a potential candidate for drug design against pathogenic microorganisms due to its structural stability and wide activity against a range of targets.

  16. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  17. Solid state NMR studies of oligourea foldamers: interaction of 15N-labelled amphiphilic helices with oriented lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisenbrey, Christopher; Pendem, Nagendar; Guichard, Gilles; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2012-02-21

    Synthetic oligomers that are derived from natural polypeptide sequences, albeit with unnatural building blocks, have attracted considerable interest in mimicking bioactive peptides and proteins. Many of those compounds adopt stable folds in aqueous environments that resemble protein structural elements. Here we have chemically prepared aliphatic oligoureas and labeled them at selected positions with (15)N for structural investigations using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. In the first step, the main tensor elements and the molecular alignment of the (15)N chemical shift tensor were analyzed. This was possible by using a two-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift/dipolar coupling correlation experiment on a model compound that represents the chemical, and thereby also the chemical shift characteristics, of the urea bond. In the next step (15)N labeled versions of an amphipathic oligourea, that exert potent antimicrobial activities and that adopt stable helical structures in aqueous environments, were prepared. These compounds were reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers and the (15)N chemical shift and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings of two labeled sites were determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The data are indicative of an alignment of this helix parallel to the membrane surface in excellent agreement with the amphipathic character of the foldamer and consistent with previous models explaining the antimicrobial activities of α-peptides.

  18. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of three opioid-nociceptin hybrid peptide ligands reveals substantially differing modes of their actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna I; Borbély, Adina; Magyar, Anna; Taricska, Nóra; Perczel, András; Zsíros, Ottó; Garab, Győző; Szűcs, Edina; Ötvös, Ferenc; Zádor, Ferenc; Balogh, Mihály; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Benyhe, Sándor

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt to design opioid-nociceptin hybrid peptides, three novel bivalent ligands, H-YGGFGGGRYYRIK-NH 2 , H-YGGFRYYRIK-NH 2 and Ac-RYYRIKGGGYGGFL-OH were synthesized and studied by biochemical, pharmacological, biophysical and molecular modelling tools. These chimeric molecules consist of YGGF sequence, a crucial motif in the N-terminus of natural opioid peptides, and Ac-RYYRIK-NH 2, which was isolated from a combinatorial peptide library as an antagonist or partial agonist that inhibits the biological activity of the endogenously occurring heptadecapeptide nociceptin. Solution structures for the peptides were studied by analysing their circular dichroism spectra. Receptor binding affinities were measured by equilibrium competition experiments using four highly selective radioligands. G-protein activating properties of the multitarget peptides were estimated in [ 35 S]GTPγS binding tests. The three compounds were also measured in electrically stimulated mouse vas deferens (MVD) bioassay. H-YGGFGGGRYYRIK-NH 2 (BA55), carrying N-terminal opioid and C-terminal nociceptin-like sequences interconnected with GGG tripeptide spacer displayed a tendency of having either unordered or β-sheet structures, was moderately potent in MVD and possessed a NOP/KOP receptor preference. A similar peptide without spacer H-YGGFRYYRIK-NH 2 (BA62) exhibited the weakest effect in MVD, more α-helical periodicity was present in its structure and it exhibited the most efficacious agonist actions in the G-protein stimulation assays. The third hybrid peptide Ac-RYYRIKGGGYGGFL-OH (BA61) unexpectedly displayed opioid receptor affinities, because the opioid message motif is hidden within the C-terminus. The designed chimeric peptide ligands presented in this study accommodate well into a group of multitarget opioid compounds that include opioid-non-opioid peptide dimer analogues, dual non-peptide dimers and mixed peptide- non-peptide bifunctional ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  19. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  20. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  1. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  2. Self-assembled chiral helical nanofibers by amphiphilic dipeptide derived from d- or l-threonine and application as a template for the synthesis of Au and Ag nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Xin, Xia; Sun, Jichao; Zhao, Liupeng; Shen, Jinglin; Song, Zhaohua; Yuan, Shiling

    2016-12-15

    The discovery of a class of self-assembling peptides that spontaneously undergo self-organization into well-ordered structures opened a new avenue for molecular fabrication of biological materials. In this paper, the structure controlled helical nanofibers were prepared by two artificial β-sheet dipeptides with long alkyl chains derived from l- and d-threonine (Thr) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). These helical nanofibers have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). It was demonstrated that the helicity of the nanofibers could be easily controlled by changing the chirality of the constituent amino acids in the peptide species (d- or l-threonine). Moreover, the hydrogen bonding interactions between the amide groups as well as the hydrophobic interactions among the alkyl chains play important roles in the self-assembly process. It also can be observed that with the passage of time, the hydrogen bonding interactions between the individual nanofiber induced the conversion from nanofibers to nanobelts. Particularly, gold and silver nanoparticles performed good catalytic ability were synthesized using the assembled nanofibers as template. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  4. Scolopendin 2, a cationic antimicrobial peptide from centipede, and its membrane-active mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-02-01

    Scolopendin 2 is a 16-mer peptide (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. We observed that this peptide exhibited antimicrobial activity in a salt-dependent manner against various fungal and bacterial pathogens and showed no hemolytic effect in the range of 1.6 μM to 100 μM. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the peptide has an α-helical properties. Furthermore, we determined the mechanism(s) of action using flow cytometry and by investigating the release of intracellular potassium. The results showed that the peptide permeabilized the membranes of Escherichia coli O157 and Candida albicans, resulting in loss of intracellular potassium ions. Additionally, bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol and 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide assays showed that the peptide caused membrane depolarization. Using giant unilamellar vesicles encapsulating calcein and large unilamellar vesicles containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, which were similar in composition to typical E. coli O157 and C. albicans membranes, we demonstrated that scolopendin 2 disrupts membranes, resulting in a pore size between 4.8 nm and 5.0 nm. Thus, we have demonstrated that a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendin 2, exerts its broad-spectrum antimicrobial effects by forming pores in the cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An enhanced functional interrogation/manipulation of intracellular signaling pathways with the peptide 'stapling' technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y; Chen, D; Zheng, W

    2015-11-12

    Specific protein-protein interactions (PPIs) constitute a key underlying mechanism for the presence of a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways, which are essential for the survival of normal and cancer cells. Specific molecular blockers for a crucial PPI would therefore be invaluable tools for an enhanced functional interrogation of the signaling pathway harboring this particular PPI. On the other hand, if a particular PPI is essential for the survival of cancer cells but is absent in or dispensable for the survival of normal cells, its specific molecular blockers could potentially be developed into effective anticancer therapeutics. Due to the flat and extended PPI interface, it would be conceivably difficult for small molecules to achieve an effective blockade, a problem which could be potentially circumvented with peptides or proteins. However, the well-documented proteolytic instability and cellular impermeability of peptides and proteins in general would make their developing into effective intracellular PPI blockers quite a challenge. With the advent of the peptide 'stapling' technology which was demonstrated to be able to stabilize the α-helical conformation of a peptide via bridging two neighboring amino-acid side chains with a 'molecular staple', a linear parent peptide could be transformed into a stronger PPI blocker with enhanced proteolytic stability and cellular permeability. This review will furnish an account on the peptide 'stapling' technology and its exploitation in efforts to achieve an enhanced functional interrogation or manipulation of intracellular signaling pathways especially those that are cancer relevant.

  6. Synthesis of Helical Phenolic Resin Bundles through a Sol-Gel Transcription Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhen Shao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chiral and helical polymers possess special helical structures and optical property, and may find applications in chiral catalysis and optical devices. This work presents the preparation and formation process of helical phenolic resins through a sol-gel transcription method. A pair of bola-type chiral low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs derived from valine are used as templates, while 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and formaldehyde are used as precursors. The electron microscopy images show that the phenolic resins are single-handed helical bundles comprised of helical ultrafine nanofibers. The diffused reflection circular dichroism spectra indicate that the helical phenolic resins exhibit optical activity. A possible formation mechanism is proposed, which shows the co-assembly of the LMWGs and the precursors.

  7. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  8. Spontaneous adsorption of coiled-coil model peptides K and E to a mixed lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Kirsch, Sonja; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-03-26

    A molecular description of the lipid-protein interactions underlying the adsorption of proteins to membranes is crucial for understanding, for example, the specificity of adsorption or the binding strength of a protein to a bilayer, or for characterizing protein-induced changes of membrane properties. In this paper, we extend an automated in silico assay (DAFT) for binding studies and apply it to characterize the adsorption of the model fusion peptides E and K to a mixed phospholipid/cholesterol membrane using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, we couple the coarse-grained protocol to reverse transformation to atomistic resolution, thereby allowing to study molecular interactions with high detail. The experimentally observed differential binding of the peptides E and K to membranes, as well as the increased binding affinity of helical over unstructered peptides, could be well reproduced using the polarizable Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field. Binding to neutral membranes is shown to be dominated by initial binding of the positively charged N-terminus to the phospholipid headgroup region, followed by membrane surface-aligned insertion of the peptide at the interface between the hydrophobic core of the membrane and its polar headgroup region. Both coarse-grained and atomistic simulations confirm a before hypothesized snorkeling of lysine side chains for the membrane-bound state of the peptide K. Cholesterol was found to be enriched in peptide vicinity, which is probably of importance for the mechanism of membrane fusion. The applied sequential multiscale method, using coarse-grained simulations for the slow adsorption process of peptides to membranes followed by backward transformation to atomistic detail and subsequent atomistic simulations of the preformed peptide-lipid complexes, is shown to be a versatile approach to study the interactions of peptides or proteins with biomembranes.

  9. C- and N-truncated antimicrobial peptides from LFampin 265 - 284: Biophysical versus microbiology results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adão Regina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with two globular lobes, each having two domains. Since the discovery of its antimicrobial properties, efforts have been made to find peptides derived from this protein showing antimicrobial properties. Most peptides initially studied were derived from Lactoferricin B, obtained from the protein by digestion with pepsin. More recently, a new family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs derived from Lactoferrin was discovered by Bolcher et al, and named Lactoferrampin (LFampin. The original sequence of LFampin contained residues 268 - 284 from the N1 domain of Lactoferrin. From this peptide, the Bolscher′s group synthesized a collection of peptides obtained by extension and / or truncation at the C or N-terminal sides, in order to unravel the main structural features responsible for antimicrobial action. Here, we present results for three of these peptides, namely LFampin 265 - 284, LFampin 265 - 280, and LFampin 270 - 284. The peptides were tested against bacteria (E. coli and S. sanguinis, fungi (C. albicans, and model membranes of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol] (DMPG, and their mixtures at a ratio of 3 : 1 (DMPC : DMPG (3 : 1. The ability to adopt a helical conformation was followed by a circular dichroism (CD, and the perturbation of the gel to the liquid-crystalline phase transition of the membrane was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Distinct behavior was observed in the three peptides, both from the microbiology and model membrane studies, with the biophysical results showing excellent correlation with the microbiology activity studies. LFampin 265 - 284 was the most active peptide toward the tested microorganisms, and in the biophysical studies it showed the highest ability to form an a-helix and the strongest interaction with model membranes, followed by LFampin 265 - 280. LFampin 270 - 284 was inactive, showing

  10. AWRK6, A Synthetic Cationic Peptide Derived from Antimicrobial Peptide Dybowskin-2CDYa, Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyu Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharides (LPS are major outer membrane components of Gram-negative bacteria and produce strong inflammatory responses in animals. Most antibiotics have shown little clinical anti-endotoxin activity while some antimicrobial peptides have proved to be effective in blocking LPS. Here, the anti-LPS activity of the synthetic peptide AWRK6, which is derived from antimicrobial peptide dybowskin-2CDYa, has been investigated in vitro and in vivo. The positively charged α-helical AWRK6 was found to be effective in blocking the binding of LBP (LPS binding protein with LPS in vitro using ELISA. In a murine endotoxemia model, AWRK6 offered satisfactory protection efficiency against endotoxemia death, and the serum levels of LPS, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were found to be attenuated using ELISA. Further, histopathological analysis suggested that AWRK6 could improve the healing of liver and lung injury in endotoxemia mice. The results of real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that AWRK6 significantly reversed LPS-induced TLR4 overexpression and IκB depression, as well as the enhanced IκB phosphorylation. Additionally, AWRK6 did not produce any significant toxicity in vivo and in vitro. In summary, AWRK6 showed efficacious protection from LPS challenges in vivo and in vitro, by blocking LPS binding to LBP, without obvious toxicity, providing a promising strategy against LPS-induced inflammatory responses.

  11. alpha-Helix dipole model and electrostatic stabilization of 4-alpha-helical proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheridan, R.P.; Levy, R.M.; Salemme, F. R.

    1982-01-01

    A simple dipole model is developed for estimation of the electrostatic interaction energy between alpha-helices in proteins. This model is used to estimate the electrostatic stabilization in a recurrent protein tertiary structural motif, an array of four closely packed alpha-helices. It is found that, for the proteins examined (cytochrome c', hemerythrin, myohemerythrin, cytochrome b562, and a T4 phage lysozyme domain), their common antiparallel arrangement of adjacent helices confers a stabi...

  12. Triple-Stranded Cluster Helicates for the Selective Catalytic Oxidation of C-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Gong, Wei; Liu, Lujia; Liu, Yan; Cui, Yong

    2016-10-17

    Triple-stranded cluster helicates with heptametallic dicubane cores are synthesized by entrapping metals in the cavities of linear triple helicates based on a C2-symmetrical hexadentate Schiff-base ligand of ortho-substitued biphenol. The helicates are stable in both the solution and solid states, and the copper species could selectively catalyze the oxidation of C-H bonds of alkanes to ketones.

  13. Analytic, High-beta Solutions of the Helical Grad-Shafranov Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Smith; A.H. Reiman

    2004-05-19

    We present analytic, high-beta ({beta} {approx} O(1)), helical equilibrium solutions for a class of helical axis configurations having large helical aspect ratio, with the helix assumed to be tightly wound. The solutions develop a narrow boundary layer of strongly compressed flux, similar to that previously found in high beta tokamak equilibrium solutions. The boundary layer is associated with a strong localized current which prevents the equilibrium from having zero net current.

  14. Exact solutions for helical magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. II. Nonstatic and nonbarotropic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villata, M. (Istituto di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)); Ferrari, A. (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy))

    1994-07-01

    In the framework of the analytical study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria with flow and nonuniform density, a general family of well-behaved exact solutions of the generalized Grad--Shafranov equation and of the whole set of time-independent MHD equations completed by the nonbarotropic ideal gas equation of state is obtained, both in helical and axial symmetry. The helical equilibrium solutions are suggested to be relevant to describe the helical morphology of some astrophysical jets.

  15. Pelvic migration of the helical blade after treatment of transtrochanteric fracture using a proximal femoral nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luciano Teixeira Gomes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Proximal femoral nails with a helical blade are a new generation of implants used for treating transtrochanteric fractures. The blade design provides rotational and angular stability for the fracture. Despite greater biomechanical resistance, they sometimes present complications. In the literature, there are some reports of cases of perforation of the femoral head caused by helical blades. Here, a clinical case of medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head and acetabulum into the pelvic cavity is presented.

  16. Helical CT defecography; La defecografia con Tomografia Computerizzata spirale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrando, R.; Fiorini, G.; Beghello, A.; Cicio, G.R.; Derchi, L.E.; Consigliere, M.; Resasco, M. [Genua Univ., Genua (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia, Cattedra R; Tornago, S. [Genua Univ. Genua (Italy). 2 Clinica Ortopedica

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the possible role of Helical CT defecography in pelvic floor disorders by comparing the results of the investigations with those of conventional defecography. The series analyzed consisted of 90 patients, namely 62 women and 28 men, ranging in age 24-82 years. They were all submitted to conventional defecography, and 18 questionable cases were also studied with Helical CT defecography. The conventional examination was performed during the 4 standard phases of resting, squeezing, Valsalva and straining; it is used a remote-control unit. The parameters for Helical CT defecography were: 5 mm beam collimation, pitch 2, 120 KV, 250 m As and 18-20 degrees gantry inclination to acquire coronal images of the pelvic floor. The rectal ampulla was distended with a bolus of 300 mL nonionic iodinated contrast agent (dilution: 3g/cc). The patient wore a napkin and was seated on the table, except for those who could not hold the position and were thus examined supine. Twenty-second helical scans were performed at rest and during evacuation; multiplanar reconstructions were obtained especially on the sagittal plane for comparison with conventional defecographic images. Coronal Helical CT defecography images permitted to map the perineal floor muscles, while sagittal reconstructions provided information on the ampulla and the levator ani. To conclude, Helical CT defecography performed well in study of pelvic floor disorders and can follow conventional defecography especially in questionable cases. [Italian] Scopo di questo lavoro e' ricercare un ruolo per la defeco-TC con apparecchiatura elicoidale nello studio delle malattie del pavimento pelvico confrontandola con i risultati consolidati della defecografia tradizionale. Si sono visionati 90 pazienti, 62 femmine e 28 maschi, con eta' compresa tra 24 e 82 anni, con defecografia tradizionale; di questi, 18 casi con diagnosi dubbia sono stati studiati anche con defeco-TC spirale

  17. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carboxamide protecting group in peptide synthesis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION l-Tetralinylamines used as precursors to prepare the carboxamide derivatives of asparagine and glutamine are shown in Table 1: Table 1. Summary of l-tetralinyl amines. Amines Aromatic ring NHZ. X Y Z Z. 1 H H H. 2 OCH; H H. 3 H OCH ...

  18. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important diagnostic and prognostic tools for cardiovascular disease. Plasma measurement of the bioactive peptides as well as precursor-derived fragments is a sensitive tool in assessing heart failure. In heart failure, the peptides are used as treatment...

  19. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  20. 'optimization' of animal peptide toxins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    peptides of ca. 4 to 70 amino acid residues, with a number of potential therapeutic applications.[1]. Because of the intrinsic structural complexities of these peptides (different types of fold and 1-5 disulfide bridges), this size range implicates that only a fraction of them (< 50-mer peptides) can routinely be produced by ...