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Sample records for hedgehog signaling regulates

  1. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

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    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya [Department of Life Sciences and Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Yang [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Tien-Shun [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsu-Wei, E-mail: twwang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jenn-Yah, E-mail: jyyu@ym.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences and Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  2. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development.

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    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic(-/-) mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic(-/-) mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Hedgehog signaling regulates telomerase reverse transcriptase in human cancer cells.

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    Tapati Mazumdar

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is critical for normal embryonic development, tissue patterning and cell differentiation. Aberrant HH signaling is involved in multiple human cancers. HH signaling involves a multi-protein cascade activating the GLI proteins that transcriptionally regulate HH target genes. We have previously reported that HH signaling is essential for human colon cancer cell survival and inhibition of this signal induces DNA damage and extensive cell death. Here we report that the HH/GLI axis regulates human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, which determines the replication potential of cancer cells. Suppression of GLI1/GLI2 functions by a C-terminus truncated GLI3 repressor mutant (GLI3R, or by GANT61, a pharmacological inhibitor of GLI1/GLI2, reduced hTERT protein expression in human colon cancer, prostate cancer and Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines. Expression of an N-terminus deleted constitutively active mutant of GLI2 (GLI2ΔN increased hTERT mRNA and protein expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity in human colon cancer cells while GANT61 inhibited hTERT mRNA expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with GLI1 or GLI2 antibodies precipitated fragments of the hTERT promoter in human colon cancer cells, which was reduced upon exposure to GANT61. In contrast, expression of GLI1 or GLI2ΔN in non-malignant 293T cells failed to alter the levels of hTERT mRNA and protein, or hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Further, expression of GLI2ΔN increased the telomerase enzyme activity, which was reduced by GANT61 administration in human colon cancer, prostate cancer, and GBM cells. These results identify hTERT as a direct target of the HH signaling pathway, and reveal a previously unknown role of the HH/GLI axis in regulating the replication potential of cancer cells. These findings are of significance in understanding the important regulatory

  4. Activation of Smurf E3 ligase promoted by smoothened regulates hedgehog signaling through targeting patched turnover.

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    Shoujun Huang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling plays conserved roles in controlling embryonic development; its dysregulation has been implicated in many human diseases including cancers. Hedgehog signaling has an unusual reception system consisting of two transmembrane proteins, Patched receptor and Smoothened signal transducer. Although activation of Smoothened and its downstream signal transduction have been intensively studied, less is known about how Patched receptor is regulated, and particularly how this regulation contributes to appropriate Hedgehog signal transduction. Here we identified a novel role of Smurf E3 ligase in regulating Hedgehog signaling by controlling Patched ubiquitination and turnover. Moreover, we showed that Smurf-mediated Patched ubiquitination depends on Smo activity in wing discs. Mechanistically, we found that Smo interacts with Smurf and promotes it to mediate Patched ubiquitination by targeting the K1261 site in Ptc. The further mathematic modeling analysis reveals that a bidirectional control of activation of Smo involving Smurf and Patched is important for signal-receiving cells to precisely interpret external signals, thereby maintaining Hedgehog signaling reliability. Finally, our data revealed an evolutionarily conserved role of Smurf proteins in controlling Hh signaling by targeting Ptc during development.

  5. Hedgehog signaling regulates dental papilla formation and tooth size during zebrafish odontogenesis.

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    Yu, Jeffrey C; Fox, Zachary D; Crimp, James L; Littleford, Hana E; Jowdry, Andrea L; Jackman, William R

    2015-04-01

    Intercellular communication by the hedgehog cell signaling pathway is necessary for tooth development throughout the vertebrates, but it remains unclear which specific developmental signals control cell behavior at different stages of odontogenesis. To address this issue, we have manipulated hedgehog activity during zebrafish tooth development and visualized the results using confocal microscopy. We first established that reporter lines for dlx2b, fli1, NF-κB, and prdm1a are markers for specific subsets of tooth germ tissues. We then blocked hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine and observed a reduction or elimination of the cranial neural crest derived dental papilla, which normally contains the cells that later give rise to dentin-producing odontoblasts. Upon further investigation, we observed that the dental papilla begins to form and then regresses in the absence of hedgehog signaling, through a mechanism unrelated to cell proliferation or apoptosis. We also found evidence of an isometric reduction in tooth size that correlates with the time of earliest hedgehog inhibition. We hypothesize that these results reveal a previously uncharacterized function of hedgehog signaling during tooth morphogenesis, regulating the number of cells in the dental papilla and thereby controlling tooth size. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5 is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

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    William M Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc and smoothened (Smo. Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP, we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases.

  7. Hedgehog signaling regulates the generation of ameloblast progenitors in the continuously growing mouse incisor.

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    Seidel, Kerstin; Ahn, Christina P; Lyons, David; Nee, Alexander; Ting, Kevin; Brownell, Isaac; Cao, Tim; Carano, Richard A D; Curran, Tom; Schober, Markus; Fuchs, Elaine; Joyner, Alexandra; Martin, Gail R; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Klein, Ophir D

    2010-11-01

    In many organ systems such as the skin, gastrointestinal tract and hematopoietic system, homeostasis is dependent on the continuous generation of differentiated progeny from stem cells. The rodent incisor, unlike human teeth, grows throughout the life of the animal and provides a prime example of an organ that rapidly deteriorates if newly differentiated cells cease to form from adult stem cells. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been proposed to regulate self-renewal, survival, proliferation and/or differentiation of stem cells in several systems, but to date there is little evidence supporting a role for Hh signaling in adult stem cells. We used in vivo genetic lineage tracing to identify Hh-responsive stem cells in the mouse incisor and we show that sonic hedgehog (SHH), which is produced by the differentiating progeny of the stem cells, signals to several regions of the incisor. Using a hedgehog pathway inhibitor (HPI), we demonstrate that Hh signaling is not required for stem cell survival but is essential for the generation of ameloblasts, one of the major differentiated cell types in the tooth, from the stem cells. These results therefore reveal the existence of a positive-feedback loop in which differentiating progeny produce the signal that in turn allows them to be generated from stem cells.

  8. Hedgehog

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    Oktay Avcı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog pathway is a major regulator for cell differentiation, tissue polarity and cell proliferation. Several studies reveal activation of this pathway in basal cell carcinomas in approximately 30% of extracutaneous solid tumors including medulloblastomas, lung, breast, gastrointestinal and prostate cancers. Targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling may be effective in treatment of many types of human tumors. The discovery and synthesis of specific hedgehog antagonists raise the possibility of their successful use in human cancer therapy. In this review, the molecular basis of hedgehog signaling activation, major advances in our understanding of signaling activation in human solid tumors, hedgehog antagonists and their potential application in human cancer will be evaluated.

  9. Hedgehog-PKA signaling and gnrh3 regulate the development of zebrafish gnrh3 neurons.

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    Ming-Wei Kuo

    Full Text Available GnRH neurons secrete GnRH that controls the development of the reproduction system. Despite many studies, the signals controlling the development of GnRH neurons from its progenitors have not been fully established. To understand the development of GnRH neurons, we examined the development of gnrh3-expressing cells using a transgenic zebrafish line that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP and LacZ driven by the gnrh3 promoter. GFP and LacZ expression recapitulated that of gnrh3 in the olfactory region, olfactory bulb and telencephalon. Depletion of gnrh3 by morpholinos led to a reduction of GFP- and gnrh3-expressing cells, while over-expression of gnrh3 mRNA increased the number of these cells. This result indicates a positive feed-forward regulation of gnrh3 cells by gnrh3. The gnrh3 cells were absent in embryos that lack Hedgehog signaling, but their numbers were increased in embryos overexpressing shhb. We manipulated the amounts of kinase that antagonizes the Hedgehog signaling pathway, protein kinase A (PKA, by treating embryos with PKA activator forskolin or by injecting mRNAs encoding its constitutively active catalytic subunit (PKA* and dominant negative regulatory subunit (PKI into zebrafish embryos. PKA* misexpression or forskolin treatment decreased GFP cell numbers, while PKI misexpression led to ectopic production of GFP cells. Our data indicate that the Hedgehog-PKA pathway participates in the development of gnrh3-expressing neurons during embryogenesis.

  10. Hedgehog signaling contributes to basic fibroblast growth factor-regulated fibroblast migration

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    Zhu, Zhong Xin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Sun, Cong Cong [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wenzhou People' s Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Ting Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ying; Wang, Tao; Chi, Li Sha; Cai, Wan Hui [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zheng, Jia Yong [Wenzhou People' s Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhou, Xuan [Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang (China); Cong, Wei Tao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Xiao Kun, E-mail: proflxk@163.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Jin, Li Tai, E-mail: jin_litai@126.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2017-06-15

    Fibroblast migration is a central process in skin wound healing, which requires the coordination of several types of growth factors. bFGF, a well-known fibroblast growth factor (FGF), is able to accelerate fibroblast migration; however, the underlying mechanism of bFGF regulation fibroblast migration remains unclear. Through the RNA-seq analysis, we had identified that the hedgehog (Hh) canonical pathway genes including Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1, were regulated by bFGF. Further analysis revealed that activation of the Hh pathway via up-regulation of Smo promoted fibroblast migration, invasion, and skin wound healing, but which significantly reduced by GANT61, a selective antagonist of Gli1/Gli2. Western blot analyses and siRNA transfection assays demonstrated that Smo acted upstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-β-catenin to promote cell migration. Moreover, RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that Hh pathway genes including Smo and Gli1 were under control of β-catenin, suggesting that β-catenin turn feedback activates Hh signaling. Taken together, our analyses identified a new bFGF-regulating mechanism by which Hh signaling regulates human fibroblast migration, and the data presented here opens a new avenue for the wound healing therapy. - Highlights: • bFGF regulates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in fibroblasts. • The Smo and Gli two master regulators of Hh signaling positively regulate fibroblast migration. • Smo facilitates β-catenin nuclear translocation via activation PI3K/JNK/GSK3β. • β-catenin positively regulates fibroblast cell migration and the expression of Hh signaling genes including Smo and Gli.

  11. Hedgehog signaling in the stomach.

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    Konstantinou, Daniel; Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Zavros, Yana

    2016-12-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway not only plays a key part in controlling embryonic development, but in the adult stomach governs important cellular events such as epithelial cell differentiation, proliferation, gastric disease, and regeneration. In particular, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been well studied for its role in gastric physiology and pathophysiology. Shh is secreted from the gastric parietal cells and contributes to the regeneration of the epithelium in response to injury, or the development of gastritis during Helicobacter pylori infection. Dysregulation of the Shh signaling pathway leads to the disruption of gastric differentiation, loss of gastric acid secretion and the development of cancer. In this chapter, we will review the most recent findings that reveal the role of Shh as a regulator of gastric physiology, regeneration, and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo RNAi screen reveals neddylation genes as novel regulators of Hedgehog signaling.

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    Juan Du

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling is highly conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in many developmental processes. Dysregulation of the Hh signaling cascade has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer. Although key components of the Hh pathway have been identified, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of individual Hh signaling molecules. Here, we report the identification of novel regulators of the Hh pathway, obtained from an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila. By selectively targeting critical genes functioning in post-translational modification systems utilizing ubiquitin (Ub and Ub-like proteins, we identify two novel genes (dUba3 and dUbc12 that negatively regulate Hh signaling activity. We provide in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrating that dUba3 and dUbc12 are essential components of the neddylation pathway; they function in an enzyme cascade to conjugate the ubiquitin-like NEDD8 modifier to Cullin proteins. Neddylation activates the Cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complex, which in turn promotes the degradation of Cubitus interruptus (Ci, the downstream transcription factor of the Hh pathway. Our study reveals a conserved molecular mechanism of the neddylation pathway in Drosophila and sheds light on the complex post-translational regulations in Hh signaling.

  13. Hedgehog signaling pathway regulated the target genes for adipogenesis in silkworm Bombyx mori.

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    Liang, Shuang; Chen, Rui-Ting; Zhang, Deng-Pan; Xin, Hu-Hu; Lu, Yan; Wang, Mei-Xian; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2015-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signals regulate invertebrate and vertebrate development, yet the role of the pathway in adipose development remains poorly understood. In this report, we found that Hh pathway components are expressed in the fat body of silkworm larvae. Functional analysis of these components in a BmN cell line model revealed that activation of the Hh gene stimulated transcription of Hh pathway components, but inhibited the expression of the adipose marker gene AP2. Conversely, specific RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hh resulted in increased AP2 expression. This further showed the regulation of Hh signal on the adipose marker gene. In silkworm larval models, enhanced adipocyte differentiation and an increase in adipocyte cell size were observed in silkworms that had been treated with a specific Hh signaling pathway antagonist, cyclopamine. The fat-body-specific Hh blockade tests were consistent with Hh signaling inhibiting silkworm adipogenesis. Our results indicate that the role of Hh signaling in inhibiting fat formation is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Hedgehog Signaling in Endochondral Ossification

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    Shinsuke Ohba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays crucial roles in the patterning and morphogenesis of various organs within the bodies of vertebrates and insects. Endochondral ossification is one of the notable developmental events in which Hh signaling acts as a master regulator. Among three Hh proteins in mammals, Indian hedgehog (Ihh is known to work as a major Hh input that induces biological impact of Hh signaling on the endochondral ossification. Ihh is expressed in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes of developing endochondral bones. Genetic studies so far have demonstrated that the Ihh-mediated activation of Hh signaling synchronizes chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during endochondral ossification by regulating the following processes: (1 chondrocyte differentiation; (2 chondrocyte proliferation; and (3 specification of bone-forming osteoblasts. Ihh not only forms a negative feedback loop with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP to maintain the growth plate length, but also directly promotes chondrocyte propagation. Ihh input is required for the specification of progenitors into osteoblast precursors. The combinatorial approaches of genome-wide analyses and mouse genetics will facilitate understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying the roles of Hh signaling in endochondral ossification, providing genome-level evidence of the potential of Hh signaling for the treatment of skeletal disorders.

  15. Maml1 acts cooperatively with Gli proteins to regulate sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

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    Quaranta, Roberta; Pelullo, Maria; Zema, Sabrina; Nardozza, Francesca; Checquolo, Saula; Lauer, Dieter Matthias; Bufalieri, Francesca; Palermo, Rocco; Felli, Maria Pia; Vacca, Alessandra; Talora, Claudio; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Screpanti, Isabella; Bellavia, Diana

    2017-07-20

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCPs) and its misregulation is linked to various disorders, including cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. The effects of Shh pathway are mediated by the Gli family of transcription factors, which controls the expression of a number of target genes, including Gli1. Here, we identify Mastermind-like 1 (Maml1) as a novel regulator of the Shh signaling since it interacts with Gli proteins, working as a potent transcriptional coactivator. Notably, Maml1 silencing results in a significant reduction of Gli target genes expression, with a negative impact on cell growth of NIH3T3 and Patched1-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), bearing a constitutively active Shh signaling. Remarkably, Shh pathway activity results severely compromised both in MEFs and GCPs deriving from Maml1-/- mice with an impairment of GCPs proliferation and cerebellum development. Therefore Maml1-/- phenotype mimics aspects of Shh pathway deficiency, suggesting an intrinsic requirement for Maml1 in cerebellum development. The present study shows a new role for Maml1 as a component of Shh signaling, which plays a crucial role in both development and tumorigenesis.

  16. Hedgehog signaling regulates FOXA2 in esophageal embryogenesis and Barrett’s metaplasia

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    Wang, David H.; Tiwari, Anjana; Kim, Monica E.; Clemons, Nicholas J.; Regmi, Nanda L.; Hodges, William A.; Berman, David M.; Montgomery, Elizabeth A.; Watkins, D. Neil; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qiuyang; Jie, Chunfa; Spechler, Stuart J.; Souza, Rhonda F.

    2014-01-01

    Metaplasia can result when injury reactivates latent developmental signaling pathways that determine cell phenotype. Barrett’s esophagus is a squamous-to-columnar epithelial metaplasia caused by reflux esophagitis. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is active in columnar-lined, embryonic esophagus and inactive in squamous-lined, adult esophagus. We showed previously that Hh signaling is reactivated in Barrett’s metaplasia and overexpression of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) in mouse esophageal squamous epithelium leads to a columnar phenotype. Here, our objective was to identify Hh target genes involved in Barrett’s pathogenesis. By microarray analysis, we found that the transcription factor Foxa2 is more highly expressed in murine embryonic esophagus compared with postnatal esophagus. Conditional activation of Shh in mouse esophageal epithelium induced FOXA2, while FOXA2 expression was reduced in Shh knockout embryos, establishing Foxa2 as an esophageal Hh target gene. Evaluation of patient samples revealed FOXA2 expression in Barrett’s metaplasia, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma but not in esophageal squamous epithelium or squamous cell carcinoma. In esophageal squamous cell lines, Hh signaling upregulated FOXA2, which induced expression of MUC2, an intestinal mucin found in Barrett’s esophagus, and the MUC2-processing protein AGR2. Together, these data indicate that Hh signaling induces expression of genes that determine an intestinal phenotype in esophageal squamous epithelial cells and may contribute to the development of Barrett’s metaplasia. PMID:25083987

  17. Non-Canonical Hedgehog Signaling Is a Positive Regulator of the WNT Pathway and Is Required for the Survival of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

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    Joseph L. Regan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Colon cancer is a heterogeneous tumor driven by a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs. To study CSCs in colon cancer, we used limiting dilution spheroid and serial xenotransplantation assays to functionally define the frequency of CSCs in a panel of patient-derived cancer organoids. These studies demonstrated cancer organoids to be enriched for CSCs, which varied in frequency between tumors. Whole-transcriptome analysis identified WNT and Hedgehog signaling components to be enhanced in CSC-enriched tumors and in aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-positive CSCs. Canonical GLI-dependent Hedgehog signaling is a negative regulator of WNT signaling in normal intestine and intestinal tumors. Here, we show that Hedgehog signaling in colon CSCs is autocrine SHH-dependent, non-canonical PTCH1 dependent, and GLI independent. In addition, using small-molecule inhibitors and RNAi against SHH-palmitoylating Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT, we demonstrate that non-canonical Hedgehog signaling is a positive regulator of WNT signaling and required for colon CSC survival. : Colon cancer is a heterogeneous tumor driven by a subpopulation(s of therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs. Regan et al. use 3D culture models to demonstrate that CSC survival is regulated by non-canonical, SHH-dependent, PTCH1-dependent Hedgehog signaling, which acts as a positive regulator of WNT signaling to block CSC differentiation. Keywords: WNT pathway, non-canonical Hedgehog signaling, cancer stem cell, colon cancer, cancer organoid, PTCH1, HHAT, SHH

  18. Regulation of Hedgehog Signaling in Cancer by Natural and Dietary Compounds.

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    Bao, Cheng; Kramata, Pavel; Lee, Hong Jin; Suh, Nanjoo

    2018-01-01

    The aberrant Hedgehog (Hh) signaling induced by mutations or overexpression of the signaling mediators has been implicated in cancer, associated with processes including inflammation, tumor cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, as well as cancer stemness. Small molecules targeting the regulatory components of the Hh signaling pathway, especially Smoothened (Smo), have been developed for the treatment of cancer. However, acquired resistance to a Smo inhibitor vismodegib observed in clinical trials suggests that other Hh signaling components need to be explored as potential anticancer targets. Natural and dietary compounds provide a resource for the development of potent agents affecting intracellular signaling cascades, and numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of natural products in targeting the Hh signaling pathway. In this review, we summarize the role of Hh signaling in tumorigenesis, discuss results from recent studies investigating the effect of natural products and dietary components on Hh signaling in cancer, and provide insight on novel small molecules as potential Hh signaling inhibitors. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

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    Mariana Rodova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN, an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4 as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway

  20. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates mode of cell division of early cerebral cortex progenitors and increases astrogliogenesis

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    Geissy LL Araújo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH plays a critical role in the development of different tissues. In the central nervous system, SHH is well known to contribute to the patterning of the spinal cord and separation of the brain hemispheres. In addition, it has recently been shown that SHH signaling also contributes to the patterning of the telencephalon and establishment of adult neurogenic niches. In this work, we investigated whether SHH signaling influences the behavior of neural progenitors isolated from the dorsal telencephalon, which generate excitatory neurons and macroglial cells in vitro. We observed that SHH increases proliferation of cortical progenitors and generation of astrocytes, whereas blocking SHH signaling with cyclopamine has opposite effects. In both cases, generation of neurons did not seem to be affected. However, cell survival was broadly affected by blockade of SHH signaling. SHH effects were related to three different cell phenomena: mode of cell division, cell cycle length and cell growth. Together, our data in vitro demonstrate that SHH signaling controls cell behaviors that are important for proliferation of cerebral cortex progenitors, as well as differentiation and survival of neurons and astroglial cells.

  1. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

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    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  2. Sonic Hedgehog signaling in the mammalian brain.

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    Traiffort, Elisabeth; Angot, Elodie; Ruat, Martial

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of a Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway in the mature vertebrate CNS has paved the way to the characterization of the functional roles of Shh signals in normal and diseased brain. Shh is proposed to participate in the establishment and maintenance of adult neurogenic niches and to regulate the proliferation of neuronal or glial precursors in several brain areas. Consistent with its role during brain development, misregulation of Shh signaling is associated with tumorigenesis while its recruitement in damaged neural tissue might be part of the regenerating process. This review focuses on the most recent data of the Hedgehog pathway in the adult brain and its relevance as a novel therapeutic approach for brain diseases including brain tumors.

  3. Ski modulate the characteristics of pancreatic cancer stem cells via regulating sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Libin; Chen, Xiangyuan; Gao, Song; Zhang, Chenyue; Qu, Chao; Wang, Peng; Liu, Luming

    2016-10-12

    Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies shows that Ski may act as both a tumor proliferation-promoting factor and a metastatic suppressor in human pancreatic cancer and also may be a therapeutic target of integrative therapies. At present, pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to conventional therapies. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is found to be aberrantly activated in CSCs. The objectives of this study were to investigate the role of Ski in modulating pancreatic CSCs and to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in pancreatic cancer treatment both in vivo and in vitro. In in vitro study, the results showed that enhanced Ski expression could increase the expression of pluripotency maintaining markers, such as CD24, CD44, Sox-2, and Oct-4, and also components of Shh signaling pathway, such as Shh, Ptch-1, Smo, Gli-1, and Gli-2, whereas depletion of Ski to the contrary. Then, we investigated the underlying mechanism and found that inhibiting Gli-2 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) can decrease the effects of Ski on the maintenance of pancreatic CSCs, indicating that Ski mediates the pluripotency of pancreatic CSCs mainly through Shh pathway. The conclusion is that Ski may be an important factor in maintaining the stemness of pancreatic CSCs through modulating Shh pathway.

  4. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates amygdalar neurogenesis and extinction of fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Chi; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Gean, Po-Wu

    2015-10-01

    It is now recognized that neurogenesis occurs throughout life predominantly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between neurogenesis in the amygdala and extinction of fear memory. Mice received 15 tone-footshock pairings. Twenty-four hours after training, the mice were given 15 tone-alone trials (extinction training) once per day for 7 days. Two hours before extinction training, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5-bromo-3-deoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-positive and NeuN-positive cells were analyzed 52 days after the training. A group of mice that received tone-footshock pairings but no extinction training served as controls (FC+No-Ext). The number of BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells was significantly higher in the extinction (FC+Ext) than in the FC+No-Ext mice. Proliferation inhibitor methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) or DNA synthesis inhibitor cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) reduced neurogenesis and retarded extinction. Silencing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene with short hairpin interfering RNA (shRNA) by means of a retrovirus expression system to knockdown Shh specifically in the mitotic neurons reduced neurogenesis and retarded extinction. By contrast, over-expression of Shh increased neurogenesis and facilitated extinction. These results suggest that amygdala neurogenesis and Shh signaling are involved in the extinction of fear memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine regulates Hedgehog signaling and promotes growth of cortical axons

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    Giorgi Kharebava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Axonogenesis, a process for the establishment of neuron connectivity, is central to brain function. The role of metabolites derived from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 that is specifically enriched in the brain, has not been addressed in axon development. In this study, we tested if synaptamide (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine, an endogenous metabolite of DHA, affects axon growth in cultured cortical neurons. We found that synaptamide increased the average axon length, inhibited GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1 transcription and sonic hedgehog (Shh target gene expression while inducing cAMP elevation. Similar effects were produced by cyclopamine, a regulator of the Shh pathway. Conversely, Shh antagonized elevation of cAMP and blocked synaptamide-mediated increase in axon length. Activation of Shh pathway by a smoothened (SMO agonist (SAG or overexpression of SMO did not inhibit axon growth mediated by synaptamide or cyclopamine. Instead, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished synaptamide-mediated axon growth indicating requirement of cAMP elevation for this process. Our findings establish that synaptamide promotes axon growth while Shh antagonizes synaptamide-mediated cAMP elevation and axon growth by a SMO-independent, non-canonical pathway.

  6. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

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    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  7. Sex and hedgehog: roles of genes in the hedgehog signaling pathway in mammalian sexual differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Heather L; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2012-01-01

    The chromosome status of the mammalian embryo initiates a multistage process of sexual development in which the bipotential reproductive system establishes itself as either male or female. These events are governed by intricate cell-cell and interorgan communication that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. The hedgehog signaling pathway was originally identified for its key role in the development of Drosophila, but is now recognized as a critical developmental regulator in many species, including humans. In addition to its developmental roles, the hedgehog signaling pathway also modulates adult organ function, and misregulation of this pathway often leads to diseases, such as cancer. The hedgehog signaling pathway acts through its morphogenetic ligands that signal from ligand-producing cells to target cells over a specified distance. The target cells then respond in a graded manner based on the concentration of the ligands that they are exposed to. Through this unique mechanism of action, the hedgehog signaling pathway elicits cell fate determination, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and cellular homeostasis. Here, we review current findings on the roles of hedgehog signaling in the sexually dimorphic development of the reproductive organs with an emphasis on mammals and comparative evidence in other species.

  8. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

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    Carolina N Perdigoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures.

  9. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hedgehog signaling and therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Fergal C

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the role that the hedgehog signaling pathway has in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. METHOD: PubMed search (2000-2010) and literature based references. RESULTS: Firstly, in 2009 a genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers found that a core set of 12 cellular signaling pathways including hedgehog were genetically altered in 67-100% of cases. Secondly, in vitro and in vivo studies of treatment with cyclopamine (a naturally occurring antagonist of the hedgehog signaling pathway component; Smoothened) has shown that inhibition of hedgehog can abrogate pancreatic cancer metastasis. Thirdly, experimental evidence has demonstrated that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is correlated with desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer. This is important because targeting the Shh pathway potentially may facilitate chemotherapeutic drug delivery as pancreatic cancers tend to have a dense fibrotic stroma that extrinsically compresses the tumor vasculature leading to a hypoperfusing intratumoral circulation. It is probable that patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer will derive the greatest benefit from treatment with Smoothened antagonists. Fourthly, it has been found that ligand dependent activation by hedgehog occurs in the tumor stromal microenvironment in pancreatic cancer, a paracrine effect on tumorigenesis. Finally, in pancreatic cancer, cells with the CD44+CD24+ESA+ immunophenotype select a population enriched for cancer initiating stem cells. Shh is increased 46-fold in CD44+CD24+ESA+ cells compared with normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Medications that destruct pancreatic cancer initiating stem cells are a potentially novel strategy in cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Aberrant hedgehog signaling occurs in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and therapeutics that target the transmembrane receptor Smoothened abrogate hedgehog signaling and may improve the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  11. Hedgehog Signaling in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

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    Emanuela Felley-Bosco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a cancer associated with exposure to asbestos fibers, which accumulate in the pleural space, damage tissue and stimulate regeneration. Hedgehog signaling is a pathway important during embryonic mesothelium development and is inactivated in adult mesothelium. The pathway is reactivated in some MPM patients with poor clinical outcome, mainly mediated by the expression of the ligands. Nevertheless, mutations in components of the pathway have been observed in a few cases. Data from different MPM animal models and primary culture suggest that both autocrine and paracrine Hedgehog signaling are important to maintain tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting the pathway at the level of the smoothened receptor (Smo or glioma-associated protein transcription factors (Gli have been used mostly in experimental models. For clinical development, biomarkers are necessary for the selection of patients who can benefit from Hedgehog signaling inhibition.

  12. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

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    Shuangxi Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR-family protein Smoothened (Smo. Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail. We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo.

  13. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

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    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  14. Maintenance of Taste Organs Is Strictly Dependent on Epithelial Hedgehog/GLI Signaling.

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    Alexandre N Ermilov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For homeostasis, lingual taste papilla organs require regulation of epithelial cell survival and renewal, with sustained innervation and stromal interactions. To investigate a role for Hedgehog/GLI signaling in adult taste organs we used a panel of conditional mouse models to manipulate GLI activity within epithelial cells of the fungiform and circumvallate papillae. Hedgehog signaling suppression rapidly led to taste bud loss, papilla disruption, and decreased proliferation in domains of papilla epithelium that contribute to taste cells. Hedgehog responding cells were eliminated from the epithelium but retained in the papilla stromal core. Despite papilla disruption and loss of taste buds that are a major source of Hedgehog ligand, innervation to taste papillae was maintained, and not misdirected, even after prolonged GLI blockade. Further, vimentin-positive fibroblasts remained in the papilla core. However, retained innervation and stromal cells were not sufficient to maintain taste bud cells in the context of compromised epithelial Hedgehog signaling. Importantly taste organ disruption after GLI blockade was reversible in papillae that retained some taste bud cell remnants where reactivation of Hedgehog signaling led to regeneration of papilla epithelium and taste buds. Therefore, taste bud progenitors were either retained during epithelial GLI blockade or readily repopulated during recovery, and were poised to regenerate taste buds once Hedgehog signaling was restored, with innervation and papilla connective tissue elements in place. Our data argue that Hedgehog signaling is essential for adult tongue tissue maintenance and that taste papilla epithelial cells represent the key targets for physiologic Hedgehog-dependent regulation of taste organ homeostasis. Because disruption of GLI transcriptional activity in taste papilla epithelium is sufficient to drive taste organ loss, similar to pharmacologic Hedgehog pathway inhibition, the findings

  15. Research advances in Hedgehog signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

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    LIU Jia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is present in many animals and plays an important role in regulating embryonic development and differentiation. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of many malignancies. Recent studies have shown that dysregulated Hh signaling pathway participates in the tumorigenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Investigation of the relationship between Hh signaling pathway and HCC will help elucidate the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis of HCC and provide a new insight into the development of novel anticancer therapy and therapeutic target.

  16. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  17. Three Tctn proteins are functionally conserved in the regulation of neural tube patterning and Gli3 processing but not ciliogenesis and Hedgehog signaling in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbing; Li, Jia; Meng, Qing; Wang, Baolin

    2017-10-01

    Tctn1, Tctn2, and Tctn3 are membrane proteins that localize at the transition zone of primary cilia. Tctn1 and Tctn2 mutations have been reported in both humans and mice, but Tctn3 mutations have been reported only in humans. It is also not clear whether the three Tctn proteins are functionally conserved with respect to ciliogenesis and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. In the present study, we report that loss of Tctn3 gene function in mice results in a decrease in ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Consistent with this, Tctn3 mutant mice exhibit holoprosencephaly and randomized heart looping and lack the floor plate in the neural tube, the phenotypes similar to those of Tctn1 and Tctn2 mutants. We also show that overexpression of Tctn3, but not Tctn1 or Tctn2, can rescue ciliogenesis in Tctn3 mutant cells. Similarly, replacement of Tctn3 with Tctn1 or Tctn2 in the Tctn3 gene locus results in reduced ciliogenesis and Hh signaling, holoprosencephaly, and randomized heart looping. Surprisingly, however, the neural tube patterning and the proteolytic processing of Gli3 (a transcription regulator for Hh signaling) into a repressor, both of which are usually impaired in ciliary gene mutants, are normal. These results suggest that Tctn1, Tctn2, and Tctn3 are functionally divergent with respect to their role in ciliogenesis and Hh signaling but conserved in neural tube patterning and Gli3 processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. EFCAB7 and IQCE regulate hedgehog signaling by tethering the EVC-EVC2 complex to the base of primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusapati, Ganesh V; Hughes, Casey E; Dorn, Karolin V; Zhang, Dapeng; Sugianto, Priscilla; Aravind, L; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-03-10

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway depends on primary cilia in vertebrates, but the signaling machinery within cilia remains incompletely defined. We report the identification of a complex between two ciliary proteins, EFCAB7 and IQCE, which positively regulates the Hh pathway. The EFCAB7-IQCE module anchors the EVC-EVC2 complex in a signaling microdomain at the base of cilia. EVC and EVC2 genes are mutated in Ellis van Creveld and Weyers syndromes, characterized by impaired Hh signaling in skeletal, cardiac, and orofacial tissues. EFCAB7 binds to a C-terminal disordered region in EVC2 that is deleted in Weyers patients. EFCAB7 depletion mimics the Weyers cellular phenotype-the mislocalization of EVC-EVC2 within cilia and impaired activation of the transcription factor GLI2. Evolutionary analysis suggests that emergence of these complexes might have been important for adaptation of an ancient organelle, the cilium, for an animal-specific signaling network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A compartmentalized phosphoinositide signaling axis at cilia is regulated by INPP5E to maintain cilia and promote Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, S E; Ramaswamy, V; Remke, M; Watkins, D N; Wainwright, B J; Taylor, M D; Mitchell, C A; Dyson, J M

    2017-10-26

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling at primary cilia drives the proliferation and progression of a subset of medulloblastomas, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumor. Severe side effects associated with conventional treatments and resistance to targeted therapies has led to the need for new strategies. SHH signaling is dependent on primary cilia for signal transduction suggesting the potential for cilia destabilizing mechanisms as a therapeutic target. INPP5E is an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase that hydrolyses PtdIns(4,5)P2 and more potently, the phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase product PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. INPP5E promotes SHH signaling during embryonic development via PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis at cilia, that in turn regulates the cilia recruitment of the SHH suppressor GPR161. However, the role INPP5E plays in cancer is unknown and the contribution of PI3-kinase signaling to cilia function is little characterized. Here, we reveal INPP5E promotes SHH signaling in SHH medulloblastoma by negatively regulating a cilia-compartmentalized PI3-kinase signaling axis that maintains primary cilia on tumor cells. Conditional deletion of Inpp5e in a murine model of constitutively active Smoothened-driven medulloblastoma slowed tumor progression, suppressed cell proliferation, reduced SHH signaling and promoted tumor cell cilia loss. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, its effector pAKT and the target pGSK3β, which when non-phosphorylated promotes cilia assembly/stability, localized to tumor cell cilia. The number of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3/pAKT/pGSK3β-positive cilia was increased in cultured Inpp5e-null tumor cells relative to controls. PI3-kinase inhibition or expression of wild-type, but not catalytically inactive HA-INPP5E partially rescued cilia loss in Inpp5e-null tumor cells in vitro. INPP5E mRNA and copy number were reduced in human SHH medulloblastoma compared to other molecular subtypes and consistent with the murine model, reduced INPP5E was associated with improved overall survival

  20. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling and Development of the Dentition

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    Maisa Seppala

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sonic hedgehog (Shh is an essential signaling peptide required for normal embryonic development. It represents a highly-conserved marker of odontogenesis amongst the toothed vertebrates. Signal transduction is involved in early specification of the tooth-forming epithelium in the oral cavity, and, ultimately, in defining tooth number within the established dentition. Shh also promotes the morphogenetic movement of epithelial cells in the early tooth bud, and influences cell cycle regulation, morphogenesis, and differentiation in the tooth germ. More recently, Shh has been identified as a stem cell regulator in the continuously erupting incisors of mice. Here, we review contemporary data relating to the role of Shh in odontogenesis, focusing on tooth development in mammals and cartilaginous fishes. We also describe the multiple actions of this signaling protein at the cellular level.

  1. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T.; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome. PMID:24853502

  2. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  3. Role of the Drosophila non-visual ß-arrestin kurtz in hedgehog signalling.

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    Cristina Molnar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The non-visual ß-arrestins are cytosolic proteins highly conserved across species that participate in a variety of signalling events, including plasma membrane receptor degradation, recycling, and signalling, and that can also act as scaffolding for kinases such as MAPK and Akt/PI3K. In Drosophila melanogaster, there is only a single non-visual ß-arrestin, encoded by kurtz, whose function is essential for neuronal activity. We have addressed the participation of Kurtz in signalling during the development of the imaginal discs, epithelial tissues requiring the activity of the Hedgehog, Wingless, EGFR, Notch, Insulin, and TGFβ pathways. Surprisingly, we found that the complete elimination of kurtz by genetic techniques has no major consequences in imaginal cells. In contrast, the over-expression of Kurtz in the wing disc causes a phenotype identical to the loss of Hedgehog signalling and prevents the expression of Hedgehog targets in the corresponding wing discs. The mechanism by which Kurtz antagonises Hedgehog signalling is to promote Smoothened internalization and degradation in a clathrin- and proteosomal-dependent manner. Intriguingly, the effects of Kurtz on Smoothened are independent of Gprk2 activity and of the activation state of the receptor. Our results suggest fundamental differences in the molecular mechanisms regulating receptor turnover and signalling in vertebrates and invertebrates, and they could provide important insights into divergent evolution of Hedgehog signalling in these organisms.

  4. Functional Interaction between HEXIM and Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Wing Development.

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    Duy Nguyen

    Full Text Available Studying the dynamic of gene regulatory networks is essential in order to understand the specific signals and factors that govern cell proliferation and differentiation during development. This also has direct implication in human health and cancer biology. The general transcriptional elongation regulator P-TEFb regulates the transcriptional status of many developmental genes. Its biological activity is controlled by an inhibitory complex composed of HEXIM and the 7SK snRNA. Here, we examine the function of HEXIM during Drosophila development. Our key finding is that HEXIM affects the Hedgehog signaling pathway. HEXIM knockdown flies display strong phenotypes and organ failures. In the wing imaginal disc, HEXIM knockdown initially induces ectopic expression of Hedgehog (Hh and its transcriptional effector Cubitus interuptus (Ci. In turn, deregulated Hedgehog signaling provokes apoptosis, which is continuously compensated by apoptosis-induced cell proliferation. Thus, the HEXIM knockdown mutant phenotype does not result from the apoptotic ablation of imaginal disc; but rather from the failure of dividing cells to commit to a proper developmental program due to Hedgehog signaling defects. Furthermore, we show that ci is a genetic suppressor of hexim. Thus, HEXIM ensures the integrity of Hedgehog signaling in wing imaginal disc, by a yet unknown mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the physiological function of HEXIM has been addressed in such details in vivo.

  5. Dampening the signals transduced through hedgehog via microRNA miR-7 facilitates notch-induced tumourigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina G Da Ros

    Full Text Available Fine-tuned Notch and Hedgehog signalling pathways via attenuators and dampers have long been recognized as important mechanisms to ensure the proper size and differentiation of many organs and tissues. This notion is further supported by identification of mutations in these pathways in human cancer cells. However, although it is common that the Notch and Hedgehog pathways influence growth and patterning within the same organ through the establishment of organizing regions, the cross-talk between these two pathways and how the distinct organizing activities are integrated during growth is poorly understood. Here, in an unbiased genetic screen in the Drosophila melanogaster eye, we found that tumour-like growth was provoked by cooperation between the microRNA miR-7 and the Notch pathway. Surprisingly, the molecular basis of this cooperation between miR-7 and Notch converged on the silencing of Hedgehog signalling. In mechanistic terms, miR-7 silenced the interference hedgehog (ihog Hedgehog receptor, while Notch repressed expression of the brother of ihog (boi Hedgehog receptor. Tumourigenesis was induced co-operatively following Notch activation and reduced Hedgehog signalling, either via overexpression of the microRNA or through specific down-regulation of ihog, hedgehog, smoothened, or cubitus interruptus or via overexpression of the cubitus interruptus repressor form. Conversely, increasing Hedgehog signalling prevented eye overgrowth induced by the microRNA and Notch pathway. Further, we show that blocking Hh signal transduction in clones of cells mutant for smoothened also enhance the organizing activity and growth by Delta-Notch signalling in the wing primordium. Together, these findings uncover a hitherto unsuspected tumour suppressor role for the Hedgehog signalling and reveal an unanticipated cooperative antagonism between two pathways extensively used in growth control and cancer.

  6. Opening new doors: Hedgehog signaling and the pancreatic cancer stroma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhofer, H.

    2015-01-01

    In pancreatic cancer, a very difficult to treat tumor type with a dismal prognosis, Hedgehog (Hh) ligands are produced by tumor cells and signal to the surrounding tumor microenvironment. This thesis gives new insights into the different aspects of stromal biology and Hh signaling by describing for

  7. The primary cilium coordinates early cardiogenesis and hedgehog signaling in cardiomyocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Christian A; Kristensen, Stine G; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2009-01-01

    Defects in the assembly or function of primary cilia, which are sensory organelles, are tightly coupled to developmental defects and diseases in mammals. Here, we investigated the function of the primary cilium in regulating hedgehog signaling and early cardiogenesis. We report that the pluripotent...... P19.CL6 mouse stem cell line, which can differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes, forms primary cilia that contain essential components of the hedgehog pathway, including Smoothened, Patched-1 and Gli2. Knockdown of the primary cilium by Ift88 and Ift20 siRNA or treatment with cyclopamine......, an inhibitor of Smoothened, blocks hedgehog signaling in P19.CL6 cells, as well as differentiation of the cells into beating cardiomyocytes. E11.5 embryos of the Ift88(tm1Rpw) (Ift88-null) mice, which form no cilia, have ventricular dilation, decreased myocardial trabeculation and abnormal outflow tract...

  8. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Verdelho Machado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual’s response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease.

  9. Investigations on Inhibitors of Hedgehog Signal Pathway: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiwei Cao; Huiliang Li; Ruixin Zhu; Qi Liu; Jian Tang

    2011-01-01

    The hedgehog signal pathway is an essential agent in developmental patterning, wherein the local concentration of the Hedgehog morphogens directs cellular differentiation and expansion. Furthermore, the Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor/stromal interaction and cancer stem cell. Nowadays searching novel inhibitors for Hedgehog Signal Pathway is drawing much more attention by biological, chemical and pharmological scientists. In our study, a solid computational model is proposed whi...

  10. Neogenin regulates Sonic hedgehog pathway activity during digit patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mingi; Schachter, Karen A.; Jiang, Guoying; Krauss, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Digit patterning integrates signaling by the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), FGF and BMP pathways. GLI3, a component of the SHH pathway, is a major regulator of digit number and identity. Neogenin (encoded by Neo1) is a cell surface protein that serves to transduce signals from several ligands, including BMPs, in various developmental contexts. Although neogenin is implicated in BMP signaling, it has not been linked to SHH signaling and its role in digit patterning is unknown. Results We report that Neo1 mutant mice have preaxial polydactyly with low penetrance. Expression of SHH target genes, but not BMP target genes, is altered in Neo1 mutant limb buds. Analysis of mice carrying mutations in both Neo1 and Gli3 reveals that although neogenin plays a role in constraint of digit numbers, suppressing polydactyly, it is also required for the severe polydactyly caused by loss of GLI3. Furthermore, embryo fibroblasts from Neo1 mutant mice are sensitized to SHH pathway activation in vitro. Conclusions Our findings indicate that neogenin regulates SHH signaling in the limb bud to achieve proper digit patterning. PMID:22275192

  11. Attenuation of hedgehog acyltransferase-catalyzed sonic Hedgehog palmitoylation causes reduced signaling, proliferation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Chang, Shu-Chun; Jovanović, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    autocrine and juxtacrine signaling, and inhibited PDAC cell growth and invasiveness in vitro. In addition, Hhat knockdown in a HEK293a cell line constitutively expressing Shh and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells inhibited their ability to signal in a juxtacrine/paracrine fashion to the reporter......Overexpression of Hedgehog family proteins contributes to the aetiology of many cancers. To be highly active, Hedgehog proteins must be palmitoylated at their N-terminus by the MBOAT family multispanning membrane enzyme Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat). In a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC...

  12. Dynamic interpretation of hedgehog signaling in the Drosophila wing disc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Nahmad

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Morphogens are classically defined as molecules that control patterning by acting at a distance to regulate gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner. In the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, secreted Hedgehog (Hh forms an extracellular gradient that organizes patterning along the anterior-posterior axis and specifies at least three different domains of gene expression. Although the prevailing view is that Hh functions in the Drosophila wing disc as a classical morphogen, a direct correspondence between the borders of these patterns and Hh concentration thresholds has not been demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence that the interpretation of Hh signaling depends on the history of exposure to Hh and propose that a single concentration threshold is sufficient to support multiple outputs. Using mathematical modeling, we predict that at steady state, only two domains can be defined in response to Hh, suggesting that the boundaries of two or more gene expression patterns cannot be specified by a static Hh gradient. Computer simulations suggest that a spatial "overshoot" of the Hh gradient occurs, i.e., a transient state in which the Hh profile is expanded compared to the Hh steady-state gradient. Through a temporal examination of Hh target gene expression, we observe that the patterns initially expand anteriorly and then refine, providing in vivo evidence for the overshoot. The Hh gene network architecture suggests this overshoot results from the Hh-dependent up-regulation of the receptor, Patched (Ptc. In fact, when the network structure was altered such that the ptc gene is no longer up-regulated in response to Hh-signaling activation, we found that the patterns of gene expression, which have distinct borders in wild-type discs, now overlap. Our results support a model in which Hh gradient dynamics, resulting from Ptc up-regulation, play an instructional role in the establishment of patterns of gene expression.

  13. Small-molecule synthetic compound norcantharidin reverses multi-drug resistance by regulating Sonic hedgehog signaling in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chen

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves upregulated ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and activated Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling. By preparing human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resistant to doxorubicin (DOX, we examined the effect and mechanism of norcantharidin (NCTD, a small-molecule synthetic compound, on reversing multidrug resistance. The DOX-prepared MCF-7R cells also possessed resistance to vinorelbine, characteristic of MDR. At suboptimal concentration, NCTD significantly inhibited the viability of DOX-sensitive (MCF-7S and DOX-resistant (MCF-7R cells and reversed the resistance to DOX and vinorelbine. NCTD increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX in MCF-7R cells and suppressed the upregulated the mdr-1 mRNA, P-gp and BCRP protein expression, but not the MRP-1. The role of P-gp was strengthened by partial reversal of the DOX and vinorelbine resistance by cyclosporine A. NCTD treatment suppressed the upregulation of Shh expression and nuclear translocation of Gli-1, a hallmark of Shh signaling activation in the resistant clone. Furthermore, the Shh ligand upregulated the expression of P-gp and attenuated the growth inhibitory effect of NCTD. The knockdown of mdr-1 mRNA had not altered the expression of Shh and Smoothened in both MCF-7S and MCF-7R cells. This indicates that the role of Shh signaling in MDR might be upstream to mdr-1/P-gp, and similar effect was shown in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells. This study demonstrated that NCTD may overcome multidrug resistance through inhibiting Shh signaling and expression of its downstream mdr-1/P-gp expression in human breast cancer cells.

  14. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  15. The you gene encodes an EGF-CUB protein essential for Hedgehog signaling in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G Woods

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling is required for many aspects of development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Misregulation of the Hedgehog pathway causes developmental abnormalities and has been implicated in certain types of cancer. Large-scale genetic screens in zebrafish have identified a group of mutations, termed you-class mutations, that share common defects in somite shape and in most cases disrupt Hedgehog signaling. These mutant embryos exhibit U-shaped somites characteristic of defects in slow muscle development. In addition, Hedgehog pathway mutations disrupt spinal cord patterning. We report the positional cloning of you, one of the original you-class mutations, and show that it is required for Hedgehog signaling in the development of slow muscle and in the specification of ventral fates in the spinal cord. The you gene encodes a novel protein with conserved EGF and CUB domains and a secretory pathway signal sequence. Epistasis experiments support an extracellular role for You upstream of the Hedgehog response mechanism. Analysis of chimeras indicates that you mutant cells can appropriately respond to Hedgehog signaling in a wild-type environment. Additional chimera analysis indicates that wild-type you gene function is not required in axial Hedgehog-producing cells, suggesting that You is essential for transport or stability of Hedgehog signals in the extracellular environment. Our positional cloning and functional studies demonstrate that You is a novel extracellular component of the Hedgehog pathway in vertebrates.

  16. Disrupting hedgehog and WNT signaling interactions promotes cleft lip pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Iulianella, Angelo; Williams, Trevor; Trainor, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip, which results from impaired facial process growth and fusion, is one of the most common craniofacial birth defects. Many genes are known to be involved in the etiology of this disorder; however, our understanding of cleft lip pathogenesis remains incomplete. In the present study, we uncovered a role for sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling during lip fusion. Mice carrying compound mutations in hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) and patched1 (Ptch1) exhibited perturbations in the SHH gradient during frontonasal development, which led to hypoplastic nasal process outgrowth, epithelial seam persistence, and cleft lip. Further investigation revealed that enhanced SHH signaling restricts canonical WNT signaling in the lambdoidal region by promoting expression of genes encoding WNT inhibitors. Moreover, reduction of canonical WNT signaling perturbed p63/interferon regulatory factor 6 (p63/IRF6) signaling, resulting in increased proliferation and decreased cell death, which was followed by persistence of the epithelial seam and cleft lip. Consistent with our results, mutations in genes that disrupt SHH and WNT signaling have been identified in both mice and humans with cleft lip. Collectively, our data illustrate that altered SHH signaling contributes to the etiology and pathogenesis of cleft lip through antagonistic interactions with other gene regulatory networks, including the canonical WNT and p63/IRF6 signaling pathways. PMID:24590292

  17. Hedgehog Signaling Inhibitors as Anti-Cancer Agents in Osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram Kumar, Ram Mohan, E-mail: rkumar@research.balgrist.ch; Fuchs, Bruno [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Research, Balgrist University Hospital, Sarcoma Center-UZH University of Zurich, Zurich 8008 (Switzerland)

    2015-05-13

    Osteosarcoma is a rare type of cancer associated with a poor clinical outcome. Even though the pathologic characteristics of OS are well established, much remains to be understood, particularly at the molecular signaling level. The molecular mechanisms of osteosarcoma progression and metastases have not yet been fully elucidated and several evolutionary signaling pathways have been found to be linked with osteosarcoma pathogenesis, especially the hedgehog signaling (Hh) pathway. The present review will outline the importance and targeting the hedgehog signaling (Hh) pathway in osteosarcoma tumor biology. Available data also suggest that aberrant Hh signaling has pro-migratory effects and leads to the development of osteoblastic osteosarcoma. Activation of Hh signaling has been observed in osteosarcoma cell lines and also in primary human osteosarcoma specimens. Emerging data suggests that interference with Hh signal transduction by inhibitors may reduce osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth thereby preventing osteosarcomagenesis. From this perspective, we outline the current state of Hh pathway inhibitors in osteosarcoma. In summary, targeting Hh signaling by inhibitors promise to increase the efficacy of osteosarcoma treatment and improve patient outcome.

  18. Gedunin inhibits pancreatic cancer by altering sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Nandy, Sushmita Bose; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Camacho, Fernando; Medel, Joshua; Alabi, Damilola; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2017-02-14

    The lack of efficient treatment options for pancreatic cancer highlights the critical need for the development of novel and effective chemotherapeutic agents. The medicinal properties found in plants have been used to treat many different illnesses including cancers. This study focuses on the anticancer effects of gedunin, a natural compound isolated from Azadirachta indica. Anti-proliferative effect of gedunin on pancreatic cancer cells was assessed using MTS assay. We used matrigel invasion assay, scratch assay, and soft agar colony formation assay to measure the anti-metastatic potential of gedunin. Immunoblotting was performed to analyze the effect of gedunin on the expression of key proteins involved in pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. Gedunin induced apoptosis was measured using flow cytometric analysis. To further validate, xenograft studies with HPAC cells were performed. Gedunin treatment is highly effective in inducing death of pancreatic cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic mediated apoptosis. Our data further indicates that gedunin inhibited metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by decreasing their EMT, invasive, migratory and colony formation capabilities. Gedunin treatment also inhibited sonic hedgehog signaling pathways. Further, experiments with recombinant sonic hedgehog protein and Gli inhibitor (Gant-61) demonstrated that gedunin induces its anti-metastatic effect through inhibition of sonic hedgehog signaling. The anti-cancer effect of gedunin was further validated using xenograft mouse model. Overall, our data suggests that gedunin could serve as a potent anticancer agent against pancreatic cancers.

  19. Hedgehog Signaling Promotes the Proliferation and Subsequent Hair Cell Formation of Progenitor Cells in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hair cell (HC loss is the major cause of permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Unlike lower vertebrates, mammalian cochlear HCs cannot regenerate spontaneously after damage, although the vestibular system does maintain limited HC regeneration capacity. Thus HC regeneration from the damaged sensory epithelium has been one of the main areas of research in the field of hearing restoration. Hedgehog signaling plays important roles during the embryonic development of the inner ear, and it is involved in progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the cell fate decision. In this study, we show that recombinant Sonic Hedgehog (Shh protein effectively promotes sphere formation, proliferation, and differentiation of Lgr5+ progenitor cells isolated from the neonatal mouse cochlea. To further explore this, we determined the effect of Hedgehog signaling on cell proliferation and HC regeneration in cultured cochlear explant from transgenic R26-SmoM2 mice that constitutively activate Hedgehog signaling in the supporting cells of the cochlea. Without neomycin treatment, up-regulation of Hedgehog signaling did not significantly promote cell proliferation or new HC formation. However, after injury to the sensory epithelium by neomycin treatment, the over-activation of Hedgehog signaling led to significant supporting cell proliferation and HC regeneration in the cochlear epithelium explants. RNA sequencing and real-time PCR were used to compare the transcripts of the cochleae from control mice and R26-SmoM2 mice, and multiple genes involved in the proliferation and differentiation processes were identified. This study has important implications for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by manipulating the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  20. Lithium inhibits tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through targeting hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Peng

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and represents an attractive target for PDA treatment. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for mental disorders, potently inhibits the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β that promotes the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation of GLI1, an important downstream component of hedgehog signaling. Herein, we report that lithium inhibits cell proliferation, blocks G1/S cell-cycle progression, induces cell apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through down-regulation of the expression and activity of GLI1. Moreover, lithium synergistically enhances the anti-cancer effect of gemcitabine. These findings further our knowledge of mechanisms of action for lithium and provide a potentially new therapeutic strategy for PDA through targeting GLI1.

  1. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Switches the Mode of Division in the Developing Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murielle Saade

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The different modes of stem cell division are tightly regulated to balance growth and differentiation during organ development and homeostasis, and these regulatory processes are subverted in tumor formation. Here, we developed markers that provided the single-cell resolution necessary to quantify the three modes of division taking place in the developing nervous system in vivo: self-expanding, PP; self-replacing, PN; and self-consuming, NN. Using these markers and a mathematical model that predicts the dynamics of motor neuron progenitor division, we identify a role for the morphogen Sonic hedgehog in the maintenance of stem cell identity in the developing spinal cord. Moreover, our study provides insight into the process linking lineage commitment to neurogenesis with changes in cell-cycle parameters. As a result, we propose a challenging model in which the external Sonic hedgehog signal dictates stem cell identity, reflected in the consequent readjustment of cell-cycle parameters.

  2. Hedgehog signaling patterns the outgrowth of unpaired skeletal appendages in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlberg Per

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the control of the development of vertebrate unpaired appendages such as the caudal fin, one of the key morphological specializations of fishes. Recent analysis of lamprey and dogshark median fins suggests the co-option of some molecular mechanisms between paired and median in Chondrichthyes. However, the extent to which the molecular mechanisms patterning paired and median fins are shared remains unknown. Results Here we provide molecular description of the initial ontogeny of the median fins in zebrafish and present several independent lines of evidence that Sonic hedgehog signaling emanating from the embryonic midline is essential for establishment and outgrowth of the caudal fin primordium. However, gene expression analysis shows that the primordium of the adult caudal fin does not harbor a Sonic hedgehog-expressing domain equivalent to the Shh secreting zone of polarizing activity (ZPA of paired appendages. Conclusion Our results suggest that Hedgehog proteins can regulate skeletal appendage outgrowth independent of a ZPA and demonstrates an unexpected mechanism for mediating Shh signals in a median fin primordium. The median fins evolved before paired fins in early craniates, thus the patterning of the median fins may be an ancestral mechanism that controls the outgrowth of skeletogenic appendages in vertebrates.

  3. CDO, an Hh-coreceptor, mediates lung cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity through Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling.

  4. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India); Patra, Samir Kumar, E-mail: samirp@nitrkl.ac.in [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India)

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  5. Investigations on Inhibitors of Hedgehog Signal Pathway: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Cao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog signal pathway is an essential agent in developmental patterning, wherein the local concentration of the Hedgehog morphogens directs cellular differentiation and expansion. Furthermore, the Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor/stromal interaction and cancer stem cell. Nowadays searching novel inhibitors for Hedgehog Signal Pathway is drawing much more attention by biological, chemical and pharmological scientists. In our study, a solid computational model is proposed which incorporates various statistical analysis methods to perform a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR study on the inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling. The whole QSAR data contain 93 cyclopamine derivatives as well as their activities against four different cell lines (NCI-H446, BxPC-3, SW1990 and NCI-H157. Our extensive testing indicated that the binary classification model is a better choice for building the QSAR model of inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling compared with other statistical methods and the corresponding in silico analysis provides three possible ways to improve the activity of inhibitors by demethylation, methylation and hydroxylation at specific positions of the compound scaffold respectively. From these, demethylation is the best choice for inhibitor structure modifications. Our investigation also revealed that NCI-H466 served as the best cell line for testing the activities of inhibitors of Hedgehog signal pathway among others.

  6. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  7. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellese A. Cannonier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung, directly invade into bone (head and neck or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  8. Proper ciliary assembly is critical for restricting Hedgehog signaling during early eye development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Jacob B; Lupu, Floria I; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T

    2017-10-01

    Patterning of the vertebrate eye into optic stalk, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neural retina (NR) territories relies on a number of signaling pathways, but how these signals are interpreted by optic progenitors is not well understood. The primary cilium is a microtubule-based organelle that is essential for Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, but it has also been implicated in the regulation of other signaling pathways. Here, we show that the optic primordium is ciliated during early eye development and that ciliogenesis is essential for proper patterning and morphogenesis of the mouse eye. Ift172 mutants fail to generate primary cilia and exhibit patterning defects that resemble those of Gli3 mutants, suggesting that cilia are required to restrict Hh activity during eye formation. Ift122 mutants, which produce cilia with abnormal morphology, generate optic vesicles that fail to invaginate to produce the optic cup. These mutants also lack formation of the lens, RPE and NR. Such phenotypic features are accompanied by strong, ectopic Hh pathway activity, evidenced by altered gene expression patterns. Removal of GLI2 from Ift122 mutants rescued several aspects of optic cup and lens morphogenesis as well as RPE and NR specification. Collectively, our data suggest that proper assembly of primary cilia is critical for restricting the Hedgehog pathway during eye formation in the mouse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Loss of Merlin induces metabolomic adaptation that engages dependence on Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shamik; Jackson, William P; Prasain, Jeevan K; Hanna, Ann; Bailey, Sarah K; Tucker, J Allan; Bae, Sejong; Wilson, Landon S; Samant, Rajeev S; Barnes, Stephen; Shevde, Lalita A

    2017-01-23

    The tumor suppressor protein Merlin is proteasomally degraded in breast cancer. We undertook an untargeted metabolomics approach to discern the global metabolomics profile impacted by Merlin in breast cancer cells. We discerned specific changes in glutathione metabolites that uncovered novel facets of Merlin in impacting the cancer cell metabolome. Concordantly, Merlin loss increased oxidative stress causing aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling. Abrogation of GLI-mediated transcription activity compromised the aggressive phenotype of Merlin-deficient cells indicating a clear dependence of cells on Hedgehog signaling. In breast tumor tissues, GLI1 expression enhanced tissue identification and discriminatory power of Merlin, cumulatively presenting a powerful substantiation of the relationship between these two proteins. We have uncovered, for the first time, details of the tumor cell metabolomic portrait modulated by Merlin, leading to activation of Hedgehog signaling. Importantly, inhibition of Hedgehog signaling offers an avenue to target the vulnerability of tumor cells with loss of Merlin.

  10. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jui Tung [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  11. Influenza NS1 directly modulates Hedgehog signaling during infection.

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    Margery G Smelkinson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional NS1 protein of influenza A viruses suppresses host cellular defense mechanisms and subverts other cellular functions. We report here on a new role for NS1 in modifying cell-cell signaling via the Hedgehog (Hh pathway. Genetic epistasis experiments and FRET-FLIM assays in Drosophila suggest that NS1 interacts directly with the transcriptional mediator, Ci/Gli1. We further confirmed that Hh target genes are activated cell-autonomously in transfected human lung epithelial cells expressing NS1, and in infected mouse lungs. We identified a point mutation in NS1, A122V, that modulates this activity in a context-dependent fashion. When the A122V mutation was incorporated into a mouse-adapted influenza A virus, it cell-autonomously enhanced expression of some Hh targets in the mouse lung, including IL6, and hastened lethality. These results indicate that, in addition to its multiple intracellular functions, NS1 also modifies a highly conserved signaling pathway, at least in part via cell autonomous activities. We discuss how this new Hh modulating function of NS1 may influence host lethality, possibly through controlling cytokine production, and how these new insights provide potential strategies for combating infection.

  12. Tongue and Taste Organ Biology and Function: Homeostasis Maintained by Hedgehog Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, Charlotte M; Kumari, Archana

    2017-02-10

    The tongue is an elaborate complex of heterogeneous tissues with taste organs of diverse embryonic origins. The lingual taste organs are papillae, composed of an epithelium that includes specialized taste buds, the basal lamina, and a lamina propria core with matrix molecules, fibroblasts, nerves, and vessels. Because taste organs are dynamic in cell biology and sensory function, homeostasis requires tight regulation in specific compartments or niches. Recently, the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has emerged as an essential regulator that maintains lingual taste papillae, taste bud and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurophysiological function. Activating or suppressing Hh signaling, with genetic models or pharmacological agents used in cancer treatments, disrupts taste papilla and taste bud integrity and can eliminate responses from taste nerves to chemical stimuli but not to touch or temperature. Understanding Hh regulation of taste organ homeostasis contributes knowledge about the basic biology underlying taste disruptions in patients treated with Hh pathway inhibitors.

  13. The hedgehog-signaling pathway is repressed during the osteogenic differentiation of dental follicle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Reck, A; Beck, H C

    2017-01-01

    Dental follicle stem cells (DFCs) are precursor cells of alveolar osteoblasts, and previous studies have shown that the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 induces the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. However, the molecular mechanism down-stream of the induction of the osteogenic...... of repressors of the hedgehog-signaling pathway such as Patched 1 (PTCH1), Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), and Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (PTHrP). Previous studies suggested that hedgehog proteins induce the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via a paracrine pathway. Indian hedgehog (IHH...

  14. Hedgehog Signaling in Prostate Development, Regeneration and Cancer

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    Wade Bushman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The prostate is a developmental model system study of prostate growth regulation. Historically the research focus was on androgen regulation of development and growth and instructive interactions between the mesenchyme and epithelium. The study of Hh signaling in prostate development revealed important roles in ductal morphogenesis and in epithelial growth regulation that appear to be recapitulated in prostate cancer. This overview of Hh signaling in the prostate will address the well-described role of paracrine signaling prostate development as well as new evidence suggesting a role for autocrine signaling, the role of Hh signaling in prostate regeneration and reiterative activities in prostate cancer.

  15. Epicardial regeneration is guided by cardiac outflow tract and Hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhu; Cao, Jingli; Dickson, Amy L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2015-06-11

    In response to cardiac damage, a mesothelial tissue layer enveloping the heart called the epicardium is activated to proliferate and accumulate at the injury site. Recent studies have implicated the epicardium in multiple aspects of cardiac repair: as a source of paracrine signals for cardiomyocyte survival or proliferation; a supply of perivascular cells and possibly other cell types such as cardiomyocytes; and as a mediator of inflammation. However, the biology and dynamism of the adult epicardium is poorly understood. To investigate this, we created a transgenic line to ablate the epicardial cell population in adult zebrafish. Here we find that genetic depletion of the epicardium after myocardial loss inhibits cardiomyocyte proliferation and delays muscle regeneration. The epicardium vigorously regenerates after its ablation, through proliferation and migration of spared epicardial cells as a sheet to cover the exposed ventricular surface in a wave from the chamber base towards its apex. By reconstituting epicardial regeneration ex vivo, we show that extirpation of the bulbous arteriosus-a distinct, smooth-muscle-rich tissue structure that distributes outflow from the ventricle-prevents epicardial regeneration. Conversely, experimental repositioning of the bulbous arteriosus by tissue recombination initiates epicardial regeneration and can govern its direction. Hedgehog (Hh) ligand is expressed in the bulbous arteriosus, and treatment with a Hh signalling antagonist arrests epicardial regeneration and blunts the epicardial response to muscle injury. Transplantation of Sonic hedgehog (Shh)-soaked beads at the ventricular base stimulates epicardial regeneration after bulbous arteriosus removal, indicating that Hh signalling can substitute for the influence of the outflow tract. Thus, the ventricular epicardium has pronounced regenerative capacity, regulated by the neighbouring cardiac outflow tract and Hh signalling. These findings extend our understanding of

  16. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

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    Stock David W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution.

  17. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution. PMID:21118524

  18. Role of Hedgehog signaling pathway in progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver fibrosis

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    AN Baiquan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and related metabolic syndromes are prevalent on the global scale. Thus far, non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL disease has caused wide attention from domestic and overseas scholars. NAFL cirrhosis is considered to be the central part and inevitable stage of liver cirrhosis developed from simple fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The effect of Hedgehog signaling pathway on hepatocytes in the progression of NAFL fibrosis was elucidated and investigated by a population study. Results showed that abnormal activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway promoted the progression of NAFL fibrosis. In-depth study on the Hedgehog signaling pathway may provide a new approach for the treatment of NAFL fibrosis.

  19. Two populations of endochondral osteoblasts with differential sensitivity to Hedgehog signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, Christina Lindsey; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling has been implicated in the development of osteoblasts and osteoclasts whose balanced activities are critical for proper bone formation. As many mouse mutants in the Hh pathway are embryonic lethal, questions on the exact effects of Hh signalling on osteogenesis remain. Using

  20. Two populations of endochondral osteoblasts with differential sensitivity to Hedgehog signalling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, C.L.; Schulte-Merker, S.

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling has been implicated in the development of osteoblasts and osteoclasts whose balanced activities are critical for proper bone formation. As many mouse mutants in the Hh pathway are embryonic lethal, questions on the exact effects of Hh signalling on osteogenesis remain. Using

  1. A screen for modifiers of hedgehog signaling in Drosophila melanogaster identifies swm and mts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casso, David J; Liu, Songmei; Iwaki, D David; Ogden, Stacey K; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2008-03-01

    Signaling by Hedgehog (Hh) proteins shapes most tissues and organs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, and its misregulation has been implicated in many human diseases. Although components of the signaling pathway have been identified, key aspects of the signaling mechanism and downstream targets remain to be elucidated. We performed an enhancer/suppressor screen in Drosophila to identify novel components of the pathway and identified 26 autosomal regions that modify a phenotypic readout of Hh signaling. Three of the regions include genes that contribute constituents to the pathway-patched, engrailed, and hh. One of the other regions includes the gene microtubule star (mts) that encodes a subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. We show that mts is necessary for full activation of Hh signaling. A second region includes the gene second mitotic wave missing (swm). swm is recessive lethal and is predicted to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein with RNA binding and Zn(+) finger domains. Characterization of newly isolated alleles indicates that swm is a negative regulator of Hh signaling and is essential for cell polarity.

  2. Anti‑fibrotic effect of Sedum sarmentosum Bunge extract in kidneys via the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yongheng; Wu, Cunzao; Hong, Weilong; Zhang, Xing; Liu, Leping; Chen, Bicheng

    2017-07-01

    Sedum sarmentosum Bunge (SSBE) is a perennial plant widely distributed in Asian countries, and its extract is traditionally used for the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases. Our previous studies demonstrated that SSBE has marked renal anti‑fibrotic effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. The present study identified that SSBE exerts its inhibitory effect on the myofibroblast phenotype and renal fibrosis via the hedgehog signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro. In rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), SSBE administration reduced kidney injury and alleviated interstitial fibrosis by decreasing the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1 and its receptor, and inhibiting excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including type I and III collagens. In addition, SSBE suppressed the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and this anti‑proliferative activity was associated with downregulation of hedgehog signaling activity in SSBE‑treated UUO kidneys. In cultured renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs), recombinant TGF‑β1 activated hedgehog signaling, and resulted in induction of the myofibroblast phenotype. SSBE treatment inhibited the activation of hedgehog signaling and partially reversed the fibrotic phenotype in TGF‑β1‑treated RTECs. Similarly, aristolochic acid‑mediated upregulated activity of hedgehog signaling was reduced by SSBE treatment, and thereby led to the abolishment of excessive ECM accumulation. Therefore, these findings suggested that SSBE attenuates the myofibroblast phenotype and renal fibrosis via suppressing the hedgehog signaling pathway, and may facilitate the development of treatments for kidney fibrosis.

  3. Cholesterol activates the G-protein coupled receptor Smoothened to promote Hedgehog signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Giovanni; Sircar, Ria; Kong, Jennifer H; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Sagner, Andreas; Byrne, Eamon FX; Covey, Douglas F; Siebold, Christian; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the function of many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). We find that cholesterol is not just necessary but also sufficient to activate signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, a prominent cell-cell communication system in development. Cholesterol influences Hh signaling by directly activating Smoothened (SMO), an orphan GPCR that transmits the Hh signal across the membrane in all animals. Unlike many GPCRs, which are regulated by cholesterol through their heptahelical transmembrane domains, SMO is activated by cholesterol through its extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Residues shown to mediate cholesterol binding to the CRD in a recent structural analysis also dictate SMO activation, both in response to cholesterol and to native Hh ligands. Our results show that cholesterol can initiate signaling from the cell surface by engaging the extracellular domain of a GPCR and suggest that SMO activity may be regulated by local changes in cholesterol abundance or accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20304.001 PMID:27705744

  4. Contribution of hedgehog signaling to the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jacob F; Miranda, Esther L; McClay, David R

    2016-03-15

    Most bilaterians exhibit a left-right asymmetric distribution of their internal organs. The sea urchin larva is notable in this regard since most adult structures are generated from left sided embryonic structures. The gene regulatory network governing this larval asymmetry is still a work in progress but involves several conserved signaling pathways including Nodal, and BMP. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of Hedgehog signaling and it's contribution to left-right asymmetry. We report that Hh signaling plays a conserved role to regulate late asymmetric expression of Nodal and that this regulation occurs after Nodal breaks left-right symmetry in the mesoderm. Thus, while Hh functions to maintain late Nodal expression, the molecular asymmetry of the future coelomic pouches is locked in. Furthermore we report that cilia play a role only insofar as to transduce Hh signaling and do not have an independent effect on the asymmetry of the mesoderm. From this, we are able to construct a more complete regulatory network governing the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduced primary cilia length and altered Arl13b expression are associated with deregulated chondrocyte Hedgehog signaling in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Gambassi, Silvia; Thompson, Clare L; Chandrakumar, Charmilie; Santucci, Annalisa; Knight, Martin M

    2017-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inherited disease resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase which leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). AKU is characterized by severe cartilage degeneration, similar to that observed in osteoarthritis. Previous studies suggest that AKU is associated with alterations in cytoskeletal organization which could modulate primary cilia structure/function. This study investigated whether AKU is associated with changes in chondrocyte primary cilia and associated Hedgehog signaling which mediates cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. Human articular chondrocytes were obtained from healthy and AKU donors. Additionally, healthy chondrocytes were treated with HGA to replicate AKU pathology (+HGA). Diseased cells exhibited shorter cilia with length reductions of 36% and 16% in AKU and +HGA chondrocytes respectively, when compared to healthy controls. Both AKU and +HGA chondrocytes demonstrated disruption of the usual cilia length regulation by actin contractility. Furthermore, the proportion of cilia with axoneme breaks and bulbous tips was increased in AKU chondrocytes consistent with defective regulation of ciliary trafficking. Distribution of the Hedgehog-related protein Arl13b along the ciliary axoneme was altered such that its localization was increased at the distal tip in AKU and +HGA chondrocytes. These changes in cilia structure/trafficking in AKU and +HGA chondrocytes were associated with a complete inability to activate Hedgehog signaling in response to exogenous ligand. Thus, we suggest that altered responsiveness to Hedgehog, as a consequence of cilia dysfunction, may be a contributing factor in the development of arthropathy highlighting the cilium as a novel target in AKU. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  6. Silibinin Treatment Inhibits the Growth of Hedgehog Inhibitor-Resistant Basal Cell Carcinoma Cells via Targeting EGFR-MAPK-Akt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeraj, Arpit; Rigby, Cynthia M; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Agarwal, Chapla; Singh, Rana P; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin malignancy. Deregulated hedgehog signaling plays a central role in BCC development; therefore, hedgehog inhibitors have been approved to treat locally advanced or metastatic BCC. However, the development of resistance to hedgehog inhibitors is the major challenge in effective treatment of this disease. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of a natural agent silibinin to overcome resistance with hedgehog inhibitors (Sant-1 and GDC-0449) in BCC cells. Silibinin (25-100 μm) treatment for 48 h strongly inhibited growth and induced death in ASZ001, Sant-1-resistant (ASZ001-Sant-1) and GDC-0449-resistant (ASZ001-GDC-0449) BCC cells. Furthermore, colony-forming ability of ASZ001, ASZ001-Sant-1 and ASZ001-GDC-0449 cells was completely inhibited by silibinin treatment. Molecular analysis showed that silibinin treatment decreased the level of phosphorylated EGFR (Tyrosine 1173) and total EGFR in ASZ001-Sant-1 cells, key signaling molecules responsible for BCC resistance toward hedgehog inhibitors. Further, silibinin treatment decreased the phosphorylated Akt (Serine 473), phosphorylated ERK1/2 (Threonine 202/Tyrosine 204), cyclin D1 and Gli-1 level but increased the SUFU expression in ASZ001-Sant-1-resistant cells. Silibinin treatment of ASZ001-Sant-1-resistant cells also decreased bcl-2 but increased cleaved caspase 3 and PARP cleavage, suggesting induction of apoptosis. Together, these results support silibinin use to target hedgehog inhibitor-resistant BCC cells. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies. PMID:22981989

  8. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

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    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  9. Aberrant FGF signaling, independent of ectopic hedgehog signaling, initiates preaxial polydactyly in Dorking chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldin, Cortney M; Harfe, Brian D

    2009-10-01

    The formation of supernumerary digits, or polydactyly, is a common congenital malformation. Although mutations in a number of genes have been linked to polydactyly, the molecular etiology for a third of human disorders with polydactyly remains unknown. To increase our understanding of the potential causes for polydactyly, we characterized a spontaneous chicken mutant, known as Dorking. The hindlimbs of Dorkings form a preaxial supernumerary digit. During the early stages of limb development, ectopic expression of several genes, including Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast Growth Factor 4 (Fgf4), was found in Dorking hindlimbs. In addition to ectopic gene expression, a decrease in cell death in the anterior of the developing Dorking hindlimb was observed. Further molecular investigation revealed that ectopic Fgf4 expression was initiated and maintained independent of ectopic Shh. Additionally, inhibition of Fgf signaling but not hedgehog signaling was capable of restoring the normal anterior domain of cell death in Dorking hindlimbs. Our data indicates that in Dorking chickens, preaxial polydactyly is initiated independent of Shh.

  10. FGFR3 Deficiency Causes Multiple Chondroma-like Lesions by Upregulating Hedgehog Signaling.

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    Siru Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most cartilaginous tumors are formed during skeletal development in locations adjacent to growth plates, suggesting that they arise from disordered endochondral bone growth. Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3 signaling plays essential roles in this process; however, the role of FGFR3 in cartilaginous tumorigenesis is not known. In this study, we found that postnatal chondrocyte-specific Fgfr3 deletion induced multiple chondroma-like lesions, including enchondromas and osteochondromas, adjacent to disordered growth plates. The lesions showed decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK activity and increased Indian hedgehog (IHH expression. The same was observed in Fgfr3-deficient primary chondrocytes, in which treatment with a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK inhibitor increased Ihh expression. Importantly, treatment with an inhibitor of IHH signaling reduced the occurrence of chondroma-like lesions in Fgfr3-deficient mice. This is the first study reporting that the loss of Fgfr3 function leads to the formation of chondroma-like lesions via downregulation of MEK/ERK signaling and upregulation of IHH, suggesting that FGFR3 has a tumor suppressor-like function in chondrogenesis.

  11. Two distinct sites in sonic Hedgehog combine for heparan sulfate interactions and cell signaling functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Shu-Chun; Mulloy, Barbara; Magee, Anthony I

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are morphogens that mediate many developmental processes. Hh signaling is significant for many aspects of embryonic development, whereas dysregulation of this pathway is associated with several types of cancer. Hh proteins require heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for t...

  12. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary prote...

  13. Activation of the hedgehog pathway in advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Frank

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hedgehog pathway plays a critical role in the development of prostate. However, the role of the hedgehog pathway in prostate cancer is not clear. Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent cause of cancer death in American men. Therefore, identification of novel therapeutic targets for prostate cancer has significant clinical implications. Results Here we report that activation of the hedgehog pathway occurs frequently in advanced human prostate cancer. We find that high levels of hedgehog target genes, PTCH1 and hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP, are detected in over 70% of prostate tumors with Gleason scores 8–10, but in only 22% of tumors with Gleason scores 3–6. Furthermore, four available metastatic tumors all have high expression of PTCH1 and HIP. To identify the mechanism of the hedgehog signaling activation, we examine expression of Su(Fu protein, a negative regulator of the hedgehog pathway. We find that Su(Fu protein is undetectable in 11 of 27 PTCH1 positive tumors, two of them contain somatic loss-of-function mutations of Su(Fu. Furthermore, expression of sonic hedgehog protein is detected in majority of PTCH1 positive tumors (24 out of 27. High levels of hedgehog target genes are also detected in four prostate cancer cell lines (TSU, DU145, LN-Cap and PC3. We demonstrate that inhibition of hedgehog signaling by smoothened antagonist, cyclopamine, suppresses hedgehog signaling, down-regulates cell invasiveness and induces apoptosis. In addition, cancer cells expressing Gli1 under the CMV promoter are resistant to cyclopamine-mediated apoptosis. All these data suggest a significant role of the hedgehog pathway for cellular functions of prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that activation of the hedgehog pathway, through loss of Su(Fu or overexpression of sonic hedgehog, may involve tumor progression and metastases of prostate cancer. Thus, targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling may have

  14. Resveratrol Downregulates Interleukin-6-Stimulated Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Yu-Chieh Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-6 and sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling molecules are considered to maintain the growth of cancer stem cells (CSCs. Resveratrol, an important integrant in traditional Chinese medicine, possesses certain antitumor effects. However, the mechanisms on regulating acute myeloid leukemia (AML are unclear. This study first used human subjects to demonstrate that the plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-1β in AML patients were higher and lower, respectively, than healthy donors. The expression of Shh preproproteins, and C- and N-terminal Shh peptides increased in bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from AML patients, and the plasma N-Shh secretion was greater. To further clarify the effect of IL-6 and resveratrol in Shh signaling, human AML HL-60 cells were tested. IL-6 upregulated Shh and Gli-1 expression and was accompanied by an increase of cell viability. Resveratrol significantly decreased CSC-related Shh expression, Gli-1 nuclear translocation, and cell viability in IL-6-treated HL-60 cells and had synergistic effect with Shh inhibitor cyclopamine on inhibiting cell growth. Conclusions. IL-6 stimulated the growth of AML cells through Shh signaling, and this effect might be blocked by resveratrol. Further investigations of Shh as a prognostic marker and resveratrol as a therapeutic drug target to CSCs in AML are surely warranted.

  15. Hedgehog signalling in myeloid cells impacts on body weight, adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Julia; Weyer, Ulrike; Matz-Soja, Madlen; Hobusch, Constance; Kern, Matthias; Kunath, Anne; Klöting, Nora; Kralisch, Susann; Blüher, Matthias; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zavros, Yana; Bechmann, Ingo; Gericke, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Recently, hedgehog (Hh) was identified as a crucial player in adipose tissue development and energy expenditure. Therefore, we tested whether Hh ligands are regulated in obesity. Further, we aimed at identifying potential target cells of Hh signalling and studied the functional impact of Hh signalling on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism. Hh ligands and receptors were analysed in adipose tissue or serum from lean and obese mice as well as in humans. To study the impact on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism, Hh signalling was specifically blocked in myeloid cells using a conditional knockout approach (Lys-Smo (-/-)). Desert Hh (DHH) and Indian Hh (IHH) are local Hh ligands, whereas Sonic Hh is not expressed in adipose tissue from mice or humans. In mice, obesity leads to a preferential upregulation of Hh ligands (Dhh) and signalling components (Ptch1, Smo and Gli1) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Further, adipose tissue macrophages are Hh target cells owing to the expression of Hh receptors, such as Patched1 and 2. Conditional knockout of Smo (which encodes Smoothened, a mandatory Hh signalling component) in myeloid cells increases body weight and adipose tissue inflammation and attenuates glucose tolerance, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect of Hh signalling. In humans, adipose tissue expression of DHH and serum IHH decrease with obesity and type 2 diabetes, which might be explained by the intake of metformin. Interestingly, metformin reduced Dhh and Ihh expression in mouse adipose tissue explants. Hh signalling in myeloid cells affects adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism and may be a potential target to treat type 2 diabetes.

  16. Phosphoproteome analysis reveals a critical role for hedgehog signalling in osteoblast morphological transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Ariane; Milani, Renato; da Silva, Rodrigo A; da Costa Fernandes, Célio Junior; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Ferreira, Carmen V; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2017-10-01

    The reciprocal and adaptive interactions between cells and substrates governing morphological transitions in the osteoblast compartment remain largely obscure. Here we show that osteoblast cultured in basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™) exhibits significant morphological changes after ten days of culture, and we decided to exploit this situation to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for guiding osteoblast morphological transitions. As almost all aspects of cellular physiology are under control of kinases, we generated more or less comprehensive cellular kinome profiles employing PepChip peptide arrays that contain over 1000 consensus substrates of kinase peptide. The results obtained were used to construct interactomes, and these revealed an important role for FoxO in mediating morphological changes of osteoblast, which was validated by Western blot technology when FoxO was significantly up-expressed in response to Matrigel™. As FoxO is a critical protein in canonical hedgehog signalling, we decided to explore the possible involvement of hedgehog signalling during osteoblast morphological changes. It appeared that osteoblast culture in Matrigel™ stimulates release of a substantial amounts Shh while concomitantly inducing upregulation of the expression of the bona fide hedgehog target genes Gli-1 and Patched. Functional confirmation of the relevance of these results for osteoblast morphological transitions came from experiments in which Shh hedgehog signalling was inhibited using the well-established pathway inhibitor cyclopamine (Cyc). In the presence of Cyc, culture of osteoblasts in Matrigel™ is not capable of inducing morphological changes but appears to provoke a proliferative response as evident from the upregulation of Cyclin D3 and cdk4. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that hedgehog signalling is both necessary and sufficient for membrane matrix-based morphological transitions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  17. All Mammalian Hedgehog Proteins Interact with Cell Adhesion Molecule, Down-regulated by Oncogenes (CDO) and Brother of CDO (BOC) in a Conserved Manner*

    OpenAIRE

    Kavran, Jennifer M.; Ward, Matthew D.; Oladosu, Oyindamola O.; Mulepati, Sabin; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins stimulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning at multiple points in animal development. A single Hh homolog is present in Drosophila, but three Hh homologs, Sonic Hh, Indian Hh, and Desert Hh, are present in mammals. Distribution, movement, and reception of Hh signals are tightly regulated, and abnormal Hh signaling is associated with developmental defects and cancer. In addition to the integral membrane proteins Patched and Smoothened, ...

  18. NANOG Expression as a Responsive Biomarker during Treatment with Hedgehog Signal Inhibitor in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Kakiuchi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is involved in the maintenance of leukemic stem cell (LSCs populations. PF-0444913 (PF-913 is a novel inhibitor that selectively targets Smoothened (SMO, which regulates the Hh pathway. Treatment with PF-913 has shown promising results in an early phase study of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, a detailed mode of action for PF-913 and relevant biomarkers remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined bone marrow samples derived from AML patients under PF-913 monotherapy. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA revealed that PF-913 treatment affected the self-renewal signature and cell-cycle regulation associated with LSC-like properties. We then focused on the expression of a pluripotency factor, NANOG, because previous reports showed that a downstream effector in the Hh pathway, GLI, directly binds to the NANOG promoter and that the GLI-NANOG axis promotes stemness and growth in several cancers. In this study, we found that a change in NANOG transcripts was closely associated with GLI-target genes and NANOG transcripts can be a responsive biomarker during PF-913 therapy. Additionally, the treatment of AML with PF-913 holds promise, possibly through inducing quiescent leukemia stem cells toward cell cycling.

  19. Hedgehog signaling antagonist GDC-0449 (Vismodegib inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cell characteristics: molecular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahma N Singh

    Full Text Available Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that aberrant reactivation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway regulates genes that promote cellular proliferation in various human cancer stem cells (CSCs. Therefore, the chemotherapeutic agents that inhibit activation of Gli transcription factors have emerged as promising novel therapeutic drugs for pancreatic cancer. GDC-0449 (Vismodegib, orally administrable molecule belonging to the 2-arylpyridine class, inhibits SHH signaling pathway by blocking the activities of Smoothened. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which GDC-0449 regulates human pancreatic CSC characteristics in vitro.GDC-0499 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in three pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic CSCs. This inhibitor also suppressed cell viability, Gli-DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in pancreatic CSCs. GDC-0449-induced apoptosis in CSCs showed increased Fas expression and decreased expression of PDGFRα. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was down-regulated whereas TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-R2/DR5 expression was increased following the treatment of CSCs with GDC-0449. Suppression of both Gli1 plus Gli2 by shRNA mimicked the changes in cell viability, spheroid formation, apoptosis and gene expression observed in GDC-0449-treated pancreatic CSCs. Thus, activated Gli genes repress DRs and Fas expressions, up-regulate the expressions of Bcl-2 and PDGFRα and facilitate cell survival.These data suggest that GDC-0499 can be used for the management of pancreatic cancer by targeting pancreatic CSCs.

  20. Synergism between Hedgehog-GLI and EGFR signaling in Hedgehog-responsive human medulloblastoma cells induces downregulation of canonical Hedgehog-target genes and stabilized expression of GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Götschel

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH signaling has been identified as a key etiologic factor in many human malignancies. Signal strength, target gene specificity, and oncogenic activity of HH signaling depend profoundly on interactions with other pathways, such as epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signaling, which has been shown to cooperate with HH/GLI in basal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer. Our experimental data demonstrated that the Daoy human medulloblastoma cell line possesses a fully inducible endogenous HH pathway. Treatment of Daoy cells with Sonic HH or Smoothened agonist induced expression of GLI1 protein and simultaneously prevented the processing of GLI3 to its repressor form. To study interactions between HH- and EGF-induced signaling in greater detail, time-resolved measurements were carried out and analyzed at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. The Daoy cells responded to the HH/EGF co-treatment by downregulating GLI1, PTCH, and HHIP at the transcript level; this was also observed when Amphiregulin (AREG was used instead of EGF. We identified a novel crosstalk mechanism whereby EGFR signaling silences proteins acting as negative regulators of HH signaling, as AKT- and ERK-signaling independent process. EGFR/HH signaling maintained high GLI1 protein levels which contrasted the GLI1 downregulation on the transcript level. Conversely, a high-level synergism was also observed, due to a strong and significant upregulation of numerous canonical EGF-targets with putative tumor-promoting properties such as MMP7, VEGFA, and IL-8. In conclusion, synergistic effects between EGFR and HH signaling can selectively induce a switch from a canonical HH/GLI profile to a modulated specific target gene profile. This suggests that there are more wide-spread, yet context-dependent interactions, between HH/GLI and growth factor receptor signaling in human malignancies.

  1. Forskolin, a hedgehog signalling inhibitor, attenuates carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Agroudy, Nermeen N; El-Naga, Reem N; El-Razeq, Rania Abd; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2016-11-01

    Liver fibrosis is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide with very limited therapeutic options. Given the pivotal role of activated hepatic stellate cells in liver fibrosis, attention has been directed towards the signalling pathways underlying their activation and fibrogenic functions. Recently, the hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway has been identified as a potentially important therapeutic target in liver fibrosis. The present study was designed to explore the antifibrotic effects of the potent Hh signalling inhibitor, forskolin, and the possible molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either CCl4 and/or forskolin for 6 consecutive weeks. Serum hepatotoxicity markers were determined, and histopathological evaluation was performed. Hepatic fibrosis was assessed by measuring α-SMA expression and collagen deposition by Masson's trichrome staining and hydroxyproline content. The effects of forskolin on oxidative stress markers (GSH, GPx, lipid peroxides), inflammatory markers (NF-κB, TNF-α, COX-2, IL-1β), TGF-β1 and Hh signalling markers (Ptch-1, Smo, Gli-2) were also assessed. Hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4 was significantly reduced by forskolin, as indicated by decreased α-SMA expression and collagen deposition. Forskolin co-treatment significantly attenuated oxidative stress and inflammation, reduced TGF-β1 levels and down-regulated mRNA expression of Ptch-1, Smo and Gli-2 through cAMP-dependent PKA activation. In our model, forskolin exerted promising antifibrotic effects which could be partly attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, as well as to its inhibition of Hh signalling, mediated by cAMP-dependent activation of PKA. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Hey1 and Hey2 control the spatial and temporal pattern of mammalian auditory hair cell differentiation downstream of Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Gonzalez, Ana; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2014-09-17

    Mechano-sensory hair cells (HCs), housed in the inner ear cochlea, are critical for the perception of sound. In the mammalian cochlea, differentiation of HCs occurs in a striking basal-to-apical and medial-to-lateral gradient, which is thought to ensure correct patterning and proper function of the auditory sensory epithelium. Recent studies have revealed that Hedgehog signaling opposes HC differentiation and is critical for the establishment of the graded pattern of auditory HC differentiation. However, how Hedgehog signaling interferes with HC differentiation is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that in the murine cochlea, Hey1 and Hey2 control the spatiotemporal pattern of HC differentiation downstream of Hedgehog signaling. It has been recently shown that HEY1 and HEY2, two highly redundant HES-related transcriptional repressors, are highly expressed in supporting cell (SC) and HC progenitors (prosensory cells), but their prosensory function remained untested. Using a conditional double knock-out strategy, we demonstrate that prosensory cells form and proliferate properly in the absence of Hey1 and Hey2 but differentiate prematurely because of precocious upregulation of the pro-HC factor Atoh1. Moreover, we demonstrate that prosensory-specific expression of Hey1 and Hey2 and its subsequent graded downregulation is controlled by Hedgehog signaling in a largely FGFR-dependent manner. In summary, our study reveals a critical role for Hey1 and Hey2 in prosensory cell maintenance and identifies Hedgehog signaling as a novel upstream regulator of their prosensory function in the mammalian cochlea. The regulatory mechanism described here might be a broadly applied mechanism for controlling progenitor behavior in the central and peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412865-12$15.00/0.

  3. Targeting of the Hedgehog signal transduction pathway suppresses survival of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Min; Varona-Santos, Javier; Singh, Samer; Robbins, David J; Savaraj, Niramol; Nguyen, Dao M

    2014-01-01

    The present study sought to determine whether the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is active and regulates the cell growth of cultured malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells and to evaluate the efficacy of pathway blockade using smoothened (SMO) antagonists (SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 or the antifungal drug itraconazole [ITRA]) or Gli inhibitors (GANT61 or the antileukemia drug arsenic trioxide [ATO]) in suppressing MPM viability. Selective knockdown of SMO to inhibit Hh signaling was achieved by small interfering RNA in 3 representative MPM cells. The growth inhibitory effect of GDC-0449, ITRA, GANT61, and ATO was evaluated in 8 MPM lines, with cell viability quantified using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell death was determined by annexinV/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. SMO small interfering RNA mediated a two- to more than fivefold reduction of SMO and Gli1 gene expression as determined by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, indicating significant Hh pathway blockade. This was associated with significantly reduced cell viability (34% ± 7% to 61% ± 14% of nontarget small interfering RNA controls; P = .0024 to P = .043). Treating MPM cells with Hh inhibitors resulted in a 1.5- to 4-fold reduction of Gli1 expression. These 4 Hh antagonists strongly suppressed MPM cell viability. More importantly, ITRA, ATO, GANT61 induced significant apoptosis in the representative MPM cells. Hh signaling is active in MPM and regulates cell viability. ATO and ITRA were as effective as the prototypic SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 and the Gli inhibitor GANT61 in suppressing Hh signaling in MPM cells. Pharmaceutical agents Food and Drug Administration-approved for other indications but recently found to have anti-Hh activity, such as ATO or ITRA, could be repurposed to treat MPM. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. The Hedgehog Signal Induced Modulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling: An Essential Signaling Relay for Urinary Tract Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagata, Naomi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kitazawa, Sohei; Yamada, Gen

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital diseases of the urinary tract are frequently observed in infants. Such diseases present a number of developmental anomalies such as hydroureter and hydronephrosis. Although some genetically-modified mouse models of growth factor signaling genes reproduce urinary phenotypes, the pathogenic mechanisms remain obscure. Previous studies suggest that a portion of the cells in the external genitalia and bladder are derived from peri-cloacal mesenchymal cells that receive Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the early developmental stages. We hypothesized that defects in such progenitor cells, which give rise to urinary tract tissues, may be a cause of such diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of upper urinary tract malformations, we analyzed a series of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) deficient mice. Shh−/− displayed hydroureter and hydronephrosis phenotypes and reduced expression of several developmental markers. In addition, we suggested that Shh modulation at an early embryonic stage is responsible for such phenotypes by analyzing the Shh conditional mutants. Tissue contribution assays of Hh-responsive cells revealed that peri-cloacal mesenchymal cells, which received Hh signal secreted from cloacal epithelium, could contribute to the ureteral mesenchyme. Gain- and loss-of-functional mutants for Hh signaling revealed a correlation between Hh signaling and Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling. Finally, a conditional ablation of Bmp receptor type IA (BmprIA) gene was examined in Hh-responsive cell lineages. This system thus made it possible to analyze the primary functions of the growth factor signaling relay. The defective Hh-to-Bmp signaling relay resulted in severe urinary tract phenotypes with a decrease in the number of Hh-responsive cells. Conclusions/Significance This study identified the essential embryonic stages for the pathogenesis of urinary tract phenotypes. These results suggested that Hh

  5. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-03-10

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog.

  6. The relationship between Sonic hedgehog signalling, cilia and neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway is essential for many aspects of normal embryonic development, including formation and patterning of the neural tube. Absence of Shh ligand is associated with the midline defect holoprosencephaly, while increased Shh signalling is associated with exencephaly and spina bifida. To complicate this apparently simple relationship, mutation of proteins required for function of cilia often leads to impaired Shh signalling and to disruption of neural tube closure. In this manuscript, we review the literature on Shh pathway mutants and discuss the relationship between Shh signalling, cilia and neural tube defects. PMID:20544799

  7. Mechanical stimulation promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through epigenetic regulation of Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuandong; Shan, Shengzhou; Wang, Chenglong; Wang, Jing; Li, Jiao; Hu, Guoli; Dai, Kerong; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2017-03-15

    Mechanical unloading leads to bone loss and disuse osteoporosis partly due to impaired osteoblastogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS) promotes osteoblastogenesis of BMSCs both in vivo and in vitro. Besides, we found that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway was activated in this process. Inhibition of which by either knockdown of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) or treating BMSCs with Hh inhibitors attenuated the osteogenic effect of CMS on BMSCs, suggesting that Hh signaling pathway acts as an endogenous mediator of mechanical stimuli on BMSCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Shh expression level was regulated by DNA methylation mechanism. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b) binds to Shh gene promoter, leading to DNA hypermethylation in mechanical unloading BMSCs. However, mechanical stimulation down-regulates the protein level of Dnmt3b, results in DNA demethylation and Shh expression. More importantly, we found that inhibition of Dnmt3b partly rescued bone loss in HU mice by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation regulates osteoblastic genes expression via direct regulation of Dnmt3b, and the therapeutic inhibition of Dnmt3b may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical unloading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that...

  9. Mutations in KIF7 link Joubert syndrome with Sonic Hedgehog signaling and microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafinger, Claudia; Liebau, Max Christoph; Elsayed, Solaf Mohamed; Hellenbroich, Yorck; Boltshauser, Eugen; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Fabretti, Francesca; Janecke, Andreas Robert; Ebermann, Inga; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Koerber, Friederike; Addicks, Klaus; Elsobky, Ezzat; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Bolz, Hanno Jörn

    2011-07-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is characterized by a specific brain malformation with various additional pathologies. It results from mutations in any one of at least 10 different genes, including NPHP1, which encodes nephrocystin-1. JBTS has been linked to dysfunction of primary cilia, since the gene products known to be associated with the disorder localize to this evolutionarily ancient organelle. Here we report the identification of a disease locus, JBTS12, with mutations in the KIF7 gene, an ortholog of the Drosophila kinesin Costal2, in a consanguineous JBTS family and subsequently in other JBTS patients. Interestingly, KIF7 is a known regulator of Hedgehog signaling and a putative ciliary motor protein. We found that KIF7 co-precipitated with nephrocystin-1. Further, knockdown of KIF7 expression in cell lines caused defects in cilia formation and induced abnormal centrosomal duplication and fragmentation of the Golgi network. These cellular phenotypes likely resulted from abnormal tubulin acetylation and microtubular dynamics. Thus, we suggest that modified microtubule stability and growth direction caused by loss of KIF7 function may be an underlying disease mechanism contributing to JBTS.

  10. Development of stratum intermedium and its role as a Sonic hedgehog-signaling structure during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, E; Wu, C; Shimo, T; Iwamoto, M; Ohmori, T; Kurisu, K; Ookura, T; Bashir, M M; Abrams, W R; Tucker, T; Pacifici, M

    2001-10-01

    Stratum intermedium is a transient and subtle epithelial structure closely associated with inner dental epithelium in tooth germs. Little is known about its development and roles. To facilitate analysis, we used bovine tooth germs, predicting that they may contain a more conspicuous stratum intermedium. Indeed, early bell stage bovine tooth germs already displayed an obvious stratum intermedium with a typical multilayered organization and flanking the enamel knot. Strikingly, with further development, the cuspally located stratum intermedium underwent thinning and involution, whereas a multilayered stratum intermedium formed at successive sites along the cusp-to-cervix axis of odontogenesis. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that stratum intermedium produces the signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Maximal Shh expression was invariably seen in its thickest multilayered portions. Shh was also produced by inner dental epithelium; expression was not constant but varied with development and cytodifferentiation of ameloblasts along the cusp-to-cervix axis. Interestingly, maximal Shh expression in inner dental epithelium did not coincide with that in stratum intermedium. Both stratum intermedium and inner dental epithelium expressed the Shh receptor Patched2 (Ptch2), an indication of autocrine signaling loops. Shh protein, but not RNA, was present in underlying dental mesenchyme, probably resulting from gradual diffusion from epithelial layers and reflecting paracrine loops of action. To analyze the regulation of Shh expression, epithelial and mesenchymal layers were separated and maintained in organ culture. Shh expression decreased over time, but was maintained in unoperated specimens. Our data show for the first time that stratum intermedium is a highly regulated and Shh-expressing structure. Given its dynamic and apparently interactive properties, stratum intermedium may help orchestrate progression of odontogenesis from cusp to cervix

  11. A mutation in the mouse ttc26 gene leads to impaired hedgehog signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Swiderski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype of the spontaneous mutant mouse hop-sterile (hop is characterized by a hopping gait, polydactyly, hydrocephalus, and male sterility. Previous analyses of the hop mouse revealed a deficiency of inner dynein arms in motile cilia and a lack of sperm flagella, potentially accounting for the hydrocephalus and male sterility. The etiology of the other phenotypes and the location of the hop mutation remained unexplored. Here we show that the hop mutation is located in the Ttc26 gene and impairs Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Expression analysis showed that this mutation led to dramatically reduced levels of the Ttc26 protein, and protein-protein interaction assays demonstrated that wild-type Ttc26 binds directly to the Ift46 subunit of Intraflagellar Transport (IFT complex B. Although IFT is required for ciliogenesis, the Ttc26 defect did not result in a decrease in the number or length of primary cilia. Nevertheless, Hh signaling was reduced in the hop mouse, as revealed by impaired activation of Gli transcription factors in embryonic fibroblasts and abnormal patterning of the neural tube. Unlike the previously characterized mutations that affect IFT complex B, hop did not interfere with Hh-induced accumulation of Gli at the tip of the primary cilium, but rather with the subsequent dissociation of Gli from its negative regulator, Sufu. Our analysis of the hop mouse line provides novel insights into Hh signaling, demonstrating that Ttc26 is necessary for efficient coupling between the accumulation of Gli at the ciliary tip and its dissociation from Sufu.

  12. Molecular signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma: Role of and crosstalk among Wnt/β-catenin, Sonic Hedgehog, Notch and Dickkopf-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios; Mudan, Satvinder; Sklavos, Argyrios; Williams, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. In the majority of cases, there is evidence of existing chronic liver disease from a variety of causes including viral hepatitis B and C, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Identification of the signalling pathways used by hepatocellular carcinoma cells to proliferate, invade or metastasize is of paramount importance in the discovery and implementation of successfully targeted therapies. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog pathways play a critical role in regulating liver cell proliferation during development and in controlling crucial functions of the adult liver in the initiation and progression of human cancers. β-catenin was identified as a protein interacting with the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin at the cell-cell junction, and has been shown to be one of the most important mediators of the Wnt signalling pathway in tumourigenesis. Investigations into the role of Dikkopf-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma have demonstrated controversial results, with a decreased expression of Dickkopf-1 and soluble frizzled-related protein in various cancers on one hand, and as a possible negative prognostic indicator of hepatocellular carcinoma on the other. In the present review, the authors focus on the Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Sonic Hedgehog pathways, and their interaction with Dikkopf-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25965442

  13. Targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling by cyclopamine prodrugs for advanced prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Srinivas K.; Roy, Indrajit; Anchoori, Ravi K.; Fazli, Sarah; Maitra, Anirban; Beachy, Philip A.; Khan, Saeed R.

    2009-01-01

    A promising agent for use in prostate cancer therapy is the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway inhibitor, cyclopamine. This compound, however, has the potential for causing serious side effects in non-tumor tissues. To minimize these bystander toxicities, we have designed and synthesized two novel peptide-cyclopamine conjugates as prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrugs for use against prostate cancer. These prodrugs were composed of cyclopamine coupled to one of two peptides (either HSSKLQ or SSKYQ) that can be selectively cleaved by PSA, converting the mature prodrug into an active Hedgehog inhibitor within the malignant cells. Of the two prodrugs, Mu-SSKYQ-Cyclopamine was rapidly hydrolyzed, with a half-life of 3.2 h, upon incubation with the PSA enzyme. Thus, modulating cyclopamine at the secondary amine with PSA-cleavable peptides is a promising strategy for developing prodrugs to target prostate cancer. PMID:18249125

  14. Hedgehog signaling mediates woven bone formation and vascularization during stress fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; McKenzie, Jennifer A; Shen, Tony S; Long, Fanxin; Silva, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical in developmental osteogenesis, and recent studies suggest it may also play a role in regulating osteogenic gene expression in the post-natal setting. However, there is a void of studies directly assessing the effect of Hh inhibition on post-natal osteogenesis. This study utilized a cyclic loading-induced ulnar stress fracture model to evaluate the hypothesis that Hh signaling contributes to osteogenesis and angiogenesis during stress fracture healing. Immediately prior to loading, adult rats were given GDC-0449 (Vismodegib - a selective Hh pathway inhibitor; 50mg/kg orally twice daily), or vehicle. Hh signaling was upregulated in response to stress fracture at 3 days (Ptch1, Gli1 expression), and was markedly inhibited by GDC-0449 at 1 day and 3 days in the loaded and non-loaded ulnae. GDC-0449 did not affect Hh ligand expression (Shh, Ihh, Dhh) at 1 day, but decreased Shh expression by 37% at 3 days. GDC-0449 decreased woven bone volume (-37%) and mineral density (-17%) at 7 days. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed that the 7 day callus was composed predominantly of woven bone in both groups. The observed reduction in woven bone occurred concomitantly with decreased expression of Alpl and Ibsp, but was not associated with differences in early cellular proliferation (as determined by callus PCNA staining at 3 days), osteoblastic differentiation (Osx expression at 1 day and 3 days), chondrogenic gene expression (Acan, Sox9, and Col2α1 expression at 1 day and 3 days), or bone resorption metrics (callus TRAP staining at 3 days, Rankl and Opg expression at 1 day and 3 days). To evaluate angiogenesis, vWF immunohistochemistry showed that GDC-0449 reduced fracture callus blood vessel density by 55% at 3 days, which was associated with increased Hif1α gene expression (+30%). Dynamic histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that GDC-0449 also inhibited lamellar bone formation. Lamellar bone analysis of the loaded limb (directly adjacent

  15. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Vismodegib, an antagonist of hedgehog signaling, directly alters taste molecular signaling in taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyekyung; Cong, Wei-Na; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Egan, Josephine M

    2015-02-01

    Vismodegib, a highly selective inhibitor of hedgehog (Hh) pathway, is an approved treatment for basal-cell carcinoma. Patients on treatment with vismodegib often report profound alterations in taste sensation. The cellular mechanisms underlying the alterations have not been studied. Sonic Hh (Shh) signaling is required for cell growth and differentiation. In taste buds, Shh is exclusively expressed in type IV taste cells, which are undifferentiated basal cells and the precursors of the three types of taste sensing cells. Thus, we investigated if vismodegib has an inhibitory effect on taste cell turnover because of its known effects on Hh signaling. We gavaged C57BL/6J male mice daily with either vehicle or 30 mg/kg vismodegib for 15 weeks. The gustatory behavior and immunohistochemical profile of taste cells were examined. Vismodegib-treated mice showed decreased growth rate and behavioral responsivity to sweet and bitter stimuli, compared to vehicle-treated mice. We found that vismodegib-treated mice had significant reductions in taste bud size and numbers of taste cells per taste bud. Additionally, vismodegib treatment resulted in decreased numbers of Ki67- and Shh-expressing cells in taste buds. The numbers of phospholipase Cβ2- and α-gustducin-expressing cells, which contain biochemical machinery for sweet and bitter sensing, were reduced in vismodegib-treated mice. Furthermore, vismodegib treatment resulted in reduction in numbers of T1R3, glucagon-like peptide-1, and glucagon-expressing cells, which are known to modulate sweet taste sensitivity. These results suggest that inhibition of Shh signaling by vismodegib treatment directly results in alteration of taste due to local effects in taste buds. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. MMTV-Wnt1 and -DeltaN89beta-catenin induce canonical signaling in distinct progenitors and differentially activate Hedgehog signaling within mammary tumors.

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    Brigitte Teissedre

    Full Text Available Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates stem/progenitor cells and, when perturbed, induces many human cancers. A significant proportion of human breast cancer is associated with loss of secreted Wnt antagonists and mice expressing MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-DeltaN89beta-catenin develop mammary adenocarcinomas. Many studies have assumed these mouse models of breast cancer to be equivalent. Here we show that MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-DeltaN89beta-catenin transgenes induce tumors with different phenotypes. Using axin2/conductin reporter genes we show that MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-DeltaN89beta-catenin activate canonical Wnt signaling within distinct cell-types. DeltaN89beta-catenin activated signaling within a luminal subpopulation scattered along ducts that exhibited a K18(+ER(-PR(-CD24(highCD49f(low profile and progenitor properties. In contrast, MMTV-Wnt1 induced canonical signaling in K14(+ basal cells with CD24/CD49f profiles characteristic of two distinct stem/progenitor cell-types. MMTV-Wnt1 produced additional profound effects on multiple cell-types that correlated with focal activation of the Hedgehog pathway. We document that large melanocytic nevi are a hitherto unreported hallmark of early hyperplastic Wnt1 glands. These nevi formed along the primary mammary ducts and were associated with Hedgehog pathway activity within a subset of melanocytes and surrounding stroma. Hh pathway activity also occurred within tumor-associated stromal and K14(+/p63(+ subpopulations in a manner correlated with Wnt1 tumor onset. These data show MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-DeltaN89beta-catenin induce canonical signaling in distinct progenitors and that Hedgehog pathway activation is linked to melanocytic nevi and mammary tumor onset arising from excess Wnt1 ligand. They further suggest that Hedgehog pathway activation maybe a critical component and useful indicator of breast tumors arising from unopposed Wnt1 ligand.

  18. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary proteins, Evc and Evc2, the products of human disease genes responsible for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, act downstream of Smo to transduce the Hh signal. We found that loss of Evc/Evc2 does not affect Sonic Hedgehog-induced Smo phosphorylation and ciliary localization but impedes Hh pathway activation mediated by constitutively active forms of Smo. Evc/Evc2 are dispensable for the constitutive Gli activity in Sufu(-/-) cells, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 act upstream of Sufu to promote Gli activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Hh stimulates binding of Evc/Evc2 to Smo depending on phosphorylation of the Smo C-terminal intracellular tail and that the binding is abolished in Kif3a(-/-) cilium-deficient cells. We propose that Hh activates Smo by inducing its phosphorylation, which recruits Evc/Evc2 to activate Gli proteins by antagonizing Sufu in the primary cilia.

  19. Precision medicine and precision therapeutics: hedgehog signaling pathway, basal cell carcinoma and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shalini V; Chang, Anne Lynn S

    2014-06-01

    Precision medicine and precision therapeutics is currently in its infancy with tremendous potential to improve patient care by better identifying individuals at risk for skin cancer and predict tumor responses to treatment. This review focuses on the Hedgehog signaling pathway, its critical role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma, and the emergence of targeted treatments for advanced basal cell carcinoma. Opportunities to utilize precision medicine are outlined, such as molecular profiling to predict basal cell carcinoma response to targeted therapy and to inform therapeutic decisions.

  20. Human embryonic stem cells in culture possess primary cilia with hedgehog signaling machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiprilov, Enko N; Awan, Aashir; Desprat, Romain

    2008-01-01

    are present in three undifferentiated hESC lines. EM reveals the characteristic 9 + 0 axoneme. The number and length of cilia increase after serum starvation. Important components of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway, including smoothened, patched 1 (Ptc1), and Gli1 and 2, are present in the cilia. Stimulation...... of the pathway results in the concerted movement of Ptc1 out of, and smoothened into, the primary cilium as well as up-regulation of GLI1 and PTC1. These findings show that hESCs contain primary cilia associated with working Hh machinery. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar-10...

  1. Genetic analysis of Hedgehog signaling in ventral body wall development and the onset of omphalocele formation.

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    Daisuke Matsumaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In spite of its clinical importance, the etiology of omphalocele formation is still controversial. Hedgehog (Hh signaling is one of the essential growth factor signaling pathways involved in the formation of the limbs and urogenital system. However, the relationship between Hh signaling and ventral body wall formation remains unclear.To gain insight into the roles of Hh signaling in ventral body wall formation and its malformation, we analyzed phenotypes of mouse mutants of Sonic hedgehog (Shh, GLI-Kruppel family member 3 (Gli3 and Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (Alx4. Introduction of additional Alx4(Lst mutations into the Gli3(Xt/Xt background resulted in various degrees of severe omphalocele and pubic diastasis. In addition, loss of a single Shh allele restored the omphalocele and pubic symphysis of Gli3(Xt/+; Alx4(Lst/Lst embryos. We also observed ectopic Hh activity in the ventral body wall region of Gli3(Xt/Xt embryos. Moreover, tamoxifen-inducible gain-of-function experiments to induce ectopic Hh signaling revealed Hh signal dose-dependent formation of omphaloceles.We suggest that one of the possible causes of omphalocele and pubic diastasis is ectopically-induced Hh signaling. To our knowledge, this would be the first demonstration of the involvement of Hh signaling in ventral body wall malformation and the genetic rescue of omphalocele phenotypes.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Hedgehog Signaling in Ventral Body Wall Development and the Onset of Omphalocele Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumaru, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Motoyama, Jun; Nakagata, Naomi; Meijlink, Frits; Yamada, Gen

    2011-01-01

    Background An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In spite of its clinical importance, the etiology of omphalocele formation is still controversial. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is one of the essential growth factor signaling pathways involved in the formation of the limbs and urogenital system. However, the relationship between Hh signaling and ventral body wall formation remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain insight into the roles of Hh signaling in ventral body wall formation and its malformation, we analyzed phenotypes of mouse mutants of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), GLI-Kruppel family member 3 (Gli3) and Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (Alx4). Introduction of additional Alx4Lst mutations into the Gli3Xt/Xt background resulted in various degrees of severe omphalocele and pubic diastasis. In addition, loss of a single Shh allele restored the omphalocele and pubic symphysis of Gli3Xt/+; Alx4Lst/Lst embryos. We also observed ectopic Hh activity in the ventral body wall region of Gli3Xt/Xt embryos. Moreover, tamoxifen-inducible gain-of-function experiments to induce ectopic Hh signaling revealed Hh signal dose-dependent formation of omphaloceles. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that one of the possible causes of omphalocele and pubic diastasis is ectopically-induced Hh signaling. To our knowledge, this would be the first demonstration of the involvement of Hh signaling in ventral body wall malformation and the genetic rescue of omphalocele phenotypes. PMID:21283718

  3. Primary cilia are present on human blood and bone marrow cells and mediate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Merchant, Akil A

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile, microtubule-based organelles that are present on the cellular membrane of all eukaryotic cells. Functional cilia are required for the response to developmental signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin. Although the Hh pathway has been shown to be active in leukemia and other blood cancers, there have been no reports describing the presence of primary cilia in human blood or leukemia cells. In the present study, we show that nearly all human blood and bone marrow cells have primary cilia (97-99%). In contrast, primary cilia on AML cell lines (KG1, KG1a, and K562) were less frequent (10-36% of cells) and were often shorter and dysmorphic, with less well-defined basal bodies. Finally, we show that treatment of blood cells with the Hh pathway ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) causes translocation of Smoothened (SMO) to the primary cilia and activation of Hh target genes, demonstrating that primary cilia in blood cells are functional and participate in Hh signaling. Loss of primary cilia on leukemia cells may have important implications for aberrant pathway activation and response to SMO inhibitors currently in clinical development. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. FOXC1 Activates Smoothened-Independent Hedgehog Signaling in Basal-like Breast Cancer

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    Bingchen Han

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mesoderm- and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated transcription factor FOXC1 is specifically overexpressed in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC, but its biochemical function is not understood. Here, we demonstrate that FOXC1 controls cancer stem cell (CSC properties enriched in BLBC cells via activation of Smoothened (SMO-independent Hedgehog (Hh signaling. This non-canonical activation of Hh is specifically mediated by Gli2. Furthermore, we show that the N-terminal domain of FOXC1 (aa 1–68 binds directly to an internal region (aa 898–1168 of Gli2, enhancing the DNA-binding and transcription-activating capacity of Gli2. FOXC1 expression correlates with that of Gli2 and its targets in human breast cancers. Moreover, FOXC1 overexpression reduces sensitivity to anti-Hedgehog (Hh inhibitors in BLBC cells and xenograft tumors. Together, these findings reveal FOXC1-mediated non-canonical Hh signaling that determines the BLBC stem-like phenotype and anti-Hh sensitivity, supporting inhibition of FOXC1 pathways as potential approaches for improving BLBC treatment.

  5. Differential Cellular Responses to Hedgehog Signalling in Vertebrates—What is the Role of Competence?

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    Clemens Kiecker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A surprisingly small number of signalling pathways generate a plethora of cellular responses ranging from the acquisition of multiple cell fates to proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis and cell death. These diverse responses may be due to the dose-dependent activities of signalling factors, or to intrinsic differences in the response of cells to a given signal—a phenomenon called differential cellular competence. In this review, we focus on temporal and spatial differences in competence for Hedgehog (HH signalling, a signalling pathway that is reiteratively employed in embryos and adult organisms. We discuss the upstream signals and mechanisms that may establish differential competence for HHs in a range of different tissues. We argue that the changing competence for HH signalling provides a four-dimensional framework for the interpretation of the signal that is essential for the emergence of functional anatomy. A number of diseases—including several types of cancer—are caused by malfunctions of the HH pathway. A better understanding of what provides differential competence for this signal may reveal HH-related disease mechanisms and equip us with more specific tools to manipulate HH signalling in the clinic.

  6. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemban, Arwa [Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah 24382 (Saudi Arabia); Qualtrough, David, E-mail: david.qualtrough@uwe.ac.uk [Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-16

    The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in tumor invasion. It is important to understand mechanisms that regulate this process, which bears relation to the normal dynamic of epithelial/basal phenotype regulation in the mammary gland. Understanding this process could provide answers for the regulation of EMT in breast cancer, and thereby identify potential targets for therapy. Evidence points towards a role for hedgehog signaling in breast tissue homeostasis and also in mammary neoplasia. This review examines our current understanding of role of the hedgehog-signaling (Hh) pathway in breast epithelial cells both during breast development and homeostasis and to assess the potential misappropriation of Hh signals in breast neoplasia, cancer stem cells and tumor metastasis via EMT.

  7. Calcitriol Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling and Induces Vitamin D Receptor Signaling and Differentiation in the Patched Mouse Model of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Anja Uhmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh signaling is characteristic of the embryonal subtype (ERMS and of fusion-negative alveolar RMS. In the mouse, ERMS-like tumors can be induced by mutations in the Hh receptor Patched1 (Ptch. As in humans these tumors show increased Hh pathway activity. Here we demonstrate that the treatment with the active form of vitamin D3, calcitriol, inhibits Hh signaling and proliferation of murine ERMS in vivo and in vitro. Concomitantly, calcitriol activates vitamin D receptor (Vdr signaling and induces tumor differentiation. In addition, calcitriol inhibits ERMS growth in Ptch-mutant mice, which is, however, a rather late response. Taken together, our results suggest that exogenous supply of calcitriol could be beneficial in the treatment of RMS, especially in those which are associated with aberrant Hh signaling activity.

  8. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling.

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    Rannar Airik

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in the SDCCAG8 gene cause a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-like features in humans. Our previous characterization of the orthologous Sdccag8gt/gt mouse model recapitulated the retinal-renal disease phenotypes and identified impaired DNA damage response signaling as an underlying disease mechanism in the kidney. However, several other phenotypic and mechanistic features of Sdccag8gt/gt mice remained unexplored. Here we show that Sdccag8gt/gt mice exhibit developmental and structural abnormalities of the skeleton and limbs, suggesting impaired Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1, of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC1, and with non-muscle myosin motor proteins (MYH9, MYH10, MYH14 at the centrosome. Furthermore, we show that RABEP2 localization at the centrosome is regulated by SDCCAG8. siRNA mediated RABEP2 knockdown in hTERT-RPE1 cells leads to defective ciliogenesis, indicating a critical role for RABEP2 in this process. Together, this study identifies several centrosome-associated proteins as novel SDCCAG8 interaction partners, and provides new insights into the function of SDCCAG8 at this structure.

  9. Roles of the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in Epidermal and Hair Follicle Development, Homeostasis, and Cancer

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    Yoshinori Abe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin and provides a protective barrier against environmental insults. It is a rapidly-renewing tissue undergoing constant regeneration, maintained by several types of stem cells. The Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is one of the fundamental signaling pathways that contributes to epidermal development, homeostasis, and repair, as well as to hair follicle development and follicle bulge stem cell maintenance. The HH pathway interacts with other signal transduction pathways, including those activated by Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein, platelet-derived growth factor, Notch, and ectodysplasin. Furthermore, aberrant activation of HH signaling is associated with various tumors, including basal cell carcinoma. Therefore, an understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of the HH signaling pathway is important for elucidating fundamental mechanisms underlying both organogenesis and carcinogenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of the HH signaling pathway in the development and homeostasis epidermis and hair follicles, and in basal cell carcinoma formation, providing an update of current knowledge in this field.

  10. Cilia-mediated Hedgehog signaling controls form and function in the mammalian larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabler, Jacqueline M; Rigney, Maggie M; Berman, Gordon J; Gopalakrishnan, Swetha; Heude, Eglantine; Al-Lami, Hadeel Adel; Yannakoudakis, Basil Z; Fitch, Rebecca D; Carter, Christopher; Vokes, Steven; Liu, Karen J; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Egnor, Se Roian; Wallingford, John B

    2017-02-13

    Acoustic communication is fundamental to social interactions among animals, including humans. In fact, deficits in voice impair the quality of life for a large and diverse population of patients. Understanding the molecular genetic mechanisms of development and function in the vocal apparatus is thus an important challenge with relevance both to the basic biology of animal communication and to biomedicine. However, surprisingly little is known about the developmental biology of the mammalian larynx. Here, we used genetic fate mapping to chart the embryological origins of the tissues in the mouse larynx, and we describe the developmental etiology of laryngeal defects in mice with disruptions in cilia-mediated Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we show that mild laryngeal defects correlate with changes in the acoustic structure of vocalizations. Together, these data provide key new insights into the molecular genetics of form and function in the mammalian vocal apparatus.

  11. Gli2a protein localization reveals a role for Iguana/DZIP1 in primary ciliogenesis and a dependence of Hedgehog signal transduction on primary cilia in the zebrafish

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    van Eeden Freek

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammalian cells, the integrity of the primary cilium is critical for proper regulation of the Hedgehog (Hh signal transduction pathway. Whether or not this dependence on the primary cilium is a universal feature of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling has remained contentious due, in part, to the apparent divergence of the intracellular transduction pathway between mammals and teleost fish. Results Here, using a functional Gli2-GFP fusion protein, we show that, as in mammals, the Gli2 transcription factor localizes to the primary cilia of cells in the zebrafish embryo and that this localization is modulated by the activity of the Hh pathway. Moreover, we show that the Igu/DZIP1protein, previously implicated in the modulation of Gli activity in zebrafish, also localizes to the primary cilium and is required for its proper formation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a conserved role of the primary cilium in mediating Hedgehog signalling activity across the vertebrate phylum and validate the use of the zebrafish as a representative model for the in vivo analysis of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling.

  12. Hedgehog signaling plays roles in epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal mouse uterus and vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2012-04-01

    Both the uterus and vagina develop from the Müllerian duct but are quite distinct in morphology and function. To investigate factors controlling epithelial differentiation and cell proliferation in neonatal uterus and vagina, we focused on Hedgehog (HH) signaling. In neonatal mice, Sonic hh (Shh) was localized in the vaginal epithelium and Indian hh (Ihh) was slightly expressed in the uterus and vagina, whereas all Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) genes were mainly expressed in the stroma. The expression of target genes of HH signaling was high in the neonatal vagina and in the uterus, it increased with growth. Thus, in neonatal mice, Shh in the vaginal epithelium and Ihh in the uterus and vagina activated HH signaling in the stroma. Tissue recombinants showed that vaginal Shh expression was inhibited by the vaginal stroma and uterine Ihh expression was stimulated by the uterine stroma. Addition of a HH signaling inhibitor decreased epithelial cell proliferation in organ-cultured uterus and vagina and increased stromal cell proliferation in organ-cultured uterus. However, it did not affect epithelial differentiation or the expression of growth factors in organ-cultured uterus and vagina. Thus, activated HH signaling stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal uterus and vagina but inhibits stromal cell proliferation in neonatal uterus.

  13. BMP and Hedgehog Regulate Distinct AGM Hematopoietic Stem Cells Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Neagu, Alex; Karkanpouna, Sofia; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Purini, Caterina; Vink, Chris S; van der Linden, Reinier; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Monteiro, Rui; Mummery, Christine; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-03-08

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the self-renewing cells of the adult blood differentiation hierarchy, are generated during embryonic stages. The first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the embryo through endothelial to a hematopoietic transition. BMP4 and Hedgehog affect their production and expansion, but it is unknown whether they act to affect the same HSCs. In this study using the BRE GFP reporter mouse strain that identifies BMP/Smad-activated cells, we find that the AGM harbors two types of adult-repopulating HSCs upon explant culture: One type is BMP-activated and the other is a non-BMP-activated HSC type that is indirectly controlled by Hedgehog signaling through the VEGF pathway. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that the two HSC types express distinct but overlapping genetic programs. These results revealing the bifurcation in HSC types at early embryonic stages in the AGM explant model suggest that their development is dependent upon the signaling molecules in the microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. BMP and Hedgehog Regulate Distinct AGM Hematopoietic Stem Cells Ex Vivo

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    Mihaela Crisan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, the self-renewing cells of the adult blood differentiation hierarchy, are generated during embryonic stages. The first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region of the embryo through endothelial to a hematopoietic transition. BMP4 and Hedgehog affect their production and expansion, but it is unknown whether they act to affect the same HSCs. In this study using the BRE GFP reporter mouse strain that identifies BMP/Smad-activated cells, we find that the AGM harbors two types of adult-repopulating HSCs upon explant culture: One type is BMP-activated and the other is a non-BMP-activated HSC type that is indirectly controlled by Hedgehog signaling through the VEGF pathway. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that the two HSC types express distinct but overlapping genetic programs. These results revealing the bifurcation in HSC types at early embryonic stages in the AGM explant model suggest that their development is dependent upon the signaling molecules in the microenvironment.

  15. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling improves the angiogenic potential of Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Gabriela; Prieto, Catalina P; Villanueva, Andrea A; Palma, Verónica

    2017-09-29

    Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC) show remarkable therapeutic potential to repair tissue upon injury via paracrine signaling by secreting diverse trophic factors that promote angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms and signaling pathways that regulate the induction of these specific factors are still mostly unknown. Emerging evidence suggests that Sonic hedgehog (SHH) plays a central role in angiogenesis and tissue maintenance. However, its contribution to the angiogenic potential of MSC has not been fully addressed. The aim of this work was to characterize the expression of the SHH pathway components in WJ-MSC primary cultures and to evaluate their angiogenic responsiveness to SHH signaling. Primary cell cultures obtained from human umbilical cords were treated with pharmacological modulators of the SHH pathway. We evaluated the modulation of diverse trophic factors in cell lysates, conditioned medium, and functional in vitro assays. In addition, we determined the angiogenic potential of the SHH pathway in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane, an in vivo model. Our results show that WJ-MSC express components of the canonical SHH pathway and are activated by its signaling. In fact, we provide evidence of basal autocrine/paracrine SHH signaling in WJ-MSC. SHH pathway stimulation promotes the secretion of angiogenic factors such as activin A, angiogenin, angiopoietin 1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, matrix metallometallopeptidase -9, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator, enhancing the pro-angiogenic capabilities of WJ-MSC both in vitro and in vivo. WJ-MSC are a cell population responsive to SHH pathway stimulation. Basal SHH signaling is in part responsible for the angiogenic inductive properties of WJ-MSC. Overall, exogenous activation of the SHH pathway enhances the angiogenic properties of WJ-MSC, making this cell population an ideal target for treating tissue injury.

  16. Na,K-ATPase β1-subunit is a target of sonic hedgehog signaling and enhances medulloblastoma tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Litan, Alisa; Li, Zhiqin; Graves, Bruce; Lindsey, Stephan; Barwe, Sonali P; Langhans, Sigrid A

    2015-08-19

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role in cerebellar development, and mutations leading to hyperactive Shh signaling have been associated with certain forms of medulloblastoma, a common form of pediatric brain cancer. While the fundamentals of this pathway are known, the molecular targets contributing to Shh-mediated proliferation and transformation are still poorly understood. Na,K-ATPase is a ubiquitous enzyme that maintains intracellular ion homeostasis and functions as a signaling scaffold and a cell adhesion molecule. Changes in Na,K-ATPase function and subunit expression have been reported in several cancers and loss of the β1-subunit has been associated with a poorly differentiated phenotype in carcinoma but its role in medulloblastoma progression is not known. Human medulloblastoma cell lines and primary cultures of cerebellar granule cell precursors (CGP) were used to determine whether Shh regulates Na,K-ATPase expression. Smo/Smo medulloblastoma were used to assess the Na,K-ATPase levels in vivo. Na,K-ATPase β1-subunit was knocked down in DAOY cells to test its role in medulloblastoma cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. Na,K-ATPase β1-subunit levels increased with differentiation in normal CGP cells. Activation of Shh signaling resulted in reduced β1-subunit mRNA and protein levels and was mimicked by overexpression of Gli1and Bmi1, both members of the Shh signaling cascade; overexpression of Bmi1 reduced β1-subunit promoter activity. In human medulloblastoma cells, low β1-subunit levels were associated with increased cell proliferation and in vivo tumorigenesis. Na,K-ATPase β1-subunit is a target of the Shh signaling pathway and loss of β1-subunit expression may contribute to tumor development and progression not only in carcinoma but also in medulloblastoma, a tumor of neuronal origin.

  17. In vitro osteoinductive effects of hydroxycholesterol on human adipose-derived stem cells are mediated through the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, Anisa; Hokugo, Akishige; Sorice, Sarah; Li, Andrew; Segovia Aguilar, Luis A; Zuk, Patricia; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells have been identified as a potential source of cells for use in bone tissue engineering because of their ready availability, ease of harvest, and susceptibility to osteogenic induction. The authors have previously demonstrated the ability of an osteogenic molecule called hydroxycholesterol, an oxidative derivative of cholesterol, to induce osteogenic differentiation in pluripotent murine and rabbit bone marrow stromal cells. In this study, the authors examine the ability of hydroxycholesterol to induce osteogenesis in human adipose-derived stem cells. Human adipose-derived stem cells were isolated from raw human lipoaspirates through standard isolation and expansion of the stromal vascular fraction. Cells were plated onto tissue culture plates in control medium and harvested between passages 2 and 3, incubated with conventional osteogenic media, and treated with various concentrations (1, 5, and 10 μM) of the 20(S) analogue of hydroxycholesterol. Evaluation of cellular osteogenic activity was performed. The role of the hedgehog signaling pathway in hydroxycholesterol-mediated osteogenesis was evaluated by hedgehog inhibition assays. Alkaline phosphatase activity, bone-related gene expression, and mineralization were all significantly increased in cultures of human adipose-derived stem cells treated with 5 μM of 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol relative to controls. In addition, induction of hydroxycholesterol-mediated osteogenesis was mitigated by the addition of the hedgehog pathway inhibitor to cell cultures, implicating the hedgehog signaling pathway in the osteogenic mechanism on human adipose-derived stem cells by hydroxycholesterol. These in vitro studies demonstrate that hydroxycholesterol exerts an osteoinductive influence on human adipose-derived stem cells and that these effects are mediated at least in part through the hedgehog signaling pathway.

  18. Targeting Sonic Hedgehog Signaling by Compounds and Derivatives from Natural Products

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    Yu-Chuen Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a major cause of cancer treatment failure, relapse, and drug resistance and are known to be responsible for cancer cell invasion and metastasis. The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is crucial to embryonic development. Intriguingly, the aberrant activation of the Shh pathway plays critical roles in developing CSCs and leads to angiogenesis, migration, invasion, and metastasis. Natural compounds and chemical structure modified derivatives from complementary and alternative medicine have received increasing attention as cancer chemopreventives, and their antitumor effects have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. However, reports for their bioactivity against CSCs and specifically targeting Shh signaling remain limited. In this review, we summarize investigations of the compounds cyclopamine, curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, genistein, resveratrol, zerumbone, norcantharidin, and arsenic trioxide, with a focus on Shh signaling blockade. Given that Shh signaling antagonism has been clinically proven as effective strategy against CSCs, this review may be exploitable for development of novel anticancer agents from complementary and alternative medicine.

  19. Targeting Hedgehog signaling pathway and autophagy overcomes drug resistance of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia.

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    Zeng, Xian; Zhao, Hui; Li, Yubin; Fan, Jiajun; Sun, Yun; Wang, Shaofei; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Ping; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-01-01

    The frontline tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance is the major clinical challenge in the treatment of CML. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and autophagy are both related to tumorigenesis, cancer therapy, and drug resistance. This study was conducted to explore whether the Hh pathway could regulate autophagy in CML cells and whether simultaneously regulating the Hh pathway and autophagy could induce cell death of drug-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Our results indicated that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Hh pathway could markedly induce autophagy in BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Autophagic inhibitors or ATG5 and ATG7 silencing could significantly enhance CML cell death induced by Hh pathway suppression. Based on the above findings, our study demonstrated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could markedly reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells. Moreover, this combination had little cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, this combined strategy was related to PARP cleavage, CASP3 and CASP9 cleavage, and inhibition of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. In conclusion, this study indicated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could potently kill imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells, providing a novel concept that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy might be a potent new strategy to overcome CML drug resistance.

  20. The Exon Junction Complex and Srp54 Contribute to Hedgehog Signaling via ci RNA Splicing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Elisa; Little, Jamie C; Kalderon, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) regulates the Cubitus interruptus (Ci) transcription factor in Drosophila melanogaster by activating full-length Ci-155 and blocking processing to the Ci-75 repressor. However, the interplay between the regulation of Ci-155 levels and activity, as well as processing-independent mechanisms that affect Ci-155 levels, have not been explored extensively. Here, we identified Mago Nashi (Mago) and Y14 core Exon Junction Complex (EJC) proteins, as well as the Srp54 splicing factor, as modifiers of Hh pathway activity under sensitized conditions. Mago inhibition reduced Hh pathway activity by altering the splicing pattern of ci to reduce Ci-155 levels. Srp54 inhibition also affected pathway activity by reducing ci RNA levels but additionally altered Ci-155 levels and activity independently of ci splicing. Further tests using ci transgenes and ci mutations confirmed evidence from studying the effects of Mago and Srp54 that relatively small changes in the level of Ci-155 primary translation product alter Hh pathway activity under a variety of sensitized conditions. We additionally used ci transgenes lacking intron sequences or the presumed translation initiation codon for an alternatively spliced ci RNA to provide further evidence that Mago acts principally by modulating the levels of the major ci RNA encoding Ci-155, and to show that ci introns are necessary to support the production of sufficient Ci-155 for robust Hh signaling and may also be important mediators of regulatory inputs. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Sonic Hedgehog and WNT Signaling Promote Adrenal Gland Regeneration in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Isabella; Lerario, Antonio M; Hammer, Gary D

    2018-02-01

    The atrophy and hypofunction of the adrenal cortex following long-term pharmacologic glucocorticoid therapy is a major health problem necessitating chronic glucocorticoid replacement that often prolongs the ultimate return of endogenous adrenocortical function. Underlying this functional recovery is anatomic regeneration, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Investigating the lineage contribution of cortical Sonic hedgehog (Shh)+ progenitor cells and the SHH-responsive capsular Gli1+ cells to the regenerating adrenal cortex, we observed a spatially and temporally bimodal contribution of both cell types to adrenocortical regeneration following cessation of glucocorticoid treatment. First, an early repopulation of the cortex is defined by a marked delamination and expansion of capsular Gli1+ cells, recapitulating the establishment of the capsular-cortical homeostatic niche during embryonic development. This rapid repopulation is promptly cleared from the cortical compartment only to be supplanted by repopulating cortical cells derived from the resident long-term-retained zona glomerulosa Shh+ progenitors. Pharmacologic and genetic dissection of SHH signaling further defines an SHH-dependent activation of WNT signaling that supports regeneration of the cortex following long-term glucocorticoid therapy. We define the signaling and lineage relationships that underlie the regeneration process. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  2. Sonic hedgehog regulation of Foxf2 promotes cranial neural crest mesenchyme proliferation and is disrupted in cleft lip morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Joshua L; Fink, Dustin M; Yoon, Joon Won; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Kietzman, Henry W; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Chung, Hannah M; Walterhouse, David O; Marazita, Mary L; Lipinski, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Cleft lip is one of the most common human birth defects, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lip morphogenesis is limited. Here, we show in mice that sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced proliferation of cranial neural crest cell (cNCC) mesenchyme is required for upper lip closure. Gene expression profiling revealed a subset of Forkhead box (Fox) genes that are regulated by Shh signaling during lip morphogenesis. During cleft pathogenesis, reduced proliferation in the medial nasal process mesenchyme paralleled the domain of reduced Foxf2 and Gli1 expression. SHH ligand induction of Foxf2 expression was dependent upon Shh pathway effectors in cNCCs, while a functional GLI-binding site was identified downstream of Foxf2 Consistent with the cellular mechanism demonstrated for cleft lip pathogenesis, we found that either SHH ligand addition or FOXF2 overexpression is sufficient to induce cNCC proliferation. Finally, analysis of a large multi-ethnic human population with cleft lip identified clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXF2 These data suggest that direct targeting of Foxf2 by Shh signaling drives cNCC mesenchyme proliferation during upper lip morphogenesis, and that disruption of this sequence results in cleft lip. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. A Joint Less Ordinary: Intriguing Roles for Hedgehog Signalling in the Development of the Temporomandibular Synovial Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kubiak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the essential role of Hedgehog (Hh signalling in the developmental steps of temporomandibular joint (TMJ formation. We review evidence for intra- and potentially inter-tissue Hh signaling as well as Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog (GLI dependent and independent functions. Morphogenesis and maturation of the TMJ’s individual components and the general landscape of Hh signalling is also covered. Comparison of the appendicular knee and axial TMJ also reveals interesting differences and similarities in their mechanisms of development, chondrogenesis and reliance on Hh signalling.

  4. Indian hedgehog signaling promotes chondrocyte differentiation in enchondral ossification in human cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Daisuke; Yayama, Takafumi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Takeura, Naoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2013-10-15

    Histological, immunohistochemical, and immunoblot analyses of the expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). To examine the hypothesis that Ihh signaling in correlation with Sox9 and parathyroid-related peptide hormone (PTHrP) facilitates chondrocyte differentiation in enchondral ossification process in human cervical OPLL. In enchondral ossification, certain transcriptional factors regulate cell differentiation. OPLL is characterized by overexpression of these factors and disturbance of the normal cell differentiation process. Ihh signaling is essential for enchondral ossification, especially in chondrocyte hypertrophy. Samples of ossified ligaments were harvested from 45 patients who underwent anterior cervical decompressive surgery for symptomatic OPLL, and 6 control samples from patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy without OPLL. The harvested sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and toluidine blue, examined by transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemically stained for Ihh, PTHrP, Sox9, type X, XI collagen, and alkaline phosphatase. Immunoblot analysis was performed in cultured cells derived from the posterior longitudinal ligaments in the vicinity of the ossified plaque and examined for the expression of these factors. The ossification front in OPLL contained chondrocytes at various differentiation stages, including proliferating chondrocytes in fibrocartilaginous area, hypertrophic chondrocytes around the calcification front, and apoptotic chondrocytes near the ossified area. Immunoreactivity for Ihh and Sox9 was evident in proliferating chondrocytes and was strongly positive for PTHrP in hypertrophic chondrocytes. Mesenchymal cells with blood vessel formation were positive for Ihh, PTHrP, and Sox9. Cultured cells from OPLL tissues expressed significantly higher levels of Ihh, PTHrP, and Sox9 than those in non-OPLL cells. Our results

  5. Lithium Suppresses Hedgehog Signaling via Promoting ITCH E3 Ligase Activity and Gli1–SUFU Interaction in PDA Cells

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    Xinshuo Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is one of the hallmarks of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for the treatment of mental disorders, is known to suppress tumorigenic potential of PDA cells by targeting the Hh/Gli signaling pathway. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of lithium induced down-regulation of Hh/Gli1. Our data show that lithium promotes the poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of Gli1 through activating E3 ligase ITCH. Additionally, lithium enhances interaction between Gli1 and SUFU via suppressing GSK3β, which phosphorylates SUFU and destabilizes the SUFU-Gli1 inhibitory complex. Our studies illustrate a novel mechanism by which lithium suppresses Hh signaling via simultaneously promoting ITCH-dependent Gli1 ubiquitination/degradation and SUFU-mediated Gli1 inhibition.

  6. Zebrafish con/disp1 reveals multiple spatiotemporal requirements for Hedgehog-signaling in craniofacial development

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    Schwend Tyler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate head skeleton is derived largely from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC. Genetic studies in zebrafish and mice have established that the Hedgehog (Hh-signaling pathway plays a critical role in craniofacial development, partly due to the pathway's role in CNCC development. Disruption of the Hh-signaling pathway in humans can lead to the spectral disorder of Holoprosencephaly (HPE, which is often characterized by a variety of craniofacial defects including midline facial clefting and cyclopia 12. Previous work has uncovered a role for Hh-signaling in zebrafish dorsal neurocranium patterning and chondrogenesis, however Hh-signaling mutants have not been described with respect to the ventral pharyngeal arch (PA skeleton. Lipid-modified Hh-ligands require the transmembrane-spanning receptor Dispatched 1 (Disp1 for proper secretion from Hh-synthesizing cells to the extracellular field where they act on target cells. Here we study chameleon mutants, lacking a functional disp1(con/disp1. Results con/disp1 mutants display reduced and dysmorphic mandibular and hyoid arch cartilages and lack all ceratobranchial cartilage elements. CNCC specification and migration into the PA primorida occurs normally in con/disp1 mutants, however disp1 is necessary for post-migratory CNCC patterning and differentiation. We show that disp1 is required for post-migratory CNCC to become properly patterned within the first arch, while the gene is dispensable for CNCC condensation and patterning in more posterior arches. Upon residing in well-formed pharyngeal epithelium, neural crest condensations in the posterior PA fail to maintain expression of two transcription factors essential for chondrogenesis, sox9a and dlx2a, yet continue to robustly express other neural crest markers. Histology reveals that posterior arch residing-CNCC differentiate into fibrous-connective tissue, rather than becoming chondrocytes. Treatments with Cyclopamine, to

  7. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  8. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieser, Eckhard; Swierczynski, Stefan; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Illig, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a protective role, whereas in chronic pancreatitis, Hh interacts with pancreatic stellate cells, leading to destructive parenchym fibrosis and atrophy, as well as to irregular tissue remodeling with potency of initiating cancerogenesis. In vitro and in situ analysis of Hh in pancreatic cancer revealed that the Hh pathway participates in the development of pancreatic precursor lesions and ductal adenocarcinoma including critical interactions with the tumor microenvironment. The application of specific inhibitors of components of the Hh pathway is currently subject of ongoing clinical trials (phases 1 and 2). Furthermore, a combination of Hh pathway inhibitors and established chemotherapeutic drugs could also represent a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we give a structured survey of the role of the Hh pathway in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinogenesis and pancreatic cancer as well as an overview of current clinical trials concerning Hh pathway inhibitors and pancreas cancer. PMID:27190692

  9. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling antagonizes serous ovarian cancer growth in a primary xenograft model.

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    Christopher K McCann

    Full Text Available Recent evidence links aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh signaling with the pathogenesis of several cancers including medulloblastoma, basal cell, small cell lung, pancreatic, prostate and ovarian. This investigation was designed to determine if inhibition of this pathway could inhibit serous ovarian cancer growth.We utilized an in vivo pre-clinical model of serous ovarian cancer to characterize the anti-tumor activity of Hh pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and a clinically applicable derivative, IPI-926. Primary human serous ovarian tumor tissue was used to generate tumor xenografts in mice that were subsequently treated with cyclopamine or IPI-926.Both compounds demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity as single agents. When IPI-926 was used in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatinum (T/C, no synergistic effect was observed, though sustained treatment with IPI-926 after cessation of T/C continued to suppress tumor growth. Hh pathway activity was analyzed by RT-PCR to assess changes in Gli1 transcript levels. A single dose of IPI-926 inhibited mouse stromal Gli1 transcript levels at 24 hours with unchanged human intra-tumor Gli1 levels. Chronic IPI-926 therapy for 21 days, however, inhibited Hh signaling in both mouse stromal and human tumor cells. Expression data from the micro-dissected stroma in human serous ovarian tumors confirmed the presence of Gli1 transcript and a significant association between elevated Gli1 transcript levels and worsened survival.IPI-926 treatment inhibits serous tumor growth suggesting the Hh signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and may hold promise as a novel therapeutic target, especially in the maintenance setting.

  10. A novel PEGylated liposome-encapsulated SANT75 suppresses tumor growth through inhibiting hedgehog signaling pathway.

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    Yike Yuan

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh pathway inhibitors have shown great promise in cancer therapeutics. SANT75, a novel compound we previously designed to specially inhibit the Smoothened (SMO protein in the Hh pathway, has greater inhibitory potency than many of commonly used Hh inhibitors. However, preclinical studies of SANT75 revealed water insolubility and acute toxicity. To overcome these limitations, we developed a liposomal formulation of SANT75 and investigated its antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo. We encapsulated SANT75 into PEGylated liposome and the mean particle size distribution and zeta-potential (ZP of liposomes were optimized. Using the Shh-light2 cell and Gli-GFP or Flk-GFP transgenic reporter zebrafish, we confirmed that liposome-encapsulated SANT75 inhibited Hh activity with similar potency as the original SANT75. SANT75 encapsulated into liposome exerted strong tumor growth-inhibiting effects in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the liposomal SANT75 therapy efficiently improved the survival time of tumor-bearing mice without obvious systemic toxicity. The pathological morphology and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that liposomal SANT75 induced tumor cell apoptosis, inhibited tumor angiogenesis as assessed by CD31 and down-regulated the expression of Hh target protein Gli-1 in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that liposomal formulated SANT75 has improved solubility and bioavailability and should be further developed as a drug candidate for treating tumors with abnormally high Hh activity.

  11. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies regulators of cholesterol-modified hedgehog secretion in Drosophila.

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    Reid Aikin

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh proteins are secreted molecules that function as organizers in animal development. In addition to being palmitoylated, Hh is the only metazoan protein known to possess a covalently-linked cholesterol moiety. The absence of either modification severely disrupts the organization of numerous tissues during development. It is currently not known how lipid-modified Hh is secreted and released from producing cells. We have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells to identify regulators of Hh secretion. We found that cholesterol-modified Hh secretion is strongly dependent on coat protein complex I (COPI but not COPII vesicles, suggesting that cholesterol modification alters the movement of Hh through the early secretory pathway. We provide evidence that both proteolysis and cholesterol modification are necessary for the efficient trafficking of Hh through the ER and Golgi. Finally, we identified several putative regulators of protein secretion and demonstrate a role for some of these genes in Hh and Wingless (Wg morphogen secretion in vivo. These data open new perspectives for studying how morphogen secretion is regulated, as well as provide insight into regulation of lipid-modified protein secretion.

  12. Epiphyseal chondrocyte secondary ossification centers require thyroid hormone activation of Indian hedgehog and osterix signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Weirong; Cheng, Shaohong; Wergedal, Jon; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are known to regulate endochondral ossification during skeletal development via acting directly in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. In this study, we focused on TH effects on the secondary ossification center (SOC) because the time of appearance of SOCs in several species coincides with the time when peak levels of TH are attained. Accordingly, micro-computed tomography (µCT) evaluation of femurs and tibias at day 21 in TH-deficient and control mice revealed that endochondral ossification of SOCs is severely compromised owing to TH deficiency and that TH treatment for 10 days completely rescued this phenotype. Staining of cartilage and bone in the epiphysis revealed that whereas all of the cartilage is converted into bone in the prepubertal control mice, this conversion failed to occur in the TH-deficient mice. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that TH treatment of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor mutant (Tshr(-/-) ) mice induced expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and Osx in type 2 collagen (Col2)-expressing chondrocytes in the SOC at day 7, which subsequently differentiate into type 10 collagen (Col10)/osteocalcin-expressing chondro/osteoblasts at day 10. Consistent with these data, treatment of tibia cultures from 3-day-old mice with 10 ng/mL TH increased expression of Osx, Col10, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin in the epiphysis by sixfold to 60-fold. Furthermore, knockdown of the TH-induced increase in Osx expression using lentiviral small hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly blocked TH-induced ALP and osteocalcin expression in chondrocytes. Treatment of chondrogenic cells with an Ihh inhibitor abolished chondro/osteoblast differentiation and SOC formation. Our findings indicate that TH regulates the SOC initiation and progression via differentiating chondrocytes into bone matrix-producing osteoblasts by stimulating Ihh and Osx expression in chondrocytes. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Affected by Promoter Hypermethylation Induces Aberrant Gli2 Expression in Spina Bifida.

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    Lu, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Li; Chang, Shao-Yan; Shangguan, Shao-Fang; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Li-Hua; Zou, Ji-Zhen; Xiao, Ping; Li, Rui; Bao, Yi-Hua; Qiu, Z-Y; Zhang, Ting

    2016-10-01

    GLI2 is a key mediator of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway and plays an important role in neural tube development during vertebrate embryogenesis; however, the role of gli2 in human folate-related neural tube defects remains unclear. In this study, we compared methylation status and polymorphisms of gli2 between spina bifida patients and a control group to explore the underlying mechanisms related to folate deficiency in spina bifida. No single nucleotide polymorphism was found to be significantly different between the two groups, although gli2 methylation levels were significantly increased in spina bifida samples, accompanied by aberrant GLI2 expression. Moreover, a prominent negative correlation was found between the folate level in brain tissue and the gli2 methylation status (r = -0.41, P = 0.014), and gli2 hypermethylation increased the risk of spina bifida with an odds ratio of 12.45 (95 % confidence interval: 2.71-57.22, P = 0.001). In addition, we established a cell model to illustrate the effect of gli2 expression and the accessibility of chromatin affected by methylation. High gli2 and gli1 mRNA expression was detected in 5-Aza-treated cells, while gli2 hypermethylation resulted in chromatin inaccessibility and a reduced association with nuclear proteins containing transcriptional factors. More meaningful to the pathway, the effect gene of the Shh pathway, gli1, was found to have a reduced level of expression along with a decreased expression of gli2 in our cell model. Aberrant high methylation resulted in the low expression of gli2 in spina bifida, which was affected by the change in chromatin status and the capacity of transcription factor binding.

  14. Mouse hitchhiker mutants have spina bifida, dorso-ventral patterning defects and polydactyly: identification of Tulp3 as a novel negative regulator of the Sonic hedgehog pathway

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    Patterson, Victoria L.; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Reeve, Benjamin; Grimes, Daniel T.; Stewart, Michelle E.; Williams, Debbie J.; Siggers, Pam; Greenfield, Andy; Murdoch, Jennifer N.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling pathway is essential for embryonic development and the patterning of multiple organs. Disruption or activation of Shh signalling leads to multiple birth defects, including holoprosencephaly, neural tube defects and polydactyly, and in adults results in tumours of the skin or central nervous system. Genetic approaches with model organisms continue to identify novel components of the pathway, including key molecules that function as positive or negative regulators of Shh signalling. Data presented here define Tulp3 as a novel negative regulator of the Shh pathway. We have identified a new mouse mutant that is a strongly hypomorphic allele of Tulp3 and which exhibits expansion of ventral markers in the caudal spinal cord, as well as neural tube defects and preaxial polydactyly, consistent with increased Shh signalling. We demonstrate that Tulp3 acts genetically downstream of Shh and Smoothened (Smo) in neural tube patterning and exhibits a genetic interaction with Gli3 in limb development. We show that Tulp3 does not appear to alter expression or processing of Gli3, and we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of other negative regulators (Rab23, Fkbp8, Thm1, Sufu and PKA) is not affected. We discuss the possible mechanism of action of Tulp3 in Shh-mediated signalling in light of these new data. PMID:19223390

  15. Inhibition of sonic hedgehog pathway and pluripotency maintaining factors regulate human pancreatic cancer stem cell characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Su‐Ni; Fu, Junsheng; Nall, Dara; Rodova, Mariana; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the sonic hedgehog (SHh) pathway is required for the growth of numerous tissues and organs and recent evidence indicates that this pathway is often recruited to stimulate growth of cancer stem cells (CSCs...

  16. Nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 promotes the aggressiveness of astrocytoma by activating the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianqiu; Xu, Benke; Yang, Chao; Wang, Wentao; Zhong, Dequan; Zhao, Zhan; He, Longshuang; Hu, Yuanjun; Jiang, Lili; Li, Jun; Song, Libing; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-12

    The prognosis of human astrocytoma is poor, and the molecular alterations underlying its pathogenesis still needed to be elucidated. Nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) was observed in several types of cancers, but its role in astrocytoma remained unknown. The expression of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma cell lines and tissues were measured with western blotting and Real-Time PCR. Two hundred and twenty-one astrocytoma tissue samples were analyzed by immunochemistry to demonstrate the correlation between the NUSAP1 expression and clinicopathological characteristics. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, colony formation, transwell matrix penetration assay, wound healing assay and anchorage-independent growth assay were used to investigate the biological effect of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma. An intracranial brain xenograft tumor model was used to confirm the oncogenic role of NUSAP1 in human astrocytoma. Luciferase reporter assay was used to investigate the effect of NUSAP1 on Hedgehog signaling pathway. NUSAP1 was markedly overexpressed in astrocytoma cell lines and tissues compared with normal astrocytes and brain tissues. NUSAP1 was found to be overexpressed in 152 of 221 (68.78%) astrocytoma tissues, and was significantly correlated to poor survival. Further, ectopic expression or knockdown of NUSAP1 significantly promoted or inhibited, respectively, the invasive ability of astrocytoma cells. Moreover, intracranial xenografts of astrocytoma cells engineered to express NUSAP1 were highly invasive compared with the parental cells. With regard to its molecular mechanism, upregulation of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma cells promoted the nuclear translocation of GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) and upregulated the downstream genes of the Hedgehog pathway. These findings indicate that NUSAP1 contributes to the progression of astrocytoma by enhancing tumor cell invasiveness via activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and that NUSAP1

  17. Laser irradiation promotes the proliferation of mouse pre-osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 through hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiushi; Chen, Yingxin; Dong, Shujun; Liu, Shujie; Zhang, Xiaodan; Si, Xi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2017-09-01

    Low-level laser could promote osteoblast proliferation, and it has been applied in clinical practice to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration. However, the mechanism related to laser irradiation remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on the cell proliferation and the expressions of hedgehog signaling molecules Indian hedgehog (Ihh), Ptch, and Gli in vitro. In our present study, the MTT method was used to evaluate the effect on cell proliferation of laser irradiation on MC3T3-E1 cells. And cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. Gene and protein expressions of hedgehog signaling molecules, including Ihh, Ptch, Smoothened (Smo), and Gli, were examined by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that laser irradiation at dosage of 3.75 J/cm(2) enhances the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells compared with control groups (p = 0.00). Moreover, laser irradiation (3.75 J/cm(2)) increased the cell amount at S phase (p = 0.00). In addition, the expressions of Ihh, Ptch, Smo, and Gli were significantly increased compared to the control during laser irradiation (3.75 J/cm(2))-induced MC3T3-E1 osteoblast proliferation. After adding the hedgehog signaling inhibitor CY (cyclopamine), cell proliferation and Ihh, Ptch, Smo, and Gli expressions were inhibited (p = 0.00), and the cell amount at S phase was reduced compared with combination groups (p = 0.00). These results indicated that laser irradiation promotes proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells through hedgehog signaling pathway. Our findings provide insights into the mechanistic link between laser irradiation-induced osteogenesis and hedgehog signaling pathway.

  18. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airik, Rannar; Schueler, Markus; Airik, Merlin

    2016-01-01

    Recessive mutations in the SDCCAG8 gene cause a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-like features in humans. Our previous characterization of the orthologous Sdccag8gt/gt mouse model recapitulated the retinal-renal disease phenotypes and identified impaired DNA damage...... response signaling as an underlying disease mechanism in the kidney. However, several other phenotypic and mechanistic features of Sdccag8gt/gt mice remained unexplored. Here we show that Sdccag8gt/gt mice exhibit developmental and structural abnormalities of the skeleton and limbs, suggesting impaired...... Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1), of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC...

  19. Hedgehog signaling acts with the temporal cascade to promote neuroblast cell cycle exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing Chian Chai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila postembryonic neuroblasts, transition in gene expression programs of a cascade of transcription factors (also known as the temporal series acts together with the asymmetric division machinery to generate diverse neurons with distinct identities and regulate the end of neuroblast proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism of how this "temporal series" acts during development remains unclear. Here, we show that Hh signaling in the postembryonic brain is temporally regulated; excess (earlier onset of Hh signaling causes premature neuroblast cell cycle exit and under-proliferation, whereas loss of Hh signaling causes delayed cell cycle exit and excess proliferation. Moreover, the Hh pathway functions downstream of Castor but upstream of Grainyhead, two components of the temporal series, to schedule neuroblast cell cycle exit. Interestingly, hh is likely a target of Castor. Hence, Hh signaling provides a link between the temporal series and the asymmetric division machinery in scheduling the end of neurogenesis.

  20. The intersection of the extrinsic hedgehog and WNT/wingless signals with the intrinsic Hox code underpins branching pattern and tube shape diversity in the drosophila airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Matsuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tubular networks of the Drosophila respiratory system and our vasculature show distinct branching patterns and tube shapes in different body regions. These local variations are crucial for organ function and organismal fitness. Organotypic patterns and tube geometries in branched networks are typically controlled by variations of extrinsic signaling but the impact of intrinsic factors on branch patterns and shapes is not well explored. Here, we show that the intersection of extrinsic hedgehog(hh and WNT/wingless (wg signaling with the tube-intrinsic Hox code of distinct segments specifies the tube pattern and shape of the Drosophila airways. In the cephalic part of the airways, hh signaling induces expression of the transcription factor (TF knirps (kni in the anterior dorsal trunk (DTa1. kni represses the expression of another TF spalt major (salm, making DTa1 a narrow and long tube. In DTa branches of more posterior metameres, Bithorax Complex (BX-C Hox genes autonomously divert hh signaling from inducing kni, thereby allowing DTa branches to develop as salm-dependent thick and short tubes. Moreover, the differential expression of BX-C genes is partly responsible for the anterior-to-posterior gradual increase of the DT tube diameter through regulating the expression level of Salm, a transcriptional target of WNT/wg signaling. Thus, our results highlight how tube intrinsic differential competence can diversify tube morphology without changing availabilities of extrinsic factors.

  1. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lei [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin 300071 (China); Carr, Aprell L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Lei, E-mail: Li.78@nd.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  2. Serpent, Suppressor of Hairless and U-shaped are crucial regulators of hedgehog niche expression and prohemocyte maintenance during Drosophila larval hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokusumi, Yumiko; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Stoller-Conrad, Jessica; Schulz, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The lymph gland is a specialized organ for hematopoiesis, utilized during larval development in Drosophila. This tissue is composed of distinct cellular domains populated by blood cell progenitors (the medullary zone), niche cells that regulate the choice between progenitor quiescence and hemocyte differentiation [the posterior signaling center (PSC)], and mature blood cells of distinct lineages (the cortical zone). Cells of the PSC express the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling molecule, which instructs cells within the neighboring medullary zone to maintain a hematopoietic precursor state while preventing hemocyte differentiation. As a means to understand the regulatory mechanisms controlling Hh production, we characterized a PSC-active transcriptional enhancer that drives hh expression in supportive niche cells. Our findings indicate that a combination of positive and negative transcriptional inputs program the precise PSC expression of the instructive Hh signal. The GATA factor Serpent (Srp) is essential for hh activation in niche cells, whereas the Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and U-shaped (Ush) transcriptional regulators prevent hh expression in blood cell progenitors and differentiated hemocytes. Furthermore, Srp function is required for the proper differentiation of niche cells. Phenotypic analyses also indicated that the normal activity of all three transcriptional regulators is essential for maintaining the progenitor population and preventing premature hemocyte differentiation. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into hh transcriptional regulation in hematopoietic progenitor niche cells, and demonstrate the requirement of the Srp, Su(H) and Ush proteins in the control of niche cell differentiation and blood cell precursor maintenance. PMID:20876645

  3. Hedgehog Zoonoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Patricia Y.

    2005-01-01

    Exotic pets, including hedgehogs, have become popular in recent years among pet owners, especially in North America. Such animals can carry and introduce zoonotic agents, a fact well illustrated by the recent outbreak of monkeypox in pet prairie dogs. We reviewed known and potential zoonotic diseases that could be carried and transmitted by pet hedgehogs or when rescuing and caring for wild-caught hedgehogs. PMID:15705314

  4. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  5. Lizard tail regeneration: regulation of two distinct cartilage regions by Indian hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozito, Thomas P; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-03-15

    Lizards capable of caudal autotomy exhibit the remarkable ability to "drop" and then regenerate their tails. However, the regenerated lizard tail (RLT) is known as an "imperfect replicate" due to several key anatomical differences compared to the original tail. Most striking of these "imperfections" concerns the skeleton; instead of the vertebrae of the original tail, the skeleton of the RLT takes the form of an unsegmented cartilage tube (CT). Here we have performed the first detailed staging of skeletal development of the RLT CT, identifying two distinct mineralization events. CTs isolated from RLTs of various ages were analyzed by micro-computed tomography to characterize mineralization, and to correlate skeletal development with expression of endochondral ossification markers evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. During early tail regeneration, shortly after CT formation, the extreme proximal CT in direct contact with the most terminal vertebra of the original tail develops a growth plate-like region that undergoes endochondral ossification. Proximal CT chondrocytes enlarge, express hypertrophic markers, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), apoptose, and are replaced by bone. During later stages of tail regeneration, the distal CT mineralizes without endochondral ossification. The sub-perichondrium of the distal CT expresses Ihh, and the perichondrium directly calcifies without cartilage growth plate formation. The calcified CT perichondrium also contains a population of stem/progenitor cells that forms new cartilage in response to TGF-β stimulation. Treatment with the Ihh inhibitor cyclopamine inhibited both proximal CT ossification and distal CT calcification. Thus, while the two mineralization events are spatially, temporally, and mechanistically very different, they both involve Ihh. Taken together, these results suggest that Ihh regulates CT mineralization during two distinct stages of lizard tail regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue: Novel Regulation by Developmental Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Jerde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN is a critical cell endogenous inhibitor of phosphoinositide signaling in mammalian cells. PTEN dephosphorylates phosphoinositide trisphosphate (PIP3, and by so doing PTEN has the function of negative regulation of Akt, thereby inhibiting this key intracellular signal transduction pathway. In numerous cell types, PTEN loss-of-function mutations result in unopposed Akt signaling, producing numerous effects on cells. Numerous reports exist regarding mutations in PTEN leading to unregulated Akt and human disease, most notably cancer. However, less is commonly known about nonmutational regulation of PTEN. This review focuses on an emerging literature on the regulation of PTEN at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. Specifically, a focus is placed on the role developmental signaling pathways play in PTEN regulation; this includes insulin-like growth factor, NOTCH, transforming growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, wnt, and hedgehog signaling. The regulation of PTEN by developmental mediators affects critical biological processes including neuronal and organ development, stem cell maintenance, cell cycle regulation, inflammation, response to hypoxia, repair and recovery, and cell death and survival. Perturbations of PTEN regulation consequently lead to human diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes, developmental abnormalities, diabetes, and neurodegeneration.

  7. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  8. Primary cilia on porcine testicular somatic cells and their role in hedgehog signaling and tubular morphogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, Camila; Alpaugh, Whitney; Su, Lin; Biernaskie, Jeff; Dobrinski, Ina

    2017-04-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based sensory organelle found on nearly all eukaryotic cells but little is understood about its function in the testis. We investigate the role of primary cilia on testis cells in vitro by inhibiting formation of the primary cilium with Ciliobrevin D, a cell-permeable, reversible chemical inhibitor of ATPase motor cytoplasmic dynein. We analyzed cultured cells for the presence of primary cilia and their involvement in hedgehog signaling. Primary cilia were present on 89.3 ± 2.3 % of untreated testicular somatic cells compared to 3.1 ± 2.5 % cells with primary cilia for Ciliobrevin D-treated cells. Protein levels of Gli-2 and Smoothened were lower on Western blots after suppression of cilia with Ciliobrevin D. The inhibitor did not affect centrosome localization or cell proliferation, indicating that changes were due to ablation of the primary cilium. Testicular somatic cells have the ability to form three-dimensional tubules in vitro. In vitro-formed tubules were significantly longer and wider in the control group than in the Ciliobrevin D-treated group (9.91 ± 0.35 vs. 5.540 ± 1.08 mm and 339.8 ± 55.78 vs. 127.2 ± 11.9 μm, respectively) indicating that primary cilia play a role in tubule formation. Our results establish that the inhibition of ATPase motor cytoplasmic dynein perturbs formation of primary cilia in testicular somatic cells, affects the hedgehog signaling pathway and impairs tubule formation in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a role of cilia in the testis in cell signaling and tubular morphogenesis in vitro.

  9. PDGFRaa Signaling Is Regulated through the Primary Cilium in Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Linda; Clement, Christian Alexandro; Teilmann, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings show that cilia are sensory organelles that display specific receptors and ion channels, which transmit signals from the extracellular environment via the cilium to the cell to control tissue homeostasis and function [ [1] , [2] , [3] , [4] , [5] and [6] ]. Agenesis of primary cilia...... or mislocation of ciliary signal components affects human pathologies, such as polycystic kidney disease [ 7 ] and disorders associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome [ 8 ]. Primary cilia are essential for hedgehog ligand-induced signaling cascade regulating growth and patterning [ [9] and [10] ]. Here, we show...... is followed by activation of Akt and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathways, with Mek1/2 being phosphorylated within the cilium and at the basal body. Fibroblasts derived from Tg737orpk mutants fail to form normal cilia and to upregulate the level of PDGFRa; PDGF-AA fails to activate PDGFRaa and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathway...

  10. An In Vivo Chemical Genetic Screen Identifies Phosphodiesterase 4 as a Pharmacological Target for Hedgehog Signaling Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. Williams

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays an integral role in vertebrate development, and its dysregulation has been accepted widely as a driver of numerous malignancies. While a variety of small molecules target Smoothened (Smo as a strategy for Hh inhibition, Smo gain-of-function mutations have limited their clinical implementation. Modulation of targets downstream of Smo could define a paradigm for treatment of Hh-dependent cancers. Here, we describe eggmanone, a small molecule identified from a chemical genetic zebrafish screen, which induced an Hh-null phenotype. Eggmanone exerts its Hh-inhibitory effects through selective antagonism of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4, leading to protein kinase A activation and subsequent Hh blockade. Our study implicates PDE4 as a target for Hh inhibition, suggests an improved strategy for Hh-dependent cancer therapy, and identifies a unique probe of downstream-of-Smo Hh modulation.

  11. Lung fibroblasts share mesenchymal stem cell features which are altered in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via the overactivation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figeac, Florence; Dagouassat, Maylis; Mahrouf-Yorgov, Meriem; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Trébeau, Céline; Sayed, Angeliqua; Stern, Jean-Baptiste; Validire, Pierre; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Boczkowski, Jorge; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle; Rodriguez, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of functional regenerative properties of parenchymal lung fibroblasts is widely proposed as a pathogenic mechanism for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, what these functions are and how they are impaired in COPD remain poorly understood. Apart from the role of fibroblasts in producing extracellular matrix, recent studies in organs different from the lung suggest that such cells might contribute to repair processes by acting like mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, several reports sustain that the Hedgehog pathway is altered in COPD patients thus aggravating the disease. Nevertheless, whether this pathway is dysregulated in COPD fibroblasts remains unknown. We investigated the stem cell features and the expression of Hedgehog components in human lung fibroblasts isolated from histologically-normal parenchymal tissue from 25 patients--8 non-smokers/non-COPD, 8 smokers-non COPD and 9 smokers with COPD--who were undergoing surgery for lung tumor resection. We found that lung fibroblasts resemble mesenchymal stem cells in terms of cell surface marker expression, differentiation ability and immunosuppressive potential and that these properties were altered in lung fibroblasts from smokers and even more in COPD patients. Furthermore, we showed that some of these phenotypic changes can be explained by an over activation of the Hedgehog signaling in smoker and COPD fibroblasts. Our study reveals that lung fibroblasts possess mesenchymal stem cell-features which are impaired in COPD via the contribution of an abnormal Hedgehog signaling. These processes should constitute a novel pathomechanism accounting for disease occurrence and progression.

  12. Hedgehog/GLI and PI3K signaling in the initiation and maintenance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, D; Regl, G; Hofbauer, S W; Altenhofer, P; Achatz, G; Dlugosz, A; Schnidar, H; Greil, R; Hartmann, T N; Aberger, F

    2015-01-01

    The initiation and maintenance of a malignant phenotype requires complex and synergistic interactions of multiple oncogenic signals. The Hedgehog (HH)/GLI pathway has been implicated in a variety of cancer entities and targeted pathway inhibition is of therapeutic relevance. Signal cross-talk with other cancer pathways including PI3K/AKT modulates HH/GLI signal strength and its oncogenicity. In this study, we addressed the role of HH/GLI and its putative interaction with the PI3K/AKT cascade in the initiation and maintenance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Using transgenic mouse models, we show that B-cell-specific constitutive activation of HH/GLI signaling either at the level of the HH effector and drug target Smoothened or at the level of the GLI transcription factors does not suffice to initiate a CLL-like phenotype characterized by the accumulation of CD5+ B cells in the lymphatic system and peripheral blood. Furthermore, Hh/Gli activation in Pten-deficient B cells with activated Pi3K/Akt signaling failed to enhance the expansion of leukemic CD5+ B cells, suggesting that genetic or epigenetic alterations leading to aberrant HH/GLI signaling in B cells do not suffice to elicit a CLL-like phenotype in mice. By contrast, we identify a critical role of GLI and PI3K signaling for the survival of human primary CLL cells. We show that combined targeting of GLI and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling can have a synergistic therapeutic effect in cells from a subgroup of CLL patients, thereby providing a basis for the evaluation of future combination therapies targeting HH/GLI and PI3K signaling in this common hematopoietic malignancy. PMID:25639866

  13. Loss of Pin1 Suppresses Hedgehog-Driven Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Honglai; Park, Sung-Soo; Venneti, Sriram; Kuick, Rork; Ha, Kimberly; Michael, Lowell Evan; Santi, Mariarita; Uchida, Chiyoko; Uchida, Takafumi; Srinivasan, Ashok; Olson, James M; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Rual, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Therapeutic approaches to medulloblastoma (combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy) have led to significant improvements, but these are achieved at a high cost to quality of life. Alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Genetic mutations leading to the activation of the Hedgehog pathway drive tumorigenesis in ~30% of medulloblastoma. In a yeast two-hybrid proteomic screen, we discovered a novel interaction between GLI1, a key transcription factor for the mediation of Hedgehog signals, and PIN1, a peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase that regulates the postphosphorylation fate of its targets. The GLI1/PIN1 interaction was validated by reciprocal pulldowns using epitope-tagged proteins in HEK293T cells as well as by co-immunoprecipiations of the endogenous proteins in a medulloblastoma cell line. Our results support a molecular model in which PIN1 promotes GLI1 protein abundance, thus contributing to the positive regulation of Hedgehog signals. Most importantly, in vivo functional analyses of Pin1 in the GFAP-tTA;TRE-SmoA1 mouse model of Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma demonstrate that the loss of Pin1 impairs tumor development and dramatically increases survival. In summary, the discovery of the GLI1/PIN1 interaction uncovers PIN1 as a novel therapeutic target in Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. LncRNA-Hh Strengthen Cancer Stem Cells Generation in Twist-Positive Breast Cancer via Activation of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingli; Hou, Yixuan; Yang, Guanglun; Zhang, Hailong; Tu, Gang; Du, Yan-e; Wen, Siyang; Xu, Liyun; Tang, Xi; Tang, Shifu; Yang, Li; Cui, Xiaojiang; Liu, Manran

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of neoplastic cells with self-renewal capacity and limitless proliferative potential as well as high invasion and migration capacity. These cells are commonly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is also critical for tumor metastasis. Recent studies illustrate a direct link between EMT and stemness of cancer cells. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important new players in the regulation of multiple cellular processes in various diseases. To date, the role of lncRNAs in EMT-associated CSC stemness acquisition and maintenance remains unclear. In this study, we discovered that a set of lncRNAs were dysregulated in Twist-positive mammosphere cells using lncRNA microarray analysis. Multiple lncRNAs-associated canonical signaling pathways were identified via bioinformatics analysis. Especially, the Shh-GLI1 pathway associated lncRNA-Hh, transcriptionally regulated by Twist, directly targets GAS1 to stimulate the activation of hedgehog signaling (Hh). The activated Hh increases GLI1 expression, and enhances the expression of SOX2 and OCT4 to play a regulatory role in CSC maintenance. Thus, the mammosphere-formation efficiency (MFE) and the self-renewal capacity in vitro, and oncogenicity in vivo in Twist-positive breast cancer cells are elevated. lncRNA-Hh silence in Twist-positive breast cells attenuates the activated Shh-GLI1 signaling and decreases the CSC-associated SOX and OCT4 levels, thus reduces the MFE and tumorigenesis of transplanted tumor. Our results reveal that lncRNAs function as an important regulator endowing Twist-induced EMT cells to gain the CSC-like stemness properties. © 2015 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. An Evolutionarily Conserved Network Mediates Development of the zona limitans intrathalamica, a Sonic Hedgehog-Secreting Caudal Forebrain Signaling Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies revealed new insights into the development of a unique caudal forebrain-signaling center: the zona limitans intrathalamica (zli. The zli is the last brain signaling center to form and the first forebrain compartment to be established. It is the only part of the dorsal neural tube expressing the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh whose activity participates in the survival, growth and patterning of neuronal progenitor subpopulations within the thalamic complex. Here, we review the gene regulatory network of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements that underlies formation of a shh-expressing delimitated domain in the anterior brain. We discuss evidence that this network predates the origin of chordates. We highlight the contribution of Shh, Wnt and Notch signaling to zli development and discuss implications for the fact that the morphogen Shh relies on primary cilia for signal transduction. The network that underlies zli development also contributes to thalamus induction, and to its patterning once the zli has been set up. We present an overview of the brain malformations possibly associated with developmental defects in this gene regulatory network (GRN.

  16. Characterization of primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling during development of the human pancreas and in human pancreatic duct cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sonja K; Møllgård, Kjeld; Clement, Christian A

    2008-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls pancreatic development and homeostasis; aberrant Hh signaling is associated with several pancreatic diseases. Here we investigated the link between Hh signaling and primary cilia in the human developing pancreatic ducts and in cultures of human pancreatic duct...... adenocarcinoma cell lines, PANC-1 and CFPAC-1. We show that the onset of Hh signaling from human embryogenesis to fetal development is associated with accumulation of Hh signaling components Smo and Gli2 in duct primary cilia and a reduction of Gli3 in the duct epithelium. Smo, Ptc, and Gli2 localized to primary...

  17. Molecular modelling of berberine derivatives as inhibitors of human smoothened receptor and hedgehog signalling pathway using a newly developed algorithm on anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboli, Parham Jabbarzadeh; Bazrafkan, Mohammad; Ismail, Patimah; Ling, King-Hwa

    2017-09-29

    Protoberberine isoquinoline alkaloids are found in many plant species. They consist of a diverse class of secondary metabolites with many pharmacologically active members, such as different derivatives of berberine already patented. In the development of approximately 20-25% of all cancers, altered hedgehog (Hh) signalling is involved where the smoothened (Smo) transmembrane receptor triggers Hh signalling pathway towards Gli1 gene expression. The current study aimed to model and verify the anti-Smo activity of berberine and its derivatives using a novel automated script. Based on the patented inventions filed on ADMET modelling until 2016, which also predicts ADMET parameters and binding efficiency indices for all molecules, a script was developed to run automated molecular docking for a large number of small molecules. Berberine was found to interact with Lys395 of Smo receptor via hydrogen bonding and cation-π interactions. In addition, π-π interactions between berberine aromatic rings and two aromatic residues in the Smo transmembrane domain, Tyr394 and Phe484, were noted. Binding efficiency indices using an in-silico approach to plot the Smo-specific binding potency of each ligand was performed. The mRNA level of Gli1 was studied as the outcome of Hh signalling pathway to show the effect of berberine on hedgehog signalling. This study predicted the role of berberine as an inhibitor of Smo receptor, suggesting its effectiveness in hedgehog signalling during cancer treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Disruption of sonic hedgehog signaling in Ellis-van Creveld dwarfism confers protection against bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, E I; Galdzicka, M; Elston, R C; Song, Y E; Paul, S M; Egeland, J A

    2015-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, an autosomal recessively inherited chondrodysplastic dwarfism, is frequent among Old Order Amish of Pennsylvania. Decades of longitudinal research on bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) revealed cosegregation of high numbers of EvC and Bipolar I (BPI) cases in several large Amish families descending from the same pioneer. Despite the high prevalence of both disorders in these families, no EvC individual has ever been reported with BPI. The proximity of the EVC gene to our previously reported chromosome 4p16 BPAD locus with protective alleles, coupled with detailed clinical observations that EvC and BPI do not occur in the same individuals, led us to hypothesize that the genetic defect causing EvC in the Amish confers protection from BPI. This hypothesis is supported by a significant negative association of these two disorders when contrasted with absence of disease (P=0.029, Fisher's exact test, two-sided, verified by permutation to estimate the null distribution of the test statistic). As homozygous Amish EVC mutations causing EvC dwarfism do so by disrupting sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, our data implicate Shh signaling in the underlying pathophysiology of BPAD. Understanding how disrupted Shh signaling protects against BPI could uncover variants in the Shh pathway that cause or increase risk for this and related mood disorders.

  19. Spatial regulation of Rap signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gloerich, M.

    2011-01-01

    By cycling between an inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound state, small G-proteins of the Rap family act as molecular switches that relay upstream signals to diverse cellular processes. This GDP/GTP-cycle and consequently downstream signaling by Rap is under tight regulation by its GEFs and GAPs.

  20. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Ponting Chris P; MacArthur Katie; Campbell Jennifer; Liu Yu-Ning; Tompson Stuart; Blair Helen J; Ruiz-Perez Victor L; Goodship Judith A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Results Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essenti...

  1. Prognostic value of hedgehog signaling pathway in digestive system cancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihan; Peng, Qian; Jia, Hongyuan; Du, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has recently been reported to be associated with the prognosis of digestive system cancers. However, the results are inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate the association between Hh pathway components and survival outcomes in patients with digestive system cancers. We conducted a comprehensive retrieval in PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane library for relevant literatures until May 1st, 2015. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to clarify the prognostic value of Hh pathway components, including Shh, Gli1, Gli2, Smo and Ptch1. A total of 16 eligible articles with 3222 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled HR suggested that over-expression of Shh and Gli1 were both associated with poor OS (HR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.14-3.07 and HR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.66-2.32, respectively) and DFS (HR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.19-4.72 and HR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.61-2.96, respectively). In addition, over-expression of Smo was associated with poor DFS (HR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.08-1.75). This study reveals that over-expressed Hh pathway components, including Shh, Gli1 and Smo, are associated with poor prognosis in digestive system cancer patients. Hh signaling pathway may become a potential therapeutic target in digestive system cancers.

  2. Expression patterns of key Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway components in the developing and adult mouse midbrain and in the MN9D cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Melanie; Chleilat, Enaam; Khakipoor, Shokoufeh; Michailidis, Konstantinos; Ophoven, Christian; Roussa, Eleni

    2017-11-01

    The temporal dynamic expression of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and signaling during early midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development is one of the key players in establishing mDA progenitor diversity. However, whether SHH signaling is also required during later developmental stages and in mature mDA neurons is less understood. We study the expression of SHH receptors Ptch1 and Gas1 (growth arrest-specific 1) and of the transcription factors Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3 in mouse midbrain during embryonic development [embryonic day (E) 12.5 onwards)], in newborn and adult mice using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we examine the expression and regulation of dopaminergic neuronal progenitor markers, midbrain dopaminergic neuronal markers and markers of the SHH signaling pathway in undifferentiated and butyric acid-treated (differentiated) MN9D cells in the presence or absence of exogenous SHH in vitro by RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Gli1 was expressed in the lateral mesencephalic domains, whereas Gli2 and Gli3 were expressed dorsolaterally and complemented by ventrolateral expression of Ptch1. Co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase could not be observed. GAS1 was exclusively expressed in the dorsal mesencephalon at E11.5 and co-localized with Ki67. In contrast, MN9D cells expressed all the genes investigated and treatment of the cells with butyric acid significantly upregulated their expression. The results suggest that SHH is only indirectly involved in the differentiation and survival of mDA neurons and that the MN9D cell line is a valuable model for investigating early development but not the differentiation and survival of mDA neurons.

  3. Gut–neuron interaction via Hh signaling regulates intestinal progenitor cell differentiation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Pan, Chenyu; Liu, Chunying; Lv, Xiangdong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Yue; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Han, Junhai; Zhou, Zhaocai; Jiang, Hai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their progenies. A complex autonomic nervous system spreads over posterior intestine. However, whether and how neurons regulate posterior intestinal homeostasis is largely unknown. Here we report that neurons regulate Drosophila posterior intestinal homeostasis. Specifically, downregulation of neuronal Hedgehog (Hh) signaling inhibits the differentiation of ISCs toward enterocytes (ECs), whereas upregulated neuronal Hh signaling promotes such process. We demonstrate that, among multiple sources of Hh ligand, those secreted by ECs induces similar phenotypes as does neuronal Hh. In addition, intestinal JAK/STAT signaling responds to activated neuronal Hh signaling, suggesting that JAK/STAT signaling acts downstream of neuronal Hh signaling in intestine. Collectively, our results indicate that neuronal Hh signaling is essential for the determination of ISC fate. PMID:27462407

  4. Gut-neuron interaction via Hh signaling regulates intestinal progenitor cell differentiation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Pan, Chenyu; Liu, Chunying; Lv, Xiangdong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Yue; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Han, Junhai; Zhou, Zhaocai; Jiang, Hai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their progenies. A complex autonomic nervous system spreads over posterior intestine. However, whether and how neurons regulate posterior intestinal homeostasis is largely unknown. Here we report that neurons regulate Drosophila posterior intestinal homeostasis. Specifically, downregulation of neuronal Hedgehog (Hh) signaling inhibits the differentiation of ISCs toward enterocytes (ECs), whereas upregulated neuronal Hh signaling promotes such process. We demonstrate that, among multiple sources of Hh ligand, those secreted by ECs induces similar phenotypes as does neuronal Hh. In addition, intestinal JAK/STAT signaling responds to activated neuronal Hh signaling, suggesting that JAK/STAT signaling acts downstream of neuronal Hh signaling in intestine. Collectively, our results indicate that neuronal Hh signaling is essential for the determination of ISC fate.

  5. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  6. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponting Chris P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Results Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus.

  7. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Helen J; Tompson, Stuart; Liu, Yu-Ning; Campbell, Jennifer; MacArthur, Katie; Ponting, Chris P; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Goodship, Judith A

    2011-02-28

    Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus.

  8. Hedgehog promotes neovascularization in pancreatic cancers by regulating Ang-1 and IGF-1 expression in bone-marrow derived pro-angiogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Nakamura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog (Hh pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Recent studies have suggested that the oncogenic function of Hh in PDAC involves signaling in the stromal cells rather than cell autonomous effects on the tumor cells. However, the origin and nature of the stromal cell type(s that are responsive to Hh signaling remained unknown. Since Hh signaling plays a crucial role during embryonic and postnatal vasculogenesis, we speculated that Hh ligand may act on tumor vasculature specifically focusing on bone marrow (BM-derived cells.Cyclopamine was utilized to inhibit the Hh pathway in human PDAC cell lines and their xenografts. BM transplants, co-culture systems of tumor cells and BM-derived pro-angiogenic cells (BMPCs were employed to assess the role of tumor-derived Hh in regulating the BM compartment and the contribution of BM-derived cells to angiogenesis in PDAC. Cyclopamine administration attenuated Hh signaling in the stroma rather than in the cancer cells as reflected by decreased expression of full length Gli2 protein and Gli1 mRNA specifically in the compartment. Cyclopamine inhibited the growth of PDAC xenografts in association with regression of the tumor vasculature and reduced homing of BM-derived cells to the tumor. Host-derived Ang-1 and IGF-1 mRNA levels were downregulated by cyclopamine in the tumor xenografts. In vitro co-culture and matrigel plug assays demonstrated that PDAC cell-derived Shh induced Ang-1 and IGF-1 production in BMPCs, resulting in their enhanced migration and capillary morphogenesis activity.We identified the BMPCs as alternative stromal targets of Hh-ligand in PDAC suggesting that the tumor vasculature is an attractive therapeutic target of Hh blockade. Our data is consistent with the emerging concept that BM-derived cells make important contributions to epithelial tumorigenesis.

  9. Signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins directs formation of an ectodermal signaling center that regulates craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppiano, Silvia; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2007-12-01

    We previously described a signaling center, the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) that regulates growth and patterning of the frontonasal process (FNP). The FEZ is comprised of FNP ectoderm flanking a boundary between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression domains. Our objective was to examine BMP signaling during formation of the FEZ. We blocked BMP signaling throughout the FNP prior to FEZ formation by infecting chick embryos at stage 10 (HH10) with a replication-competent avian retrovirus encoding the BMP antagonist Noggin. We assessed gene expression patterns in the FNP 72 h after infection (approximately HH22) and observed that Shh expression was reduced or absent. In the mesenchyme, we observed that Bmp2 transcripts were absent while the Bmp4 expression domain was expanded proximally. In addition to the molecular changes, infected embryos also exhibited facial malformations at 72 and 96 h after infection suggesting that the FEZ did not form. Our data indicate that reduced cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the mesenchyme contributed to the phenotype that we observed. Additionally, adding exogenous SHH into the mesenchyme of RCAS-Noggin-infected embryos did not restore Bmp2 and Bmp4 to a normal pattern of expression. These data indicate that BMP signaling mediates interactions between tissues in the FNP that regulate FEZ formation; and that the correct pattern of Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not Bmp7, expression in the FNP mesenchyme requires signaling by the BMP pathway.

  10. Fstl1 Antagonizes BMP Signaling and Regulates Ureter Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianfeng; Yu, Mingyan; Zhang, Fangxiong; Sha, Haibo; Gao, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway plays important roles in urinary tract development although the detailed regulation of its activity in this process remains unclear. Here we report that follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), encoding a secreted extracellular glycoprotein, is expressed in developing ureter and antagonizes BMP signaling activity. Mouse embryos carrying disrupted Fstl1 gene displayed prominent hydroureter arising from proximal segment and ureterovesical junction defects. These defects were associated with significant reduction in ureteric epithelial cell proliferation at E15.5 and E16.5 as well as absence of subepithelial ureteral mesenchymal cells in the urinary tract at E16.5 and E18.5. At the molecular level, increased BMP signaling was found in Fstl1 deficient ureters, indicated by elevated pSmad1/5/8 activity. In vitro study also indicated that Fstl1 can directly bind to ALK6 which is specifically expressed in ureteric epithelial cells in developing ureter. Furthermore, Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, which is crucial for differentiation of ureteral subepithelial cell proliferation, was also impaired in Fstl1-/- ureter. Altogether, our data suggest that Fstl1 is essential in maintaining normal ureter development by antagonizing BMP signaling. PMID:22485132

  11. Inhibition of p70S6K2 down-regulates Hedgehog/GLI pathway in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotani Hidehito

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hedgehog (HH pathway promotes tumorigenesis in a diversity of cancers. Activation of the HH signaling pathway is caused by overexpression of HH ligands or mutations in the components of the HH/GLI1 cascade, which lead to increased transactivation of GLI transcription factors. Although negative kinase regulators that antagonize the activity of GLI transcription factors have been reported, including GSK3β, PKA and CK1s, little is known regarding positive kinase regulators that are suitable for use on cancer therapeutic targets. The present study attempted to identify kinases whose silencing inhibits HH/GLI signalling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Results To find positive kinase regulators in the HH pathway, kinome-wide siRNA screening was performed in a NSCLC cell line, A549, harboring the GLI regulatory reporter gene. This showed that p70S6K2-silencing remarkably reduced GLI reporter gene activity. The decrease in the activity of the HH pathway caused by p70S6K2-inhibition was accompanied by significant reduction in cell viability. We next investigated the mechanism for p70S6K2-mediated inhibition of GLI1 transcription by hypothesizing that GSK3β, a negative regulator of the HH pathway, is activated upon p70S6K2-silencing. We found that phosphorylated-GSK3β (Ser9 was reduced by p70S6K2-silencing, causing a decreased level of GLI1 protein. Finally, to further confirm the involvement of p70S6K2 in GLI1 signaling, down-regulation in GLI-mediated transcription by PI3KCA-inhibition was confirmed, establishing the pivotal role of the PI3K/p70S6K2 pathway in GLI1 cascade regulation. Conclusion We report herein that inhibition of p70S6K2, known as a downstream effector of the PI3K pathway, remarkably decreases GLI-mediated transactivation in NSCLC by reducing phosphorylated-GSK3β followed by GLI1 degradation. These results infer that p70S6K2 is a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC with hyperactivated HH/GLI pathway.

  12. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuiping Yang Wenlin Chen Yongbin Chen Jin Jiang

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary proteins, Evc and Evc2, the products of human disease genes responsible for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, act downstream of Smo to transduce the Hh signal...

  13. Tibial hemimelia-polydactyly-five-fingered hand syndrome associated with a 404 G>A mutation in a distant sonic hedgehog cis-regulator (ZRS): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Tae-Joon; Baek, Goo Hyun; Lee, Hey-Ran; Moon, Hyuk Joo; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho

    2013-05-01

    Tibial hemimelia-polydactyly-triphalangeal thumb syndrome is a distinct congenital limb anomaly complex, whose association with the 404 G>A mutation in a distant sonic hedgehog cis-regulator (ZRS) was suggested. The authors report a sporadic case of bilateral tibial hemimelia-preaxial polydactyly-five-fingered hands harboring the same mutation. This case further supports a causal relationship between this mutation and the phenotype.

  14. Inhibition of CaMKK2 Enhances Fracture Healing by Stimulating Indian Hedgehog Signaling and Accelerating Endochondral Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Justin N; Kambrath, Anuradha Valiya; Patel, Roshni B; Kang, Kyung Shin; Mével, Elsa; Li, Yong; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Pucylowski, Austin J; Hassert, Mariah A; Voor, Michael J; Kacena, Melissa A; Thompson, William R; Warden, Stuart J; Burr, David B; Allen, Matthew R; Robling, Alexander G; Sankar, Uma

    2018-01-03

    Approximately ten percent of all bone fractures do not heal, resulting in patient morbidity and healthcare costs. However, no pharmacological treatments are currently available to promote efficient bone healing. Inhibition of Ca2+ /calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) reverses age-associated loss of trabecular and cortical bone volume and strength in mice. In the current study, we investigated the role of CaMKK2 in bone fracture healing and show that its pharmacological inhibition using STO-609 accelerates early cellular and molecular events associated with endochondral ossification, resulting in a more rapid and efficient healing of the fracture. Within 7 days post-fracture, treatment with STO-609 resulted in enhanced Indian hedgehog signaling, paired-related homeobox (PRX1)-positive mesenchymal stem cell recruitment, chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy, along with elevated expression of osterix, vascular endothelial growth factor and type 1 collagen at the fracture callus. Early deposition of primary bone by osteoblasts resulted in STO-609 treated mice possessing significantly higher callus bone volume by 14 days following fracture. Subsequent rapid maturation of the bone matrix bestowed fractured bones in STO-609 treated animals with significantly higher torsional strength and stiffness by 28 days post-injury, indicating accelerated healing of the fracture. Previous studies indicate that fixed and closed femoral fractures in the mice take 35 days to fully heal without treatment. Therefore, our data suggest that STO-609 potentiates a 20% acceleration of the bone healing process. Moreover, inhibiting CaMKK2 also imparted higher mechanical strength and stiffness at the contralateral cortical bone within 4 weeks of treatment. Taken together, the data presented here underscore the therapeutic potential of targeting CaMKK2 to promote efficacious and rapid healing of bone fractures and as a mechanism to strengthen normal bones. This

  15. MRT-92 inhibits Hedgehog signaling by blocking overlapping binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the Smoothened receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Lucile; Faure, Helene; Roudaut, Hermine; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Girard, Nicolas; Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier; Petricci, Elena; Taddei, Maurizio; Rognan, Didier; Ruat, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The Smoothened (Smo) receptor, a member of class F G protein-coupled receptors, is the main transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway implicated in a wide range of developmental and adult processes. Smo is the target of anticancer drugs that bind to a long and narrow cavity in the 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain. X-ray structures of human Smo (hSmo) bound to several ligands have revealed 2 types of 7TM-directed antagonists: those binding mostly to extracellular loops (site 1, e.g., LY2940680) and those penetrating deeply in the 7TM cavity (site 2, e.g., SANT-1). Here we report the development of the acylguanidine MRT-92, which displays subnanomolar antagonist activity against Smo in various Hh cell-based assays. MRT-92 inhibits rodent cerebellar granule cell proliferation induced by Hh pathway activation through pharmacologic (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.4 nM) or genetic manipulation. Using [(3)H]MRT-92 (Kd = 0.3 nM for hSmo), we created a comprehensive framework for the interaction of small molecule modulators with hSmo and for understanding chemoresistance linked to hSmo mutations. Guided by molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis data, our work convincingly confirms that MRT-92 simultaneously recognized and occupied both sites 1 and 2. Our data demonstrate the existence of a third type of Smo antagonists, those entirely filling the Smo binding cavity from the upper extracellular part to the lower cytoplasmic-proximal subpocket. Our studies should help design novel potent Smo antagonists and more effective therapeutic strategies for treating Hh-linked cancers and associated chemoresistance. © FASEB.

  16. Dynamic Bayesian Network Modeling of the Interplay between EGFR and Hedgehog Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Fröhlich

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of sonic Hegdehog (SHH signaling has been found to disrupt cellular differentiation in many human cancers and to increase proliferation. The SHH pathway is known to cross-talk with EGFR dependent signaling. Recent studies experimentally addressed this interplay in Daoy cells, which are presumable a model system for medulloblastoma, a highly malignant brain tumor that predominately occurs in children. Currently ongoing are several clinical trials for different solid cancers, which are designed to validate the clinical benefits of targeting the SHH in combination with other pathways. This has motivated us to investigate interactions between EGFR and SHH dependent signaling in greater depth. To our knowledge, there is no mathematical model describing the interplay between EGFR and SHH dependent signaling in medulloblastoma so far. Here we come up with a fully probabilistic approach using Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs. To build our model, we made use of literature based knowledge describing SHH and EGFR signaling and integrated gene expression (Illumina and cellular location dependent time series protein expression data (Reverse Phase Protein Arrays. We validated our model by sub-sampling training data and making Bayesian predictions on the left out test data. Our predictions focusing on key transcription factors and p70S6K, showed a high level of concordance with experimental data. Furthermore, the stability of our model was tested by a parametric bootstrap approach. Stable network features were in agreement with published data. Altogether we believe that our model improved our understanding of the interplay between two highly oncogenic signaling pathways in Daoy cells. This may open new perspectives for the future therapy of Hedghog/EGF-dependent solid tumors.

  17. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Juhász

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load.

  19. Anticancer drugs and the regulation of Hedgehog genes GLI1 and PTCH1, a comparative study in nonmelanoma skin cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe H; Bojesen, Sophie; Gehl, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans, comprising mainly basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). BCC proliferation is highly dependent on the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We aimed to investigate a panel of anticancer drugs with known activity against skin...... to the examined anticancer drugs were observed. Generally, 24-h drug exposure was sufficient to reduce cell viability. We found that 5-FU, MTX, and cisplatin significantly downregulated the expression of two genes controlled by the Hedgehog pathway (≤25-, 2.9-, and 12.5-fold, respectively, for GLI1 in UWBCC1...... cells at 48 h, Panticancer drugs in localized and enhanced topical treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Of importance in the clinical setting...

  20. Protecting the hedgerow: p53 and hedgehog pathway interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Louisa; Alman, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    A common environment for the Hedgehog (Subfamily: erinaceinae) is a row of shrubs and trees often used on farms for enclosing or separating fields, called a hedgerow. Maintenance of a continuous shrub border is important for shielding crops from weather damage, but also provides an ideal protective habitat for the hedgehog. Similar to its mammalian counterpart, the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway requires a controlled environment to regulate proper functioning of the cell. When allowed to run wild, constitutive activation of the Hh pathway results in tumorigenesis in different tissues types, including brain, skin and cartilage. With an additional loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity, an increase in tumor incidence, size and metastasis have been observed. p53 has a number of functions that can suppress tumor formation and growth in most, if not all Hh-related cancers, such as the inhibition of cell cycle progression and cell survival. Furthermore, increasing evidence of an interaction between p53 and Hedgehog signalling pathways suggests a critical role for the tumor suppressor activity of p53 in "protecting the hedgerow".

  1. Chemoresistance in prostate cancer cells is regulated by miRNAs and Hedgehog pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    Full Text Available Many prostate cancers relapse due to the generation of chemoresistance rendering first-line treatment drugs like paclitaxel (PTX ineffective. The present study aims to determine the role of miRNAs and Hedgehog (Hh pathway in chemoresistant prostate cancer and to evaluate the combination therapy using Hh inhibitor cyclopamine (CYA. Studies were conducted on PTX resistant DU145-TXR and PC3-TXR cell lines and clinical prostate tissues. Drug sensitivity and apoptosis assays showed significantly improved cytotoxicity with combination of PTX and CYA. To distinguish the presence of cancer stem cell like side populations (SP, Hoechst 33342 flow cytometry method was used. PTX resistant DU145 and PC3 cells, as well as human prostate cancer tissue possess a distinct SP fraction. Nearly 75% of the SP cells are in the G0/G1 phase compared to 62% for non-SP cells and have higher expression of stem cell markers as well. SP cell fraction was increased following PTX monotherapy and treatment with CYA or CYA plus PTX effectively reduced their numbers suggesting the effectiveness of combination therapy. SP fraction cells were allowed to differentiate and reanalyzed by Hoechst staining and gene expression analysis. Post differentiation, SP cells constitute 15.8% of total viable cells which decreases to 0.6% on treatment with CYA. The expression levels of P-gp efflux protein were also significantly decreased on treatment with PTX and CYA combination. MicroRNA profiling of DU145-TXR and PC3-TXR cells and prostate cancer tissue from the patients showed decreased expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs such as miR34a and miR200c. Treatment with PTX and CYA combination restored the expression of miR200c and 34a, confirming their role in modulating chemoresistance. We have shown that supplementing mitotic stabilizer drugs such as PTX with Hh-inhibitor CYA can reverse PTX chemoresistance and eliminate SP fraction in androgen independent, metastatic prostate cancer cell

  2. MYB Promotes Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer through Direct Transcriptional Up-regulation and Cooperative Action of Sonic Hedgehog and Adrenomedullin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Seema; Tyagi, Nikhil; Arora, Sumit; Carter, James E; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-07-29

    Extensive desmoplasia is a prominent pathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC) that not only impacts tumor development, but therapeutic outcome as well. Recently, we demonstrated a novel role of MYB, an oncogenic transcription factor, in PC growth and metastasis. Here we studied its effect on pancreatic tumor histopathology and associated molecular and biological mechanisms. Tumor-xenografts derived from orthotopic-inoculation of MYB-overexpressing PC cells exhibited far-greater desmoplasia in histological analyses compared with those derived from MYB-silenced PC cells. These findings were further confirmed by immunostaining of tumor-xenograft sections with collagen-I, fibronectin (major extracellular-matrix proteins), and α-SMA (well-characterized marker of myofibroblasts or activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)). Likewise, MYB-overexpressing PC cells provided significantly greater growth benefit to PSCs in a co-culture system as compared with the MYB-silenced cells. Interrogation of deep-sequencing data from MYB-overexpressing versus -silenced PC cells identified Sonic-hedgehog (SHH) and Adrenomedullin (ADM) as two differentially-expressed genes among others, which encode for secretory ligands involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. In-silico analyses predicted putative MYB-binding sites in SHH and ADM promoters, which was later confirmed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. A cooperative role of SHH and ADM in growth promotion of PSCs was confirmed in co-culture by using their specific-inhibitors and exogenous recombinant-proteins. Importantly, while SHH acted exclusively in a paracrine fashion on PSCs and influenced the growth of PC cells only indirectly, ADM could directly impact the growth of both PC cells and PSCs. In summary, we identified MYB as novel regulator of pancreatic tumor desmoplasia, which is suggestive of its diverse roles in PC pathobiology. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Inhibition of sonic hedgehog signaling blocks cell migration and growth but induces apoptosis via suppression of FOXQ1 in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pingyi; Chen, Lingling

    2018-01-01

    The present study explored the effects of Forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1) on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis via the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway in Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). Quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to detect FOXQ1 expression in 117 NKTCL patients and 120 healthy controls. Additionally, FOXQ1 expression in NKTCL cell lines (HANK-1, NK-92, SNK-6, SNT-8 and YT) was determined by western blotting and qRT-PCR. SNK-6 cells were transfected with FOXQ1-shRNA or Shh pathway inhibitor Cyclopamine/recombinant protein Shh. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and 5-bromo-2-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation assays were conducted to detect cell proliferation, flow cytometry was used to determine the cell cycle and cell apoptosis, and western blotting was used to detect protein expression. FOXQ1 expression was higher in NKTCL patients than in healthy controls, which was related to Ann Arbor stage, bone marrow involvement and the 5year survival rate in NKTCL patients. Moreover, FOXQ1 expression, pathological type, Ann Arbor stage, B symptom and bone marrow involvement were independent risk factors in NKTCL. Shh pathway-related proteins were down-regulated after transfection of SNK-6 cells with FOXQ1-shRNA. Additionally, SNK-6 cell proliferation was greatly reduced, the cell cycle was blocked at the G0/G1 phase, and the expression of CyclinD1 and CyclinE was markedly decreased, while an increase in cell apoptosis with elevated Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Caspase-3 and reduced B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2) were also observed. However, no significant alterations were observed between the FOXQ1-shRNA+Shh and Blank groups. The inhibition of FOXQ1 restricted NKTCL cell proliferation and growth but induced apoptosis via blocking the Shh signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The regulation of tooth morphogenesis is associated with epithelial cell proliferation and the expression of Sonic hedgehog through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Kentaro; Murofushi, Mayumi [Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Nakao, Kazuhisa; Morita, Ritsuko [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Ogawa, Miho [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Organ Technologies Inc., Tokyo 101-0048 (Japan); Tsuji, Takashi, E-mail: t-tsuji@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Organ Technologies Inc., Tokyo 101-0048 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bioengineered teeth regulated the contact area of epithelium and mesenchyme. {yields} The crown width is regulated by the contact area of the epithelium and mesenchyme. {yields} This regulation is associated with cell proliferation and Sonic hedgehog expression. {yields} The cusp number is correlated with the crown width of the bioengineered tooth. {yields} Cell proliferation and Shh expression areas regulate the tooth morphogenesis. -- Abstract: Ectodermal organs, such as the tooth, salivary gland, hair, and mammary gland, develop through reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Tooth morphologies are defined by the crown width and tooth length (macro-morphologies), and by the number and locations of the cusp and roots (micro-morphologies). In our current study, we report that the crown width of a bioengineered molar tooth, which was reconstructed using dissociated epithelial and mesenchymal cells via an organ germ method, can be regulated by the contact area between epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers. We further show that this is associated with cell proliferation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression in the inner enamel epithelium after the germ stage has formed a secondary enamel knot. We also demonstrate that the cusp number is significantly correlated with the crown width of the bioengineered tooth. These findings suggest that the tooth micro-morphology, i.e. the cusp formation, is regulated after the tooth width, or macro-morphology, is determined. These findings also suggest that the spatiotemporal patterning of cell proliferation and the Shh expression areas in the epithelium regulate the crown width and cusp formation of the developing tooth.

  5. Signaling pathways regulating the expression of Prx1 and Prx2 in the Chick Mandibular Mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-El; Mina, Mina

    2009-01-01

    Prx1 and Prx2 are members of the aristaless-related homeobox genes shown to play redundant but essential roles in morphogenesis of the mandibular processes. To gain insight into the signaling pathways that regulate expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme, we used the chick as a model system. We examined the patterns of gene expression in the face and the roles of signals derived from the epithelium on the expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme. Our results demonstrated stage-dependent roles of mandibular epithelium on the expression of Prx in the mandibular mesenchyme and provide evidence for positive roles of members of the fibroblast and hedgehog families derived from mandibular epithelium on the expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme. Our studies suggest that endothelin-1 signaling derived from the mesenchyme is involved in restricting the expression of Prx2 to the medial mandibular mesenchyme. PMID:18942149

  6. An Integrated Approach Identifies Nhlh1 and Insm1 as Sonic Hedgehog-regulated Genes in Developing Cerebellum and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico De Smaele

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood arising from deregulated cerebellar development. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh pathway plays a critical role in cerebellar development and its aberrant expression has been identified in MB. Gene expression profiling of cerebella from 1- to 14-day-old mice unveiled a cluster of genes whose expression correlates with the levels of Hedgehog (HH activity. From this cluster, we identified Insm1 and Nhlh1/NSCL1 as novel HH targets induced by Shh treatment in cultured cerebellar granule cell progenitors. Nhlh1 promoter was found to be bound and activated by Gli1 transcription factor. Remarkably, the expression of these genes is also upregulated in mouse and human HH-dependent MBs, suggesting that they may be either a part of the HH-induced tumorigenic process or a specific trait of HH-dependent tumor cells.

  7. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Pava

    Full Text Available The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184 or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506 produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability. Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1 receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis.

  8. In vivo imaging of Hedgehog pathway activation with a nuclear fluorescent reporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Mich

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh pathway is essential for embryonic development and tissue regeneration, and its dysregulation can lead to birth defects and tumorigenesis. Understanding how this signaling mechanism contributes to these processes would benefit from an ability to visualize Hedgehog pathway activity in live organisms, in real time, and with single-cell resolution. We report here the generation of transgenic zebrafish lines that express nuclear-localized mCherry fluorescent protein in a Gli transcription factor-dependent manner. As demonstrated by chemical and genetic perturbations, these lines faithfully report Hedgehog pathway state in individual cells and with high detection sensitivity. They will be valuable tools for studying dynamic Gli-dependent processes in vertebrates and for identifying new chemical and genetic regulators of the Hh pathway.

  9. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Mediates Resveratrol to Increase Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells After Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation Injury in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: There is interest in drugs and rehabilitation methods to enhance neurogenesis and improve neurological function after brain injury or degeneration. Resveratrol may enhance hippocampal neurogenesis and improve hippocampal atrophy in chronic fatigue mice and prenatally stressed rats. However, its effect and mechanism of neurogenesis after stroke is less well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling is crucial for neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain, but relatively little is known about the role of Shh signaling in resveratrol-enhanced neurogenesis after stroke. Methods: Neural stem cells (NSCs before oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R in vitro were pretreated with resveratrol with or without cyclopamine. Survival and proliferation of NSCs was assessed by the CCK8 assay and BrdU immunocytochemical staining. The expressions and activity of signaling proteins and mRNAs were detected by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and RT-PCR analysis. Results: Resveratrol significantly increased NSCs survival and proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner after OGD/R injury in vitro. At the same time, the expression of Patched-1, Smoothened (Smo, and Gli-1 proteins and mRNAs was upregulated, and Gli-1 entered the nucleus, which was inhibited by cyclopamine, a Smo inhibitor. Conclusion: Shh signaling mediates resveratrol to increase NSCs proliferation after OGD/R injury in vitro.

  10. Regulation of Hippo signalling by p38 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dashun; Li, Xiaojiao; Sun, Li; Huang, Ping; Ying, Hao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Jiarui; Song, Haiyun

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo signalling pathway has a crucial role in growth control during development, and its dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis. Recent studies uncover multiple upstream regulatory inputs into Hippo signalling, which affects phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yki/YAP/TAZ by Wts/Lats. Here we identify the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a new upstream branch of the Hippo pathway. In Drosophila, overexpression of MAPKK gene licorne (lic), or MAPKKK gene Mekk1, promotes Yki activity and induces Hippo target gene expression. Loss-of-function studies show that lic regulates Hippo signalling in ovary follicle cells and in the wing disc. Epistasis analysis indicates that Mekk1 and lic affect Hippo signalling via p38b and wts We further demonstrate that the Mekk1-Lic-p38b cascade inhibits Hippo signalling by promoting F-actin accumulation and Jub phosphorylation. In addition, p38 signalling modulates actin filaments and Hippo signalling in parallel to small GTPases Ras, Rac1, and Rho1. Lastly, we show that p38 signalling regulates Hippo signalling in mammalian cell lines. The Lic homologue MKK3 promotes nuclear localization of YAP via the actin cytoskeleton. Upregulation or downregulation of the p38 pathway regulates YAP-mediated transcription. Our work thus reveals a conserved crosstalk between the p38 MAPK pathway and the Hippo pathway in growth regulation. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.

  11. PKA-mediated Gli2 and Gli3 phosphorylation is inhibited by Hedgehog signaling in cilia and reduced in Talpid3 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Chengbing; Wu, Chuanqing; Cao, Ting; Xu, Guoqiang; Meng, Qing; Wang, Baolin

    2017-09-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is thought to occur in primary cilia, but the molecular basis of Gli2 and Gli3 activation by Hh signaling in cilia is unknown. Similarly, how ciliary gene mutations result in reduced Gli3 processing that generates a repressor is also not clear. Here we show that Hh signaling inhibits Gli2 and Gli3 phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) in cilia. The cilia related gene Talpid3 (Ta3) mutation results in the reduced processing and phosphorylation of Gli2 and Gli3. Interestingly, Ta3 interacts and colocalizes with PKA regulatory subunit PKARIIβ at centrioles in the cell. The centriolar localization and PKA binding regions are located in the N- and C-terminal regions of Ta3, respectively. PKARIIβ fails to localize at centrioles in some Ta3 mutant cells. Therefore, our study provides the direct evidence that Gli2 and Gli3 are dephosphorylated and activated in cilia and that impaired Gli2 and Gli3 processing in Ta3 mutant is at least in part due to a decrease in Gli2 and Gli3 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism reduce proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors in rat offspring by downregulation of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wei, Wei; Song, Binbin; Min, Hui; Yu, Ye; Lei, Xibing; Zhao, Ming; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID)-induced hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism during development result in dysfunction of the central nervous system, affecting psychomotor and motor function, although the underlying mechanisms causing these alterations are still unclear. Therefore, our aim is to study the effects of developmental hypothyroxinemia, caused by mild ID, and developmental hypothyroidism, caused by severe ID or methimazole (MMZ), on the proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs), an excellent experimental model of cerebellar development and function. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is essential for CGNP proliferation, and as such, its activation is also investigated here. A maternal hypothyroxinemia model was established in Wistar rats by administrating a mild ID diet, and two maternal hypothyroidism models were developed either by administrating a severe ID diet or MMZ water. Our results showed that hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism reduced proliferation of CGNPs on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14, and PN21. Accordingly, the mean intensity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki67 nuclear antigen immunofluorescence was reduced in the mild ID, severe ID, and MMZ groups. Moreover, maternal hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism reduced expression of the Shh signaling pathway on PN7, PN14, and PN21. Our study supports the hypothesis that developmental hypothyroxinemia induced by mild ID, and hypothyroidism induced by severe ID or MMZ, reduce the proliferation of CGNPs, which may be ascribed to the downregulation of the Shh signaling pathway.

  13. Sonic hedgehog and FGF8: inadequate signals for the differentiation of a dopamine phenotype in mouse and human neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, N D; Iacovitti, L

    2001-05-01

    Embryonic mouse striatal neurons and human neurons derived from the NT2/hNT stem cell line can be induced, in culture, to express the dopaminergic (DA) biosynthetic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The novel expression of TH in these cells is signaled by the synergistic interaction of factors present in the media, such as fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) and one of several possible coactivators [DA, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), or forskolin]. Similarly, in vivo, it has recently been reported that the expression of TH in the developing midbrain is mediated by the synergy of FGF8 and the patterning molecule sonic hedgehog (Shh). In the present study, we examined whether the putative in vivo DA differentiation factors can similarly signal TH in our in vitro cell systems. We found that FGF8 and Shh induced TH expression in fewer than 2% of NT2/hNT cells and less than 5% of striatal neurons. The latter could be amplified to as much as 30% by increasing the concentration of growth factor 10-fold or by the addition of other competent coactivators (IBMX/forskolin, TPA, and DA). Additivity/inhibitor experiments indicated that FGF8 worked through traditional tyrosine kinase-initiated MAP/MEK signaling pathways. However, the Shh signal transduction cascade remained unclear. These data suggest that cues effective in vivo may be less successful in promoting the differentiation of a DA phenotype in mouse and human neurons in culture. Thus, our ability to generate DA neurons from different cell lines, for use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, will depend on the identification of appropriate differentiation signals for each cell type under investigation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J. Mooney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall.

  15. Widening the mutation spectrum of EVC and EVC2: ectopic expression of Weyer variants in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts disrupts Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Maria; Lapunzina, Pablo; Lim, Derek; Zannolli, Raffaella; Bartholdi, Deborah; Wollnik, Bernd; Al-Ajlouni, Othman; Eid, Suhair S; Cox, Helen; Buoni, Sabrina; Hayek, Joseph; Martinez-Frias, Maria L; Antonio, Perez-Aytes; Temtamy, Samia; Aglan, Mona; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2009-12-01

    Autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and autosomal dominant Weyer acrodental dysostosis are allelic conditions caused by mutations in EVC or EVC2. We performed a mutation screening study in 36 EvC cases and 3 cases of Weyer acrodental dysostosis, and identified pathogenic changes either in EVC or in EVC2 in all cases. We detected 40 independent EVC/EVC2 mutations of which 29 were novel changes in Ellis-van Creveld cases and 2 were novel mutations identified in Weyer pedigrees. Of interest one EvC patient had a T>G nucleotide substitution in intron 7 of EVC (c.940-150T>G), which creates a new donor splice site and results in the inclusion of a new exon. The T>G substitution is at nucleotide +5 of the novel 5' splice site. The three Weyer mutations occurred in the final exon of EVC2 (exon 22), suggesting that specific residues encoded by this exon are a key part of the protein. Using murine versions of EVC2 exon 22 mutations we demonstrate that the expression of a Weyer variant, but not the expression of a truncated protein that mimics an Ellis-van Creveld syndrome mutation, impairs Hedgehog signal transduction in NIH 3T3 cells in keeping with its dominant effect.

  16. The pleiotropic mouse phenotype extra-toes spotting is caused by translation initiation factor Eif3c mutations and is associated with disrupted sonic hedgehog signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Derek E.; Luetkemeier, Erin S.; Bao, Xiaozhong; Loftus, Stacie K.; Mackem, Susan; Yang, Yingzi; Pavan, William J.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2011-01-01

    Polydactyly is a common malformation and can be an isolated anomaly or part of a pleiotropic syndrome. The elucidation of the mutated genes that cause polydactyly provides insight into limb development pathways. The extra-toes spotting (Xs) mouse phenotype manifests anterior polydactyly, predominantly in the forelimbs, with ventral hypopigmenation. The mapping of XsJ to chromosome 7 was confirmed, and the interval was narrowed to 322 kb using intersubspecific crosses. Two mutations were identified in eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit C (Eif3c). An Eif3c c.907C>T mutation (p.Arg303X) was identified in XsJ, and a c.1702_1758del mutation (p.Leu568_Leu586del) was identified in extra-toes spotting-like (Xsl), an allele of XsJ. The effect of the XsJ mutation on the SHH/GLI3 pathway was analyzed by in situ hybridization analysis, and we show that Xs mouse embryos have ectopic Shh and Ptch1 expression in the anterior limb. In addition, anterior limb buds show aberrant Gli3 processing, consistent with perturbed SHH/GLI3 signaling. Based on the occurrence of Eif3c mutations in 2 Xs lines and haploinsufficiency of the XsJ allele, we conclude that the Xs phenotype is caused by a mutation in Eif3c, a component of the translation initiation complex, and that the phenotype is associated with aberrant SHH/GLI3 signaling.—Gildea, D. E., Luetkemeier, E. S., Bao, X., Loftus, S. K., Mackem, S., Yang, Y., Pavan, W. J., Biesecker, L. G. The pleiotropic mouse phenotype extra-toes spotting is caused by translation initiation factor Eif3c mutations and is associated with disrupted sonic hedgehog signaling. PMID:21292980

  17. Outfoxing the Hedgehog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Jim Collins's "Good to Great" has attained near-scriptural status in organizations, including nonprofits, which Collins says constitute a third of his readers. The pivot point in "Good to Great" is the Hedgehog Concept. The "Hedgehog Concept" (HC), this author claims, is dangerous for schools because it distorts the nature of education. As Collins…

  18. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have b...... been identified and the specific roles have been investigated by genetic and cell biological methods. The present review presents an overview of the principal signaling pathways involved in regulating murine pancreatic growth, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation....

  19. Rho1 regulates signaling events required for proper Drosophila embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magie, Craig R; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2005-02-01

    The Rho small GTPase has been implicated in many cellular processes, including actin cytoskeletal regulation and transcriptional activation. The molecular mechanisms underlying Rho function in many of these processes are not yet clear. Here we report that in Drosophila, reduction of maternal Rho1 compromises signaling pathways consistent with defects in membrane trafficking events. These mutants fail to maintain expression of the segment polarity genes engrailed (en), wingless (wg), and hedgehog (hh), contributing to a segmentation phenotype. Formation of the Wg protein gradient involves the internalization of Wg into vesicles. The number of these Wg-containing vesicles is reduced in maternal Rho1 mutants, suggesting a defect in endocytosis. Consistent with this, stripes of cytoplasmic beta-catenin that accumulate in response to Wg signaling are narrower in these mutants relative to wild type. Additionally, the amount of extracellular Wg protein is reduced in maternal Rho1 mutants, indicating a defect in secretion. Signaling pathways downregulated by endocytosis, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Torso pathways, are hyperactivated in maternal Rho1 mutants, consistent with a general role for Rho1 in regulating signaling events governing proper patterning during Drosophila development.

  20. The Meckel syndrome- associated protein MKS1 functionally interacts with components of the BBSome and IFT complexes to mediate ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Goetz

    Full Text Available The importance of primary cilia in human health is underscored by the link between ciliary dysfunction and a group of primarily recessive genetic disorders with overlapping clinical features, now known as ciliopathies. Many of the proteins encoded by ciliopathy-associated genes are components of a handful of multi-protein complexes important for the transport of cargo to the basal body and/or into the cilium. A key question is whether different complexes cooperate in cilia formation, and whether they participate in cilium assembly in conjunction with intraflagellar transport (IFT proteins. To examine how ciliopathy protein complexes might function together, we have analyzed double mutants of an allele of the Meckel syndrome (MKS complex protein MKS1 and the BBSome protein BBS4. We find that Mks1; Bbs4 double mutant mouse embryos exhibit exacerbated defects in Hedgehog (Hh dependent patterning compared to either single mutant, and die by E14.5. Cells from double mutant embryos exhibit a defect in the trafficking of ARL13B, a ciliary membrane protein, resulting in disrupted ciliary structure and signaling. We also examined the relationship between the MKS complex and IFT proteins by analyzing double mutant between Mks1 and a hypomorphic allele of the IFTB component Ift172. Despite each single mutant surviving until around birth, Mks1; Ift172avc1 double mutants die at mid-gestation, and exhibit a dramatic failure of cilia formation. We also find that Mks1 interacts genetically with an allele of Dync2h1, the IFT retrograde motor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the MKS transition zone complex cooperates with the BBSome to mediate trafficking of specific trans-membrane receptors to the cilium. Moreover, the genetic interaction of Mks1 with components of IFT machinery suggests that the transition zone complex facilitates IFT to promote cilium assembly and structure.

  1. The Meckel syndrome- associated protein MKS1 functionally interacts with components of the BBSome and IFT complexes to mediate ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Sarah C; Bangs, Fiona; Barrington, Chloe L; Katsanis, Nicholas; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2017-01-01

    The importance of primary cilia in human health is underscored by the link between ciliary dysfunction and a group of primarily recessive genetic disorders with overlapping clinical features, now known as ciliopathies. Many of the proteins encoded by ciliopathy-associated genes are components of a handful of multi-protein complexes important for the transport of cargo to the basal body and/or into the cilium. A key question is whether different complexes cooperate in cilia formation, and whether they participate in cilium assembly in conjunction with intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. To examine how ciliopathy protein complexes might function together, we have analyzed double mutants of an allele of the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex protein MKS1 and the BBSome protein BBS4. We find that Mks1; Bbs4 double mutant mouse embryos exhibit exacerbated defects in Hedgehog (Hh) dependent patterning compared to either single mutant, and die by E14.5. Cells from double mutant embryos exhibit a defect in the trafficking of ARL13B, a ciliary membrane protein, resulting in disrupted ciliary structure and signaling. We also examined the relationship between the MKS complex and IFT proteins by analyzing double mutant between Mks1 and a hypomorphic allele of the IFTB component Ift172. Despite each single mutant surviving until around birth, Mks1; Ift172avc1 double mutants die at mid-gestation, and exhibit a dramatic failure of cilia formation. We also find that Mks1 interacts genetically with an allele of Dync2h1, the IFT retrograde motor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the MKS transition zone complex cooperates with the BBSome to mediate trafficking of specific trans-membrane receptors to the cilium. Moreover, the genetic interaction of Mks1 with components of IFT machinery suggests that the transition zone complex facilitates IFT to promote cilium assembly and structure.

  2. Foxf genes integrate tbx5 and hedgehog pathways in the second heart field for cardiac septation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Hoffmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Second Heart Field (SHF has been implicated in several forms of congenital heart disease (CHD, including atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs. Identifying the SHF gene regulatory networks required for atrioventricular septation is therefore an essential goal for understanding the molecular basis of AVSDs. We defined a SHF Hedgehog-dependent gene regulatory network using whole genome transcriptional profiling and GLI-chromatin interaction studies. The Forkhead box transcription factors Foxf1a and Foxf2 were identified as SHF Hedgehog targets. Compound haploinsufficiency for Foxf1a and Foxf2 caused atrioventricular septal defects, demonstrating the biological relevance of this regulatory network. We identified a Foxf1a cis-regulatory element that bound the Hedgehog transcriptional regulators GLI1 and GLI3 and the T-box transcription factor TBX5 in vivo. GLI1 and TBX5 synergistically activated transcription from this cis-regulatory element in vitro. This enhancer drove reproducible expression in vivo in the posterior SHF, the only region where Gli1 and Tbx5 expression overlaps. Our findings implicate Foxf genes in atrioventricular septation, describe the molecular underpinnings of the genetic interaction between Hedgehog signaling and Tbx5, and establish a molecular model for the selection of the SHF gene regulatory network for cardiac septation.

  3. Inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway by Thiazole Antibiotic Thiostrepton Attenuates the CD44+/CD24-Stem-Like Population and Sphere-Forming Capacity in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC represents a particular clinical challenge because these cancers do not respond to endocrine therapy or other available targeted agents. The lack of effective agents and obvious targets are major challenges in treating TNBC. In this study we explored the cytostatic effect of thiazole ring containing antibiotic drug thiostrepton on TNBC cell lines and investigated the molecular mechanism. Methods: Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Cell surface marker was monitored by FCM. Western blot was applied to assess the protein expression levels of target genes. Results: We found that thiostrepton remarkably suppressed the CD44+/CD24- stem-like population and sphere forming capacity of TNBC cell lines. Notably, we showed for the first time that thiostrepton exerted its pharmacological action by targeting sonic hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway. Thiostrepton repressed SHH ligand expression and reduced Gli-1 nuclear localization in TNBC cell line. Furthermore, the downstream target of SHH signaling undergone dose-dependent, rapid, and sustained loss of mRNA transcript level after thiostrepton treatment. Finally, we showed that SHH ligand was essential for maintaining CD44+/CD24- stem-like population in TNBC cell line. Conclusion: We conclude that thiostrepton suppresses the CD44+/CD24- stem-like population through inhibition of SHH signaling pathway. Our results give a new insight into the mechanism of thiostrepton anti-tumor activity and suggest thiostrepton as a promising agent that targets hedgehog signaling pathway in TNBC.

  4. F3/contactin and TAG1 play antagonistic roles in the regulation of sonic hedgehog-induced cerebellar granule neuron progenitor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenaki, Dia; Martin, Indira B; Yoshida, Lynn; Ohyama, Kyoji; Gennarini, Gianfranco; Grumet, Martin; Sakurai, Takeshi; Furley, Andrew J W

    2011-02-01

    Modulation of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway is a crucial factor in cerebellar morphogenesis. Stimulation of granule neuron progenitor (GNP) proliferation is a central function of SHH signalling, but how this is controlled locally is not understood. We show that two sequentially expressed members of the contactin (CNTN) family of adhesion molecules, TAG1 and F3, act antagonistically to control SHH-induced proliferation: F3 suppresses SHH-induced GNP proliferation and induces differentiation, whereas TAG1 antagonises F3. Production of GNPs in TAG1-null mice is delayed and reduced. F3 and TAG1 colocalise on GNPs with the related L1-like adhesion molecule NrCAM, and F3 fails to suppress the SHH-induced proliferation of NrCAM-deficient GNPs. We show that F3 and SHH both primarily affect a group of intermediate GNPs (IPs), which, though actively dividing, also express molecules associated with differentiation, including β-tubulin III (TuJ1) and TAG1. In vivo, intermediate progenitors form a discrete layer in the middle of the external germinal layer (mEGL), while F3 becomes expressed on the axons of postmitotic granule neurons as they leave the inner EGL (iEGL). We propose, therefore, that F3 acts as a localised signal in the iEGL that induces SHH-stimulated cells in the overlying mEGL to exit cell cycle and differentiate. By contrast, expression of TAG1 on GNPs antagonises this signal in the mEGL, preventing premature differentiation and sustaining GNP expansion in a paracrine fashion. Together, these findings indicate that CNTN and L1-like proteins play a significant role in modulating SHH-induced neuronal precursor proliferation.

  5. Proteoglycan interactions with Sonic Hedgehog specify mitogenic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Balasubramanian, Srividya; Witt, Rochelle M.; Nazemi, Kellie J.; Choi, Yoojin; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Walsh, Carolyn O.; Thompson, Margaret; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) has dual roles in vertebrate development, as it promotes progenitor cell proliferation and induces tissue patterning. Here we show mitogenic and patterning functions of Shh can be uncoupled from one another. Using a genetic approach to selectively inhibit Shh-proteoglycan interactions in a mouse model, we show binding of Shh to proteoglycans is required for proliferation of neural stem/precursor cells but not for tissue patterning. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulate both spatial and temporal features of Shh signaling. Proteoglycans localize Shh to specialized mitogenic niches and also act at the single cell level to regulate the duration of Shh signaling, thereby promoting a gene expression program important for cell division. As activation of the Shh pathway is a feature of diverse human cancers, selective stimulation of proliferation by Shh-proteoglycan interactions may also figure prominently in neoplastic growth. PMID:19287388

  6. KIF13B establishes a CAV1-enriched microdomain at the ciliary transition zone to promote Sonic hedgehog signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Mogensen, Johanne Bay; Morthorst, Stine Kjær

    2017-01-01

    of Smoothened (SMO), which is disrupted by disease-causing mutations in TZ components. Here we identify kinesin-3 motor protein KIF13B as a novel member of the RPGRIP1N-C2 domain-containing protein family and show that KIF13B regulates TZ membrane composition and ciliary SMO accumulation. KIF13B is upregulated...

  7. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A. N.; Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2015-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed c...

  8. A Novel Strategy to Inhibit Hedgehog Signaling and Control Growth of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    approach is the slow image acquisition time and measurement of final spheroid size. Time lapse photography is difficult.The approach works for all the...mediated signaling: a novel therapeutic paradigm for androgen independent prostate cancer. Apoptosis, 2010. 15(2): p. 153-61. 4. Graham, T.R., K.C...Histopathol, 2008. 23(10): p. 1279-90. 10. Paule, B., et al., The NF-kappaB/IL-6 pathway in metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer: new therapeutic

  9. Discovery of 1-(3-aryl-4-chlorophenyl)-3-(p-aryl)urea derivatives against breast cancer by inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Hedgehog signalings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Sun, Qinsheng; Song, Lu; Gao, Chunmei; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yuzong; Jiang, Yuyang

    2017-12-01

    PI3K/Akt/mTOR and hedgehog (Hh) signalings are two important pathways in breast cancer, which are usually connected with the drug resistance and cancer migration. Many studies indicated that PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors and Hh inhibitors displayed synergistic effects, and the combination of the two signaling drugs could delay drug resistance and inhibit cancer migration in breast cancer. Therefore, the development of molecules simultaneously inhibiting these two pathways is urgent needed. Based on the structures of PI3K inhibitor buparlisib and Hh inhibitor vismodegib, a series of hybrid structures were designed and synthesized utilizing rational drug design and computer-based drug design. Several compounds displayed excellent antiproliferative activities against several breast cancer cell lines, including triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) MDA-MB-231 cell. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the representative compound 9i could inhibit both PI3K/Akt/mTOR and hedgehog (Hh) signalings by inhibiting the phosphorylation of S6K and Akt as well as decreasing the SAG elevated expression of Gli1. Compound 9i could also induce apoptosis remarkably in T47D and MDA-MB-231 cells. In the transwell assay, 9i showed significant inhibition on the migration of MDA-MB-231. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Han, Zhe [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Chuai, Manli [College of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Wang, Li-jing [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka [Stem Cell and Regeneration Thematic Research Programme, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Geng, Jian-guo, E-mail: jgeng@umich.edu [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  11. Membrane mechanisms and intracellular signalling in cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Dunham, Philip B.

    1995-01-01

    Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation.......Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation....

  12. The extracellular domain of Smoothened regulates ciliary localization and is required for high-level Hh signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanstad, Pia; Santos, Nicole; Corbit, Kevin C; Scherz, Paul J; Trinh, Le A; Salvenmoser, Willi; Huisken, Jan; Reiter, Jeremy F; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2009-06-23

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins function as morphogens to pattern developing tissues and control cell proliferation. The seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for the activation of all levels of Hh signaling. However, the mechanisms by which Smo differentially activates low- or high-level Hh signaling are not known. Here we show that a newly identified mutation in the extracellular domain (ECD) of zebrafish Smo attenuates Smo signaling. The Smo agonist purmorphamine induces the stabilization, ciliary translocation, and high-level signaling of wild-type Smo. In contrast, purmorphamine induces the stabilization but not the ciliary translocation or high-level signaling of the Smo ECD mutant protein. Surprisingly, a truncated form of Smo that lacks the cysteine-rich domain of the ECD localizes to the cilium but is unable to activate high-level Hh signaling. We also present evidence that cilia may be required for Hh signaling in early zebrafish embryos. These data indicate that the ECD, previously thought to be dispensable for vertebrate Smo function, both regulates Smo ciliary localization and is essential for high-level Hh signaling.

  13. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Charu Shukla, Radhika Basheer Department of Psychiatry, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, West Roxbury, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism. Keywords: sleep, energy balance, hypothalamus, metabolism, homeostasis

  14. Identification of conserved regions and residues within Hedgehog acyltransferase critical for palmitoylation of Sonic Hedgehog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Buglino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a palmitoylated protein that plays key roles in mammalian development and human cancers. Palmitoylation of Shh is required for effective long and short range Shh-mediated signaling. Attachment of palmitate to Shh is catalyzed by Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat, a member of the membrane bound O-acyl transferase (MBOAT family of multipass membrane proteins. The extremely hydrophobic composition of MBOAT proteins has limited their biochemical characterization. Except for mutagenesis of two conserved residues, there has been no structure-function analysis of Hhat, and the regions of the protein required for Shh palmitoylation are unknown.Here we undertake a systematic approach to identify residues within Hhat that are required for protein stability and/or enzymatic activity. We also identify a second, novel MBOAT homology region (residues 196-234 that is required for Hhat activity. In total, ten deletion mutants and eleven point mutants were generated and analyzed. Truncations at the N- and C-termini of Hhat yielded inactive proteins with reduced stability. Four Hhat mutants with deletions within predicted loop regions and five point mutants retained stability but lost palmitoylation activity. We purified two point mutants, W378A and H379A, with defective Hhat activity. Kinetic analyses revealed alterations in apparent K(m and V(max for Shh and/or palmitoyl CoA, changes that likely explain the catalytic defects observed for these mutants.This study has pinpointed specific regions and multiple residues that regulate Hhat stability and catalysis. Our findings should be applicable to other MBOAT proteins that mediate lipid modification of Wnt proteins and ghrelin, and should serve as a model for understanding how secreted morphogens are modified by palmitoyl acyltransferases.

  15. Digital automatic regulator of seismic signal amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirin, V.V.; Kazanin, G.S.; Remizov, V.Ya.; Slutskovskiy, A.I.

    1978-05-05

    A digital automatic regulator of seismic signal amplitudes is suggested. It contains parallel connected chains consisting of a source of input information, control assembly, outlet recorder, as well as first shift and arithmetic recorders, summator, second and third shift recorders connected in series, and recorder for the order code also connected in series. In order to improve the quality of regulation and for fast response, the device has an additional transformer of the code for the stages of momentary automatic amplification regulator and frequency circuit. In this case the input information source is connected to the inlet of the shift recorder and through the transformer of the stage code to the inlet of the arithmetic recorder, and through the frequency circuit to the inlet of the control assembly. The summator outlet is connected to the second inlet of the latter. The outlet of the control assembly is connected to the inlets of the outlet recorder, as well as the second and third shift recorders, and by the recorder of the order code through the first shift and arithmetic recorders to the first inlet of the summator. Its second inlet is connected to the outlet of the second shift recorder. Its two inlets are connected to the outlets of the third shift recorder and the recorder of the order code.

  16. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary inductive signal for taste placode formation, followed by taste papilla morphogenesis and taste bud differentiation, but the degree to which these later elements were direct or indirect consequences of β-catenin signaling was not explored. Here, we define discrete spatiotemporal functions of β-catenin in fungiform taste bud development. Specifically, we show that early epithelial activation of β-catenin, before taste placodes form, diverts lingual epithelial cells from a taste bud fate. By contrast, β-catenin activation a day later within Shh+ placodes, expands taste bud precursors directly, but enlarges papillae indirectly. Further, placodal activation of β-catenin drives precocious differentiation of Type I glial-like taste cells, but not other taste cell types. Later activation of β-catenin within Shh+ precursors during papilla morphogenesis also expands taste bud precursors and accelerates Type I cell differentiation, but papilla size is no longer enhanced. Finally, although Shh regulates taste placode patterning, we find that it is dispensable for the accelerated Type I cell differentiation induced by β-catenin. PMID:26525674

  17. Protein phosphorylation in bcterial signaling and regulation

    KAUST Repository

    Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-26

    In 2003, it was demonstrated for the first time that bacteria possess protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), capable of phosphorylating other cellular proteins and regulating their activity. It soon became apparent that these kinases phosphorylate a number of protein substrates, involved in different cellular processes. More recently, we found out that BY-kinases can be activated by several distinct protein interactants, and are capable of engaging in cross-phosphorylation with other kinases. Evolutionary studies based on genome comparison indicate that BY-kinases exist only in bacteria. They are non-essential (present in about 40% bacterial genomes), and their knockouts lead to pleiotropic phenotypes, since they phosphorylate many substrates. Surprisingly, BY-kinase genes accumulate mutations at an increased rate (non-synonymous substitution rate significantly higher than other bacterial genes). One direct consequence of this phenomenon is no detectable co-evolution between kinases and their substrates. Their promiscuity towards substrates thus seems to be “hard-wired”, but why would bacteria maintain such promiscuous regulatory devices? One explanation is the maintenance of BY-kinases as rapidly evolving regulators, which can readily adopt new substrates when environmental changes impose selective pressure for quick evolution of new regulatory modules. Their role is clearly not to act as master regulators, dedicated to triggering a single response, but they might rather be employed to contribute to fine-tuning and improving robustness of various cellular responses. This unique feature makes BY-kinases a potentially useful tool in synthetic biology. While other bacterial kinases are very specific and their signaling pathways insulated, BY-kinase can relatively easily be engineered to adopt new substrates and control new biosynthetic processes. Since they are absent in humans, and regulate some key functions in pathogenic bacteria, they are also very promising

  18. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eNies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases, and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed.In this review we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease, and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  19. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualtrough, David, E-mail: david.qualtrough@uwe.ac.uk [Department of Biological, Biomedical & Analytical Sciences, University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos [School of Cellular & Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol, Medical Sciences Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-17

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  20. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Qualtrough

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, Cancers 2015, 7 1886 these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  1. Regulation of Hh/Gli signaling by dual ubiquitin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin

    2006-11-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway governs cell growth and patterning in animal development. Malfunction of several pathway components, including the key transcriptional effector Ci/Gli proteins, leads to a variety of human disorders including several malignancies. Ci/Gli activity is controlled by multi-layered regulatory mechanisms, the most prominent of which is the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In the absence of Hh, Ci/Gli is proteolytically processed into a truncated form that functions as a transcriptional repressor of the Hh pathway. Ci processing is mediated by an SCF (Skip1/Cul1/F-box protein) ubiquitin ligase in which the F-box protein Slimb/beta-TRCP bridges Ci to the ubiquitin ligase. Recent studies in Drosophila and mammalian cultured cells have demonstrated that sequential phosphorylation of Ci/Gli by PKA, GSK3, and CKI creates multiple docking sites that can recruit SCF(Slimb/beta-TRCP), which then promotes Ci/Gli ubiquitination followed by proteasome-mediated processing. Recently, an E3 ubiquitin ligase consisting of the BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric a Brac) protein HIB (Hh induced MATH and BTB protein) and Cullin 3 (Cul3) has been identified that acts in a negative feedback loop to fine-tune Hh signaling responses by degrading full length Ci. In eye imaginal discs where Hh signals coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation, HIB is highly expressed in the differentiating cells to prevent aberrant Hh signaling activity and ensure normal eye development. Tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of HIB and its homologs in vertebrates may provide a conserved mechanism for ensuring precision in spatial and temporal control of Hh signaling.

  2. A SHH-responsive signaling center in the forebrain regulates craniofacial morphogenesis via the facial ectoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2009-01-01

    Interactions among the forebrain, neural crest and facial ectoderm regulate development of the upper jaw. To examine these interactions, we activated the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway in the brain. Beginning 72 hours after activation of the SHH pathway, growth within the avian frontonasal process (FNP) was exaggerated in lateral regions and impaired in medial regions. This growth pattern is similar to that in mice and superimposed a mammalian-like morphology on the upper jaw. Jaw growth is controlled by signals from the frontonasal ectodermal zone (FEZ), and the divergent morphologies that characterize birds and mammals are accompanied by changes in the FEZ. In chicks there is a single FEZ spanning the FNP, but in mice both median nasal processes have a FEZ. In treated chicks, the FEZ was split into right and left domains that resembled the pattern present in mice. Additionally, we observed that, in the brain, fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) was downregulated, and signals in or near the nasal pit were altered. Raldh2 expression was expanded, whereas Fgf8, Wnt4, Wnt6 and Zfhx1b were downregulated. However, Wnt9b, and activation of the canonical WNT pathway, were unaltered in treated embryos. At later time points the upper beak was shortened owing to hypoplasia of the skeleton, and this phenotype was reproduced when we blocked the FGF pathway. Thus, the brain establishes multiple signaling centers within the developing upper jaw. Changes in organization of the brain that occur during evolution or as a result of disease can alter these centers and thereby generate morphological variation.

  3. Non-Canonical Hh Signaling in Cancer-Current Understanding and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongsheng; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-08-27

    As a major regulatory pathway for embryonic development and tissue patterning, hedgehog signaling is not active in most adult tissues, but is reactivated in a number of human cancer types. A major milestone in hedgehog signaling in cancer is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a smoothened inhibitor Vismodegib for treatment of basal cell carcinomas. Vismodegib can block ligand-mediated hedgehog signaling, but numerous additional clinical trials have failed to show significant improvements in cancer patients. Amounting evidence indicate that ligand-independent hedgehog signaling plays an essential role in cancer. Ligand-independent hedgehog signaling, also named non-canonical hedgehog signaling, generally is not sensitive to smoothened inhibitors. What we know about non-canonical hedgehog signaling in cancer, and how should we prevent its activation? In this review, we will summarize recent development of non-canonical hedgehog signaling in cancer, and will discuss potential ways to prevent this type of hedgehog signaling.

  4. Role of reactive oxygen species in extracellular signal-regulated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. 6-hydroxydopamine; mitogen activated protein kinase; Parkinson's disease; redox signalling. Abstract. A number of reports indicate the potential for redox signalling via extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) during neuronal injury. We have previously found that sustained ERK activation contributes ...

  5. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371685-11$15.00/0.

  6. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  7. Testosterone signaling and the regulation of spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, William H

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis and male fertility are dependent upon the presence of testosterone in the testis. In the absence of testosterone or the androgen receptor, spermatogenesis does not proceed beyond the meiosis stage. The major cellular target and translator of testosterone signals to developing germ cells is the Sertoli cell. In the Sertoli cell, testosterone signals can be translated directly to changes in gene expression (the classical pathway) or testosterone can activate kinases that may reg...

  8. The Hedgehog gene family of the cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis, and implications for understanding metazoan Hedgehog pathway evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, David Q; Magie, Craig R; Pang, Kevin; Martindale, Mark Q; Thomsen, Gerald H

    2008-01-15

    Hedgehog signaling is an important component of cell-cell communication during bilaterian development, and abnormal Hedgehog signaling contributes to disease and birth defects. Hedgehog genes are composed of a ligand ("hedge") domain and an autocatalytic intein ("hog") domain. Hedgehog (hh) ligands bind to a conserved set of receptors and activate downstream signal transduction pathways terminating with Gli/Ci transcription factors. We have identified five intein-containing genes in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, two of which (NvHh1 and NvHh2) contain definitive hedgehog ligand domains, suggesting that to date, cnidarians are the earliest branching metazoan phylum to possess definitive Hh orthologs. Expression analysis of NvHh1 and NvHh2, the receptor NvPatched, and a downstream transcription factor NvGli (a Gli3/Ci ortholog) indicate that these genes may have conserved roles in planar and trans-epithelial signaling during gut and germline development, while the three remaining intein-containing genes (NvHint1,2,3) are expressed in a cell-type-specific manner in putative neural precursors. Metazoan intein-containing genes that lack a hh ligand domain have previously only been identified within nematodes. However, we have identified intein-containing genes from both Nematostella and in two newly annotated lophotrochozoan genomes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that while nematode inteins may be derived from an ancestral true hedgehog gene, the newly identified cnidarian and lophotrochozoan inteins may be orthologous, suggesting that both true hedgehog and hint genes may have been present in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. Genomic surveys of N. vectensis suggest that most of the components of both protostome and deuterostome Hh signaling pathways are present in anthozoans and that some appear to have been lost in ecdysozoan lineages. Cnidarians possess many bilaterian cell-cell signaling pathways (Wnt, TGFbeta, FGF, and Hh) that appear to act in

  9. Planarian Hh signaling regulates regeneration polarity and links Hh pathway evolution to cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Jochen C; Gurley, Kyle A; Elliott, Sarah A; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2009-12-04

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays multiple essential roles during metazoan development, homeostasis, and disease. Although core protein components are highly conserved, the variations in Hh signal transduction mechanisms exhibited by existing model systems (Drosophila, fish, and mammals) are difficult to understand. We characterized the Hh pathway in planarians. Hh signaling is essential for establishing the anterior/posterior axis during regeneration by modulating wnt expression. Moreover, RNA interference methods to reduce signal transduction proteins Cos2/Kif27/Kif7, Fused, or Iguana do not result in detectable Hh signaling defects; however, these proteins are essential for planarian ciliogenesis. Our study expands the understanding of Hh signaling in the animal kingdom and suggests an ancestral mechanistic link between Hh signaling and the function of cilia.

  10. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Heppner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway.

  11. Notch 1 signaling regulates peripheral T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Todd N; Tang, Qizhi; Wolfe, Michael; He, Yiping; Pear, Warren S; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2004-04-01

    Notch signaling has been identified as an important regulator of leukocyte differentiation and thymic maturation. Less is known about the role of Notch signaling in regulating mature T cells. We examined the role of Notch 1 in regulating peripheral T cell activity in vitro and in vivo. Coligation of Notch 1 together with TCR and CD28 resulted in a dramatic inhibition of T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. This effect was dependent on presenilin activity and induced the expression of HES-1, suggestive of Notch 1 signaling. Biochemical analysis demonstrated an inhibition of AKT and GSK3beta phosphorylation following Notch 1 engagement while other biochemical signals such as TCR and ERK phosphorylation remained intact. Similar effects were observed in vivo in an adoptive transfer model. Therefore, Notch 1 signaling may play an important role in regulating naive T cell activation and homeostasis.

  12. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Krause, Michael W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kostrouch, Zdenek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kostrouchova, Marta, E-mail: marta.kostrouchova@lf1.cuni.cz [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  13. Dissecting the Role of Hedgehog Pathway in Murine Gonadal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Ivraym Boshra

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the universal pathways involved in animal development. This dissertation focuses on Hh role in the mammalian gonad development, which is a central part of mammalian sexual development and identity. The central dogma of mammalian sex development is that genetic sex determines the gonadal sex, which in turn…

  14. Intracellular calcium release and protein kinase C activation stimulate sonic hedgehog gene expression during gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Zavros, Yana; Tessier, Art; Waghray, Meghna; Lentz, Steve; Gumucio, Deborah; Todisco, Andrea; Merchant, Juanita L

    2010-12-01

    Hypochlorhydria during Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits gastric Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) expression. We investigated whether acid-secretory mechanisms regulate Shh gene expression through intracellular calcium (Ca2(+)(i))-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activation. We blocked Hedgehog signaling by transgenically overexpressing a secreted form of the Hedgehog interacting protein-1, a natural inhibitor of hedgehog ligands, which induced hypochlorhydria. Gadolinium, ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), PKC-overexpressing adenoviruses, and PKC inhibitors were used to modulate Ca(2+)(i)-release, PKC activity, and Shh gene expression in primary gastric cell, organ, and AGS cell line cultures. PKA hyperactivity was induced in the H(+)/K(+)-β-cholera-toxin-overexpressing mice. Mice that expressed secreted hedgehog-interacting protein-1 had lower levels of gastric acid (hypochlorhydria), reduced production of somatostatin, and increased gastrin gene expression. Hypochlorhydria in these mice repressed Shh gene expression, similar to the levels obtained with omeprazole treatment of wild-type mice. However, Shh expression also was repressed in the hyperchlorhydric H(+)/K(+)-β-cholera-toxin model with increased cAMP, suggesting that the regulation of Shh was not solely acid-dependent, but pertained to specific acid-stimulatory signaling pathways. Based on previous reports that Ca(2+)(i) release also stimulates acid secretion in parietal cells, we showed that gadolinium-, thapsigargin-, and carbachol-mediated release of Ca(2+)(i) induced Shh expression. Ca(2+)-chelation with BAPTA + EGTA reduced Shh expression. Overexpression of PKC-α, -β, and -δ (but not PKC-ϵ) induced an Shh gene expression. In addition, phorbol esters induced a Shh-regulated reporter gene. Secretagogues that stimulate

  15. Hedgehog Controls Quiescence and Activation of Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Ventricular-Subventricular Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Daynac

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the mechanisms controlling quiescence and activation of neural stem cells (NSCs is crucial for understanding brain repair. Here, we demonstrate that Hedgehog (Hh signaling actively regulates different pools of quiescent and proliferative NSCs in the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ, one of the main brain neurogenic niches. Specific deletion of the Hh receptor Patched in NSCs during adulthood upregulated Hh signaling in quiescent NSCs, progressively leading to a large accumulation of these cells in the V-SVZ. The pool of non-neurogenic astrocytes was not modified, whereas the activated NSC pool increased after a short period, before progressively becoming exhausted. We also showed that Sonic Hedgehog regulates proliferation of activated NSCs in vivo and shortens both their G1 and S-G2/M phases in culture. These data demonstrate that Hh orchestrates the balance between quiescent and activated NSCs, with important implications for understanding adult neurogenesis under normal homeostatic conditions or during injury.

  16. The retinoid anticancer signal: mechanisms of target gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, T.; Bohlken, A; Kuljaca, S; Lee, M.; Nguyen, T; S.; Smith; Cheung, B; Norris, M D; Haber, M; Holloway, A.J.; Bowtell, D D L; Marshall, G M

    2005-01-01

    Retinoids induce growth arrest, differentiation, and cell death in many cancer cell types. One factor determining the sensitivity or resistance to the retinoid anticancer signal is the transcriptional response of retinoid-regulated target genes in cancer cells. We used cDNA microarray to identify 31 retinoid-regulated target genes shared by two retinoid-sensitive neuroblastoma cell lines, and then sought to determine the relevance of the target gene responses to the retinoid anticancer signal...

  17. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2 of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJs of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN, e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs.Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9. A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9 and C. elegans (ascr#2 dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers.Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes.

  18. Hh signaling regulates patterning and morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arch-derived skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Mary E; Nguyen, Van; McCarthy, Neil Q; Eberhart, Johann K

    2012-09-01

    The proper function of the craniofacial skeleton requires the proper shaping of many individual skeletal elements. Neural crest cells generate much of the craniofacial skeleton and morphogenesis of skeletal elements occurs in transient, reiterated structures termed pharyngeal arches. The shape of individual elements depends upon intrinsic patterning within the neural crest as well as extrinsic signals to the neural crest from adjacent tissues within the arches. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is known to play roles in craniofacial development, yet its involvement in intrinsic and extrinsic patterning of the craniofacial skeleton is still not well understood. Here, we show that morphogenetic movements of the pharyngeal arches and patterning of the neural crest require Hh signaling. Loss of Hh signaling, in smoothened (smo) mutants, disrupts the expression of some Dlx genes as well as other markers of dorsal/ventral patterning of the neural crest. Transplantation of wild-type neural crest cells into smo mutants rescues this defect, demonstrating that the neural crest requires reception of Hh signals for proper patterning. Despite the rescue, morphogenesis of the facial skeleton is not fully recovered. Through transplant analyses, we find two additional requirements for Hh signaling. The endoderm requires the reception of Hh signals for proper morphogenetic movements of the pharyngeal arches and the neural crest require the reception of Hh signaling for the activity of a reverse signal that maintains sonic hedgehog expression in the endoderm. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hh signaling is essential to establish intrinsic and extrinsic patterning information for the craniofacial skeleton. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there have been tremendous progress in cancer research and treatment, the mortality caused by this disease is still very high. Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide and second leading cause of death in the United States of America. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer covers topics including the role of various signaling pathways in development, regulation of cell fate, tumor angiogenesis, duodenal neoplasias, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer, cancer development and progression, microRNA in cancer and epigenetic regulation of cancer.

  20. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  1. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  2. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  3. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) has emerged as an important regulator of peripheral T cell responses. However, whether there is endogenous retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling in developing thymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in thymocyte development remains unclear...... further enhanced in recently generated CD69+ CD4+ SP cells. To address the potential biological significance of RA signaling in developing thymocytes, we evaluated T cell development in CD4Cre-dnRAR mice, where RA signaling is blocked in thymocytes from the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage onwards due...... of this cell subset. Collectively, our data suggest a direct role for RA signaling in regulating thymocyte homeostasis and T cell development....

  4. Intracellular calcium-release and protein kinase C-activation stimulate sonic hedgehog gene expression during gastric acid secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Zavros, Yana; Tessier, Art; Waghray, Meghna; Lentz, Steve; Gumucio, Deborah; Todisco, Andrea; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypochlorhydria during Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits gastric Shh expression. We investigated whether acid-secretory mechanisms regulate Shh gene expression through Ca2+i-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-activation. Method We blocked Hedgehog signaling by transgenically overexpressing a secreted form of the Hedgehog interacting protein-1 (sHip-1), a natural inhibitor of hedgehog ligands, which induced hypochlorhydria. Gadolinium, EGTA+BAPTA, PKC-overexpressing adenoviruses, and PKC-inhibitors were used to modulate Ca2+i-release, PKC-activity and Shh gene expression in primary gastric cell, organ, and AGS cell line cultures. PKA hyperactivity was induced in the H+/K+-β-cholera-toxin overexpressing mice (Ctox). Results Mice that expressed sHip-1 had lower levels of gastric acid (hypochlorhydria), reduced production of somatostatin, and increased gastrin gene expression. Hypochlorhydria in these mice repressed Shh gene expression, similar to the levels obtained with omeprazole treatment of wild-type mice. However, Shh expression was also repressed in the hyperchlorhydric Ctox model with elevated cAMP, suggesting that the regulation of Shh was not solely acid-dependent, but pertained to specific acid-stimulatory signaling pathways. Based on previous reports that Ca2+i-release also stimulates acid secretion in parietal cells, we showed that gadolinium-, thapsigargin- and carbachol-mediated release of Ca2+i induced Shh expression. Ca2+-chelation with BAPTA+EGTA reduced Shh expression. Overexpression of PKC-α, -β and -δ (but not PKC-ε) induced Shh gene expression. In addition, phorbol esters induced a Shh-regulated reporter gene. Conclusion Secretagogues that stimulate gastric acid secretion induce Shh gene expression through increased Ca2+i-release and PKC activation. Shh might be the ligand transducing changes in gastric acidity to the regulation of G-cell secretion of gastrin. PMID:20816837

  5. Sonic hedgehog functions upstream of disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (disc1: implications for mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope J. Boyd

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available DISRUPTED-IN-SCHIZOPHRENIA (DISC1 has been one of the most intensively studied genetic risk factors for mental illness since it was discovered through positional mapping of a translocation breakpoint in a large Scottish family where a balanced chromosomal translocation was found to segregate with schizophrenia and affective disorders. While the evidence for it being central to disease pathogenesis in the original Scottish family is compelling, recent genome-wide association studies have not found evidence for common variants at the DISC1 locus being associated with schizophrenia in the wider population. It may therefore be the case that DISC1 provides an indication of biological pathways that are central to mental health issues and functional studies have shown that it functions in multiple signalling pathways. However, there is little information regarding factors that function upstream of DISC1 to regulate its expression and function. We herein demonstrate that Sonic hedgehog (Shh signalling promotes expression of disc1 in the zebrafish brain. Expression of disc1 is lost in smoothened mutants that have a complete loss of Shh signal transduction, and elevated in patched mutants which have constitutive activation of Shh signalling. We previously demonstrated that disc1 knockdown has a dramatic effect on the specification of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC in the hindbrain and Shh signalling is known to be essential for the specification of these cells. We show that disc1 is prominently expressed in olig2-positive midline progenitor cells that are absent in smo mutants, while cyclopamine treatment blocks disc1 expression in these cells and mimics the effect of disc1 knock down on OPC specification. Various features of a number of psychiatric conditions could potentially arise through aberrant Hedgehog signalling. We therefore suggest that altered Shh signalling may be an important neurodevelopmental factor in the pathobiology of mental

  6. Hedgehog inhibition causes complete loss of limb outgrowth and transformation of digit identity in Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopper, Geffrey F; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-03-01

    The study of the tetrapod limb has contributed greatly to our understanding of developmental pathways and how changes to these pathways affect the evolution of morphology. Most of our understanding of tetrapod limb development comes from research on amniotes, with far less known about mechanisms of limb development in amphibians. To better understand the mechanisms of limb development in anuran amphibians, we used cyclopamine to inhibit Hedgehog signaling at various stages of development in the western clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis, and observed resulting morphologies. We also analyzed gene expression changes resulting from similar experiments in Xenopus laevis. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis results in limb abnormalities including reduced digit number, missing skeletal elements, and complete absence of limbs. In addition, posterior digits assume an anterior identity by developing claws that are usually only found on anterior digits, confirming Sonic hedgehog's role in digit identity determination. Thus, Sonic hedgehog appears to play mechanistically separable roles in digit number specification and digit identity specification as in other studied tetrapods. The complete limb loss observed in response to reduced Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis, however, is striking, as this functional role for Hedgehog signaling has not been found in any other tetrapod. This changed mechanism may represent a substantial developmental constraint to digit number evolution in frogs. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor signalling: focus on the cardiovascular system and regulator of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks-Balk, Mariëlle C; Peters, Stephan L M; Michel, Martin C; Alewijnse, Astrid E

    2008-05-13

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in many biological processes. Therefore, GPCR function is tightly controlled both at receptor level and at the level of signalling components. Well-known mechanisms by which GPCR function can be regulated comprise desensitization/resensitization processes and GPCR up- and downregulation. GPCR function can also be regulated by several proteins that directly interact with the receptor and thereby modulate receptor activity. An additional mechanism by which receptor signalling is regulated involves an emerging class of proteins, the so-called regulators of G protein signalling (RGS). In this review we will describe some of these control mechanisms in more detail with some specific examples in the cardiovascular system. In addition, we will provide an overview on RGS proteins and the involvement of RGS proteins in cardiovascular function.

  8. Identification and Characterization of KCASH2 and KCASH3, 2 Novel Cullin3 Adaptors Suppressing Histone Deacetylase and Hedgehog Activity in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico De Smaele

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor, arising from aberrant cerebellar precursors' development, a process mainly controlled by Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway. Histone deacetylase HDAC1 has been recently shown to modulate Hh signaling, deacetylating its effectors Gli1/2 and enhancing their transcriptional activity. Therefore, HDAC may represent a potential therapeutic target for Hh-dependent tumors, but still little information is available on the physiological mechanisms of HDAC regulation. The putative tumor suppressor RENKCTD11 acts through ubiquitination-dependent degradation of HDAC1, thereby affecting Hh activity and medulloblastoma growth. We identify and characterize here two RENKCTD11 homologues, defining a new family of proteins named KCASH, as “KCTD containing, Cullin3 adaptor, suppressor of Hedgehog.” Indeed, the novel genes (KCASH2KCTD21 and KCASH3KCTD6 share with RENKCTD11 a number of features, such as a BTB domain required for the formation of a Cullin3 ubiquitin ligase complex and HDAC1 ubiquitination and degradation capability, suppressing the acetylation-dependent Hh/Gli signaling. Expression of KCASH2 and -3 is observed in cerebellum, whereas epigenetic silencing and allelic deletion are observed in human medulloblastoma. Rescuing KCASHs expression reduces the Hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma growth, suggesting that loss of members of this novel family of native HDAC inhibitors is crucial in sustaining Hh pathway-mediated tumorigenesis. Accordingly, they might represent a promising class of endogenous “agents” through which this pathway may be targeted.

  9. Hypothalamic Wnt Signalling and its Role in Energy Balance Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, G; Tups, A

    2016-03-01

    Wnt signalling and its downstream effectors are well known for their roles in embryogenesis and tumourigenesis, including the regulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In the nervous system, Wnt signalling has been described mainly during embryonic development, although accumulating evidence suggests that it also plays a major role in adult brain morphogenesis and function. Studies have predominantly concentrated on memory formation in the hippocampus, although recent data indicate that Wnt signalling is also critical for neuroendocrine control of the developed hypothalamus, a brain centre that is key in energy balance regulation and whose dysfunction is implicated in metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Based on scattered findings that report the presence of Wnt molecules in the tanycytes and ependymal cells lining the third ventricle and arcuate nucleus neurones of the hypothalamus, their potential importance in key regions of food intake and body weight regulation has been investigated in recent studies. The present review brings together current knowledge on Wnt signalling in the hypothalamus of adult animals and discusses the evidence suggesting a key role for members of the Wnt signalling family in glucose and energy balance regulation in the hypothalamus in diet-induced and genetically obese (leptin deficient) mice. Aspects of Wnt signalling in seasonal (photoperiod sensitive) rodents are also highlighted, given the recent evidence indicating that the Wnt pathway in the hypothalamus is not only regulated by diet and leptin, but also by photoperiod in seasonal animals, which is connected to natural adaptive changes in food intake and body weight. Thus, Wnt signalling appears to be critical as a modulator for normal functioning of the physiological state in the healthy adult brain, and is also crucial for normal glucose and energy homeostasis where its dysregulation can lead to a range of metabolic disorders. © 2016

  10. The ciliary Evc/Evc2 complex interacts with Smo and controls Hedgehog pathway activity in chondrocytes by regulating Sufu/Gli3 dissociation and Gli3 trafficking in primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrós-Martín, Jose A; Valencia, María; Reytor, Edel; Pacheco, María; Fernandez, Margarita; Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Gean, Esther; Lapunzina, Pablo; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in patterning and morphogenesis of most organs in the developing mammalian embryo. Despite many advances in understanding core components of the pathway, little is known about how the activity of the Hh pathway is adjusted in organ- and tissue-specific developmental processes. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 disrupt Hh signaling in tooth and bone development. Using mouse models, we show here that Evc and Evc2 are mutually required for localizing to primary cilia and also for maintaining their normal protein levels. Consistent with Evc and Evc2 functioning as a complex, the skeletal phenotypes in either single or double homozygous mutant mice are virtually indistinguishable. Smo translocation to the cilium was normal in Evc2-deficient chondrocytes following Hh activation with the Smo-agonist SAG. However, Gli3 recruitment to cilia tips was reduced and Sufu/Gli3 dissociation was impaired. Interestingly, we found Smo to co-precipitate with Evc/Evc2, indicating that in some cells Hh signaling requires direct interaction of Smo with the Evc/Evc2 complex. Expression of a dominantly acting Evc2 mutation previously identified in Weyer's acrodental dysostosis (Evc2Δ43) caused mislocalization of Evc/Evc2Δ43 within the cilium and also reproduced the Gli3-related molecular defects observed in Evc2(-/-) chondrocytes. Moreover, Evc silencing in Sufu(-/-) cells attenuated the output of the Hh pathway, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 also promote Hh signaling in the absence of Sufu. Together our data reveal that the Hh pathway involves Evc/Evc2-dependent modulations that are necessary for normal endochondral bone formation.

  11. Regulation from within: the cytoskeleton in transmembrane signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaqaman, Khuloud; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that the plasma membrane is highly dynamic and organized in a complex manner. The cortical cytoskeleton is proving to be a particularly important regulator of plasmalemmal organization, modulating the mobility of proteins and lipids in the membrane, facilitating their segregation and influencing their clustering. This organization plays a critical role in receptor-mediated signaling, especially in the case of immunoreceptors, which require lateral clustering for their activation. Based on recent developments, we discuss the structures and mechanisms whereby the cortical cytoskeleton regulates membrane dynamics and organization, and how the non-uniform distribution of immunoreceptors and their self-association may affect activation and signaling. PMID:22917551

  12. Rnd3 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation through notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Tang

    Full Text Available Rnd3/RhoE is a small Rho GTPase involved in the regulation of different cell behaviors. Dysregulation of Rnd3 has been linked to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Lung cancers are the leading cause of cancer-related death in the West and around the world. The expression of Rnd3 and its ectopic role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC remain to be explored. Here, we reported that Rnd3 was down-regulated in three NSCLC cell lines: H358, H520 and A549. The down-regulation of Rnd3 led to hyper-activation of Rho Kinase and Notch signaling. The reintroduction of Rnd3 or selective inhibition of Notch signaling, but not Rho Kinase signaling, blocked the proliferation of H358 and H520 cells. Mechanistically, Notch intracellular domain (NICD protein abundance in H358 cells was regulated by Rnd3-mediated NICD proteasome degradation. Rnd3 regulated H358 and H520 cell proliferation through a Notch1/NICD/Hes1 signaling axis independent of Rho Kinase.

  13. Ragulator-a multifaceted regulator of lysosomal signaling and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaço, Alexandria; Jäättelä, Marja

    2017-12-04

    The lysosomal Ragulator complex regulates cell metabolism and growth by coordinating the activities of metabolic signaling pathways with nutrient availability. In this issue, Filipek et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201703061) and Pu et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201703094) introduce a role for Ragulator in growth factor- and nutrient-regulated lysosomal trafficking. © 2017 Colaço and Jäättelä.

  14. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis: emergent role in cell signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Aonghus J; Coleman-Vaughan, Caroline; McCarthy, Justin V

    2017-10-27

    Receptor signalling events including those initiated following activation of cytokine and growth factor receptors and the well-characterised death receptors (tumour necrosis factor receptor, type 1, FasR and TRAIL-R1/2) are initiated at the cell surface through the recruitment and formation of intracellular multiprotein signalling complexes that activate divergent signalling pathways. Over the past decade, research studies reveal that many of these receptor-initiated signalling events involve the sequential proteolysis of specific receptors by membrane-bound proteases and the γ-secretase protease complexes. Proteolysis enables the liberation of soluble receptor ectodomains and the generation of intracellular receptor cytoplasmic domain fragments. The combined and sequential enzymatic activity has been defined as regulated intramembrane proteolysis and is now a fundamental signal transduction process involved in the termination or propagation of receptor signalling events. In this review, we discuss emerging evidence for a role of the γ-secretase protease complexes and regulated intramembrane proteolysis in cell- and immune-signalling pathways. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Loss of parietal cell expression of Sonic hedgehog induces hypergastrinemia and hyperproliferation of surface mucous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chang; Ogle, Sally A; Schumacher, Michael A; Orr-Asman, Melissa A; Miller, Marian L; Lertkowit, Nantaporn; Varro, Andrea; Hollande, Frederic; Zavros, Yana

    2010-02-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the adult stomach, but its role as a gastric morphogen is unclear. We sought to identify mechanisms by which Shh might regulate gastric epithelial cell function and differentiation. Mice with a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/Shh(KO)) were created. Gastric morphology and function were studied in control and HKCre/Shh(KO) mice between 1 and 8 months of age. In contrast to control mice, HKCre/Shh(KO) mice developed gastric hypochlorhydria, hypergastrinemia, and a phenotype that resembled foveolar hyperplasia. The fundic mucosa of HKCre/Shh(KO) mice had an expanded surface pit cell lineage that was documented by increased incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine and was attributed to the hypergastrinemia. Compared with controls, numbers of total mucous neck and zymogen cells were significantly decreased in stomachs of HKCre/Shh(KO) mice. In addition, zymogen and neck cell markers were coexpressed in the same cell populations, indicating disrupted differentiation of the zymogen cell lineage from the mucous neck cells in the stomachs of HKCre/Shh(KO) mice. Laser capture microdissection of the surface epithelium, followed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed a significant increase in expression of Indian Hedgehog, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1, Wnt, and cyclin D1. Laser capture microdissection analysis also showed a significant increase in Snail with a concomitant decrease in E-cadherin. In the stomachs of adult mice, loss of Shh from parietal cells results in hypochlorhydria and hypergastrinemia. Hypergastrinemia might subsequently induce increased Hedgehog and Wnt signaling in the surface pit epithelium, resulting in hyperproliferation.

  16. Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog Pathways in Rhabdomyosarcoma: From Single Pathways to an Integrated Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Roma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma in children. Regarding histopathological criteria, RMS can be divided into 2 main subtypes: embryonal and alveolar. These subtypes differ considerably in their clinical phenotype and molecular features. Abnormal regulation or mutation of signalling pathways that regulate normal embryonic development such as Notch, Hedgehog, and Wnt is a recurrent feature in tumorigenesis. Herein, the general features of each of the three pathways, their implication in cancer and particularly in RMS are reviewed. Finally, the cross-talking among these three pathways and the possibility of better understanding of the horizontal communication among them, leading to the development of more potent therapeutic approaches, are discussed.

  17. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...uction. PubmedID 18631453 Title When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative

  18. Activin Receptor Signaling Regulates Prostatic Epithelial Cell Adhesion and Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Simon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutational changes coupled with endocrine, paracrine, and/or autocrine signals regulate cell division during carcinogenesis. The hormone signals remain undefined, although the absolute requirement in vitro for fetal serum indicates the necessity for a fetal serum factor(s in cell proliferation. Using prostatic cancer cell (PCC lines as a model of cancer cell proliferation, we have identified the fetal serum component activin A and its signaling through the activin receptor type II (ActRII, as necessary, although not sufficient, for PCC proliferation. Activin A induced Smad2 phosphorylation and PCC proliferation, but only in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS. Conversely, activin A antibodies and inhibin A suppressed FBS-induced PCC proliferation confirming activin A as one of multiple serum components required for PCC proliferation. Basic fibroblast growth factor was subsequently shown to synergize activin A-induced PCC proliferation. Inhibition of ActRII signaling using a blocking antibody or antisense-P decreased mature ActRII expression, Smad2 phosphorylation, and the apparent viability of PCCs and neuroblastoma cells grown in FBS. Suppression of ActRII signaling in PCC and neuroblastoma cells did not induce apoptosis as indicated by the ratio of active/inactive caspase 3 but did correlate with increased cell detachment and ADAM-15 expression, a disintegrin whose expression is strongly correlated with prostatic metastasis. These findings indicate that ActRII signaling is required for PCC and neuroblastoma cell viability, with ActRII mediating cell fate via the regulation of cell adhesion. That ActRII signaling governs both cell viability and cell adhesion has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to regulate cancer growth and metastasis.

  19. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Strigolactone regulates shoot development through a core signalling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Bennett

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Strigolactones are a recently identified class of hormone that regulate multiple aspects of plant development. The DWARF14 (D14 α/β fold protein has been identified as a strigolactone receptor, which can act through the SCFMAX2 ubiquitin ligase, but the universality of this mechanism is not clear. Multiple proteins have been suggested as targets for strigolactone signalling, including both direct proteolytic targets of SCFMAX2, and downstream targets. However, the relevance and importance of these proteins to strigolactone signalling in many cases has not been fully established. Here we assess the contribution of these targets to strigolactone signalling in adult shoot developmental responses. We find that all examined strigolactone responses are regulated by SCFMAX2 and D14, and not by other D14-like proteins. We further show that all examined strigolactone responses likely depend on degradation of SMXL proteins in the SMXL6 clade, and not on the other proposed proteolytic targets BES1 or DELLAs. Taken together, our results suggest that in the adult shoot, the dominant mode of strigolactone signalling is D14-initiated, MAX2-mediated degradation of SMXL6-related proteins. We confirm that the BRANCHED1 transcription factor and the PIN-FORMED1 auxin efflux carrier are plausible downstream targets of this pathway in the regulation of shoot branching, and show that BRC1 likely acts in parallel to PIN1.

  1. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Helicobacter pylori-induced Sonic Hedgehog expression is regulated by NFκB pathway activation: the use of a novel in vitro model to study epithelial response to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Michael A; Feng, Rui; Aihara, Eitaro; Engevik, Amy C; Montrose, Marshall H; Ottemann, Karen M; Zavros, Yana

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to acute induction of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the stomach that is associated with the initiation of gastritis. The mechanism by which H. pylori induces Shh is unknown. Shh is a target gene of transcription factor Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB). We hypothesize that NFκB mediates H. pylori-induced Shh. To visualize Shh ligand expression in response to H. pylori infection in vivo, we used a mouse model that expresses Shh fused to green fluorescent protein (Shh::GFP mice) in place of wild-type Shh. In vitro, changes in Shh expression were measured in response to H. pylori infection using 3-dimensional epithelial cell cultures grown from whole dissociated gastric glands (organoids). Organoids were generated from stomachs collected from the fundic region of control and mice expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (PC-Shh(KO) mice). Within 2 days of infection, H. pylori induced Shh expression within parietal cells of Shh::GFP mice. Organoids expressed all major gastric cell markers, including parietal cell marker H(+) ,K(+) -ATPase and Shh. H. pylori infection of gastric organoids induced Shh expression; a response that was blocked by inhibiting NFκB signaling and correlated with IκB degradation. H. pylori infection of PC-Shh(KO) mouse-derived organoids did not result in the induction of Shh expression. Gastric organoids allow for the study of the interaction between H. pylori and the differentiated gastric epithelium independent of the host immune response. H. pylori induces Shh expression from the parietal cells, a response mediated via activation of NFκB signaling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Differential age-dependent import regulation by signal peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shan Teng

    Full Text Available Gene-specific, age-dependent regulations are common at the transcriptional and translational levels, while protein transport into organelles is generally thought to be constitutive. Here we report a new level of differential age-dependent regulation and show that chloroplast proteins are divided into three age-selective groups: group I proteins have a higher import efficiency into younger chloroplasts, import of group II proteins is nearly independent of chloroplast age, and group III proteins are preferentially imported into older chloroplasts. The age-selective signal is located within the transit peptide of each protein. A group III protein with its transit peptide replaced by a group I transit peptide failed to complement its own mutation. Two consecutive positive charges define the necessary motif in group III signals for older chloroplast preference. We further show that different members of a gene family often belong to different age-selective groups because of sequence differences in their transit peptides. These results indicate that organelle-targeting signal peptides are part of cells' differential age-dependent regulation networks. The sequence diversity of some organelle-targeting peptides is not a result of the lack of selection pressure but has evolved to mediate regulation.

  4. Trithorax regulates systemic signaling during Drosophila imaginal disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Andrea; Khan, Sumbul Jawed; Smith-Bolton, Rachel K

    2015-10-15

    Although tissue regeneration has been studied in a variety of organisms, from Hydra to humans, many of the genes that regulate the ability of each animal to regenerate remain unknown. The larval imaginal discs of the genetically tractable model organism Drosophila melanogaster have complex patterning, well-characterized development and a high regenerative capacity, and are thus an excellent model system for studying mechanisms that regulate regeneration. To identify genes that are important for wound healing and tissue repair, we have carried out a genetic screen for mutations that impair regeneration in the wing imaginal disc. Through this screen we identified the chromatin-modification gene trithorax as a key regeneration gene. Here we show that animals heterozygous for trithorax are unable to maintain activation of a developmental checkpoint that allows regeneration to occur. This defect is likely to be caused by abnormally high expression of puckered, a negative regulator of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, at the wound site. Insufficient JNK signaling leads to insufficient expression of an insulin-like peptide, dILP8, which is required for the developmental checkpoint. Thus, trithorax regulates regeneration signaling and capacity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Bmp signaling mediates endoderm pouch morphogenesis by regulating Fgf signaling in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, C Ben; Swartz, Mary E; McCarthy, Neil; Norrie, Jacqueline L; Eberhart, Johann K

    2016-06-01

    The endodermal pouches are a series of reiterated structures that segment the pharyngeal arches and help pattern the vertebrate face. Multiple pathways regulate the complex process of endodermal development, including the Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) pathway. However, the role of Bmp signaling in pouch morphogenesis is poorly understood. Using genetic and chemical inhibitor approaches, we show that pouch morphogenesis requires Bmp signaling from 10-18 h post-fertilization, immediately following gastrulation. Blocking Bmp signaling during this window results in morphological defects to the pouches and craniofacial skeleton. Using genetic chimeras we show that Bmp signals directly to the endoderm for proper morphogenesis. Time-lapse imaging and analysis of reporter transgenics show that Bmp signaling is necessary for pouch outpocketing via the Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway. Double loss-of-function analyses demonstrate that Bmp and Fgf signaling interact synergistically in craniofacial development. Collectively, our analyses shed light on the tissue and signaling interactions that regulate development of the vertebrate face. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eOaks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein.

  7. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, A R; Kahn, C R

    2001-12-13

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  8. Cryptic red light signal regulates ascorbic acid in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Lakshmi; Kadur Narayanaswamy, Guruprasad

    2009-02-15

    The regulation of endogenous level of ascorbic acid in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) by cryptic red light signal (CRS) was studied. CRS is a cellular signal induced by red light pre-irradiation that amplifies the action of phytochrome, and is known to enhance anthocyanin synthesis in sorghum. A phytochrome-enhanced endogenous level of ascorbic acid in soybean seedlings was amplified by CRS. The lifetime of CRS was from 0 to 2h and the peak of enhancement was between 16 and 24h of dark incubation after the end of treatment.

  9. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  10. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    proteins, SOCS1-7, and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS). A key feature of this family of proteins is the presence of an SH2 domain and a SOCS box. Recent studies suggest that SOCS proteins also play a role in RTK signaling. Activation of RTK results in transcriptional activation of SOCS......-encoding genes. These proteins associate with RTKs through their SH2 domains and subsequently recruit the E3 ubiquitin machinery through the SOCS box, and thereby limit receptor stability by inducing ubiquitination. In a similar fashion, SOCS proteins negatively regulate mitogenic signaling by RTKs. It is also...

  11. Sonic hedgehog increases the commitment of pluripotent mesenchymal cells into the osteoblastic lineage and abolishes adipocytic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella-Jaegle, S; Rawadi, G; Kawai, S; Gallea, S; Faucheu, C; Mollat, P; Courtois, B; Bergaud, B; Ramez, V; Blanchet, A M; Adelmant, G; Baron, R; Roman-Roman, S

    2001-06-01

    The proteins of the hedgehog (Hh) family regulate various aspects of development. Recently, members of this family have been shown to regulate skeletal formation in vertebrates and to control both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) on the osteoblastic and adipocytic commitment/differentiation. Recombinant N-terminal Shh (N-Shh) significantly increased the percentage of both the pluripotent mesenchymal cell lines C3H10T1/2 and ST2 and calvaria cells responding to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), in terms of osteoblast commitment as assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This synergistic effect was mediated, at least partly, through the positive modulation of the transcriptional output of BMPs via Smad signaling. Furthermore, N-Shh was found to abolish adipocytic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells both in the presence or absence of BMP-2. A short treatment with N-Shh was sufficient to dramatically reduce the levels of the adipocytic-related transcription factors C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma in both C3H10T1/2 and calvaria cell cultures. Given the inverse relationship between marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts with aging, agonists of the Hh signaling pathway might constitute potential drugs for preventing and/or treating osteopenic disorders.

  12. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg Nygaard, Marie; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the form......Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about...... the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from...... cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components...

  13. Merlin, a regulator of Hippo signaling, regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyoung; Jho, Eek-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Merlin, encoded by the NF2 gene, is a tumor suppressor that exerts its function via inhibiting mitogenic receptors at the plasma membrane. Although multiple mutations in Merlin have been identified in Neurofibromatosis type II (NF2) disease, its molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that Merlin interacts with LRP6 and inhibits LRP6 phosphorylation, a critical step for the initiation of Wnt signaling. We found that treatment of Wnt3a caused phosphorylation of Merlin by PAK1, leading to detachment of Merlin from LRP6 and allowing the initiation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. A higher level of β-catenin was found in tissues from NF2 patients. Enhanced proliferation and migration caused by knockdown of Merlin in glioblastoma cells were inhibited by suppression of β-catenin. Conclusively, these results suggest that sustained Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity induced by abrogation of Merlin-mediated inhibition of LRP6 phosphorylation might be a cause of NF2 disease. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 357-358].

  14. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  15. BMP signalling differentially regulates distinct haematopoietic stem cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Kartalaei, Parham Solaimani; Vink, Chris S; Vink, Chris; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Bollerot, Karine; van IJcken, Wilfred; van der Linden, Reinier; de Sousa Lopes, Susana M Chuva; Monteiro, Rui; Mummery, Christine; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2015-08-18

    Adult haematopoiesis is the outcome of distinct haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subtypes with self-renewable repopulating ability, but with different haematopoietic cell lineage outputs. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity is largely unknown. BMP signalling regulates HSCs as they are first generated in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, but at later developmental stages, its role in HSCs is controversial. Here we show that HSCs in murine fetal liver and the bone marrow are of two types that can be prospectively isolated--BMP activated and non-BMP activated. Clonal transplantation demonstrates that they have distinct haematopoietic lineage outputs. Moreover, the two HSC types differ in intrinsic genetic programs, thus supporting a role for the BMP signalling axis in the regulation of HSC heterogeneity and lineage output. Our findings provide insight into the molecular control mechanisms that define HSC types and have important implications for reprogramming cells to HSC fate and treatments targeting distinct HSC types.

  16. Membrane–initiated estradiol signaling regulating sexual receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Micevych

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Estradiol has profound actions on the structure and function of the nervous system. In addition to nuclear actions that directly modulate gene expression, the idea that estradiol can rapidly activate cell signaling by binding to membrane estrogen receptors (mERs has emerged. Even the regulation of sexual receptivity, an action previously thought to be completely regulated by nuclear ERs, has been shown to have a membrane-initiated estradiol signaling (MIES component. This highlighted the question of the nature of mERs. Several candidates have been proposed, ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 (G protein coupled estrogen receptor; GPER, and a receptor activated by a diphenylacrylamide compound, STX. Although each of these receptors has been shown to be active in specific assays, we present evidence for and against their participation in sexual receptivity by acting in the lordosis-regulating circuit. The initial MIES that activates the circuit is in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH. Using both activation of μ-opioid receptors (MOR in the medial preoptic nucleus and lordosis behavior, we document that both ERα and the STX receptor participate in the required MIES. ERα and the STX receptor activation of cell signaling are dependent on the transactivation of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1a that augment progesterone synthesis in astrocytes and protein kinase C (PKC in ARH neurons. While estradiol-induced sexual receptivity does not depend on neuroprogesterone, proceptive behaviors do. Moreover, the ERα and the STX receptor activation of medial preoptic MORs and augmentation of lordosis were sensitive to mGluR1a blockade. These observations suggest a common mechanism through which mERs are coupled to intracellular signaling cascades, not just in regulating reproduction, but in actions throughout the neuraxis including the cortex, hippocampus, striatum and DRGs.

  17. Mechanisms of hypoxic signal transduction regulated by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, V V; Yasinska, I M

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports devoted to the field of oxygen sensing outline that signalling molecules such as nitric oxide/nitric oxide derived species as well as cytokines and other inflammatory mediators participate in hypoxic signal transduction. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) derived from it in hypoxic signal transduction and particularly in accumulation/de-accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein, which is critical not only for cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability but also for generation of inflammatory and innate immune responses. After brief description of nitric oxide and other RNS as multifunctional messengers we analyse and discuss the RNS-dependent accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein under normoxia followed by discussion of the mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent enzyme-regulated degradation of HIF-1alpha protein under low oxygen availability.

  18. Positive regulation of insulin signaling by neuraminidase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Larbi; Seyrantepe, Volkan; Fougerat, Anne; Pan, Xuefang; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Moreau, Allain; Mitchell, Grant A; Heveker, Nikolaus; Cairo, Christopher W; Issad, Tarik; Hinek, Alexander; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2013-07-01

    Neuraminidases (sialidases) catalyze the removal of sialic acid residues from sialylated glycoconjugates. We now report that mammalian neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), in addition to its catabolic function in lysosomes, is transported to the cell surface where it is involved in the regulation of insulin signaling. Insulin binding to its receptor rapidly induces interaction of the receptor with Neu1, which hydrolyzes sialic acid residues in the glycan chains of the receptor and, consequently, induces its activation. Cells from sialidosis patients with a genetic deficiency of Neu1 show impairment of insulin-induced phosphorylation of downstream protein kinase AKT, and treatment of these cells with purified Neu1 restores signaling. Genetically modified mice with ∼10% of the normal Neu1 activity exposed to a high-fat diet develop hyperglycemia and insulin resistance twice as fast as their wild-type counterparts. Together, these studies identify Neu1 as a novel component of the signaling pathways of energy metabolism and glucose uptake.

  19. Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cark, Steven E.

    2003-09-10

    Research support by DE-FG02-96ER20227 focused on the CLV loci and their regulation of organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem. Shoot meristem function is central to plant development as all of the above-ground organs and tissues of the plant are derived post-embryonically from the shoot meristem. At the shoot meristem, stem cells are maintained, and progeny cells undergo a switch toward differentiation and organ formation. The CLV loci, represented by three genes CLV1, CLV2 and CLV3 are key regulators of meristem development. Each of the CLV loci encode a putative receptor-mediated signaling component. When this work began, virtually nothing was known about receptor-mediated signaling in plants. Thus, our goal was to both characterize these genes and the proteins they encode as regulators of meristem development, and to investigate how receptor-mediated signaling might function in plants. Our work lead to several major publications that were significant contributions to understanding this system.

  20. Hippo Signaling Regulates Pancreas Development through Inactivation of Yap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Caroline E.; Boerner, Brian P.; Johnson, Randy L.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian pancreas is required for normal metabolism, with defects in this vital organ commonly observed in cancer and diabetes. Development must therefore be tightly controlled in order to produce a pancreas of correct size, cell type composition, and physiologic function. Through negative regulation of Yap-dependent proliferation, the Hippo kinase cascade is a critical regulator of organ growth. To investigate the role of Hippo signaling in pancreas biology, we deleted Hippo pathway components in the developing mouse pancreas. Unexpectedly, the pancreas from Hippo-deficient offspring was reduced in size, with defects evident throughout the organ. Increases in the dephosphorylated nuclear form of Yap are apparent throughout the exocrine compartment and correlate with increases in levels of cell proliferation. However, the mutant exocrine tissue displays extensive disorganization leading to pancreatitis-like autodigestion. Interestingly, our results suggest that Hippo signaling does not directly regulate the pancreas endocrine compartment as Yap expression is lost following endocrine specification through a Hippo-independent mechanism. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Hippo signaling plays a crucial role in pancreas development and provide novel routes to a better understanding of pathological conditions that affect this organ. PMID:23071096

  1. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  2. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulomi Ray

    Full Text Available Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  3. Neuroendocrine regulation of Drosophila metamorphosis requires TGFbeta/Activin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbens, Ying Y; Warren, James T; Gilbert, Lawrence I; O'Connor, Michael B

    2011-07-01

    In insects, initiation of metamorphosis requires a surge in the production of the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone from the prothoracic gland, the primary endocrine organ of juvenile larvae. Here, we show that blocking TGFβ/Activin signaling, specifically in the Drosophila prothoracic gland, results in developmental arrest prior to metamorphosis. The terminal, giant third instar larval phenotype results from a failure to induce the large rise in ecdysteroid titer that triggers metamorphosis. We further demonstrate that activin signaling regulates competence of the prothoracic gland to receive PTTH and insulin signals, and that these two pathways act at the mRNA and post-transcriptional levels, respectively, to control ecdysone biosynthetic enzyme expression. This dual regulatory circuitry may provide a cross-check mechanism to ensure that both developmental and nutritional inputs are synchronized before initiating the final genetic program leading to reproductive adult development. As steroid hormone production in C. elegans and mammals is also influenced by TGFβ/Activin signaling, this family of secreted factors may play a general role in regulating developmental transitions across phyla.

  4. Neuroendocrine regulation of Drosophila metamorphosis requires TGFβ/Activin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbens, Ying Y.; Warren, James T.; Gilbert, Lawrence I.; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    In insects, initiation of metamorphosis requires a surge in the production of the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone from the prothoracic gland, the primary endocrine organ of juvenile larvae. Here, we show that blocking TGFβ/Activin signaling, specifically in the Drosophila prothoracic gland, results in developmental arrest prior to metamorphosis. The terminal, giant third instar larval phenotype results from a failure to induce the large rise in ecdysteroid titer that triggers metamorphosis. We further demonstrate that activin signaling regulates competence of the prothoracic gland to receive PTTH and insulin signals, and that these two pathways act at the mRNA and post-transcriptional levels, respectively, to control ecdysone biosynthetic enzyme expression. This dual regulatory circuitry may provide a cross-check mechanism to ensure that both developmental and nutritional inputs are synchronized before initiating the final genetic program leading to reproductive adult development. As steroid hormone production in C. elegans and mammals is also influenced by TGFβ/Activin signaling, this family of secreted factors may play a general role in regulating developmental transitions across phyla. PMID:21613324

  5. [The history of optical signals for traffic regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draeger, J; Harsch, V

    2008-04-01

    For signal transmission in traffic today, different optical, acoustic, or other physical or technical means are used for information. The different kinds of traffic (water navigation, road and rail, and, later air transport) made traffic regulation necessary early on. This regulation, from its very beginning in ancient times, began by means of optical signals; nowadays, this remains the most important method. From the very start, minimum requirements for the navigator's vision, color discrimination, dark adaptation, and even visual field were needed. For historical reasons, it was in seafaring medicine that these first developed. Besides the development of the different signals, methods for checking the requirements were soon developed. National and international requirements have been very different. Only within the last 50 years has international cooperation led to the acceptance of general standards for the different traffic modes. This article discusses the technical development of optical signals for the different kinds of traffic, from ancient times to the present, and explains the development of minimum requirements for the different visual functions.

  6. RPN1a negatively regulates ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dashi; Li, Xiushan; Zhao, Xiaoying; Du, Changqing; Chen, Jia; Li, Chiyu; Sun, Mengsi; Wang, Long; Lin, Jianzhong; Tang, Dongying; Yu, Feng; Liu, Xuanming

    2016-11-01

    The 26S proteasome selectively regulates key abscisic acid (ABA) signaling proteins, but the physiological functions and mechanisms of RPN1a (a subunit of the 26S proteasome) in ABA signaling remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that the mRNA expression of RPN1a was suppressed by ABA treatment, and that RPN1a protein was expressed abundantly in guard cells. In the presence of ABA, rpn1a mutants showed rapid stomatal closure, low water loss, delayed germination, and inhibited root elongation. In addition, the transcripts of key ABA signaling genes, including ABI5, RD22, RD29A, and RD29B, were upregulated in rpn1a mutant plants in response to ABA. Furthermore, the ABI5 protein level was higher in rpn1a mutants subjected to ABA treatment. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that RPN1a interacts with ABI1. Overall, these findings suggest that RPN1a negatively regulates ABA signaling in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Self-renewal of acute lymphocytic leukemia cells is limited by the Hedgehog pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and IPI-926.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L Lin

    Full Text Available Conserved embryonic signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh, Wingless and Notch have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies. Recent data suggests that Hh signaling plays a role in normal B-cell development, and we hypothesized that Hh signaling may be important in precursor B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL. We found that the expression of Hh pathway components was common in human B-ALL cell lines and clinical samples. Moreover, pathway activity could be modulated by Hh ligand or several pathway inhibitors including cyclopamine and the novel SMOOTHENED (SMO inhibitor IPI-926. The inhibition of pathway activity primarily impacted highly clonogenic B-ALL cells expressing aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH by limiting their self-renewal potential both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that Hh pathway activation is common in B-ALL and represents a novel therapeutic target regulating self-renewal and persistence of the malignant clone.

  8. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Gu

    2013-12-01

    Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions. During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO, stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation.

  9. Transient activation of hedgehog pathway rescued irradiation-induced hyposalivation by preserving salivary stem/progenitor cells and parasympathetic innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Bo; Qin, Lizheng; Yang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Qingguo; Shangguan, Lei; Ti, Xinyu; Zhao, Yanqiu; Kim, Sangroh; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effects and mechanisms of transient activation of the Hedgehog pathway on rescuing radiotherapy-induced hyposalivation in survivors of head and neck cancer. Mouse salivary glands and cultured human salivary epithelial cells were irradiated by a single 15-Gy dose. The Hedgehog pathway was transiently activated in mouse salivary glands, by briefly overexpressing the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) transgene or administrating smoothened agonist, and in human salivary epithelial cells, by infecting with adenovirus encoding Gli1. The activity of Hedgehog signaling was examined by the expression of the Ptch1-lacZ reporter and endogenous Hedgehog target genes. The salivary flow rate was measured following pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary stem/progenitor cells (SSPC), parasympathetic innervation, and expression of related genes were examined by flow cytometry, salisphere assay, immunohistochemistry, quantitative reverse transcription PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA. Irradiation does not activate Hedgehog signaling in mouse salivary glands. Transient Shh overexpression activated the Hedgehog pathway in ductal epithelia and, after irradiation, rescued salivary function in male mice, which is related with preservation of functional SSPCs and parasympathetic innervation. The preservation of SSPCs was likely mediated by the rescue of signaling activities of the Bmi1 and Chrm1-HB-EGF pathways. The preservation of parasympathetic innervation was associated with the rescue of the expression of neurotrophic factors such as Bdnf and Nrtn. The expression of genes related with maintenance of SSPCs and parasympathetic innervation in female salivary glands and cultured human salivary epithelial cells was similarly affected by irradiation and transient Hedgehog activation. These findings suggest that transient activation of the Hedgehog pathway has the potential to restore salivary gland function after irradiation-induced dysfunction.

  10. Transient activation of Hedgehog pathway rescued irradiation-induced hyposalivation by preserving salivary stem/progenitor cells and parasympathetic innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Qingguo; Shangguan, Lei; Ti, Xinyu; Zhao, Yanqiu; Kim, Sangroh; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine effects and mechanisms of transient activation of Hedgehog pathway on rescuing radiotherapy-induced hyposalivation in head and neck cancer survivors. Experimental Design Mouse salivary glands and cultured human salivary epithelial cells were irradiated by single 15Gy dose. Hedgehog pathway was transiently activated in mouse salivary glands by shortly over-expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) transgene or administrating Smoothened Agonist and in human salivary epithelial cells by infecting with adenovirus encoding Gli1. Activity of Hedgehog signaling was examined by expression of Ptch1-lacZ reporter and endogenous Hedgehog target genes. Salivary flow rate was measured following pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary stem/progenitor cells (SSPCs), parasympathetic innervation and expression of related genes were examined by flow cytometry, salisphere assay, IHC, quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA. Results Irradiation does not activate Hedgehog signaling in mouse salivary glands. Transient Shh over-expression activated Hedgehog pathway in ductal epithelia and that after irradiation rescued salivary function in male mice, which is related with preservation of functional SSPCs and parasympathetic innervation. The preservation of SSPCs was likely mediated by rescue of signaling activities of Bmi1 and Chrm1/HB-EGF pathways. The preservation of parasympathetic innervation was related with rescue of expression of neurotrophic factors such as Bdnf and Nrtn. The expression of genes related with maintenance of salivary stem/progenitor cells and parasympathetic innervation in female salivary glands and cultured human salivary epithelial cells was similarly affected by irradiation and transient Hedgehog activation. Conclusions These findings suggest that transient activation of Hedgehog pathway has the potential to restore irradiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:24150232

  11. Syndecans – key regulators of cell signaling and biological functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afratis, Nikolaos A.; Nikitovic, Dragana; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.

    2017-01-01

    has been established, which has consequences for the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, ecto- and cytoplasmic domains are responsible for the interaction with extracellular matrix molecules and intracellular kinases, respectively. These interactions indicate syndecans as key...... molecules during cancer initiation and progression. Particularly syndecans interact with other cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and integrins, which lead to activation of downstream signaling pathways, which are critical for the cellular behavior. Moreover, this review describes...... the key role of syndecans in intracellular calcium regulation and homeostasis. The syndecan-mediated regulation of calcium metabolism is highly correlated with cells’ adhesion phenotype through the actin cytoskeleton and formation of junctions, with implications during differentiation and disease...

  12. Exposure-QT analysis for sonidegib (LDE225), an oral inhibitor of the hedgehog signaling pathway, for measures of the QT prolongation potential in healthy subjects and in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michelle; Zhou, Jocelyn; Hurh, Eunju; Sellami, Dalila

    2016-12-01

    Sonidegib prevents activation of the Hedgehog signal transduction pathway. This PK-QT analysis has been performed to test for potential prolongation of the QT/QTc interval during extended use, and to understand the exposure-QT relationship for sonidegib in patients and in healthy volunteers (HV). A pooled analysis of the change in QT interval corrected for heart rate according to Fridericia's formula was conducted across four patient studies from a total of 341 patients (n = 211, 102, 21, and 7 from the phase II pivotal study A2201, study X2101, study X1101, and study B2209, respectively), and across four healthy volunteer studies from a total of 204 healthy volunteers (n = 146, 36, 16, and 6 from study A2114, study A1102, study A2108, and study A2110, respectively). A PK/ECG subgroup of 62 patients from the pivotal study A2201 was also analyzed to assess the QT prolongation risk at steady-state exposures. Sonidigib PK and ECG data were matched to determine the change from baseline in QTcF using a linear mixed-effect model. Clinical data indicate sonidegib does not cause QTc prolongation. ΔQTcF at steady-state concentrations for both 200 and 800-mg doses were all below 5 ms. The highest mean ΔQTcF at steady state was -3.9 ms at week 17 pre-dose in the sonidegib 200-mg group and 2.7 ms at 2-h post-dose in the sonidegib 800-mg group. The upper one-sided 95 % confidence interval of the estimated ΔQTcF at steady-state concentrations from the linear mixed-effect models were all QT prolongation have been reported in the sonidegib clinical development program. Based on these analyses, there is no evidence of QT prolongation associated with sonidegib 200 or 800 mg in solid tumor patients and HV.

  13. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Tarayrah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid maintains germline stem cell (GSC mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities.

  14. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. Copyright © 2014

  15. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) works as a ligand for a family of nuclearRA receptors (RARα, RARβ and RARγ) which form heterodimers with retinoid Xreceptors (RXR). These complexes function as ligand-activated transcription factors,recognizing specific RA responsive elements in the reg......The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) works as a ligand for a family of nuclearRA receptors (RARα, RARβ and RARγ) which form heterodimers with retinoid Xreceptors (RXR). These complexes function as ligand-activated transcription factors,recognizing specific RA responsive elements...... in the regulatory regions of targetgenes. RA has been reported to play a direct role in regulating multiple aspects of peripheralT cell responses1, but whether endogenous RA signalling occurs in developingthymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in regulating T cell developmentremains unclear. To address......RARα. This blocks RA signalling in developing thymocytes from the DN3/4 stageonwards and thus allows us to study the role of RA in T cell development...

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase beta regulates mTOR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Blaskovich

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT-β is a phosphatidic acid (PA generating enzyme that plays an essential role in triglyceride synthesis. However, LPAAT-β is now being studied as an important regulator of cell growth and differentiation and as a potential therapeutic target in cancer since PA is necessary for the activity of key proteins such as Raf, PKC-ζ and mTOR. In this report we determine the effect of LPAAT-β silencing with siRNA in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. We show for the first time that LPAAT-β knockdown inhibits proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of pancreatic cancer cells. This is associated with inhibition of signaling by mTOR as determined by levels of mTORC1- and mTORC2-specific phosphorylation sites on 4E-BP1, S6K and Akt. Since PA regulates the activity of mTOR by modulating its binding to FKBP38, we explored the possibility that LPAAT-β might regulate mTOR by affecting its association with FKBP38. Coimmunoprecipitation studies of FKBP38 with mTOR show increased levels of FKBP38 associated with mTOR when LPAAT-β protein levels are knocked down. Furthermore, depletion of LPAAT-β results in increased Lipin 1 nuclear localization which is associated with increased nuclear eccentricity, a nuclear shape change that is dependent on mTOR, further confirming the ability of LPAAT-β to regulate mTOR function. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that PA generated by LPAAT-β regulates mTOR signaling. We discuss the implications of these findings for using LPAAT-β as a therapeutic target.

  17. The Spectrin cytoskeleton regulates the Hippo signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Georgina C; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Khanal, Ichha; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-04-01

    The Spectrin cytoskeleton is known to be polarised in epithelial cells, yet its role remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the Spectrin cytoskeleton controls Hippo signalling. In the developing Drosophila wing and eye, loss of apical Spectrins (alpha/beta-heavy dimers) produces tissue overgrowth and mis-regulation of Hippo target genes, similar to loss of Crumbs (Crb) or the FERM-domain protein Expanded (Ex). Apical beta-heavy Spectrin binds to Ex and co-localises with it at the apical membrane to antagonise Yki activity. Interestingly, in both the ovarian follicular epithelium and intestinal epithelium of Drosophila, apical Spectrins and Crb are dispensable for repression of Yki, while basolateral Spectrins (alpha/beta dimers) are essential. Finally, the Spectrin cytoskeleton is required to regulate the localisation of the Hippo pathway effector YAP in response to cell density human epithelial cells. Our findings identify both apical and basolateral Spectrins as regulators of Hippo signalling and suggest Spectrins as potential mechanosensors. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Regulation of tissue morphogenesis by endothelial cell-derived signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Saravana K.; Kusumbe, Anjali P.; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Endothelial cells form an extensive network of blood vessels that has numerous essential functions in the vertebrate body. In addition to their well-established role as a versatile transport network, blood vessels can induce organ formation or direct growth and differentiation processes by providing signals in a paracrine (angiocrine) fashion. Tissue repair also requires the local restoration of vasculature. Endothelial cells are emerging as important signaling centers that coordinate regeneration and help to prevent deregulated, disease-promoting processes. Vascular cells are also part of stem cell niches and play key roles in hematopoiesis, bone formation and neurogenesis. Here, we will review these newly identified roles of endothelial cells in the regulation of organ morphogenesis, maintenance and regeneration. PMID:25529933

  19. ASPM regulates Wnt signaling pathway activity in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Joshua J; Durak, Omer; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2011-09-15

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a neural developmental disorder in which patients display significantly reduced brain size. Mutations in Abnormal Spindle Microcephaly (ASPM) are the most common cause of MCPH. Here, we investigate the underlying functions of Aspm in brain development and find that Aspm expression is critical for proper neurogenesis and neuronal migration. The Wnt signaling pathway is known for its roles in embryogenesis, and genome-wide siRNA screens indicate that ASPM is a positive regulator of Wnt signaling. We demonstrate that knockdown of Aspm results in decreased Wnt-mediated transcription, and that expression of stabilized β-catenin can rescue this deficit. Finally, coexpression of stabilized β-catenin can rescue defects observed upon in vivo knockdown of Aspm. Our findings provide an impetus to further explore Aspm's role in facilitating Wnt-mediated neurogenesis programs, which may contribute to psychiatric illness etiology when perturbed.

  20. SIRT1 regulates endothelial Notch signaling in lung cancer.

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    Mian Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 acts as a key regulator of vascular endothelial homeostasis, angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanism for SIRT1-mediated lung carcinoma angiogenesis remains unknown. Herein, we report that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 1 (NAD1-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 can function as an intrinsic negative modulator of Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4/Notch signaling in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC xenograft-derived vascular endothelial cells (lung cancer-derived ECs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SIRT1 negatively regulates Notch1 intracellular domain (N1IC and Notch1 target genes HEY1 and HEY2 in response to Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4 stimulation. Furthermore, SIRT1 deacetylated and repressed N1IC expression. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP analysis and gene reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 bound to one highly conserved region, which was located at approximately -500 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of Notch1,and repressed Notch1 transcription. Inhibition of endothelial cell growth and sprouting angiogenesis by DLL4/Notch signaling was enhanced in SIRT1-silenced lung cancer-derived EC and rescued by Notch inhibitor DAPT. In vivo, an increase in proangiogenic activity was observed in Matrigel plugs from endothelial-specific SIRT1 knock-in mice. SIRT1 also enhanced tumor neovascularization and tumor growth of LLC xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that SIRT1 facilitates endothelial cell branching and proliferation to increase vessel density and promote lung tumor growth through down-regulation of DLL4/Notch signaling and deacetylation of N1IC. Thus, targeting SIRT1 activity or/and gene expression may represent a novel mechanism in the treatment of lung cancer.

  1. INTU is essential for oncogenic Hh signaling through regulating primary cilia formation in basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, N; Leung, E L-H; Liu, C; Li, L; Eguether, T; Jun Yao, X-J; Jones, E C; Norris, D A; Liu, A; Clark, R A; Roop, D R; Pazour, G J; Shroyer, K R; Chen, J

    2017-08-31

    Inturned (INTU), a cilia and planar polarity effector, performs prominent ciliogenic functions during morphogenesis, such as in the skin. INTU is expressed in adult tissues but its role in tissue maintenance is unknown. Here, we report that the expression of the INTU gene is aberrantly elevated in human basal cell carcinoma (BCC), coinciding with increased primary cilia formation and activated hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Disrupting Intu in an oncogenic mutant Smo (SmoM2)-driven BCC mouse model prevented the formation of BCC through suppressing primary cilia formation and Hh signaling, suggesting that Intu performs a permissive role during BCC formation. INTU is essential for intraflagellar transport A complex assembly during ciliogenesis. To further determine whether Intu is directly involved in the activation of Hh signaling downstream of ciliogenesis, we examined the Hh signaling pathway in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which readily responds to the Hh pathway activation. Depleting Intu blocked Smo agonist-induced Hh pathway activation, whereas the expression of Gli2ΔN, a constitutively active Gli2, restored Hh pathway activation in Intu-deficient cells, suggesting that INTU functions upstream of Gli2 activation. In contrast, overexpressing Intu did not promote ciliogenesis or Hh signaling. Taken together, data obtained from this study suggest that INTU is indispensable during BCC tumorigenesis and that its aberrant upregulation is likely a prerequisite for primary cilia formation during Hh-dependent tumorigenesis.

  2. PR65A phosphorylation regulates PP2A complex signaling.

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    Kumar Kotlo

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A, a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac; a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa; and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314. Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A, elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure.

  3. Generalidades de la señalización molecular durante el desarrollo embrionario: El caso del Sonic Hedgehog

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    David Arias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Histogenesis and organogenesis of the vertebrates –including humans– involves the interaction of an epithelium (derived from the ectoderm and endoderm and the underlying mesenchyme (derived from the intraembryonic mesoderm. This interaction is regulated by a paracrine signaling network that includes several ligands and their respective receptors, in addition to a series of transcription factors that control the whole system. Among these factors are fibroblast growth factors (Fgf, Hedgehog family (Hh, Wingless family (Wnt and beta-fibroblast growth factor superfamily (Tgf-β, which act to organize the morphogenetic pattern of a tissue, an organ, an apparatus and a morphofunctional system. One of the most studied factors is Sonic hedgehog (Shh, which is essential for regulating the formation of morphogenetic fields in specific places of the embryo’s body schema through cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell survival processes –in development or in the adult–. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review is to describe the role of Shh in the embryonic development of the neural tube, the limbs and the teeth.

  4. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about 30 years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of, T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. The outcome of PKC activation is highly context-dependent, with the precise cell cycle target(s) and overall effects determined by the specific isozyme involved, the timing of PKC activation, the cell type, and the signaling environment. Although PKCs can regulate all stages of the cell cycle, they appear to predominantly affect G0/G1 and G2. PKCs can modulate multiple cell cycle regulatory molecules, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), cdk inhibitors and cdc25 phosphatases; however, evidence points to Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins as key mediators of PKC-regulated cell cycle-specific effects. Several PKC isozymes can target Cip/Kip proteins to control G0/G1 → S and/or G2 → M transit, while effects on D-type cyclins regulate entry into and progression through G1. Analysis of PKC signaling in T cells has largely focused on its roles in T cell activation; thus, observed cell cycle effects are mainly positive. A prominent role is emerging for PKCθ, with non-redundant functions of other isozymes also described. Additional evidence points to PKCδ as a negative regulator of the cell cycle in these cells. As in other cell types, context-dependent effects of individual isozymes have been noted in T cells, and Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins appear to be major PKC targets. Future studies are anticipated to take advantage of the similarities between these various systems to enhance understanding of PKC-mediated cell cycle regulation in T cells. PMID

  5. Bilateral thalamocortical projection in hedgehogs: evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regidor, J; Divac, I

    1992-01-01

    In adult hedgehogs with large unilateral cortical deposits of fluorescent somatopetal tracers, labelled perikarya were found not only in the ipsilateral but also contralateral thalamus. An exceptionally large number of contralaterally labelled neurons was seen in the ventrolateral nucleus, also at a considerable distance from the midline. Deposits of one of two different tracers in the frontoparietal cortex of each hemisphere appear to label different perikarya in each ventrolateral nucleus. This projection to the contralateral cortex in hedgehogs does not resemble thalamo-cortical connections in either adult or developing brains of other mammalian species. Among amniotes, only in pigeons have contralateral projections from the thalamus to the telencephalon been described. The somatosensorimotor system of hedgehogs may be the only known mammalian remnant of primitive vertebrate thalamocortical organization. Whether primitive or derived, the bilateral thalamocortical projection in hedgehogs shows that hedgehog brains cannot be uncritically taken to represent brains of primate ancestors.

  6. DMPD: Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16753195 Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscript...l) (.csml) Show Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. PubmedI...D 16753195 Title Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscript

  7. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  8. Phytochemical regulation of Fyn and AMPK signaling circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Gyu; Koo, Ja Hyun; Kim, Sang Geon

    2015-12-01

    During the past decades, phytochemical terpenoids, polyphenols, lignans, flavonoids, and alkaloids have been identified as antioxidative and cytoprotective agents. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a kinase that controls redox-state and oxidative stress in the cell, and serves as a key molecule regulating energy metabolism. Many phytochemicals directly or indirectly alter the AMPK pathway in distinct manners, exerting catabolic metabolism. Some of them are considered promising in the treatment of metabolic diseases such as type II diabetes, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Another important kinase that regulates energy metabolism is Fyn kinase, a member of the Src family kinases that plays a role in various cellular responses such as insulin signaling, cell growth, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Phytochemical inhibition of Fyn leads to AMPK-mediated protection of the cell in association with increased antioxidative capacity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The kinases may work together to form a signaling circuitry for the homeostasis of energy conservation and expenditure, and may serve as targets of phytochemicals. This review is intended as a compilation of recent advancements in the pharmacological research of phytochemicals targeting Fyn and AMPK circuitry, providing information for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases and the accompanying tissue injuries.

  9. INSULIN SIGNALING AND THE REGULATION OF INSECT DIAPAUSE

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    Cheolho eSim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A rich chapter in the history of insect endocrinology has focused on hormonal control of diapause, especially the major roles played by juvenile hormones (JHs, ecdysteroids, and the neuropeptides that govern JH and ecdysteroid synthesis. More recently, experiments with adult diapause in Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Culex pipiens, and pupal diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis provide strong evidence that insulin signaling is also an important component of the regulatory pathway leading to the diapause phenotype. Insects produce many different insulin-like peptides (ILPs, and not all are involved in the diapause response; ILP-1 appears to be the one most closely linked to diapause in C. pipiens. Many steps in the pathway leading from perception of daylength (the primary environmental cue used to program diapause to generation of the diapause phenotype remain unknown, but the role for insulin signaling in mosquito diapause appears to be upstream of JH, as evidenced by the fact that application of exogenous JH can rescue the effects of knocking down expression of ILP-1 or the Insulin Receptor. Fat accumulation, enhancement of stress tolerance, and other features of the diapause phenotype are likely linked to the insulin pathway through the action of a key transcription factor, FOXO. This review highlights many parallels for the role of insulin signaling as a regulator in insect diapause and dauer formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  10. [Structural Life Science towards the Regulation of Selective GPCR Signaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors in the human genome. They are involved in many diseases and also the target of approximately 30% of all modern medicinal drugs. GPCRs respond to a broad spectrum of chemical entities, ranging from photons, protons, and calcium ions to small organic molecules (including odorants and neurotransmitters), peptides, and glycoproteins. Many GPCRs are members of closely related subfamilies that respond to the same hormone or neurotransmitter. However, they have different physiologic functions based on the cells in which they are expressed and the different signaling pathways that they exploit (e.g., coupling through heterotrimeric G-proteins such as Gs, Gi, and Gq, as well as β-arrestins). Antibody fragments including Fab and Fv can effectively stabilize and crystallize membrane proteins. However, using the mouse hybridoma technology it has been difficult to develop monoclonal antibodies that can recognize conformational epitopes of native GPCRs. We have recently succeeded in developing antibodies against native GPCRs using this technology in combination with our improved immunization and screening methods. In this symposium review, I present a successful example of prostaglandin E2 receptor (one of the GPCRs) crystallization using antibody fragments. To avoid several adverse effects of current therapeutics, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanism of GPCR signaling in a monomeric, dimeric, or oligomeric state. Also, we are interested in selectively regulating GPCR signaling via functional antibodies developed using our methods and/or the designed small organic molecules depending on the GPCR structure.

  11. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  12. Beta Adrenergic Signaling: A Targetable Regulator of Angiosarcoma and Hemangiosarcoma

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    Erin B. Dickerson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human angiosarcomas and canine hemangiosarcomas are highly aggressive cancers thought to arise from cells of vascular origin. The pathological features, morphological organization, and clinical behavior of canine hemangiosarcomas are virtually indistinct from those of human angiosarcomas. Overall survival with current standard-of-care approaches remains dismal for both humans and dogs, and each is likely to succumb to their disease within a short duration. While angiosarcomas in humans are extremely rare, limiting their study and treatment options, canine hemangiosarcomas occur frequently. Therefore, studies of these sarcomas in dogs can be used to advance treatment approaches for both patient groups. Emerging data suggest that angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas utilize beta adrenergic signaling to drive their progression by regulating the tumor cell niche and fine-tuning cellular responses within the tumor microenvironment. These discoveries indicate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling could serve as an Achilles heel for these tumors and emphasize the need to design therapeutic strategies that target tumor cell and stromal cell constituents. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries and present new hypotheses regarding the roles of beta adrenergic signaling in angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas. Because the use of beta adrenergic receptor antagonists is well established in human and veterinary medicine, beta blockade could provide an immediate adjunct therapy for treatment along with a tangible opportunity to improve upon the outcomes of both humans and dogs with these diseases.

  13. Beta Adrenergic Signaling: A Targetable Regulator of Angiosarcoma and Hemangiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B.; Bryan, Brad A.

    2015-01-01

    Human angiosarcomas and canine hemangiosarcomas are highly aggressive cancers thought to arise from cells of vascular origin. The pathological features, morphological organization, and clinical behavior of canine hemangiosarcomas are virtually indistinct from those of human angiosarcomas. Overall survival with current standard-of-care approaches remains dismal for both humans and dogs, and each is likely to succumb to their disease within a short duration. While angiosarcomas in humans are extremely rare, limiting their study and treatment options, canine hemangiosarcomas occur frequently. Therefore, studies of these sarcomas in dogs can be used to advance treatment approaches for both patient groups. Emerging data suggest that angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas utilize beta adrenergic signaling to drive their progression by regulating the tumor cell niche and fine-tuning cellular responses within the tumor microenvironment. These discoveries indicate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling could serve as an Achilles heel for these tumors and emphasize the need to design therapeutic strategies that target tumor cell and stromal cell constituents. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries and present new hypotheses regarding the roles of beta adrenergic signaling in angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas. Because the use of beta adrenergic receptor antagonists is well established in human and veterinary medicine, beta blockade could provide an immediate adjunct therapy for treatment along with a tangible opportunity to improve upon the outcomes of both humans and dogs with these diseases. PMID:29061946

  14. Regulation of brown adipocyte metabolism by myostatin/follistatin signaling

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    Rajan eSingh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity develops from perturbations of cellular bioenergetics, when energy uptake exceeds energy expenditure, and represents a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other conditions. Brown adipose tissue (BAT has long been known to dissipate energy as heat and contribute to energy expenditure, but its presence and physiological role in adult human physiology has been questioned for years. Recent demonstrations of metabolically active brown fat depots in adult humans have revolutionized current therapeutic approaches for obesity-related diseases. The balance between white adipose tissue (WAT and BAT affects the systemic energy balance and is widely believed to be the key determinant in the development of obesity and related metabolic diseases. Members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β superfamily play an important role in regulating overall energy homeostasis by modulation of brown adipocyte characteristics. Inactivation of TGF-β/Smad3/myostatin (Mst signaling promotes browning of white adipocytes, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and protects mice from diet-induced obesity, suggesting the need for development of a novel class of TGF-β/Mst antagonists for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. We recently described an important role of follistatin (Fst, a soluble glycoprotein that is known to bind and antagonize Mst actions, during brown fat differentiation and the regulation of cellular metabolism. Here we highlight various investigations performed using different in vitro and in vivo models to support the contention that targeting TGF-β/Mst signaling enhances brown adipocyte functions and regulates energy balance, reducing insulin resistance and curbing the development of obesity and diabetes.

  15. Gli1 Protein Participates in Hedgehog-mediated Specification of Osteoblast Lineage during Endochondral Ossification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Hironori; Ohba, Shinsuke; Yano, Fumiko; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Komiyama, Yuske; Nakagata, Naomi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Chung, Ung-il

    2012-01-01

    With regard to Hedgehog signaling in mammalian development, the majority of research has focused on Gli2 and Gli3 rather than Gli1. This is because Gli1−/− mice do not show any gross abnormalities in adulthood, and no detailed analyses of fetal Gli1−/− mice are available. In this study, we investigated the physiological role of Gli1 in osteogenesis. Histological analyses revealed that bone formation was impaired in Gli1−/− fetuses compared with WT fetuses. Gli1−/− perichondrial cells expressed neither runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) nor osterix, master regulators of osteogenesis, in contrast to WT cells. In vitro analyses showed that overexpression of Gli1 up-regulated early osteogenesis-related genes in both WT and Runx2−/− perichondrial cells, and Gli1 activated transcription of those genes via its association with their 5′-regulatory regions, underlying the function of Gli1 in the perichondrium. Moreover, Gli1−/−;Gli2−/− mice showed more severe phenotypes of impaired bone formation than either Gli1−/− or Gli2−/− mice, and osteoblast differentiation was impaired in Gli1−/−;Gli3−/− perichondrial cells compared with Gli3−/− cells in vitro. These data suggest that Gli1 itself can induce early osteoblast differentiation, at least to some extent, in a Runx2-independent manner. It also plays a redundant role with Gli2 and is involved in the repressor function of Gli3 in osteogenesis. On the basis of these findings, we propose that upon Hedgehog input, Gli1 functions collectively with Gli2 and Gli3 in osteogenesis. PMID:22493482

  16. Nuclear movement regulated by non-Smad Nodal signaling via JNK is associated with Smad signaling during zebrafish endoderm specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Shunya; Aoki, Shun; Kikuchi, Yutaka

    2017-11-01

    Asymmetric nuclear positioning is observed during animal development, but its regulation and significance in cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Using zebrafish blastulae, we provide evidence that nuclear movement towards the yolk syncytial layer, which comprises extraembryonic tissue, occurs in the first cells fated to differentiate into the endoderm. Nodal signaling is essential for nuclear movement, whereas nuclear envelope proteins are involved in movement through microtubule formation. Positioning of the microtubule-organizing center, which is proposed to be crucial for nuclear movement, is regulated by Nodal signaling and nuclear envelope proteins. The non-Smad JNK signaling pathway, which is downstream of Nodal signaling, regulates nuclear movement independently of the Smad pathway, and this nuclear movement is associated with Smad signal transduction toward the nucleus. Our study provides insight into the function of nuclear movement in Smad signaling toward the nucleus, and could be applied to the control of TGFβ signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  18. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  19. Resistant Starch Regulates Gut Microbiota: Structure, Biochemistry and Cell Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Huang, Yanjun; He, Caimei; Yang, Huansheng; He, Shanping; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Jian; Hocher, Berthold; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Starch is one of the most popular nutritional sources for both human and animals. Due to the variation of its nutritional traits and biochemical specificities, starch has been classified into rapidly digestible, slowly digestible and resistant starch. Resistant starch has its own unique chemical structure, and various forms of resistant starch are commercially available. It has been found being a multiple-functional regulator for treating metabolic dysfunction. Different functions of resistant starch such as modulation of the gut microbiota, gut peptides, circulating growth factors, circulating inflammatory mediators have been characterized by animal studies and clinical trials. In this mini-review, recent remarkable progress in resistant starch on gut microbiota, particularly the effect of structure, biochemistry and cell signaling on nutrition has been summarized, with highlights on its regulatory effect on gut microbiota. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Evc regulates a symmetrical response to Shh signaling in molar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatomi, M; Hovorakova, M; Gritli-Linde, A; Blair, H J; MacArthur, K; Peterka, M; Lesot, H; Peterkova, R; Ruiz-Perez, V L; Goodship, J A; Peters, H

    2013-03-01

    Tooth morphogenesis involves patterning through the activity of epithelial signaling centers that, among other molecules, secrete Sonic hedgehog (Shh). While it is known that Shh responding cells need intact primary cilia for signal transduction, the roles of individual cilia components for tooth morphogenesis are poorly understood. The clinical features of individuals with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome include various dental anomalies, and we show here that absence of the cilial protein Evc in mice causes various hypo- and hyperplasia defects during molar development. During first molar development, the response to Shh signaling is progressively lost in Evc-deficient embryos and, unexpectedly, the response consistently disappears in a buccal to lingual direction. The important role of Evc for establishing the buccal-lingual axis of the developing first molar is also supported by a displaced activity of the Wnt pathway in Evc mutants. The observed growth abnormalities eventually manifest in first molar microdontia, disruption of molar segmentation and symmetry, root fusions, and delayed differentiation. Analysis of our data indicates that both spatially and temporally disrupted activities of the Shh pathway are the primary cause for the variable dental anomalies seen in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome or Weyers acrodental dysostosis.

  1. Role of oxytocin signaling in the regulation of body weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, James E.; Ho, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are growing health concerns in the US and worldwide. In the US alone, more than two-thirds of the adult population is classified as either overweight or obese [1], highlighting the need to develop new, effective treatments for these conditions. Whereas the hormone oxytocin is well known for its peripheral effects on uterine contraction during parturition and milk ejection during lactation, release of oxytocin from somatodendrites and axonal terminals within the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated in both the formation of prosocial behaviors and in the control of energy balance. Recent findings demonstrate that chronic administration of oxytocin reduces food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese rodents with impaired or defective leptin signaling. Importantly, chronic systemic administration of oxytocin out to 6 weeks recapitulates the effects of central administration on body weight loss in DIO rodents at doses that do not result in the development of tolerance. Furthermore, these effects are coupled with induction of Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) in hindbrain areas (e.g. dorsal vagal complex (DVC)) linked to the control of meal size and forebrain areas (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala) linked to the regulation of food intake and body weight. This review assesses the potential central and peripheral targets by which oxytocin may inhibit body weight gain, its regulation by anorexigenic and orexigenic signals, and its potential use as a therapy that can circumvent leptin resistance and reverse the behavioral and metabolic abnormalities associated with DIO and genetically obese models. PMID:24065622

  2. Role of oxytocin signaling in the regulation of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, James E; Ho, Jacqueline M

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are growing health concerns in the US and worldwide. In the US alone, more than two-thirds of the adult population is classified as either overweight or obese [1], highlighting the need to develop new, effective treatments for these conditions. Whereas the hormone oxytocin is well known for its peripheral effects on uterine contraction during parturition and milk ejection during lactation, release of oxytocin from somatodendrites and axonal terminals within the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated in both the formation of prosocial behaviors and in the control of energy balance. Recent findings demonstrate that chronic administration of oxytocin reduces food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese rodents with impaired or defective leptin signaling. Importantly, chronic systemic administration of oxytocin out to 6 weeks recapitulates the effects of central administration on body weight loss in DIO rodents at doses that do not result in the development of tolerance. Furthermore, these effects are coupled with induction of Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) in hindbrain areas (e.g. dorsal vagal complex (DVC)) linked to the control of meal size and forebrain areas (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala) linked to the regulation of food intake and body weight. This review assesses the potential central and peripheral targets by which oxytocin may inhibit body weight gain, its regulation by anorexigenic and orexigenic signals, and its potential use as a therapy that can circumvent leptin resistance and reverse the behavioral and metabolic abnormalities associated with DIO and genetically obese models.

  3. Sonic hedgehog mediates a novel pathway of PDGF-BB-dependent vessel maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qinyu; Renault, Marie-Ange; Chapouly, Candice; Vandierdonck, Soizic; Belloc, Isabelle; Jaspard-Vinassa, Béatrice; Daniel-Lamazière, Jean-Marie; Laffargue, Muriel; Merched, Aksam; Desgranges, Claude; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre

    2014-04-10

    Recruitment of mural cells (MCs), namely pericytes and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), is essential to improve the maturation of newly formed vessels. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) has been suggested to promote the formation of larger and more muscularized vessels, but the underlying mechanisms of this process have not yet been elucidated. We first identified Shh as a target of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and found that SMCs respond to Shh by upregulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. We next showed that PDGF-BB-induced SMC migration was reduced after inhibition of Shh or its signaling pathway. Moreover, we found that PDGF-BB-induced SMC migration involves Shh-mediated motility. In vivo, in the mouse model of corneal angiogenesis, Shh is expressed by MCs of newly formed blood vessels. PDGF-BB inhibition reduced Shh expression, demonstrating that Shh is a target of PDGF-BB, confirming in vitro experiments. Finally, we found that in vivo inhibition of either PDGF-BB or Shh signaling reduces NG2(+) MC recruitment into neovessels and subsequently reduces neovessel life span. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Shh is involved in PDGF-BB-induced SMC migration and recruitment of MCs into neovessels and elucidate the molecular signaling pathway involved in this process.

  4. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  5. Hypothalamic eIF2α Signaling Regulates Food Intake

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    Anne-Catherine Maurin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reversible phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α is a highly conserved signal implicated in the cellular adaptation to numerous stresses such as the one caused by amino acid limitation. In response to dietary amino acid deficiency, the brain-specific activation of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 leads to food intake inhibition. We report here that GCN2 is rapidly activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH after consumption of a leucine-deficient diet. Furthermore, knockdown of GCN2 in this particular area shows that MBH GCN2 activity controls the onset of the aversive response. Importantly, pharmacological experiments demonstrate that the sole phosphorylation of eIF2α in the MBH is sufficient to regulate food intake. eIF2α signaling being at the crossroad of stress pathways activated in several pathological states, our study indicates that hypothalamic eIF2α phosphorylation could play a critical role in the onset of anorexia associated with certain diseases.

  6. How do cilia organize signalling cascades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachury, Maxence V

    2014-09-05

    Cilia and flagella are closely related centriole-nucleated protrusions of the cell with roles in motility and signal transduction. Two of the best-studied signalling pathways organized by cilia are the transduction cascade for the morphogen Hedgehog in vertebrates and the mating pathway that initiates gamete fusion in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. What is the role of cilia in these signalling transduction cascades? In both Hedgehog and mating pathways, all signalling intermediates have been found to localize to cilia, and, for some signalling factors, ciliary localization is regulated by pathway activation. Given a concentration factor of three orders of magnitude provided by translocating a protein into the cilium, the compartment model proposes that cilia act as miniaturized reaction tubes bringing signalling factors and processing enzymes in close proximity. On the other hand, the scaffolding model views the intraflagellar transport machinery, whose primary function is to build cilia and flagella, as a molecular scaffold for the mating transduction cascade at the flagellar membrane. While these models may coexist, it is hoped that a precise understanding of the mechanisms that govern signalling inside cilia will provide a satisfying answer to the question 'how do cilia organize signalling?'. This review covers the evidence supporting each model of signalling and outlines future directions that may address which model applies in given biological settings. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Yeast Gup1(2 Proteins Are Homologues of the Hedgehog Morphogens Acyltransferases HHAT(L: Facts and Implications

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    Cândida Lucas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In multiple tissues, the Hedgehog secreted morphogen activates in the receiving cells a pathway involved in cell fate, proliferation and differentiation in the receiving cells. This pathway is particularly important during embryogenesis. The protein HHAT (Hedgehog O-acyltransferase modifies Hh morphogens prior to their secretion, while HHATL (Hh O-acyltransferase-like negatively regulates the pathway. HHAT and HHATL are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gup2 and Gup1, respectively. In yeast, Gup1 is associated with a high number and diversity of biological functions, namely polarity establishment, secretory/endocytic pathway functionality, vacuole morphology and wall and membrane composition, structure and maintenance. Phenotypes underlying death, morphogenesis and differentiation are also included. Paracrine signalling, like the one promoted by the Hh pathway, has not been shown to occur in microbial communities, despite the fact that large aggregates of cells like biofilms or colonies behave as proto-tissues. Instead, these have been suggested to sense the population density through the secretion of quorum-sensing chemicals. This review focuses on Gup1/HHATL and Gup2/HHAT proteins. We review the functions and physiology associated with these proteins in yeasts and higher eukaryotes. We suggest standardisation of the presently chaotic Gup-related nomenclature, which includes KIAA117, c3orf3, RASP, Skinny, Sightless and Central Missing, in order to avoid the disclosure of otherwise unnoticed information.

  8. Regulation of CaMKII signaling in cardiovascular disease

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    Mariya Yordanova Mollova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a major cause of death in the developed countries. (Murray and Lopez, 1996;Koitabashi and Kass, 2012. Adverse cardiac remodeling that precedes heart muscle dysfunction is characterized by a myriad of molecular changes affecting the cardiomyocyte. Among these, alterations in protein kinase pathways play often an important mediator role since they link upstream pathologic stress signaling with downstream regulatory programs and thus affect both the structural and functional integrity of the heart muscle. In the context of cardiac disease, a profound understanding for the overriding mechanisms that regulate protein kinase activity (protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, or targeting via anchoring proteins is crucial for the development of specific and effective pharmacological treatment strategies targeting the failing myocardium.In this review, we focus on several mechanisms of upstream regulation of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaM Kinase II, CaMKII that play a relevant pathophysiological role in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease; precise targeting of these mechanisms might therefore represent novel and promising tools for prevention and treatment of HF.

  9. Proteasome inhibition reverses hedgehog inhibitor and taxane resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steg, Adam D; Burke, Mata R; Amm, Hope M; Katre, Ashwini A; Dobbin, Zachary C; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Landen, Charles N

    2014-08-30

    The goal of this study was to determine whether combined targeted therapies, specifically those against the Notch, hedgehog and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways, could overcome ovarian cancer chemoresistance. Chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells were exposed to gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSI-I, Compound E) or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, alone and in combination with the hedgehog antagonist, LDE225. Bortezomib, alone and in combination with LDE225, was evaluated for effects on paclitaxel efficacy. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis were assessed by MTT assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Proteasome activity and gene expression were determined by luminescence assay and qPCR, respectively. Studies demonstrated that GSI-I, but not Compound E, inhibited proteasome activity, similar to bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition decreased hedgehog target genes (PTCH1, GLI1 and GLI2) and increased LDE225 sensitivity in vitro. Bortezomib, alone and in combination with LDE225, increased paclitaxel sensitivity through apoptosis and G2/M arrest. Expression of the multi-drug resistance gene ABCB1/MDR1 was decreased and acetylation of α-tubulin, a marker of microtubule stabilization, was increased following bortezomib treatment. HDAC6 inhibitor tubastatin-a demonstrated that microtubule effects are associated with hedgehog inhibition and sensitization to paclitaxel and LDE225. These results suggest that proteasome inhibition, through alteration of microtubule dynamics and hedgehog signaling, can reverse taxane-mediated chemoresistance.

  10. The p53 inhibitor MDM2 facilitates Sonic Hedgehog-mediated tumorigenesis and influences cerebellar foliation.

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    Reem Malek

    Full Text Available Disruption of cerebellar granular neuronal precursor (GNP maturation can result in defects in motor coordination and learning, or in medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain tumor. The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh pathway is important for GNP proliferation; however, the factors regulating the extent and timing of GNP proliferation, as well as GNP differentiation and migration are poorly understood. The p53 tumor suppressor has been shown to negatively regulate the activity of the Shh effector, Gli1, in neural stem cells; however, the contribution of p53 to the regulation of Shh signaling in GNPs during cerebellar development has not been determined. Here, we exploited a hypomorphic allele of Mdm2 (Mdm2(puro, which encodes a critical negative regulator of p53, to alter the level of wild-type MDM2 and p53 in vivo. We report that mice with reduced levels of MDM2 and increased levels of p53 have small cerebella with shortened folia, reminiscent of deficient Shh signaling. Indeed, Shh signaling in Mdm2-deficient GNPs is attenuated, concomitant with decreased expression of the Shh transducers, Gli1 and Gli2. We also find that Shh stimulation of GNPs promotes MDM2 accumulation and enhances phosphorylation at serine 166, a modification known to increase MDM2-p53 binding. Significantly, loss of MDM2 in Ptch1(+/- mice, a model for Shh-mediated human medulloblastoma, impedes cerebellar tumorigenesis. Together, these results place MDM2 at a major nexus between the p53 and Shh signaling pathways in GNPs, with key roles in cerebellar development, GNP survival, cerebellar foliation, and MB tumorigenesis.

  11. Potent small molecule Hedgehog agonists induce VEGF expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Katrin; Büttner, Anita; Rigol, Stephan; Eilert, Nicole; Wandel, Elke; Giannis, Athanassios

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis, SAR studies as well as biological investigations of the known Hedgehog signaling agonist SAG and a small library of its analogues. The SAG and its derivatives were analyzed for their potency to activate the expression of the Hh target gene Gli1 in a reporter gene assay. By analyzing SAR important molecular descriptors for Gli1 activation have been identified. SAG as well as compound 10c proven to be potent activators of VEGF expression in cultivated dermal fibroblasts. Importantly and in contrast to SAG, derivative 10c displayed no toxicity in concentrations up to 250 μm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of longevity by regulator of G-protein signaling protein, Loco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuh-Ru; Kim, Keetae; Yang, Yanfei; Ivessa, Andreas; Sadoshima, Junichi; Park, Yongkyu

    2011-06-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins contribute to G-protein signaling pathways as activators or repressors with GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity. To characterize whether regulation of RGS proteins influences longevity in several species, we measured stress responses and lifespan of RGS-overexpressing and RGS-lacking mutants. Reduced expression of Loco, a RGS protein of Drosophila melanogaster, resulted in a longer lifespan for both male and female flies, also exhibiting stronger resistance to three different stressors (starvation, oxidation, and heat) and higher manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity. In addition, this reduction in Loco expression increased fat content and diminished cAMP levels. In contrast, overexpression of both genomic and cDNA loco gene significantly shortened the lifespan with weaker stress resistance and lower fat content. Deletion analysis of the Loco demonstrated that its RGS domain is required for the regulation of longevity. Consistently, when expression of RGS14, mammalian homologue of Loco, was reduced in rat fibroblast cells, the resistance to oxidative stress increased with higher MnSOD expression. The changes of yeast Rgs2 expression, which shares a conserved RGS domain with the fly Loco protein, also altered lifespan and stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide the first evidence that RGS proteins with GAP activity affect both stress resistance and longevity in several species. © 2011 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3(+) anti-CD28-stimulated CD4(+) T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Synthetic Triterpenoid CDDO-Im Inhibits Tumorsphere Formation by Regulating Stem Cell Signaling Pathways in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahler, Joseph; Liby, Karen T.; Sporn, Michael B.; Suh, Nanjoo

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is associated with poor prognosis because of a high rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies demonstrated that the synthetic triterpenoid, CDDO-Imidazolide (CDDO-Im) induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer. Since a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells has been suggested to be responsible for drug resistance and metastasis of tumors, our present study determined whether the effects of CDDO-Im in triple-negative breast cancer are due to the inhibition of a cancer stem cell subpopulation. CDDO-Im treatment markedly induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M-phase and apoptosis in the triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, SUM159 and MDA-MB-231. Because SUM159 cells were more sensitive to CDDO-Im than MDA-MB-231 cells, the effects of CDDO-Im on the cancer stem cell subpopulation were further investigated in SUM159 cells. SUM159 cells formed tumorspheres in culture, and the cancer stem cell subpopulation, CD24−/EpCAM+ cells, was markedly enriched in SUM159 tumorspheres. The CD24−/EpCAM+ cells in SUM159 tumorspheres were significantly inhibited by CDDO-Im treatment. CDDO-Im also significantly decreased sphere forming efficiency and tumorsphere size in both primary and secondary sphere cultures. PCR array of stem cell signaling genes showed that expression levels of many key molecules in the stem cell signaling pathways, such as Notch, TGF-β/Smad, Hedgehog and Wnt, were significantly down-regulated by CDDO-Im in SUM159 tumorspheres. Protein levels of Notch receptors (c-Notch1, Notch1 and Notch3), TGF-β/Smad (pSmad2/3) and Hedgehog downstream effectors (GLI1) also were markedly reduced by CDDO-Im. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the synthetic triterpenoid, CDDO-Im, is a potent anti-cancer agent against triple-negative breast cancer cells by targeting the cancer stem cell subpopulation. PMID:25229616

  15. Sonic Hedgehog-Induced Histone Deacetylase Activation Is Required for Cerebellar Granule Precursor Hyperplasia in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Lindsey, Stephan; Graves, Bruce; Yoo, Soonmoon; Olson, James M.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2013-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP) cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL) in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease. PMID:23951168

  16. Sonic hedgehog-induced histone deacetylase activation is required for cerebellar granule precursor hyperplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease.

  17. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis

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    Zuzanna Rzepka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA. Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones. Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells.

  18. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    component of the calcium signalling repertoire within motile growth cones, regulating guidance-cue-induced calcium release and maintaining basal cytosolic calcium.

  19. In the absence of Sonic hedgehog, p53 induces apoptosis and inhibits retinal cell proliferation, cell-cycle exit and differentiation in zebrafish.

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    Sergey V Prykhozhij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling regulates cell proliferation during vertebrate development via induction of cell-cycle regulator gene expression or activation of other signalling pathways, prevents cell death by an as yet unclear mechanism and is required for differentiation of retinal cell types. Thus, an unsolved question is how the same signalling molecule can regulate such distinct cell processes as proliferation, cell survival and differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of the zebrafish shh(-/- mutant revealed that in this context p53 mediates elevated apoptosis during nervous system and retina development and interferes with retinal proliferation and differentiation. While in shh(-/- mutants there is activation of p53 target genes and p53-mediated apoptosis, an increase in Hedgehog (Hh signalling by over-expression of dominant-negative Protein Kinase A strongly decreased p53 target gene expression and apoptosis levels in shh(-/- mutants. Using a novel p53 reporter transgene, I confirm that p53 is active in tissues that require Shh for cell survival. Proliferation assays revealed that loss of p53 can rescue normal cell-cycle exit and the mitotic indices in the shh(-/- mutant retina at 24, 36 and 48 hpf. Moreover, generation of amacrine cells and photoreceptors was strongly enhanced in the double p53(-/-shh(-/- mutant retina suggesting the effect of p53 on retinal differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of Shh signalling leads to the p53-dependent apoptosis in the developing nervous system and retina. Moreover, Shh-mediated control of p53 activity is required for proliferation and cell cycle exit of retinal cells as well as differentiation of amacrine cells and photoreceptors.

  20. The Binding Mode of the Sonic Hedgehog Inhibitor Robotnikinin, a Combined Docking and QM/MM MD Study

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    Manuel Hitzenberger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Erroneous activation of the Hedgehog pathway has been linked to a great amount of cancerous diseases and therefore a large number of studies aiming at its inhibition have been carried out. One leverage point for novel therapeutic strategies targeting the proteins involved, is the prevention of complex formation between the extracellular signaling protein Sonic Hedgehog and the transmembrane protein Patched 1. In 2009 robotnikinin, a small molecule capable of binding to and inhibiting the activity of Sonic Hedgehog has been identified, however in the absence of X-ray structures of the Sonic Hedgehog-robotnikinin complex, the binding mode of this inhibitor remains unknown. In order to aid with the identification of novel Sonic Hedgehog inhibitors, the presented investigation elucidates the binding mode of robotnikinin by performing an extensive docking study, including subsequent molecular mechanical as well as quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations. The attained configurations enabled the identification of a number of key protein-ligand interactions, aiding complex formation and providing stabilizing contributions to the binding of the ligand. The predicted structure of the Sonic Hedgehog-robotnikinin complex is provided via a PDB file as Supplementary Material and can be used for further reference.

  1. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  2. SCFKMD controls cytokinin signaling by regulating the degradation of type-B response regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Kieber, Joseph J.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that play critical roles in growth and development. In Arabidopsis, the transcriptional response to cytokinin is regulated by action of type-B Arabidopsis response regulators (ARRs). Although central elements in the cytokinin signal transduction pathway have been identified, mechanisms controlling output remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a family of F-box proteins, called the KISS ME DEADLY (KMD) family, targets type-B ARR proteins for degradation. KMD proteins form an S-PHASE KINASE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN1 (SKP1)/Cullin/F-box protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and directly interact with type-B ARR proteins. Loss-of-function KMD mutants stabilize type-B ARRs and exhibit an enhanced cytokinin response. In contrast, plants with elevated KMD expression destabilize type-B ARR proteins leading to cytokinin insensitivity. Our results support a model in which an SCFKMD complex negatively regulates cytokinin responses by controlling levels of a key family of transcription factors. PMID:23720308

  3. Phosphorylation of myocardin by extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M; Sethakorn, Nan; Kach, Jacob; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2009-12-04

    The contractile phenotype of smooth muscle (SM) cells is controlled by serum response factor (SRF), which drives the expression of SM-specific genes including SM alpha-actin, SM22, and others. Myocardin is a cardiac and SM-restricted coactivator of SRF that is necessary for SM gene transcription. Growth factors inducing proliferation of SM cells inhibit SM gene transcription, in a manner dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. In this study, we found that ERK1/2 phosphorylates mouse myocardin (isoform B) at four sites (Ser(812), Ser(859), Ser(866), and Thr(893)), all of which are located within the transactivation domain of myocardin. The single mutation of each site either to alanine or to aspartate has no effect on the ability of myocardin to activate SRF. However, the phosphomimetic mutation of all four sites to aspartate (4xD) significantly impairs activation of SRF by myocardin, whereas the phosphodeficient mutation of all four sites to alanine (4xA) has no effect. This translates to a reduced ability of the 4xD (but not of 4xA) mutant of myocardin to stimulate expression of SM alpha-actin and SM22, as assessed by corresponding promoter, mRNA, or protein assays. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of myocardin at these sites impairs its interaction with acetyltransferase, cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein, which is known to promote the transcriptional activity of myocardin. In conclusion, we describe a novel mode of modulation of SM gene transcription by ERK1/2 through a direct phosphorylation of myocardin.

  4. Phosphorylation of Myocardin by Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M.; Sethakorn, Nan; Kach, Jacob; Dulin, Nickolai O.

    2009-01-01

    The contractile phenotype of smooth muscle (SM) cells is controlled by serum response factor (SRF), which drives the expression of SM-specific genes including SM α-actin, SM22, and others. Myocardin is a cardiac and SM-restricted coactivator of SRF that is necessary for SM gene transcription. Growth factors inducing proliferation of SM cells inhibit SM gene transcription, in a manner dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. In this study, we found that ERK1/2 phosphorylates mouse myocardin (isoform B) at four sites (Ser812, Ser859, Ser866, and Thr893), all of which are located within the transactivation domain of myocardin. The single mutation of each site either to alanine or to aspartate has no effect on the ability of myocardin to activate SRF. However, the phosphomimetic mutation of all four sites to aspartate (4×D) significantly impairs activation of SRF by myocardin, whereas the phosphodeficient mutation of all four sites to alanine (4×A) has no effect. This translates to a reduced ability of the 4×D (but not of 4×A) mutant of myocardin to stimulate expression of SM α-actin and SM22, as assessed by corresponding promoter, mRNA, or protein assays. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of myocardin at these sites impairs its interaction with acetyltransferase, cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein, which is known to promote the transcriptional activity of myocardin. In conclusion, we describe a novel mode of modulation of SM gene transcription by ERK1/2 through a direct phosphorylation of myocardin. PMID:19776005

  5. Human Plasma Very Low Density Lipoprotein Carries Indian Hedgehog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Zijlstra, Felix; Badlou, Bahram; de Vries, Marcel; Ferreira, Carmen V.; Spek, C. Arnold; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog is one of the major morphogens and fulfils critical functions in both the development and maintenance of the vasculature. Hedgehog is highly hydrophobic and its diffusion toward target tissues remains only partly understood. In Drosophila, hedgehog transport via lipophorins is relevant for

  6. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Karel F.; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking. PMID:22689656

  7. Multisite interaction with Sufu regulates Ci/Gli activity through distinct mechanisms in Hh signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuhong; Shi, Qing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-05-19

    The tumor suppressor protein Suppressor of fused (Sufu) plays a conserved role in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway by inhibiting Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors, but the molecular mechanism by which Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity remains poorly understood. Here we show that Sufu can bind Ci/Gli through a C-terminal Sufu-interacting site (SIC) in addition to a previously identified N-terminal site (SIN), and that both SIC and SIN are required for optimal inhibition of Ci/Gli by Sufu. We show that Sufu can sequester Ci/Gli in the cytoplasm through binding to SIN while inhibiting Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus depending on SIC. We also find that binding of Sufu to SIC and the middle region of Ci can impede recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by masking its binding site in the C-terminal region of Ci. Indeed, moving the CBP-binding site to an "exposed" location can render Ci resistant to Sufu-mediated inhibition in the nucleus. Hence, our study identifies a previously unidentified and conserved Sufu-binding motif in the C-terminal region of Ci/Gli and provides mechanistic insight into how Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus.

  8. Interleukin-1β induces blood-brain barrier disruption by downregulating Sonic hedgehog in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is composed of capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular astrocytes, which regulate central nervous system homeostasis. Sonic hedgehog (SHH released from astrocytes plays an important role in the maintenance of BBB integrity. BBB disruption and microglial activation are common pathological features of various neurologic diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine released from activated microglia, increases BBB permeability. Here we show that IL-1β abolishes the protective effect of astrocytes on BBB integrity by suppressing astrocytic SHH production. Astrocyte conditioned media, SHH, or SHH signal agonist strengthened BBB integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins, whereas SHH signal inhibitor abrogated these effects. Moreover, IL-1β increased astrocytic production of pro-inflammatory chemokines such as CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL2, which induce immune cell migration and exacerbate BBB disruption and neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest that astrocytic SHH is a potential therapeutic target that could be used to restore disrupted BBB in patients with neurologic diseases.

  9. Hedgehog and wingless induce metameric pattern in the Drosophila visceral mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, D; Scott, M P

    1998-09-01

    The Drosophila visceral mesoderm (VM) is a favorite system for studying the regulation of target genes by Hox proteins. The VM is formed by cells from only the anterior subdivision of each mesodermal parasegment (PS). We show here that the VM itself acquires modular anterior-posterior subdivisions similar to those found in the ectoderm. As VM progenitors merge to form a continuous band running anterior to posterior along the embryo, expression of connectin (con) in 11 metameric patches within the VM reveals VM subdivisions analagous to ectodermal compartments. The VM subdivisions form in response to ectodermal production of secreted signals encoded by the segment polarity genes hedgehog (hh) and wingless (wg) and are independent of Hox gene activity. A cascade of induction from ectoderm to mesoderm to endoderm thus subdivides the gut tissues along the A-P axis. Induction of VM subdivisions may converge with Hox-mediated information to refine spatial patterning in the VM. Con patches align with ectodermal engrailed stripes, so the VM subdivisions correspond to PS 2-12 boundaries in the VM. The PS boundaries demarcated by Con in the VM can be used to map expression domains of Hox genes and their targets with high resolution. The resultant map suggests a model for the origins of VM-specific Hox expression in which Hox domains clonally inherited from blastoderm ancestors are modified by diffusible signals acting on VM-specific enhancers. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  10. Insulin-dependent signaling: regulation by amino acids and energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that amino acids stimulate a signal-transduction pathway that is also used by insulin. Moreover, for insulin to exert its anabolic and anticatabolic effects on protein, there is an absolute requirement for amino acids. This signaling pathway becomes inhibited by

  11. Hedgehog inhibitors from Artocarpus communis and Hyptis suaveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Midori A; Uchida, Kyoko; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Koyano, Takashi; Kowithayakorn, Thaworn; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-08-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in cell maintenance and proliferation during embryonic development. Naturally occurring Hh inhibitors were isolated from Artocarpus communis and Hyptis suaveolens using our previously constructed cell-based assay system. Bioactivity guided fractionation led to the isolation of 15 compounds, including seven new compounds (4, 5, 6, 7, and 9-11). The isolated compounds showed cytotoxicity against a cancer cell line (PANC1) in which Hh signaling was abnormally activated. Several compounds (12-14; GLI1 transcriptional inhibition IC50=7.6, 4.7, and 4.0 μM, respectively) inhibited Hh related protein (BCL2) expression. Moreover, compounds 1, 12, and 13 disrupted GLI1 and DNA complex formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  13. Regulation of ARE-mRNA Stability by Cellular Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    but as a response to different cellular cues they can become either stabilized, allowing expression of a given gene, or further destabilized to silence their expression. These tightly regulated mRNAs include many that encode growth factors, proto-oncogenes, cytokines, and cell cycle regulators. Failure to properly...

  14. Regulation of ERK-MAPK signaling in human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursons, Joseph; Gao, Jerry; Hurley, Daniel G; Print, Cristin G; Dunbar, P Rod; Jacobs, Marc D; Crampin, Edmund J

    2015-07-25

    The skin is largely comprised of keratinocytes within the interfollicular epidermis. Over approximately two weeks these cells differentiate and traverse the thickness of the skin. The stage of differentiation is therefore reflected in the positions of cells within the tissue, providing a convenient axis along which to study the signaling events that occur in situ during keratinocyte terminal differentiation, over this extended two-week timescale. The canonical ERK-MAPK signaling cascade (Raf-1, MEK-1/2 and ERK-1/2) has been implicated in controlling diverse cellular behaviors, including proliferation and differentiation. While the molecular interactions involved in signal transduction through this cascade have been well characterized in cell culture experiments, our understanding of how this sequence of events unfolds to determine cell fate within a homeostatic tissue environment has not been fully characterized. We measured the abundance of total and phosphorylated ERK-MAPK signaling proteins within interfollicular keratinocytes in transverse cross-sections of human epidermis using immunofluorescence microscopy. To investigate these data we developed a mathematical model of the signaling cascade using a normalized-Hill differential equation formalism. These data show coordinated variation in the abundance of phosphorylated ERK-MAPK components across the epidermis. Statistical analysis of these data shows that associations between phosphorylated ERK-MAPK components which correspond to canonical molecular interactions are dependent upon spatial position within the epidermis. The model demonstrates that the spatial profile of activation for ERK-MAPK signaling components across the epidermis may be maintained in a cell-autonomous fashion by an underlying spatial gradient in calcium signaling. Our data demonstrate an extended phospho-protein profile of ERK-MAPK signaling cascade components across the epidermis in situ, and statistical associations in these data

  15. Insulin Signalling and Regulation of Protein Kinase B in Adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Göransson, Olga

    2003-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, an increasingly common disorder. The cause of insulin resistance is supposedly failures in the processes used by insulin to signal to the interior of its target cells. These failing steps are still unknown, most probably because of incomplete knowledge of how the insulin signals are transmitted. Since insulin resistance is strongly linked to obesity, defects in lipid metabolism or other adipocyte functions, may be an important factor in the...

  16. DEG9, a serine protease, modulates cytokinin and light signaling by regulating the level of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Wei; Li, Jing; He, Baoye; Chai, Xin; Xu, Xiumei; Sun, Xuwu; Jiang, Jingjing; Feng, Peiqiang; Zuo, Jianru; Lin, Rongcheng; Rochaix, Jean-David; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-06-21

    Cytokinin is an essential phytohormone that controls various biological processes in plants. A number of response regulators are known to be important for cytokinin signal transduction. ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 4 (ARR4) mediates the cross-talk between light and cytokinin signaling through modulation of the activity of phytochrome B. However, the mechanism that regulates the activity and stability of ARR4 is unknown. Here we identify an ATP-independent serine protease, degradation of periplasmic proteins 9 (DEG9), which localizes to the nucleus and regulates the stability of ARR4. Biochemical evidence shows that DEG9 interacts with ARR4, thereby targeting ARR4 for degradation, which suggests that DEG9 regulates the stability of ARR4. Moreover, genetic evidence shows that DEG9 acts upstream of ARR4 and regulates the activity of ARR4 in cytokinin and light-signaling pathways. This study thus identifies a role for a ubiquitin-independent selective protein proteolysis in the regulation of the stability of plant signaling components.

  17. GDSL LIPASE1 Modulates Plant Immunity through Feedback Regulation of Ethylene Signaling1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Gi; Kwon, Sun Jae; Jang, Young Jin; Nam, Myung Hee; Chung, Joo Hee; Na, Yun-Cheol; Guo, Hongwei; Park, Ohkmae K.

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is a key signal in the regulation of plant defense responses. It is required for the expression and function of GDSL LIPASE1 (GLIP1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which plays an important role in plant immunity. Here, we explore molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between GLIP1 and ethylene signaling by an epistatic analysis of ethylene response mutants and GLIP1-overexpressing (35S:GLIP1) plants. We show that GLIP1 expression is regulated by ethylene signaling components and, further, that GLIP1 expression or application of petiole exudates from 35S:GLIP1 plants affects ethylene signaling both positively and negatively, leading to ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 activation and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) down-regulation, respectively. Additionally, 35S:GLIP1 plants or their exudates increase the expression of the salicylic acid biosynthesis gene SALICYLIC ACID INDUCTION-DEFICIENT2, known to be inhibited by EIN3 and EIN3-LIKE1. These results suggest that GLIP1 regulates plant immunity through positive and negative feedback regulation of ethylene signaling, and this is mediated by its activity to accumulate a systemic signal(s) in the phloem. We propose a model explaining how GLIP1 regulates the fine-tuning of ethylene signaling and ethylene-salicylic acid cross talk. PMID:24170202

  18. Regulation of Phagocyte Migration by Signal Regulatory Protein-Alpha Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Alvarez-Zarate

    Full Text Available Signaling through the inhibitory receptor signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRPα controls effector functions in phagocytes. However, there are also indications that interactions between SIRPα and its ligand CD47 are involved in phagocyte transendothelial migration. We have investigated the involvement of SIRPα signaling in phagocyte migration in vitro and in vivo using mice that lack the SIRPα cytoplasmic tail. During thioglycolate-induced peritonitis in SIRPα mutant mice, both neutrophil and macrophage influx were found to occur, but to be significantly delayed. SIRPα signaling appeared to be essential for an optimal transendothelial migration and chemotaxis, and for the amoeboid type of phagocyte migration in 3-dimensional environments. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that SIRPα signaling can directly control phagocyte migration, and this may contribute to the impaired inflammatory phenotype that has been observed in the absence of SIRPα signaling.

  19. Targeted treatment for sonic hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieran, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatment options, including targeted therapies, are needed for patients with medulloblastoma (MB), especially for those with high-risk or recurrent/relapsed disease. Four major molecular subgroups of MB have been identified, one of which is characterized by activation of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway. Preclinical data suggest that inhibitors of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway could become valuable treatment options for patients with this subgroup of MB. Indeed, agents targeting the positive regulator of the pathway, smoothened (SMO), have demonstrated efficacy in a subset of patients with SHH MB. However, because of resistance and the presence of mutations downstream of SMO, not all patients with SHH MB respond to SMO inhibitors. The development of agents that target these resistance mechanisms and the potential for their combination with traditional chemotherapy and SHH inhibitors will be discussed. Due to its extensive molecular heterogeneity, the future of MB treatment is in personalized therapy, which may lead to improved efficacy and reduced toxicity. This will include the development of clinically available tests that can efficiently discern the SHH subgroup. The preliminary use of these tests in clinical trials is also discussed herein. PMID:24951114

  20. Nuclear calcium signalling in the regulation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bading, Hilmar

    2013-09-01

    Synaptic activity initiates biochemical processes that have various outcomes, including the formation of memories, increases in neuronal survival and the development of chronic pain and addiction. Virtually all activity-induced, long-lasting adaptations of brain functions require a dialogue between synapses and the nucleus that results in changes in gene expression. Calcium signals that are induced by synaptic activity and propagate into the nucleus are a major route for synapse-to-nucleus communication. Recent findings indicate that diverse forms of neuroadaptation require calcium transients in the nucleus to switch on the necessary genomic programme. Deficits in nuclear calcium signalling as a result of a reduction in synaptic activity or increased extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signalling may underlie the aetiologies of various diseases, including neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Regulation of Arabidopsis root development by small signaling peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eDelay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant root systems arise de novo from a single embryonic root. Complex and highly coordinated developmental networks are required to ensure the formation of lateral organs maximises plant fitness. The Arabidopsis root is well suited to dissection of regulatory and developmental networks due to its highly ordered, predictable structure. A myriad of regulatory signalling networks control the development of plant roots, from the classical hormones such as auxin and cytokinin to short-range positional signalling molecules that relay information between neighbouring cells. Small signaling peptides are a growing class of regulatory molecules involved in many aspects of root development including meristem maintenance, the gravitropic response, lateral root development and vascular formation. Here, recent findings on the roles of regulatory peptides in these aspects of root development are discussed.

  2. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  3. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  4. RhoA Controls Retinoid Signaling by ROCK Dependent Regulation of Retinol Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Mariscal, Alberto; Peyrollier, Karine; Basse, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed small GTPase RhoA is essential for embryonic development and mutated in different cancers. Functionally, it is well described as a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, but its role in gene regulation is less understood. Using primary mouse keratinocytes with a deletion ......A-null keratinocytes. These data reveal an unexpected link between the cytoskeletal regulator RhoA and retinoid signalling and uncover a novel pathway by which RhoA regulates gene expression....

  5. Click chemistry armed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure palmitoylation by hedgehog acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Masumoto, Naoko; Bodakh, George; Konitsiotis, Antonio D; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Rodgers, Ursula R; Owens, Raymond J; Magee, Anthony I; Tate, Edward W

    2015-12-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for correct embryogenesis and tissue development. However, on maturation, signaling is also found to be aberrantly activated in many cancers. Palmitoylation of the secreted signaling protein sonic hedgehog (Shh) by the enzyme hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) is required for functional signaling. To quantify this important posttranslational modification, many in vitro Shh palmitoylation assays employ radiolabeled fatty acids, which have limitations in terms of cost and safety. Here we present a click chemistry armed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (click-ELISA) for assessment of Hhat activity through acylation of biotinylated Shh peptide with an alkyne-tagged palmitoyl-CoA (coenzyme A) analogue. Click chemistry functionalization of the alkyne tag with azido-FLAG peptide allows analysis through an ELISA protocol and colorimetric readout. This assay format identified the detergent n-dodecyl β-d-maltopyranoside as an improved solubilizing agent for Hhat activity. Quantification of the potency of RU-SKI small molecule Hhat inhibitors by click-ELISA indicated IC50 values in the low- or sub-micromolar range. A stopped assay format was also employed that allows measurement of Hhat kinetic parameters where saturating substrate concentrations exceed the binding capacity of the streptavidin-coated plate. Therefore, click-ELISA represents a nonradioactive method for assessing protein palmitoylation in vitro that is readily expandable to other classes of protein lipidation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sonic Hedgehog dependent phosphorylation by CK1α and GRK2 is required for ciliary accumulation and activation of smoothened.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the GPCR-like protein Smoothened (Smo, but how vertebrate Smo is activated remains poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hh dependent phosphorylation activates Smo. Whether this is also the case in vertebrates is unclear, owing to the marked sequence divergence between vertebrate and Drosophila Smo (dSmo and the involvement of primary cilia in vertebrate Hh signaling. Here we demonstrate that mammalian Smo (mSmo is activated through multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail by CK1α and GRK2. Phosphorylation of mSmo induces its active conformation and simultaneously promotes its ciliary accumulation. We demonstrate that graded Hh signals induce increasing levels of mSmo phosphorylation that fine-tune its ciliary localization, conformation, and activity. We show that mSmo phosphorylation is induced by its agonists and oncogenic mutations but is blocked by its antagonist cyclopamine, and efficient mSmo phosphorylation depends on the kinesin-II ciliary motor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hh signaling recruits CK1α to initiate mSmo phosphorylation, and phosphorylation further increases the binding of CK1α and GRK2 to mSmo, forming a positive feedback loop that amplifies and/or sustains mSmo phosphorylation. Hence, despite divergence in their primary sequences and their subcellular trafficking, mSmo and dSmo employ analogous mechanisms for their activation.

  7. Wnt signaling regulates pulp volume and dentin thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Won Hee; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Du; Hunter, Daniel J; Zhong, Zhendong; Ramos, Daniel M; Williams, Bart O; Sharpe, Paul T; Bardet, Claire; Mah, Su-Jung; Helms, Jill A

    2014-04-01

    Odontoblasts, cementoblasts, ameloblasts, and osteoblasts all form mineralized tissues in the craniofacial complex, and all these cell types exhibit active Wnt signaling during postnatal life. We set out to understand the functions of this Wnt signaling, by evaluating the phenotypes of mice in which the essential Wnt chaperone protein, Wntless was eliminated. The deletion of Wls was restricted to cells expressing Osteocalcin (OCN), which in addition to osteoblasts includes odontoblasts, cementoblasts, and ameloblasts. Dentin, cementum, enamel, and bone all formed in OCN-Cre;Wls(fl/fl) mice but their homeostasis was dramatically affected. The most notable feature was a significant increase in dentin volume and density. We attribute this gain in dentin volume to a Wnt-mediated misregulation of Runx2. Normally, Wnt signaling stimulates Runx2, which in turn inhibits dentin sialoprotein (DSP); this inhibition must be relieved for odontoblasts to differentiate. In OCN-Cre;Wls(fl/fl) mice, Wnt pathway activation is reduced and Runx2 levels decline. The Runx2-mediated repression of DSP is relieved and odontoblast differentiation is accordingly enhanced. This study demonstrates the importance of Wnt signaling in the homeostasis of mineralized tissues of the craniofacial complex. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Regulation of Metabolic Signaling in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth

    enzymes. Skeletal muscle consists of thousands of muscle fibers. These fibers can roughly be classified into type I and type II muscle fibers. The overall aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate the effect of insulin and exercise on human muscle fiber type specific metabolic signaling. The importance...

  9. Signaling pathways regulated by Brassicaceae extract inhibit the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The goal of this study was identification signaling molecules mediated the formation of AGEs in brain of rats injected with CdCl2 and the role of camel whey proteins and Brassicaceae extract on formation of AGEs in brain. Methods: Ninety male rats were randomly grouped into five groups; Normal control (GpI) ...

  10. Ophthalmological abnormalities in wild European hedgehogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant finding was bilateral nuclear cataract seen particularly in young poorly growing animals. Investigation into the potential causation of cataracts by poor nutrition or poor feeding ability by lens opacification requires further study. Keywords: Cataract, Conservation, Eye abnormality, Hedgehog, Rehabilitation ...

  11. Wnt signaling in the thymus is regulated by differential expression of intracellular signaling molecules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Weerkamp (Floor); M.R.M. Baert (Miranda); B.A. Naber (Brigitta); E.E. Koster (Esther); E.F. de Haas (Edwin); K.R. Atkuri (Kondala); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); L.A. Herzenberg (Leonard); F.J.T. Staal (Frank)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWnt signaling is essential for T cell development in the thymus, but the stages in which it occurs and the molecular mechanisms underlying Wnt responsiveness have remained elusive. Here we examined Wnt signaling activity in both human and murine thymocyte populations by determining

  12. Dancing with Hormones: A Current Perspective of Nitrate Signaling and Regulation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhu Guan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In nature and agriculture, nitrate availability is a main environmental cue for plant growth, development and stress responses. Nitrate signaling and regulation are hence at the center of communications between plant intrinsic programs and the environment. It is also well known that endogenous phytohormones play numerous critical roles in integrating extrinsic cues and intrinsic responses, regulating and refining almost all aspects of plant growth, development and stress responses. Therefore, interaction between nitrate and phytohormones, such as auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, gibberellins, and ethylene, is prevalent. The growing evidence indicates that biosynthesis, de-conjugation, transport, and signaling of hormones are partly controlled by nitrate signaling. Recent advances with nitrate signaling and transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis give rise to new paradigms. Given the comprehensive nitrate transport, sensing, signaling and regulations at the level of the cell and organism, nitrate itself is a local and long-distance signal molecule, conveying N status at the whole-plant level. A direct molecular link between nitrate signaling and cell cycle progression was revealed with TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1-20 (TCP20 – NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 6/7 (NLP6/7 regulatory nexus. NLPs are key regulators of nitrogen responses in plants. TCPs function as the main regulators of plant morphology and architecture, with the emerging role as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment. By analogy with auxin being proposed as a plant morphogen, nitrate may be an environmental morphogen. The morphogen-gradient-dependent and cell-autonomous mechanisms of nitrate signaling and regulation are an integral part of cell growth and cell identification. This is especially true in root meristem growth that is regulated by intertwined nitrate, phytohormones, and glucose-TOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, the nitrate

  13. Dancing with Hormones: A Current Perspective of Nitrate Signaling and Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Peizhu

    2017-01-01

    In nature and agriculture, nitrate availability is a main environmental cue for plant growth, development and stress responses. Nitrate signaling and regulation are hence at the center of communications between plant intrinsic programs and the environment. It is also well known that endogenous phytohormones play numerous critical roles in integrating extrinsic cues and intrinsic responses, regulating and refining almost all aspects of plant growth, development and stress responses. Therefore, interaction between nitrate and phytohormones, such as auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, gibberellins, and ethylene, is prevalent. The growing evidence indicates that biosynthesis, de-conjugation, transport, and signaling of hormones are partly controlled by nitrate signaling. Recent advances with nitrate signaling and transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis give rise to new paradigms. Given the comprehensive nitrate transport, sensing, signaling and regulations at the level of the cell and organism, nitrate itself is a local and long-distance signal molecule, conveying N status at the whole-plant level. A direct molecular link between nitrate signaling and cell cycle progression was revealed with TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1-20 (TCP20) - NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 6/7 (NLP6/7) regulatory nexus. NLPs are key regulators of nitrogen responses in plants. TCPs function as the main regulators of plant morphology and architecture, with the emerging role as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment. By analogy with auxin being proposed as a plant morphogen, nitrate may be an environmental morphogen. The morphogen-gradient-dependent and cell-autonomous mechanisms of nitrate signaling and regulation are an integral part of cell growth and cell identification. This is especially true in root meristem growth that is regulated by intertwined nitrate, phytohormones, and glucose-TOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, the nitrate transcriptional

  14. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering.

  15. A dynamic Gli code interprets Hh signals to regulate induction, patterning, and endocrine cell specification in the zebrafish pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Christine A; Sbrogna, Jennifer L; Guner, Burcu; Osgood, Marcey; Shen, Meng-Chieh; Karlstrom, Rolf O

    2009-02-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is necessary for the induction and functional patterning of the pituitary placode, however the mechanisms by which Hh signals are interpreted by placodal cells are unknown. Here we show distinct temporal requirements for Hh signaling in endocrine cell differentiation and describe a dynamic Gli transcriptional response code that interprets these Hh signals within the developing adenohypophysis. Gli1 is required for the differentiation of selected endocrine cell types and acts as the major activator of Hh-mediated pituitary induction, while Gli2a and Gli2b contribute more minor activator functions. Intriguingly, this Gli response code changes as development proceeds. Gli1 continues to be required for the activation of the Hh response anteriorly in the pars distalis. In contrast, Gli2b is required to repress Hh target gene expression posteriorly in the pars intermedia. Consistent with these changing roles, gli1, gli2a, and gli2b, but not gli3, are expressed in pituitary precursor cells at the anterior neural ridge. Later in development, gli1 expression is maintained throughout the adenohypophysis while gli2a and gli2b expression are restricted to the pars intermedia. Given the link between Hh signaling and pituitary adenomas in humans, our data suggest misregulation of Gli function may contribute to these common pituitary tumors.

  16. Regulation of PDH, GS and insulin signalling in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup

    The aims of the present thesis were to investigate 1) The impact of physical inactivity on insulinstimulated Akt, TBC1D4 and GS regulation in human skeletal muscle, 2) The impact of exercise training on glucose-mediated regulation of PDH and GS in skeletal muscle in elderly men, 3) The impact...... with physical inactivity in humans, and physical inactivity did not affect the ability of exercise to enhance insulinmediated skeletal muscle glucose extraction. 2) Exercise training-improved glucose handling in aged human skeletal muscle was associated with increased content of key proteins in glucose...

  17. Leukotriene synthesis is required for hedgehog-dependent neurite projection in neuralized embryoid bodies but not for motor neuron differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold; Roelink, Henk

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is required for many developmental processes,. as well as for adult homeostasis. Although all known effects of Hh signaling affecting patterning and differentiation are mediated by members of the Gli family of zinc ringer transcription factors, we demonstrate that the

  18. The deubiquitinating enzyme Usp5 regulates Notch and RTK signaling during Drosophila eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xuemei; Huang, Qinzhu; Xu, Yanqin; Jin, Yuxiao; Feng, Ying; Shi, Weijie; Ye, Xiaolei; Lin, Yi; Hou, Ling; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-03-01

    Usp5 belongs to the USP family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which comprises the largest class of DUBs. We previously reported that loss of Usp5 impairs development of photoreceptors in Drosophila eyes, although the detailed mechanism remained unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that Usp5 regulates both Notch and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Loss of Usp5 results in upregulation of Notch signaling and downregulation of RTK signaling, leading to impaired photoreceptor development. Moreover, genetic rescue experiments with the DNA binding protein Suppressor of Hairless or Notch RNAi indicate that they mediate the regulation of RTK signaling by Usp5. The present study provides mechanistic insight into how Usp5 regulates photoreceptor differentiation by Notch and RTK signaling in the Drosophila eye. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. PIMS Modulates Immune Tolerance by Negatively Regulating Drosophila Innate Immune Signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lhocine, Nouara; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Buchon, Nicolas; Wepf, Alexander; Wilson, Rebecca; Tenev, Tencho; Lemaitre, Bruno; Gstaiger, Matthias; Meier, Pascal; Leulier, François

    2008-01-01

    .... Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the establishment of this threshold. We report that a recently identified Drosophila immune regulator, which we call PGRP-LC-interacting inhibitor of Imd signaling (PIMS...

  20. Is the regulation of insulin signaling multi-organismal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Angela E

    2011-12-13

    The sustained health of an individual animal depends on the composition and activities of its resident microbiota. A major challenge is to identify the processes by which the microbiota and animal interact, recognizing that this research should lead ultimately to novel strategies to promote human health. Drosophila is emerging as a tractable model system to investigate these interactions. New evidence reveals that the gut microbiota promotes insulin signaling in Drosophila, leading to increased growth and development rates. Different gut bacteria and mechanisms [corrected] were implicated: acetic acid produced by Acetobacter pomorum and the promotion of amino acid nutrition by Lactobacillus plantarum. [corrected]. These findings raise the possibility that multiple bacterial effectors may interact with signaling networks to shape animal health.

  1. ROP GTPase Signaling in The Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2013-05-24

    I secured funding from the DOE to investigate the effect of auxin signaling on ROP9. This was based on our preliminary data showing that ROP9 is activated by auxin. However, we were unable to show that rop9 knockout mutants have altered sensitivity to auxin. Instead, we found that auxin activates both ROP2 and ROP6, and relevant mutants exhibit reduced sensitivity to auxin. Therefore we used the fund to strengthen our research on ROP2 and ROP6. My laboratory made major advancements in the recent years in the understanding of the effect of auxin signaling on ROP2 and ROP6. This is clearly exemplified by the numerous publications acknowledging fund DE-FG0204ER15555 as the source of funding.

  2. Mammalian Hippo signalling: a kinase network regulated by protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergovich, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The Hippo signal transduction cascade controls cell growth, proliferation, and death, all of which are frequently deregulated in tumour cells. Since initial studies in Drosophila melanogaster were instrumental in defining Hippo signalling, the machinery was named after the central Ste20-like kinase Hippo. Moreover, given that loss of Hippo signalling components Hippo, Warts, and Mats resulted in uncontrolled tissue overgrowth, Hippo signalling was defined as a tumour suppressor cascade. Significantly, all core factors of Hippo signalling have mammalian orthologues that functionally compensate for loss of their counterparts in flies. Furthermore, studies in flies and mammalian cell systems showed that Hippo signalling represents a kinase cascade that is tightly regulated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Several Hippo signalling molecules contain SARAH domains that mediate specific PPIs, thereby influencing the activities of MST1/2 kinases, the human Hippo orthologues. Moreover, WW domains are present in several Hippo factors, and these domains also serve as interaction surfaces for regulatory PPIs in Hippo signalling. Finally, the kinase activities of LATS1/2, the human counterparts of Warts, are controlled by binding to hMOB1, the human Mats. Therefore, Hippo signalling is regulated by PPIs on several levels. Here we review our current understanding of how these regulatory PPIs are regulated and contribute to the functionality of Hippo signalling. PMID:22260677

  3. A self-regulating biomolecular comparator for processing oscillatory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Franco, Elisa; Schulman, Rebecca

    2015-10-06

    While many cellular processes are driven by biomolecular oscillators, precise control of a downstream on/off process by a biochemical oscillator signal can be difficult: over an oscillator's period, its output signal varies continuously between its amplitude limits and spends a significant fraction of the time at intermediate values between these limits. Further, the oscillator's output is often noisy, with particularly large variations in the amplitude. In electronic systems, an oscillating signal is generally processed by a downstream device such as a comparator that converts a potentially noisy oscillatory input into a square wave output that is predominantly in one of two well-defined on and off states. The comparator's output then controls downstream processes. We describe a method for constructing a synthetic biochemical device that likewise produces a square-wave-type biomolecular output for a variety of oscillatory inputs. The method relies on a separation of time scales between the slow rate of production of an oscillatory signal molecule and the fast rates of intermolecular binding and conformational changes. We show how to control the characteristics of the output by varying the concentrations of the species and the reaction rates. We then use this control to show how our approach could be applied to process different in vitro and in vivo biomolecular oscillators, including the p53-Mdm2 transcriptional oscillator and two types of in vitro transcriptional oscillators. These results demonstrate how modular biomolecular circuits could, in principle, be combined to build complex dynamical systems. The simplicity of our approach also suggests that natural molecular circuits may process some biomolecular oscillator outputs before they are applied downstream. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. Is the Regulation of Insulin Signaling Multi-Organismal?

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Angela E.

    2011-01-01

    The sustained health of an individual animal depends on the composition and activities of its resident microbiota. A major challenge is to identify the processes by which the microbiota and animal interact, recognizing that this research should lead ultimately to novel strategies to promote human health. Drosophila is emerging as a tractable model system to investigate these interactions. New evidence reveals that the gut microbiota promotes insulin signaling in Drosophila, leading to increas...

  5. Regulation of Arabidopsis root development by small signaling peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Christina eDelay; Nijat eImin; Michael Anthony Djordjevic

    2013-01-01

    Plant root systems arise de novo from a single embryonic root. Complex and highly coordinated developmental networks are required to ensure the formation of lateral organs maximizes plant fitness. The Arabidopsis root is well-suited to dissection of regulatory and developmental networks due to its highly ordered, predictable structure. A myriad of regulatory signaling networks control the development of plant roots, from the classical hormones such as auxin and cytokinin to short-range positi...

  6. N-wasp is essential for the negative regulation of B cell receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohong Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP, which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell-specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation.

  7. Metastasis-associated kinase modulates Wnt signaling to regulate brain patterning and morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kibardin, Alexey; Ossipova, Olga; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2006-01-01

    Wnt signaling is a major pathway regulating cell fate determination, cell proliferation and cell movements in vertebrate embryos. Distinct branches of this pathway activate β-catenin/TCF target genes and modulate morphogenetic movements in embryonic tissues by reorganizing the cytoskeleton. The selection of different molecular targets in the pathway is driven by multiple phosphorylation events. Here, we report that metastasis-associated kinase (MAK) is a novel regulator of Wnt signaling durin...

  8. Wnt signaling-mediated redox regulation maintains the germ line stem cell differentiation niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su; Gao, Yuan; Song, Xiaoqing; Ma, Xing; Zhu, Xiujuan; Mao, Ying; Yang, Zhihao; Ni, Jianquan; Li, Hua; Malanowski, Kathryn E; Anoja, Perera; Park, Jungeun; Haug, Jeff; Xie, Ting

    2015-10-09

    Adult stem cells continuously undergo self-renewal and generate differentiated cells. In the Drosophila ovary, two separate niches control germ line stem cell (GSC) self-renewal and differentiation processes. Compared to the self-renewing niche, relatively little is known about the maintenance and function of the differentiation niche. In this study, we show that the cellular redox state regulated by Wnt signaling is critical for the maintenance and function of the differentiation niche to promote GSC progeny differentiation. Defective Wnt signaling causes the loss of the differentiation niche and the upregulated BMP signaling in differentiated GSC progeny, thereby disrupting germ cell differentiation. Mechanistically, Wnt signaling controls the expression of multiple glutathione-S-transferase family genes and the cellular redox state. Finally, Wnt2 and Wnt4 function redundantly to maintain active Wnt signaling in the differentiation niche. Therefore, this study has revealed a novel strategy for Wnt signaling in regulating the cellular redox state and maintaining the differentiation niche.

  9. CD47 signaling regulates the immunosuppressive activity of VEGF in T cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Chang, Tiffany; Singh, Satya P.; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Garfield, Susan H.; Pendrak, Michael L.; Pantoja, David R. Soto; Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Jin, Shelly; Roberts, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Thromobospondin-1 inhibits angiogenesis in part by interacting with the ubiquitous cell surface receptor CD47. In endothelial cells, CD47 interacts directly with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2), and thrombospondin-1 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation and signaling by disrupting this association. We now show that CD47 similarly associates with and regulates VEGFR2 in T cells. Thrombospondin-1 inhibits phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream target Src in wild type but not in CD47-deficient human Jurkat and primary murine T cells. VEGFR2 signaling inhibits proliferation and TCR signaling in wild type T cells. However, ligation of CD47 by thrombospondin-1 or loss of CD47 expression reverses some inhibitory effects of VEGF on proliferation and T cell activation. We further found that VEGF and VEGFR2 expression are up-regulated in CD47-deficient murine CD4+ and human Jurkat T cells, and the resulting autocrine VEGFR2 signaling enhances proliferation and some TCR responses in the absence of CD47. Thus, CD47 signaling modulates the ability of VEGF to regulate proliferation and TCR signaling, and autocrine production of VEGF by T cells contributes to this regulation. This provides a mechanism to understand the context-dependent effects of thrombospondin-1 and VEGF on T cell activation and reveals an important role for CD47 signaling in regulating T cell production of the major angiogenic factor VEGF. PMID:25200950

  10. Developing an ancient epithelial appendage: FGF signalling regulates early tail denticle formation in sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory L. Cooper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate epithelial appendages constitute a diverse group of organs that includes integumentary structures such as reptilian scales, avian feathers and mammalian hair. Recent studies have provided new evidence for the homology of integumentary organ development throughout amniotes, despite their disparate final morphologies. These structures develop from conserved molecular signalling centres, known as epithelial placodes. It is not yet certain whether this homology extends beyond the integumentary organs of amniotes, as there is a lack of knowledge regarding their development in basal vertebrates. As the ancient sister lineage of bony vertebrates, extant chondrichthyans are well suited to testing the phylogenetic depth of this homology. Elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays possess hard, mineralised epithelial appendages called odontodes, which include teeth and dermal denticles (placoid scales. Odontodes constitute some of the oldest known vertebrate integumentary appendages, predating the origin of gnathostomes. Here, we used an emerging model shark (Scyliorhinus canicula to test the hypothesis that denticles are homologous to other placode-derived amniote integumentary organs. To examine the conservation of putative gene regulatory network (GRN member function, we undertook small molecule inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling during caudal denticle formation. Results We show that during early caudal denticle morphogenesis, the shark expresses homologues of conserved developmental gene families, known to comprise a core GRN for early placode morphogenesis in amniotes. This includes conserved expression of FGFs, sonic hedgehog (shh and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (bmp4. Additionally, we reveal that denticle placodes possess columnar epithelial cells with a reduced rate of proliferation, a conserved characteristic of amniote skin appendage development. Small molecule inhibition of FGF signalling revealed

  11. GH administration patterns differently regulate epidermal growth factor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Maria E.; Miquet, Johanna Gabriela; Rossi, Soledad Paola; Irene, Pablo E.; Sotelo, Ana Isabel; Frungieri, Monica Beatriz; Turyn, Daniel; Gonzalez, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Current GH administration protocols imply frequent s.c. injections, resulting in suboptimal compliance. Therefore, there is interest in developing delivery systems for sustained release of the hormone. However, GH has different actions depending on its continuous or pulsatile plasma concentration pattern. GH levels and circulating concentration patterns could be involved in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in liver. Aberrant expression of this receptor and/...

  12. AEG-1 regulates retinoid X receptor and inhibits retinoid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Robertson, Chadia L; Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Gredler, Rachel; Siddiq, Ayesha; Emdad, Luni; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D; Ghosh, Shobha; Hylemon, Phillip B; Gil, Gregorio; Shah, Khalid; Bhere, Deepak; Subler, Mark A; Windle, Jolene J; Fisher, Paul B; Sarkar, Devanand

    2014-08-15

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) regulates key cellular responses such as cell growth and development, and this regulation is frequently perturbed in various malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecule(s) that physically govern this deregulation are mostly unknown. Here, we identified RXR as an interacting partner of astrocyte-elevated gene-1 (AEG-1)/metadherin (MTDH), an oncogene upregulated in all cancers. Upon interaction, AEG-1 profoundly inhibited RXR/retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-mediated transcriptional activation. Consequently, AEG-1 markedly protected HCC and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells from retinoid- and rexinoid-induced cell death. In nontumorigenic cells and primary hepatocytes, AEG-1/RXR colocalizes in the nucleus in which AEG-1 interferes with recruitment of transcriptional coactivators to RXR, preventing transcription of target genes. In tumor cells and AEG-1 transgenic hepatocytes, overexpressed AEG-1 entraps RXR in cytoplasm, precluding its nuclear translocation. In addition, ERK, activated by AEG-1, phosphorylates RXR that leads to its functional inactivation and attenuation of ligand-dependent transactivation. In nude mice models, combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and AEG-1 knockdown synergistically inhibited growth of human HCC xenografts. The present study establishes AEG-1 as a novel homeostatic regulator of RXR and RXR/RAR that might contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. Targeting AEG-1 could sensitize patients with HCC and AML to retinoid- and rexinoid-based therapeutics. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nucle...

  14. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: innks@khu.ac.kr

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  15. Cullin-4 regulates Wingless and JNK signaling-mediated cell death in the Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tare, Meghana; Sarkar, Ankita; Bedi, Shimpi; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2016-12-29

    In all multicellular organisms, the fundamental processes of cell proliferation and cell death are crucial for growth regulation during organogenesis. Strict regulation of cell death is important to maintain tissue homeostasis by affecting processes like regulation of cell number, and elimination of unwanted/unfit cells. The developing Drosophila eye is a versatile model to study patterning and growth, where complex signaling pathways regulate growth and cell survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of these processes is not fully understood. In a gain-of-function screen, we found that misexpression of cullin-4 (cul-4), an ubiquitin ligase, can rescue reduced eye mutant phenotypes. Previously, cul-4 has been shown to regulate chromatin remodeling, cell cycle and cell division. Genetic characterization of cul-4 in the developing eye revealed that loss-of-function of cul-4 exhibits a reduced eye phenotype. Analysis of twin-spots showed that in comparison with their wild-type counterparts, the cul-4 loss-of-function clones fail to survive. Here we show that cul-4 clones are eliminated by induction of cell death due to activation of caspases. Aberrant activation of signaling pathways is known to trigger cell death in the developing eye. We found that Wingless (Wg) and c-Jun-amino-terminal-(NH2)-Kinase (JNK) signaling are ectopically induced in cul-4 mutant clones, and these signals co-localize with the dying cells. Modulating levels of Wg and JNK signaling by using agonists and antagonists of these pathways demonstrated that activation of Wg and JNK signaling enhances cul-4 mutant phenotype, whereas downregulation of Wg and JNK signaling rescues the cul-4 mutant phenotypes of reduced eye. Here we present evidences to demonstrate that cul-4 is involved in restricting Wg signaling and downregulation of JNK signaling-mediated cell death during early eye development. Overall, our studies provide insights into a novel role of cul-4 in promoting cell

  16. Desert hedgehog is a mammal-specific gene expressed during testicular and ovarian development in a marsupial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara William A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desert hedgehog (DHH belongs to the hedgehog gene family that act as secreted intercellular signal transducers. DHH is an essential morphogen for normal testicular development and function in both mice and humans but is not present in the avian lineage. Like other hedgehog proteins, DHH signals through the patched (PTCH receptors 1 and 2. Here we examine the expression and protein distribution of DHH, PTCH1 and PTCH2 in the developing testes of a marsupial mammal (the tammar wallaby to determine whether DHH signalling is a conserved factor in gonadal development in all therian mammals. Results DHH, PTCH1 and PTCH2 were present in the marsupial genome and highly conserved with their eutherian orthologues. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that DHH has recently evolved and is a mammal-specific hedgehog orthologue. The marsupial PTCH2 receptor had an additional exon (exon 21a not annotated in eutherian PTCH2 proteins. Interestingly we found evidence of this exon in humans and show that its translation would result in a truncated protein with functions similar to PTCH1. We also show that DHH expression was not restricted to the testes during gonadal development (as in mice, but was also expressed in the developing ovary. Expression of DHH, PTCH1 and PTCH2 in the adult tammar testis and ovary was consistent with findings in the adult mouse. Conclusions These data suggest that there is a highly conserved role for DHH signalling in the differentiation and function of the mammalian testis and that DHH may be necessary for marsupial ovarian development. The receptors PTCH1 and PTCH2 are highly conserved mediators of hedgehog signalling in both the developing and adult marsupial gonads. Together these findings indicate DHH is an essential therian mammal-specific morphogen in gonadal development and gametogenesis.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of ethylene perception and signaling in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, George Eric [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2014-03-19

    The simple gas ethylene functions as an endogenous regulator of plant growth and development, and modulates such energy relevant processes as photosynthesis and biomass accumulation. Ethylene is perceived in the plant Arabidopsis by a five-member family of receptors related to bacterial histidine kinases. Our data support a general model in which the receptors exist as parts of larger protein complexes. Our goals have been to (1) characterize physical interactions among members of the signaling complex; (2) the role of histidine-kinase transphosphorylation in signaling by the complex; and (3) the role of a novel family of proteins that regulate signal output by the receptors.

  18. A SHH-FOXF1-BMP4 signaling axis regulating growth and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal tissues in ureter development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenpoll, Tobias; Wittern, Anna B; Mamo, Tamrat M; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Rudat, Carsten; Kleppa, Marc-Jens; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Wojahn, Irina; Lüdtke, Timo H-W; Trowe, Mark-Oliver; Kispert, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    The differentiated cell types of the epithelial and mesenchymal tissue compartments of the mature ureter of the mouse arise in a precise temporal and spatial sequence from uncommitted precursor cells of the distal ureteric bud epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme. Previous genetic efforts identified a member of the Hedgehog (HH) family of secreted proteins, Sonic hedgehog (SHH) as a crucial epithelial signal for growth and differentiation of the ureteric mesenchyme. Here, we used conditional loss- and gain-of-function experiments of the unique HH signal transducer Smoothened (SMO) to further characterize the cellular functions and unravel the effector genes of HH signaling in ureter development. We showed that HH signaling is not only required for proliferation and SMC differentiation of cells of the inner mesenchymal region but also for survival of cells of the outer mesenchymal region, and for epithelial proliferation and differentiation. We identified the Forkhead transcription factor gene Foxf1 as a target of HH signaling in the ureteric mesenchyme. Expression of a repressor version of FOXF1 in this tissue completely recapitulated the mesenchymal and epithelial proliferation and differentiation defects associated with loss of HH signaling while re-expression of a wildtype version of FOXF1 in the inner mesenchymal layer restored these cellular programs when HH signaling was inhibited. We further showed that expression of Bmp4 in the ureteric mesenchyme depends on HH signaling and Foxf1, and that exogenous BMP4 rescued cell proliferation and epithelial differentiation in ureters with abrogated HH signaling or FOXF1 function. We conclude that SHH uses a FOXF1-BMP4 module to coordinate the cellular programs for ureter elongation and differentiation, and suggest that deregulation of this signaling axis occurs in human congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT).

  19. A SHH-FOXF1-BMP4 signaling axis regulating growth and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal tissues in ureter development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bohnenpoll

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The differentiated cell types of the epithelial and mesenchymal tissue compartments of the mature ureter of the mouse arise in a precise temporal and spatial sequence from uncommitted precursor cells of the distal ureteric bud epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme. Previous genetic efforts identified a member of the Hedgehog (HH family of secreted proteins, Sonic hedgehog (SHH as a crucial epithelial signal for growth and differentiation of the ureteric mesenchyme. Here, we used conditional loss- and gain-of-function experiments of the unique HH signal transducer Smoothened (SMO to further characterize the cellular functions and unravel the effector genes of HH signaling in ureter development. We showed that HH signaling is not only required for proliferation and SMC differentiation of cells of the inner mesenchymal region but also for survival of cells of the outer mesenchymal region, and for epithelial proliferation and differentiation. We identified the Forkhead transcription factor gene Foxf1 as a target of HH signaling in the ureteric mesenchyme. Expression of a repressor version of FOXF1 in this tissue completely recapitulated the mesenchymal and epithelial proliferation and differentiation defects associated with loss of HH signaling while re-expression of a wildtype version of FOXF1 in the inner mesenchymal layer restored these cellular programs when HH signaling was inhibited. We further showed that expression of Bmp4 in the ureteric mesenchyme depends on HH signaling and Foxf1, and that exogenous BMP4 rescued cell proliferation and epithelial differentiation in ureters with abrogated HH signaling or FOXF1 function. We conclude that SHH uses a FOXF1-BMP4 module to coordinate the cellular programs for ureter elongation and differentiation, and suggest that deregulation of this signaling axis occurs in human congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT.

  20. Regulators and effectors of bone morphogenetic protein signalling in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiang-Yun; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Li; Huang, Yu

    2015-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play key roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in various tissues and organs, including the cardiovascular system. BMPs signal through both Smad-dependent and -independent cascades to exert a wide spectrum of biological activities. Cardiovascular disorders such as abnormal angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy have been linked to aberrant BMP signalling. To correct the dysregulated BMP signalling in cardiovascular pathogenesis, it is essential to get a better understanding of how the regulators and effectors of BMP signalling control cardiovascular function and how the dysregulated BMP signalling contributes to cardiovascular dysfunction. We hence highlight several key regulators of BMP signalling such as extracellular regulators of ligands, mechanical forces, microRNAs and small molecule drugs as well as typical BMP effectors like direct downstream target genes, mitogen-activated protein kinases, reactive oxygen species and microRNAs. The insights into these molecular processes will help target both the regulators and important effectors to reverse BMP-associated cardiovascular pathogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  1. CD47 signaling regulates the immunosuppressive activity of VEGF in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Chang, Tiffany; Singh, Satya P; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Garfield, Susan H; Pendrak, Michael L; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Jin, Shelly; Roberts, David D

    2014-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) inhibits angiogenesis, in part, by interacting with the ubiquitous cell-surface receptor CD47. In endothelial cells, CD47 interacts directly with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, and TSP1 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation and signaling by disrupting this association. We show that CD47 similarly associates with and regulates VEGFR2 in T cells. TSP1 inhibits phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream target Src in wild type but not in CD47-deficient human Jurkat and primary murine T cells. VEGFR2 signaling inhibits proliferation and TCR signaling in wild type T cells. However, ligation of CD47 by TSP1 or loss of CD47 expression reverses some inhibitory effects of VEGF on proliferation and T cell activation. We further found that VEGF and VEGFR2 expression are upregulated in CD47-deficient murine CD4(+) and human Jurkat T cells, and the resulting autocrine VEGFR2 signaling enhances proliferation and some TCR responses in the absence of CD47. Thus, CD47 signaling modulates the ability of VEGF to regulate proliferation and TCR signaling, and autocrine production of VEGF by T cells contributes to this regulation. This provides a mechanism to understand the context-dependent effects of TSP1 and VEGF on T cell activation, and reveals an important role for CD47 signaling in regulating T cell production of the major angiogenic factor VEGF.

  2. IQGAP scaffold proteins are the multifunctional regulators of cellular signaling and malignant transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Skovorodnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins coordinate the assembling of multicomponent protein complexes and participate in transduction of cellular signals via multiple signaling pathways therefore acting as important regulators of cell properties. IQ Motif Containing GTPase Activating Proteins (IQGAPs are promising targets for studying the role of scaffold proteins in intracellular signaling regulation and development of cancer and other diseases. IQGAP family includes 3 proteins (IQGAP1, IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 that differ considerably by their expression patterns and functions. Distinct genomic aberrations and expression changes in various tumors were reported for all three IQGAP family members. The present paper thoroughly reviews the structure of IQGAP proteins, their involvement in regulation of cell characteristics and interactions with components of intracellular signaling pathways. Special attention is given to the up-to-date data on deregulation of IQGAP genes functions in different tumor types, analysis of their possible role in tumor progression and their associations with clinicopathological tumor characteristics.

  3. Kinetic Model for Signal Binding to the Quorum Sensing Regulator LasR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussen, Anetta; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We propose a kinetic model for the activation of the las regulon in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The model is based on in vitro data and accounts for the LasR dimerization and consecutive activation by binding of two OdDHL signal molecules. Experimentally, the production...... of the active LasR quorum-sensing regulator was studied in an Escherichia coli background as a function of signal molecule concentration. The functional activity of the regulator was monitored via a GFP reporter fusion to lasB expressed from the native lasB promoter. The new data shows that the active form...... of the LasR dimer binds two signal molecules cooperatively and that the timescale for reaching saturation is independent of the signal molecule concentration. This favors a picture where the dimerized regulator is protected against proteases and remains protected as it is activated through binding of two...

  4. Proteomic analysis of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) medulloblastoma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronci, Maurizio; Catanzaro, Giuseppina; Pieroni, Luisa; Po, Agnese; Besharat, Zein Mersini; Greco, Viviana; Levi Mortera, Stefano; Screpanti, Isabella; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Urbani, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Human medulloblastoma (MB) is a malignant brain tumor that comprises four distinct molecular subgroups including the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-MB group. A leading cause of the SHH subgroup is an aberrant activation of the SHH pathway, a developmental signaling that regulates postnatal development of the cerebellum by promoting the mitotic expansion of granule neural precursors (GNPs) in the external granule layer (EGL). The abnormal SHH signaling pathway drives not only SHH-MB but also its cancer stem-like cells (SLCs), which represent a fraction of the tumor cell population that maintain cancer growth and have been associated with high grade tumors. Here, we report the first proteomic analysis of human SHH-MB SLCs before and after Retinoic Acid (RA)-induced differentiation. A total of 994 nLC-MS buckets were statistically analysed returning 68 modulated proteins between SLCs and their differentiated counterparts. Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) was one of the proteins that characterized the protein profile of SLCs. By means of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), Genomatix analysis and extending the network obtained using the differentially expressed proteins we found a correlation between Hsp70 and the NF-κB complex. A key driver of the SHH-MB group is cMET whose downstream proliferation/survival signalling is indeed via PI3K/Akt/NF-κB. We confirmed the results of the proteomic analysis by western blot, underlining that a P-p65/NF-κB activatory complex is highly expressed in SLCs. Taking together these results we define a new protein feature of SHH-MB SLCs.

  5. Broad relays hormone signals to regulate stem cell differentiation in Drosophila midgut during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X

    2012-11-01

    Like the mammalian intestine, the Drosophila adult midgut is constantly replenished by multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Although it is well known that adult ISCs arise from adult midgut progenitors (AMPs), relatively little is known about the mechanisms that regulate AMP specification. Here, we demonstrate that Broad (Br)-mediated hormone signaling regulates AMP specification. Br is highly expressed in AMPs temporally during the larva-pupa transition stage, and br loss of function blocks AMP differentiation. Furthermore, Br is required for AMPs to develop into functional ISCs. Conversely, br overexpression drives AMPs toward premature differentiation. In addition, we found that Br and Notch (N) signaling function in parallel pathways to regulate AMP differentiation. Our results reveal a molecular mechanism whereby Br-mediated hormone signaling directly regulates stem cells to generate adult cells during metamorphosis.

  6. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  7. Red yeast rice prevents atherosclerosis through regulating inflammatory signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Zhang, Wen-Gao; Liu, Long-Tao

    2017-09-01

    To observe the effects of red yeast rice (RYR) on blood lipid levels, aortic atherosclerosis (AS), and plaque stability in apolipoprotein E gene knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. Twenty-four ApoE-/- mice were fed with a high-fat diet starting from 6 weeks of age. Mice were randomized into three groups (n = 8 in each group): model group (ApoE-/- group), RYR group (ApoE-/- + RYR group), and simvastatin group (ApoE-/- + simvastatin group). Eight 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned as the control group and fed with a basic diet. After 36 weeks, plasma lipids and inflflammatory factors were measured. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions by microscope, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were observed. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The level of high sensitivity C-reaction protein (Hs-CRP) was detected by the scattering immunoturbidimetric assay. Protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in aorta were tested by immunohistochemistry. Compared with the model group, treatment with RYR significantly decreased the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a), and apolipoprotein B100 in ApoE-/- mice (P<0.01). Compared with the model group, treatment with RYR decreased the levels of Hs-CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α (P<0.01). RYR also reduced the protein levels of NF-κB and MMP-9 of the aorta. RYR has the anti-atherosclerotic and stabilizing unstable plaque effects. The mechanism might be related to the inflflammatory signaling pathways.

  8. Electrical signals as mechanism of photosynthesis regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This review summarizes current works concerning the effects of electrical signals (ESs) on photosynthesis, the mechanisms of the effects, and its physiological role in plants. Local irritations of plants induce various photosynthetic responses in intact leaves, including fast and long-term inactivation of photosynthesis, and its activation. Irritation-induced ESs, including action potential, variation potential, and system potential, probably causes the photosynthetic responses in intact leaves. Probable mechanisms of induction of fast inactivation of photosynthesis are associated with Ca(2+)- and (or) H(+)-influxes during ESs generation; long-term inactivation of photosynthesis might be caused by Ca(2+)- and (or) H(+)-influxes, production of abscisic and jasmonic acids, and inactivation of phloem H(+)-sucrose symporters. It is probable that subsequent development of inactivation of photosynthesis is mainly associated with decreased CO2 influx and inactivation of the photosynthetic dark reactions, which induces decreased photochemical quantum yields of photosystems I and II and increased non-photochemical quenching of photosystem II fluorescence and cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. However, other pathways of the ESs influence on the photosynthetic light reactions are also possible. One of them might be associated with ES-connected acidification of chloroplast stroma inducing ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase accumulation at the thylakoids in Tic62 and TROL complexes. Mechanisms of ES-induced activation of photosynthesis require further investigation. The probable ultimate effect of ES-induced photosynthetic responses in plant life is the increased photosynthetic machinery resistance to stressors, including high and low temperatures, and enhanced whole-plant resistance to environmental factors at least during 1 h after irritation.

  9. At Light Speed: Advances in Optogenetic Systems for Regulating Cell Signaling and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, Nicole A; Rosenbloom, Alyssa; Mukherjee, Abhirup; Schaffer, David V; Kane, Ravi S

    2017-06-07

    Cells are bombarded by extrinsic signals that dynamically change in time and space. Such dynamic variations can exert profound effects on behaviors, including cellular signaling, organismal development, stem cell differentiation, normal tissue function, and disease processes such as cancer. Although classical genetic tools are well suited to introduce binary perturbations, new approaches have been necessary to investigate how dynamic signal variation may regulate cell behavior. This fundamental question is increasingly being addressed with optogenetics, a field focused on engineering and harnessing light-sensitive proteins to interface with cellular signaling pathways. Channelrhodopsins initially defined optogenetics; however, through recent use of light-responsive proteins with myriad spectral and functional properties, practical applications of optogenetics currently encompass cell signaling, subcellular localization, and gene regulation. Now, important questions regarding signal integration within branch points of signaling networks, asymmetric cell responses to spatially restricted signals, and effects of signal dosage versus duration can be addressed. This review summarizes emerging technologies and applications within the expanding field of optogenetics.

  10. Dopamine Signaling Regulates Fat Content through β-Oxidation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de Almeida; Bridi, Jessika Cristina; de Souza, Bruno Rezende; de Castro Júnior, Célio; de Lima Torres, Karen Cecília; Malard, Leandro; Jorio, Ado; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of energy balance involves an intricate interplay between neural mechanisms that respond to internal and external cues of energy demand and food availability. Compelling data have implicated the neurotransmitter dopamine as an important part of body weight regulation. However, the precise mechanisms through which dopamine regulates energy homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate mechanisms through which dopamine modulates energy storage. We showed that dopamine signaling regulates fat reservoirs in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the fat reducing effects of dopamine were dependent on dopaminergic receptors and a set of fat oxidation enzymes. Our findings reveal an ancient role for dopaminergic regulation of fat and suggest that dopamine signaling elicits this outcome through cascades that ultimately mobilize peripheral fat depots. PMID:24465759

  11. Regulation of epithelial branching morphogenesis and cancer cell growth of the prostate by Wnt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu-Er Wang

    Full Text Available Although Wnt signaling has been shown to be important for embryonic morphogenesis and cancer pathogenesis of several tissues, its role in prostatic development and tumorigenesis is not well understood. Here we show that Wnt signaling regulated prostatic epithelial branching morphogenesis and luminal epithelial cell differentiation in developing rat prostate organ cultures. Specifically, Wnt signaling regulated the proliferation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells. Assessment of the expression levels of a Wnt pathway transcriptional target gene, Axin2, showed that the Wnt pathway was activated in the developing prostate, but was down-regulated in the adult. Castration resulted in an upregulation of Axin2 whereas androgen replacement resulted in a down regulation of Axin2. Such dynamic changes of Wnt activity was also confirmed in a BAT-gal transgenic mouse line in which beta-galactosidase reporter is expressed under the control of beta-catenin/T cell factor responsive elements. Furthermore, we evaluated the role of Wnt signaling in prostate tumorigenesis. Axin2 expression was found upregulated in the majority of human prostate cancer cell lines examined. Moreover, addition of a Wnt pathway inhibitor, Dickkopf 1 (DKK1, into the culture medium significantly inhibited prostate cancer cell growth and migration. These findings suggest that Wnt signaling regulates prostatic epithelial ductal branching morphogenesis by influencing cell proliferation, and highlights a role for Wnt pathway activation in prostatic cancer progression.

  12. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  13. Nutritive, Post-ingestive Signals Are the Primary Regulators of AgRP Neuron Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei Su

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The brain regulates food intake by processing sensory cues and peripheral physiological signals, but the neural basis of this integration remains unclear. Hypothalamic, agouti-related protein (AgRP-expressing neurons are critical regulators of food intake. AgRP neuron activity is high during hunger and is rapidly reduced by the sight and smell of food. Here, we reveal two distinct components of AgRP neuron activity regulation: a rapid but transient sensory-driven signal and a slower, sustained calorie-dependent signal. We discovered that nutrients are necessary and sufficient for sustained reductions in AgRP neuron activity and that activity reductions are proportional to the calories obtained. This change in activity is recapitulated by exogenous administration of gut-derived satiation signals. Furthermore, we showed that the nutritive value of food trains sensory systems—in a single trial—to drive rapid, anticipatory AgRP neuron activity inhibition. Together, these data demonstrate that nutrients are the primary regulators of AgRP neuron activity. : Su et al. demonstrate that nutrient content in the GI tract is rapidly signaled to hypothalamic neurons activated by hunger. This rapid effect is mediated by three satiation signals that synergistically reduce the activity of AgRP neurons. These findings uncover how hunger circuits in the brain are regulated and raise the possibility that hunger can be pharmacologically controlled. Keywords: calcium imaging, AgRP neurons, calories, satiation signals, sensory regulation, single trial learning, cholecystokinin, CCK, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, PYY, amylin, homeostasis

  14. Resveratrol regulates autophagy signaling in chronically ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabe, Ashraf A; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Dalal, Rahul S; Robich, Michael P; Sellke, Frank W

    2014-02-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process by which damaged components are removed. Although autophagy can result in cell death, when optimally regulated, it might be cardioprotective. Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol also believed to be cardioprotective. Using a clinically relevant swine model of metabolic syndrome, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on autophagy in the chronically ischemic myocardium. Yorkshire swine were fed a regular diet (n = 7), a high cholesterol diet (n = 7), or a high cholesterol diet with supplemental resveratrol (n = 6). After 4 weeks, an ameroid constrictor was surgically placed on the left circumflex artery to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. The diets were continued another 7 weeks, and then the ischemic and nonischemic myocardium were harvested for protein analysis. In the ischemic myocardium, a high cholesterol diet partly attenuated the autophagy, as determined by an increase in phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and a decrease in p70 S6 kinase (P70S6K), lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-2, and autophagy-related gene 12-5 conjugate (ATG 12-5; P changes, because the p-mTOR, P70S6K, and LAMP-2 levels were not significantly altered from those of the pigs fed a regular diet. Other autophagy markers were increased with a high cholesterol diet, including light chain 3A-II and beclin 1 (P changes in protein expression were noted among the 3 groups. In the chronically ischemic myocardium, resveratrol partly reversed the effects of a high cholesterol diet on autophagy. This might be a mechanism by which resveratrol exerts its cardioprotective effects. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endogenous B-ring oxysterols inhibit the Hedgehog component Smoothened in a manner distinct from cyclopamine or side-chain oxysterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Navdar; Mann, Randall K; Xu, Libin; Snell, William J; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Porter, Ned A; Beachy, Philip A

    2016-05-24

    Cellular lipids are speculated to act as key intermediates in Hedgehog signal transduction, but their precise identity and function remain enigmatic. In an effort to identify such lipids, we pursued a Hedgehog pathway inhibitory activity that is particularly abundant in flagellar lipids of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, resulting in the purification and identification of ergosterol endoperoxide, a B-ring oxysterol. A mammalian analog of ergosterol, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), accumulates in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, a human genetic disease that phenocopies deficient Hedgehog signaling and is caused by genetic loss of 7-DHC reductase. We found that depleting endogenous 7-DHC with methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment enhances Hedgehog activation by a pathway agonist. Conversely, exogenous addition of 3β,5α-dihydroxycholest-7-en-6-one, a naturally occurring B-ring oxysterol derived from 7-DHC that also accumulates in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, blocked Hedgehog signaling by inhibiting activation of the essential transduction component Smoothened, through a mechanism distinct from Smoothened modulation by other lipids.

  16. Agrin as a Mechanotransduction Signal Regulating YAP through the Hippo Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Chakraborty

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway effectors YAP and TAZ act as nuclear sensors of mechanical signals in response to extracellular matrix (ECM cues. However, the identity and nature of regulators in the ECM and the precise pathways relaying mechanoresponsive signals into intracellular sensors remain unclear. Here, we uncover a functional link between the ECM proteoglycan Agrin and the transcriptional co-activator YAP. Importantly, Agrin transduces matrix and cellular rigidity signals that enhance stability and mechanoactivity of YAP through the integrin-focal adhesion- and Lrp4/MuSK receptor-mediated signaling pathways. Agrin antagonizes focal adhesion assembly of the core Hippo components by facilitating ILK-PAK1 signaling and negating the functions of Merlin and LATS1/2. We further show that Agrin promotes oncogenesis through YAP-dependent transcription and is clinically relevant in human liver cancer. We propose that Agrin acts as a mechanotransduction signal in the ECM.

  17. Evolutionary genomics and adaptive evolution of the Hedgehog gene family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Pereira

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog--Shh; Indian hedgehog--Ihh; and Desert hedgehog--Dhh, each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots.

  18. Cross talk between hedgehog and epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathways in gastric pit cells and in diffuse-type gastric cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, H; Aoyagi, K; Fukaya, M; Danjoh, I; Ohta, A; Isohata, N; Saeki, N; Taniguchi, H; Sakamoto, H; Shimoda, T; Tani, T; Yoshida, T; Sasaki, H

    2009-01-27

    We previously reported hedgehog (Hh) signal activation in the mucus-secreting pit cell of the stomach and in diffuse-type gastric cancer (GC). Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is known to be involved in tumour malignancy. However, little is known about whether and how both signallings cooperatively act in diffuse-type GC. By microarray and reverse transcription-PCR, we investigated the expression of those Hh and EMT signalling molecules in pit cells and in diffuse-type GCs. How both signallings act cooperatively in those cells was also investigated by the treatment of an Hh-signal inhibitor and siRNAs of Hh and EMT transcriptional key regulator genes on a mouse primary culture and on human GC cell lines. Pit cells and diffuse-type GCs co-expressed many Hh and EMT signalling genes. Mesenchymal-related genes (WNT5A, CDH2, PDGFRB, EDNRA, ROBO1, ROR2, and MEF2C) were found to be activated by an EMT regulator, SIP1/ZFHX1B/ZEB2, which was a target of a primary transcriptional regulator GLI1 in Hh signal. Furthermore, we identified two cancer-specific Hh targets, ELK1 and MSX2, which have an essential role in GC cell growth. These findings suggest that the gastric pit cell exhibits mesenchymal-like gene expression, and that diffuse-type GC maintains expression through the Hh-EMT pathway. Our proposed extensive Hh-EMT signal pathway has the potential to an understanding of diffuse-type GC and to the development of new drugs.

  19. ROP GTPase-mediated auxin signaling regulates pavement cell interdigitation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deshu; Ren, Huibo; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular plant organs, cell shape formation depends on molecular switches to transduce developmental or environmental signals and to coordinate cell-to-cell communication. Plants have a specific subfamily of the Rho GTPase family, usually called Rho of Plants (ROP), which serve as a critical signal transducer involved in many cellular processes. In the last decade, important advances in the ROP-mediated regulation of plant cell morphogenesis have been made by using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and cotyledon pavement cells. Especially, the auxin-ROP signaling networks have been demonstrated to control interdigitated growth of pavement cells to form jigsaw-puzzle shapes. Here, we review findings related to the discovery of this novel auxin-signaling mechanism at the cell surface. This signaling pathway is to a large extent independent of the well-known Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR)-Auxin Signaling F-Box (AFB) pathway, and instead requires Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) interaction with the plasma membrane-localized, transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor-like kinase to regulate ROP proteins. Once activated, ROP influences cytoskeletal organization and inhibits endocytosis of the auxin transporter PIN1. The present review focuses on ROP signaling and its self-organizing feature allowing ROP proteins to serve as a bustling signal decoder and integrator for plant cell morphogenesis. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Emerging Roles for Intersectin (ITSN in Regulating Signaling and Disease Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. O'Bryan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intersectins (ITSNs represent a family of multi-domain adaptor proteins that regulate endocytosis and cell signaling. ITSN genes are highly conserved and present in all metazoan genomes examined thus far. Lower eukaryotes have only one ITSN gene, whereas higher eukaryotes have two ITSN genes. ITSN was first identified as an endocytic scaffold protein, and numerous studies reveal a conserved role for ITSN in endocytosis. Subsequently, ITSNs were found to regulate multiple signaling pathways including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, GTPases, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Class 2beta (PI3KC2β. ITSN has also been implicated in diseases such as Down Syndrome (DS, Alzheimer Disease (AD, and other neurodegenerative disorders. This review summarizes the evolutionary conservation of ITSN, the latest research on the role of ITSN in endocytosis, the emerging roles of ITSN in regulating cell signaling pathways, and the involvement of ITSN in human diseases such as DS, AD, and cancer.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Matthew R; Johnson, William M; Pilat, Jennifer M; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y

    2015-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. String gas shells, their dual radiation and hedgehog signature control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guendelman, E.I

    2009-01-01

    ... as spacelike in nature. This “dual radiation”, we will argue, can be interpreted as representing the virtual quantum fluctuations that stabilize the shell. The solutions can be generalized allowing for the introduction of a string-hedgehog [2] or a global monopole [3] on top of the string gas shell and its dual radiation. Then, for big enough hedgehog strengt...

  3. Coordinated action of NSF and PKC regulates GABAB receptor signaling efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Pontier, Stéphanie M; Lahaie, Nicolas; Ginham, Rachel; St-Gelais, Fannie; Bonin, Hélène; Bell, David J; Flynn, Helen; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; McIlhinney, Jeffrey; White, Julia H; Bouvier, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The obligatory heterodimerization of the GABAB receptor (GBR) raises fundamental questions about molecular mechanisms controlling its signaling efficacy. Here, we show that NEM sensitive fusion (NSF) protein interacts directly with the GBR heterodimer both in rat brain synaptosomes and in CHO cells, forming a ternary complex that can be regulated by agonist stimulation. Inhibition of NSF binding with a peptide derived from GBR2 (TAT-Pep-27) did not affect basal signaling activity but almost c...

  4. NF1 Is an Effector and Regulator of the GPCR Signaling in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    of NF1 by infecting differentiated cultures with AAV carrying Cre recombinase (Task 2 A and B). We used these cultures along with uninfected...activation and regulation of its signaling to downstream protein kinases (Task 3). We infected neurons with the AAV virus encoding Cre-recombinase...cultured striatal neurons on MAPK signaling. Cultured neurons from NF1flx/flx mice were infected with either AAV -Cre deleting NF1 or control AAV

  5. PIMS Modulates Immune Tolerance by Negatively Regulating Drosophila Innate Immune Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lhocine, Nouara; Paulo S. Ribeiro; Buchon, Nicolas; Wepf, Alexander; Wilson, Rebecca; Tenev, Tencho; Lemaitre, Bruno; Gstaiger, Matthias; Meier, Pascal; Leulier, François

    2008-01-01

    Metazoans tolerate commensal-gut microbiota by suppressing immune activation while maintaining the ability to launch rapid and balanced immune reactions to pathogenic bacteria. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the establishment of this threshold. We report that a recently identified Drosophila immune regulator, which we call PGRP-LC-interacting inhibitor of Imd signaling (PIMS), is required to suppress the Imd innate immune signaling pathway in response to commensal bacteria. p...

  6. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches.

  7. Regulation of striatal dopamine responsiveness by Notch/RBP-J signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toritsuka, M; Kimoto, S; Muraki, K; Kitagawa, M; Kishimoto, T; Sawa, A; Tanigaki, K

    2017-03-07

    Dopamine signaling is essential for reward learning and fear-related learning, and thought to be involved in neuropsychiatric diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of dopamine responsiveness is unclear. Here we show the critical roles of Notch/RBP-J signaling in the regulation of dopamine responsiveness in the striatum. Notch/RBP-J signaling regulates various neural cell fate specification, and neuronal functions in the adult central nervous system. Conditional deletion of RBP-J specifically in neuronal cells causes enhanced response to apomorphine, a non-selective dopamine agonist, and SKF38393, a D1 agonist, and impaired dopamine-dependent instrumental avoidance learning, which is corrected by SCH23390, a D1 antagonist. RBP-J deficiency drastically reduced dopamine release in the striatum and caused a subtle decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons. Lentivirus-mediated gene transfer experiments showed that RBP-J deficiency in the striatum was sufficient for these deficits. These findings demonstrated that Notch/RBP-J signaling regulates dopamine responsiveness in the striatum, which may explain the mechanism whereby Notch/RBP-J signaling affects an individual's susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disease.

  8. SAP-MEDIATED INHIBITION OF DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE ALPHA REGULATES TCR-INDUCED DIACYLGLYCEROL SIGNALING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldanzi, Gianluca; Pighini, Andrea; Bettio, Valentina; Rainero, Elena; Traini, Sara; Chianale, Federica; Porporato, Paolo; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Mesturini, Riccardo; Song, Shuping; Schweighoffer, Tamas; Patrussi, Laura; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; van Blitterswijk, Wim J.; Sinigaglia, Fabiola; Nichols, Kim E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Parolini, Ornella; Graziani, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) metabolize diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). In T lymphocytes, DGKα acts as a negative regulator of TCR signaling by decreasing diacylglycerol levels and inducing anergy. Here, we show that upon co-stimulation of the TCR with CD28 or SLAM, DGKα, but not DGKζ, exit from the nucleus and undergoes rapid negative regulation of its enzymatic activity. Inhibition of DGKα is dependent on the expression of SAP, an adaptor protein mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), which is essential for SLAM-mediated signaling and contributes to TCR/CD28-induced signaling and T cell activation. Accordingly, over-expression of SAP is sufficient to inhibit DGKα, while SAP mutants unable to bind either phospho-tyrosine residues or SH3 domain are ineffective. Moreover phospholipase C activity and calcium, but not Src-family tyrosine kinases, are also required for negative regulation of DGKα. Finally, inhibition of DGKα in SAP-deficient cells partially rescues defective TCR/CD28 signaling, including Ras and ERK-1/2 activation, PKCθ membrane recruitment, induction of NF-AT transcriptional activity and IL-2 production. Thus SAP-mediated inhibition of DGKα sustains diacylglycerol signaling, thereby regulating T cell activation and may represent a novel pharmacological strategy for XLP treatment. PMID:22048771

  9. Developmental hypothyroidism abolishes bilateral differences in sonic hedgehog gene control in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism disrupt rat hippocampal neurogenesis. We previously showed that exposing mouse offspring to manganese permanently disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and abolishes the asymmetric distribution of cells expressing Mid1, a molecule regulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. The present study examined the involvement of Shh signaling on the disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in rats with hypothyroidism. Pregnant rats were treated with methimazole (MMI) at 0 or 200 ppm in the drinking water from gestation day 10-21 days after delivery (developmental hypothyroidism). Adult male rats were treated with MMI in the same manner from postnatal day (PND) 46 to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Developmental hypothyroidism reduced the number of Mid1(+) cells within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of offspring on PND 21, and consequently abolished the normal asymmetric predominance of Mid1(+) cells on the right side through the adult stage. In control animals, Shh was expressed in a subpopulation of hilar neurons, showing asymmetric distribution with left side predominance on PND 21; however, this asymmetry did not continue through the adult stage. Developmental hypothyroidism increased Shh(+) neurons bilaterally and abolished the asymmetric distribution pattern on PND 21. Adult hypothyroidism also disrupted the asymmetric distribution of Mid1(+) cells but did not affect the distribution of Shh(+) hilar neurons. The results suggest that the hippocampal neurogenesis disruption seen in hypothyroidism involves changes in asymmetric Shh(+) neuron distribution in developmental hypothyroidism and altered Mid1 expression in both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Bmi1 Is Required for Hedgehog Pathway-Driven Medulloblastoma Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowell Evan Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate Hedgehog (Hh signaling underlies development of a subset of medulloblastomas, and tumors with elevated HH signaling activity express the stem cell self-renewal gene BMI1. To test whether Bmi1 is required for Hh-driven medulloblastoma development, we varied Bmi1 gene dosage in transgenic mice expressing an oncogenic Hh effector, SmoA1, driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP promoter. Whereas 100% of SmoA1; Bmi1+/+ or SmoA1;Bmi1+/- mice examined between postnatal (P days 14 and 26 had typical medulloblastomas (N = 29, tumors were not detected in any of the SmoA1;Bmi1-/- animals examined (N = 6. Instead, small ectopic collections of cells were present in the region of greatest tumor load in SmoA1 animals, suggesting that medulloblastomas were initiated but failed to undergo expansion into frank tumors. Cells within these Bmi1-/- lesions expressed SmoA1 but were largely nonproliferative, in contrast to cells in Bmi1+/+ tumors (6.2% vs 81.9% PCNA-positive, respectively. Ectopic cells were negative for the progenitor marker nestin, strongly GFAP-positive, and highly apoptotic, relative to Bmi1+/+ tumor cells (29.6% vs 6.3% TUNEL-positive. The alterations in proliferation and apoptosis in SmoA1;Bmi1-/- ectopic cells are associated with reduced levels of Cyclin D1 and elevated expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19Arf, two inversely regulated downstream targets of Bmi1. These data provide the first demonstration that Bmi1 is required for spontaneous de novo development of a solid tumor arising in the brain, suggest a crucial role for Bmi1-dependent, nestin-expressing progenitor cells in medulloblastoma expansion, and implicate Bmi1 as a key factor required for Hh pathway-driven tumorigenesis.

  11. Estrogen receptor signal in regulation of B cell activation during diverse immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaba, Josaine; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Kindy, Mark; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2015-11-01

    The role of signalling through oestrogen receptors (ERs) in the regulation of B cell activation is an area of growing importance not only in terms protective immunity but also in the determination of the mechanisms of the onset of autoimmune disorders and cancers. The mode of signalling action of this single chain nuclear receptor protein molecule depends on its ability to bind to the promoters of Pax5, HOXC4 and apolipoprotein B RNA-editing enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) genes. ER-mediated transcriptional regulation induces class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (VH) to DH-JH genes and somatic hypermutation in developing B cells. The mode of action of ER is associated with BCR-signal pathways that involve the regulator proteins BAFF and APRIL. Additionally, the plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor-1 (GEPR1) directs diverse cell signalling events in B cells that involve the MAPK pathways. These signals are immensely important during progenitor and precursor B cell activation. We have focused our goals on the medicinal aspects of ER-signalling mechanisms and their effects on polyclonal B cell activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  13. Regulation of Autocrine Signaling in Subsets of Sympathetic Neurons Has Regional Effects on Tissue Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. McWilliams

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of innervation by target-derived factors like nerve growth factor (NGF is the cornerstone of neurotrophic theory. Whereas autocrine signaling in neurons affecting survival and axon growth has been described, it is difficult to reconcile autocrine signaling with the idea that targets control their innervation. Here, we report that an autocrine signaling loop in developing mouse sympathetic neurons involving CD40L (TNFSF5 and CD40 (TNFRSF5 selectively enhances NGF-promoted axon growth and branching, but not survival, via CD40L reverse signaling. Because NGF negatively regulates CD40L and CD40 expression, this signaling loop operates only in neurons exposed to low levels of NGF. Consequently, the sympathetic innervation density of tissues expressing low NGF is significantly reduced in CD40-deficient mice, whereas the innervation density of tissues expressing high levels of NGF is unaffected. Our findings reveal how differential regulation of autocrine signaling in neurons has region-specific effects on axon growth and tissue innervation.

  14. Specification of Drosophila corpora cardiaca neuroendocrine cells from mesoderm is regulated by Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangbin Park

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila neuroendocrine cells comprising the corpora cardiaca (CC are essential for systemic glucose regulation and represent functional orthologues of vertebrate pancreatic α-cells. Although Drosophila CC cells have been regarded as developmental orthologues of pituitary gland, the genetic regulation of CC development is poorly understood. From a genetic screen, we identified multiple novel regulators of CC development, including Notch