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Sample records for hedgehog protein family

  1. Correlation Between Hedgehog (Hh) Protein Family and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

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    Halepoto, Dost Muhammad; Bashir, Shahid; Zeina, Rana; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2015-12-01

    To determine the correlation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). An observational, comparative study. Autism Research and Treatment Center, Al-Amodi Autism Research Chair, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2011 to May 2012. Serum levels of SHH, IHH and BDNF were determined in recently diagnosed autistic patients and age-matched healthy children (n=25), using the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was used for the assessment of autistic severity. Spearman correlation co-efficient 'r' was determined. The serum levels of IHH and SHH were significantly higher in autistic subjects than those of control subjects. There was significant correlation between age and IHH (r = 0.176, p = 0.03), BDNF and severe IHH (r = 0.1763, p = 0.003), and severe BDNF and severe SHH (r = 0.143, p BDNF and the CARS score, age or gender. The findings support a correlation between SHH, IHH and BDNF in autistic children, suggesting their pathological role in autism.

  2. Hedgehog

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    Oktay Avcı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog pathway is a major regulator for cell differentiation, tissue polarity and cell proliferation. Several studies reveal activation of this pathway in basal cell carcinomas in approximately 30% of extracutaneous solid tumors including medulloblastomas, lung, breast, gastrointestinal and prostate cancers. Targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling may be effective in treatment of many types of human tumors. The discovery and synthesis of specific hedgehog antagonists raise the possibility of their successful use in human cancer therapy. In this review, the molecular basis of hedgehog signaling activation, major advances in our understanding of signaling activation in human solid tumors, hedgehog antagonists and their potential application in human cancer will be evaluated.

  3. Evolutionary genomics and adaptive evolution of the Hedgehog gene family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh in vertebrates.

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    Joana Pereira

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog--Shh; Indian hedgehog--Ihh; and Desert hedgehog--Dhh, each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots.

  4. The you gene encodes an EGF-CUB protein essential for Hedgehog signaling in zebrafish.

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    Ian G Woods

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling is required for many aspects of development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Misregulation of the Hedgehog pathway causes developmental abnormalities and has been implicated in certain types of cancer. Large-scale genetic screens in zebrafish have identified a group of mutations, termed you-class mutations, that share common defects in somite shape and in most cases disrupt Hedgehog signaling. These mutant embryos exhibit U-shaped somites characteristic of defects in slow muscle development. In addition, Hedgehog pathway mutations disrupt spinal cord patterning. We report the positional cloning of you, one of the original you-class mutations, and show that it is required for Hedgehog signaling in the development of slow muscle and in the specification of ventral fates in the spinal cord. The you gene encodes a novel protein with conserved EGF and CUB domains and a secretory pathway signal sequence. Epistasis experiments support an extracellular role for You upstream of the Hedgehog response mechanism. Analysis of chimeras indicates that you mutant cells can appropriately respond to Hedgehog signaling in a wild-type environment. Additional chimera analysis indicates that wild-type you gene function is not required in axial Hedgehog-producing cells, suggesting that You is essential for transport or stability of Hedgehog signals in the extracellular environment. Our positional cloning and functional studies demonstrate that You is a novel extracellular component of the Hedgehog pathway in vertebrates.

  5. The Hedgehog gene family of the cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis, and implications for understanding metazoan Hedgehog pathway evolution.

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    Matus, David Q; Magie, Craig R; Pang, Kevin; Martindale, Mark Q; Thomsen, Gerald H

    2008-01-15

    Hedgehog signaling is an important component of cell-cell communication during bilaterian development, and abnormal Hedgehog signaling contributes to disease and birth defects. Hedgehog genes are composed of a ligand ("hedge") domain and an autocatalytic intein ("hog") domain. Hedgehog (hh) ligands bind to a conserved set of receptors and activate downstream signal transduction pathways terminating with Gli/Ci transcription factors. We have identified five intein-containing genes in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, two of which (NvHh1 and NvHh2) contain definitive hedgehog ligand domains, suggesting that to date, cnidarians are the earliest branching metazoan phylum to possess definitive Hh orthologs. Expression analysis of NvHh1 and NvHh2, the receptor NvPatched, and a downstream transcription factor NvGli (a Gli3/Ci ortholog) indicate that these genes may have conserved roles in planar and trans-epithelial signaling during gut and germline development, while the three remaining intein-containing genes (NvHint1,2,3) are expressed in a cell-type-specific manner in putative neural precursors. Metazoan intein-containing genes that lack a hh ligand domain have previously only been identified within nematodes. However, we have identified intein-containing genes from both Nematostella and in two newly annotated lophotrochozoan genomes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that while nematode inteins may be derived from an ancestral true hedgehog gene, the newly identified cnidarian and lophotrochozoan inteins may be orthologous, suggesting that both true hedgehog and hint genes may have been present in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. Genomic surveys of N. vectensis suggest that most of the components of both protostome and deuterostome Hh signaling pathways are present in anthozoans and that some appear to have been lost in ecdysozoan lineages. Cnidarians possess many bilaterian cell-cell signaling pathways (Wnt, TGFbeta, FGF, and Hh) that appear to act in

  6. Maml1 acts cooperatively with Gli proteins to regulate sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

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    Quaranta, Roberta; Pelullo, Maria; Zema, Sabrina; Nardozza, Francesca; Checquolo, Saula; Lauer, Dieter Matthias; Bufalieri, Francesca; Palermo, Rocco; Felli, Maria Pia; Vacca, Alessandra; Talora, Claudio; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Screpanti, Isabella; Bellavia, Diana

    2017-07-20

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCPs) and its misregulation is linked to various disorders, including cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. The effects of Shh pathway are mediated by the Gli family of transcription factors, which controls the expression of a number of target genes, including Gli1. Here, we identify Mastermind-like 1 (Maml1) as a novel regulator of the Shh signaling since it interacts with Gli proteins, working as a potent transcriptional coactivator. Notably, Maml1 silencing results in a significant reduction of Gli target genes expression, with a negative impact on cell growth of NIH3T3 and Patched1-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), bearing a constitutively active Shh signaling. Remarkably, Shh pathway activity results severely compromised both in MEFs and GCPs deriving from Maml1-/- mice with an impairment of GCPs proliferation and cerebellum development. Therefore Maml1-/- phenotype mimics aspects of Shh pathway deficiency, suggesting an intrinsic requirement for Maml1 in cerebellum development. The present study shows a new role for Maml1 as a component of Shh signaling, which plays a crucial role in both development and tumorigenesis.

  7. Nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 promotes the aggressiveness of astrocytoma by activating the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

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    Wu, Xianqiu; Xu, Benke; Yang, Chao; Wang, Wentao; Zhong, Dequan; Zhao, Zhan; He, Longshuang; Hu, Yuanjun; Jiang, Lili; Li, Jun; Song, Libing; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-12

    The prognosis of human astrocytoma is poor, and the molecular alterations underlying its pathogenesis still needed to be elucidated. Nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) was observed in several types of cancers, but its role in astrocytoma remained unknown. The expression of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma cell lines and tissues were measured with western blotting and Real-Time PCR. Two hundred and twenty-one astrocytoma tissue samples were analyzed by immunochemistry to demonstrate the correlation between the NUSAP1 expression and clinicopathological characteristics. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, colony formation, transwell matrix penetration assay, wound healing assay and anchorage-independent growth assay were used to investigate the biological effect of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma. An intracranial brain xenograft tumor model was used to confirm the oncogenic role of NUSAP1 in human astrocytoma. Luciferase reporter assay was used to investigate the effect of NUSAP1 on Hedgehog signaling pathway. NUSAP1 was markedly overexpressed in astrocytoma cell lines and tissues compared with normal astrocytes and brain tissues. NUSAP1 was found to be overexpressed in 152 of 221 (68.78%) astrocytoma tissues, and was significantly correlated to poor survival. Further, ectopic expression or knockdown of NUSAP1 significantly promoted or inhibited, respectively, the invasive ability of astrocytoma cells. Moreover, intracranial xenografts of astrocytoma cells engineered to express NUSAP1 were highly invasive compared with the parental cells. With regard to its molecular mechanism, upregulation of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma cells promoted the nuclear translocation of GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) and upregulated the downstream genes of the Hedgehog pathway. These findings indicate that NUSAP1 contributes to the progression of astrocytoma by enhancing tumor cell invasiveness via activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and that NUSAP1

  8. Attenuation of hedgehog acyltransferase-catalyzed sonic Hedgehog palmitoylation causes reduced signaling, proliferation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Chang, Shu-Chun; Jovanović, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    autocrine and juxtacrine signaling, and inhibited PDAC cell growth and invasiveness in vitro. In addition, Hhat knockdown in a HEK293a cell line constitutively expressing Shh and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells inhibited their ability to signal in a juxtacrine/paracrine fashion to the reporter......Overexpression of Hedgehog family proteins contributes to the aetiology of many cancers. To be highly active, Hedgehog proteins must be palmitoylated at their N-terminus by the MBOAT family multispanning membrane enzyme Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat). In a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC...

  9. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

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    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371685-11$15.00/0.

  10. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5 is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

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    William M Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc and smoothened (Smo. Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP, we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Amur hedgehog Erinaceus amurensis (Erinaceidae) and higher phylogeny of the family Erinaceidae.

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    Kim, N H; Lim, S J; Chae, H M; Park, Y C

    2017-02-08

    We sequenced and characterized the complete mitogenome (KX964606) of the Amur hedgehog Erinaceus amurensis to provide more data for comparative mitogenomics of the genus Erinaceus (Erinaceidae). The mitogenome of E. amurensis is a circular molecule 16,941 bp long, consisting of a control region and a conserved set of 37 genes containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA). The mitogenome of E. amurensis is AT-biased, with a nucleotide composition of 33.9% A, 21.1% C, 32.6% T, and 12.4% G. The mitogenomes of E. amurensis and the closely related hedgehog species E. europaeus, excluding the control region (66.7%), share over 90% sequence similarity. According to the inter-generic relationship based on six mitogenomes described from five genera of Erinaceidae, the subfamilies Erinaceinae and Galericinae are strongly supported as monophyletic groups, with each genus well placed within its own subfamily. Within the subfamily Erinaceinae, E. amurensis is a sister species to E. europaeus, and the relationship between Hemiechinus and Erinaceus is strongly supported. Within the subfamily Galericinae, the clade of Hylomys + Neotetracus was sister to that of Echinosorex, with clades supported by high values. Our findings will help to understand the codon usage pattern and molecular evolution of E. amurensis, and provide insight into inter-generic relationships within the family Erinaceidae. In future studies, the inclusion of mitogenomes from other genera would greatly enhance our understanding of higher phylogeny within the Erinaceidae.

  12. IGSF9 Family Proteins

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    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  13. Cholesterol Modification of Hedgehog Signaling Proteins in Animal Development

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    Porter, Jeffrey A.; Young, Keith E.; Beachy, Philip A.

    1996-10-01

    To determine the function of the pS2 trefoil protein, which is normally expressed in the gastric mucosa, the mouse pS2 (mpS2) gene was inactivated. The antral and pyloric gastric mucosa of mpS2-null mice was dysfunctional and exhibited severe hyperplasia and dysplasia. All homozygous mutant mice developed antropyloric adenoma, and 30 percent developed multifocal intraepithelial or intramucosal carcinomas. The small intestine was characterized by enlarged villi and an abnormal infiltrate of lymphoid cells. These results indicate that mpS2 is essential for normal differentiation of the antral and pyloric gastric mucosa and may function as a gastric-specific tumor suppressor gene.

  14. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Directly Phosphorylates and Destabilizes Hedgehog Pathway Transcription Factor GLI1 in Medulloblastoma

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    Yen-Hsing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh pathway regulates cell differentiation and proliferation during development by controlling the Gli transcription factors. Cell fate decisions and progression toward organ and tissue maturity must be coordinated, and how an energy sensor regulates the Hh pathway is not clear. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is an important sensor of energy stores and controls protein synthesis and other energy-intensive processes. AMPK is directly responsive to intracellular AMP levels, inhibiting a wide range of cell activities if ATP is low and AMP is high. Thus, AMPK can affect development by influencing protein synthesis and other processes needed for growth and differentiation. Activation of AMPK reduces GLI1 protein levels and stability, thus blocking Sonic-hedgehog-induced transcriptional activity. AMPK phosphorylates GLI1 at serines 102 and 408 and threonine 1074. Mutation of these three sites into alanine prevents phosphorylation by AMPK. This leads to increased GLI1 protein stability, transcriptional activity, and oncogenic potency.

  15. Hedgehog Zoonoses

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    Riley, Patricia Y.

    2005-01-01

    Exotic pets, including hedgehogs, have become popular in recent years among pet owners, especially in North America. Such animals can carry and introduce zoonotic agents, a fact well illustrated by the recent outbreak of monkeypox in pet prairie dogs. We reviewed known and potential zoonotic diseases that could be carried and transmitted by pet hedgehogs or when rescuing and caring for wild-caught hedgehogs. PMID:15705314

  16. Intracellular calcium release and protein kinase C activation stimulate sonic hedgehog gene expression during gastric acid secretion.

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    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Zavros, Yana; Tessier, Art; Waghray, Meghna; Lentz, Steve; Gumucio, Deborah; Todisco, Andrea; Merchant, Juanita L

    2010-12-01

    Hypochlorhydria during Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits gastric Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) expression. We investigated whether acid-secretory mechanisms regulate Shh gene expression through intracellular calcium (Ca2(+)(i))-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activation. We blocked Hedgehog signaling by transgenically overexpressing a secreted form of the Hedgehog interacting protein-1, a natural inhibitor of hedgehog ligands, which induced hypochlorhydria. Gadolinium, ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), PKC-overexpressing adenoviruses, and PKC inhibitors were used to modulate Ca(2+)(i)-release, PKC activity, and Shh gene expression in primary gastric cell, organ, and AGS cell line cultures. PKA hyperactivity was induced in the H(+)/K(+)-β-cholera-toxin-overexpressing mice. Mice that expressed secreted hedgehog-interacting protein-1 had lower levels of gastric acid (hypochlorhydria), reduced production of somatostatin, and increased gastrin gene expression. Hypochlorhydria in these mice repressed Shh gene expression, similar to the levels obtained with omeprazole treatment of wild-type mice. However, Shh expression also was repressed in the hyperchlorhydric H(+)/K(+)-β-cholera-toxin model with increased cAMP, suggesting that the regulation of Shh was not solely acid-dependent, but pertained to specific acid-stimulatory signaling pathways. Based on previous reports that Ca(2+)(i) release also stimulates acid secretion in parietal cells, we showed that gadolinium-, thapsigargin-, and carbachol-mediated release of Ca(2+)(i) induced Shh expression. Ca(2+)-chelation with BAPTA + EGTA reduced Shh expression. Overexpression of PKC-α, -β, and -δ (but not PKC-ϵ) induced an Shh gene expression. In addition, phorbol esters induced a Shh-regulated reporter gene. Secretagogues that stimulate

  17. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells.

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    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J Fah; Cho, Michael H; Mancini, John D; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per S; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Beaty, Terri H; Hersh, Craig P; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A; Rennard, Stephen I; Perrella, Mark A; Choi, Augustine M K; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-05-01

    Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

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    Lu, Na [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Chen, Yan [Central Laboratory, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Zhengmin [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Guoling [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Lin, Qin [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Otolaryngology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Otolaryngology Institute of Fujian Province, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Zheng-Yi, E-mail: Zheng-yi_chen@meei.harvard.edu [Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Li, Huawei, E-mail: hwli@shmu.edu.cn [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  19. Cholesterol activates the G-protein coupled receptor Smoothened to promote Hedgehog signaling

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    Luchetti, Giovanni; Sircar, Ria; Kong, Jennifer H; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Sagner, Andreas; Byrne, Eamon FX; Covey, Douglas F; Siebold, Christian; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the function of many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). We find that cholesterol is not just necessary but also sufficient to activate signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, a prominent cell-cell communication system in development. Cholesterol influences Hh signaling by directly activating Smoothened (SMO), an orphan GPCR that transmits the Hh signal across the membrane in all animals. Unlike many GPCRs, which are regulated by cholesterol through their heptahelical transmembrane domains, SMO is activated by cholesterol through its extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Residues shown to mediate cholesterol binding to the CRD in a recent structural analysis also dictate SMO activation, both in response to cholesterol and to native Hh ligands. Our results show that cholesterol can initiate signaling from the cell surface by engaging the extracellular domain of a GPCR and suggest that SMO activity may be regulated by local changes in cholesterol abundance or accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20304.001 PMID:27705744

  20. Differential Expression of Sonic Hedgehog Protein in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

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    Al-Bahrani, Redha; Nagamori, Seishi; Leng, Roger; Petryk, Anna; Sergi, Consolato

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) are the two most common primary liver malignancies in adult patients. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of HCC and CCA are still poorly understood. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling plays an essential role during mammalian development, i.e., promoting organ growth, tissue differentiation, and cell polarity. The upregulation of SHH has been observed during carcinogenesis, including colorectal carcinoma. Our aim was to investigate the expression pattern of SHH in HCC and CCA. We investigated 40 malignant tumors of the liver, including 21 HCC and 19 of intrahepatic CCA cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a polyclonal antibody against SHH and Avidin-Biotin Complex method. We also investigated the co-localization of SHH and Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in CCA using indirect double IHC. Moreover, we examined whether SHH is expressed in two HCC cell lines HepG2 and HuH-7 and three CCA cell lines OZ, HuCCT1 and HuH28. We found that SHH was expressed in 15 out of 21 cases (71.4 %) of HCC and 100 % of CCA cases by immunohistochemistry. SHH expression showed a positive trend in liver tumors (HCC, CCA) with high grade (G2-G3). SHH localized to the epithelial cells, while BMP4 was expressed in the stromal cells in CCA by double IHC. However, both HCC and CCA cell lines showed SHH expression by Western blot analysis. In conclusion, SHH seems to be an interesting marker of de-differentiation in liver tumors and the simultaneous epithelial-mesenchymal expression may be an intriguing prompt to investigate cross-talks between SHH and BMP4.

  1. Intracellular calcium-release and protein kinase C-activation stimulate sonic hedgehog gene expression during gastric acid secretion

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    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Zavros, Yana; Tessier, Art; Waghray, Meghna; Lentz, Steve; Gumucio, Deborah; Todisco, Andrea; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypochlorhydria during Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits gastric Shh expression. We investigated whether acid-secretory mechanisms regulate Shh gene expression through Ca2+i-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-activation. Method We blocked Hedgehog signaling by transgenically overexpressing a secreted form of the Hedgehog interacting protein-1 (sHip-1), a natural inhibitor of hedgehog ligands, which induced hypochlorhydria. Gadolinium, EGTA+BAPTA, PKC-overexpressing adenoviruses, and PKC-inhibitors were used to modulate Ca2+i-release, PKC-activity and Shh gene expression in primary gastric cell, organ, and AGS cell line cultures. PKA hyperactivity was induced in the H+/K+-β-cholera-toxin overexpressing mice (Ctox). Results Mice that expressed sHip-1 had lower levels of gastric acid (hypochlorhydria), reduced production of somatostatin, and increased gastrin gene expression. Hypochlorhydria in these mice repressed Shh gene expression, similar to the levels obtained with omeprazole treatment of wild-type mice. However, Shh expression was also repressed in the hyperchlorhydric Ctox model with elevated cAMP, suggesting that the regulation of Shh was not solely acid-dependent, but pertained to specific acid-stimulatory signaling pathways. Based on previous reports that Ca2+i-release also stimulates acid secretion in parietal cells, we showed that gadolinium-, thapsigargin- and carbachol-mediated release of Ca2+i induced Shh expression. Ca2+-chelation with BAPTA+EGTA reduced Shh expression. Overexpression of PKC-α, -β and -δ (but not PKC-ε) induced Shh gene expression. In addition, phorbol esters induced a Shh-regulated reporter gene. Conclusion Secretagogues that stimulate gastric acid secretion induce Shh gene expression through increased Ca2+i-release and PKC activation. Shh might be the ligand transducing changes in gastric acidity to the regulation of G-cell secretion of gastrin. PMID:20816837

  2. Yeast Gup1(2 Proteins Are Homologues of the Hedgehog Morphogens Acyltransferases HHAT(L: Facts and Implications

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    Cândida Lucas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In multiple tissues, the Hedgehog secreted morphogen activates in the receiving cells a pathway involved in cell fate, proliferation and differentiation in the receiving cells. This pathway is particularly important during embryogenesis. The protein HHAT (Hedgehog O-acyltransferase modifies Hh morphogens prior to their secretion, while HHATL (Hh O-acyltransferase-like negatively regulates the pathway. HHAT and HHATL are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gup2 and Gup1, respectively. In yeast, Gup1 is associated with a high number and diversity of biological functions, namely polarity establishment, secretory/endocytic pathway functionality, vacuole morphology and wall and membrane composition, structure and maintenance. Phenotypes underlying death, morphogenesis and differentiation are also included. Paracrine signalling, like the one promoted by the Hh pathway, has not been shown to occur in microbial communities, despite the fact that large aggregates of cells like biofilms or colonies behave as proto-tissues. Instead, these have been suggested to sense the population density through the secretion of quorum-sensing chemicals. This review focuses on Gup1/HHATL and Gup2/HHAT proteins. We review the functions and physiology associated with these proteins in yeasts and higher eukaryotes. We suggest standardisation of the presently chaotic Gup-related nomenclature, which includes KIAA117, c3orf3, RASP, Skinny, Sightless and Central Missing, in order to avoid the disclosure of otherwise unnoticed information.

  3. Relationship between Sonic hedgehog protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and oxidative stress in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2012-02-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is not well known but oxidative stress has been suggested to play a pathological role. We report here that the serum levels of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) might be linked to oxidative stress in ASD. By using the whole blood or polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we demonstrated that autistic children produced a significantly higher level of oxygen free radicals (OFR). In addition, we found significantly higher levels of serum SHH protein in children with mild as well as severe form of autism. We also found that the serum level of BDNF was significantly reduced in autistic children with mild form of the disorder but not with severe form of the disorder. Our findings are the first to report a correlation between SHH, BDNF and OFR in autistic children, suggesting a pathological role of oxidative stress and SHH in autism spectrum disorders.

  4. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airik, Rannar; Schueler, Markus; Airik, Merlin

    2016-01-01

    Recessive mutations in the SDCCAG8 gene cause a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-like features in humans. Our previous characterization of the orthologous Sdccag8gt/gt mouse model recapitulated the retinal-renal disease phenotypes and identified impaired DNA damage...... response signaling as an underlying disease mechanism in the kidney. However, several other phenotypic and mechanistic features of Sdccag8gt/gt mice remained unexplored. Here we show that Sdccag8gt/gt mice exhibit developmental and structural abnormalities of the skeleton and limbs, suggesting impaired...... Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1), of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC...

  5. All Mammalian Hedgehog Proteins Interact with Cell Adhesion Molecule, Down-regulated by Oncogenes (CDO) and Brother of CDO (BOC) in a Conserved Manner*

    OpenAIRE

    Kavran, Jennifer M.; Ward, Matthew D.; Oladosu, Oyindamola O.; Mulepati, Sabin; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins stimulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning at multiple points in animal development. A single Hh homolog is present in Drosophila, but three Hh homologs, Sonic Hh, Indian Hh, and Desert Hh, are present in mammals. Distribution, movement, and reception of Hh signals are tightly regulated, and abnormal Hh signaling is associated with developmental defects and cancer. In addition to the integral membrane proteins Patched and Smoothened, ...

  6. Peptide amphiphile nanofiber delivery of sonic hedgehog protein to reduce smooth muscle apoptosis in the penis after cavernous nerve resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Christopher W; Angeloni, Nicholas L; Harrington, Daniel A; Stupp, Samuel I; McKenna, Kevin E; Podlasek, Carol A

    2011-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a serious medical condition that affects 16-82% of prostate cancer patients treated by radical prostatectomy and current treatments are ineffective in 50-60% of prostatectomy patients. The reduced efficacy of treatments makes novel therapeutic approaches to treat ED essential. The secreted protein Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is a critical regulator of penile smooth muscle and apoptosis that is decreased in cavernous nerve (CN) injury and diabetic ED models. Past studies using Affi-Gel beads have shown SHH protein to be effective in suppressing apoptosis caused by CN injury. We hypothesize that SHH protein delivered via novel peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers will be effective in suppressing CN injury-induced apoptosis. Adult Sprague Dawley rats (n=50) were used to optimize PA injection in vivo. PA with SHH protein (n=16) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (control, n=14) was injected into adult rats that underwent bilateral CN cut. Rats were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 7 days. Alexa Fluor-labeled SHH protein was used to determine the target of SHH signaling (n=3). Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and semiquantitative immunohistochemical analysis for SHH protein and cluster differentiation protein three (CD3) were performed. SHH-PA caused a 25% and 16% reduction in apoptosis at 4 and 7 days after CN injury and a 9.3% and 19% increase in SHH protein at 4 and 7 days after CN injury. CD3 protein was not observed in SHH-PA-treated penis. In vitro, 73% of SHH protein diffused from PA within 6 days. Labeled SHH was observed in smooth muscle. PA technology is effective in delivering SHH protein to the penis and SHH is effective in suppressing CN injury-induced apoptosis. These results suggest substantial translational potential of this methodology and show that only a short duration of SHH treatment is required to impact the apoptotic index. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. The Hedgehog Signal Induced Modulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling: An Essential Signaling Relay for Urinary Tract Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagata, Naomi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kitazawa, Sohei; Yamada, Gen

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital diseases of the urinary tract are frequently observed in infants. Such diseases present a number of developmental anomalies such as hydroureter and hydronephrosis. Although some genetically-modified mouse models of growth factor signaling genes reproduce urinary phenotypes, the pathogenic mechanisms remain obscure. Previous studies suggest that a portion of the cells in the external genitalia and bladder are derived from peri-cloacal mesenchymal cells that receive Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the early developmental stages. We hypothesized that defects in such progenitor cells, which give rise to urinary tract tissues, may be a cause of such diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of upper urinary tract malformations, we analyzed a series of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) deficient mice. Shh−/− displayed hydroureter and hydronephrosis phenotypes and reduced expression of several developmental markers. In addition, we suggested that Shh modulation at an early embryonic stage is responsible for such phenotypes by analyzing the Shh conditional mutants. Tissue contribution assays of Hh-responsive cells revealed that peri-cloacal mesenchymal cells, which received Hh signal secreted from cloacal epithelium, could contribute to the ureteral mesenchyme. Gain- and loss-of-functional mutants for Hh signaling revealed a correlation between Hh signaling and Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling. Finally, a conditional ablation of Bmp receptor type IA (BmprIA) gene was examined in Hh-responsive cell lineages. This system thus made it possible to analyze the primary functions of the growth factor signaling relay. The defective Hh-to-Bmp signaling relay resulted in severe urinary tract phenotypes with a decrease in the number of Hh-responsive cells. Conclusions/Significance This study identified the essential embryonic stages for the pathogenesis of urinary tract phenotypes. These results suggested that Hh

  8. Gli1 Protein Participates in Hedgehog-mediated Specification of Osteoblast Lineage during Endochondral Ossification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Hironori; Ohba, Shinsuke; Yano, Fumiko; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Komiyama, Yuske; Nakagata, Naomi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Chung, Ung-il

    2012-01-01

    With regard to Hedgehog signaling in mammalian development, the majority of research has focused on Gli2 and Gli3 rather than Gli1. This is because Gli1−/− mice do not show any gross abnormalities in adulthood, and no detailed analyses of fetal Gli1−/− mice are available. In this study, we investigated the physiological role of Gli1 in osteogenesis. Histological analyses revealed that bone formation was impaired in Gli1−/− fetuses compared with WT fetuses. Gli1−/− perichondrial cells expressed neither runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) nor osterix, master regulators of osteogenesis, in contrast to WT cells. In vitro analyses showed that overexpression of Gli1 up-regulated early osteogenesis-related genes in both WT and Runx2−/− perichondrial cells, and Gli1 activated transcription of those genes via its association with their 5′-regulatory regions, underlying the function of Gli1 in the perichondrium. Moreover, Gli1−/−;Gli2−/− mice showed more severe phenotypes of impaired bone formation than either Gli1−/− or Gli2−/− mice, and osteoblast differentiation was impaired in Gli1−/−;Gli3−/− perichondrial cells compared with Gli3−/− cells in vitro. These data suggest that Gli1 itself can induce early osteoblast differentiation, at least to some extent, in a Runx2-independent manner. It also plays a redundant role with Gli2 and is involved in the repressor function of Gli3 in osteogenesis. On the basis of these findings, we propose that upon Hedgehog input, Gli1 functions collectively with Gli2 and Gli3 in osteogenesis. PMID:22493482

  9. SDCCAG8 Interacts with RAB Effector Proteins RABEP2 and ERC1 and Is Required for Hedgehog Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rannar Airik

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in the SDCCAG8 gene cause a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-like features in humans. Our previous characterization of the orthologous Sdccag8gt/gt mouse model recapitulated the retinal-renal disease phenotypes and identified impaired DNA damage response signaling as an underlying disease mechanism in the kidney. However, several other phenotypic and mechanistic features of Sdccag8gt/gt mice remained unexplored. Here we show that Sdccag8gt/gt mice exhibit developmental and structural abnormalities of the skeleton and limbs, suggesting impaired Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Indeed, cell culture studies demonstrate the requirement of SDCCAG8 for ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Using an affinity proteomics approach, we demonstrate that SDCCAG8 interacts with proteins of the centriolar satellites (OFD1, AZI1, of the endosomal sorting complex (RABEP2, ERC1, and with non-muscle myosin motor proteins (MYH9, MYH10, MYH14 at the centrosome. Furthermore, we show that RABEP2 localization at the centrosome is regulated by SDCCAG8. siRNA mediated RABEP2 knockdown in hTERT-RPE1 cells leads to defective ciliogenesis, indicating a critical role for RABEP2 in this process. Together, this study identifies several centrosome-associated proteins as novel SDCCAG8 interaction partners, and provides new insights into the function of SDCCAG8 at this structure.

  10. Activation of the hedgehog pathway in advanced prostate cancer

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    McCormick Frank

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hedgehog pathway plays a critical role in the development of prostate. However, the role of the hedgehog pathway in prostate cancer is not clear. Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent cause of cancer death in American men. Therefore, identification of novel therapeutic targets for prostate cancer has significant clinical implications. Results Here we report that activation of the hedgehog pathway occurs frequently in advanced human prostate cancer. We find that high levels of hedgehog target genes, PTCH1 and hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP, are detected in over 70% of prostate tumors with Gleason scores 8–10, but in only 22% of tumors with Gleason scores 3–6. Furthermore, four available metastatic tumors all have high expression of PTCH1 and HIP. To identify the mechanism of the hedgehog signaling activation, we examine expression of Su(Fu protein, a negative regulator of the hedgehog pathway. We find that Su(Fu protein is undetectable in 11 of 27 PTCH1 positive tumors, two of them contain somatic loss-of-function mutations of Su(Fu. Furthermore, expression of sonic hedgehog protein is detected in majority of PTCH1 positive tumors (24 out of 27. High levels of hedgehog target genes are also detected in four prostate cancer cell lines (TSU, DU145, LN-Cap and PC3. We demonstrate that inhibition of hedgehog signaling by smoothened antagonist, cyclopamine, suppresses hedgehog signaling, down-regulates cell invasiveness and induces apoptosis. In addition, cancer cells expressing Gli1 under the CMV promoter are resistant to cyclopamine-mediated apoptosis. All these data suggest a significant role of the hedgehog pathway for cellular functions of prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that activation of the hedgehog pathway, through loss of Su(Fu or overexpression of sonic hedgehog, may involve tumor progression and metastases of prostate cancer. Thus, targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling may have

  11. Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber Delivery of Sonic Hedgehog Protein to Reduce Smooth Muscle Apoptosis in the Penis after Cavernous Nerve Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Christopher W.; Angeloni, Nicholas L.; Harrington, Daniel A.; Stupp, Samuel I.; McKenna, Kevin E.; Podlasek, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a serious medical condition that affects 16–82% of prostate cancer patients treated by radical prostatectomy and current treatments are ineffective in 50–60% of prostatectomy patients. The reduced efficacy of treatments makes novel therapeutic approaches to treat ED essential. The secreted protein Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is a critical regulator of penile smooth muscle and apoptosis that is decreased in cavernous nerve (CN) injury and diabetic ED models. Past studies using Affi-Gel beads have shown SHH protein to be effective in suppressing apoptosis caused by CN injury. Aim We hypothesize that SHH protein delivered via novel peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers will be effective in suppressing CN injury-induced apoptosis. Methods Adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 50) were used to optimize PA injection in vivo. PA with SHH protein (n = 16) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (control, n = 14) was injected into adult rats that underwent bilateral CN cut. Rats were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 7 days. Alexa Fluor-labeled SHH protein was used to determine the target of SHH signaling (n = 3). Main Outcome Measures Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and semi-quantitative immunohistochemical analysis for SHH protein and cluster differentiation protein three (CD3) were performed. Results SHH-PA caused a 25% and 16% reduction in apoptosis at 4 and 7 days after CN injury and a 9.3% and 19% increase in SHH protein at 4 and 7 days after CN injury. CD3 protein was not observed in SHH-PA-treated penis. In vitro, 73% of SHH protein diffused from PA within 6 days. Labeled SHH was observed in smooth muscle. Conclusions PA technology is effective in delivering SHH protein to the penis and SHH is effective in suppressing CN injury-induced apoptosis. These results suggest substantial translational potential of this methodology and show that only a short duration of SHH treatment is required to impact the apoptotic index

  12. The V0-ATPase mediates apical secretion of exosomes containing Hedgehog-related proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Samuel; Benedetto, Alexandre; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Schwab, Yannick; Labouesse, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Polarized intracellular trafficking in epithelia is critical in development, immunity, and physiology to deliver morphogens, defensins, or ion pumps to the appropriate membrane domain. The mechanisms that control apical trafficking remain poorly defined. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we characterize a novel apical secretion pathway involving multivesicularbodies and the release of exosomes at the apical plasma membrane. By means of two different genetic approaches, we show that the membrane-bound V0 sector of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) acts in this pathway, independent of its contribution to the V-ATPase proton pump activity. Specifically, we identified mutations in the V0 “a” subunit VHA-5 that affect either the V0-specific function or the V0+V1 function of the V-ATPase. These mutations allowed us to establish that the V0 sector mediates secretion of Hedgehog-related proteins. Our data raise the possibility that the V0 sector mediates exosome and morphogen release in mammals. PMID:16785323

  13. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hedgehog Protein Cholesterolysis: A New Therapeutic Target for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    provide proof of concept but do not possess the physico- chemical characteristics of drug-like molecules. B) Compounds to be screened in year 3 include...a sterol mole - cule.[15] To establish conjugation of A and G to the SHhN C ter- minus, molecular masses of the trypsin-digested proteins were

  15. Identification of conserved regions and residues within Hedgehog acyltransferase critical for palmitoylation of Sonic Hedgehog.

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    John A Buglino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a palmitoylated protein that plays key roles in mammalian development and human cancers. Palmitoylation of Shh is required for effective long and short range Shh-mediated signaling. Attachment of palmitate to Shh is catalyzed by Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat, a member of the membrane bound O-acyl transferase (MBOAT family of multipass membrane proteins. The extremely hydrophobic composition of MBOAT proteins has limited their biochemical characterization. Except for mutagenesis of two conserved residues, there has been no structure-function analysis of Hhat, and the regions of the protein required for Shh palmitoylation are unknown.Here we undertake a systematic approach to identify residues within Hhat that are required for protein stability and/or enzymatic activity. We also identify a second, novel MBOAT homology region (residues 196-234 that is required for Hhat activity. In total, ten deletion mutants and eleven point mutants were generated and analyzed. Truncations at the N- and C-termini of Hhat yielded inactive proteins with reduced stability. Four Hhat mutants with deletions within predicted loop regions and five point mutants retained stability but lost palmitoylation activity. We purified two point mutants, W378A and H379A, with defective Hhat activity. Kinetic analyses revealed alterations in apparent K(m and V(max for Shh and/or palmitoyl CoA, changes that likely explain the catalytic defects observed for these mutants.This study has pinpointed specific regions and multiple residues that regulate Hhat stability and catalysis. Our findings should be applicable to other MBOAT proteins that mediate lipid modification of Wnt proteins and ghrelin, and should serve as a model for understanding how secreted morphogens are modified by palmitoyl acyltransferases.

  16. Outfoxing the Hedgehog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Jim Collins's "Good to Great" has attained near-scriptural status in organizations, including nonprofits, which Collins says constitute a third of his readers. The pivot point in "Good to Great" is the Hedgehog Concept. The "Hedgehog Concept" (HC), this author claims, is dangerous for schools because it distorts the nature of education. As Collins…

  17. Gli2a protein localization reveals a role for Iguana/DZIP1 in primary ciliogenesis and a dependence of Hedgehog signal transduction on primary cilia in the zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eeden Freek

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammalian cells, the integrity of the primary cilium is critical for proper regulation of the Hedgehog (Hh signal transduction pathway. Whether or not this dependence on the primary cilium is a universal feature of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling has remained contentious due, in part, to the apparent divergence of the intracellular transduction pathway between mammals and teleost fish. Results Here, using a functional Gli2-GFP fusion protein, we show that, as in mammals, the Gli2 transcription factor localizes to the primary cilia of cells in the zebrafish embryo and that this localization is modulated by the activity of the Hh pathway. Moreover, we show that the Igu/DZIP1protein, previously implicated in the modulation of Gli activity in zebrafish, also localizes to the primary cilium and is required for its proper formation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a conserved role of the primary cilium in mediating Hedgehog signalling activity across the vertebrate phylum and validate the use of the zebrafish as a representative model for the in vivo analysis of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling.

  18. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

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    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  19. The Meckel syndrome- associated protein MKS1 functionally interacts with components of the BBSome and IFT complexes to mediate ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling.

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    Sarah C Goetz

    Full Text Available The importance of primary cilia in human health is underscored by the link between ciliary dysfunction and a group of primarily recessive genetic disorders with overlapping clinical features, now known as ciliopathies. Many of the proteins encoded by ciliopathy-associated genes are components of a handful of multi-protein complexes important for the transport of cargo to the basal body and/or into the cilium. A key question is whether different complexes cooperate in cilia formation, and whether they participate in cilium assembly in conjunction with intraflagellar transport (IFT proteins. To examine how ciliopathy protein complexes might function together, we have analyzed double mutants of an allele of the Meckel syndrome (MKS complex protein MKS1 and the BBSome protein BBS4. We find that Mks1; Bbs4 double mutant mouse embryos exhibit exacerbated defects in Hedgehog (Hh dependent patterning compared to either single mutant, and die by E14.5. Cells from double mutant embryos exhibit a defect in the trafficking of ARL13B, a ciliary membrane protein, resulting in disrupted ciliary structure and signaling. We also examined the relationship between the MKS complex and IFT proteins by analyzing double mutant between Mks1 and a hypomorphic allele of the IFTB component Ift172. Despite each single mutant surviving until around birth, Mks1; Ift172avc1 double mutants die at mid-gestation, and exhibit a dramatic failure of cilia formation. We also find that Mks1 interacts genetically with an allele of Dync2h1, the IFT retrograde motor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the MKS transition zone complex cooperates with the BBSome to mediate trafficking of specific trans-membrane receptors to the cilium. Moreover, the genetic interaction of Mks1 with components of IFT machinery suggests that the transition zone complex facilitates IFT to promote cilium assembly and structure.

  20. The Meckel syndrome- associated protein MKS1 functionally interacts with components of the BBSome and IFT complexes to mediate ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Sarah C; Bangs, Fiona; Barrington, Chloe L; Katsanis, Nicholas; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2017-01-01

    The importance of primary cilia in human health is underscored by the link between ciliary dysfunction and a group of primarily recessive genetic disorders with overlapping clinical features, now known as ciliopathies. Many of the proteins encoded by ciliopathy-associated genes are components of a handful of multi-protein complexes important for the transport of cargo to the basal body and/or into the cilium. A key question is whether different complexes cooperate in cilia formation, and whether they participate in cilium assembly in conjunction with intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. To examine how ciliopathy protein complexes might function together, we have analyzed double mutants of an allele of the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex protein MKS1 and the BBSome protein BBS4. We find that Mks1; Bbs4 double mutant mouse embryos exhibit exacerbated defects in Hedgehog (Hh) dependent patterning compared to either single mutant, and die by E14.5. Cells from double mutant embryos exhibit a defect in the trafficking of ARL13B, a ciliary membrane protein, resulting in disrupted ciliary structure and signaling. We also examined the relationship between the MKS complex and IFT proteins by analyzing double mutant between Mks1 and a hypomorphic allele of the IFTB component Ift172. Despite each single mutant surviving until around birth, Mks1; Ift172avc1 double mutants die at mid-gestation, and exhibit a dramatic failure of cilia formation. We also find that Mks1 interacts genetically with an allele of Dync2h1, the IFT retrograde motor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the MKS transition zone complex cooperates with the BBSome to mediate trafficking of specific trans-membrane receptors to the cilium. Moreover, the genetic interaction of Mks1 with components of IFT machinery suggests that the transition zone complex facilitates IFT to promote cilium assembly and structure.

  1. Hedgehog Signaling in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

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    Emanuela Felley-Bosco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a cancer associated with exposure to asbestos fibers, which accumulate in the pleural space, damage tissue and stimulate regeneration. Hedgehog signaling is a pathway important during embryonic mesothelium development and is inactivated in adult mesothelium. The pathway is reactivated in some MPM patients with poor clinical outcome, mainly mediated by the expression of the ligands. Nevertheless, mutations in components of the pathway have been observed in a few cases. Data from different MPM animal models and primary culture suggest that both autocrine and paracrine Hedgehog signaling are important to maintain tumor growth. Drugs inhibiting the pathway at the level of the smoothened receptor (Smo or glioma-associated protein transcription factors (Gli have been used mostly in experimental models. For clinical development, biomarkers are necessary for the selection of patients who can benefit from Hedgehog signaling inhibition.

  2. Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice

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    Zhu Wei

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental duplication of a substantial portion of its genome. This, coupled with other genetic events such as tandem duplications, has resulted in a substantial number of its genes, and resulting proteins, occurring in paralogous families. Results Using a computational pipeline that utilizes Pfam and novel protein domains, we characterized paralogous families in rice and compared these with paralogous families in the model dicotyledonous diploid species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis, which has undergone genome duplication as well, has a substantially smaller genome (~120 Mb and gene complement compared to rice. Overall, 53% and 68% of the non-transposable element-related rice and Arabidopsis proteins could be classified into paralogous protein families, respectively. Singleton and paralogous family genes differed substantially in their likelihood of encoding a protein of known or putative function; 26% and 66% of singleton genes compared to 73% and 96% of the paralogous family genes encode a known or putative protein in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Furthermore, a major skew in the distribution of specific gene function was observed; a total of 17 Gene Ontology categories in both rice and Arabidopsis were statistically significant in their differential distribution between paralogous family and singleton proteins. In contrast to mammalian organisms, we found that duplicated genes in rice and Arabidopsis tend to have more alternative splice forms. Using data from Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing, we show that a significant portion of the duplicated genes in rice show divergent expression although a correlation between sequence divergence and correlation of expression could be seen in very young genes. Conclusion

  3. Three Tctn proteins are functionally conserved in the regulation of neural tube patterning and Gli3 processing but not ciliogenesis and Hedgehog signaling in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbing; Li, Jia; Meng, Qing; Wang, Baolin

    2017-10-01

    Tctn1, Tctn2, and Tctn3 are membrane proteins that localize at the transition zone of primary cilia. Tctn1 and Tctn2 mutations have been reported in both humans and mice, but Tctn3 mutations have been reported only in humans. It is also not clear whether the three Tctn proteins are functionally conserved with respect to ciliogenesis and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. In the present study, we report that loss of Tctn3 gene function in mice results in a decrease in ciliogenesis and Hh signaling. Consistent with this, Tctn3 mutant mice exhibit holoprosencephaly and randomized heart looping and lack the floor plate in the neural tube, the phenotypes similar to those of Tctn1 and Tctn2 mutants. We also show that overexpression of Tctn3, but not Tctn1 or Tctn2, can rescue ciliogenesis in Tctn3 mutant cells. Similarly, replacement of Tctn3 with Tctn1 or Tctn2 in the Tctn3 gene locus results in reduced ciliogenesis and Hh signaling, holoprosencephaly, and randomized heart looping. Surprisingly, however, the neural tube patterning and the proteolytic processing of Gli3 (a transcription regulator for Hh signaling) into a repressor, both of which are usually impaired in ciliary gene mutants, are normal. These results suggest that Tctn1, Tctn2, and Tctn3 are functionally divergent with respect to their role in ciliogenesis and Hh signaling but conserved in neural tube patterning and Gli3 processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolution of Gab family adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbeyquaye, Tetteh; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan; Raabe, Thomas; Thackeray, Justin R

    2003-06-05

    The Gab/dos/Soc-1 proteins form a family of multi-adaptor/scaffolding proteins involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. To further understanding of the Gab family and the Drosophila Dos protein in particular, we isolated a dos homolog from both Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila virilis and compared their gene structures and protein sequences with the rest of the Gab family. The presence of two conserved introns confirmed that the dos and gab genes are orthologous, but the Caenorhabditis elegans soc-1 gene had no unambiguously conserved introns with either dos or gab. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that soc-1 probably represents a divergent member of the Gab family. Apart from the PH domain, which is well conserved in all Gab family members, the proteins show a low level of sequence conservation. Two tyrosines that probably bind to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains of a tyrosine phosphatase in all Gab family members are conserved at the C-terminal end; two other potential SH2-binding sites in Dos were also identified, as well as several proline rich sequences that might bind to SH3 or EVH1 domains in other proteins. A major partner for mammalian Gab is phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma); genetic and biochemical tests for a PLC-gamma-SH3::Dos interaction were negative, indicating that if Drosophila PLC-gamma binds to Dos, it must do so indirectly or through an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction.

  5. Hedgehog Signaling in Endochondral Ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Ohba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays crucial roles in the patterning and morphogenesis of various organs within the bodies of vertebrates and insects. Endochondral ossification is one of the notable developmental events in which Hh signaling acts as a master regulator. Among three Hh proteins in mammals, Indian hedgehog (Ihh is known to work as a major Hh input that induces biological impact of Hh signaling on the endochondral ossification. Ihh is expressed in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes of developing endochondral bones. Genetic studies so far have demonstrated that the Ihh-mediated activation of Hh signaling synchronizes chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during endochondral ossification by regulating the following processes: (1 chondrocyte differentiation; (2 chondrocyte proliferation; and (3 specification of bone-forming osteoblasts. Ihh not only forms a negative feedback loop with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP to maintain the growth plate length, but also directly promotes chondrocyte propagation. Ihh input is required for the specification of progenitors into osteoblast precursors. The combinatorial approaches of genome-wide analyses and mouse genetics will facilitate understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying the roles of Hh signaling in endochondral ossification, providing genome-level evidence of the potential of Hh signaling for the treatment of skeletal disorders.

  6. Desert hedgehog is a mammal-specific gene expressed during testicular and ovarian development in a marsupial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara William A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desert hedgehog (DHH belongs to the hedgehog gene family that act as secreted intercellular signal transducers. DHH is an essential morphogen for normal testicular development and function in both mice and humans but is not present in the avian lineage. Like other hedgehog proteins, DHH signals through the patched (PTCH receptors 1 and 2. Here we examine the expression and protein distribution of DHH, PTCH1 and PTCH2 in the developing testes of a marsupial mammal (the tammar wallaby to determine whether DHH signalling is a conserved factor in gonadal development in all therian mammals. Results DHH, PTCH1 and PTCH2 were present in the marsupial genome and highly conserved with their eutherian orthologues. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that DHH has recently evolved and is a mammal-specific hedgehog orthologue. The marsupial PTCH2 receptor had an additional exon (exon 21a not annotated in eutherian PTCH2 proteins. Interestingly we found evidence of this exon in humans and show that its translation would result in a truncated protein with functions similar to PTCH1. We also show that DHH expression was not restricted to the testes during gonadal development (as in mice, but was also expressed in the developing ovary. Expression of DHH, PTCH1 and PTCH2 in the adult tammar testis and ovary was consistent with findings in the adult mouse. Conclusions These data suggest that there is a highly conserved role for DHH signalling in the differentiation and function of the mammalian testis and that DHH may be necessary for marsupial ovarian development. The receptors PTCH1 and PTCH2 are highly conserved mediators of hedgehog signalling in both the developing and adult marsupial gonads. Together these findings indicate DHH is an essential therian mammal-specific morphogen in gonadal development and gametogenesis.

  7. Protein function prediction using domain families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzsch, Robert; Orengo, Christine A

    2013-01-01

    Here we assessed the use of domain families for predicting the functions of whole proteins. These 'functional families' (FunFams) were derived using a protocol that combines sequence clustering with supervised cluster evaluation, relying on available high-quality Gene Ontology (GO) annotation data in the latter step. In essence, the protocol groups domain sequences belonging to the same superfamily into families based on the GO annotations of their parent proteins. An initial test based on enzyme sequences confirmed that the FunFams resemble enzyme (domain) families much better than do families produced by sequence clustering alone. For the CAFA 2011 experiment, we further associated the FunFams with GO terms probabilistically. All target proteins were first submitted to domain superfamily assignment, followed by FunFam assignment and, eventually, function assignment. The latter included an integration step for multi-domain target proteins. The CAFA results put our domain-based approach among the top ten of 31 competing groups and 56 prediction methods, confirming that it outperforms simple pairwise whole-protein sequence comparisons.

  8. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T.; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome. PMID:24853502

  9. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  10. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  11. IREB2, CHRNA5, CHRNA3, FAM13A & hedgehog interacting protein genes polymorphisms & risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Tatar population from Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnaz Faritovna Korytina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory system affecting primarily distal respiratory pathways and lung parenchyma. This study was aimed at investigating the association of COPD with IREB2, CHRNA5, CHRNA3, FAM13A and hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP genes in a Tatar population from Russia. Methods: Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs13180, rs16969968, rs1051730, rs6495309, rs7671167, rs13118928 were genotyped by the real-time polymerase chain reaction in this study (511 COPD patients and 508 controls. Logistic regression was used to detect the association of SNPs and haplotypes of linked loci in different models. Linear regression analyses were performed to estimate the relationship between SNPs and lung function parameters and pack-years. Results: The rs13180 (IREB2, rs16969968 (CHRNA5 and rs1051730 (CHRNA3 were significantly associated with COPD in additive model [Padj =0.00001, odds ratio (OR=0.64; Padj =0.0001, OR=1.41 and Padj =0.0001, OR=1.47]. The C-G haplotype by rs13180 and rs1051730 was a protective factor for COPD in our population (Padj =0.0005, OR=0.61. These results were confirmed only in smokers. The rs16969968 and rs1051730 were associated with decrease of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec % predicted (Padj =0.005 and Padj =0.0019. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed the association of rs13180, rs16969968 and rs1051730 with COPD and lung function in Tatar population from Russia. Further studies need to be done in other ethnic populations.

  12. Nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 promotes the aggressiveness of astrocytoma by activating the Hedgehog signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xianqiu; Xu, Benke; Yang, Chao; Wang, Wentao; Zhong, Dequan; Zhao, Zhan; He, Longshuang; Hu, Yuanjun; JIANG, LILI; Li, Jun; Song, Libing; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background The prognosis of human astrocytoma is poor, and the molecular alterations underlying its pathogenesis still needed to be elucidated. Nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) was observed in several types of cancers, but its role in astrocytoma remained unknown. Methods The expression of NUSAP1 in astrocytoma cell lines and tissues were measured with western blotting and Real-Time PCR. Two hundred and twenty-one astrocytoma tissue samples were analyzed by immunochemistry ...

  13. The family of LSU-like proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eSirko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant response to sulfur deficiency includes extensive metabolic changes which can be monitored at various levels (transcriptome, proteome, metabolome even before the first visible symptoms of sulfur starvation appear. Four members of the plant-specific LSU (response to Low SUlfur gene family occur in Arabidopsis thaliana (LSU1-4. Variable numbers of LSU genes occur in other plant species but they were studied only in Arabidopsis and tobacco. Three out of four of the Arabidopsis LSU genes are induced by sulfur deficiency. The LSU-like genes in tobacco were characterized as UP9 (UPregulated by sulfur deficit 9. LSU-like proteins do not have characteristic domains that provide clues to their function. Despite having only moderate primary sequence conservation they share several common features including small size, a coiled-coil secondary structure and short conserved motifs in specific positions. Although the precise function of LSU-like proteins is still unknown there is some evidence that members of the LSU family are involved in plant responses to environmental challenges, such as sulfur deficiency, and possibly in plant immune responses. Various bioinformatic approaches have identified LSU-like proteins as important hubs for integration of signals from environmental stimuli. In this paper we review a variety of published data on LSU gene expression, the properties of lsu mutants and features of LSU-like proteins in the hope of shedding some light on their possible role in plant metabolism.

  14. Activation of REG family proteins in colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, Atle van Beelen; Beisvag, Vidar; Torp, Sverre H; Flatberg, Arnar; Kleveland, Per Martin; Ostvik, Ann Elisabeth; Waldum, Helge L; Sandvik, Arne K

    2011-11-01

    To do a genome-wide gene expression study of active and inactive ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (inflammatory bowel disease--IBD) and examine the most differentially expressed genes. As the study showed an extreme upregulation of all regenerating islet-derived genes (REG proteins) in active IBD, we further studied the expression of REGs on protein level in active and inactive IBD, as well as in non-IBD (pseudomembranous) colitis. Microarray analysis was done on a total of 100 pinch biopsy samples from healthy controls and patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Tissue samples from IBD and pseudomembranous colitis were examined with routine histology and immunohistochemical analysis for REGIα, REGIV, DEFA6, and serotonin. REG mRNAs were up to 83 times overexpressed in diseased mucosa compared with mucosa from healthy individuals. REGIα and REGIV were overexpressed at immunohistochemistry and located to different mucosal cell types. REGIα was expressed in basal half of crypts, REGIV in mid and outer parts of crypts and in surface epithelium and seems to be stored in, and secreted from, goblets. Pseudomembranous colitis samples showed similar staining patterns, and some IBD samples stained REG positive without inflammation on routine histology. All REG family mRNAs are upregulated in IBD. REGIα and REGIV have different cellular localization, possibly reflecting different biological functions. REG protein expression also in pseudomembranous colitis shows that REG family proteins are regulated in inflammatory injury and repair, not specifically for IBD as previously thought.

  15. Clustering evolving proteins into homologous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Mahbob, Maisarah; Ragan, Mark A

    2013-04-08

    Clustering sequences into groups of putative homologs (families) is a critical first step in many areas of comparative biology and bioinformatics. The performance of clustering approaches in delineating biologically meaningful families depends strongly on characteristics of the data, including content bias and degree of divergence. New, highly scalable methods have recently been introduced to cluster the very large datasets being generated by next-generation sequencing technologies. However, there has been little systematic investigation of how characteristics of the data impact the performance of these approaches. Using clusters from a manually curated dataset as reference, we examined the performance of a widely used graph-based Markov clustering algorithm (MCL) and a greedy heuristic approach (UCLUST) in delineating protein families coded by three sets of bacterial genomes of different G+C content. Both MCL and UCLUST generated clusters that are comparable to the reference sets at specific parameter settings, although UCLUST tends to under-cluster compositionally biased sequences (G+C content 33% and 66%). Using simulated data, we sought to assess the individual effects of sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity, and underlying G+C content. Performance decreased with increasing sequence divergence, decreasing among-site rate variation, and increasing G+C bias. Two MCL-based methods recovered the simulated families more accurately than did UCLUST. MCL using local alignment distances is more robust across the investigated range of sequence features than are greedy heuristics using distances based on global alignment. Our results demonstrate that sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity and content bias can individually and in combination affect the accuracy with which MCL and UCLUST can recover homologous protein families. For application to data that are more divergent, and exhibit higher among-site rate variation and/or content bias, MCL may often be the better

  16. Loss of Pin1 Suppresses Hedgehog-Driven Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Honglai; Park, Sung-Soo; Venneti, Sriram; Kuick, Rork; Ha, Kimberly; Michael, Lowell Evan; Santi, Mariarita; Uchida, Chiyoko; Uchida, Takafumi; Srinivasan, Ashok; Olson, James M; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Rual, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Therapeutic approaches to medulloblastoma (combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy) have led to significant improvements, but these are achieved at a high cost to quality of life. Alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Genetic mutations leading to the activation of the Hedgehog pathway drive tumorigenesis in ~30% of medulloblastoma. In a yeast two-hybrid proteomic screen, we discovered a novel interaction between GLI1, a key transcription factor for the mediation of Hedgehog signals, and PIN1, a peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase that regulates the postphosphorylation fate of its targets. The GLI1/PIN1 interaction was validated by reciprocal pulldowns using epitope-tagged proteins in HEK293T cells as well as by co-immunoprecipiations of the endogenous proteins in a medulloblastoma cell line. Our results support a molecular model in which PIN1 promotes GLI1 protein abundance, thus contributing to the positive regulation of Hedgehog signals. Most importantly, in vivo functional analyses of Pin1 in the GFAP-tTA;TRE-SmoA1 mouse model of Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma demonstrate that the loss of Pin1 impairs tumor development and dramatically increases survival. In summary, the discovery of the GLI1/PIN1 interaction uncovers PIN1 as a novel therapeutic target in Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Thiol dioxygenases: unique families of cupin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipanuk, Martha H; Simmons, Chad R; Karplus, P Andrew; Dominy, John E

    2011-06-01

    Proteins in the cupin superfamily have a wide range of biological functions in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. Although proteins in the cupin superfamily show very low overall sequence similarity, they all contain two short but partially conserved cupin sequence motifs separated by a less conserved intermotif region that varies both in length and amino acid sequence. Furthermore, these proteins all share a common architecture described as a six-stranded β-barrel core, and this canonical cupin or "jelly roll" β-barrel is formed with cupin motif 1, the intermotif region, and cupin motif 2 each forming two of the core six β-strands in the folded protein structure. The recently obtained crystal structures of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), with contains conserved cupin motifs, show that it has the predicted canonical cupin β-barrel fold. Although there had been no reports of CDO activity in prokaryotes, we identified a number of bacterial cupin proteins of unknown function that share low similarity with mammalian CDO and that conserve many residues in the active-site pocket of CDO. Putative bacterial CDOs predicted to have CDO activity were shown to have similar substrate specificity and kinetic parameters as eukaryotic CDOs. Information gleaned from crystal structures of mammalian CDO along with sequence information for homologs shown to have CDO activity facilitated the identification of a CDO family fingerprint motif. One key feature of the CDO fingerprint motif is that the canonical metal-binding glutamate residue in cupin motif 1 is replaced by a cysteine (in mammalian CDOs) or by a glycine (bacterial CDOs). The recent report that some putative bacterial CDO homologs are actually 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases suggests that the CDO family may include proteins with specificities for other thiol substrates. A paralog of CDO in mammals was also identified and shown to be the other mammalian thiol dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase (ADO). A tentative fingerprint

  18. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Aebersold, Ruedi; Simons, Kai; Shevchenko, Andrej; Ejsing, Christer S; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2010-02-25

    Despite the essential roles of sphingolipids both as structural components of membranes and critical signalling molecules, we have a limited understanding of how cells sense and regulate their levels. Here we reveal the function in sphingolipid metabolism of the ORM genes (known as ORMDL genes in humans)-a conserved gene family that includes ORMDL3, which has recently been identified as a potential risk factor for childhood asthma. Starting from an unbiased functional genomic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify Orm proteins as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis that form a conserved complex with serine palmitoyltransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid production. We also define a regulatory pathway in which phosphorylation of Orm proteins relieves their inhibitory activity when sphingolipid production is disrupted. Changes in ORM gene expression or mutations to their phosphorylation sites cause dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Our work identifies the Orm proteins as critical mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis and raises the possibility that sphingolipid misregulation contributes to the development of childhood asthma.

  19. The hedgehog-signaling pathway is repressed during the osteogenic differentiation of dental follicle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Reck, A; Beck, H C

    2017-01-01

    Dental follicle stem cells (DFCs) are precursor cells of alveolar osteoblasts, and previous studies have shown that the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 induces the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. However, the molecular mechanism down-stream of the induction of the osteogenic...... of repressors of the hedgehog-signaling pathway such as Patched 1 (PTCH1), Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), and Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (PTHrP). Previous studies suggested that hedgehog proteins induce the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via a paracrine pathway. Indian hedgehog (IHH...

  20. HMM Logos for visualization of protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs are a widely used tool for protein family research. Up to now, however, there exists no method to visualize all of their central aspects graphically in an intuitively understandable way. Results We present a visualization method that incorporates both emission and transition probabilities of the pHMM, thus extending sequence logos introduced by Schneider and Stephens. For each emitting state of the pHMM, we display a stack of letters. The stack height is determined by the deviation of the position's letter emission frequencies from the background frequencies. The stack width visualizes both the probability of reaching the state (the hitting probability and the expected number of letters the state emits during a pass through the model (the state's expected contribution. A web interface offering online creation of HMM Logos and the corresponding source code can be found at the Logos web server of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics http://logos.molgen.mpg.de. Conclusions We demonstrate that HMM Logos can be a useful tool for the biologist: We use them to highlight differences between two homologous subfamilies of GTPases, Rab and Ras, and we show that they are able to indicate structural elements of Ras.

  1. Dock protein family in brain development and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    The family of dedicator of cytokinesis (Dock), a protein family that belongs to the atypical Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rac and/or Cdc42 GTPases, plays pivotal roles in various processes of brain development. To date, 11 members of Docks have been identified in the mammalian system. Emerging evidence has suggested that members of the Dock family are associated with several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer disease and autism spectrum disorders. This review summarizes recent advances on the understanding of the roles of the Dock protein family in normal and diseased processes in the nervous system. Furthermore, interacting proteins and the molecular regulation of Docks are discussed.

  2. Loss of Merlin induces metabolomic adaptation that engages dependence on Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shamik; Jackson, William P; Prasain, Jeevan K; Hanna, Ann; Bailey, Sarah K; Tucker, J Allan; Bae, Sejong; Wilson, Landon S; Samant, Rajeev S; Barnes, Stephen; Shevde, Lalita A

    2017-01-23

    The tumor suppressor protein Merlin is proteasomally degraded in breast cancer. We undertook an untargeted metabolomics approach to discern the global metabolomics profile impacted by Merlin in breast cancer cells. We discerned specific changes in glutathione metabolites that uncovered novel facets of Merlin in impacting the cancer cell metabolome. Concordantly, Merlin loss increased oxidative stress causing aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling. Abrogation of GLI-mediated transcription activity compromised the aggressive phenotype of Merlin-deficient cells indicating a clear dependence of cells on Hedgehog signaling. In breast tumor tissues, GLI1 expression enhanced tissue identification and discriminatory power of Merlin, cumulatively presenting a powerful substantiation of the relationship between these two proteins. We have uncovered, for the first time, details of the tumor cell metabolomic portrait modulated by Merlin, leading to activation of Hedgehog signaling. Importantly, inhibition of Hedgehog signaling offers an avenue to target the vulnerability of tumor cells with loss of Merlin.

  3. A new family of global protein shape descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Bohr, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    A family of global geometric measures is constructed for protein structure classification. These measures originate from integral formulas of Vassiliev knot invariants and give rise to a unique classification scheme. Our measures can better discriminate between many known protein structures than...... the simple measures of the secondary structure content of these protein structures....

  4. Organisation of the lamprey ( Lampetra fluviatilis) embryonic brain: Insights from LIM-homeodomain, Pax and hedgehog genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osorio, Joana; Mazan, Sylvie; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the embryonic development of the central nervous system of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, we have isolated and analysed the expression patterns of members of the LIM-homeodomain, Pax, Hedgehog and Nkx2.1 families...

  5. DWARF – a data warehouse system for analyzing protein families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Markus; Thai, Quan K; Grieb, Melanie; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Background The emerging field of integrative bioinformatics provides the tools to organize and systematically analyze vast amounts of highly diverse biological data and thus allows to gain a novel understanding of complex biological systems. The data warehouse DWARF applies integrative bioinformatics approaches to the analysis of large protein families. Description The data warehouse system DWARF integrates data on sequence, structure, and functional annotation for protein fold families. The underlying relational data model consists of three major sections representing entities related to the protein (biochemical function, source organism, classification to homologous families and superfamilies), the protein sequence (position-specific annotation, mutant information), and the protein structure (secondary structure information, superimposed tertiary structure). Tools for extracting, transforming and loading data from public available resources (ExPDB, GenBank, DSSP) are provided to populate the database. The data can be accessed by an interface for searching and browsing, and by analysis tools that operate on annotation, sequence, or structure. We applied DWARF to the family of α/β-hydrolases to host the Lipase Engineering database. Release 2.3 contains 6138 sequences and 167 experimentally determined protein structures, which are assigned to 37 superfamilies 103 homologous families. Conclusion DWARF has been designed for constructing databases of large structurally related protein families and for evaluating their sequence-structure-function relationships by a systematic analysis of sequence, structure and functional annotation. It has been applied to predict biochemical properties from sequence, and serves as a valuable tool for protein engineering. PMID:17094801

  6. Identification and Characterization of KCASH2 and KCASH3, 2 Novel Cullin3 Adaptors Suppressing Histone Deacetylase and Hedgehog Activity in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico De Smaele

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor, arising from aberrant cerebellar precursors' development, a process mainly controlled by Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway. Histone deacetylase HDAC1 has been recently shown to modulate Hh signaling, deacetylating its effectors Gli1/2 and enhancing their transcriptional activity. Therefore, HDAC may represent a potential therapeutic target for Hh-dependent tumors, but still little information is available on the physiological mechanisms of HDAC regulation. The putative tumor suppressor RENKCTD11 acts through ubiquitination-dependent degradation of HDAC1, thereby affecting Hh activity and medulloblastoma growth. We identify and characterize here two RENKCTD11 homologues, defining a new family of proteins named KCASH, as “KCTD containing, Cullin3 adaptor, suppressor of Hedgehog.” Indeed, the novel genes (KCASH2KCTD21 and KCASH3KCTD6 share with RENKCTD11 a number of features, such as a BTB domain required for the formation of a Cullin3 ubiquitin ligase complex and HDAC1 ubiquitination and degradation capability, suppressing the acetylation-dependent Hh/Gli signaling. Expression of KCASH2 and -3 is observed in cerebellum, whereas epigenetic silencing and allelic deletion are observed in human medulloblastoma. Rescuing KCASHs expression reduces the Hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma growth, suggesting that loss of members of this novel family of native HDAC inhibitors is crucial in sustaining Hh pathway-mediated tumorigenesis. Accordingly, they might represent a promising class of endogenous “agents” through which this pathway may be targeted.

  7. Thiol Dioxygenases: Unique Families of Cupin Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Stipanuk, M H; Simmons, C. R.; Karplus, P A; Dominy, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins in the cupin superfamily have a wide range of biological functions in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. Although proteins in the cupin superfamily show very low overall sequence similarity, they all contain two short but partially conserved cupin sequence motifs separated by a less conserved intermotif region that varies both in length and amino acid sequence. Furthermore, these proteins all share a common architecture described as a 6-stranded β-barrel core, and this canonical cupin...

  8. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  9. Sonic hedgehog increases the commitment of pluripotent mesenchymal cells into the osteoblastic lineage and abolishes adipocytic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella-Jaegle, S; Rawadi, G; Kawai, S; Gallea, S; Faucheu, C; Mollat, P; Courtois, B; Bergaud, B; Ramez, V; Blanchet, A M; Adelmant, G; Baron, R; Roman-Roman, S

    2001-06-01

    The proteins of the hedgehog (Hh) family regulate various aspects of development. Recently, members of this family have been shown to regulate skeletal formation in vertebrates and to control both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) on the osteoblastic and adipocytic commitment/differentiation. Recombinant N-terminal Shh (N-Shh) significantly increased the percentage of both the pluripotent mesenchymal cell lines C3H10T1/2 and ST2 and calvaria cells responding to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), in terms of osteoblast commitment as assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This synergistic effect was mediated, at least partly, through the positive modulation of the transcriptional output of BMPs via Smad signaling. Furthermore, N-Shh was found to abolish adipocytic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells both in the presence or absence of BMP-2. A short treatment with N-Shh was sufficient to dramatically reduce the levels of the adipocytic-related transcription factors C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma in both C3H10T1/2 and calvaria cell cultures. Given the inverse relationship between marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts with aging, agonists of the Hh signaling pathway might constitute potential drugs for preventing and/or treating osteopenic disorders.

  10. HIPPI: highly accurate protein family classification with ensembles of HMMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-phuong Nguyen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given a new biological sequence, detecting membership in a known family is a basic step in many bioinformatics analyses, with applications to protein structure and function prediction and metagenomic taxon identification and abundance profiling, among others. Yet family identification of sequences that are distantly related to sequences in public databases or that are fragmentary remains one of the more difficult analytical problems in bioinformatics. Results We present a new technique for family identification called HIPPI (Hierarchical Profile Hidden Markov Models for Protein family Identification. HIPPI uses a novel technique to represent a multiple sequence alignment for a given protein family or superfamily by an ensemble of profile hidden Markov models computed using HMMER. An evaluation of HIPPI on the Pfam database shows that HIPPI has better overall precision and recall than blastp, HMMER, and pipelines based on HHsearch, and maintains good accuracy even for fragmentary query sequences and for protein families with low average pairwise sequence identity, both conditions where other methods degrade in accuracy. Conclusion HIPPI provides accurate protein family identification and is robust to difficult model conditions. Our results, combined with observations from previous studies, show that ensembles of profile Hidden Markov models can better represent multiple sequence alignments than a single profile Hidden Markov model, and thus can improve downstream analyses for various bioinformatic tasks. Further research is needed to determine the best practices for building the ensemble of profile Hidden Markov models. HIPPI is available on GitHub at https://github.com/smirarab/sepp .

  11. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Gonzalo Parra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins.

  12. Genome Pool Strategy for Structural Coverage of Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Slabinski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian. A.; Godzik, Adam

    2010-01-01

    As noticed by generations of structural biologists, closely homologous proteins may have substantially different crystallization properties and propensities. These observations can be used to systematically introduce additional dimensionality into crystallization trials by targeting homologous proteins from multiple genomes in a “genome pool” strategy. Through extensive use of our recently introduced “crystallization feasibility score” (Slabinski et al., 2007a), we can explain that the genome pool strategy works well because the crystallization feasibility scores are surprisingly broad within families of homologous proteins, with most families containing a range of optimal to very difficult targets. We also show that some families can be regarded as relatively “easy”, where a significant number of proteins are predicted to have optimal crystallization features, and others are “very difficult”, where almost none are predicted to result in a crystal structure. Thus, the outcome of such variable distributions of such crystallizability' preferences leads to uneven structural coverage of known families, with “easier” or “optimal” families having several times more solved structures than “very difficult” ones. Nevertheless, this latter category can be successfully targeted by increasing the number of genomes that are used to select targets from a given family. On average, adding 10 new genomes to the “genome pool” provides more promising targets for 7 “very difficult” families. In contrast, our crystallization feasibility score does not indicate that any specific microbial genomes can be readily classified as “easier” or “very difficult” with respect to providing suitable candidates for crystallization and structure determination. Finally, our analyses show that specific physicochemical properties of the protein sequence favor successful outcomes for structure determination and, hence, the group of proteins with known 3D

  13. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    or mutations to their phosphorylation sites cause dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Our work identifies the Orm proteins as critical mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis and raises the possibility that sphingolipid misregulation contributes to the development of childhood asthma....

  14. Protein folds and families: sequence and structure alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1999-01-01

    Dali and HSSP are derived databases organizing protein space in the structurally known regions. We use an automatic structure alignment program (Dali) for the classification of all known 3D structures based on all-against-all comparison of 3D structures in the Protein Data Bank. The HSSP database associates 1D sequences with known 3D structures using a position-weighted dynamic programming method for sequence profile alignment (MaxHom). As a result, the HSSP database not only provides aligned sequence families, but also implies secondary and tertiary structures covering 36% of all sequences in Swiss-Prot. The structure classification by Dali and the sequence families in HSSP can be browsed jointly from a web interface providing a rich network of links between neighbours in fold space, between domains and proteins, and between structures and sequences. In particular, this results in a database of explicit multiple alignments of protein families in the twilight zone of sequence similarity. The organization of protein structures and families provides a map of the currently known regions of the protein universe that is useful for the analysis of folding principles, for the evolutionary unification of protein families and for maximizing the information return from experimental structure determination. The databases are available from http://www.embl-ebi.ac.uk/dali/

  15. The origin recognition complex protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Bernard P; Chesnokov, Igor N; McConkey, Brendan J

    2009-01-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC) proteins were first discovered as a six-subunit assemblage in budding yeast that promotes the initiation of DNA replication. Orc1-5 appear to be present in all eukaryotes, and include both AAA+ and winged-helix motifs. A sixth protein, Orc6, shows no structural similarity to the other ORC proteins, and is poorly conserved between budding yeast and most other eukaryotic species. The replication factor Cdc6 has extensive sequence similarity with Orc1 and phylogenetic analysis suggests the genes that encode them may be paralogs. ORC proteins have also been found in the archaea, and the bacterial DnaA replication protein has ORC-like functional domains. In budding yeast, Orc1-6 are bound to origins of DNA replication throughout the cell cycle. Following association with Cdc6 in G1 phase, the sequential hydrolysis of Cdc6 - then ORC-bound ATP loads the Mcm2-7 helicase complex onto DNA. Localization of ORC subunits to the kinetochore and centrosome during mitosis and to the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis has been observed in metazoan cells and, along with phenotypes observed following knockdown with short interfering RNAs, point to additional roles at these cell-cycle stages. In addition, ORC proteins function in epigenetic gene silencing through interactions with heterochromatin factors such as Sir1 in budding yeast and HP1 in higher eukaryotes. Current avenues of research have identified roles for ORC proteins in the development of neuronal and muscle tissue, and are probing their relationship to genome integrity.

  16. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their

  17. Expansion of the protein repertoire in newly explored environments: human gut microbiome specific protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Ellrott

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbes that inhabit particular environments must be able to perform molecular functions that provide them with a competitive advantage to thrive in those environments. As most molecular functions are performed by proteins and are conserved between related proteins, we can expect that organisms successful in a given environmental niche would contain protein families that are specific for functions that are important in that environment. For instance, the human gut is rich in polysaccharides from the diet or secreted by the host, and is dominated by Bacteroides, whose genomes contain highly expanded repertoire of protein families involved in carbohydrate metabolism. To identify other protein families that are specific to this environment, we investigated the distribution of protein families in the currently available human gut genomic and metagenomic data. Using an automated procedure, we identified a group of protein families strongly overrepresented in the human gut. These not only include many families described previously but also, interestingly, a large group of previously unrecognized protein families, which suggests that we still have much to discover about this environment. The identification and analysis of these families could provide us with new information about an environment critical to our health and well being.

  18. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangxi Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR-family protein Smoothened (Smo. Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail. We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo.

  19. An electrophoretic investigation of mammalian spermatid-specific nuclear proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanneau, M; Loir, M

    1982-05-01

    Using standardized methods for protein extraction and analysis, the testes of rams, bulls, goats, boars, stallions, rats, cats, hedgehogs, European mink and ferrets were examined for basic spermatid nucleoproteins by electrophoresis. The results suggest that differences exist in the total number of these proteins as well as in the number and amount of the cross-linked cystein-containing proteins. These differences appear to be more family-specific than species-specific.

  20. Hedgehog signaling in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Daniel; Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Zavros, Yana

    2016-12-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway not only plays a key part in controlling embryonic development, but in the adult stomach governs important cellular events such as epithelial cell differentiation, proliferation, gastric disease, and regeneration. In particular, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been well studied for its role in gastric physiology and pathophysiology. Shh is secreted from the gastric parietal cells and contributes to the regeneration of the epithelium in response to injury, or the development of gastritis during Helicobacter pylori infection. Dysregulation of the Shh signaling pathway leads to the disruption of gastric differentiation, loss of gastric acid secretion and the development of cancer. In this chapter, we will review the most recent findings that reveal the role of Shh as a regulator of gastric physiology, regeneration, and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns of hedgehog-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baillie David

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes ten proteins that share sequence similarity with the Hedgehog signaling molecule through their C-terminal autoprocessing Hint/Hog domain. These proteins contain novel N-terminal domains, and C. elegans encodes dozens of additional proteins containing only these N-terminal domains. These gene families are called warthog, groundhog, ground-like and quahog, collectively called hedgehog (hh-related genes. Previously, the expression pattern of seventeen genes was examined, which showed that they are primarily expressed in the ectoderm. Results With the completion of the C. elegans genome sequence in November 2002, we reexamined and identified 61 hh-related ORFs. Further, we identified 49 hh-related ORFs in C. briggsae. ORF analysis revealed that 30% of the genes still had errors in their predictions and we improved these predictions here. We performed a comprehensive expression analysis using GFP fusions of the putative intergenic regulatory sequence with one or two transgenic lines for most genes. The hh-related genes are expressed in one or a few of the following tissues: hypodermis, seam cells, excretory duct and pore cells, vulval epithelial cells, rectal epithelial cells, pharyngeal muscle or marginal cells, arcade cells, support cells of sensory organs, and neuronal cells. Using time-lapse recordings, we discovered that some hh-related genes are expressed in a cyclical fashion in phase with molting during larval development. We also generated several translational GFP fusions, but they did not show any subcellular localization. In addition, we also studied the expression patterns of two genes with similarity to Drosophila frizzled, T23D8.1 and F27E11.3A, and the ortholog of the Drosophila gene dally-like, gpn-1, which is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The two frizzled homologs are expressed in a few neurons in the head, and gpn-1 is expressed in the pharynx. Finally, we compare the

  2. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen P Graether

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dehydration proteins (dehydrins are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y- and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggest multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins.

  3. Identification and characterization of cytosolic Hansenula polymorpha proteins belonging to the Hsp70 protein family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Evers, Melchior E.; Diesel, Andre; Samyn, Bart; Beeumen, Josef van; Roggenkamp, Rainer; Kiel, Jan A.K.W.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    We have isolated two members of the Hsp70 protein family from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha using affinity chromatography. Both proteins were located in the cytoplasm. One of these, designated Hsp72, was inducible in nature (e.g. by heat shock). The second protein (designated Hsc74) was

  4. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. PSI-2: structural genomics to cover protein domain family space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessailly, Benoît H; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2009-06-10

    One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centers, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterized protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterized subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly overrepresented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first 3 years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space.

  6. Gedunin inhibits pancreatic cancer by altering sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Nandy, Sushmita Bose; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Camacho, Fernando; Medel, Joshua; Alabi, Damilola; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2017-02-14

    The lack of efficient treatment options for pancreatic cancer highlights the critical need for the development of novel and effective chemotherapeutic agents. The medicinal properties found in plants have been used to treat many different illnesses including cancers. This study focuses on the anticancer effects of gedunin, a natural compound isolated from Azadirachta indica. Anti-proliferative effect of gedunin on pancreatic cancer cells was assessed using MTS assay. We used matrigel invasion assay, scratch assay, and soft agar colony formation assay to measure the anti-metastatic potential of gedunin. Immunoblotting was performed to analyze the effect of gedunin on the expression of key proteins involved in pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. Gedunin induced apoptosis was measured using flow cytometric analysis. To further validate, xenograft studies with HPAC cells were performed. Gedunin treatment is highly effective in inducing death of pancreatic cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic mediated apoptosis. Our data further indicates that gedunin inhibited metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by decreasing their EMT, invasive, migratory and colony formation capabilities. Gedunin treatment also inhibited sonic hedgehog signaling pathways. Further, experiments with recombinant sonic hedgehog protein and Gli inhibitor (Gant-61) demonstrated that gedunin induces its anti-metastatic effect through inhibition of sonic hedgehog signaling. The anti-cancer effect of gedunin was further validated using xenograft mouse model. Overall, our data suggests that gedunin could serve as a potent anticancer agent against pancreatic cancers.

  7. Picasso: generating a covering set of protein family profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, A; Holm, L

    2001-03-01

    Evolutionary classification leads to an economical description of protein sequence data because attributes of function and structure are inherited in protein families. This paper presents Picasso, a procedure for deriving a minimal set of protein family profiles that cover all known protein sequences. Picasso starts from highly overlapping sequence neighbourhoods revealed by all-on-all pairwise Blast alignment. Overlaps are reduced by merging sequences or parts of sequences into multiple alignments. For maximum unification, the multiple alignments must reach into the twilight zone of sequence similarity. Sensitive and selective profile-profile comparison allows unification down to about 15% pairwise sequence identity. Families unified through a short conserved sequence motif are associated with multiple full-length alignments describing different subfamilies. Domains that are mobile modules are identified based on their association with different sets of neighbours. The result is 10000 unified domain families (excluding singletons) representing functionally related proteins and recovering classical prolific domain types in high numbers. The classification is useful, for example, in developing strategies for efficient database searching and for selecting targets to complete the map of all 3-D structures.

  8. Bilateral thalamocortical projection in hedgehogs: evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regidor, J; Divac, I

    1992-01-01

    In adult hedgehogs with large unilateral cortical deposits of fluorescent somatopetal tracers, labelled perikarya were found not only in the ipsilateral but also contralateral thalamus. An exceptionally large number of contralaterally labelled neurons was seen in the ventrolateral nucleus, also at a considerable distance from the midline. Deposits of one of two different tracers in the frontoparietal cortex of each hemisphere appear to label different perikarya in each ventrolateral nucleus. This projection to the contralateral cortex in hedgehogs does not resemble thalamo-cortical connections in either adult or developing brains of other mammalian species. Among amniotes, only in pigeons have contralateral projections from the thalamus to the telencephalon been described. The somatosensorimotor system of hedgehogs may be the only known mammalian remnant of primitive vertebrate thalamocortical organization. Whether primitive or derived, the bilateral thalamocortical projection in hedgehogs shows that hedgehog brains cannot be uncritically taken to represent brains of primate ancestors.

  9. Two distinct sites in sonic Hedgehog combine for heparan sulfate interactions and cell signaling functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Shu-Chun; Mulloy, Barbara; Magee, Anthony I

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are morphogens that mediate many developmental processes. Hh signaling is significant for many aspects of embryonic development, whereas dysregulation of this pathway is associated with several types of cancer. Hh proteins require heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for t...

  10. The Binding Mode of the Sonic Hedgehog Inhibitor Robotnikinin, a Combined Docking and QM/MM MD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hitzenberger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Erroneous activation of the Hedgehog pathway has been linked to a great amount of cancerous diseases and therefore a large number of studies aiming at its inhibition have been carried out. One leverage point for novel therapeutic strategies targeting the proteins involved, is the prevention of complex formation between the extracellular signaling protein Sonic Hedgehog and the transmembrane protein Patched 1. In 2009 robotnikinin, a small molecule capable of binding to and inhibiting the activity of Sonic Hedgehog has been identified, however in the absence of X-ray structures of the Sonic Hedgehog-robotnikinin complex, the binding mode of this inhibitor remains unknown. In order to aid with the identification of novel Sonic Hedgehog inhibitors, the presented investigation elucidates the binding mode of robotnikinin by performing an extensive docking study, including subsequent molecular mechanical as well as quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations. The attained configurations enabled the identification of a number of key protein-ligand interactions, aiding complex formation and providing stabilizing contributions to the binding of the ligand. The predicted structure of the Sonic Hedgehog-robotnikinin complex is provided via a PDB file as Supplementary Material and can be used for further reference.

  11. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity, but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins to be an important therapeutic targets, for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and ...

  12. P1 peptidase–a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Potyviridae family, named after its type member, Potato virus Y (PVY), is the largest of the 65 plant virus groups ... Cucumber vein yellowing virus; HC-Pro, helper component proteinase; MP, movement protein; NIa, nuclear inclusion-a peptidase;. NBRF ..... proposed that the binding of a ligand of charge +z to a linear.

  13. Adducin family proteins possess different nuclear export potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chia-Mei; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Yi; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Background The adducin (ADD) family proteins, namely ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3, are actin-binding proteins that play important roles in the stabilization of membrane cytoskeleton and cell-cell junctions. All the ADD proteins contain a highly conserved bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at the carboxyl termini, but only ADD1 can localize to the nucleus. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear. Methods To avoid the potential effect of cell-cell junctions on the distribution of ADD prot...

  14. Chitinase family GH18: evolutionary insights from the genomic history of a diverse protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronson Nathan N

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chitinases (EC.3.2.1.14 hydrolyze the β-1,4-linkages in chitin, an abundant N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine polysaccharide that is a structural component of protective biological matrices such as insect exoskeletons and fungal cell walls. The glycoside hydrolase 18 (GH18 family of chitinases is an ancient gene family widely expressed in archea, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mammals are not known to synthesize chitin or metabolize it as a nutrient, yet the human genome encodes eight GH18 family members. Some GH18 proteins lack an essential catalytic glutamic acid and are likely to act as lectins rather than as enzymes. This study used comparative genomic analysis to address the evolutionary history of the GH18 multiprotein family, from early eukaryotes to mammals, in an effort to understand the forces that shaped the human genome content of chitinase related proteins. Results Gene duplication and loss according to a birth-and-death model of evolution is a feature of the evolutionary history of the GH18 family. The current human family likely originated from ancient genes present at the time of the bilaterian expansion (approx. 550 mya. The family expanded in the chitinous protostomes C. elegans and D. melanogaster, declined in early deuterostomes as chitin synthesis disappeared, and expanded again in late deuterostomes with a significant increase in gene number after the avian/mammalian split. Conclusion This comprehensive genomic study of animal GH18 proteins reveals three major phylogenetic groups in the family: chitobiases, chitinases/chitolectins, and stabilin-1 interacting chitolectins. Only the chitinase/chitolectin group is associated with expansion in late deuterostomes. Finding that the human GH18 gene family is closely linked to the human major histocompatibility complex paralogon on chromosome 1, together with the recent association of GH18 chitinase activity with Th2 cell inflammation, suggests that its late expansion

  15. Mitochondrial Band-7 family proteins: scaffolds for respiratory chain assembly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette eGehl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The band-7 protein family comprises a diverse set of membrane-bound proteins characterised by the presence of a conserved domain. The exact function of this band-7 domain remains elusive, but examples from animal and bacterial stomatin-type proteins demonstrate binding to lipids and the ability to assemble into membrane-bound oligomers that form putative scaffolds. Some members, such as prohibitins and human stomatin-like protein 2 (HsSLP2, localise to the mitochondrial inner membrane where they function in cristae formation and hyperfusion. In Arabidopsis, the band-7 protein family has diversified and includes plant-specific members. Mitochondrial-localised members include prohibitins (AtPHBs and two stomatin-like proteins (AtSLP1 and -2. Studies into PHB function in plants have demonstrated an involvement in root meristem proliferation and putative scaffold formation for mAAA proteases, but it remains unknown how these roles are achieved at the molecular level. In this minireview we summarise the current status of band-7 protein functions in Arabidopsis, and speculate how the mitochondrial members might recruit specific lipids to form microdomains that could shape the organisation and functioning of the respiratory chain.

  16. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  17. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  18. Activation of Smurf E3 ligase promoted by smoothened regulates hedgehog signaling through targeting patched turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoujun Huang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling plays conserved roles in controlling embryonic development; its dysregulation has been implicated in many human diseases including cancers. Hedgehog signaling has an unusual reception system consisting of two transmembrane proteins, Patched receptor and Smoothened signal transducer. Although activation of Smoothened and its downstream signal transduction have been intensively studied, less is known about how Patched receptor is regulated, and particularly how this regulation contributes to appropriate Hedgehog signal transduction. Here we identified a novel role of Smurf E3 ligase in regulating Hedgehog signaling by controlling Patched ubiquitination and turnover. Moreover, we showed that Smurf-mediated Patched ubiquitination depends on Smo activity in wing discs. Mechanistically, we found that Smo interacts with Smurf and promotes it to mediate Patched ubiquitination by targeting the K1261 site in Ptc. The further mathematic modeling analysis reveals that a bidirectional control of activation of Smo involving Smurf and Patched is important for signal-receiving cells to precisely interpret external signals, thereby maintaining Hedgehog signaling reliability. Finally, our data revealed an evolutionarily conserved role of Smurf proteins in controlling Hh signaling by targeting Ptc during development.

  19. Fluralaner as a single dose oral treatment for Caparinia tripilis in a pygmy African hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Camilo; Sheinberg Waisburd, Galia; Pineda, Jocelyn; Heredia, Rafael; Yarto, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto M

    2017-12-01

    African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are popular pets belonging to the Erinaceidae family of spined mammals. Amongst the most common skin diseases occurring in this species is infestation caused by the mite Caparinia spp. Due to their skin anatomy and spiny coat, detection of skin lesions in these hedgehogs can be difficult. This may result in delays in seeking medical care, which may lead to secondary bacterial infection and self-inflicted trauma. Multiple therapies have been used in the treatment of this skin condition including ivermectin, amitraz, fipronil and selamectin. A drug which could be administered as a single oral dose would be advantageous to these pets and their owners. To evaluate the effect of a single oral dose (15 mg/kg) of fluralaner on Caparinia tripilis infestation in the African pygmy hedgehog. A 10-month-old African pygmy hedgehog weighing 184 g. Response to treatment was monitored by dermatological examination and superficial skin scrapings repeated at 7, 14, 21, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days following fluralaner administration. On Day 7 after treatment, adult mites were observed exhibiting normal movement. On Day 14, only dead mites were observed. No life stages of the mites were found after Day 21. A single oral dose at 15 mg/kg of fluralaner was effective within 21 days after treatment for capariniasis in this case. Further studies are required to evaluate the drug's safety and toxicology in hedgehogs, and to confirm efficacy. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  20. Nomenclature for the human Arf family of GTP-binding proteins: ARF, ARL, and SAR proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Richard A.; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Elias, Marek; Lovering, Ruth C.; Munro, Sean; Schurmann, Annette

    2006-01-01

    The Ras superfamily is comprised of at least four large families of regulatory guanosine triphosphate–binding proteins, including the Arfs. The Arf family includes three different groups of proteins: the Arfs, Arf-like (Arls), and SARs. Several Arf family members have been very highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution and have orthologues in evolutionally diverse species. The different means by which Arf family members have been identified have resulted in an inconsistent and confusing array of names. This confusion is further compounded by differences in nomenclature between different species. We propose a more consistent nomenclature for the human members of the Arf family that may also serve as a guide for nomenclature in other species. PMID:16505163

  1. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S; Rennert, Paul D; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C; Freed, Eric O; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-09-02

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors.

  2. Target Molecular Simulations of RecA Family Protein Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeng-Tseng Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the RadA family mechanism is crucial to understanding the DNA SOS repair process. In a 2007 report, the archaeal RadA proteins function as rotary motors (linker region: I71-K88 such as shown in Figure 1. Molecular simulations approaches help to shed further light onto this phenomenon. We find 11 rotary residues (R72, T75-K81, M84, V86 and K87 and five zero rotary residues (I71, K74, E82, R83 and K88 in the simulations. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the RadA family mechanism.

  3. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  4. Dysregulation of BCL-2 family proteins by leukemia fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lauren M; Hanna, Diane T; Khaw, Seong L; Ekert, Paul G

    2017-09-01

    The genomic lesions that characterize acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood include recurrent translocations that result in the expression of fusion proteins that typically involve genes encoding tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, and transcription factors. These genetic rearrangements confer phenotypic hallmarks of malignant transformation, including unrestricted proliferation and a relative resistance to apoptosis. In this Minireview, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that link these fusions to the control of cell death. We examine how these fusion genes dysregulate the BCL-2 family of proteins, preventing activation of the apoptotic effectors, BAX and BAK, and promoting cell survival. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Role of the Drosophila non-visual ß-arrestin kurtz in hedgehog signalling.

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    Cristina Molnar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The non-visual ß-arrestins are cytosolic proteins highly conserved across species that participate in a variety of signalling events, including plasma membrane receptor degradation, recycling, and signalling, and that can also act as scaffolding for kinases such as MAPK and Akt/PI3K. In Drosophila melanogaster, there is only a single non-visual ß-arrestin, encoded by kurtz, whose function is essential for neuronal activity. We have addressed the participation of Kurtz in signalling during the development of the imaginal discs, epithelial tissues requiring the activity of the Hedgehog, Wingless, EGFR, Notch, Insulin, and TGFβ pathways. Surprisingly, we found that the complete elimination of kurtz by genetic techniques has no major consequences in imaginal cells. In contrast, the over-expression of Kurtz in the wing disc causes a phenotype identical to the loss of Hedgehog signalling and prevents the expression of Hedgehog targets in the corresponding wing discs. The mechanism by which Kurtz antagonises Hedgehog signalling is to promote Smoothened internalization and degradation in a clathrin- and proteosomal-dependent manner. Intriguingly, the effects of Kurtz on Smoothened are independent of Gprk2 activity and of the activation state of the receptor. Our results suggest fundamental differences in the molecular mechanisms regulating receptor turnover and signalling in vertebrates and invertebrates, and they could provide important insights into divergent evolution of Hedgehog signalling in these organisms.

  6. Molecular evolution of the ependymin protein family: a necessary update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Arrarás José E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ependymin (Epd, the predominant protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of teleost fishes, was originally associated with neuroplasticity and regeneration. Ependymin-related proteins (Epdrs have been identified in other vertebrates, including amphibians and mammals. Recently, we reported the identification and characterization of an Epdr in echinoderms, showing that there are ependymin family members in non-vertebrate deuterostomes. We have now explored multiple databases to find Epdrs in different metazoan species. Using these sequences we have performed genome mapping, molecular phylogenetic analyses using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods, and statistical tests of tree topologies, to ascertain the phylogenetic relationship among ependymin proteins. Results Our results demonstrate that ependymin genes are also present in protostomes. In addition, as a result of the putative fish-specific genome duplication event and posterior divergence, the ependymin family can be divided into four groups according to their amino acid composition and branching pattern in the gene tree: 1 a brain-specific group of ependymin sequences that is unique to teleost fishes and encompasses the originally described ependymin; 2 a group expressed in non-brain tissue in fishes; 3 a group expressed in several tissues that appears to be deuterostome-specific, and 4 a group found in invertebrate deuterostomes and protostomes, with a broad pattern of expression and that probably represents the evolutionary origin of the ependymins. Using codon-substitution models to statistically assess the selective pressures acting over the ependymin protein family, we found evidence of episodic positive Darwinian selection and relaxed selective constraints in each one of the postduplication branches of the gene tree. However, purifying selection (with among-site variability appears to be the main influence on the evolution of each subgroup within the family

  7. Protein aggregation and protein instability govern familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the "toxic gain of function" that results from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-, Parkinson-, and Alzheimer-related mutations is a matter of debate. As a result no adequate model of any neurodegenerative disease etiology exists. We demonstrate that two synergistic properties, namely, increased protein aggregation propensity (increased likelihood that an unfolded protein will aggregate and decreased protein stability (increased likelihood that a protein will unfold, are central to ALS etiology. Taken together these properties account for 69% of the variability in mutant Cu/Zn-superoxide-dismutase-linked familial ALS patient survival times. Aggregation is a concentration-dependent process, and spinal cord motor neurons have higher concentrations of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase than the surrounding cells. Protein aggregation therefore is expected to contribute to the selective vulnerability of motor neurons in familial ALS.

  8. Role of the prion protein family in the gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Pailhoux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The prion-gene family comprises four members named PRNP (PRP(c)), PRND (Doppel), PRNT (PRT), and SPRN (Shadoo). According to species, PRND is located 16-52 kb downstream from the PRNP locus, whereas SPRN is located on another chromosome. The fourth prion-family gene, PRNT, belongs to the same genomic cluster as PRNP and PRND in humans and bovidae. PRNT and PRND possibly resulted from a duplication event of PRND and PRNP, respectively, that occurred early during eutherian species divergence. Although most of the studies concerning the prion-family has been done on PRP(c) and its involvement in transmissible neurodegenerative disorders, different works report some potential roles of these proteins in the reproductive function of both sexes. Among them, a clear role of PRND, that encodes for the Doppel protein, in male fertility has been demonstrated through gene targeting studies in mice. In other species, Doppel seems to play a role in testis and ovary development but its cellular localization is variable according to the gonadal developmental stage and to the mammalian species considered. For the other three genes, their roles in reproductive function appear ill-defined and/or controversial. The present review aimed to synthesize all the available data on these prion-family members and their relations with reproductive processes, mainly in the gonad of both sexes.

  9. Rate matrices for analyzing large families of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, C; Grossmann, A; Hénaut, A; Holschneider, M; Monnerot, M; Risler, J L; Torrésani, B

    2001-01-01

    We propose and study a new approach for the analysis of families of protein sequences. This method is related to the LogDet distances used in phylogenetic reconstructions; it can be viewed as an attempt to embed these distances into a multidimensional framework. The proposed method starts by associating a Markov matrix to each pairwise alignment deduced from a given multiple alignment. The central objects under consideration here are matrix-valued logarithms L of these Markov matrices, which exist under conditions that are compatible with fairly large divergence between the sequences. These logarithms allow us to compare data from a family of aligned proteins with simple models (in particular, continuous reversible Markov models) and to test the adequacy of such models. If one neglects fluctuations arising from the finite length of sequences, any continuous reversible Markov model with a single rate matrix Q over an arbitrary tree predicts that all the observed matrices L are multiples of Q. Our method exploits this fact, without relying on any tree estimation. We test this prediction on a family of proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome of 26 multicellular animals, which include vertebrates, arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, and nematodes. A principal component analysis of the observed matrices L shows that a single rate model can be used as a rough approximation to the data, but that systematic deviations from any such model are unmistakable and related to the evolutionary history of the species under consideration.

  10. Molecular evolution of the EGF-CFC protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravisankar, V; Singh, Taran P; Manoj, Narayanan

    2011-08-15

    The epidermal growth factor-Cripto-1/FRL-1/Cryptic (EGF-CFC) proteins, characterized by the highly conserved EGF and CFC domains, are extracellular membrane associated growth factor-like glycoproteins. These proteins are essential components of the Nodal signaling pathway during early vertebrate embryogenesis. Homologs of the EGF-CFC family have also been implicated in tumorigenesis in humans. Yet, little is known about the mode of molecular evolution in this family. Here we investigate the origin, extent of conservation and evolutionary relationships of EGF-CFC proteins across the metazoa. The results suggest that the first appearance of the EGF-CFC gene occurred in the ancestor of the deuterostomes. Phylogenetic analysis supports the classification of the family into distinct subfamilies that appear to have evolved through lineage-specific duplication and divergence. Site-specific analyses of evolutionary rate shifts between the two major mammalian paralogous subfamilies, Cripto and Cryptic, reveal critical amino acid sites that may account for the observed functional divergence. Furthermore, estimates of functional divergence suggest that rapid change of evolutionary rates at sites located mainly in the CFC domain may contribute towards distinct functional properties of the two paralogs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hedgehog signaling and therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Fergal C

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the role that the hedgehog signaling pathway has in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. METHOD: PubMed search (2000-2010) and literature based references. RESULTS: Firstly, in 2009 a genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers found that a core set of 12 cellular signaling pathways including hedgehog were genetically altered in 67-100% of cases. Secondly, in vitro and in vivo studies of treatment with cyclopamine (a naturally occurring antagonist of the hedgehog signaling pathway component; Smoothened) has shown that inhibition of hedgehog can abrogate pancreatic cancer metastasis. Thirdly, experimental evidence has demonstrated that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is correlated with desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer. This is important because targeting the Shh pathway potentially may facilitate chemotherapeutic drug delivery as pancreatic cancers tend to have a dense fibrotic stroma that extrinsically compresses the tumor vasculature leading to a hypoperfusing intratumoral circulation. It is probable that patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer will derive the greatest benefit from treatment with Smoothened antagonists. Fourthly, it has been found that ligand dependent activation by hedgehog occurs in the tumor stromal microenvironment in pancreatic cancer, a paracrine effect on tumorigenesis. Finally, in pancreatic cancer, cells with the CD44+CD24+ESA+ immunophenotype select a population enriched for cancer initiating stem cells. Shh is increased 46-fold in CD44+CD24+ESA+ cells compared with normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Medications that destruct pancreatic cancer initiating stem cells are a potentially novel strategy in cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Aberrant hedgehog signaling occurs in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and therapeutics that target the transmembrane receptor Smoothened abrogate hedgehog signaling and may improve the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  12. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  13. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Drew H; Moll, Mark; Chen, Brian Y; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2010-05-11

    Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST) method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs). SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH) framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated, statistically rigorous procedure for incorporating structural

  14. In vivo imaging of Hedgehog pathway activation with a nuclear fluorescent reporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Mich

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh pathway is essential for embryonic development and tissue regeneration, and its dysregulation can lead to birth defects and tumorigenesis. Understanding how this signaling mechanism contributes to these processes would benefit from an ability to visualize Hedgehog pathway activity in live organisms, in real time, and with single-cell resolution. We report here the generation of transgenic zebrafish lines that express nuclear-localized mCherry fluorescent protein in a Gli transcription factor-dependent manner. As demonstrated by chemical and genetic perturbations, these lines faithfully report Hedgehog pathway state in individual cells and with high detection sensitivity. They will be valuable tools for studying dynamic Gli-dependent processes in vertebrates and for identifying new chemical and genetic regulators of the Hh pathway.

  15. Quantification of protein copy number in single mitochondria: The Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoxiang; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Xu, Jingyi; Zheng, Yan; Han, Jinyan; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-12-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins, represented by antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and proapoptotic protein Bax, are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. To build a quantitative model of how Bcl-2 family protein interactions control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent cytochrome c release, it is essential to know the number of proteins in individual mitochondria. Here, we report an effective method to quantify the copy number and distribution of proteins in single mitochondria via immunofluorescent labeling and sensitive detection by a laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Mitochondria isolated from HeLa cells were stained with Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488)-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically targeting Bcl-2 or Bax and with nucleic acid dye. A series of fluorescent nanospheres with fluorescence intensity calibrated in the unit of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF)-AF488 were used to construct a calibration curve for converting the immunofluorescence of a single mitochondrion to the number of antibodies bound to it and then to the number of proteins per mitochondrion. Under the normal condition, the measured mean copy numbers were 1300 and 220 per mitochondrion for Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. A significant variation in protein copy number was identified, which ranged from 130 to 6000 (2.5-97.5%) for Bcl-2 and from 65 to 700 (2.5-97.5%) for Bax, respectively. We observed an approximately 4.4 fold increase of Bax copy number per mitochondrion upon 9h of apoptosis stimulation while the abundance of Bcl-2 remained almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bcl-2 family protein copy number and variance in single mitochondria. Collectively, we demonstrate that the HSFCM-based immunoassay provides a rapid and sensitive method for determining protein copy number distribution in single mitochondria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Desmosomal Plaque Proteins of the Plakophilin Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Neuber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three related proteins of the plakophilin family (PKP1_3 have been identified as junctional proteins that are essential for the formation and stabilization of desmosomal cell contacts. Failure of PKP expression can have fatal effects on desmosomal adhesion, leading to abnormal tissue and organ development. Thus, loss of functional PKP 1 in humans leads to ectodermal dysplasia/skin fragility (EDSF syndrome, a genodermatosis with severe blistering of the epidermis as well as abnormal keratinocytes differentiation. Mutations in the human PKP 2 gene have been linked to severe heart abnormalities that lead to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. In the past few years it has been shown that junctional adhesion is not the only function of PKPs. These proteins have been implicated in cell signaling, organization of the cytoskeleton, and control of protein biosynthesis under specific cellular circumstances. Clearly, PKPs are more than just cell adhesion proteins. In this paper we will give an overview of our current knowledge on the very distinct roles of plakophilins in the cell.

  17. Nkrp1 Family, from Lectins to Protein Interacting Molecules

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    Daniel Rozbeský

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin-like receptors include the Nkrp1 protein family that regulates the activity of natural killer (NK cells. Rat Nkrp1a was reported to bind monosaccharide moieties in a Ca2+-dependent manner in preference order of GalNac > GlcNAc >> Fuc >> Gal > Man. These findings established for rat Nkrp1a have been extrapolated to all additional Nkrp1 receptors and have been supported by numerous studies over the past two decades. However, since 1996 there has been controversy and another article showed lack of interactions with saccharides in 1999. Nevertheless, several high affinity saccharide ligands were synthesized in order to utilize their potential in antitumor therapy. Subsequently, protein ligands were introduced as specific binders for Nkrp1 proteins and three dimensional models of receptor/protein ligand interaction were derived from crystallographic data. Finally, for at least some members of the NK cell C-type lectin-like proteins, the “sweet story” was impaired by two reports in recent years. It has been shown that the rat Nkrp1a and CD69 do not bind saccharide ligands such as GlcNAc, GalNAc, chitotetraose and saccharide derivatives (GlcNAc-PAMAM do not directly and specifically influence cytotoxic activity of NK cells as it was previously described.

  18. Human Plasma Very Low Density Lipoprotein Carries Indian Hedgehog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Zijlstra, Felix; Badlou, Bahram; de Vries, Marcel; Ferreira, Carmen V.; Spek, C. Arnold; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog is one of the major morphogens and fulfils critical functions in both the development and maintenance of the vasculature. Hedgehog is highly hydrophobic and its diffusion toward target tissues remains only partly understood. In Drosophila, hedgehog transport via lipophorins is relevant for

  19. CHD proteins: a diverse family with strong ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J Adam; Georgel, Philippe T

    2007-08-01

    Chromodomain/helicase/DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms. Despite common features, such as their chromodomain and helicase domain, they have been described as having multiple roles and interacting partners. However, a common theme for the main role of CHD proteins appears to be linked to their ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling activity. Their actual activity as either repressor or activator, and their cell or gene specificity, is connected to their interacting partner(s). In this minireview, we attempt to match the members of the CHD family with the presence of structural domains, cofactors, and cellular roles in the regulation of gene expression, recombination, genome organization, and chromatin structure, as well as their potential activity in RNA processing.

  20. Adducin family proteins possess different nuclear export potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Mei; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Yi; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2017-05-10

    The adducin (ADD) family proteins, namely ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3, are actin-binding proteins that play important roles in the stabilization of membrane cytoskeleton and cell-cell junctions. All the ADD proteins contain a highly conserved bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at the carboxyl termini, but only ADD1 can localize to the nucleus. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear. To avoid the potential effect of cell-cell junctions on the distribution of ADD proteins, HA epitope-tagged ADD proteins and mutants were transiently expressed in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and their distribution in the cytoplasm and nucleus was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Several nuclear proteins were identified to interact with ADD1 by mass spectrometry, which were further verified by co-immunoprecipitation. In this study, we found that ADD1 was detectable both in the cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas ADD2 and ADD3 were detected only in the cytoplasm. However, ADD2 and ADD3 were partially (~40%) sequestered in the nucleus by leptomycin B, a CRM1/exportin1 inhibitor. Upon the removal of leptomycin B, ADD2 and ADD3 re-distributed to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that ADD2 and ADD3 possess functional NLS and are quickly transported to the cytoplasm upon entering the nucleus. Indeed, we found that ADD2 and ADD3 possess much higher potential to counteract the activity of the NLS derived from Simian virus 40 large T-antigen than ADD1. All the ADD proteins appear to contain multiple nuclear export signals mainly in their head and neck domains. However, except for the leucine-rich motif ( 377 FEALMRMLDWLGYRT 391 ) in the neck domain of ADD1, no other classic nuclear export signal was identified in the ADD proteins. In addition, the nuclear retention of ADD1 facilitates its interaction with RNA polymerase II and zinc-finger protein 331. Our results suggest that ADD2 and ADD3 possess functional NLS and shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus. The discrepancy in the

  1. 14-3-3 proteins and the p53 family : a study in keratinocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Several associations between 14-3-3 proteins and members of the p53 family have been revealed. However, numerous questions regarding 14-3-3 proteins, p53 family members and the relationships between thetwo families remain. This thesis contributes to answer these questions. Downregulation of 14-3-3ζ

  2. Identification and analysis of YELLOW protein family genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yong-Zhu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major royal jelly proteins/yellow (MRJP/YELLOW family possesses several physiological and chemical functions in the development of Apis mellifera and Drosophila melanogaster. Each protein of the family has a conserved domain named MRJP. However, there is no report of MRJP/YELLOW family proteins in the Lepidoptera. Results Using the YELLOW protein sequence in Drosophila melanogaster to BLAST silkworm EST database, we found a gene family composed of seven members with a conserved MRJP domain each and named it YELLOW protein family of Bombyx mori. We completed the cDNA sequences with RACE method. The protein of each member possesses a MRJP domain and a putative cleavable signal peptide consisting of a hydrophobic sequence. In view of genetic evolution, the whole Bm YELLOW protein family composes a monophyletic group, which is distinctly separate from Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera. We then showed the tissue expression profiles of Bm YELLOW protein family genes by RT-PCR. Conclusion A Bombyx mori YELLOW protein family is found to be composed of at least seven members. The low homogeneity and unique pattern of gene expression by each member among the family ensure us to prophesy that the members of Bm YELLOW protein family would play some important physiological functions in silkworm development.

  3. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary prote...

  4. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that...

  5. BCL-2 family proteins: changing partners in the dance towards death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Justin; Osterlund, Elizabeth J; Andrews, David W

    2018-01-01

    The BCL-2 family of proteins controls cell death primarily by direct binding interactions that regulate mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) leading to the irreversible release of intermembrane space proteins, subsequent caspase activation and apoptosis. The affinities and relative abundance of the BCL-2 family proteins dictate the predominate interactions between anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins that regulate MOMP. We highlight the core mechanisms of BCL-2 family regulation of MOMP with an emphasis on how the interactions between the BCL-2 family proteins govern cell fate. We address the critical importance of both the concentration and affinities of BCL-2 family proteins and show how differences in either can greatly change the outcome. Further, we explain the importance of using full-length BCL-2 family proteins (versus truncated versions or peptides) to parse out the core mechanisms of MOMP regulation by the BCL-2 family. Finally, we discuss how post-translational modifications and differing intracellular localizations alter the mechanisms of apoptosis regulation by BCL-2 family proteins. Successful therapeutic intervention of MOMP regulation in human disease requires an understanding of the factors that mediate the major binding interactions between BCL-2 family proteins in cells.

  6. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  7. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Davis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL. This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.

  8. Hedgehog Signaling Promotes the Proliferation and Subsequent Hair Cell Formation of Progenitor Cells in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hair cell (HC loss is the major cause of permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Unlike lower vertebrates, mammalian cochlear HCs cannot regenerate spontaneously after damage, although the vestibular system does maintain limited HC regeneration capacity. Thus HC regeneration from the damaged sensory epithelium has been one of the main areas of research in the field of hearing restoration. Hedgehog signaling plays important roles during the embryonic development of the inner ear, and it is involved in progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the cell fate decision. In this study, we show that recombinant Sonic Hedgehog (Shh protein effectively promotes sphere formation, proliferation, and differentiation of Lgr5+ progenitor cells isolated from the neonatal mouse cochlea. To further explore this, we determined the effect of Hedgehog signaling on cell proliferation and HC regeneration in cultured cochlear explant from transgenic R26-SmoM2 mice that constitutively activate Hedgehog signaling in the supporting cells of the cochlea. Without neomycin treatment, up-regulation of Hedgehog signaling did not significantly promote cell proliferation or new HC formation. However, after injury to the sensory epithelium by neomycin treatment, the over-activation of Hedgehog signaling led to significant supporting cell proliferation and HC regeneration in the cochlear epithelium explants. RNA sequencing and real-time PCR were used to compare the transcripts of the cochleae from control mice and R26-SmoM2 mice, and multiple genes involved in the proliferation and differentiation processes were identified. This study has important implications for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by manipulating the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  9. Expression of SFRP Family Proteins in Human Keratoconus Corneas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing You

    Full Text Available We investigated the expression of the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs in keratoconus (KC and control corneas. KC buttons (∼8 mm diameter (n = 15 and whole control corneas (n = 7 were fixed in 10% formalin or 2% paraformaldehyde and subsequently paraffin embedded and sectioned. Sections for histopathology were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or Periodic Acid Schiff's reagent. A series of sections was also immunolabelled with SFRP 1 to 5 antibodies, visualised using immunofluorescence, and examined with a Zeiss LSM700 scanning laser confocal microscope. Semi-quantitative grading was used to compare SFRP immunostaining in KC and control corneas. Overall, KC corneas showed increased immunostaining for SFRP1 to 5, compared to controls. Corneal epithelium in all KC corneas displayed heterogeneous moderate to strong immunoreactivity for SFRP1 to 4, particularly in the basal epithelium adjacent to cone area. SFRP3 and 5 were localised to epithelial cell membranes in KC and control corneas, with increased SFRP3 cytoplasmic expression observed in KC. Strong stromal expression of SFRP5, including extracellular matrix, was seen in both KC and control corneas. In control corneas we observed differential expression of SFRP family proteins in the limbus compared to more central cornea. Taken together, our results support a role for SFRPs in maintaining a healthy cornea and in the pathogenesis of epithelial and anterior stromal disruption observed in KC.

  10. Expression of SFRP Family Proteins in Human Keratoconus Corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jingjing; Wen, Li; Roufas, Athena; Madigan, Michele C.; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the expression of the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) in keratoconus (KC) and control corneas. KC buttons (∼8 mm diameter) (n = 15) and whole control corneas (n = 7) were fixed in 10% formalin or 2% paraformaldehyde and subsequently paraffin embedded and sectioned. Sections for histopathology were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or Periodic Acid Schiff’s reagent. A series of sections was also immunolabelled with SFRP 1 to 5 antibodies, visualised using immunofluorescence, and examined with a Zeiss LSM700 scanning laser confocal microscope. Semi-quantitative grading was used to compare SFRP immunostaining in KC and control corneas. Overall, KC corneas showed increased immunostaining for SFRP1 to 5, compared to controls. Corneal epithelium in all KC corneas displayed heterogeneous moderate to strong immunoreactivity for SFRP1 to 4, particularly in the basal epithelium adjacent to cone area. SFRP3 and 5 were localised to epithelial cell membranes in KC and control corneas, with increased SFRP3 cytoplasmic expression observed in KC. Strong stromal expression of SFRP5, including extracellular matrix, was seen in both KC and control corneas. In control corneas we observed differential expression of SFRP family proteins in the limbus compared to more central cornea. Taken together, our results support a role for SFRPs in maintaining a healthy cornea and in the pathogenesis of epithelial and anterior stromal disruption observed in KC. PMID:23825088

  11. Leukotriene synthesis is required for hedgehog-dependent neurite projection in neuralized embryoid bodies but not for motor neuron differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold; Roelink, Henk

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is required for many developmental processes,. as well as for adult homeostasis. Although all known effects of Hh signaling affecting patterning and differentiation are mediated by members of the Gli family of zinc ringer transcription factors, we demonstrate that the

  12. Ophthalmological abnormalities in wild European hedgehogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant finding was bilateral nuclear cataract seen particularly in young poorly growing animals. Investigation into the potential causation of cataracts by poor nutrition or poor feeding ability by lens opacification requires further study. Keywords: Cataract, Conservation, Eye abnormality, Hedgehog, Rehabilitation ...

  13. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard; Wilbek, Theis S

    2015-01-01

    and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series...... of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG...... linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic...

  14. The importance of the SIBLING family of proteins on skeletal mineralisation and bone remodelling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staines, Katherine A; MacRae, Vicky E; Farquharson, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family consists of osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein...

  15. Mutations in KIF7 link Joubert syndrome with Sonic Hedgehog signaling and microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafinger, Claudia; Liebau, Max Christoph; Elsayed, Solaf Mohamed; Hellenbroich, Yorck; Boltshauser, Eugen; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Fabretti, Francesca; Janecke, Andreas Robert; Ebermann, Inga; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Koerber, Friederike; Addicks, Klaus; Elsobky, Ezzat; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Bolz, Hanno Jörn

    2011-07-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is characterized by a specific brain malformation with various additional pathologies. It results from mutations in any one of at least 10 different genes, including NPHP1, which encodes nephrocystin-1. JBTS has been linked to dysfunction of primary cilia, since the gene products known to be associated with the disorder localize to this evolutionarily ancient organelle. Here we report the identification of a disease locus, JBTS12, with mutations in the KIF7 gene, an ortholog of the Drosophila kinesin Costal2, in a consanguineous JBTS family and subsequently in other JBTS patients. Interestingly, KIF7 is a known regulator of Hedgehog signaling and a putative ciliary motor protein. We found that KIF7 co-precipitated with nephrocystin-1. Further, knockdown of KIF7 expression in cell lines caused defects in cilia formation and induced abnormal centrosomal duplication and fragmentation of the Golgi network. These cellular phenotypes likely resulted from abnormal tubulin acetylation and microtubular dynamics. Thus, we suggest that modified microtubule stability and growth direction caused by loss of KIF7 function may be an underlying disease mechanism contributing to JBTS.

  16. Sonic Hedgehog-Induced Histone Deacetylase Activation Is Required for Cerebellar Granule Precursor Hyperplasia in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Lindsey, Stephan; Graves, Bruce; Yoo, Soonmoon; Olson, James M.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2013-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP) cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL) in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease. PMID:23951168

  17. Sonic hedgehog-induced histone deacetylase activation is required for cerebellar granule precursor hyperplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease.

  18. The NOX Family of Proteins Is Also Present in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hajjar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane NADPH oxidase (NOX enzymes have been so far only characterized in eukaryotes. In most of these organisms, they reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide and, depending on the presence of additional domains, are called NOX or dual oxidases (DUOX. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, including superoxide, have been traditionally considered accidental toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. However, during the last decade it has become evident that both O2•− and H2O2 are key players in complex signaling networks and defense. A well-studied example is the production of O2•− during the bactericidal respiratory burst of phagocytes; this production is catalyzed by NOX2. Here, we devised and applied a novel algorithm to search for additional NOX genes in genomic databases. This procedure allowed us to discover approximately 23% new sequences from bacteria (in relation to the number of NOX-related sequences identified by the authors that we have added to the existing eukaryotic NOX family and have used to build an expanded phylogenetic tree. We cloned and overexpressed the identified nox gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae and confirmed that it codes for an NADPH oxidase. The membrane of the S. pneumoniae NOX protein (SpNOX shares many properties with its eukaryotic counterparts, such as affinity for NADPH and flavin adenine dinucleotide, superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium inhibition, cyanide resistance, oxygen consumption, and superoxide production. Traditionally, NOX enzymes in eukaryotes are related to functions linked to multicellularity. Thus, the discovery of a large family of NOX-related enzymes in the bacterial world brings up fascinating questions regarding their role in this new biological context.

  19. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphoproteome analysis reveals a critical role for hedgehog signalling in osteoblast morphological transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Ariane; Milani, Renato; da Silva, Rodrigo A; da Costa Fernandes, Célio Junior; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Ferreira, Carmen V; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2017-10-01

    The reciprocal and adaptive interactions between cells and substrates governing morphological transitions in the osteoblast compartment remain largely obscure. Here we show that osteoblast cultured in basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™) exhibits significant morphological changes after ten days of culture, and we decided to exploit this situation to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for guiding osteoblast morphological transitions. As almost all aspects of cellular physiology are under control of kinases, we generated more or less comprehensive cellular kinome profiles employing PepChip peptide arrays that contain over 1000 consensus substrates of kinase peptide. The results obtained were used to construct interactomes, and these revealed an important role for FoxO in mediating morphological changes of osteoblast, which was validated by Western blot technology when FoxO was significantly up-expressed in response to Matrigel™. As FoxO is a critical protein in canonical hedgehog signalling, we decided to explore the possible involvement of hedgehog signalling during osteoblast morphological changes. It appeared that osteoblast culture in Matrigel™ stimulates release of a substantial amounts Shh while concomitantly inducing upregulation of the expression of the bona fide hedgehog target genes Gli-1 and Patched. Functional confirmation of the relevance of these results for osteoblast morphological transitions came from experiments in which Shh hedgehog signalling was inhibited using the well-established pathway inhibitor cyclopamine (Cyc). In the presence of Cyc, culture of osteoblasts in Matrigel™ is not capable of inducing morphological changes but appears to provoke a proliferative response as evident from the upregulation of Cyclin D3 and cdk4. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that hedgehog signalling is both necessary and sufficient for membrane matrix-based morphological transitions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  1. Coordinated Translocation of Mammalian Gli Proteins and Suppressor of Fused to the Primary Cilium

    OpenAIRE

    Huiqing Zeng; Jinping Jia; Aimin Liu

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular transduction of Hedgehog (Hh) signals in mammals requires functional primary cilia. The Hh signaling effectors, the Gli family of transcription factors, and their negative regulator, Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), accumulate at the tips of cilia; however, the molecular mechanism regulating this localization remains elusive. In the current study, we show that the ciliary localization of mammalian Gli proteins depends on both their N-terminal domains and a central region lying C-term...

  2. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region....... These results suggest that the compartmentalization of PKC isoforms in neurons may contribute to their function, with the location of PKMzeta prominent in areas notable for long-term synaptic plasticity....

  3. Sex and hedgehog: roles of genes in the hedgehog signaling pathway in mammalian sexual differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Heather L; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2012-01-01

    The chromosome status of the mammalian embryo initiates a multistage process of sexual development in which the bipotential reproductive system establishes itself as either male or female. These events are governed by intricate cell-cell and interorgan communication that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. The hedgehog signaling pathway was originally identified for its key role in the development of Drosophila, but is now recognized as a critical developmental regulator in many species, including humans. In addition to its developmental roles, the hedgehog signaling pathway also modulates adult organ function, and misregulation of this pathway often leads to diseases, such as cancer. The hedgehog signaling pathway acts through its morphogenetic ligands that signal from ligand-producing cells to target cells over a specified distance. The target cells then respond in a graded manner based on the concentration of the ligands that they are exposed to. Through this unique mechanism of action, the hedgehog signaling pathway elicits cell fate determination, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and cellular homeostasis. Here, we review current findings on the roles of hedgehog signaling in the sexually dimorphic development of the reproductive organs with an emphasis on mammals and comparative evidence in other species.

  4. P1 peptidase–a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Potyviridae family, named after its type member, Potato virus Y (PVY), is the largest of the 65 plant virus groups and families currently recognized. The coding region for P1 peptidase is located at the very beginning of the viral genome of the family Potyviridae. Until recently P1 was thought of as serine peptidase with ...

  5. AB307. SPR-34 Optimization of sonic hedgehog delivery from self-assembled nanofiber hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Shawn; Harrington, Daniel A.; Stupp, Samuel I.; McVary, Kevin T; Podlasek, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sonic hedgehog (SHH) protein delivered by nanoparticle based peptide amphiphile (PA) hydrogels to the penis suppress apoptosis in a rat cavernous nerve (CN) resection model. We examine the hypothesis that SHH PA will suppress morphology changes in the penis in a CN crush model that more readily reflects injury observed in prostatectomy patients. Optimization of delivery conditions is essential for clinical translation. Methods Bilateral CN crush was performed on Sprague Dawley rats ...

  6. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  7. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling and Development of the Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisa Seppala

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sonic hedgehog (Shh is an essential signaling peptide required for normal embryonic development. It represents a highly-conserved marker of odontogenesis amongst the toothed vertebrates. Signal transduction is involved in early specification of the tooth-forming epithelium in the oral cavity, and, ultimately, in defining tooth number within the established dentition. Shh also promotes the morphogenetic movement of epithelial cells in the early tooth bud, and influences cell cycle regulation, morphogenesis, and differentiation in the tooth germ. More recently, Shh has been identified as a stem cell regulator in the continuously erupting incisors of mice. Here, we review contemporary data relating to the role of Shh in odontogenesis, focusing on tooth development in mammals and cartilaginous fishes. We also describe the multiple actions of this signaling protein at the cellular level.

  8. Hedgehog inhibitors from Artocarpus communis and Hyptis suaveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Midori A; Uchida, Kyoko; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Koyano, Takashi; Kowithayakorn, Thaworn; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-08-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in cell maintenance and proliferation during embryonic development. Naturally occurring Hh inhibitors were isolated from Artocarpus communis and Hyptis suaveolens using our previously constructed cell-based assay system. Bioactivity guided fractionation led to the isolation of 15 compounds, including seven new compounds (4, 5, 6, 7, and 9-11). The isolated compounds showed cytotoxicity against a cancer cell line (PANC1) in which Hh signaling was abnormally activated. Several compounds (12-14; GLI1 transcriptional inhibition IC50=7.6, 4.7, and 4.0 μM, respectively) inhibited Hh related protein (BCL2) expression. Moreover, compounds 1, 12, and 13 disrupted GLI1 and DNA complex formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sonic Hedgehog signaling in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiffort, Elisabeth; Angot, Elodie; Ruat, Martial

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of a Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway in the mature vertebrate CNS has paved the way to the characterization of the functional roles of Shh signals in normal and diseased brain. Shh is proposed to participate in the establishment and maintenance of adult neurogenic niches and to regulate the proliferation of neuronal or glial precursors in several brain areas. Consistent with its role during brain development, misregulation of Shh signaling is associated with tumorigenesis while its recruitement in damaged neural tissue might be part of the regenerating process. This review focuses on the most recent data of the Hedgehog pathway in the adult brain and its relevance as a novel therapeutic approach for brain diseases including brain tumors.

  10. Click chemistry armed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure palmitoylation by hedgehog acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Masumoto, Naoko; Bodakh, George; Konitsiotis, Antonio D; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Rodgers, Ursula R; Owens, Raymond J; Magee, Anthony I; Tate, Edward W

    2015-12-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for correct embryogenesis and tissue development. However, on maturation, signaling is also found to be aberrantly activated in many cancers. Palmitoylation of the secreted signaling protein sonic hedgehog (Shh) by the enzyme hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) is required for functional signaling. To quantify this important posttranslational modification, many in vitro Shh palmitoylation assays employ radiolabeled fatty acids, which have limitations in terms of cost and safety. Here we present a click chemistry armed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (click-ELISA) for assessment of Hhat activity through acylation of biotinylated Shh peptide with an alkyne-tagged palmitoyl-CoA (coenzyme A) analogue. Click chemistry functionalization of the alkyne tag with azido-FLAG peptide allows analysis through an ELISA protocol and colorimetric readout. This assay format identified the detergent n-dodecyl β-d-maltopyranoside as an improved solubilizing agent for Hhat activity. Quantification of the potency of RU-SKI small molecule Hhat inhibitors by click-ELISA indicated IC50 values in the low- or sub-micromolar range. A stopped assay format was also employed that allows measurement of Hhat kinetic parameters where saturating substrate concentrations exceed the binding capacity of the streptavidin-coated plate. Therefore, click-ELISA represents a nonradioactive method for assessing protein palmitoylation in vitro that is readily expandable to other classes of protein lipidation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. TIS11 Family Proteins and Their Roles in Posttranscriptional Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Baou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression of mRNAs containing adenine-uridine rich elements (AREs in their 3 untranslated regions is mediated by a number of different proteins that interact with these elements to either stabilise or destabilise them. The present review concerns the TPA-inducible sequence 11 (TIS11 protein family, a small family of proteins, that appears to interact with ARE-containing mRNAs and promote their degradation. This family of proteins has been extensively studied in the past decade. Studies have focussed on determining their biochemical functions, identifying their target mRNAs, and determining their roles in cell functions and diseases.

  12. A Review on Structures and Functions of Bcl-2 Family Proteins from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Dakshinamurthy; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells evade apoptosis, which is regulated by proteins of Bcl-2 family in the intrinsic pathways. Numerous experimental three-dimensional (3D) structures of the apoptotic proteins and the proteins bound with small chemical molecules/peptides/proteins have been reported in the literature. In this review article, the 3D structures of the Bcl-2 family proteins from Homo sapiens and as well complex structures of the anti-apoptotic proteins bound with small molecular inhibitors reported in the literature to date have been comprehensively listed out and described in detail. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms by which the Bcl-2 family proteins modulate the apoptotic processes and strategies for designing antagonists to anti-apoptotic proteins have been concisely discussed.

  13. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  14. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Verdelho Machado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual’s response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease.

  15. Rbfox family proteins make the homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunkyung; Kim, Yong-Eun; Kim, Jae Whan; Cho, Namjoon; Cheon, Seonghye; Kim, Kee K

    2017-11-21

    Rbfox family of proteins that consists of Rbfox1, Rbfox2, and Rbfox3 in mammals regulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in various tissues via direct binding to their RNA binding element. Although many studies have indicated the splicing activity of each member of the Rbfox family, the interactions of Rbfox family proteins are largely unknown. Here, we have investigated interactions among Rbfox family proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and GST-pull down assays confirmed that Rbfox proteins form homo and hetero complexes. Moreover, in vivo crosslinking using disuccinimidyl suberate treatment indicated that the Rbfox proteins form a dimer which then assembles with other proteins to form a large multiprotein complex. Duolink in situ proximity ligation (PLA) assay revealed that neuron specific Rbfox3 protein interacts with other Rbfox family proteins. This study is the first to provide an evidence that Rbfox family proteins form homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. FGFR Family Members Protein Expression as Prognostic Markers in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Koos; Clausen, Martijn J A M; van Es, Robert J J; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Melchers, Lieuwe J; Koole, Ron; Langendijk, Johannes A; van Diest, Paul J; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Schuuring, Ed; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor family member proteins (FGFR1-4) have been identified as promising novel therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in a wide spectrum of solid tumors. The present study investigates the expression and prognostic value of four FGFR family member proteins in a large multicenter oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cohort. Protein expression of FGFR1-4 was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays containing 951 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded OCSCC and OPSCC tissues from the University Medical Center Utrecht and University Medical Center Groningen. Protein expression was correlated to overall survival using Cox regression models, and bootstrapping was performed as internal validation. FGFR proteins were highly expressed in 39-64 % of OCSCC and 63-79 % of OPSCC. Seventy-three percent (299/412) of OCSCC and 85 % (305/357) of OPSCC highly co-expressed two or more FGFR family member proteins. FGFR1 protein was more frequently highly expressed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative OPSCC than HPV-positive OPSCC (82 vs. 65 %; p = 0.008). Furthermore, protein expression of FGFR family members was not related to overall survival in OCSCC or OPSCC (p > 0.05). FGFR family members are frequently highly expressed in OCSCC and OPSCC. These FGFR family member proteins are therefore potential targets for novel therapies that are urgently required to improve survival of OCSCC and OPSCC patients.

  17. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  18. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  19. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Yooseph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  20. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamin superfamily proteins comprising classical dynamins and related proteins are membrane remodelling agentsinvolved in several biological processes such as endocytosis, maintenance of organelle morphology and viralresistance. These large GTPases couple GTP hydrolysis with membrane alterations such as ...

  1. Myxoma of the penis in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshinori; Yasuda, Namie; Une, Yumi

    2017-01-20

    A penile tumor (4 × 2.5 × 1 cm) was surgically removed from an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) aged 3 years and 5 months. The tumor was continuous with the dorsal fascia of the penile head. Histopathologically, tumor cells were pleomorphic (oval-, short spindle- and star-shaped cells) with low cell density. Abundant edematous stroma was weakly positive for Alcian blue staining and positive for colloidal iron reaction. Tumor cells displayed no cellular atypia or karyokinesis. Tumor cell cytoplasm was positive for vimentin antibody, while cytoplasm and nuclei were positive for S-100 protein antibody. Tumor cell ultrastructure matched that of fibroblasts, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was enlarged. The tumor was diagnosed as myxoma. This represents the first report of myxoma in a hedgehog.

  2. Comparative and functional analysis of the widely occurring family of Nep1-like proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oome, Stan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325800847; van den Ackerveken, Guido|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113853254

    2014-01-01

    Nep1-like proteins (NLP) are best known for their cytotoxic activity in dicot plants. NLP are taxonomically widespread among microbes with very different lifestyles. To learn more about this enigmatic protein family, we analyzed more than 500 available NLP protein sequences from fungi, oomycetes,

  3. String gas shells, their dual radiation and hedgehog signature control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guendelman, E.I

    2009-01-01

    ... as spacelike in nature. This “dual radiation”, we will argue, can be interpreted as representing the virtual quantum fluctuations that stabilize the shell. The solutions can be generalized allowing for the introduction of a string-hedgehog [2] or a global monopole [3] on top of the string gas shell and its dual radiation. Then, for big enough hedgehog strengt...

  4. Hedgehog-PKA signaling and gnrh3 regulate the development of zebrafish gnrh3 neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Kuo

    Full Text Available GnRH neurons secrete GnRH that controls the development of the reproduction system. Despite many studies, the signals controlling the development of GnRH neurons from its progenitors have not been fully established. To understand the development of GnRH neurons, we examined the development of gnrh3-expressing cells using a transgenic zebrafish line that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP and LacZ driven by the gnrh3 promoter. GFP and LacZ expression recapitulated that of gnrh3 in the olfactory region, olfactory bulb and telencephalon. Depletion of gnrh3 by morpholinos led to a reduction of GFP- and gnrh3-expressing cells, while over-expression of gnrh3 mRNA increased the number of these cells. This result indicates a positive feed-forward regulation of gnrh3 cells by gnrh3. The gnrh3 cells were absent in embryos that lack Hedgehog signaling, but their numbers were increased in embryos overexpressing shhb. We manipulated the amounts of kinase that antagonizes the Hedgehog signaling pathway, protein kinase A (PKA, by treating embryos with PKA activator forskolin or by injecting mRNAs encoding its constitutively active catalytic subunit (PKA* and dominant negative regulatory subunit (PKI into zebrafish embryos. PKA* misexpression or forskolin treatment decreased GFP cell numbers, while PKI misexpression led to ectopic production of GFP cells. Our data indicate that the Hedgehog-PKA pathway participates in the development of gnrh3-expressing neurons during embryogenesis.

  5. Exploring the common dynamics of homologous proteins. Application to the globin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguid, Sandra; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Ferrelli, Leticia; Echave, Julian

    2005-07-01

    We present a procedure to explore the global dynamics shared between members of the same protein family. The method allows the comparison of patterns of vibrational motion obtained by Gaussian network model analysis. After the identification of collective coordinates that were conserved during evolution, we quantify the common dynamics within a family. Representative vectors that describe these dynamics are defined using a singular value decomposition approach. As a test case, the globin heme-binding family is considered. The two lowest normal modes are shown to be conserved within this family. Our results encourage the development of models for protein evolution that take into account the conservation of dynamical features.

  6. Cloning of ovocalyxin-36, a novel chicken eggshell protein related to lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins, and plunc family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautron, Joël; Murayama, Emi; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; McKee, Marc D; Réhault, Sophie; Labas, Valérie; Belghazi, Maya; Vidal, Mary-Laure; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2007-02-23

    The avian eggshell is a composite biomaterial composed of noncalcifying eggshell membranes and the overlying calcified shell matrix. The shell is deposited in a uterine fluid where the concentration of different protein species varies at different stages of its formation. The role of avian eggshell proteins during shell formation remains poorly understood, and we have sought to identify and characterize the individual components in order to gain insight into their function during elaboration of the eggshell. In this study, we have used direct sequencing, immunochemistry, expression screening, and EST data base mining to clone and characterize a 1995-bp full-length cDNA sequence corresponding to a novel chicken eggshell protein that we have named Ovocalyxin-36 (OCX-36). Ovocalyxin-36 protein was only detected in the regions of the oviduct where egg-shell formation takes place; uterine OCX-36 message was strongly up-regulated during eggshell calcification. OCX-36 localized to the calcified eggshell predominantly in the inner part of the shell, and to the shell membranes. BlastN data base searching indicates that there is no mammalian version of OCX-36; however, the protein sequence is 20-25% homologous to proteins associated with the innate immune response as follows: lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins, and Plunc family proteins. Moreover, the genomic organization of these proteins and OCX-36 appears to be highly conserved. These observations suggest that OCX-36 is a novel and specific chicken eggshell protein related to the superfamily of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins/bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins and Plunc proteins. OCX-36 may therefore participate in natural defense mechanisms that keep the egg free of pathogens.

  7. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Rh Family Genes and Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng-Han Huang; Jianbin Peng

    2005-01-01

    .... In the latter view, Rh and Amt are different biological gas channels. To reconstruct the phytogeny of the Rh family and study its coexistence with and relationship to Amt in depth, we analyzed 111 Rh genes and 260 Amt genes...

  8. CHD proteins: a diverse family with strong ties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, J. Adam; Georgel, Philippe T

    2007-01-01

    ...(s). In this minireview, we attempt to match the members of the CHD family with the presence of structural domains, cofactors, and cellular roles in the regulation of gene expression, recombination...

  9. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon a atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being...

  10. Immune regulatory functions of DOCK family proteins in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikimi, Akihiko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fukui, Yoshinori

    2013-09-10

    DOCK proteins constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho family of GTPases. Although DOCK family proteins do not contain the Dbl homology domain typically found in GEFs, they mediate the GTP-GDP exchange reaction through DHR-2 domain. Accumulating evidence indicates that the DOCK proteins act as major GEFs in varied biological settings. For example, DOCK2, which is predominantly expressed in hematopoietic cells, regulates migration and activation of leukocytes through Rac activation. On the other hand, it was recently reported that mutations of DOCK8, another member of the DOCK family proteins, cause a combined immunodeficiency syndrome in humans. This article reviews the structure, functions and signaling of DOCK2 and DOCK8, especially focusing on their roles in immune responses. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of the prion protein family in the gonads

    OpenAIRE

    Allais-Bonnet , Aurélie; Pailhoux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The prion-gene family comprises four members named PRNP (PRP(c)), PRND (Doppel), PRNT (PRT), and SPRN (Shadoo). According to species, PRND is located 16-52 kb downstream from the PRNP locus, whereas SPRN is located on another chromosome. The fourth prion-family gene, PRNT, belongs to the same genomic cluster as PRNP and PRND in humans and bovidae. PRNT and PRND possibly resulted from a duplication event of PRND and PRNP, respectively, that occurred early during eutherian species divergence. A...

  12. Hedgehog signaling patterns the outgrowth of unpaired skeletal appendages in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlberg Per

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the control of the development of vertebrate unpaired appendages such as the caudal fin, one of the key morphological specializations of fishes. Recent analysis of lamprey and dogshark median fins suggests the co-option of some molecular mechanisms between paired and median in Chondrichthyes. However, the extent to which the molecular mechanisms patterning paired and median fins are shared remains unknown. Results Here we provide molecular description of the initial ontogeny of the median fins in zebrafish and present several independent lines of evidence that Sonic hedgehog signaling emanating from the embryonic midline is essential for establishment and outgrowth of the caudal fin primordium. However, gene expression analysis shows that the primordium of the adult caudal fin does not harbor a Sonic hedgehog-expressing domain equivalent to the Shh secreting zone of polarizing activity (ZPA of paired appendages. Conclusion Our results suggest that Hedgehog proteins can regulate skeletal appendage outgrowth independent of a ZPA and demonstrates an unexpected mechanism for mediating Shh signals in a median fin primordium. The median fins evolved before paired fins in early craniates, thus the patterning of the median fins may be an ancestral mechanism that controls the outgrowth of skeletogenic appendages in vertebrates.

  13. Forced chondrocyte expression of sonic hedgehog impairs joint formation affecting proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavella, S; Biticchi, R; Morello, R; Castagnola, P; Musante, V; Costa, D; Cancedda, R; Garofalo, S

    2006-09-01

    Proliferation and apoptosis are two fundamental processes that occur during limb development, and in particular in joint formation. To study the role of hedgehog proteins in limbs, we have misexpressed Sonic Hedgehog specifically in chondrocytes. We found that the appendicular skeleton was severely misshapen while pelvic and shoulder girdles developed normally. In particular, we detected fusion of the elbow/knee joint, no definite carpal/tarsal, metacarpal/metatarsal bones and absence of distinct phalanges, fused in a continuous cartilaginous rod. Molecular markers of joints, such as Gdf5 and sFrp2 were absent at presumptive joint sites and Tenascin C, a molecule associated with joint formation and expressed in permanent cartilage, was expressed in a wider region in transgenic animals as compared to the wild type. The ratio of proliferating to non-proliferating chondrocytes was about two times higher in transgenic developing cartilage as compared to the wild type. Accordingly, the proapoptotic gene Bax was barely detectable in the growth plate of transgenic mice and Tunel assay showed the absence of apoptosis in presumptive joints at E15.5. Taken together, these results suggest that misexpression of Sonic Hedgehog causes apoptosis and proliferation defects leading to the lack of joint cavity and fusion of selected limb skeletal elements.

  14. Data on circulating leukocyte subpopulations and inflammatory proteins in children with familial hypercholesterolemia and healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J. Christensen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data in this relies on a previous publication: “Altered leukocyte distribution under hypercholesterolemia: a cross-sectional study in children with familial hypercholesterolemia” (Christensen et al. 2016 [1]. In the present paper, whole blood leukocyte distribution and plasma inflammatory proteins were measured for association with cholesterol concentration and CRP in children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and healthy children.

  15. FGFR Family Members Protein Expression as Prognostic Markers in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Koos; Clausen, Martijn J. A. M.; van Es, Robert J. J.; van Kempen, Pauline M. W.; Melchers, Lieuwe J.; Koole, Ron; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Diest, Paul J.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Schuuring, Ed; Willems, Stefan M.

    Introduction Fibroblast growth factor receptor family member proteins (FGFR1-4) have been identified as promising novel therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in a wide spectrum of solid tumors. The present study investigates the expression and prognostic value of four FGFR family member

  16. Using amino acid correlation and community detection algorithms to identify functional determinants in protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Bleicher

    Full Text Available Correlated mutation analysis has a long history of interesting applications, mostly in the detection of contact pairs in protein structures. Based on previous observations that, if properly assessed, amino acid correlation data can also provide insights about functional sub-classes in a protein family, we provide a complete framework devoted to this purpose. An amino acid specific correlation measure is proposed, which can be used to build networks summarizing all correlation and anti-correlation patterns in a protein family. These networks can be submitted to community structure detection algorithms, resulting in subsets of correlated amino acids which can be further assessed by specific parameters and procedures that provide insight into the relationship between different communities, the individual importance of community members and the adherence of a given amino acid sequence to a given community. By applying this framework to three protein families with contrasting characteristics (the Fe/Mn-superoxide dismutases, the peroxidase-catalase family and the C-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family, we show how our method and the proposed parameters and procedures are related to biological characteristics observed in these protein families, highlighting their potential use in protein characterization and gene annotation.

  17. Proteomic analyses of Ehrlichia ruminantium highlight differential expression of MAP1-family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Isabel; de Almeida, André Martinho; Brito, Catarina; Meyer, Damien F; Barreto, Mónica; Sheikboudou, Christian; Franco, Catarina F; Martinez, Dominique; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Coelho, Ana Varela; Alves, Paula M

    2012-05-04

    The Rickettsiales Ehrlichia ruminantium (ER) is the causative agent of heartwater, a fatal tick-borne disease of livestock in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Caribbean, posing strong economical constraints to livestock production. In an attempt to identify the most prominent proteins expressed by this bacterium, especially those encoded by the major antigenic protein 1 (map1) multigene family, a proteome map of ER cultivated in endothelial cells was constructed by using two dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry. Among the sixty-four spots detected, we could identify only four proteins from the MAP1-family; the other proteins detected were mainly related to energy, amino acid and general metabolism (26%), to protein turnover, chaperones and survival (21%) and to information processes (14%) or classified as hypothetical proteins (23%). Additional studies on MAP1-family protein using immunochemical labeling also revealed that these proteins are differentially expressed along the bacterium life cycle, presenting different structural organization. Interestingly, when infectious elementary bodies (EBs) are released from host cells, MAP1 appears to be organized in SDS and heat-resistant dimers and trimers stabilized by disulfide bridges. Overall, the results presented herein not only reveal the first partial proteome map of ER but provide new insights on the expression ER MAP1-family proteins in host endothelial cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hematologic and biochemical variables of hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) after overwintering in rehabilitation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Gabriele; Mangiagalli, Gerard; Paracchini, Giulia; Paltrinieri, Saverio

    2014-03-01

    Information about laboratory reference intervals (RIs) of European Hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) hospitalized at rehabilitation centers is scarce. The purpose of this study was to establish hematologic and biochemical RIs for rehabilitated hedgehogs before the release into the wild, and to assess whether sex and management of the center influence laboratory results. Blood was collected from 50 hedgehogs at 3 centers. Thirty-eight animals were included in the study based on normal body weight, absence of clinical signs of disease, Bunnell index > 0.80, and absence of hibernation during overwintering. CBCs were performed using an automated laser cell counter followed by morphologic analysis of blood smears. Clinical biochemistry was performed using an automated spectrophotometer. RIs were determined as recommended by the ASVCP guidelines. Hematology profiles revealed a prevalence of lymphocytes, a constant presence of nucleated RBCs, Howell-Jolly bodies and basophils, and bilobed nuclei in neutrophils and eosinophils. Biochemistry profiles were characterized by higher creatinine and urea concentrations, and higher ALP and GGT activities compared with other domestic species. The sex did not influence the results. Conversely, numbers of eosinophils, activated and large granular lymphocytes, and concentrations of total protein, glucose and cholesterol were different among the centers, likely due to different management practices (eg, antiparasitic treatments, environmental exposure to microorganisms, diet). The RIs established in this study can be used to monitor the health status of hedgehogs in rehabilitation centers. As management practices appeared to influence some variables, it is recommended to standardize the management protocols to minimize their influence on laboratory data. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  19. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Usha P; Dey, Himani; Rahaman, Abdur

    2017-06-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins comprising classical dynamins and related proteins are membrane remodelling agents involved in several biological processes such as endocytosis, maintenance of organelle morphology and viral resistance. These large GTPases couple GTP hydrolysis with membrane alterations such as fission, fusion or tubulation by undergoing repeated cycles of self-assembly/disassembly. The functions of these proteins are regulated by various post-translational modifications that affect their GTPase activity, multimerization or membrane association. Recently, several reports have demonstrated variety of such modifications providing a better understanding of the mechanisms by which dynamin proteins influence cellular responses to physiological and environmental cues. In this review, we discuss major post-translational modifications along with their roles in the mechanism of dynamin functions and implications in various cellular processes.

  20. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... targets for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases. [Padmanabhan B, Mathur S, Manjula R and Tripathi S 2016 Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) ...

  1. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  2. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.elias@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Liebschner, Dorothee [CRM2, Nancy Université (France); Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric [AFMB, Université Aix-Marseille II (France)

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.

  3. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The hypothetical protein 'Alr3200' of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 is highly conserved among cyanobacterialspecies. It is a member of the DUF820 (Domain of Unknown Function) protein family, and is predicted to have aDNase domain. Biochemical analysis revealed a Mg(II)-dependent DNase activity for Alr3200 with a ...

  4. The alpha-kinase family: an exceptional branch on the protein kinase tree.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelbeek, J.A.J.; Clark, K.; Venselaar, H.; Huynen, M.A.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2010-01-01

    The alpha-kinase family represents a class of atypical protein kinases that display little sequence similarity to conventional protein kinases. Early studies on myosin heavy chain kinases in Dictyostelium discoideum revealed their unusual propensity to phosphorylate serine and threonine residues in

  5. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-14

    Oct 14, 2016 ... The hypothetical protein 'Alr3200' of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 is highly conserved among cyanobacterial species. It is a member of the DUF820 (Domain of Unknown Function) protein family, and is predicted to have a. DNase domain. Biochemical analysis revealed a Mg(II)-dependent DNase activity ...

  6. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most...... diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed...... conotoxin-specific PDIs, significantly and differentially accelerate the kinetics of disulfide-bond formation of several conotoxins. Our results are consistent with a unique biological scenario associated with protein folding: The diversification of a family of foldases can be correlated with the rapid...

  7. 46,XY Gonadal Dysgenesis due to a Homozygous Mutation in Desert Hedgehog (DHH) Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Ralf; Merz, Hartmut; Birnbaum, Wiebke; Marshall, Louise; Schröder, Tatjana; Reiz, Benedikt; Kavran, Jennifer M; Bäumer, Tobias; Capetian, Philipp; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-07-01

    46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD) comprise a heterogeneous group of congenital conditions. Mutations in a variety of genes can affect gonadal development or androgen biosynthesis/action and thereby influence the development of the internal and external genital organs. The objective of the study was to identify the genetic cause in two 46,XY sisters of a consanguineous family with DSD and gonadal tumor formation. We used a next-generation sequencing approach by exome sequencing. Electrophysiological and high-resolution ultrasound examination of peripheral nerves as well as histopathological examination of the gonads were performed. We identified a novel homozygous R124Q mutation in the desert hedgehog gene (DHH), which alters a conserved residue among the three mammalian Hedgehog ligands sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, and desert hedgehog. No other relevant mutations in DSD-related genes were encountered. The gonads of one patient showed partial gonadal dysgenesis with loss of Leydig cells in tubular areas with seminoma in situ and a hyperplasia of Leydig cell-like cells expressing CYP17A1 in more dysgenetic parts of the gonad. In addition, both patients suffer from a polyneuropathy. High-resolution ultrasound revealed a structural change of peripheral nerve structure that fits well to a minifascicle formation of peripheral nerves. Mutations in DHH play a role in 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis and are associated with seminoma formation and a neuropathy with minifascicle formation. Gonadal dysgenesis in these cases may be due to impairment of Sertoli cell-Leydig cell interaction during gonadal development.

  8. Analysis of the MLO protein family and characterization of a mlo-virulent Bgh isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Kusch, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Mildew Locus O (MLO) protein family is best-known for its prominent role in the plant-powdery mildew interaction. Loss-of-function mutation of barley Mlo, respective wheat TaMlo1 orthologues, Arabidopsis AtMLO2, AtMLO6 and AtMLO12, and of tomato SlMlo1 (to name but a few) results in durable broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew across these diverse plant species. However, the MLO protein family is more complex. In Arabidopsis, for instance, 15 MLO proteins are present, and in additi...

  9. Of proteins and RNA: The RNase P/MRP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear ribonuclease (RNase) P is a ubiquitous essential ribonucleoprotein complex, one of only two known RNA-based enzymes found in all three domains of life. The RNA component is the catalytic moiety of RNases P across all phylogenetic domains; it contains a well-conserved core, whereas peripheral structural elements are diverse. RNA components of eukaryotic RNases P tend to be less complex than their bacterial counterparts, a simplification that is accompanied by a dramatic reduction of their catalytic ability in the absence of protein. The size and complexity of the protein moieties increase dramatically from bacterial to archaeal to eukaryotic enzymes, apparently reflecting the delegation of some structural functions from RNA to proteins and, perhaps, in response to the increased complexity of the cellular environment in the more evolutionarily advanced organisms; the reasons for the increased dependence on proteins are not clear. We review current information on RNase P and the closely related universal eukaryotic enzyme RNase MRP, focusing on their functions and structural organization. PMID:20627997

  10. p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin proteins define a conserved sequence domain present in other eukaryotic protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ranea, J A; Mirey, Gladys; Camonis, Jacques; Valencia, Alfonso

    2002-10-09

    We identified families of proteins characterized by the presence of a domain similar to human p23 protein, which include proteins such as Sgt1, involved in the yeast kinetochore assembly; melusin, involved in specific interactions with the cytoplasmic integrin beta1 domain; Rar1, related to pathogenic resistance in plants, and to development in animals; B5+B5R flavo-hemo cytochrome NAD(P)H oxidoreductase type B in humans and mice; and NudC, involved in nucleus migration during mitosis. We also found that p23 and the HSP20/alpha-crystallin family of heat shock proteins, which share the same three-dimensional folding, show a pattern of conserved residues that points to a common origin in the evolution of both protein domains. The p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin phylogenetic relationship and their similar role in chaperone activity suggest a common function, probably involving protein-protein interaction, for those proteins containing p23-like domains.

  11. The PEF family proteins sorcin and grancalcin interact in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian; Tarabykina, Svetlana; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2003-01-01

    The penta-EF hand (PEF) family of calcium binding proteins includes grancalcin, peflin, sorcin, calpain large and small subunits as well as ALG-2. Systematic testing of the heterodimerization abilities of the PEF proteins using the yeast two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays...... be a way to regulate and fine tune processes mediated by calcium binding proteins of the penta-EF hand type....

  12. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jui Tung [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  13. Impacts of removing badgers on localised counts of hedgehogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain D Trewby

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence of the interactions among mammalian predators that eat or compete with one another is rare, due to the ethical and logistical challenges of managing wild populations in a controlled and replicated way. Here, we report on the opportunistic use of a replicated and controlled culling experiment (the Randomised Badger Culling Trial to investigate the relationship between two sympatric predators: European badgers Meles meles and western European hedgehogs Erinaceus europaeus. In areas of preferred habitat (amenity grassland, counts of hedgehogs more than doubled over a 5-year period from the start of badger culling (from 0.9 ha-1 pre-cull to 2.4 ha-1 post-cull, whereas hedgehog counts did not change where there was no badger culling (0.3-0.3 hedgehogs ha-1. This trial provides experimental evidence for mesopredator release as an outcome of management of a top predator.

  14. Impacts of Removing Badgers on Localised Counts of Hedgehogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewby, Iain D.; Young, Richard; McDonald, Robbie A.; Wilson, Gavin J.; Davison, John; Walker, Neil; Robertson, Andrew; Doncaster, C. Patrick; Delahay, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the interactions among mammalian predators that eat or compete with one another is rare, due to the ethical and logistical challenges of managing wild populations in a controlled and replicated way. Here, we report on the opportunistic use of a replicated and controlled culling experiment (the Randomised Badger Culling Trial) to investigate the relationship between two sympatric predators: European badgers Meles meles and western European hedgehogs Erinaceus europaeus. In areas of preferred habitat (amenity grassland), counts of hedgehogs more than doubled over a 5-year period from the start of badger culling (from 0.9 ha−1 pre-cull to 2.4 ha−1 post-cull), whereas hedgehog counts did not change where there was no badger culling (0.3–0.3 hedgehogs ha−1). This trial provides experimental evidence for mesopredator release as an outcome of management of a top predator. PMID:24736454

  15. Evolutionary gradient of predicted nuclear localization signals (NLS)-bearing proteins in genomes of family Planctomycetaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Yang, Ruifu; Huang, Chen; Liao, Qiwen; Fan, Guangyi; Sun, Chenghang; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-04-04

    The nuclear envelope is considered a key classification marker that distinguishes prokaryotes from eukaryotes. However, this marker does not apply to the family Planctomycetaceae, which has intracellular spaces divided by lipidic intracytoplasmic membranes (ICMs). Nuclear localization signal (NLS), a short stretch of amino acid sequence, destines to transport proteins from cytoplasm into nucleus, and is also associated with the development of nuclear envelope. We attempted to investigate the NLS motifs in Planctomycetaceae genomes to demonstrate the potential molecular transition in the development of intracellular membrane system. In this study, we identified NLS-like motifs that have the same amino acid compositions as experimentally identified NLSs in genomes of 11 representative species of family Planctomycetaceae. A total of 15 NLS types and 170 NLS-bearing proteins were detected in the 11 strains. To determine the molecular transformation, we compared NLS-bearing protein abundances in the 11 representative Planctomycetaceae genomes with them in genomes of 16 taxonomically varied microorganisms: nine bacteria, two archaea and five fungi. In the 27 strains, 29 NLS types and 1101 NLS-bearing proteins were identified, principal component analysis showed a significant transitional gradient from bacteria to Planctomycetaceae to fungi on their NLS-bearing protein abundance profiles. Then, we clustered the 993 non-redundant NLS-bearing proteins into 181 families and annotated their involved metabolic pathways. Afterwards, we aligned the ten types of NLS motifs from the 13 families containing NLS-bearing proteins among bacteria, Planctomycetaceae or fungi, considering their diversity, length and origin. A transition towards increased complexity from non-planctomycete bacteria to Planctomycetaceae to archaea and fungi was detected based on the complexity of the 10 types of NLS-like motifs in the 13 NLS-bearing proteins families. The results of this study reveal that

  16. WCS120 protein family and proteins soluble upon boiling in cold-acclimated winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitamvas, P.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Prasil, I.T.

    2007-01-01

    The amount of proteins soluble upon boiling (especially WCS120 proteins) and the ability to develop frost tolerance (FT) after cold acclimation was studied in two frost-tolerant winter wheat cultivars, Mironovskaya 808 and Bezostaya 1. Protein get Not analysis, mass spectrometry (MS) and image...... analysis of total sample of proteins soluble upon boiling showed seven COR proteins in the CA samples and only three COR proteins in the NA samples of cultivar Mironovskaya 808 (MIR). In conclusion, the Level of the accumulation of WCS120, WCS66 and WCS40 distinguished our two frost-tolerant winter wheat...

  17. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  18. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  19. Three Members of the 6-cys Protein Family of Plasmodium Play a Role in Gamete Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahid M.; van Dooren, Maaike W.; Ramesar, Jai; Kaczanowski, Szymon; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Kroeze, Hans; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Eling, Wijnand M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Waters, Andrew P.; Janse, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    The process of fertilization is critically dependent on the mutual recognition of gametes and in Plasmodium, the male gamete surface protein P48/45 is vital to this process. This protein belongs to a family of 10 structurally related proteins, the so called 6-cys family. To identify the role of additional members of this family in Plasmodium fertilisation, we performed genetic and functional analysis on the five members of the 6-cys family that are transcribed during the gametocyte stage of P. berghei. This analysis revealed that in addition to P48/45, two members (P230 and P47) also play an essential role in the process of parasite fertilization. Mating studies between parasites lacking P230, P48/45 or P47 demonstrate that P230, like P48/45, is a male fertility factor, consistent with the previous demonstration of a protein complex containing both P48/45 and P230. In contrast, disruption of P47 results in a strong reduction of female fertility, while males remain unaffected. Further analysis revealed that gametes of mutants lacking expression of p48/45 or p230 or p47 are unable to either recognise or attach to each other. Disruption of the paralog of p230, p230p, also specifically expressed in gametocytes, had no observable effect on fertilization. These results indicate that the P. berghei 6-cys family contains a number of proteins that are either male or female specific ligands that play an important role in gamete recognition and/or attachment. The implications of low levels of fertilisation that exist even in the absence of these proteins, indicating alternative pathways of fertilisation, as well as positive selection acting on these proteins, are discussed in the context of targeting these proteins as transmission blocking vaccine candidates. PMID:20386715

  20. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J. Mooney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall.

  1. Crystal Structure of a Plant Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Family Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Iwaki, Shigehiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya

    2017-09-05

    The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of proteins consists of transporters responsible for multidrug resistance in prokaryotes. In plants, a number of MATE proteins were identified by recent genomic and functional studies, which imply that the proteins have substrate-specific transport functions instead of multidrug extrusion. The three-dimensional structure of eukaryotic MATE proteins, including those of plants, has not been reported, preventing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a MATE protein from the plant Camelina sativa at 2.9 Å resolution. Two sets of six transmembrane α helices, assembled pseudo-symmetrically, possess a negatively charged internal pocket with an outward-facing shape. The crystal structure provides insight into the diversity of plant MATE proteins and their substrate recognition and transport through the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary proteins, Evc and Evc2, the products of human disease genes responsible for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, act downstream of Smo to transduce the Hh signal. We found that loss of Evc/Evc2 does not affect Sonic Hedgehog-induced Smo phosphorylation and ciliary localization but impedes Hh pathway activation mediated by constitutively active forms of Smo. Evc/Evc2 are dispensable for the constitutive Gli activity in Sufu(-/-) cells, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 act upstream of Sufu to promote Gli activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Hh stimulates binding of Evc/Evc2 to Smo depending on phosphorylation of the Smo C-terminal intracellular tail and that the binding is abolished in Kif3a(-/-) cilium-deficient cells. We propose that Hh activates Smo by inducing its phosphorylation, which recruits Evc/Evc2 to activate Gli proteins by antagonizing Sufu in the primary cilia.

  3. The ribbon of hydrogen bonds in globular proteins. IV. The example of the papain family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, David; Peters, Jane

    2004-02-05

    A study of the role of the hydrogen-bonding side chains in the ribbon of hydrogen bonds in globular proteins, using the papain family as an example, suggests that these side chains may be divided into three categories depending on their position in the molecule. In the first category, they form part of the local ribbon, in the second they form part of the ribbon at a site remote along the main chain, and in the third they play no role in the formation of the ribbon. The second case is particularly interesting because it provides a natural mechanism for the formation of the tertiary structure of the globular proteins. The results suggest that the robustness of the globular proteins towards mutations arises from the fact that many mutations that involve hydrogen-bonding side chains either leave the hydrogen bonding of the ribbon essentially unchanged or their hydrogen bonding plays no part in the formation of the ribbon in the first place. The results show that it is possible to obtain the ribbon of hydrogen bonds for a family of proteins whose data set's are of intermediate quality by studying the ribbons of several members of such a family and then taking an average over the different partial ribbons to create a standard ribbon of hydrogen bonds for the family as a whole. This method is used here to derive the standard ribbon for the papain family with papain itself, actinidin, and human liver cathepsin B as the representatives of the family. All three members of the family fit the standard ribbon with an accuracy of 85-91%. This result opens up the use of this technique for the study of a large number of globular proteins whose recorded data sets are of intermediate quality. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Arabidopsis ovate family proteins, a novel transcriptional repressor family, control multiple aspects of plant growth and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs, a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7, and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the

  5. The relationship between Sonic hedgehog signalling, cilia and neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway is essential for many aspects of normal embryonic development, including formation and patterning of the neural tube. Absence of Shh ligand is associated with the midline defect holoprosencephaly, while increased Shh signalling is associated with exencephaly and spina bifida. To complicate this apparently simple relationship, mutation of proteins required for function of cilia often leads to impaired Shh signalling and to disruption of neural tube closure. In this manuscript, we review the literature on Shh pathway mutants and discuss the relationship between Shh signalling, cilia and neural tube defects. PMID:20544799

  6. A family of activation associated secreted protein (ASP) homologues of Cooperia punctata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuda, A P; Eysker, M; Vieira-Bressan, M C R; De Vries, E

    2002-12-01

    Activation-associated secreted proteins (ASP) of nematodes have been studied as potential vaccine components. In this study we report the cloning and analysis of cDNA and genomic sequences of Cooperia punctata and establish the presence of two 75% identical ASP-1 genes in C. punctata. Additional C. punctata ASP paralogues were shown to be present. Analysis of PCR products amplified from genomic DNA from a pool of worms revealed extensive sequence diversity within this family of proteins, reflecting the presence of different ASP paralogues in a single worm as well as extensive polymorphisms between different worms. ASP proteins contain a conserved region called the sperm-coating protein (SCP) domain of unknown function, which is present as a single copy in proteins from yeast and a wide range of multi-cellular organisms. Only in three nematodes has a protein composed of duplicated SCP-domains been identified. C. punctata is the first organism in which at least two such genes are found. Database searches identified similarity of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of ASP proteins to a nematode metallothionein motif. Cp-asp-1b was expressed in Escherichia coli and both the N-terminal and C-terminal domain were shown to be recognized by sera of C. punctata infected bovines. The description of the asp gene family of C. punctata provides the basis for more detailed studies into the extent of variation and immunological recognition of this family that may assist in rational vaccine design.

  7. S18 family of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins: evolutionary history and Gly132 polymorphism in colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Ali, Raja Hashim; Kashuba, Vladimir; Klein, George; Kashuba, Elena

    2016-08-23

    S18 family of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPS18, S18) consists of three members, S18-1 to -3. Earlier, we found that overexpression of S18-2 protein resulted in immortalization and eventual transformation of primary rat fibroblasts. The S18-1 and -3 have not exhibited such abilities. To understand the differences in protein properties, the evolutionary history of S18 family was analyzed. The S18-3, followed by S18-1 and S18-2 emerged as a result of ancient gene duplication in the root of eukaryotic species tree, followed by two metazoan-specific gene duplications. However, the most conserved metazoan S18 homolog is the S18-1; it shares the most sequence similarity with S18 proteins of bacteria and of other eukaryotic clades. Evolutionarily conserved residues of S18 proteins were analyzed in various cancers. S18-2 is mutated at a higher rate, compared with S18-1 and -3 proteins. Moreover, the evolutionarily conserved residue, Gly132 of S18-2, shows genetic polymorphism in colon adenocarcinomas that was confirmed by direct DNA sequencing.Concluding, S18 family represents the yet unexplored important mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  8. Using the SUBcellular database for Arabidopsis proteins to localize the Deg protease family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanz, Sandra K.; Castleden, Ian; Hooper, Cornelia M.; Small, Ian; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Sub-functionalization during the expansion of gene families in eukaryotes has occurred in part through specific subcellular localization of different family members. To better understand this process in plants, compiled records of large-scale proteomic and fluorescent protein localization datasets can be explored and bioinformatic predictions for protein localization can be used to predict the gaps in experimental data. This process can be followed by targeted experiments to test predictions. The SUBA3 database is a free web-service at http://suba.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au that helps users to explore reported experimental data and predictions concerning proteins encoded by gene families and to define the experiments required to locate these homologous sets of proteins. Here we show how SUBA3 can be used to explore the subcellular location of the Deg protease family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases (Deg1–Deg16). Combined data integration and new experiments refined location information for Deg1 and Deg9, confirmed Deg2, Deg5, and Deg8 in plastids and Deg 15 in peroxisomes and provide substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localized Deg proteases. Two of these, Deg3 and Deg10, additionally localized to the plastid, revealing novel dual-targeted Deg proteases in the plastid and the mitochondrion. SUBA3 is continually updated to ensure that researchers can use the latest published data when planning the experimental steps remaining to localize gene family functions. PMID:25161662

  9. Influenza NS1 directly modulates Hedgehog signaling during infection.

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    Margery G Smelkinson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional NS1 protein of influenza A viruses suppresses host cellular defense mechanisms and subverts other cellular functions. We report here on a new role for NS1 in modifying cell-cell signaling via the Hedgehog (Hh pathway. Genetic epistasis experiments and FRET-FLIM assays in Drosophila suggest that NS1 interacts directly with the transcriptional mediator, Ci/Gli1. We further confirmed that Hh target genes are activated cell-autonomously in transfected human lung epithelial cells expressing NS1, and in infected mouse lungs. We identified a point mutation in NS1, A122V, that modulates this activity in a context-dependent fashion. When the A122V mutation was incorporated into a mouse-adapted influenza A virus, it cell-autonomously enhanced expression of some Hh targets in the mouse lung, including IL6, and hastened lethality. These results indicate that, in addition to its multiple intracellular functions, NS1 also modifies a highly conserved signaling pathway, at least in part via cell autonomous activities. We discuss how this new Hh modulating function of NS1 may influence host lethality, possibly through controlling cytokine production, and how these new insights provide potential strategies for combating infection.

  10. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  11. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellese A. Cannonier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung, directly invade into bone (head and neck or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  12. Neogenin regulates Sonic hedgehog pathway activity during digit patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mingi; Schachter, Karen A.; Jiang, Guoying; Krauss, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Digit patterning integrates signaling by the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), FGF and BMP pathways. GLI3, a component of the SHH pathway, is a major regulator of digit number and identity. Neogenin (encoded by Neo1) is a cell surface protein that serves to transduce signals from several ligands, including BMPs, in various developmental contexts. Although neogenin is implicated in BMP signaling, it has not been linked to SHH signaling and its role in digit patterning is unknown. Results We report that Neo1 mutant mice have preaxial polydactyly with low penetrance. Expression of SHH target genes, but not BMP target genes, is altered in Neo1 mutant limb buds. Analysis of mice carrying mutations in both Neo1 and Gli3 reveals that although neogenin plays a role in constraint of digit numbers, suppressing polydactyly, it is also required for the severe polydactyly caused by loss of GLI3. Furthermore, embryo fibroblasts from Neo1 mutant mice are sensitized to SHH pathway activation in vitro. Conclusions Our findings indicate that neogenin regulates SHH signaling in the limb bud to achieve proper digit patterning. PMID:22275192

  13. Bromodomain and hedgehog pathway targets in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Reinhart, Russell A; Monks, Anne; Evans, David; Morris, Joel; Polley, Eric; Teicher, Beverly A

    2016-02-28

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive cancer that frequently recurs. Twenty-three human SCLC lines were selected representing varied Myc status. Gene expression of lung cancer, stem-like, hedgehog pathway, and notch pathway genes were determined by RT(2)-PCR array and Exon 1.0 ST array. Etoposide and topotecan concentration response was examined. The IC50's for etoposide and topotecan ranged over nearly 3 logs upon 96 hrs exposure to the drugs. Myc status, TOP2A, TOP2B and TOP1 mRNA expression or topoisomerase 1 and topoisomerase 2 protein did not account for the range in the sensitivity to the drugs. γ-secretase inhibitors, RO429097 and PF-03084014, had little activity in the SCLC lines over ranges covering the clinical Cmax concentrations. MYC amplified lines tended to be more sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. The Smo antagonists, erismodegib and vismodegib and the Gli antagonists, HPI1 and SEN-450 had a trend toward greater sensitivity of the MYC amplified line. Recurrent SCLC is among the most recalcitrant cancers and drug development efforts in this cancer are a high priority. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis reveals dynamic evolution of the poly(A)-binding protein gene family in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Gallie, Daniel R; Liu, Renyi

    2014-01-01

    Background The poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) binds the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs and functions to maintain the integrity of the mRNA while promoting protein synthesis through its interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G and eIF4B. PABP is encoded by a single gene in yeast and marine algae but during plant evolution the PABP gene family expanded substantially, underwent sequence divergence into three subclasses, and acquired tissue-specificity in gene family m...

  15. Ubiquitin-Mediated Regulation of Endocytosis by Proteins of the Arrestin Family

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    Michel Becuwe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In metazoans, proteins of the arrestin family are key players of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRS signaling and trafficking. Following stimulation, activated receptors are phosphorylated, thus allowing the binding of arrestins and hence an “arrest” of receptor signaling. Arrestins act by uncoupling receptors from G proteins and contribute to the recruitment of endocytic proteins, such as clathrin, to direct receptor trafficking into the endocytic pathway. Arrestins also serve as adaptor proteins by promoting the recruitment of ubiquitin ligases and participate in the agonist-induced ubiquitylation of receptors, known to have impact on their subcellular localization and stability. Recently, the arrestin family has expanded following the discovery of arrestin-related proteins in other eukaryotes such as yeasts or fungi. Surprisingly, most of these proteins are also involved in the ubiquitylation and endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins, thus suggesting that the role of arrestins as ubiquitin ligase adaptors is at the core of these proteins' functions. Importantly, arrestins are themselves ubiquitylated, and this modification is crucial for their function. In this paper, we discuss recent data on the intricate connections between arrestins and the ubiquitin pathway in the control of endocytosis.

  16. The CPCFC cuticular protein family: Anatomical and cuticular locations in Anopheles gambiae and distribution throughout Pancrustacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Laura; Bowen, John Hunter; Reed, Tyler W; Willis, Judith H

    2015-10-01

    Arthropod cuticles have, in addition to chitin, many structural proteins belonging to diverse families. Information is sparse about how these different cuticular proteins contribute to the cuticle. Most cuticular proteins lack cysteine with the exception of two families (CPAP1 and CPAP3), recently described, and the one other that we now report on that has a motif of 16 amino acids first identified in a protein, Bc-NCP1, from the cuticle of nymphs of the cockroach, Blaberus craniifer (Jensen et al., 1997). This motif turns out to be present as two or three copies in one or two proteins in species from many orders of Hexapoda. We have named the family of cuticular proteins with this motif CPCFC, based on its unique feature of having two cysteines interrupted by five amino acids (C-X(5)-C). Analysis of the single member of the family in Anopheles gambiae (AgamCPCFC1) revealed that its mRNA is most abundant immediately following ecdysis in larvae, pupae and adults. The mRNA is localized primarily in epidermis that secretes hard cuticle, sclerites, setae, head capsules, appendages and spermatheca. EM immunolocalization revealed the presence of the protein, generally in endocuticle of legs and antennae. A phylogenetic analysis found proteins bearing this motif in 14 orders of Hexapoda, but not in some species for which there are complete genomic data. Proteins were much longer in Coleoptera and Diptera than in other orders. In contrast to the 1 and occasionally 2 copies in other species, a dragonfly, Ladona fulva, has at least 14 genes coding for family members. CPCFC proteins were present in four classes of Crustacea with 5 repeats in one species, and motifs that ended C-X(7)-C in Malacostraca. They were not detected, except as obvious contaminants, in any other arthropod subphyla or in any other phylum. The conservation of CPCFC proteins throughout the Pancrustacea and the small number of copies in individual species indicate that, when present, these proteins are

  17. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G; Shihab, Hashem A; Rivas, Manuel A; McCarthy, Mark I; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gaunt, Tom R

    2016-01-01

    It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  18. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  19. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    Full Text Available It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit.Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1% together in three different ways 1 variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2 variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3 all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families. A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT.We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed.We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  20. FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells

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    Cobos Everardo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid differentiation in the murine EML hematopoietic stem cell line. Results One identified clone encoded a previously unidentified protein of 541 amino acids that contains an amino terminal signal sequence but no other characterized domains. This protein is a member of family of related proteins that has been named family with sequence similarity 20 (FAM20 with three members (FAM20A, FAM20B and FAM20C in mammals. Evolutionary comparisons revealed the existence of a single FAM20 gene in the simple vertebrate Ciona intestinalis and the invertebrate worm Caenorhabditis elegans and two genes in two insect species, Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Six FAM20 family members were identified in the genome of the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes and five members in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The mouse Fam20a protein was ectopically expressed in a mammalian cell line and found to be a bona fide secreted protein and efficient secretion was dependent on the integrity of the signal sequence. Expression analysis revealed that the Fam20a gene was indeed differentially expressed during hematopoietic differentiation and that the other two family members (Fam20b and Fam20c were also expressed during hematcpoiesis but that their mRNA levels did not vary significantly. Likewise FAM20A was expressed in more limited set of human tissues than the other two family members. Conclusions The FAM20 family represents a new family of secreted proteins with potential functions in regulating

  1. Evolution of protein families: is it possible to distinguish between domains of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Pardo, Marta; Chan, Albert O B; Amaral, Luís A N; Guimerà, Roger

    2007-11-01

    Understanding evolutionary relationships between species can shed new light into the rooting of the tree of life and the origin of eukaryotes, thus, resulting in a long standing interest in accurately assessing evolutionary parameters at time scales on the order of a billion of years. Prior work suggests large variability in molecular substitution rates, however, we still do not know whether such variability is due to species-specific trends at a genomic scale, or whether it can be attributed to the fluctuations inherent in any stochastic process. Here, we study the statistical properties of gene and protein-family sizes in order to quantify the long time scale evolutionary differences and similarities across species. We first determine the protein families of 209 species of bacteria and 20 species of archaea. We find that we are unable to reject the null hypothesis that the protein-family sizes of these species are drawn from the same distribution. In addition, we find that for species classified in the same phylogenetic branch or in the same lifestyle group, family size distributions are not significantly more similar than for species in different branches. These two findings can be accounted for in terms of a dynamical birth, death, and innovation model that assumes identical protein-family evolutionary rates for all species. Our theoretical and empirical results thus strongly suggest that the variability empirically observed in protein-family size distributions is compatible with the expected stochastic fluctuations for an evolutionary process with identical genomic evolutionary rates. Our findings hold special importance for the plausibility of some theories of the origin of eukaryotes which require drastic changes in evolutionary rates for some period during the last 2 billion years.

  2. The Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer of split protein family in animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Megha; Kumar, Pankaj; Mathew, Sam J

    2015-07-01

    Corepressors are proteins that cannot bind DNA directly but repress transcription by interacting with partner proteins. The Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split (TLE) are a conserved family of corepressor proteins present in animals ranging from invertebrates such as Drosophila to vertebrates such as mice and humans. Groucho/TLE proteins perform important functions throughout the life span of animals, interacting with several pathways and regulating fundamental processes such as metabolism. However, these proteins have especially crucial functions in animal development, where they are required in multiple tissues in a temporally regulated manner. In this review, we summarize the functions of the Groucho/TLE proteins during animal development, emphasizing on specific tissues where they play essential roles. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Investigations on Inhibitors of Hedgehog Signal Pathway: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiwei Cao; Huiliang Li; Ruixin Zhu; Qi Liu; Jian Tang

    2011-01-01

    The hedgehog signal pathway is an essential agent in developmental patterning, wherein the local concentration of the Hedgehog morphogens directs cellular differentiation and expansion. Furthermore, the Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor/stromal interaction and cancer stem cell. Nowadays searching novel inhibitors for Hedgehog Signal Pathway is drawing much more attention by biological, chemical and pharmological scientists. In our study, a solid computational model is proposed whi...

  4. The SSX Family of Cancer-Testis Antigens as Target Proteins for Tumor Therapy

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    Heath A. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs represent an expanding class of tumor-associated proteins defined on the basis of their tissue-restricted expression to testis or ovary germline cells and frequent ectopic expression in tumor tissue. The expression of CTA in MHC class I-deficient germline cells makes these proteins particularly attractive as immunotherapeutic targets because they serve as essentially tumor-specific antigens for MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells. Moreover, because CTAs are expressed in many types of cancer, any therapeutic developed to target these antigens might have efficacy for multiple cancer types. Of particular interest among CTAs is the synovial sarcoma X chromosome breakpoint (SSX family of proteins, which includes ten highly homologous family members. Expression of SSX proteins in tumor tissues has been associated with advanced stages of disease and worse patient prognosis. Additionally, both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to SSX proteins have been demonstrated in patients with tumors of varying histological origin, which indicates that natural immune responses can be spontaneously generated to these antigens in cancer patients. The current review will describe the history and identification of this family of proteins, as well as what is known of their function, expression in normal and malignant tissues, and immunogenicity.

  5. Nature of protein family signatures: insights from singular value analysis of position-specific scoring matrices.

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    Akira R Kinjo

    Full Text Available Position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs are useful for detecting weak homology in protein sequence analysis, and they are thought to contain some essential signatures of the protein families. In order to elucidate what kind of ingredients constitute such family-specific signatures, we apply singular value decomposition to a set of PSSMs and examine the properties of dominant right and left singular vectors. The first right singular vectors were correlated with various amino acid indices including relative mutability, amino acid composition in protein interior, hydropathy, or turn propensity, depending on proteins. A significant correlation between the first left singular vector and a measure of site conservation was observed. It is shown that the contribution of the first singular component to the PSSMs act to disfavor potentially but falsely functionally important residues at conserved sites. The second right singular vectors were highly correlated with hydrophobicity scales, and the corresponding left singular vectors with contact numbers of protein structures. It is suggested that sequence alignment with a PSSM is essentially equivalent to threading supplemented with functional information. In addition, singular vectors may be useful for analyzing and annotating the characteristics of conserved sites in protein families.

  6. Effects of selenium on lead-induced alterations in Aβ production and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiqiang; Fu, Hongjun; Xiao, Yongmei; Zhang, Bo; Sun, Guangshun; Wei, Qing; Ai, Baomin; Hu, Qiansheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in humans and animals have suggested that lead (Pb) may increase the expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and accumulation of amyloid β protein (Aβ). Our previous studies have revealed that selenium (Se) can partially improve memory deficits induced by Pb exposure. In this study we sought to investigate the effect of Pb and Se on the endogenous expression of APP, Aβ40 and Bcl-2 family proteins. In vitro, the protein levels of APP and Aβ significantly decreased in SH-SY5Y and PC12 cells co-incubated with Pb-acetate and selenomethionine (SeMet) for 48h, compared with cells treated with Pb-acetate alone. Furthermore, these reductions induced by Se appeared to be concentration-dependent. In Wistar rats, we observed that the mRNA and protein levels of APP, the protein level of Bax, and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 protein significantly increased after Pb treatment at embryonic stage and in neonates. These increases were significantly reversed by the treatment of Se. Taken together, our results suggest that Se can attenuate the alterations in APP expression and Aβ production as well as Bcl-2 family proteins induced by lead exposure in cells and in animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Marked Variability in the Extent of Protein Disorder within and between Viral Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushker, Ravindra; Mooney, Catherine; Davey, Norman E.; Jacqué, Jean-Marc; Shields, Denis C.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs) embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues), and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively). Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses), except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel instances of SLi

  8. Marked variability in the extent of protein disorder within and between viral families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Pushker

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues, and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively. Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses, except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel

  9. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential molecular mimicry between the human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope proteins and myelin proteins in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Joseph, Blessy; Whittall, Trevor

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease caused by the destruction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. The major target molecules for the immune response are the myelin basic protein, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein and proteolipid protein but the aetiology of the disease is as yet poorly understood. The HLA Class II allele DRB1*1501 in particular as well as DRB5*0101 and the expression of human endogenous retroviral envelope proteins have been linked to multiple sclerosis but the molecular mechanisms relating these remain to be elucidated. We hypothesised that cross-reactive peptide epitopes in retroviral envelope proteins and myelin proteins that can be presented by the two Class II DR molecules may play a role in initiating multiple sclerosis. Sequence homologies between retroviral envelope and myelin proteins and in silico predictions of peptides derived from them that are able to bind to the two Class II alleles were examined to test the hypothesis. The results support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry in peptide epitopes from envelope proteins of the HERV-W family of endogenous retroviruses and myelin proteins is possible and could potentially trigger multiple sclerosis. Mimicry between syncytin-1, a HERV-W envelope protein that is expressed during placentation, and myelin proteins may also explain the higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis in women. Experiments to test the ability of the identified peptide epitopes to activate T H cells are required to confirm the present findings. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sequence analysis of cytoplasmic mRNA-binding proteins of Xenopus oocytes identifies a family of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M T; Schiller, D L; Franke, W W

    1992-01-01

    Storage of maternal mRNAs as nontranslated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes is an adaptive strategy in various vertebrate and invertebrate oocytes, for rapid translational recruitment during embryonic development. Previously, we showed that Xenopus laevis oocytes have a soluble cytoplasmic pool of mRNA-binding proteins and particles competent for messenger RNP assembly in vitro. Here we report the isolation of cDNAs for the most abundant messenger RNPs, the 54- and 56-kDa polypeptide (p54/p56) components of the approximately 6S mRNA-binding particle, from an ovarian expression library. The nucleotide sequence of p56 cDNA is almost identical to that recently reported for the putative Xenopus transcription factor FRG Y2. p54 and p56 are highly homologous and are smaller than expected by SDS/PAGE (36 kDa and 37 kDa) due to anomalous electrophoretic mobility. They lack the "RNP consensus motif" but contain four arginine-rich "basic/aromatic islands" that are similar to the RNA-binding domain of bacteriophage mRNA antiterminator proteins and of tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus. The basic/aromatic regions and a second conspicuous 100-amino acid "domain C" of p54 and p56 are conserved in the following DNA-binding proteins: human proteins dpbA, dpbB, and YB-1, rat protein EFIA, and Xenopus protein FRG Y1, all reported to bind to DNA; domain C is homologous to the major Escherichia coli cold-stress-response protein reportedly involved in translational control. Antibodies raised against a peptide of domain C have identified similar proteins in Xenopus somatic cells and in some mammalian cells and tissues. We conclude that p54 and p56 define a family of RNA-binding proteins, at least some of which may be involved in translational regulation.

  12. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B1-2)) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABA(B) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1-3), a promiscuous L...

  13. Laser irradiation promotes the proliferation of mouse pre-osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 through hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiushi; Chen, Yingxin; Dong, Shujun; Liu, Shujie; Zhang, Xiaodan; Si, Xi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2017-09-01

    Low-level laser could promote osteoblast proliferation, and it has been applied in clinical practice to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration. However, the mechanism related to laser irradiation remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on the cell proliferation and the expressions of hedgehog signaling molecules Indian hedgehog (Ihh), Ptch, and Gli in vitro. In our present study, the MTT method was used to evaluate the effect on cell proliferation of laser irradiation on MC3T3-E1 cells. And cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. Gene and protein expressions of hedgehog signaling molecules, including Ihh, Ptch, Smoothened (Smo), and Gli, were examined by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that laser irradiation at dosage of 3.75 J/cm(2) enhances the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells compared with control groups (p = 0.00). Moreover, laser irradiation (3.75 J/cm(2)) increased the cell amount at S phase (p = 0.00). In addition, the expressions of Ihh, Ptch, Smo, and Gli were significantly increased compared to the control during laser irradiation (3.75 J/cm(2))-induced MC3T3-E1 osteoblast proliferation. After adding the hedgehog signaling inhibitor CY (cyclopamine), cell proliferation and Ihh, Ptch, Smo, and Gli expressions were inhibited (p = 0.00), and the cell amount at S phase was reduced compared with combination groups (p = 0.00). These results indicated that laser irradiation promotes proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells through hedgehog signaling pathway. Our findings provide insights into the mechanistic link between laser irradiation-induced osteogenesis and hedgehog signaling pathway.

  14. A family of GFP-like proteins with different spectral properties in lancelet Branchiostoma floridae

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    Mushegian Arcady

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the green fluorescent protein (GFP family share sequence similarity and the 11-stranded β-barrel fold. Fluorescence or bright coloration, observed in many members of this family, is enabled by the intrinsic properties of the polypeptide chain itself, without the requirement for cofactors. Amino acid sequence of fluorescent proteins can be altered by genetic engineering to produce variants with different spectral properties, suitable for direct visualization of molecular and cellular processes. Naturally occurring GFP-like proteins include fluorescent proteins from cnidarians of the Hydrozoa and Anthozoa classes, and from copepods of the Pontellidae family, as well as non-fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa. Recently, an mRNA encoding a fluorescent GFP-like protein AmphiGFP, related to GFP from Pontellidae, has been isolated from the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae, a cephalochordate (Deheyn et al., Biol Bull, 2007 213:95. Results We report that the nearly-completely sequenced genome of Branchiostoma floridae encodes at least 12 GFP-like proteins. The evidence for expression of six of these genes can be found in the EST databases. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that a gene encoding a GFP-like protein was present in the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria. We synthesized and expressed two of the lancelet GFP-like proteins in mammalian cells and in bacteria. One protein, which we called LanFP1, exhibits bright green fluorescence in both systems. The other protein, LanFP2, is identical to AmphiGFP in amino acid sequence and is moderately fluorescent. Live imaging of the adult animals revealed bright green fluorescence at the anterior end and in the basal region of the oral cirri, as well as weaker green signals throughout the body of the animal. In addition, red fluorescence was observed in oral cirri, extending to the tips. Conclusion GFP-like proteins may have been present in the primitive Metazoa. Their

  15. The Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain (BET Family: Functional Anatomy of BET Paralogous Proteins

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    Yasushi Taniguchi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Domain (BET family of proteins is characterized by the presence of two tandem bromodomains and an extra-terminal domain. The mammalian BET family of proteins comprises BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT, which are encoded by paralogous genes that may have been generated by repeated duplication of an ancestral gene during evolution. Bromodomains that can specifically bind acetylated lysine residues in histones serve as chromatin-targeting modules that decipher the histone acetylation code. BET proteins play a crucial role in regulating gene transcription through epigenetic interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones during cellular proliferation and differentiation processes. On the other hand, BET proteins have been reported to mediate latent viral infection in host cells and be involved in oncogenesis. Human BRD4 is involved in multiple processes of the DNA virus life cycle, including viral replication, genome maintenance, and gene transcription through interaction with viral proteins. Aberrant BRD4 expression contributes to carcinogenesis by mediating hyperacetylation of the chromatin containing the cell proliferation-promoting genes. BET bromodomain blockade using small-molecule inhibitors gives rise to selective repression of the transcriptional network driven by c-MYC These inhibitors are expected to be potential therapeutic drugs for a wide range of cancers. This review presents an overview of the basic roles of BET proteins and highlights the pathological functions of BET and the recent developments in cancer therapy targeting BET proteins in animal models.

  16. A primary sequence analysis of the ARGONAUTE protein family in plants.

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    Daniel Rodriguez-Leal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA (sRNA-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  17. Focal adhesion protein FAP52 self-associates through a sequence conserved among the members of the PCH family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikki, Marko; Meriläinen, Jari; Lehto, Veli-Pekka

    2002-05-21

    FAP52 is a recently described focal adhesion-associated protein. It is a member of an emerging PCH (pombe Cdc15 homology) family of proteins characterized by a common domain organization and involvement in actin cytoskeleton organization, cytokinesis, and vesicular trafficking. Using gel filtration, surface plasmon resonance, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, combined with chemical cross-linking of both native and recombinant protein, we show that FAP52 self-associates in vitro and suggest that it occurs predominantly as a trimer also in vivo. Analysis of the various domains of FAP52 by surface plasmon resonance showed that the highly alpha-helical region in the N-terminal half of the protein provides the self-association interface. Overexpression of the oligomerization domain in cultured cells was accompanied by major alterations in cellular morphology, actin organization, and the structure of focal adhesions, suggesting that an orderly coming together of FAP52 molecules is crucial for a proper actin filament organization and cytoskeletal structure. Comparison of the primary structures shows that all of the members of the PCH family have, in their N-terminal halves, a similar, highly alpha-helical region, suggesting that they all have a capacity to self-associate.

  18. Trends in genome dynamics among major orders of insects revealed through variations in protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Nadav; Linial, Michal

    2015-08-07

    Insects belong to a class that accounts for the majority of animals on earth. With over one million identified species, insects display a huge diversity and occupy extreme environments. At present, there are dozens of fully sequenced insect genomes that cover a range of habitats, social behavior and morphologies. In view of such diverse collection of genomes, revealing evolutionary trends and charting functional relationships of proteins remain challenging. We analyzed the relatedness of 17 complete proteomes representative of proteomes from insects including louse, bee, beetle, ants, flies and mosquitoes, as well as an out-group from the crustaceans. The analyzed proteomes mostly represented the orders of Hymenoptera and Diptera. The 287,405 protein sequences from the 18 proteomes were automatically clustered into 20,933 families, including 799 singletons. A comprehensive analysis based on statistical considerations identified the families that were significantly expanded or reduced in any of the studied organisms. Among all the tested species, ants are characterized by an exceptionally high rate of family gain and loss. By assigning annotations to hundreds of species-specific families, the functional diversity among species and between the major clades (Diptera and Hymenoptera) is revealed. We found that many species-specific families are associated with receptor signaling, stress-related functions and proteases. The highest variability among insects associates with the function of transposition and nucleic acids processes (collectively coined TNAP). Specifically, the wasp and ants have an order of magnitude more TNAP families and proteins relative to species that belong to Diptera (mosquitoes and flies). An unsupervised clustering methodology combined with a comparative functional analysis unveiled proteomic signatures in the major clades of winged insects. We propose that the expansion of TNAP families in Hymenoptera potentially contributes to the accelerated

  19. Variability and action mechanism of a family of anticomplement proteins in Ixodes ricinus.

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    Bernard Couvreur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ticks are blood feeding arachnids that characteristically take a long blood meal. They must therefore counteract host defence mechanisms such as hemostasis, inflammation and the immune response. This is achieved by expressing batteries of salivary proteins coded by multigene families. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the in-depth analysis of a tick multigene family and describe five new anticomplement proteins in Ixodes ricinus. Compared to previously described Ixodes anticomplement proteins, these segregated into a new phylogenetic group or subfamily. These proteins have a novel action mechanism as they specifically bind to properdin, leading to the inhibition of C3 convertase and the alternative complement pathway. An excess of non-synonymous over synonymous changes indicated that coding sequences had undergone diversifying selection. Diversification was not associated with structural, biochemical or functional diversity, adaptation to host species or stage specificity but rather to differences in antigenicity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anticomplement proteins from I. ricinus are the first inhibitors that specifically target a positive regulator of complement, properdin. They may provide new tools for the investigation of role of properdin in physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. They may also be useful in disorders affecting the alternative complement pathway. Looking for and detecting the different selection pressures involved will help in understanding the evolution of multigene families and hematophagy in arthropods.

  20. TIM-family proteins promote infection of multiple enveloped viruses through virion-associated phosphatidylserine.

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    Stephanie Jemielity

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin-domain containing proteins (TIM1, 3, and 4 specifically bind phosphatidylserine (PS. TIM1 has been proposed to serve as a cellular receptor for hepatitis A virus and Ebola virus and as an entry factor for dengue virus. Here we show that TIM1 promotes infection of retroviruses and virus-like particles (VLPs pseudotyped with a range of viral entry proteins, in particular those from the filovirus, flavivirus, New World arenavirus and alphavirus families. TIM1 also robustly enhanced the infection of replication-competent viruses from the same families, including dengue, Tacaribe, Sindbis and Ross River viruses. All interactions between TIM1 and pseudoviruses or VLPs were PS-mediated, as demonstrated with liposome blocking and TIM1 mutagenesis experiments. In addition, other PS-binding proteins, such as Axl and TIM4, promoted infection similarly to TIM1. Finally, the blocking of PS receptors on macrophages inhibited the entry of Ebola VLPs, suggesting that PS receptors can contribute to infection in physiologically relevant cells. Notably, infection mediated by the entry proteins of Lassa fever virus, influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus was largely unaffected by TIM1 expression. Taken together our data show that TIM1 and related PS-binding proteins promote infection of diverse families of enveloped viruses, and may therefore be useful targets for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies.

  1. TIM-family proteins promote infection of multiple enveloped viruses through virion-associated phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielity, Stephanie; Wang, Jinyize J; Chan, Ying Kai; Ahmed, Asim A; Li, Wenhui; Monahan, Sheena; Bu, Xia; Farzan, Michael; Freeman, Gordon J; Umetsu, Dale T; Dekruyff, Rosemarie H; Choe, Hyeryun

    2013-03-01

    Human T-cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin-domain containing proteins (TIM1, 3, and 4) specifically bind phosphatidylserine (PS). TIM1 has been proposed to serve as a cellular receptor for hepatitis A virus and Ebola virus and as an entry factor for dengue virus. Here we show that TIM1 promotes infection of retroviruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) pseudotyped with a range of viral entry proteins, in particular those from the filovirus, flavivirus, New World arenavirus and alphavirus families. TIM1 also robustly enhanced the infection of replication-competent viruses from the same families, including dengue, Tacaribe, Sindbis and Ross River viruses. All interactions between TIM1 and pseudoviruses or VLPs were PS-mediated, as demonstrated with liposome blocking and TIM1 mutagenesis experiments. In addition, other PS-binding proteins, such as Axl and TIM4, promoted infection similarly to TIM1. Finally, the blocking of PS receptors on macrophages inhibited the entry of Ebola VLPs, suggesting that PS receptors can contribute to infection in physiologically relevant cells. Notably, infection mediated by the entry proteins of Lassa fever virus, influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus was largely unaffected by TIM1 expression. Taken together our data show that TIM1 and related PS-binding proteins promote infection of diverse families of enveloped viruses, and may therefore be useful targets for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies.

  2. A hybrid clustering approach to recognition of protein families in 114 microbial genomes

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    Gogarten J Peter

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grouping proteins into sequence-based clusters is a fundamental step in many bioinformatic analyses (e.g., homology-based prediction of structure or function. Standard clustering methods such as single-linkage clustering capture a history of cluster topologies as a function of threshold, but in practice their usefulness is limited because unrelated sequences join clusters before biologically meaningful families are fully constituted, e.g. as the result of matches to so-called promiscuous domains. Use of the Markov Cluster algorithm avoids this non-specificity, but does not preserve topological or threshold information about protein families. Results We describe a hybrid approach to sequence-based clustering of proteins that combines the advantages of standard and Markov clustering. We have implemented this hybrid approach over a relational database environment, and describe its application to clustering a large subset of PDB, and to 328577 proteins from 114 fully sequenced microbial genomes. To demonstrate utility with difficult problems, we show that hybrid clustering allows us to constitute the paralogous family of ATP synthase F1 rotary motor subunits into a single, biologically interpretable hierarchical grouping that was not accessible using either single-linkage or Markov clustering alone. We describe validation of this method by hybrid clustering of PDB and mapping SCOP families and domains onto the resulting clusters. Conclusion Hybrid (Markov followed by single-linkage clustering combines the advantages of the Markov Cluster algorithm (avoidance of non-specific clusters resulting from matches to promiscuous domains and single-linkage clustering (preservation of topological information as a function of threshold. Within the individual Markov clusters, single-linkage clustering is a more-precise instrument, discerning sub-clusters of biological relevance. Our hybrid approach thus provides a computationally efficient

  3. Characterization of the Pichia pastoris protein-O-mannosyltransferase gene family.

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    Juergen H Nett

    Full Text Available The methylotrophic yeast, Pichiapastoris, is an important organism used for the production of therapeutic proteins. However, the presence of fungal-like glycans, either N-linked or O-linked, can elicit an immune response or enable the expressed protein to bind to mannose receptors, thus reducing their efficacy. Previously we have reported the elimination of β-linked glycans in this organism. In the current report we have focused on reducing the O-linked mannose content of proteins produced in P. pastoris, thereby reducing the potential to bind to mannose receptors. The initial step in the synthesis of O-linked glycans in P. pastoris is the transfer of mannose from dolichol-phosphomannose to a target protein in the yeast secretory pathway by members of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase (PMT family. In this report we identify and characterize the members of the P. pastoris PMT family. Like Candida albicans, P. pastoris has five PMT genes. Based on sequence homology, these PMTs can be grouped into three sub-families, with both PMT1 and PMT2 sub-families possessing two members each (PMT1 and PMT5, and PMT2 and PMT6, respectively. The remaining sub-family, PMT4, has only one member (PMT4. Through gene knockouts we show that PMT1 and PMT2 each play a significant role in O-glycosylation. Both, by gene knockouts and the use of Pmt inhibitors we were able to significantly reduce not only the degree of O-mannosylation, but also the chain-length of these glycans. Taken together, this reduction of O-glycosylation represents an important step forward in developing the P. pastoris platform as a suitable system for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  4. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  5. Receptor Quaternary Organization Explains G Protein-Coupled Receptor Family Structure

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    James H. Felce

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The organization of Rhodopsin-family G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs at the cell surface is controversial. Support both for and against the existence of dimers has been obtained in studies of mostly individual receptors. Here, we use a large-scale comparative study to examine the stoichiometric signatures of 60 receptors expressed by a single human cell line. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer- and single-molecule microscopy-based assays, we found that a relatively small fraction of Rhodopsin-family GPCRs behaved as dimers and that these receptors otherwise appear to be monomeric. Overall, the analysis predicted that fewer than 20% of ∼700 Rhodopsin-family receptors form dimers. The clustered distribution of the dimers in our sample and a striking correlation between receptor organization and GPCR family size that we also uncover each suggest that receptor stoichiometry might have profoundly influenced GPCR expansion and diversification.

  6. A comprehensive software suite for protein family construction and functional site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Renfrew Haft

    Full Text Available In functionally diverse protein families, conservation in short signature regions may outperform full-length sequence comparisons for identifying proteins that belong to a subgroup within which one specific aspect of their function is conserved. The SIMBAL workflow (Sites Inferred by Metabolic Background Assertion Labeling is a data-mining procedure for finding such signature regions. It begins by using clues from genomic context, such as co-occurrence or conserved gene neighborhoods, to build a useful training set from a large number of uncharacterized but mutually homologous proteins. When training set construction is successful, the YES partition is enriched in proteins that share function with the user's query sequence, while the NO partition is depleted. A selected query sequence is then mined for short signature regions whose closest matches overwhelmingly favor proteins from the YES partition. High-scoring signature regions typically contain key residues critical to functional specificity, so proteins with the highest sequence similarity across these regions tend to share the same function. The SIMBAL algorithm was described previously, but significant manual effort, expertise, and a supporting software infrastructure were required to prepare the requisite training sets. Here, we describe a new, distributable software suite that speeds up and simplifies the process for using SIMBAL, most notably by providing tools that automate training set construction. These tools have broad utility for comparative genomics, allowing for flexible collection of proteins or protein domains based on genomic context as well as homology, a capability that can greatly assist in protein family construction. Armed with this new software suite, SIMBAL can serve as a fast and powerful in silico alternative to direct experimentation for characterizing proteins and their functional interactions.

  7. P39, a novel soybean protein allergen, belongs to a plant-specific protein family and is present in protein storage vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Baird, Lisa M; Jung, Rudolf; Zeece, Michael G; Markwell, John; Sarath, Gautam

    2008-03-26

    Soybean lecithins are seeing increasing use in industry as an emulsifier and food additive. They are also a growing source of human food allergies, which arise principally from the proteins fractionating with the lecithin fraction during manufacture. A previous study (Gu, X.; Beardslee, T.; Zeece, M.; Sarath, G.; Markwwell, J. Int Arch. Allergy Immunol. 2001, 126, 218-225) identified several allergenic proteins in soybean lecithins and a soybean IgE-binding protein termed P39 was discovered. However, very little was known about this protein except that it was coded by the soybean genome. This paper investigates key biological and immunological properties of this potential soybean lecithin allergen. P39 is encoded by a multigene family in soybeans and in several other higher plants. The soybean P39-1 protein and its essentially indistinguishable homologue, P39-2, have been cloned and studied. These proteins and their homologues belong to a family of plant-specific proteins of unknown function. In soybeans, P39-1 is seed specific, and its transcript levels are highest in developing seeds and decline during seed maturation. In contrast, P39 protein was detectable only in the fully mature, dry seed. Subcellular fractionation revealed that P39 protein was strongly associated with oil bodies; however, immunolocalization indicated P39 was distributed in the matrix of the protein storage vacuoles, suggesting that association with oil bodies was an artifact arising from the extraction procedure. By the use of recombinant techniques it has also been documented that IgE-binding epitopes are present on several different portions of the P39-1 polypeptide.

  8. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  9. Natural infection of Algerian hedgehog, Atelerix algirus (Lereboullet 1842) with Leishmania parasites in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemkhi, Jomaa; Souguir, Hejer; Ali, Insaf Bel Hadj; Driss, Mehdi; Guizani, Ikram; Guerbouj, Souheila

    2015-10-01

    In Tunisia, Leishmania parasites are responsible of visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania infantum species while three cutaneous disease forms are documented: chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania killicki, sporadic cutaneous form (SCL) caused by L. infantum and the predominant zoonotic cutaneous leishmanaisis (ZCL) due to Leishmania major. ZCL reservoirs are rodents of the Psammomys and Meriones genera, while for SCL the dog is supposed to be a reservoir. Ctenodactylus gundii is involved in the transmission of L. killicki. However, other mammals could constitute potential reservoir hosts in Tunisia and other North African countries. In order to explore the role of hedgehogs as potential reservoirs of leishmaniasis, specimens (N=6) were captured during July-November period in 2011-2013 in an SCL endemic area in El Kef region, North-Western Tunisia. Using morphological characteristics, all specimens were described and measured. Biopsies from liver, heart, kidney and spleen of each animal were used to extract genomic DNA, which was further used in PCR assays to assess the presence of Leishmania parasites. Different PCRs targeting kinetoplast minicircles, ITS1, mini-exon genes and a repetitive Leishmania- specific sequence, were applied. To further identify Leishmania species involved, RFLP analysis of amplified fragments was performed with appropriate restriction enzymes. Using morphological characters, animals were identified as North African hedgehogs, also called Algerian hedgehogs, that belong to the Erinaceidae family, genus Atelerix Pomel 1848, and species algirus (Lereboullet, 1842). PCR results showed in total that all specimens were Leishmania infected, with different organs incriminated, mainly liver and spleen. Results were confirmed by direct sequencing of amplified fragments. Species identification showed that all specimens were infected with L. major, three of which were additionally co-infected with L. infantum. The present study

  10. Conservation and divergence of C-terminal domain structure in the retinoblastoma protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liban, Tyler J.; Medina, Edgar M.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R. William; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Duke); (MSU)

    2017-04-24

    The retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the homologous pocket proteins p107 and p130 negatively regulate cell proliferation by binding and inhibiting members of the E2F transcription factor family. The structural features that distinguish Rb from other pocket proteins have been unclear but are critical for understanding their functional diversity and determining why Rb has unique tumor suppressor activities. We describe here important differences in how the Rb and p107 C-terminal domains (CTDs) associate with the coiled-coil and marked-box domains (CMs) of E2Fs. We find that although CTD–CM binding is conserved across protein families, Rb and p107 CTDs show clear preferences for different E2Fs. A crystal structure of the p107 CTD bound to E2F5 and its dimer partner DP1 reveals the molecular basis for pocket protein–E2F binding specificity and how cyclin-dependent kinases differentially regulate pocket proteins through CTD phosphorylation. Our structural and biochemical data together with phylogenetic analyses of Rb and E2F proteins support the conclusion that Rb evolved specific structural motifs that confer its unique capacity to bind with high affinity those E2Fs that are the most potent activators of the cell cycle.

  11. Slipins: ancient origin, duplication and diversification of the stomatin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J Peter W

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomatin is a membrane protein that was first isolated from human red blood cells. Since then, a number of stomatin-like proteins have been identified in all three domains of life. The conservation among these proteins is remarkable, with bacterial and human homologs sharing 50 % identity. Despite being associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer, kidney failure and anaemia, precise functions of these proteins remain unclear. Results We have constructed a comprehensive phylogeny of all 'stomatin-like' sequences that share a 150 amino acid domain. We show these proteins comprise an ancient family that arose early in prokaryotic evolution, and we propose a new nomenclature that reflects their phylogeny, based on the name "slipin" (stomatin-like protein. Within prokaryotes there are two distinct subfamilies that account for the two different origins of the eight eukaryotic stomatin subfamilies, one of which gave rise to eukaryotic SLP-2, renamed here "paraslipin". This was apparently acquired through the mitochondrial endosymbiosis and is widely distributed amongst the major kingdoms. The other prokaryotic subfamily gave rise to the ancestor of the remaining seven eukaryotic subfamilies. The highly diverged "alloslipin" subfamily is represented only by fungal, viral and ciliate sequences. The remaining six subfamilies, collectively termed "slipins", are confined to metazoa. Protostome stomatin, as well as a newly reported arthropod subfamily slipin-4, are restricted to invertebrate groups, whilst slipin-1 (previously SLP-1 is present in nematodes and higher metazoa. In vertebrates, the stomatin family expanded considerably, with at least two duplication events giving rise to podocin and slipin-3 subfamilies (previously SLP-3, with the retained ancestral sequence giving rise to vertebrate stomatin. Conclusion Stomatin-like proteins have their origin in an ancient duplication event that occurred early on in the evolution

  12. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries.

  13. Novel Sonic Hedgehog Mutation in a Couple with Variable Expression of Holoprosencephaly

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    M. Aguinaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is the most common developmental defect of the forebrain and midface in humans. sporadic and inherited mutations in the human sonic hedgehog (SHH gene cause 37% of familial HPE. A couple was referred to our unit with a family history of two spontaneous first trimester miscarriages and a daughter with HPE who presented early neonatal death. The father had a repaired median cleft lip, absence of central incisors, facial medial hypoplasia, and cleft palate. Intelligence and a brain CT scan were normal. Direct paternal sequencing analysis showed a novel nonsense mutation (W127X. Facial characteristics are considered as HPE microforms, and the pedigree suggested autosomal dominant inheritance with a variable expression of the phenotype. This study reinforces the importance of an exhaustive evaluation of couples with a history of miscarriages and neonatal deaths with structural defects.

  14. Protein sequence alignment with family-specific amino acid similarity matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Alignment of amino acid sequences by means of dynamic programming is a cornerstone sequence comparison method. The quality of alignments produced by dynamic programming critically depends on the choice of the alignment scoring function. Therefore, for a specific alignment problem one needs a way of selecting the best performing scoring function. This work is focused on the issue of finding optimized protein family- and fold-specific scoring functions for global similarity matrix-based sequence alignment. Findings I utilize a comprehensive set of reference alignments obtained from structural superposition of homologous and analogous proteins to design a quantitative statistical framework for evaluating the performance of alignment scoring functions in global pairwise sequence alignment. This framework is applied to study how existing general-purpose amino acid similarity matrices perform on individual protein families and structural folds, and to compare them to family-specific and fold-specific matrices derived in this work. I describe an adaptive alignment procedure that automatically selects an appropriate similarity matrix and optimized gap penalties based on the properties of the sequences being aligned. Conclusions The results of this work indicate that using family-specific similarity matrices significantly improves the quality of the alignment of homologous sequences over the traditional sequence alignment based on a single general-purpose similarity matrix. However, using fold-specific similarity matrices can only marginally improve sequence alignment of proteins that share the same structural fold but do not share a common evolutionary origin. The family-specific matrices derived in this work and the optimized gap penalties are available at http://taurus.crc.albany.edu/fsm. PMID:21846354

  15. Members of the Meloidogyne avirulence protein family contain multiple plant ligand-like motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Maier, Tom R; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes engage in complex interactions with their host plants by secreting effector proteins. Some effectors of both root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) mimic plant ligand proteins. Most prominently, cyst nematodes secrete effectors that mimic plant CLAVATA3/ESR-related (CLE) ligand proteins. However, only cyst nematodes have been shown to secrete such effectors and to utilize CLE ligand mimicry in their interactions with host plants. Here, we document the presence of ligand-like motifs in bona fide root-knot nematode effectors that are most similar to CLE peptides from plants and cyst nematodes. We have identified multiple tandem CLE-like motifs conserved within the previously identified Meloidogyne avirulence protein (MAP) family that are secreted from root-knot nematodes and have been shown to function in planta. By searching all 12 MAP family members from multiple Meloidogyne spp., we identified 43 repetitive CLE-like motifs composing 14 unique variants. At least one CLE-like motif was conserved in each MAP family member. Furthermore, we documented the presence of other conserved sequences that resemble the variable domains described in Heterodera and Globodera CLE effectors. These findings document that root-knot nematodes appear to use CLE ligand mimicry and point toward a common host node targeted by two evolutionarily diverse groups of nematodes. As a consequence, it is likely that CLE signaling pathways are important in other phytonematode pathosystems as well.

  16. A comprehensive survey of the grapevine VQ gene family and its transcriptional correlation with WRKY proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Wang, Gang; Zhong, Yan; Corso, Massimiliano; Cavallini, Erika; Cheng, Zong-Ming Max

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are a class of transcription factors (TFs) involved in the regulation of various physiological processes, including the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent studies in Arabidopsis have revealed that some WRKY TFs interact with a class of proteins designed as VQ proteins because of their typical conserved motif (FxxxVQxLTG). So far, no information is available about the genomic organization and the function of VQ motif-containing protein in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L). In the current study, we analyzed the 12X V1 prediction of the nearly homozygous PN40024 genotype identifying up to 18 predicted VQ genes (VvVQ). VvVQs phylogenetic and bioinformatic analyses indicated that the intron-exon structures and motif distribution are highly divergent between different members of the grapevine VQ family. Moreover, the analysis of the V. vinifera cv. Corvina expression atlas revealed a tissue- and stage-specific expression of several members of the family which also showed a significant correlation with WRKY TFs. Grapevine VQ genes also exhibited altered expression in response to drought, powdery mildew infection, salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene (ETH) treatments. The present study represents the first characterization of VQ genes in a grapevine genotype and it is a pivotal foundation for further studies aimed at functionally characterizing this mostly unknown grapevine multigenic family.

  17. Golgi coiled-coil proteins contain multiple binding sites for Rab family G proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinka, Rita; Gillingham, Alison K.; Kondylis, Vangelis; Munro, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Vesicles and other carriers destined for the Golgi apparatus must be guided to the correct cisternae. Golgins, long coiled-coil proteins that localize to particular Golgi subdomains via their C termini, are candidate regulators of vesicle sorting. In this study, we report that the GRIP domain

  18. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  19. The family feud: turning off Sp1 by Sp1-like KLF proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    Sp1 is one of the best characterized transcriptional activators. The biological importance of Sp1 is underscored by the fact that several hundreds of genes are thought to be regulated by this protein. However, during the last 5 years, a more extended family of Sp1-like transcription factors has been identified and characterized by the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain comprising three Krüppel-like zinc fingers. Each distinct family member differs in its ability to regulate transcript...

  20. Hedgehog signaling regulates telomerase reverse transcriptase in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapati Mazumdar

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is critical for normal embryonic development, tissue patterning and cell differentiation. Aberrant HH signaling is involved in multiple human cancers. HH signaling involves a multi-protein cascade activating the GLI proteins that transcriptionally regulate HH target genes. We have previously reported that HH signaling is essential for human colon cancer cell survival and inhibition of this signal induces DNA damage and extensive cell death. Here we report that the HH/GLI axis regulates human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, which determines the replication potential of cancer cells. Suppression of GLI1/GLI2 functions by a C-terminus truncated GLI3 repressor mutant (GLI3R, or by GANT61, a pharmacological inhibitor of GLI1/GLI2, reduced hTERT protein expression in human colon cancer, prostate cancer and Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines. Expression of an N-terminus deleted constitutively active mutant of GLI2 (GLI2ΔN increased hTERT mRNA and protein expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity in human colon cancer cells while GANT61 inhibited hTERT mRNA expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with GLI1 or GLI2 antibodies precipitated fragments of the hTERT promoter in human colon cancer cells, which was reduced upon exposure to GANT61. In contrast, expression of GLI1 or GLI2ΔN in non-malignant 293T cells failed to alter the levels of hTERT mRNA and protein, or hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Further, expression of GLI2ΔN increased the telomerase enzyme activity, which was reduced by GANT61 administration in human colon cancer, prostate cancer, and GBM cells. These results identify hTERT as a direct target of the HH signaling pathway, and reveal a previously unknown role of the HH/GLI axis in regulating the replication potential of cancer cells. These findings are of significance in understanding the important regulatory

  1. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  2. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  3. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Krause, Michael W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kostrouch, Zdenek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kostrouchova, Marta, E-mail: marta.kostrouchova@lf1.cuni.cz [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  4. Pu-Erh Tea Extract Induces the Degradation of FET Family Proteins Involved in the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available FET family proteins consist of fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS, Ewing's sarcoma (EWS, and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 (TAF15. Mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, and FET family proteins are associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disease. There is currently no cure for this disease and few effective treatments are available. Epidemiological studies indicate that the consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. The results of this study revealed that components of a pu-erh tea extract (PTE interacted with FET family proteins but not with TDP-43 or SOD1. PTE induced the degradation of FET family proteins but had no effects on TDP-43 or SOD1. The most frequently occurring ALS-linked FUS/TLS mutant protein, R521C FUS/TLS, was also degraded in the presence of PTE. Furthermore, ammonium chloride, a lysosome inhibitor, but not lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, reduced the degradation of FUS/TLS protein by PTE. PTE significantly reduced the incorporation of R521C FUS/TLS into stress granules under stress conditions. These findings suggest that PTE may have beneficial health effects, including preventing the onset of FET family protein-associated neurodegenerative diseases and delaying the progression of ALS by inhibiting the cytoplasmic aggregation of FET family proteins.

  5. Pu-Erh Tea Extract Induces the Degradation of FET Family Proteins Involved in the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xianbin; Fang, Chongye; Shi, Wei; Sheng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    FET family proteins consist of fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS), Ewing's sarcoma (EWS), and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 (TAF15). Mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), and FET family proteins are associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease. There is currently no cure for this disease and few effective treatments are available. Epidemiological studies indicate that the consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. The results of this study revealed that components of a pu-erh tea extract (PTE) interacted with FET family proteins but not with TDP-43 or SOD1. PTE induced the degradation of FET family proteins but had no effects on TDP-43 or SOD1. The most frequently occurring ALS-linked FUS/TLS mutant protein, R521C FUS/TLS, was also degraded in the presence of PTE. Furthermore, ammonium chloride, a lysosome inhibitor, but not lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, reduced the degradation of FUS/TLS protein by PTE. PTE significantly reduced the incorporation of R521C FUS/TLS into stress granules under stress conditions. These findings suggest that PTE may have beneficial health effects, including preventing the onset of FET family protein-associated neurodegenerative diseases and delaying the progression of ALS by inhibiting the cytoplasmic aggregation of FET family proteins. PMID:24804206

  6. Pentraxin family of proteins interact specifically with phosphorylcholine and/or phosphorylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, R A; Dahlbäck, B; Coe, J E; Nelsestuen, G L

    1992-05-26

    Pentraxins are a family of serum proteins characterized by five identical subunits that are noncovalently linked. The two major types of pentraxins are C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). CRP proteins are identified by their calcium-dependent interaction with phosphorylcholine. This study showed that SAP also bound to phosphorylated compounds but had a high specificity for phosphorylethanolamine. Thus, human CRP and SAP show high specificity that is complementary for the related compounds, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine, respectively. This relationship suggests a complementary and/or related function for the pentraxins. Pentraxins from other species were also examined. Mouse SAP showed binding interactions and specificity similar to human SAP. Female protein (FP) from hamster and rat CRP showed a hybrid specificity and bound to both phosphorylethanolamine and phosphorylcholine. All of the proteins that bound phosphorylethanolamine also associated with human C4b-binding protein (C4BP). With the exception of human and rat CRP, all the proteins also bound to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. All of these binding interactions were calcium-dependent and mutually exclusive, suggesting that they involved the same site on the protein. These findings suggest possible ways to examine the function of the pentraxins.

  7. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culhane, Kelly J; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  8. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  9. Flexibility in MuA transposase family protein structures: functional mapping with scanning mutagenesis and sequence alignment of protein homologues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina S Rasila

    Full Text Available MuA transposase protein is a member of the retroviral integrase superfamily (RISF. It catalyzes DNA cleavage and joining reactions via an initial assembly and subsequent structural transitions of a protein-DNA complex, known as the Mu transpososome, ultimately attaching transposon DNA to non-specific target DNA. The transpososome functions as a molecular DNA-modifying machine and has been used in a wide variety of molecular biology and genetics/genomics applications. To analyze structure-function relationships in MuA action, a comprehensive pentapeptide insertion mutagenesis was carried out for the protein. A total of 233 unique insertion variants were generated, and their activity was analyzed using a quantitative in vivo DNA transposition assay. The results were then correlated with the known MuA structures, and the data were evaluated with regard to the protein domain function and transpososome development. To complement the analysis with an evolutionary component, a protein sequence alignment was produced for 44 members of MuA family transposases. Altogether, the results pinpointed those regions, in which insertions can be tolerated, and those where insertions are harmful. Most insertions within the subdomains Iγ, IIα, IIβ, and IIIα completely destroyed the transposase function, yet insertions into certain loop/linker regions of these subdomains increased the protein activity. Subdomains Iα and IIIβ were largely insertion-tolerant. The comprehensive structure-function data set will be useful for designing MuA transposase variants with improved properties for biotechnology/genomics applications, and is informative with regard to the function of RISF proteins in general.

  10. MARS: A protein family involved in the formation of vertical skeletal elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abehsera, Shai; Peles, Shani; Tynyakov, Jenny; Bentov, Shmuel; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai; Sagi, Amir

    2017-05-01

    Vertical organizations of skeletal elements are found in various vertebrate teeth and invertebrate exoskeletons. The molecular mechanism behind the development of such structural organizations is poorly known, although it is generally held that organic matrix proteins play an essential role. While most crustacean cuticular organizations exhibit horizontal chitinous layering, a typical vertical organization is found towards the surface of the teeth in the mandibles of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Candidate genes encoding for mandible-forming structural proteins were mined in C. quadricarinatus molt-related transcriptomic libraries by using a binary patterning approach. A new protein family, termed the Mandible Alanine Rich Structural (MARS) protein family, with a modular sequence design predicted to form fibers, was found. Investigations of spatial and temporal expression of the different MARS genes suggested specific expression in the mandibular teeth-forming epithelium, particularly during the formation of the chitinous vertical organization. MARS loss-of-function RNAi experiments resulted in the collapse of the organization of the chitin fibers oriented vertically to the surface of the crayfish mandibular incisor tooth. A general search of transcriptomic libraries suggested conservation of MARS proteins across a wide array of crustaceans. Our results provide a first look into the molecular mechanism used to build the complex crustacean mandible and into the specialized vertical structural solution that has evolved in skeletal elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A combinatorial approach to detect coevolved amino acid networks in protein families of variable divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Baussand

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Communication between distant sites often defines the biological role of a protein: amino acid long-range interactions are as important in binding specificity, allosteric regulation and conformational change as residues directly contacting the substrate. The maintaining of functional and structural coupling of long-range interacting residues requires coevolution of these residues. Networks of interaction between coevolved residues can be reconstructed, and from the networks, one can possibly derive insights into functional mechanisms for the protein family. We propose a combinatorial method for mapping conserved networks of amino acid interactions in a protein which is based on the analysis of a set of aligned sequences, the associated distance tree and the combinatorics of its subtrees. The degree of coevolution of all pairs of coevolved residues is identified numerically, and networks are reconstructed with a dedicated clustering algorithm. The method drops the constraints on high sequence divergence limiting the range of applicability of the statistical approaches previously proposed. We apply the method to four protein families where we show an accurate detection of functional networks and the possibility to treat sets of protein sequences of variable divergence.

  12. A combinatorial approach to detect coevolved amino acid networks in protein families of variable divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baussand, Julie; Carbone, Alessandra

    2009-09-01

    Communication between distant sites often defines the biological role of a protein: amino acid long-range interactions are as important in binding specificity, allosteric regulation and conformational change as residues directly contacting the substrate. The maintaining of functional and structural coupling of long-range interacting residues requires coevolution of these residues. Networks of interaction between coevolved residues can be reconstructed, and from the networks, one can possibly derive insights into functional mechanisms for the protein family. We propose a combinatorial method for mapping conserved networks of amino acid interactions in a protein which is based on the analysis of a set of aligned sequences, the associated distance tree and the combinatorics of its subtrees. The degree of coevolution of all pairs of coevolved residues is identified numerically, and networks are reconstructed with a dedicated clustering algorithm. The method drops the constraints on high sequence divergence limiting the range of applicability of the statistical approaches previously proposed. We apply the method to four protein families where we show an accurate detection of functional networks and the possibility to treat sets of protein sequences of variable divergence.

  13. Virulence plasmid of Rhodococcus equi contains inducible gene family encoding secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, B A; Prescott, J F; Palmer, G H; Takai, S; Nicholson, V M; Alperin, D C; Hines, S A

    2001-02-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an antigenically related 20-kDa protein (herein designated VapB). These two proteins are not expressed by the same R. equi isolate. We describe here the substantial similarity between VapA and VapB. Moreover, we identify three additional genes carried on the virulence plasmid, vapC, -D, and -E, that are tandemly arranged downstream of vapA. These new genes are members of a gene family and encode proteins that are approximately 50% homologous to VapA, VapB, and each other. vapC, -D, and -E are found only in R. equi strains that express VapA and are highly conserved in VapA-positive isolates from both horses and humans. VapC, -D, and -E are secreted proteins coordinately regulated by temperature with VapA; the proteins are expressed when R. equi is cultured at 37 degrees C but not at 30 degrees C, a finding that is compatible with a role in virulence. As secreted proteins, VapC, -D, and -E may represent targets for the prevention of rhodococcal pneumonia. An immunologic study using VapA-specific antibodies and recombinant Vap proteins revealed no evidence of cross-reactivity despite extensive sequence similarity over the carboxy terminus of all four proteins.

  14. Conservation of the deadenylase activity of proteins of the Caf1 family in human

    OpenAIRE

    BIANCHIN, CLAIRE; MAUXION, FABIENNE; Sentis, Stéphanie; Séraphin, Bertrand; Corbo, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The yeast Pop2 protein, belonging to the eukaryotic Caf1 family, is required for mRNA deadenylation in vivo. It also catalyzes poly(A) degradation in vitro, even though this property has been questioned. Caf1 proteins are related to RNase D, a feature supported by the recently published structure of Pop2. Yeast Pop2 contains, however, a divergent active site while its human homologs harbor consensus catalytic residues. Given these differences, we tested whether its deadenylase activity is con...

  15. Conservation of the deadenylase activity of proteins of the Caf1 family in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Claire; Mauxion, Fabienne; Sentis, Stéphanie; Séraphin, Bertrand; Corbo, Laura

    2005-04-01

    The yeast Pop2 protein, belonging to the eukaryotic Caf1 family, is required for mRNA deadenylation in vivo. It also catalyzes poly(A) degradation in vitro, even though this property has been questioned. Caf1 proteins are related to RNase D, a feature supported by the recently published structure of Pop2. Yeast Pop2 contains, however, a divergent active site while its human homologs harbor consensus catalytic residues. Given these differences, we tested whether its deadenylase activity is conserved in the human homologs Caf1 and Pop2. Our data demonstrate that both human factors degrade poly(A) tails indicating their involvement in mRNA metabolism.

  16. Cupin: A candidate molecular structure for the Nep1-like protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Gonçalo AG; Cabrera Odalys G; Echeverrigaray Sérgio; Lemke Ney; Sinigaglia Marialva; Cechin Adelmo L; Mombach José CM

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background NEP1-like proteins (NLPs) are a novel family of microbial elicitors of plant necrosis. Some NLPs induce a hypersensitive-like response in dicot plants though the basis for this response remains unclear. In addition, the spatial structure and the role of these highly conserved proteins are not known. Results We predict a 3d-structure for the β-rich section of the NLPs based on alignments, prediction tools and molecular dynamics. We calculated a consensus sequence from 42 NL...

  17. The retinoblastoma protein binds to a family of E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, J A; Saito, M; Vidal, M

    1993-01-01

    for E2F-2 and E2F-3 were mapped to 1p36 and 6q22, respectfully, confirming their independence from E2F-1. However, the E2F-2 and E2F-3 proteins are closely related to E2F-1. Both E2F-2 and E2F-3 bound to wild-type but not mutant E2F recognition sites, and they bound specifically to the retinoblastoma...... of a family of proteins....

  18. Structural characterization of the stringent response related exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase protein family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Laurberg, Martin; Liljas, Anders

    2004-01-01

    been determined, providing the first insights to features of the common catalytic core of the PPX/GPPA family. The protein has a two-domain structure with an active site located in the interdomain cleft. Two crystal forms were investigated (type I and II) at resolutions of 1.53 and 2.15 A, respectively....... This revealed a structural flexibility that has previously been described as a "butterfly-like" cleft opening around the active site in other actin-like superfamily proteins. A calcium ion is observed at the center of this region in type I crystals, substantiating that PPX/GPPA enzymes use metal ions...

  19. Bodyguards and assassins: Bcl-2 family proteins and apoptosis control in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, Graham; Stevenson, Freda K

    2005-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most common B-cell malignancy in the Western world and exists as subtypes with very different clinical courses. CLL is generally described as a disease of failed apoptosis. Apoptosis resistance may stem from a combination of microenvironmental survival signals as well as from intrinsic alterations in the apoptotic machinery within the CLL cell. The molecular mechanism involved in controlling apoptosis in CLL is complex and is influenced by many factors, including Bcl-2 family proteins, which are critical regulators of cell death. Here we review the significance of apoptosis dysregulation in CLL, focusing on the role of Bcl-2 and related Bcl-2 family proteins, such as Bax and Mcl-1. The differential properties of the newly described subsets of CLL are also highlighted.

  20. Structure of the MarR family protein Rv0880 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun Rong; Feng, Na; Chen, Tao; Li, De Feng; Bi, Li Jun

    2015-06-01

    Rv0880 from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis is classified as a MarR family protein in the Pfam database. It consists of 143 amino acids and has an isoelectric point of 10.9. Crystals of Rv0880 belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.97, b = 69.60, c = 70.32 Å, α = 103.71, β = 111.06, γ = 105.83°. The structure of the MarR family transcription regulator Rv0880 was solved at a resolution of 2.0 Å with an R(cryst) and R(free) of 21.2 and 24.9%, respectively. The dimeric structure resembles that of other MarR proteins, with each subunit comprising a winged helix-turn-helix domain connected to an α-helical dimerization domain.

  1. Phylogeny of the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase (VKOR) Family and Evolutionary Relationship to the Disulfide Bond Formation Protein B (DsbB) Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Carville G; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-29

    In humans and other vertebrate animals, vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) family enzymes are the gatekeepers between nutritionally acquired K vitamins and the vitamin K cycle responsible for posttranslational modifications that confer biological activity upon vitamin K-dependent proteins with crucial roles in hemostasis, bone development and homeostasis, hormonal carbohydrate regulation and fertility. We report a phylogenetic analysis of the VKOR family that identifies five major clades. Combined phylogenetic and site-specific conservation analyses point to clade-specific similarities and differences in structure and function. We discovered a single-site determinant uniquely identifying VKOR homologs belonging to human pathogenic, obligate intracellular prokaryotes and protists. Building on previous work by Sevier et al. (Protein Science 14:1630), we analyzed structural data from both VKOR and prokaryotic disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbB) families and hypothesize an ancient evolutionary relationship between the two families where one family arose from the other through a gene duplication/deletion event. This has resulted in circular permutation of primary sequence threading through the four-helical bundle protein folds of both families. This is the first report of circular permutation relating distant a-helical membrane protein sequences and folds. In conclusion, we suggest a chronology for the evolution of the five extant VKOR clades.

  2. Phylogeny of the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase (VKOR Family and Evolutionary Relationship to the Disulfide Bond Formation Protein B (DsbB Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carville G. Bevans

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In humans and other vertebrate animals, vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR family enzymes are the gatekeepers between nutritionally acquired K vitamins and the vitamin K cycle responsible for posttranslational modifications that confer biological activity upon vitamin K-dependent proteins with crucial roles in hemostasis, bone development and homeostasis, hormonal carbohydrate regulation and fertility. We report a phylogenetic analysis of the VKOR family that identifies five major clades. Combined phylogenetic and site-specific conservation analyses point to clade-specific similarities and differences in structure and function. We discovered a single-site determinant uniquely identifying VKOR homologs belonging to human pathogenic, obligate intracellular prokaryotes and protists. Building on previous work by Sevier et al. (Protein Science 14:1630, we analyzed structural data from both VKOR and prokaryotic disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbB families and hypothesize an ancient evolutionary relationship between the two families where one family arose from the other through a gene duplication/deletion event. This has resulted in circular permutation of primary sequence threading through the four-helical bundle protein folds of both families. This is the first report of circular permutation relating distant a-helical membrane protein sequences and folds. In conclusion, we suggest a chronology for the evolution of the five extant VKOR clades.

  3. Characterization of the deleted in autism 1 protein family: implications for studying cognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhari Aziz

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1 and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L, lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental

  4. Reduced primary cilia length and altered Arl13b expression are associated with deregulated chondrocyte Hedgehog signaling in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Gambassi, Silvia; Thompson, Clare L; Chandrakumar, Charmilie; Santucci, Annalisa; Knight, Martin M

    2017-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inherited disease resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase which leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). AKU is characterized by severe cartilage degeneration, similar to that observed in osteoarthritis. Previous studies suggest that AKU is associated with alterations in cytoskeletal organization which could modulate primary cilia structure/function. This study investigated whether AKU is associated with changes in chondrocyte primary cilia and associated Hedgehog signaling which mediates cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. Human articular chondrocytes were obtained from healthy and AKU donors. Additionally, healthy chondrocytes were treated with HGA to replicate AKU pathology (+HGA). Diseased cells exhibited shorter cilia with length reductions of 36% and 16% in AKU and +HGA chondrocytes respectively, when compared to healthy controls. Both AKU and +HGA chondrocytes demonstrated disruption of the usual cilia length regulation by actin contractility. Furthermore, the proportion of cilia with axoneme breaks and bulbous tips was increased in AKU chondrocytes consistent with defective regulation of ciliary trafficking. Distribution of the Hedgehog-related protein Arl13b along the ciliary axoneme was altered such that its localization was increased at the distal tip in AKU and +HGA chondrocytes. These changes in cilia structure/trafficking in AKU and +HGA chondrocytes were associated with a complete inability to activate Hedgehog signaling in response to exogenous ligand. Thus, we suggest that altered responsiveness to Hedgehog, as a consequence of cilia dysfunction, may be a contributing factor in the development of arthropathy highlighting the cilium as a novel target in AKU. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  5. An immunoreactive xanthine oxidase protein-possessing xanthinuria and her family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Moriwaki, Y; Suda, M; Takahashi, S; Hada, T; Nanahoshi, M; Agbedana, E O; Higashino, K

    1992-06-15

    The presence of immunoreactive xanthine oxidase protein was proven in a xanthinuric patient, using a polyclonal antibody against xanthine oxidase. The antibody was raised against purified human liver xanthine oxidase in a rabbit. Double immunodiffusion method demonstrated the existence of an immunologically reactive xanthine oxidase which did not possess xanthine oxidase activity. In addition, urinary excretion of oxypurines in the patient and her family was investigated. The results indicated that a brother and a sister had xanthinuria.

  6. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    The CREC family consists of a number of recently discovered multiple (up to seven) EF-hand proteins that localise to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. At present, the family includes reticulocalbin, ERC-55/TCBP-49/E6BP, Cab45, calumenin and crocalbin/CBP-50. Similar proteins are found...... in quite diverse invertebrate organisms such as DCB-45 and SCF in Drosophila melanogaster, SCF in Bombyx mori, CCB-39 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Pfs40/PfERC in Plasmodium falciparum. The Ca(2+) affinity is rather low with dissociation constants around 10(-4)-10(-3) M. The proteins may participate in Ca...

  7. Palmitoylation of stathmin family proteins domain A controls Golgi versus mitochondrial subcellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Stéphanie; Poulain, Fabienne E; Ozon, Sylvie; Sobel, André

    2008-10-01

    Precise localization of proteins to specialized subcellular domains is fundamental for proper neuronal development and function. The neural microtubule-regulatory phosphoproteins of the stathmin family are such proteins whose specific functions are controlled by subcellular localization. Whereas stathmin is cytosolic, SCG10, SCLIP and RB3/RB3'/RB3'' are localized to the Golgi and vesicle-like structures along neurites and at growth cones. We examined the molecular determinants involved in the regulation of this specific subcellular localization in hippocampal neurons in culture. We show that their conserved N-terminal domain A carrying two palmitoylation sites is dominant over the others for Golgi and vesicle-like localization. Using palmitoylation-deficient GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion mutants, we demonstrate that domains A of stathmin proteins have the particular ability to control protein targeting to either Golgi or mitochondria, depending on their palmitoylation. This regulation involves the co-operation of two subdomains within domain A, and seems also to be under the control of its SLD (stathmin-like domain) extension. Our results unravel that, in specific biological conditions, palmitoylation of stathmin proteins might be able to control their targeting to express their functional activities at appropriate subcellular sites. They, more generally, open new perspectives regarding the role of palmitoylation as a signalling mechanism orienting proteins to their functional subcellular compartments.

  8. Sperm protein "DE" mediates gamete fusion through an evolutionarily conserved site of the CRISP family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerman, Diego A; Cohen, Débora J; Da Ros, Vanina G; Morgenfeld, Mauro M; Busso, Dolores; Cuasnicú, Patricia S

    2006-09-01

    The first member of the cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family was described by our laboratory in the rat epididymis, and it is known as DE or CRISP-1. Since then, numerous CRISPs exhibiting a high amino acid sequence similarity have been identified in animals, plants and fungi, although their functions remain largely unknown. CRISP-1 proteins are candidates to mediate gamete fusion in the rat, mouse and human through their binding to complementary sites on the egg surface. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying CRISP-1 function, in the present work, deletion mutants of protein DE were generated and examined for their ability to bind to the rat egg and interfere with gamete fusion. Results revealed that the egg-binding ability of DE resides within a 45-amino acid N-terminal region containing the two motifs of the CRISP family named Signature 1 and Signature 2. Subsequent assays using synthetic peptides and other CRISPs support that the egg-binding site of DE falls in the 12-amino-acid region corresponding to Signature 2. The interesting finding that the binding site of DE resides in an evolutionarily conserved region of the molecule provides novel information on the molecular mechanisms underlying CRISP-1 function in gamete fusion with important implications on the structure-function relationship of other members of the widely distributed CRISP family.

  9. PHOG-BLAST – a new generation tool for fast similarity search of protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Andrey A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to compare protein profiles frequently arises in various protein research areas: comparison of protein families, domain searches, resolution of orthology and paralogy. The existing fast algorithms can only compare a protein sequence with a protein sequence and a profile with a sequence. Algorithms to compare profiles use dynamic programming and complex scoring functions. Results We developed a new algorithm called PHOG-BLAST for fast similarity search of profiles. This algorithm uses profile discretization to convert a profile to a finite alphabet and utilizes hashing for fast search. To determine the optimal alphabet, we analyzed columns in reliable multiple alignments and obtained column clusters in the 20-dimensional profile space by applying a special clustering procedure. We show that the clustering procedure works best if its parameters are chosen so that 20 profile clusters are obtained which can be interpreted as ancestral amino acid residues. With these clusters, only less than 2% of columns in multiple alignments are out of clusters. We tested the performance of PHOG-BLAST vs. PSI-BLAST on three well-known databases of multiple alignments: COG, PFAM and BALIBASE. On the COG database both algorithms showed the same performance, on PFAM and BALIBASE PHOG-BLAST was much superior to PSI-BLAST. PHOG-BLAST required 10–20 times less computer memory and computation time than PSI-BLAST. Conclusion Since PHOG-BLAST can compare multiple alignments of protein families, it can be used in different areas of comparative proteomics and protein evolution. For example, PHOG-BLAST helped to build the PHOG database of phylogenetic orthologous groups. An essential step in building this database was comparing protein complements of different species and orthologous groups of different taxons on a personal computer in reasonable time. When it is applied to detect weak similarity between protein families, PHOG-BLAST is less

  10. The major vault protein is related to the toxic anion resistance protein (TelA) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprenant, Kathy A; Bloom, Nathan; Fang, Jianwen; Lushington, Gerald

    2007-03-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped ribonucleoprotein particles that are abundant in certain tumors and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Prokaryotic relatives of the major vault protein, MVP, have not been identified. We used sequence analysis and molecular modeling to show that MVP and the toxic anion resistance protein, TelA of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4.1, share a novel fold that consists of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. Because of this strong structural correspondence, we examined whether mammalian cell vaults respond to tellurite treatment. In the presence of the oxyanion tellurite, large vault aggregates, or vaultosomes, appear at the cell periphery in 15 min or less. Vaultosome formation is temperature-dependent, reversible, and occurs in normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as transformed HeLa cervical cancer cells. Vaultosome formation is not restricted to tellurite and occurs in the presence of other toxic oxyanions (selenate, selinite, arsenate, arsenite, vanadate). In addition, vaultosomes form independently from other stress-induced ribonucleoprotein complexes, stress granules and aggresomes. Vaultosome formation is therefore a unique cellular response to an environmental toxin.

  11. Hedgehog signaling regulates FOXA2 in esophageal embryogenesis and Barrett’s metaplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David H.; Tiwari, Anjana; Kim, Monica E.; Clemons, Nicholas J.; Regmi, Nanda L.; Hodges, William A.; Berman, David M.; Montgomery, Elizabeth A.; Watkins, D. Neil; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qiuyang; Jie, Chunfa; Spechler, Stuart J.; Souza, Rhonda F.

    2014-01-01

    Metaplasia can result when injury reactivates latent developmental signaling pathways that determine cell phenotype. Barrett’s esophagus is a squamous-to-columnar epithelial metaplasia caused by reflux esophagitis. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is active in columnar-lined, embryonic esophagus and inactive in squamous-lined, adult esophagus. We showed previously that Hh signaling is reactivated in Barrett’s metaplasia and overexpression of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) in mouse esophageal squamous epithelium leads to a columnar phenotype. Here, our objective was to identify Hh target genes involved in Barrett’s pathogenesis. By microarray analysis, we found that the transcription factor Foxa2 is more highly expressed in murine embryonic esophagus compared with postnatal esophagus. Conditional activation of Shh in mouse esophageal epithelium induced FOXA2, while FOXA2 expression was reduced in Shh knockout embryos, establishing Foxa2 as an esophageal Hh target gene. Evaluation of patient samples revealed FOXA2 expression in Barrett’s metaplasia, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma but not in esophageal squamous epithelium or squamous cell carcinoma. In esophageal squamous cell lines, Hh signaling upregulated FOXA2, which induced expression of MUC2, an intestinal mucin found in Barrett’s esophagus, and the MUC2-processing protein AGR2. Together, these data indicate that Hh signaling induces expression of genes that determine an intestinal phenotype in esophageal squamous epithelial cells and may contribute to the development of Barrett’s metaplasia. PMID:25083987

  12. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M; Szabo, Les J; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components.

  13. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane G O Saunders

    Full Text Available Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i contain a secretion signal, (ii are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv are small and cysteine rich, (v contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii contain internal repeats, and (viii do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components.

  14. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualtrough, David, E-mail: david.qualtrough@uwe.ac.uk [Department of Biological, Biomedical & Analytical Sciences, University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos [School of Cellular & Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol, Medical Sciences Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-17

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  15. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Qualtrough

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, Cancers 2015, 7 1886 these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  16. Protecting the hedgerow: p53 and hedgehog pathway interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Louisa; Alman, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    A common environment for the Hedgehog (Subfamily: erinaceinae) is a row of shrubs and trees often used on farms for enclosing or separating fields, called a hedgerow. Maintenance of a continuous shrub border is important for shielding crops from weather damage, but also provides an ideal protective habitat for the hedgehog. Similar to its mammalian counterpart, the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway requires a controlled environment to regulate proper functioning of the cell. When allowed to run wild, constitutive activation of the Hh pathway results in tumorigenesis in different tissues types, including brain, skin and cartilage. With an additional loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity, an increase in tumor incidence, size and metastasis have been observed. p53 has a number of functions that can suppress tumor formation and growth in most, if not all Hh-related cancers, such as the inhibition of cell cycle progression and cell survival. Furthermore, increasing evidence of an interaction between p53 and Hedgehog signalling pathways suggests a critical role for the tumor suppressor activity of p53 in "protecting the hedgerow".

  17. Dissecting the Role of Hedgehog Pathway in Murine Gonadal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Ivraym Boshra

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the universal pathways involved in animal development. This dissertation focuses on Hh role in the mammalian gonad development, which is a central part of mammalian sexual development and identity. The central dogma of mammalian sex development is that genetic sex determines the gonadal sex, which in turn…

  18. Opening new doors: Hedgehog signaling and the pancreatic cancer stroma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhofer, H.

    2015-01-01

    In pancreatic cancer, a very difficult to treat tumor type with a dismal prognosis, Hedgehog (Hh) ligands are produced by tumor cells and signal to the surrounding tumor microenvironment. This thesis gives new insights into the different aspects of stromal biology and Hh signaling by describing for

  19. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  20. Correlation analysis for protein evolutionary family based on amino acid position mutations and application in PDZ domain.

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    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been widely recognized that the mutations at specific directions are caused by the functional constraints in protein family and the directional mutations at certain positions control the evolutionary direction of the protein family. The mutations at different positions, even distantly separated, are mutually coupled and form an evolutionary network. Finding the controlling mutative positions and the mutative network among residues are firstly important for protein rational design and enzyme engineering. METHODOLOGY: A computational approach, namely amino acid position conservation-mutation correlation analysis (CMCA, is developed to predict mutually mutative positions and find the evolutionary network in protein family. The amino acid position mutative function, which is the foundational equation of CMCA measuring the mutation of a residue at a position, is derived from the MSA (multiple structure alignment database of protein evolutionary family. Then the position conservation correlation matrix and position mutation correlation matrix is constructed from the amino acid position mutative equation. Unlike traditional SCA (statistical coupling analysis approach, which is based on the statistical analysis of position conservations, the CMCA focuses on the correlation analysis of position mutations. CONCLUSIONS: As an example the CMCA approach is used to study the PDZ domain of protein family, and the results well illustrate the distantly allosteric mechanism in PDZ protein family, and find the functional mutative network among residues. We expect that the CMCA approach may find applications in protein engineering study, and suggest new strategy to improve bioactivities and physicochemical properties of enzymes.

  1. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Matsumori, Haruka [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel [Department of Biology of the Cell Nucleus, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Goldberg, Ilya G. [Image Informatics and Computational Biology Unit, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Nakao, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Saitoh, Noriko [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Harata, Masahiko, E-mail: mharata@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  2. Characterization of a family of novel cysteine- serine-rich nuclear proteins (CSRNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Gingras

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene array analysis has been widely used to identify genes induced during T cell activation. Our studies identified an immediate early gene that is strongly induced in response to IL-2 in mouse T cells which we named cysteine- serine-rich nuclear protein-1 (CSRNP-1. The human ortholog was previously identified as an AXIN1 induced gene (AXUD1. The protein does not contain sequence defined domains or motifs annotated in public databases, however the gene is a member of a family of three mammalian genes that share conserved regions, including cysteine- and serine-rich regions and a basic domain, they encode nuclear proteins, possess transcriptional activation domain and bind the sequence AGAGTG. Consequently we propose the nomenclature of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3 for the family. To elucidate the physiological functions of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3, we generated mice deficient for each of these genes by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Although the CSRNP proteins have the hallmark of transcription factors and CSRNP-1 expression is highly induced by IL-2, deletion of the individual genes had no obvious consequences on normal mouse development, hematopoiesis or T cell functions. However, combined deficiencies cause partial neonatal lethality suggesting that the genes have redundant functions.

  3. Génolevures: protein families and synteny among complete hemiascomycetous yeast proteomes and genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David J.; Martin, Tiphaine; Nikolski, Macha; Cayla, Cyril; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Durrens, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The Génolevures online database (http://cbi.labri.fr/Genolevures/ and http://genolevures.org/) provides exploratory tools and curated data sets relative to nine complete and seven partial genome sequences determined and manually annotated by the Génolevures Consortium, to facilitate comparative genomic studies of Hemiascomycete yeasts. The 2008 update to the Génolevures database provides four new genomes in complete (subtelomere to subtelomere) chromosome sequences, 50 000 protein-coding and tRNA genes, and in silico analyses for each gene element. A key element is a novel classification of conserved multi-species protein families and their use in detecting synteny, gene fusions and other aspects of genome remodeling in evolution. Our purpose is to release high-quality curated data from complete genomes, with a focus on the relations between genes, genomes and proteins. PMID:19015150

  4. Members of the heat-shock protein 70 family promote cancer cell growth by distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Mikkel; Daugaard, Mads; Jensen, Mette Hartvig

    2005-01-01

    the survival of tumorigenic as well as nontumorigenic cells depended on Hsc70. Cancer cells depleted for Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 displayed strikingly different morphologies (detached and round vs. flat senescent-like), cell cycle distributions (G2/M vs. G1 arrest) and gene expression profiles. Only Hsp70-2 depletion...... induced the expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 that was identified as a target of P53 tumor-suppressor protein and a mediator of the G1 arrest and the senescent phenotype. Importantly, concomitant depletion of Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 had a synergistic antiproliferative effect on cancer cells. Thus...... proteins in human cancer cells and identify Hsp70-2, a protein essential for spermatogenesis, as an important regulator of cancer cell growth. Targeted knock-down of the individual family members by RNA interference revealed that both Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 were required for cancer cell growth, whereas...

  5. The antiviral spectra of TRIM5α orthologues and human TRIM family proteins against lentiviral production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiga Ohmine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhesus monkey TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh recognizes the incoming HIV-1 core through its C-terminal B30.2(PRYSPRY domain and promotes its premature disassembly or degradation before reverse transcription. Previously, we have shown that TRIM5αrh blocks HIV-1 production through the N-terminal RBCC domain by the recognition of Gag polyproteins. Although all TRIM family proteins have RBCC domains, it remains elusive whether they possess similar late-restriction activities.We examined the antiviral spectra of TRIM5α orthologues and human TRIM family members which have a genetic locus proximal to human TRIM5α (TRIM5αhu, against primate lentiviral production. When HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs were generated in the presence of TRIM5α proteins, rhesus, African green and cynomolgus monkey TRIM5α (TRIM5αag and TRIM5αcy, but not TRIM5αhu, were efficiently incorporated into VLPs, suggesting an interaction between HIV-1 Gag and TRIM5α proteins. TRIM5αrh potently restricted the viral production of HIV-1 groups M and O and HIV-2, but not simian lentiviruses including SIV(MAC1A11, SIV(AGMTan-1 or SIV(AGMSAB-1. TRIM5αhu did not show notable late restriction activities against these lentiviruses. TRIM5αag and TRIM5αcy showed intermediate restriction phenotypes against HIV-1 and HIV-2, but showed no restriction activity against SIV production. A series of chimeric TRIM5α constructs indicated that the N-terminal region of TRIM5αag and TRIM5αcy are essential for the late restriction activity, while the C-terminal region of TRIM5αcy negatively regulates the late restriction activity against HIV-1. When select human TRIM family proteins were examined, TRIM21 and 22 were efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 VLPs, while only TRIM22 reduced HIV-1 titers up to 5-fold. The antiviral activities and encapsidation efficiencies did not correlate with their relative expression levels in the producer cells.Our results demonstrated the variations in the late

  6. Expanding the Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase Protein Family to the Fungal Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Anthony G.; Preiner, Chelsea S.

    2013-01-01

    The known enzymes that open the s-triazine ring, the cyanuric acid hydrolases, have been confined almost exclusively to the kingdom Bacteria and are all homologous members of the rare cyanuric acid hydrolase/barbiturase protein family. In the present study, a filamentous fungus, Sarocladium sp. strain CA, was isolated from soil by enrichment culturing using cyanuric acid as the sole source of nitrogen. A reverse-genetic approach identified a fungal cyanuric acid hydrolase gene composed of two exons and one intron. The translated spliced sequence was 39 to 53% identical to previously characterized bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases. The sequence was used to generate a gene optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and encoding an N-terminally histidine-tagged protein. The protein was purified by nickel affinity and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protein was shown by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) to produce carboxybiuret as the product, which spontaneously decarboxylated to yield biuret and carbon dioxide. The protein was very narrow in substrate specificity, showing activity only with cyanuric acid and N-methyl cyanuric acid. Barbituric acid was an inhibitor of enzyme activity. Sequence analysis identified genes with introns in other fungi from the Ascomycota that, if spliced, are predicted to encode proteins with cyanuric acid hydrolase activity. The Ascomycota cyanuric acid hydrolase homologs are most closely related to cyanuric acid hydrolases from Actinobacteria. PMID:24039269

  7. A new family of giardial cysteine-rich non-VSP protein genes and a novel cyst protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Davids

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, "HCNCp" (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein, that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many "CxxC" tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple "CxC" motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp containing > or = 20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents

  8. Phylogenetic distribution and membrane topology of the LytR-CpsA-Psr protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial cell wall is the target of many antibiotics and cell envelope constituents are critical to host-pathogen interactions. To combat resistance development and virulence, a detailed knowledge of the individual factors involved is essential. Members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell envelope-associated attenuators are relevant for β-lactam resistance, biofilm formation, and stress tolerance, and they are suggested to play a role in cell wall maintenance. However, their precise function is still unknown. This study addresses the occurrence as well as sequence-based characteristics of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. Results A comprehensive list of LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins was established, and their phylogenetic distribution and clustering into subgroups was determined. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins were present in all Gram-positive organisms, except for the cell wall-deficient Mollicutes and one strain of the Clostridiales. In contrast, the majority of Gram-negatives did not contain LytR-CpsA-Psr family members. Despite high sequence divergence, the LytR-CpsA-Psr domains of different subclusters shared a highly similar, predicted mixed a/β-structure, and conserved charged residues. PhoA fusion experiments, using MsrR of Staphylococcus aureus, confirmed membrane topology predictions and extracellular location of its LytR-CpsA-Psr domain. Conclusion The LytR-CpsA-Psr domain is unique to bacteria. The presence of diverse subgroups within the LytR-CpsA-Psr family might indicate functional differences, and could explain variations in phenotypes of respective mutants reported. The identified conserved structural elements and amino acids are likely to be important for the function of the domain and will help to guide future studies of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins.

  9. Defining sequence space and reaction products within the cyanuric acid hydrolase (AtzD)/barbiturase protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffernick, Jennifer L; Erickson, Jasmine S; Cameron, Stephan M; Cho, Seunghee; Dodge, Anthony G; Richman, Jack E; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2012-09-01

    Cyanuric acid hydrolases (AtzD) and barbiturases are homologous, found almost exclusively in bacteria, and comprise a rare protein family with no discernible linkage to other protein families or an X-ray structural class. There has been confusion in the literature and in genome projects regarding the reaction products, the assignment of individual sequences as either cyanuric acid hydrolases or barbiturases, and spurious connection of this family to another protein family. The present study has addressed those issues. First, the published enzyme reaction products of cyanuric acid hydrolase are incorrectly identified as biuret and carbon dioxide. The current study employed (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to show that cyanuric acid hydrolase releases carboxybiuret, which spontaneously decarboxylates to biuret. This is significant because it revealed that homologous cyanuric acid hydrolases and barbiturases catalyze completely analogous reactions. Second, enzymes that had been annotated incorrectly in genome projects have been reassigned here by bioinformatics, gene cloning, and protein characterization studies. Third, the AtzD/barbiturase family has previously been suggested to consist of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily, a large class of metallohydrolases. Bioinformatics and the lack of bound metals both argue against a connection to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Lastly, steady-state kinetic measurements and observations of protein stability suggested that the AtzD/barbiturase family might be an undistinguished protein family that has undergone some resurgence with the recent introduction of industrial s-triazine compounds such as atrazine and melamine into the environment.

  10. The family feud: turning off Sp1 by Sp1-like KLF proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2005-11-15

    Sp1 is one of the best characterized transcriptional activators. The biological importance of Sp1 is underscored by the fact that several hundreds of genes are thought to be regulated by this protein. However, during the last 5 years, a more extended family of Sp1-like transcription factors has been identified and characterized by the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain comprising three Krüppel-like zinc fingers. Each distinct family member differs in its ability to regulate transcription, and, as a consequence, to influence cellular processes. Specific activation and repression domains located within the N-terminal regions of these proteins are responsible for these differences by facilitating interactions with various co-activators and co-repressors. The present review primarily focuses on discussing the structural, biochemical and biological functions of the repressor members of this family of transcription factors. The existence of these transcriptional repressors provides a tightly regulated mechanism for silencing a large number of genes that are already known to be activated by Sp1.

  11. Omp85Tt from Thermus thermophilus HB27 : an Ancestral Type of the Omp85 Protein Family

    OpenAIRE

    Nesper, Jutta; Brosig, Alexander; Ringler, Philippe; Patel, Geetika J.; Müller, Shirley A.; Kleinschmidt, Jörg; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the Omp85 family are involved in the assembly of β-barrel outer membrane proteins or in the translocation of proteins across the outer membrane in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The cell envelope of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 is multilayered, including an outer membrane that is not well characterized. Neither the precise lipid composition nor much about integral membrane proteins is known. The genome of HB27 encodes one Omp85-like pro...

  12. Expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response in familial and sporadic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partipilo, Giulia; Simone, Giovanni; Scattone, Anna; Scarpi, Emanuela; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response could improve knowledge of the pathways that contribute to familial and sporadic breast cancer (BC). We aimed to assess the different roles of BRCA1, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), BRCT-repeat inhibitor of hTERT expression (BRIT1) and novel SWItch 5 (SWI5) expression in 130 sporadic and 73 familial BC samples, by immunohistochemistry. In the sporadic group, negative nuclear BRCA1 (nBRCA1) expression was associated with positive PgR (p = 0.037). Negative association was found between nBRCA1 expression and HER2 (p = 0.001). In the familial group, nBRCA1 expression was associated with ER (p = 0.002). Reduced nBRCA1 expression was associated with higher histological grade and positive Ki67 both in sporadic (p = 0.0010, p = 0.047) and familial groups (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). Nuclear PARP1 (nPARP1) expression was associated with histological grade (p = 0.035) and positive PgR (p = 0.047) in sporadic cases. High cytoplasmic and low nuclear BRIT1 (cBRIT1 and nBRIT1) expression were associated with high histological grade in the familial group (p = 0.013, p = 0.025). Various statistical associations between the protein expressions were observed in the sporadic group, while in familial group only few associations were found. Univariate analyses showed that nPARP1 expression is able to discriminate between sporadic and familial tumors (OR 2.80, p = 0.002). Multivariate analyses proved that its overexpression is an independent factor associated with a high risk of sporadic tumor (OR 2.96, p = 0.017). Our findings indicate that nPARP1 expression is an independent factor for sporadic BCs and PARP1 inhibitors could be a promising therapy for different phenotypes. © 2015 UICC.

  13. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    The CREC family consists of a number of recently discovered multiple (up to seven) EF-hand proteins that localise to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. At present, the family includes reticulocalbin, ERC-55/TCBP-49/E6BP, Cab45, calumenin and crocalbin/CBP-50. Similar proteins are found...... in quite diverse invertebrate organisms such as DCB-45 and SCF in Drosophila melanogaster, SCF in Bombyx mori, CCB-39 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Pfs40/PfERC in Plasmodium falciparum. The Ca(2+) affinity is rather low with dissociation constants around 10(-4)-10(-3) M. The proteins may participate in Ca......(2+)-regulated activities. Recent evidence has been obtained that some CREC family members are involved in pathological activities such as malignant cell transformation, mediation of the toxic effects of snake venom toxins and putative participation in amyloid formation. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-21...

  14. Regulation of cellulase expression, sporulation, and morphogenesis by velvet family proteins in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuimei; Dong, Yanmei; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Homologs of the velvet protein family are encoded by the ve1, vel2, and vel3 genes in Trichoderma reesei. To test their regulatory functions, the velvet protein-coding genes were disrupted, generating Δve1, Δvel2, and Δvel3 strains. The phenotypic features of these strains were examined to identify their functions in morphogenesis, sporulation, and cellulase expression. The three velvet-deficient strains produced more hyphal branches, indicating that velvet family proteins participate in the morphogenesis in T. reesei. Deletion of ve1 and vel3 did not affect biomass accumulation, while deletion of vel2 led to a significantly hampered growth when cellulose was used as the sole carbon source in the medium. The deletion of either ve1 or vel2 led to the sharp decrease of sporulation as well as a global downregulation of cellulase-coding genes. In contrast, although the expression of cellulase-coding genes of the ∆vel3 strain was downregulated in the dark, their expression in light condition was unaffected. Sporulation was hampered in the ∆vel3 strain. These results suggest that Ve1 and Vel2 play major roles, whereas Vel3 plays a minor role in sporulation, morphogenesis, and cellulase expression.

  15. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui, E-mail: thiamtsu@yahoo.com [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Cheah, Yew-Hoong [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bioassay Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Center, Institute for Medical Research, Jalan Pahang, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Meenakshii, Nallappan [Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  16. The PIN family of proteins in potato and their putative role in tuberisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios eRoumeliotis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PIN family of trans-membrane proteins mediates auxin efflux throughout the plant and during various phases of plant development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the PIN family comprised of 8 members, divided into ‘short’ and ‘long’ PINs according to the length of the hydrophilic domain of the protein. Based on sequence homology using the recently published potato genome sequence (Solanum tuberosum group Phureja we identified ten annotated potato StPIN genes. Mining the publicly available gene expression data, we constructed a catalogue tissue specificity of StPIN gene expression, focusing on the process of tuberization. A total of four StPIN genes exhibited increased expression four days after tuber induction, prior to the onset of stolon swelling. For two PIN genes, StPIN4 and StPIN2, promoter sequences were cloned and fused to the GUS reporter protein to study tissue specificity in more detail. StPIN4 promoter driven GUS staining was detected in the flower stigma, in the flower style, below the ovary and petals, in the root tips, in the vascular tissue of the stolons and in the tuber parenchyma cells. StPIN2 promoter driven GUS staining was detected in flower buds, in the vascular tissue of the swelling stolons and in the storage parenchyma of the growing tubers. Based on our results, we postulate a role for the StPINs in redistributing auxin in the swelling stolon during early events in tuber development.

  17. Function and Regulation of the Plant COPT Family of High-Affinity Copper Transport Proteins

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    Sergi Puig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotes because it participates as a redox active cofactor in multiple biological processes, including mitochondrial respiration, photosynthesis, oxidative stress protection, and iron (Fe transport. In eukaryotic cells, Cu transport toward the cytoplasm is mediated by the conserved CTR/COPT family of high-affinity Cu transport proteins. This outlook paper reviews the contribution of our research group to the characterization of the function played by the Arabidopsis thaliana COPT1–6 family of proteins in plant Cu homeostasis. Our studies indicate that the different tissue specificity, Cu-regulated expression, and subcellular localization dictate COPT-specialized contribution to plant Cu transport and distribution. By characterizing lack-of-function Arabidopsis mutant lines, we conclude that COPT1 mediates root Cu acquisition, COPT6 facilitates shoot Cu distribution, and COPT5 mobilizes Cu from storage organelles. Furthermore, our work with copt2 mutant and COPT-overexpressing plants has also uncovered Cu connections with Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock, respectively. Future studies on the interaction between COPT transporters and other components of the Cu homeostasis network will improve our knowledge of plant Cu acquisition, distribution, regulation, and utilization by Cu-proteins.

  18. The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Kazushge; Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2017-05-15

    Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family genes are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. DOCK family proteins mainly regulate actin filament polymerization and/or depolymerization and are GEF proteins, which contribute to cellular signaling events by activating small G proteins. Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to mammalian DOCK3/DOCK4, and plays a role in embryonic central nervous system development, R7 photoreceptor cell differentiation, and adult thorax development. In order to conduct further functional analyses on Spg in vivo, we examined its localization in third instar larval wing imaginal discs. Immunostaining with purified anti-Spg IgG revealed that Spg mainly localized in the air sac primordium (ASP) in wing imaginal discs. Spg is therefore predicted to play an important role in the ASP. The specific knockdown of Spg by the breathless-GAL4 driver in tracheal cells induced lethality accompanied with a defect in ASP development and the induction of apoptosis. The monitoring of ERK signaling activity in wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-diphospho-ERK IgG revealed reductions in the ERK signal cascade in Spg knockdown clones. Furthermore, the overexpression of D-raf suppressed defects in survival and the proliferation of cells in the ASP induced by the knockdown of Spg. Collectively, these results indicate that Spg plays a critical role in ASP development and tracheal cell viability that is mediated by the ERK signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers.

  20. Cupin: A candidate molecular structure for the Nep1-like protein family

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    Pereira Gonçalo AG

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NEP1-like proteins (NLPs are a novel family of microbial elicitors of plant necrosis. Some NLPs induce a hypersensitive-like response in dicot plants though the basis for this response remains unclear. In addition, the spatial structure and the role of these highly conserved proteins are not known. Results We predict a 3d-structure for the β-rich section of the NLPs based on alignments, prediction tools and molecular dynamics. We calculated a consensus sequence from 42 NLPs proteins, predicted its secondary structure and obtained a high quality alignment of this structure and conserved residues with the two Cupin superfamily motifs. The conserved sequence GHRHDWE and several common residues, especially some conserved histidines, in NLPs match closely the two cupin motifs. Besides other common residues shared by dicot Auxin-Binding Proteins (ABPs and NLPs, an additional conserved histidine found in all dicot ABPs was also found in all NLPs at the same position. Conclusion We propose that the necrosis inducing protein class belongs to the Cupin superfamily. Based on the 3d-structure, we are proposing some possible functions for the NLPs.

  1. Cupin: a candidate molecular structure for the Nep1-like protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechin, Adelmo L; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Lemke, Ney; Echeverrigaray, Sérgio; Cabrera, Odalys G; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Mombach, José C M

    2008-04-30

    NEP1-like proteins (NLPs) are a novel family of microbial elicitors of plant necrosis. Some NLPs induce a hypersensitive-like response in dicot plants though the basis for this response remains unclear. In addition, the spatial structure and the role of these highly conserved proteins are not known. We predict a 3d-structure for the beta-rich section of the NLPs based on alignments, prediction tools and molecular dynamics. We calculated a consensus sequence from 42 NLPs proteins, predicted its secondary structure and obtained a high quality alignment of this structure and conserved residues with the two Cupin superfamily motifs. The conserved sequence GHRHDWE and several common residues, especially some conserved histidines, in NLPs match closely the two cupin motifs. Besides other common residues shared by dicot Auxin-Binding Proteins (ABPs) and NLPs, an additional conserved histidine found in all dicot ABPs was also found in all NLPs at the same position. We propose that the necrosis inducing protein class belongs to the Cupin superfamily. Based on the 3d-structure, we are proposing some possible functions for the NLPs.

  2. Trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shao-Min; Wu, Guang

    2009-12-01

    The global warming is an important factor affecting the biological evolution, and the influenza is an important disease that threatens humans with possible epidemics or pandemics. In this study, we attempted to analyze the trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus, because this protein is a target of anti-flu drug, and its mutation would have significant effect on the resistance to anti-flu drugs. The evolution of matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus from 1959 to 2008 was defined using the unpredictable portion of amino-acid pair predictability. Then the trend in this evolution was compared with the trend in the global temperature, the temperature in north and south hemispheres, and the temperature in influenza A virus sampling site, and species carrying influenza A virus. The results showed the similar trends in global warming and in evolution of M2 proteins although we could not correlate them at this stage of study. The study suggested the potential impact of global warming on the evolution of proteins from influenza A virus.

  3. Sonic hedgehog functions upstream of disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (disc1: implications for mental illness

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    Penelope J. Boyd

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available DISRUPTED-IN-SCHIZOPHRENIA (DISC1 has been one of the most intensively studied genetic risk factors for mental illness since it was discovered through positional mapping of a translocation breakpoint in a large Scottish family where a balanced chromosomal translocation was found to segregate with schizophrenia and affective disorders. While the evidence for it being central to disease pathogenesis in the original Scottish family is compelling, recent genome-wide association studies have not found evidence for common variants at the DISC1 locus being associated with schizophrenia in the wider population. It may therefore be the case that DISC1 provides an indication of biological pathways that are central to mental health issues and functional studies have shown that it functions in multiple signalling pathways. However, there is little information regarding factors that function upstream of DISC1 to regulate its expression and function. We herein demonstrate that Sonic hedgehog (Shh signalling promotes expression of disc1 in the zebrafish brain. Expression of disc1 is lost in smoothened mutants that have a complete loss of Shh signal transduction, and elevated in patched mutants which have constitutive activation of Shh signalling. We previously demonstrated that disc1 knockdown has a dramatic effect on the specification of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC in the hindbrain and Shh signalling is known to be essential for the specification of these cells. We show that disc1 is prominently expressed in olig2-positive midline progenitor cells that are absent in smo mutants, while cyclopamine treatment blocks disc1 expression in these cells and mimics the effect of disc1 knock down on OPC specification. Various features of a number of psychiatric conditions could potentially arise through aberrant Hedgehog signalling. We therefore suggest that altered Shh signalling may be an important neurodevelopmental factor in the pathobiology of mental

  4. Comparative genome analysis reveals a conserved family of actin-like proteins in apicomplexan parasites

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    Sibley L David

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Apicomplexa is an early-branching eukaryotic lineage that contains a number of important human and animal pathogens. Their complex life cycles and unique cytoskeletal features distinguish them from other model eukaryotes. Apicomplexans rely on actin-based motility for cell invasion, yet the regulation of this system remains largely unknown. Consequently, we focused our efforts on identifying actin-related proteins in the recently completed genomes of Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., Cryptosporidium spp., and Theileria spp. Results Comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies of apicomplexan genomes reveals that most contain only a single conventional actin and yet they each have 8–10 additional actin-related proteins. Among these are a highly conserved Arp1 protein (likely part of a conserved dynactin complex, and Arp4 and Arp6 homologues (subunits of the chromatin-remodeling machinery. In contrast, apicomplexans lack canonical Arp2 or Arp3 proteins, suggesting they lost the Arp2/3 actin polymerization complex on their evolutionary path towards intracellular parasitism. Seven of these actin-like proteins (ALPs are novel to apicomplexans. They show no phylogenetic associations to the known Arp groups and likely serve functions specific to this important group of intracellular parasites. Conclusion The large diversity of actin-like proteins in apicomplexans suggests that the actin protein family has diverged to fulfill various roles in the unique biology of intracellular parasites. Conserved Arps likely participate in vesicular transport and gene expression, while apicomplexan-specific ALPs may control unique biological traits such as actin-based gliding motility.

  5. Structural and functional characterisation of the cyanobacterial PetC3 Rieske protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Sebastian; Takeda, Kazuki; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Baymann, Frauke; Nevo, Reinat; Reich, Ziv; Rögner, Matthias; Miki, Kunio; Rexroth, Sascha

    2016-12-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 possesses three Rieske isoforms: PetC1, PetC2 and PetC3. While PetC1 and PetC2 have been identified as alternative subunits of the cytochrome b6f complex (b6f), PetC3 was localized exclusively within the plasma membrane. The spatial separation of PetC3 from the photosynthetic and respiratory protein complexes raises doubt in its involvement in bioenergetic electron transfer. Here we report a detailed structural and functional characterization of the cyanobacterial PetC3 protein family indicating that PetC3 is not a component of the b6f and the photosynthetic electron transport as implied by gene annotation. Instead PetC3 has a distinct function in cell envelope homeostasis. Especially proteomic analysis shows that deletion of petC3 in Synechocystis PCC 6803 primarily affects cell envelope proteins including many nutrient transport systems. Therefore, the observed downregulation in the photosynthetic electron transport - mainly caused by photosystem 2 inactivation - might constitute a stress adaptation. Comprehensive in silico sequence analyses revealed that PetC3 proteins are periplasmic lipoproteins tethered to the plasma membrane with a subclass consisting of soluble periplasmic proteins, i.e. their N-terminal domain is inconsistent with their integration into the b6f. For the first time, the structure of PetC3 was determined by X-ray crystallography at an atomic resolution revealing significant high similarities to non-b6f Rieske subunits in contrast to PetC1. These results suggest that PetC3 affects processes in the periplasmic compartment that only indirectly influence photosynthetic electron transport. For this reason, we suggest to rename "Photosynthetic electron transport Chain 3" (PetC3) proteins as "periplasmic Rieske proteins" (Prp). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

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    Leese Florian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental complexity in vertebrates, since mutations modifying the function of a duplicated protein can lead to novel functions, improving the evolutionary success. Results We analyzed here the evolution of the GPRC5 family of G protein-coupled receptors by comprehensive similarity searches and found that the receptors are only present in chordates and that the size of the receptor family expanded, likely due to genome duplication events in the early history of vertebrate evolution. We propose that a single GPRC5 receptor coding gene originated in a stem chordate ancestor and gave rise by duplication events to a gene family comprising three receptor types (GPRC5A-C in vertebrates, and a fourth homologue present only in mammals (GPRC5D. Additional duplications of GPRC5B and GPRC5C sequences occurred in teleost fishes. The finding that the expression patterns of the receptors are evolutionarily conserved indicates an important biological function of these receptors. Moreover, we found that expression of GPRC5B is regulated by vitamin A in vivo, confirming previous findings that linked receptor expression to retinoic acid levels in tumor cell lines and strengthening the link between the receptor expression and the development of a complex nervous system in chordates, known to be dependent on retinoic acid signaling. Conclusions GPRC5 receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptors with unique sequence characteristics, may represent a molecular novelty that helped non

  7. Hydrogen bond networks determine emergent mechanical and thermodynamic properties across a protein family

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    Dallakyan Sargis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria use periplasmic-binding proteins (bPBP to transport nutrients through the periplasm. Despite immense diversity within the recognized substrates, all members of the family share a common fold that includes two domains that are separated by a conserved hinge. The hinge allows the protein to cycle between open (apo and closed (ligated conformations. Conformational changes within the proteins depend on a complex interplay of mechanical and thermodynamic response, which is manifested as an increase in thermal stability and decrease of flexibility upon ligand binding. Results We use a distance constraint model (DCM to quantify the give and take between thermodynamic stability and mechanical flexibility across the bPBP family. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR are readily evaluated because the DCM links mechanical and thermodynamic properties. We have previously demonstrated that QSFR is moderately conserved across a mesophilic/thermophilic RNase H pair, whereas the observed variance indicated that different enthalpy-entropy mechanisms allow similar mechanical response at their respective melting temperatures. Our predictions of heat capacity and free energy show marked diversity across the bPBP family. While backbone flexibility metrics are mostly conserved, cooperativity correlation (long-range couplings also demonstrate considerable amount of variation. Upon ligand removal, heat capacity, melting point, and mechanical rigidity are, as expected, lowered. Nevertheless, significant differences are found in molecular cooperativity correlations that can be explained by the detailed nature of the hydrogen bond network. Conclusion Non-trivial mechanical and thermodynamic variation across the family is explained by differences within the underlying H-bond networks. The mechanism is simple; variation within the H-bond networks result in altered mechanical linkage properties that directly affect

  8. The genome of Strongyloides spp. gives insights into protein families with a putative role in nematode parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Vicky L; Tsai, Isheng J; Selkirk, Murray E; Viney, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Parasitic nematodes are important and abundant parasites adapted to live a parasitic lifestyle, with these adaptations all aimed at facilitating their survival and reproduction in their hosts. The recently sequenced genomes of four Strongyloides species, gastrointestinal parasites of humans and other animals, alongside transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of free-living and parasitic stages of their life cycles have revealed a number of protein families with a putative role in their parasitism. Many of these protein families have also been associated with parasitism in other parasitic nematode species, suggesting that these proteins may play a fundamental role in nematode parasitism more generally. Here, we review key protein families that have a putative role in Strongyloides' parasitism - acetylcholinesterases, astacins, aspartic proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, proteinase inhibitors (trypsin inhibitors and cystatins), SCP/TAPS and transthyretin-like proteins - and the evidence for their key, yet diverse, roles in the parasitic lifestyle.

  9. Paired box mutations in familial and sporadic aniridia predicts truncated aniridia proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha, A.; Saunders, G.F. (Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Mintz-Hittner, H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Lyons, L.A. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Aniridia, an autosomal dominant ocular disorder characterized by iris hypoplasia, results from mutations in the PAX6 gene, which encodes paired box and homeobox motifs. In this report the authors describe five new mutations in the paired box region of the human PAX6 gene that are associated with aniridia. The paired box mutations detected were in both familial (three) and sporadic (two cases) cases. All five mutations predict truncated PAX6 proteins. This study indicates that early premature translational termination mutations in the PAX6 gene result in haploinsufficiency and generate the aniridia phenotype. 32 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. On the Power and Limits of Sequence Similarity Based Clustering of Proteins Into Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiwie, Christian; Röttger, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades, we have observed an ongoing tremendous growth of available sequencing data fueled by the advancements in wet-lab technology. The sequencing information is only the beginning of the actual understanding of how organisms survive and prosper. It is, for instance, equally...... important to also unravel the proteomic repertoire of an organism. A classical computational approach for detecting protein families is a sequence-based similarity calculation coupled with a subsequent cluster analysis. In this work we have intensively analyzed various clustering tools on a large scale. We...

  11. Enzyme promiscuity in the hormone-sensitive lipase family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppe, Manco; Luigia, Merone; Elena, Porzio; Yan, Feng; Luigi, Mandrich

    2012-02-01

    The number of enzymes endowed with the capacity to catalyse other reactions than the main, physiological one, a feature that has been called promiscuity, is increasing at a fast pace. Promiscuity is a highly pervasive phenomenon that is present at each level of life complexity. For enzymes, promiscuity encompasses interesting aspects related to their physiological role, evolution and biotechnological applications. Herein, at first we will describe some general aspects of enzyme promiscuity and then we will report some examples from the α/β hydrolase superfamily of proteins, with particular emphasis to the hormone-sensitive lipase family.

  12. A novel plant protein disulfide isomerase family homologous to animal P5 - molecular cloning and characterization as a functional protein for folding of soybean seed-storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadahama, Hiroyuki; Kamauchi, Shinya; Nakamoto, Yumi; Nishizawa, Keito; Ishimoto, Masao; Kawada, Teruo; Urade, Reiko

    2008-02-01

    The protein disulfide isomerase is known to play important roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides and in the formation of disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we cloned a gene of a novel protein disulfide isomerase family from soybean leaf (Glycine max L. Merrill. cv Jack) mRNA. The cDNA encodes a protein called GmPDIM. It is composed of 438 amino acids, and its sequence and domain structure are similar to that of animal P5. Recombinant GmPDIM expressed in Escherichia coli displayed an oxidative refolding activity on denatured RNase A. The genomic sequence of GmPDIM was also cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the soybean sequence with sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa showed significant conservation of the exon/intron structure. Consensus sequences within the promoters of the GmPDIM genes contained a cis-acting regulatory element for the unfolded protein response, and other regulatory motifs required for seed-specific expression. We observed that expression of GmPDIM was upregulated under ER-stress conditions, and was expressed ubiquitously in soybean tissues such as the cotyledon. It localized to the lumen of the ER. Data from co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that GmPDIM associated non-covalently with proglycinin, a precursor of the seed-storage protein glycinin. In addition, GmPDIM associated with the alpha' subunit of beta-conglycinin, a seed-storage protein in the presence of tunicamycin. These results suggest that GmPDIM may play a role in the folding of storage proteins and functions not only as a thiol-oxidoredactase, but also as molecular chaperone.

  13. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

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    Dina Alzhanova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197 caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination.

  14. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

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    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  15. Ectoparasitic infestations of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) in Urmia city, Iran: First report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgani-Firouzjaee, Tahmineh; Pour-Reza, Behzad; Naem, Soraya; Tavassoli, Mousa

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehogs are small, nocturnal mammals that become popular in the world and have significant role in transmission of zoonotic agents. Some of the agents are transmitted by ticks and fleas such as rickettsial agents. For these reason, a survey on ectoparasites in European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) carried out between April 2006 and December 2007 from different parts of Urmia city, west Azerbaijan, Iran. After being euthanized external surface of body of animals was precisely considered for ectoparasites, and arthropods were collected and stored in 70% ethanol solution. Out of 34 hedgehogs 23 hedgehogs (67.70%) were infested with ticks (Rhipicephalus turanicus). Fleas of the species Archaeopsylla erinacei were found on 19 hedgehogs of 34 hedgehogs (55.90%). There was no significant differences between sex of ticks (p > 0.05) but found in fleas (p 0.05). Highest occurrence of infestation in both tick and flea was in June. Among three seasons of hedgehog collection significant differences was observed (p < 0.05). The result of our survey revealed that infestation rate in hedgehog was high. According to zoonotic importance of this ectoparasite and ability to transmission of some pathogens, more studies are needed to investigate hedgehog parasites in different parts of Iran. PMID:25653796

  16. Ectoparasitic infestations of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus in Urmia city, Iran: First report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Gorgani-Firouzjaee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehogs are small, nocturnal mammals that become popular in the world and have significant role in transmission of zoonotic agents. Some of the agents are transmitted by ticks and fleas such as rickettsial agents. For these reason, a survey on ectoparasites in European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus carried out between April 2006 and December 2007 from different parts of Urmia city, west Azerbaijan, Iran. After being euthanized external surface of body of animals was precisely considered for ectoparasites, and arthropods were collected and stored in 70% ethanol solution. Out of 34 hedgehogs 23 hedgehogs (67.70% were infested with ticks (Rhipicephalus turanicus. Fleas of the species Archaeopsylla erinacei were found on 19 hedgehogs of 34 hedgehogs (55.90%. There was no significant differences between sex of ticks (p > 0.05 but found in fleas (p 0.05. Highest occurrence of infestation in both tick and flea was in June. Among three seasons of hedgehog collection significant differences was observed (p < 0.05. The result of our survey revealed that infestation rate in hedgehog was high. According to zoonotic importance of this ectoparasite and ability to transmission of some pathogens, more studies are needed to investigate hedgehog parasites in different parts of Iran.

  17. Elucidating the Activation Mechanism of the Insulin-Family Proteins with Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Anastasios; Kuyucak, Serdar; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-family proteins bind to their own receptors, but insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) can also bind to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A), activating unique and alternative signaling pathways from those of insulin. Although extensive studies of insulin have revealed that its activation is associated with the opening of the B chain-C terminal (BC-CT), the activation mechanism of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) still remains unknown. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the insulin-family proteins comparing their activation process and mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations to reveal new insights into their specificity to the insulin receptor. We have found that all the proteins appear to exhibit similar stochastic dynamics in their conformational change to an active state. For the IGFs, our simulations show that activation involves two opening locations: the opening of the BC-CT section away from the core, similar to insulin; and the additional opening of the BC-CT section away from the C domain. Furthermore, we have found that these two openings occur simultaneously in IGF-I, but not in IGF-II, where they can occur independently. This suggests that the BC-CT section and the C domain behave as a unified domain in IGF-I, but as two independent domains in IGF-II during the activation process, implying that the IGFs undergo different activation mechanisms for receptor binding. The probabilities of the active and inactive states of the proteins suggest that IGF-II is hyperactive compared to IGF-I. The hinge residue and the hydrophobic interactions in the core are found to play a critical role in the stability and activity of IGFs. Overall, our simulations have elucidated the crucial differences and similarities in the activation mechanisms of the insulin-family proteins, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed differences between IGF-I and IGF-II in receptor binding.

  18. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

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    Jinxing Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11. In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli.

  19. Expression of IAP family proteins and its clinical importance in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, P; Jeziorski, A; Cebula-Obrzut, A Pluta B; Wierzbowska, A; Piekarski, J; Smolewski, P

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family proteins is involved in mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis in various cancer cells. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of selected IAP proteins such as XIAP, cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and survivin in breast cancer patients and evaluates their relationship with the prognostic and predictive factors and their impact to overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). The study was conducted with the use of tissue samples prospectively collected from 92 previously untreated female breast cancer patients. The control encompassed 10 fibroadenoma patients. The expression of XIAP, cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and survivin was assessed using flow multicolor cytometry. XIAP expression was present in 99 % of the breast cancer patients (91/92) with the median expression 13.65% (range 1-66.8%). Expression of XIAP in breast cancer was significantly higher compared to the control group (p=0.006). Median expression of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and survivin in the study group was 25.95% (range 0.8-83.7%), 16.7% (range 1-53.2%) and 4.6% (range 0-43%) respectively. In the rank Spearman test, strong correlations (pfamily proteins and survival. However, low expression of XIAP in breast cancer showed trend to longer PFS (p=0.08). XIAP, cIAP-1 cIAP-2 and survivin participate in antiapoptotic mechanisms in breast cancer and XIAP and survivin seem to have the most significant prognostic importance. Further studies are needed to establish more complete prognostic and predictive values of IAP family proteins in breast cancer patients.

  20. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants.

  1. Differential developmental strategies by Sonic hedgehog in thalamus and hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanfeng; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The traditional concept of diencephalon (thalamus plus hypothalamus) and with it the entire traditional subdivision of the developing neural tube are being challenged by novel insights obtained by mapping the expression of key developmental genes. A model in which the hypothalamus is placed in the most rostral portion of the neural tube, followed caudally by a diencephalon formed by prethalamus, thalamus and pretectum has been proposed. The adult thalamus and hypothalamus are quite unlike each other in connectivity and functions. Here we review work on the role of the secreted morphogen protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the developing diencephalon and hypothalamic region to show how different these two regions are also from this point of view. Shh from the prechordal plate (PCP) induces and patterns the hypothalamus but there is no evidence that this role is fulfilled by a morphogen gradient. Later, the hypothalamic primordium itself expresses Shh and a large part of the hypothalamus belongs to the Shh lineage, including the ventral domains. Neural Shh is necessary to complete the specification (lateral hypothalamus), differentiation and growth of the hypothalamus. Although Gli2A is the major effector of Shh in this region, hypothalamic specification also depends on the suppression of Gli3R by Shh secreted by the PCP as well as the neuroepithelium. The thalamus is patterned by an Shh morphogen gradient originated in the ZLI following similar mechanisms to those in the spinal cord. The thalamus itself does not belong to the Shh lineage. Gli2A is necessary for appropriate growth and specification of the thalamic nuclei, to the exception of the medial and intralaminar groups (limbic-related), whose development depends on Gli3R. Beyond specification and patterning, the scarce data available about cell sorting and aggregation in these two regions shows key differences between them as well. In summary, not only expression patterns but also developmental mechanisms support

  2. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

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    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  3. CCR11 is a functional receptor for the monocyte chemoattractant protein family of chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweickart, V L; Epp, A; Raport, C J; Gray, P W

    2000-03-31

    Chemokines mediate their diverse activities through G protein-coupled receptors. The human homolog of the bovine orphan receptor PPR1 shares significant similarity to chemokine receptors. Transfection of this receptor into murine L1.2 cells resulted in responsiveness to monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-4, MCP-2, and MCP-1 in chemotaxis assays. Binding studies with radiolabeled MCP-4 demonstrated a single high affinity binding site with an IC(50) of 0.14 nM. As shown by competition binding, other members of the MCP family also recognized this receptor. MCP-2 was the next most potent ligand, with an IC(50) of 0.45 nM. Surprisingly, eotaxin (IC(50) = 6.7 nM) and MCP-3 (IC(50) = 4.1 nM) bind with greater affinity than MCP-1 (IC(50) = 10.7 nM) but only act as agonists in chemotaxis assays at 100-fold higher concentrations. Because of high affinity binding and functional chemotactic responses, we have termed this receptor CCR11. The gene for CCR11 was localized to human chromosome 3q22, which is distinct from most CC chemokine receptor genes at 3p21. Northern blot hybridization was used to identify CCR11 expression in heart, small intestine, and lung. Thus CCR11 shares functional similarity to CCR2 because it recognizes members of the MCP family, but CCR11 has a distinct expression pattern.

  4. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites.

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    Cristina K Moreira

    Full Text Available The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites.

  5. Advillin (p92): a new member of the gelsolin/villin family of actin regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, P W; Arai, M; Bandura, J L; Kwiatkowski, D J

    1998-08-01

    A new member of the gelsolin/villin family of actin regulatory proteins was initially identified by screening an adult murine brain cDNA library with a probe for bovine adseverin. The predicted amino acid sequence of the 92 kDa murine protein p92 (advillin) is 75% homologous to villin and 65% homologous to gelsolin and adseverin. It shares a six domain structure with other gelsolin family members and has a carboxy-terminal headpiece, similar to, yet distinct from, villin. Northern blot analysis shows a high level of mRNA expression in murine uterus and human intestine. In situ mRNA analysis of adult murine tissues demonstrates that the message is most highly expressed in the endometrium of the uterus, the intestinal lining, and at the surface of the tongue. In murine embryonic development, strong expression of the message is observed by day 14.5 in dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia. Expression is also noted at day 16.5 in cerebral cortex. We propose that p92 (advillin) has unique functions in the morphogenesis of neuronal cells which form ganglia, and that it may compensate to explain the near normal phenotype observed in villin-deficient mice.

  6. Luminescent quantum clusters of gold in transferrin family protein, lactoferrin exhibiting FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2010-12-01

    We report the synthesis of highly luminescent, water soluble quantum clusters (QCs) of gold, which are stabilized by an iron binding transferrin family protein, lactoferrin (Lf). The synthesized AuQC@Lfclusters were characterized using UV-Visiblespectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), matrix assisted laser desorption ionizationmass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with picosecond-resolved lifetime measurements. Detailed investigations with FTIR and CD spectroscopy have revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein in the cluster. We have also studied Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurring between the protein and the cluster. The ability of the clusters to sense cupric ions selectively at ppm concentrations was tested. The stability of clusters in widely varying pH conditions and their continued luminescence make it feasible for them to be used for intracellular imaging and molecular delivery, particularly in view of Lf protection.We report the synthesis of highly luminescent, water soluble quantum clusters (QCs) of gold, which are stabilized by an iron binding transferrin family protein, lactoferrin (Lf). The synthesized AuQC@Lfclusters were characterized using UV-Visiblespectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), matrix assisted laser desorption ionizationmass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with picosecond-resolved lifetime measurements. Detailed investigations with FTIR and CD spectroscopy have revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein in the cluster. We have also studied Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurring between the protein and the cluster. The ability of the clusters to sense cupric ions selectively at ppm concentrations was tested. The

  7. An ribonuclease T2 family protein modulates Acinetobacter baumannii abiotic surface colonization.

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    Anna C Jacobs

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen of considerable medical concern. The organism's transmission and ability to cause disease has been associated with its propensity to colonize and form biofilms on abiotic surfaces in health care settings. To better understand the genetic determinants that affect biomaterial attachment, we performed a transposon mutagenesis analysis of abiotic surface-colonization using A. baumannii strain 98-37-09. Disruption of an RNase T2 family gene was found to limit the organism's ability to colonize polystyrene, polypropylene, glass, and stainless steel surfaces. DNA microarray analyses revealed that in comparison to wild type and complemented cells, the RNase T2 family mutant exhibited reduced expression of 29 genes, 15 of which are predicted to be associated with bacterial attachment and surface-associated motility. Motility assays confirmed that RNase T2 mutant displays a severe motility defect. Taken together, our results indicate that the RNase T2 family protein identified in this study is a positive regulator of A. baumannii's ability to colonize inanimate surfaces and motility. Moreover, the enzyme may be an effective target for the intervention of biomaterial colonization, and consequently limit the organism's transmission within the hospital setting.

  8. Novel protein-truncating mutations in the ASPM gene in families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Asma; Tariq, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Nasim; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ahmad, Wasim

    2007-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes reduction in brain size. Individuals affected with the disorder show a small but architecturally normal cerebral cortex and are associated with mental retardation of mild-to severe form. MCPH is genetically heterogeneous with six loci, and four genes have been identified so far. Homozygous mutations in the ASPM gene, located at MCPH5 locus on chromosome 1q31, are the most common cause of MCPH particularly in the Pakistani population. In the present study, we have ascertained ten Pakistani and one Kashmiri family with primary microcephaly. We screened for potential mutations of the ASPM gene in seven consanguineous families (six Pakistani and one Kashmiri) linked to MCPH5 locus. Two previously reported (8508delGA, W1326X) and four novel sequence variants (Y1712X, I1717X, Y3353X, R3244X) were detected and all were predicted to be protein truncating. The degree of mental retardation in the affected individuals of the seven families varied from mild to moderate, and was not dependent on the location of mutations in the ASPM gene.

  9. The Msi Family of RNA-Binding Proteins Function Redundantly as Intestinal Oncoproteins

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    Ning Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Msi family of RNA-binding proteins have recently emerged as potent oncoproteins in a range of malignancies. MSI2 is highly expressed in hematopoietic cancers, where it is required for disease maintenance. In contrast to the hematopoietic system, colorectal cancers can express both Msi family members, MSI1 and MSI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in the intestinal epithelium, Msi1 and Msi2 have analogous oncogenic effects. Further, comparison of Msi1/2-induced gene expression programs and transcriptome-wide analyses of Msi1/2-RNA-binding targets reveal significant functional overlap, including induction of the PDK-Akt-mTORC1 axis. Ultimately, we demonstrate that concomitant loss of function of both MSI family members is sufficient to abrogate the growth of human colorectal cancer cells, and Msi gene deletion inhibits tumorigenesis in several mouse models of intestinal cancer. Our findings demonstrate that MSI1 and MSI2 act as functionally redundant oncoproteins required for the ontogeny of intestinal cancers.

  10. A conserved function in phosphatidylinositol metabolism for mammalian Vps13 family proteins.

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    Jae-Sook Park

    Full Text Available The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding the family member VPS13A lead to the neurodegenerative disorder chorea-acanthocytosis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there is just a single version of VPS13, thereby simplifying the task of unraveling its molecular function(s. While VPS13 was originally identified in yeast by its role in vacuolar sorting, recent studies have revealed a completely different function for VPS13 in sporulation, where VPS13 regulates phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns(4P levels in the prospore membrane. This discovery raises the possibility that the disease phenotype associated with vps13A mutants in humans is due to misregulation of PtdIns(4P in membranes. To determine whether VPS13A affects PtdIns(4P in membranes from mammalian neuronal cells, phosphatidylinositol phosphate pools were compared in PC12 tissue culture cells in the absence or presence of VPS13A. Consistent with the yeast results, the localization of PtdIns(4P is specifically altered in VPS13A knockdown cells while other phosphatidylinositol phosphates appear unaffected. In addition, VPS13A is necessary to prevent the premature degeneration of neurites that develop in response to Nerve Growth Factor. The regulation of PtdIns(4P is therefore a conserved function of the Vps13 family and may play a role in the maintenance of neuronal processes in mammals.

  11. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

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    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  12. Identification and characterization of WhiB-like family proteins of the Bifidobacterium genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averina, Olga V; Zakharevich, Natalia V; Danilenko, Valery N

    2012-08-01

    Bifidobacteria are strictly anaerobic bacteria, that are an important component of human microbiote due to their probiotic characteristics. They are frequently exposed to a variety of stresses, therefore, identification of genes implicated in stress responses in bifidobacteria is critical for biomedicine and maintenance of industrial strains. The WhiB-like family proteins unique for Actinobacteria are transcriptional regulators involved in major cellular processes, including stress responses. The aim of this study was the identification of WhiB-like family proteins of the Bifidobacterium genus of the Actinobacteria class and functional characterization of conservative whiB-like genes. The DNA sequence database of 36 strains revealed a family of WhiB-encoding genes. It were identified the wblE orthologs in all Bifidobacteria species and the whiB2 orthologs in all bifidobacterial strains except of all strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Bifidobacterium gallicum. Some strains, in particular, those of the Bifidobacterium longum group, contain additional whiB-like genes of different length and a low degree of similarity in sequences. The wblE and whiB2 genes of the Bifidobacterium genus are evolutionary conservative and ancient genes. The real-time PCR analysis showed that transcription of wblE is induced by a variety of stress conditions such as heat shock, osmotic, oxidative stresses, by antibiotic tetracycline and bile salt treatment, the nutrient starvation and entry into late stationary phase. The wblE gene may play a significant role in general stress responses in bifidobacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Advances in the research of LuxR family protein in quorum-sensing system of gram-negative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Xiang, J

    2016-09-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density-dependent method for information transmission among bacteria, as well as a mechanism for the bacteria to adapt to environment. LuxR family protein plays a key role in gram-negative bacterial QS system as a kind of transcription regulators and participates in a variety of biological behaviors with LuxI protein and signal molecules, such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, virulence factors production, and so on. The advances in the research of LuxR family protein in QS system of gram-negative bacteria were summarized in this review.

  14. Common Emergencies in Small Rodents, Hedgehogs, and Sugar Gliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Alicia; Strunk, Anneliese

    2016-05-01

    Small exotic mammal pets such as rats, mice, hamsters, gerbils, degus, hedgehogs, and sugar gliders are becoming more popular. Because these animals are prone to a variety of health problems, and require specialized husbandry care to remain healthy, they may present to emergency hospitals in critical condition. This article provides a basic overview of common emergency presentations of these species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. New kids on the block: The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) protein family acting as a novel class of cAMP effector proteins in striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas; Schindler, Roland

    2017-12-01

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling pathway constitutes an ancient signal transduction pathway present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Previously, it was thought that in eukaryotes three effector proteins mediate cAMP signalling, namely protein kinase A (PKA), exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) and the cyclic-nucleotide gated channels. However, recently a novel family of cAMP effector proteins emerged and was termed the Popeye domain containing (POPDC) family, which consists of three members POPDC1, POPDC2 and POPDC3. POPDC proteins are transmembrane proteins, which are abundantly present in striated and smooth muscle cells. POPDC proteins bind cAMP with high affinity comparable to PKA. Presently, their biochemical activity is poorly understood. However, mutational analysis in animal models as well as the disease phenotype observed in patients carrying missense mutations suggests that POPDC proteins are acting by modulating membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. In this review, we will describe the current knowledge about this gene family and also outline the apparent gaps in our understanding of their role in cAMP signalling and beyond. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ST proteins, a new family of plant tandem repeat proteins with a DUF2775 domain mainly found in Fabaceae and Asteraceae

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    Albornos Lucía

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many proteins with tandem repeats in their sequence have been described and classified according to the length of the repeats: I Repeats of short oligopeptides (from 2 to 20 amino acids, including structural cell wall proteins and arabinogalactan proteins. II Repeats that range in length from 20 to 40 residues, including proteins with a well-established three-dimensional structure often involved in mediating protein-protein interactions. (III Longer repeats in the order of 100 amino acids that constitute structurally and functionally independent units. Here we analyse ShooT specific (ST proteins, a family of proteins with tandem repeats of unknown function that were first found in Leguminosae, and their possible similarities to other proteins with tandem repeats. Results ST protein sequences were only found in dicotyledonous plants, limited to several plant families, mainly the Fabaceae and the Asteraceae. ST mRNAs accumulate mainly in the roots and under biotic interactions. Most ST proteins have one or several Domain(s of Unknown Function 2775 (DUF2775. All deduced ST proteins have a signal peptide, indicating that these proteins enter the secretory pathway, and the mature proteins have tandem repeat oligopeptides that share a hexapeptide (E/DFEPRP followed by 4 partially conserved amino acids, which could determine a putative N-glycosylation signal, and a fully conserved tyrosine. In a phylogenetic tree, the sequences clade according to taxonomic group. A possible involvement in symbiosis and abiotic stress as well as in plant cell elongation is suggested, although different STs could play different roles in plant development. Conclusions We describe a new family of proteins called ST whose presence is limited to the plant kingdom, specifically to a few families of dicotyledonous plants. They present 20 to 40 amino acid tandem repeat sequences with different characteristics (signal peptide, DUF2775 domain, conservative

  17. Crystal structures of catrocollastatin/VAP2B reveal a dynamic, modular architecture of ADAM/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Tomoko; Araki, Satohiko; Mori, Hidezo; Takeda, Soichi

    2007-05-29

    Catrocollastatin/vascular apoptosis-inducing protein (VAP)2B is a metalloproteinase from Crotalus atrox venom, possessing metalloproteinase/disintegrin/cysteine-rich (MDC) domains that bear the typical domain architecture of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins. Here we describe crystal structures of catrocollastatin/VAP2B in three different crystal forms, representing the first reported crystal structures of a member of the monomeric class of this family of proteins. The overall structures show good agreement with both monomers of atypical homodimeric VAP1. Comparison of the six catrocollastatin/VAP2B monomer structures and the structures of VAP1 reveals a dynamic, modular architecture that may be important for the functions of ADAM/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins.

  18. The Coat Protein and NIa Protease of Two Potyviridae Family Members Independently Confer Superinfection Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; French, Roy

    2016-12-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE) is an antagonistic virus-virus interaction whereby initial infection by one virus prevents subsequent infection by closely related viruses. Although SIE has been described in diverse viruses infecting plants, humans, and animals, its mechanisms, including involvement of specific viral determinants, are just beginning to be elucidated. In this study, SIE determinants encoded by two economically important wheat viruses, Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV; genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae), were identified in gain-of-function experiments that used heterologous viruses to express individual virus-encoded proteins in wheat. Wheat plants infected with TriMV expressing WSMV P1, HC-Pro, P3, 6K1, CI, 6K2, NIa-VPg, or NIb cistrons permitted efficient superinfection by WSMV expressing green fluorescent protein (WSMV-GFP). In contrast, wheat infected with TriMV expressing WSMV NIa-Pro or coat protein (CP) substantially excluded superinfection by WSMV-GFP, suggesting that both of these cistrons are SIE effectors encoded by WSMV. Importantly, SIE is due to functional WSMV NIa-Pro or CP rather than their encoding RNAs, as altering the coded protein products by minimally changing RNA sequences led to abolishment of SIE. Deletion mutagenesis further revealed that elicitation of SIE by NIa-Pro requires the entire protein while CP requires only a 200-amino-acid (aa) middle fragment (aa 101 to 300) of the 349 aa. Strikingly, reciprocal experiments with WSMV-mediated expression of TriMV proteins showed that TriMV CP, and TriMV NIa-Pro to a lesser extent, likewise excluded superinfection by TriMV-GFP. Collectively, these data demonstrate that WSMV- and TriMV-encoded CP and NIa-Pro proteins are effectors of SIE and that these two proteins trigger SIE independently of each other. Superinfection exclusion (SIE) is an antagonistic virus-virus interaction that prevents secondary

  19. Improved detection of remote homologues using cascade PSI-BLAST: influence of neighbouring protein families on sequence coverage.

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    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of sensitive sequence search procedures for the detection of distant relationships between proteins at superfamily/fold level is still a big challenge. The intermediate sequence search approach is the most frequently employed manner of identifying remote homologues effectively. In this study, examination of serine proteases of prolyl oligopeptidase, rhomboid and subtilisin protein families were carried out using plant serine proteases as queries from two genomes including A. thaliana and O. sativa and 13 other families of unrelated folds to identify the distant homologues which could not be obtained using PSI-BLAST. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have proposed to start with multiple queries of classical serine protease members to identify remote homologues in families, using a rigorous approach like Cascade PSI-BLAST. We found that classical sequence based approaches, like PSI-BLAST, showed very low sequence coverage in identifying plant serine proteases. The algorithm was applied on enriched sequence database of homologous domains and we obtained overall average coverage of 88% at family, 77% at superfamily or fold level along with specificity of ~100% and Mathew's correlation coefficient of 0.91. Similar approach was also implemented on 13 other protein families representing every structural class in SCOP database. Further investigation with statistical tests, like jackknifing, helped us to better understand the influence of neighbouring protein families. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that employment of multiple queries of a family for the Cascade PSI-BLAST searches is useful for predicting distant relationships effectively even at superfamily level. We have proposed a generalized strategy to cover all the distant members of a particular family using multiple query sequences. Our findings reveal that prior selection of sequences as query and the presence of neighbouring families can be important for

  20. OSTEOSARCOMA IN AFRICAN HEDGEHOGS (ATELERIX ALBIVENTRIS): FIVE CASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Matute, Alonso; Méndez-Bernal, Adriana; Ramos-Garduño, Liliana-Aurora

    2017-06-01

    Osteosarcomas are unusual neoplasms in African hedgehogs ( Atelerix albiventris ) and have been reported in extraskeletal and skeletal locations, including mandible, ribs, and vertebra. Five hedgehogs with osteosarcoma submitted to the Pathology Department at Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, National Autonomous University of Mexico are reported. In two cases, the neoplasm arose from the skull; one case arose from the ribs with associated compression of the thoracic and abdominal cavity, and another case involved the vertebrae. In the last case, the neoplasm arose from the scapula. Histologic lesions were similar in all cases and consisted of well-demarcated nodules in which neoplastic cells were arranged in sheets of polyhedral to spindle-shaped cells with interspersed areas of necrosis. Numerous trabeculae of osteoid were present throughout the tumors. No metastases were detected. The predominant histologic pattern was osteoblastic, but a telangiectatic-like pattern was observed in the vertebral osteosarcoma. Electron microscopy was performed in two cases, and malignant osteoblasts had features consistent with descriptions in other species, including deposits of hydroxyapatite in osteoid. According to these cases and previously published data, axial osteosarcomas are more frequent in contrast to appendicular osteosarcomas in African hedgehogs, and metastases are rare.

  1. Identification of Heat Shock Protein families and J-protein types by incorporating Dipeptide Composition into Chou's general PseAAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saeed; Kabir, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2015-11-01

    Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) are the substantial ingredients for cell growth and viability, which are found in all living organisms. HSPs manage the process of folding and unfolding of proteins, the quality of newly synthesized proteins and protecting cellular homeostatic processes from environmental stress. On the basis of functionality, HSPs are categorized into six major families namely: (i) HSP20 or sHSP (ii) HSP40 or J-proteins types (iii) HSP60 or GroEL/ES (iv) HSP70 (v) HSP90 and (vi) HSP100. Identification of HSPs family and sub-family through conventional approaches is expensive and laborious. It is therefore, highly desired to establish an automatic, robust and accurate computational method for prediction of HSPs quickly and reliably. Regard, a computational model is developed for the prediction of HSPs family. In this model, protein sequences are formulated using three discrete methods namely: Split Amino Acid Composition, Pseudo Amino Acid Composition, and Dipeptide Composition. Several learning algorithms are utilized to choice the best one for high throughput computational model. Leave one out test is applied to assess the performance of the proposed model. The empirical results showed that support vector machine achieved quite promising results using Dipeptide Composition feature space. The predicted outcomes of proposed model are 90.7% accuracy for HSPs dataset and 97.04% accuracy for J-protein types, which are higher than existing methods in the literature so far. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Generalidades de la señalización molecular durante el desarrollo embrionario: El caso del Sonic Hedgehog

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    David Arias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Histogenesis and organogenesis of the vertebrates –including humans– involves the interaction of an epithelium (derived from the ectoderm and endoderm and the underlying mesenchyme (derived from the intraembryonic mesoderm. This interaction is regulated by a paracrine signaling network that includes several ligands and their respective receptors, in addition to a series of transcription factors that control the whole system. Among these factors are fibroblast growth factors (Fgf, Hedgehog family (Hh, Wingless family (Wnt and beta-fibroblast growth factor superfamily (Tgf-β, which act to organize the morphogenetic pattern of a tissue, an organ, an apparatus and a morphofunctional system. One of the most studied factors is Sonic hedgehog (Shh, which is essential for regulating the formation of morphogenetic fields in specific places of the embryo’s body schema through cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell survival processes –in development or in the adult–. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review is to describe the role of Shh in the embryonic development of the neural tube, the limbs and the teeth.

  3. Characterization of an outer membrane protein of Pasteurella multocida belonging to the OmpA family.

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    Marandi, M; Mittal, K R

    1996-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicle and N-lauroylsarcosine-insoluble protein preparations of Pasteurella multocida 656 were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A major outer membrane protein (OMP) was found to be heat-modifiable, having a molecular mass of 28 kDa when the OMP preparation was solubilized at 60 degrees C and a molecular mass of 37 kDa when it was solubilized at 100 degrees C. A monoclonal antibody, designated mAb MT4.1, was generated against heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida. This mAb reacted with the heat-modifiable OMP irrespective of the temperature at which it was solubilized, as demonstrated by immunoblot results. The heat-modifiable OMP of P. multocida showed a significant N-terminal amino acid sequence homology with OmpA family. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that the mAb Mt4.1 epitope was not surface exposed on the intact bacterium. The mAb MT4.1 reacted with all the reference strains of 5 capsular and 16 somatic serotypes, as well as with 75 field strains of P. multocida in immunoblot assay. This mAb MT4.1 also reacted with strains of various other Pasteurella species such as P. stomatis, P. aerogenes P. gallinarum, P. betti, P. sp, B, P. SP-g and P. canis, but not with strains of 12 other Gram-negative bacteria. These results indicated that this protein carried a genus-specific epitope and mAb MT4.1 may be useful for identification of Pasteurella species. This is the first report in which a major heat-modifiable OMP has been identified and characterized using a mAb, and has been shown belonging to the OmpA family.

  4. [The new function of p53 family and its pathway related proteins in female reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Li, An; Yu, Jian-Hua; Xiang, Chao-Jie; Su, Shi-Da; Huang, Lei; Fang, Yu-Jie; Luo, Ying; Tang, Wen-Ru

    2012-08-01

    p53 is an important tumor suppressor gene and one of the key genes in sensing and regulating responses to the environmental stress. Recent study showed that cold winter temperature naturally selected p53 Arg72 in eastern Asian population, suggesting that p53 plays a role in reproduction. It has also been reported that some SNPs of p53, Mdm2(Murine double minute 2), MdmX and Hausp (Herpes virus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease) in p53 pathway are associated with the risk of the women's reproduction disorder. p53 regulates the LIF (leukaemia inhibitory factor) expression level by its DBD domain, and thus contributes to female reproduction by affecting the embryo implantation process. The MDM2, MDMX, and HAUSP proteins regulates the level and activity of p53 protein, which are critical for the appropriate p53 response in the embryo implantation process. The members of p53 family, p63 and p73, also play roles in female reproduction through other pathways. p63 has been implicated as a major regulator of oocyte death following treatment with irradiation and chemotherapeutic drugs, which prevents fetal malformation. p73 regulates the formation of spindle assembly complex(SAC). The dysfunction of SAC results in poor blastocyst quality and defects in kinetochore-microtubule associations, which leads to aneuploidy. This review summarized the function of p53 family and its pathway related proteins in female reproduction, pointed out a new method in improving the success rate in IVF-ET, and provided a new diagnosis idea for unexplained infertile women. It will facilitate personalized strategies in the infertility therapy.

  5. The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium

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    Morishita, Kazushge; Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp

    2017-05-15

    Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family genes are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. DOCK family proteins mainly regulate actin filament polymerization and/or depolymerization and are GEF proteins, which contribute to cellular signaling events by activating small G proteins. Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to mammalian DOCK3/DOCK4, and plays a role in embryonic central nervous system development, R7 photoreceptor cell differentiation, and adult thorax development. In order to conduct further functional analyses on Spg in vivo, we examined its localization in third instar larval wing imaginal discs. Immunostaining with purified anti-Spg IgG revealed that Spg mainly localized in the air sac primordium (ASP) in wing imaginal discs. Spg is therefore predicted to play an important role in the ASP. The specific knockdown of Spg by the breathless-GAL4 driver in tracheal cells induced lethality accompanied with a defect in ASP development and the induction of apoptosis. The monitoring of ERK signaling activity in wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-diphospho-ERK IgG revealed reductions in the ERK signal cascade in Spg knockdown clones. Furthermore, the overexpression of D-raf suppressed defects in survival and the proliferation of cells in the ASP induced by the knockdown of Spg. Collectively, these results indicate that Spg plays a critical role in ASP development and tracheal cell viability that is mediated by the ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Spg mainly localizes in the air sac primordium in wing imaginal discs. • Spg plays a critical role in air sac primordium development. • Spg positively regulates the ERK signal cascade.

  6. The BCL-2 family protein Bid is critical for pro-inflammatory signaling in astrocytes.

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    König, Hans-Georg; Coughlan, Karen S; Kinsella, Sinéad; Breen, Bridget A; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2014-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motoneurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex. Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene represent a frequent genetic determinant and recapitulate a disease phenotype similar to ALS when expressed in mice. Previous studies using SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice have suggested a paracrine mechanism of neuronal loss, in which cytokines and other toxic factors released from astroglia or microglia trigger motoneuron degeneration. Several pro-inflammatory cytokines activate death receptors and may downstream from this activate the Bcl-2 family protein, Bid. We here sought to investigate the role of Bid in astrocyte activation and non-cell autonomous motoneuron degeneration. We found that spinal cord Bid protein levels increased significantly during disease progression in SOD1(G93A) mice. Subsequent experiments in vitro indicated that Bid was expressed at relatively low levels in motoneurons, but was enriched in astrocytes and microglia. Bid was strongly induced in astrocytes in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines or exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Experiments in bid-deficient astrocytes or astrocytes treated with a small molecule Bid inhibitor demonstrated that Bid was required for the efficient activation of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB in response to these pro-inflammatory stimuli. Finally, we found that conditioned medium from wild-type astrocytes, but not from bid-deficient astrocytes, was toxic when applied to primary motoneuron cultures. Collectively, our data demonstrate a new role for the Bcl-2 family protein Bid as a mediator of astrocyte activation during neuroinflammation, and suggest that Bid activation may contribute to non-cell autonomous motoneuron degeneration in ALS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression analysis of the Theileria parva subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein gene family.

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    Jacqueline Schmuckli-Maurer

    Full Text Available The intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva transforms bovine lymphocytes inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Proteins released from the parasite are assumed to contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell and parasite persistence. With 85 members, genes encoding subtelomeric variable secreted proteins (SVSPs form the largest gene family in T. parva. The majority of SVSPs contain predicted signal peptides, suggesting secretion into the host cell cytoplasm.We analysed SVSP expression in T. parva-transformed cell lines established in vitro by infection of T or B lymphocytes with cloned T. parva parasites. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed mRNA expression for a wide range of SVSP genes. The pattern of mRNA expression was largely defined by the parasite genotype and not by host background or cell type, and found to be relatively stable in vitro over a period of two months. Interestingly, immunofluorescence analysis carried out on cell lines established from a cloned parasite showed that expression of a single SVSP encoded by TP03_0882 is limited to only a small percentage of parasites. Epitope-tagged TP03_0882 expressed in mammalian cells was found to translocate into the nucleus, a process that could be attributed to two different nuclear localisation signals.Our analysis reveals a complex pattern of Theileria SVSP mRNA expression, which depends on the parasite genotype. Whereas in cell lines established from a cloned parasite transcripts can be found corresponding to a wide range of SVSP genes, only a minority of parasites appear to express a particular SVSP protein. The fact that a number of SVSPs contain functional nuclear localisation signals suggests that proteins released from the parasite could contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell. This initial characterisation will facilitate future studies on the regulation of SVSP gene expression and the potential biological role of these enigmatic

  8. The role of the CCN family of proteins in female reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2014-06-01

    The CCN family of proteins consists of six high homologous matricellular proteins which act predominantly by binding to heparin sulphate proteoglycan and a variety of integrins. Interestingly, CCN proteins are regulated by ovarian steroid hormones and are able to adapt to changes in oxygen concentration, which is a necessary condition for successful implantation. CCN1 is involved in processes of angiogenesis within reproductive systems, thereby potentially contributing to diseases such as endometriosis and disturbed angiogenesis in the placenta and fetus. In the ovary, CCN2 is the key factor for follicular development, ovulation and corpora luteal luteolysis, and its deletion leads to fertility defects. CCN1, CCN2 and CCN3 seem to be regulators for human trophoblast proliferation and migration, but with CCN2 acting as a counterweight. Alterations in the expression of these three proteins could contribute to the shallow invasion properties observed in preeclampsia. Little is known about the role of CCN4-6 in the reproductive organs. The ability of CCN1, CCN2 and CCN3 to interact with numerous receptors enables them to adapt their biological function rapidly to the continuous remodelling of the reproductive organs and in the development of the placenta. The CCN proteins mediate their specific cell physiological function through the receptor type of their binding partner followed by a defined signalling cascade. Because of their partly overlapping expression patterns, they could act in a concert synergistically or in an opposite way within the reproductive organs. Imbalances in their expression levels are correlated to different human reproductive diseases, such as endometriosis and preeclampsia.

  9. Maintenance of Taste Organs Is Strictly Dependent on Epithelial Hedgehog/GLI Signaling.

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    Alexandre N Ermilov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For homeostasis, lingual taste papilla organs require regulation of epithelial cell survival and renewal, with sustained innervation and stromal interactions. To investigate a role for Hedgehog/GLI signaling in adult taste organs we used a panel of conditional mouse models to manipulate GLI activity within epithelial cells of the fungiform and circumvallate papillae. Hedgehog signaling suppression rapidly led to taste bud loss, papilla disruption, and decreased proliferation in domains of papilla epithelium that contribute to taste cells. Hedgehog responding cells were eliminated from the epithelium but retained in the papilla stromal core. Despite papilla disruption and loss of taste buds that are a major source of Hedgehog ligand, innervation to taste papillae was maintained, and not misdirected, even after prolonged GLI blockade. Further, vimentin-positive fibroblasts remained in the papilla core. However, retained innervation and stromal cells were not sufficient to maintain taste bud cells in the context of compromised epithelial Hedgehog signaling. Importantly taste organ disruption after GLI blockade was reversible in papillae that retained some taste bud cell remnants where reactivation of Hedgehog signaling led to regeneration of papilla epithelium and taste buds. Therefore, taste bud progenitors were either retained during epithelial GLI blockade or readily repopulated during recovery, and were poised to regenerate taste buds once Hedgehog signaling was restored, with innervation and papilla connective tissue elements in place. Our data argue that Hedgehog signaling is essential for adult tongue tissue maintenance and that taste papilla epithelial cells represent the key targets for physiologic Hedgehog-dependent regulation of taste organ homeostasis. Because disruption of GLI transcriptional activity in taste papilla epithelium is sufficient to drive taste organ loss, similar to pharmacologic Hedgehog pathway inhibition, the findings

  10. BET Family Protein BRD4: An Emerging Actor in NFκB Signaling in Inflammation and Cancer

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    Azadeh Hajmirza

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available NFκB (Nuclear Factor-κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling elicits global transcriptional changes by activating cognate promoters and through genome-wide remodeling of cognate regulatory elements called “super enhancers”. BET (Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal domain protein family inhibitor studies have implicated BET protein member BRD4 and possibly other BET proteins in NFκB-dependent promoter and super-enhancer modulation. Members of the BET protein family are known to bind acetylated chromatin to facilitate access by transcriptional regulators to chromatin, as well as to assist the activity of transcription elongation complexes via CDK9/pTEFb. BET family member BRD4 has been shown to bind non-histone proteins and modulate their activity. One such protein is RELA, the NFκB co-activator. Specifically, BRD4 binds acetylated RELA, which increases its transcriptional transactivation activity and stability in the nucleus. In aggregate, this establishes an intimate link between NFκB and BET signaling, at least via BRD4. The present review provides a brief overview of the structure and function of BET family proteins and then examines the connections between NFκB and BRD4 signaling, using the inflammatory response and cancer cell signaling as study models. We also discuss the potential of BET inhibitors for relief of aberrant NFκB signaling in cancer, focusing on non-histone, acetyl-lysine binding functions.

  11. Genetic analysis of Hedgehog signaling in ventral body wall development and the onset of omphalocele formation.

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    Daisuke Matsumaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In spite of its clinical importance, the etiology of omphalocele formation is still controversial. Hedgehog (Hh signaling is one of the essential growth factor signaling pathways involved in the formation of the limbs and urogenital system. However, the relationship between Hh signaling and ventral body wall formation remains unclear.To gain insight into the roles of Hh signaling in ventral body wall formation and its malformation, we analyzed phenotypes of mouse mutants of Sonic hedgehog (Shh, GLI-Kruppel family member 3 (Gli3 and Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (Alx4. Introduction of additional Alx4(Lst mutations into the Gli3(Xt/Xt background resulted in various degrees of severe omphalocele and pubic diastasis. In addition, loss of a single Shh allele restored the omphalocele and pubic symphysis of Gli3(Xt/+; Alx4(Lst/Lst embryos. We also observed ectopic Hh activity in the ventral body wall region of Gli3(Xt/Xt embryos. Moreover, tamoxifen-inducible gain-of-function experiments to induce ectopic Hh signaling revealed Hh signal dose-dependent formation of omphaloceles.We suggest that one of the possible causes of omphalocele and pubic diastasis is ectopically-induced Hh signaling. To our knowledge, this would be the first demonstration of the involvement of Hh signaling in ventral body wall malformation and the genetic rescue of omphalocele phenotypes.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Hedgehog Signaling in Ventral Body Wall Development and the Onset of Omphalocele Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumaru, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Motoyama, Jun; Nakagata, Naomi; Meijlink, Frits; Yamada, Gen

    2011-01-01

    Background An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In spite of its clinical importance, the etiology of omphalocele formation is still controversial. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is one of the essential growth factor signaling pathways involved in the formation of the limbs and urogenital system. However, the relationship between Hh signaling and ventral body wall formation remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain insight into the roles of Hh signaling in ventral body wall formation and its malformation, we analyzed phenotypes of mouse mutants of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), GLI-Kruppel family member 3 (Gli3) and Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (Alx4). Introduction of additional Alx4Lst mutations into the Gli3Xt/Xt background resulted in various degrees of severe omphalocele and pubic diastasis. In addition, loss of a single Shh allele restored the omphalocele and pubic symphysis of Gli3Xt/+; Alx4Lst/Lst embryos. We also observed ectopic Hh activity in the ventral body wall region of Gli3Xt/Xt embryos. Moreover, tamoxifen-inducible gain-of-function experiments to induce ectopic Hh signaling revealed Hh signal dose-dependent formation of omphaloceles. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that one of the possible causes of omphalocele and pubic diastasis is ectopically-induced Hh signaling. To our knowledge, this would be the first demonstration of the involvement of Hh signaling in ventral body wall malformation and the genetic rescue of omphalocele phenotypes. PMID:21283718

  13. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family

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    Shchelkunov Sergei N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variola virus (VARV the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. Findings De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  14. Members of the Salivary Gland Surface Protein (SGS) Family Are Major Immunogenic Components of Mosquito Saliva*

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonas G.; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Hillyer, Julián F.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes transmit Plasmodium and certain arboviruses during blood feeding, when they are injected along with saliva. Mosquito saliva interferes with the host's hemostasis and inflammation response and influences the transmission success of some pathogens. One family of mosquito salivary gland proteins, named SGS, is composed of large bacterial-type proteins that in Aedes aegypti were implicated as receptors for Plasmodium on the basal salivary gland surface. Here, we characterize the biology of two SGSs in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and demonstrate their involvement in blood feeding. Western blots and RT-PCR showed that Sgs4 and Sgs5 are produced exclusively in female salivary glands, that expression increases with age and after blood feeding, and that protein levels fluctuate in a circadian manner. Immunohistochemistry showed that SGSs are present in the acinar cells of the distal lateral lobes and in the salivary ducts of the proximal lobes. SDS-PAGE, Western blots, bite blots, and immunization via mosquito bites showed that SGSs are highly immunogenic and form major components of mosquito saliva. Last, Western and bioinformatic analyses suggest that SGSs are secreted via a non-classical pathway that involves cleavage into a 300-kDa soluble fragment and a smaller membrane-bound fragment. Combined, these data strongly suggest that SGSs play an important role in blood feeding. Together with their role in malaria transmission, we propose that SGSs could be used as markers of human exposure to mosquito bites and in the development of disease control strategies. PMID:21965675

  15. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurkó, M Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-10-15

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans.

  16. Statistical analysis of genomic protein family and domain controlled annotations for functional investigation of classified gene lists

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    Masseroli Marco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing protein family and domain based annotations constitute important information to understand protein functions and gain insight into relations among their codifying genes. To allow analyzing of gene proteomic annotations, we implemented novel modules within GFINDer, a Web system we previously developed that dynamically aggregates functional and phenotypic annotations of user-uploaded gene lists and allows performing their statistical analysis and mining. Results Exploiting protein information in Pfam and InterPro databanks, we developed and added in GFINDer original modules specifically devoted to the exploration and analysis of functional signatures of gene protein products. They allow annotating numerous user-classified nucleotide sequence identifiers with controlled information on related protein families, domains and functional sites, classifying them according to such protein annotation categories, and statistically analyzing the obtained classifications. In particular, when uploaded nucleotide sequence identifiers are subdivided in classes, the Statistics Protein Families&Domains module allows estimating relevance of Pfam or InterPro controlled annotations for the uploaded genes by highlighting protein signatures significantly more represented within user-defined classes of genes. In addition, the Logistic Regression module allows identifying protein functional signatures that better explain the considered gene classification. Conclusion Novel GFINDer modules provide genomic protein family and domain analyses supporting better functional interpretation of gene classes, for instance defined through statistical and clustering analyses of gene expression results from microarray experiments. They can hence help understanding fundamental biological processes and complex cellular mechanisms influenced by protein domain composition, and contribute to unveil new biomedical knowledge about the codifying genes.

  17. 3PFDB - A database of Best Representative PSSM Profiles (BRPs of Protein Families generated using a novel data mining approach

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    Shameer Khader

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein families could be related to each other at broad levels that group them as superfamilies. These relationships are harder to detect at the sequence level due to high evolutionary divergence. Sequence searches are strongly directed and influenced by the best representatives of families that are viewed as starting points. PSSMs are useful approximations and mathematical representations of protein alignments, with wide array of applications in bioinformatics approaches like remote homology detection, protein family analysis, detection of new members and evolutionary modelling. Computational intensive searches have been performed using the neural network based sensitive sequence search method called FASSM to identify the Best Representative PSSMs for families reported in Pfam database version 22. Results We designed a novel data mining approach for the assessment of individual sequences from a protein family to identify a single Best Representative PSSM profile (BRP per protein family. Using the approach, a database of protein family-specific best representative PSSM profiles called 3PFDB has been developed. PSSM profiles in 3PFDB are curated using performance of individual sequence as a reference in a rigorous scoring and coverage analysis approach using FASSM. We have assessed the suitability of 10, 85,588 sequences derived from seed or full alignments reported in Pfam database (Version 22. Coverage analysis using FASSM method is used as the filtering step to identify the best representative sequence, starting from full length or domain sequences to generate the final profile for a given family. 3PFDB is a collection of best representative PSSM profiles of 8,524 protein families from Pfam database. Conclusion Availability of an approach to identify BRPs and a curated database of best representative PSI-BLAST derived PSSMs for 91.4% of current Pfam family will be a useful resource for the community to perform detailed and

  18. X-ray structures of two proteins belonging to Pfam DUF178 revealed unexpected structural similarity to the DUF191 Pfam family

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    Burley Stephen K

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pfam is a comprehensive collection of protein domains and families, with a range of well-established information including genome annotation. Pfam has two large series of functionally uncharacterized families, known as Domains of Unknown Function (DUFs and Uncharacterized Protein Families (UPFs. Results Crystal structures of two proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans and Streptomyces coelicolor belonging to Pfam protein family DUF178 (ID: PF02621 have been determined using Selenium-Single-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (Se-SAD. Based on the structure, we have identified the putative function for this family of protein. Conclusion Unexpectedly, we found that DUF178 Pfam is remarkably similar to Pfam family DUF191 suggesting that the sequence-based classification alone may not be sufficient to classify proteins into Pfam families.

  19. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies regulators of cholesterol-modified hedgehog secretion in Drosophila.

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    Reid Aikin

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh proteins are secreted molecules that function as organizers in animal development. In addition to being palmitoylated, Hh is the only metazoan protein known to possess a covalently-linked cholesterol moiety. The absence of either modification severely disrupts the organization of numerous tissues during development. It is currently not known how lipid-modified Hh is secreted and released from producing cells. We have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells to identify regulators of Hh secretion. We found that cholesterol-modified Hh secretion is strongly dependent on coat protein complex I (COPI but not COPII vesicles, suggesting that cholesterol modification alters the movement of Hh through the early secretory pathway. We provide evidence that both proteolysis and cholesterol modification are necessary for the efficient trafficking of Hh through the ER and Golgi. Finally, we identified several putative regulators of protein secretion and demonstrate a role for some of these genes in Hh and Wingless (Wg morphogen secretion in vivo. These data open new perspectives for studying how morphogen secretion is regulated, as well as provide insight into regulation of lipid-modified protein secretion.

  20. Evolution of SET-domain protein families in the unicellular and multicellular Ascomycota fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolution of multicellularity is accompanied by the occurrence of differentiated tissues, of organismal developmental programs, and of mechanisms keeping the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Initially, the SET-domain proteins were associated exclusively with regulation of developmental genes in metazoa. However, finding of SET-domain genes in the unicellular yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe suggested that SET-domain proteins regulate a much broader variety of biological programs. Intuitively, it is expected that the numbers, types, and biochemical specificity of SET-domain proteins of multicellular versus unicellular forms would reflect the differences in their biology. However, comparisons across the unicellular and multicellular domains of life are complicated by the lack of knowledge of the ancestral SET-domain genes. Even within the crown group, different biological systems might use the epigenetic 'code' differently, adapting it to organism-specific needs. Simplifying the model, we undertook a systematic phylogenetic analysis of one monophyletic fungal group (Ascomycetes) containing unicellular yeasts, Saccharomycotina (hemiascomycetes), and a filamentous fungal group, Pezizomycotina (euascomycetes). Results Systematic analysis of the SET-domain genes across an entire eukaryotic phylum has outlined clear distinctions in the SET-domain gene collections in the unicellular and in the multicellular (filamentous) relatives; diversification of SET-domain gene families has increased further with the expansion and elaboration of multicellularity in animal and plant systems. We found several ascomycota-specific SET-domain gene groups; each was unique to either Saccharomycotina or Pezizomycotina fungi. Our analysis revealed that the numbers and types of SET-domain genes in the Saccharomycotina did not reflect the habitats, pathogenicity, mechanisms of sexuality, or the ability to undergo morphogenic

  1. The scientific impact of the Structural Genomics Consortium: a protein family and ligand-centered approach to medically-relevant human proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gileadi, Opher; Knapp, Stefan; Lee, Wen Hwa; Marsden, Brian D; Müller, Susanne; Niesen, Frank H; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Ball, Linda J; von Delft, Frank; Doyle, Declan A; Oppermann, Udo C T; Sundström, Michael

    2007-09-01

    As many of the structural genomics centers have ended their first phase of operation, it is a good point to evaluate the scientific impact of this endeavour. The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), operating from three centers across the Atlantic, investigates human proteins involved in disease processes and proteins from Plasmodium falciparum and related organisms. We present here some of the scientific output of the Oxford node of the SGC, where the target areas include protein kinases, phosphatases, oxidoreductases and other metabolic enzymes, as well as signal transduction proteins. The SGC has aimed to achieve extensive coverage of human gene families with a focus on protein-ligand interactions. The methods employed for effective protein expression, crystallization and structure determination by X-ray crystallography are summarized. In addition to the cumulative impact of accelerated delivery of protein structures, we demonstrate how family coverage, generic screening methodology, and the availability of abundant purified protein samples, allow a level of discovery that is difficult to achieve otherwise. The contribution of NMR to structure determination and protein characterization is discussed. To make this information available to a wide scientific audience, a new tool for disseminating annotated structural information was created that also represents an interactive platform allowing for a continuous update of the annotation by the scientific community.

  2. The MRJP/YELLOW protein family of Apis mellifera: identification of new members in the EST library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Stefan; Klaudiny, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Major royal jelly proteins (named MRJP1-5) of honeybee (Apis mellifera), yellow proteins of Drosophila, together with putative proteins found in several bacteria, form a protein family termed the MRJP/yellow family. Members of the family exert diverse physiological functions and amongst eukaryotes appear to be restricted to the order Insecta. MRJPs constitute about 90% of total protein of royal jelly, which is secreted by nurse bees to feed the queen and growing larvae. We looked for mrjp and yellow homologues in a honeybee brain expressed sequence tags (EST) library. In addition to the five mrjp cDNAs previously characterized, we found three additional cDNAs encoding novel MRJPs and importantly, two cDNAs coding for orthologues of Drosophila yellow proteins. One yellow cDNA and all three cDNAs coding for the novel MRJPs were assembled completely, the sequence of the other yellow homologue was partially assembled. The data we present here supports the view that repeated duplications and functional divergence occurred during the evolution of MRJPs in honeybees, with even closely related MRJPs appearing to perform diverse physiological functions. Conversely, yellow protein orthologues appear to be conserved and thus candidates for maintaining the former function(s) of yellow proteins.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a novel erythroid cell-derived CNC family transcription factor heterodimerizing with the small Maf family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Igarashi, K; Hayashi, N; Nishizawa, M; Yamamoto, M

    1995-08-01

    The chicken beta-globin enhancer is critical for the tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of the beta-globin genes. This enhancer contains two indispensable cis elements, one containing two GATA sites and the other containing an NF-E2 site. To identify the putative transcription factor acting through the NF-E2 motif in the chicken beta-globin enhancer, we screened chicken cDNA libraries with a mouse p45 NF-E2 cDNA probe and isolated cDNA clones which encode a protein of 582 amino acid residues. This protein contains a region that includes the basic region-leucine zipper domain which is well conserved among members of the CNC family proteins (Cap 'n' collar, p45 NF-E2, LCR-F1, Nrf1, and Nrf2). Hence, we named this protein ECH (erythroid cell-derived protein with CNC homology). ECH is expressed abundantly in cultured erythroid cells undergoing terminal differentiation, peripheral erythrocytes, and some nonhematopoietic tissues. Since most of the cDNA clones obtained from the chicken erythrocyte cDNA library encoded ECH, ECH is likely the predominant CNC family protein present in avian peripheral erythrocytes. Like p45 NF-E2, ECH can heterodimerize with any of the small Maf family proteins and bind the NF-E2 site as a heterodimer in vitro. In a transfection assay, ECH transactivates transcription depending on the presence of NF-E2 sites on the reporter gene plasmid. These results indicate that ECH is likely a key regulator of avian erythropoiesis.

  4. Helminth Parasites of Eastern European Hedgehog (Erinaceus concolor in Northern Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Youssefi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently there is a high tendency among exotic pet owners for keeping hedgehogs. This mammal can transfer some significant zoonotic pathogens to human. Hence, the present study was conducted for the first time to prepare a list of helminth parasites of hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor in North of Iran.Ten (four males and six females road killed hedgehogs were collected during April to January 2011 in rural areas of Babol city, Mazandaran province, Iran. All of internal organs were scrutinized for helminth burden. The extracted specimens were fixed and preserved in 70% ethanol and then cleared in Lacto-phenol solution. Helminth identification was carried out according to available systematic keys.All the examined hedgehogs (100% were infected with parasitic helminth as following: two hedgehogs (20% were infected with Crenosoma striatum, four hedgehogs (40% harbored Physaloptera clausa, one (10% host had Hymenolepis erinacei and three (30% of them were infected with Nephridiacanthus major.This is noteworthy that the current survey is the first report of helminth parasites fauna of Eastern European Hedgehog in Iran. Since, this is the first such investigation in our country, more researches are required to perform on unexplored areas of Iran in order to increase our knowledge regarding hedgehog parasitic diseases.

  5. Helminth Parasites of Eastern European Hedgehog (Erinaceus concolor) in Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi; Halajian, Ali; Moosapour, Ali Asghar; Nikzad, Reza; Nikzad, Mohammad; Ramezanpour, Shahab; Ebrahimpour, Soheil

    2013-10-01

    Recently there is a high tendency among exotic pet owners for keeping hedgehogs. This mammal can transfer some significant zoonotic pathogens to human. Hence, the present study was conducted for the first time to prepare a list of helminth parasites of hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) in North of Iran. Ten (four males and six females) road killed hedgehogs were collected during April to January 2011 in rural areas of Babol city, Mazandaran province, Iran. All of internal organs were scrutinized for helminth burden. The extracted specimens were fixed and preserved in 70% ethanol and then cleared in Lacto-phenol solution. Helminth identification was carried out according to available systematic keys. All the examined hedgehogs (100%) were infected with parasitic helminth as following: two hedgehogs (20%) were infected with Crenosoma striatum, four hedgehogs (40%) harbored Physaloptera clausa, one (10%) host had Hymenolepis erinacei and three (30%) of them were infected with Nephridiacanthus major. This is noteworthy that the current survey is the first report of helminth parasites fauna of Eastern European Hedgehog in Iran. Since, this is the first such investigation in our country, more researches are required to perform on unexplored areas of Iran in order to increase our knowledge regarding hedgehog parasitic diseases.

  6. Static flexural properties of hedgehog spines conditioned in coupled temperature and relative humidity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emily B; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Swift, Nathan B; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2017-11-01

    Hedgehogs are agile climbers, scaling trees and plants to heights exceeding 10m while foraging insects. Hedgehog spines (a.k.a. quills) provide fall protection by absorbing shock and could offer insights for the design of lightweight, material-efficient, impact-resistant structures. There has been some study of flexural properties of hedgehog spines, but an understanding of how this keratinous biological material is affected by various temperature and relative humidity treatments, or how spine color (multicolored vs. white) affects mechanics, is lacking. To bridge this gap in the literature, we use three-point bending to analyze the effect of temperature, humidity, spine color, and their interactions on flexural strength and modulus of hedgehog spines. We also compare specific strength and stiffness of hedgehog spines to conventional engineered materials. We find hedgehog spine flexural properties can be finely tuned by modifying environmental conditioning parameters. White spines tend to be stronger and stiffer than multicolored spines. Finally, for most temperature and humidity conditioning parameters, hedgehog spines are ounce for ounce stronger than 201 stainless steel rods of the same diameter but as pliable as styrene rods with a slightly larger diameter. This unique combination of strength and elasticity makes hedgehog spines exemplary shock absorbers, and a suitable reference model for biomimicry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hedgehog pathway does not play a role in hidradenitis suppurativa pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozeika, E.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Nürnberg, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    in normal embryonic skin, hair follicle, sebaceous and sweat gland development. Mutations of hedgehog pathway in adult skin have previously been found in basal cell carcinomas and in alopecia as well as in epidermal cysts and in odontogenic keratocysts. Therefore, we suggested that the hedgehog pathway...

  8. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  9. Transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify a family of chlorhexidine efflux proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karl A.; Jackson, Scott M.; Penesyan, Anahit; Patching, Simon G.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian. T.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic or disinfectant in both hospital and community settings. A number of bacterial species display resistance to this membrane-active biocide. We examined the transcriptomic response of a representative nosocomial human pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, to chlorhexidine to identify the primary chlorhexidine resistance elements. The most highly up-regulated genes encoded components of a major multidrug efflux system, AdeAB. The next most highly overexpressed gene under chlorhexidine stress was annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, named here as AceI. Orthologs of the aceI gene are conserved within the genomes of a broad range of proteobacterial species. Expression of aceI or its orthologs from several other γ- or β-proteobacterial species in Escherichia coli resulted in significant increases in resistance to chlorhexidine. Additionally, disruption of the aceI ortholog in Acinetobacter baylyi rendered it more susceptible to chlorhexidine. The AceI protein was localized to the membrane after overexpression in E. coli. This protein was purified, and binding assays demonstrated direct and specific interactions between AceI and chlorhexidine. Transport assays using [14C]-chlorhexidine determined that AceI was able to mediate the energy-dependent efflux of chlorhexidine. An E15Q AceI mutant with a mutation in a conserved acidic residue, although unable to mediate chlorhexidine resistance and transport, was still able to bind chlorhexidine. Taken together, these data are consistent with AceI being an active chlorhexidine efflux protein and the founding member of a family of bacterial drug efflux transporters. PMID:24277845

  10. Six subgroups and extensive recent duplications characterize the evolution of the eukaryotic tubulin protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-08-27

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog-paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. The Origin and Evolution of the Plant Cell Surface: Algal Integrin-Associated Proteins and a New Family of Integrin-Like Cytoskeleton-ECM Linker Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Burkhard; Doan, Jean Michel; Wustman, Brandon; Carpenter, Eric J; Chen, Li; Zhang, Yong; Wong, Gane K-S; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-05-14

    The extracellular matrix of scaly green flagellates consists of small organic scales consisting of polysaccharides and scale-associated proteins (SAPs). Molecular phylogenies have shown that these organisms represent the ancestral stock of flagellates from which all green plants (Viridiplantae) evolved. The molecular characterization of four different SAPs is presented. Three SAPs are type-2 membrane proteins with an arginine/alanine-rich short cytoplasmic tail and an extracellular domain that is most likely of bacterial origin. The fourth protein is a filamin-like protein. In addition, we report the presence of proteins similar to the integrin-associated proteins α-actinin (in transcriptomes of glaucophytes and some viridiplants), LIM-domain proteins, and integrin-associated kinase in transcriptomes of viridiplants, glaucophytes, and rhodophytes. We propose that the membrane proteins identified are the predicted linkers between scales and the cytoskeleton. These proteins are present in many green algae but are apparently absent from embryophytes. These proteins represent a new protein family we have termed gralins for green algal integrins. Gralins are absent from embryophytes. A model for the evolution of the cell surface proteins in Plantae is discussed. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Activation-resistant homozygous protein C R229W mutation causing familial perinatal intracranial hemorrhage and delayed onset of thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Gale, Andrew J; Kurban, Kadijah; Khalifah, Mohammed; Albadr, Fahad B; Griffin, John H

    2016-07-01

    We describe a family with two first-degree cousins who presented with similar phenotypes characterized by neonatal intracranial hemorrhage and subsequent onset of thrombosis. We enrolled the two affected patients, five unaffected family members and fifty-five normal controls. Clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics of patients were obtained. Exome sequencing was performed for the older affected child. PROC c.811 C>T was genotyped by PCR in patients, family members, and controls. Protein C amidolytic activity and antigen were measured using the STACHROM® protein C kit and ELISAs. To define functional abnormalities caused by the patients' mutation, recombinant wildtype protein C and its mutants R229W, R229Q and R229A were studied. For the two cousins, protein C amidolytic activity was 61% and 59% and antigen was 57% and 73% (nl 70-140%), respectively. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous variant in exon 9 of the protein C (PROC) gene c.811 C>T (R229W). The R229W mutation is located in the calcium binding loop of protein C's protease domain that mediates thrombomodulin interactions. Recombinant R229W-protein C mutant was strikingly defective in rate of activation by thrombin: thrombomodulin, suggesting an in vivo deficit in these children for generation of activated protein C. These cases emphasize that protein C and activated protein C are important in maintaining the integrity of the brain vascular endothelium in humans. Moreover, routine protein C assays utilizing snake venom protease fail to detect protein C mutants that are resistant to thrombin:thrombomodulin activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Celiac Disease Histopathology Recapitulates Hedgehog Downregulation, Consistent with Wound Healing Processes Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Senger

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, intestinal epithelium damage occurs secondary to an immune insult and is characterized by blunting of the villi and crypt hyperplasia. Similarities between Hedgehog (Hh/BMP4 downregulation, as reported in a mouse model, and CD histopathology, suggest mechanistic involvement of Hh/BMP4/WNT pathways in proliferation and differentiation of immature epithelial cells in the context of human intestinal homeostasis and regeneration after damage. Herein we examined the nature of intestinal crypt hyperplasia and involvement of Hh/BMP4 in CD histopathology.Immunohistochemistry, qPCR and in situ hybridization were used to study a cohort of 24 healthy controls (HC and 24 patients with diagnosed acute celiac disease (A-CD intestinal biopsies. In A-CD we observed an increase in cells positive for Leucin-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5, an epithelial stem cell specific marker and expansion of WNT responding compartment. Further, we observed alteration in number and distribution of mesenchymal cells, predicted to be part of the intestinal stem cells niche. At the molecular level we found downregulation of indian hedgehog (IHH and other components of the Hh pathway, but we did not observe a concurrent downregulation of BMP4. However, we observed upregulation of BMPs antagonists, gremlin 1 and gremlin 2.Our data suggest that acute CD histopathology partially recapitulates the phenotype reported in Hh knockdown models. Specifically, Hh/BMP4 paradigm appears to be decoupled in CD, as the expansion of the immature cell population does not occur consequent to downregulation of BMP4. Instead, we provide evidence that upregulation of BMP antagonists play a key role in intestinal crypt hyperplasia. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying CD histopathology and the limitations in the use of mouse models for celiac disease.

  14. Drosophila DOCK Family Protein Zizimin Involves in Pigment Cell Differentiation in Pupal Retinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Fumito; Morishita, Kazushige; Dang, Ngoc Anh Suong; Miyata, Seiji; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2017-08-26

    The dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family proteins are known as one of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), that contribute to cellular signaling processes by activating small G proteins. Although mammalian Zizimin is known to be a GEF for Cdc42 of Rho family small GTPase, its role in vivo is not well understood. Here we studied in vivo function of Drosophila Zizimin (Ziz). Knockdown of Ziz in eye imaginal discs induced the rough eye phenotype accompanied with fusion of ommatidia, loss of bristles and loss of pigments. Immunostaining analyses revealed that Ziz mainly localizes in the secondary pigment cells (SPCs) and tertiary pigment cells (TPCs) in pupal retinae. Ziz-knockdown induced SPC- and TPC-like cells with aberrant morphology in the pupal retina. Delta (Dl), a downstream target of EGFR signaling is known to regulate pigment cell differentiation. Loss-of-function mutation of Dl suppressed the rough eye phenotype and the defect in differentiation of SPCs and TPCs in Ziz-knockdown flies. Moreover, Ziz-knockdown increased Dl expression level especially in SPCs and TPCs. In addition, mutations of rhomboid-1 and roughoid that are activators of EGFR signaling pathway also suppressed both the rough eye phenotype and the defect in differentiation of SPCs and TPCs in Ziz-knockdown flies. Activation of EGFR signaling in Ziz-knockdown flies were further confirmed by immunostaining with anti-diphospho ERK IgG. These results indicate that Ziz negatively regulates the Dl expression in SPCs and TPCs to control differentiation of pigment cells and this regulation is mediated by EGFR signaling pathway.Key words: Zizimin, DOCK, EGFR signaling pathway, pigment cell, Drosophila.

  15. Licochalcone C induces apoptosis via B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins in T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Penglong; Yuan, Xuan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Hong; Sun, Xiling; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms by which licochalcone C induces apoptosis of T24 human malignant bladder cancer cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay. Apoptosis was investigated using a morphological assay, flow cytometry and a caspase‑3 activity assay. Alterations in the gene expression levels of Bcl‑2 family members were measured by semi‑quantitative reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction assays. The protein levels of pro‑caspase‑3 and cleaved poly(ADP ribose) polymerase were measured using western blotting. The results indicated that licochalcone C induced T24 cell apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Licochalcone C treatment reduced the levels of the anti‑apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl‑2, Bcl‑w and Bcl‑XL) and increased expression of the pro‑apoptotic mRNAs (Bax and Bim). The Bcl‑2 family inhibitor (ABT‑737) reduced apoptosis induced by licochalcone C in T24 cells. The current study demonstrated that licochalcone C may be a potential adjuvant therapeutic agent for bladder cancer.

  16. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are caused by cilia-mediated diminished response to hedgehog ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Goodship, Judith A

    2009-11-15

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC; OMIM 225500) is a recessive disorder comprising chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, nail dysplasia, orofacial abnormalities and, in a proportion of patients, cardiovascular malformations. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (Weyers; OMIM 193530) is an allelic dominant disorder comprising polydactyly, nail dysplasia, and orofacial abnormalities. EvC results from loss-of-function mutations in EVC or EVC2, the phenotype associated with the mutations in these two genes being indistinguishable. Three convincing causative mutations have been identified in patients with Weyers acrodental dysostosis, which are clustered in the last coding exon of EVC2 and lead to production of a truncated protein lacking the final 43 amino acids. Localization and function of EVC and EVC2 are inferred from studying the murine orthologs. Both Evc and Evc2 proteins localize to the basal bodies of primary cilia and analysis of an Ellis-van Creveld mouse model, which includes the limb shortening and tooth abnormalities of EvC patients, has demonstrated Hedgehog signaling defects in the absence of Evc. The loss of Evc2 has not been studied directly, but Hedgehog signaling is impaired when a mutant murine Evc2 Weyer variant is expressed in vitro. We conclude that the phenotypic abnormalities in EvC and Weyers syndrome result from tissue specific disruption of the response to Hh ligands. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Molecular signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma: Role of and crosstalk among Wnt/β-catenin, Sonic Hedgehog, Notch and Dickkopf-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios; Mudan, Satvinder; Sklavos, Argyrios; Williams, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. In the majority of cases, there is evidence of existing chronic liver disease from a variety of causes including viral hepatitis B and C, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Identification of the signalling pathways used by hepatocellular carcinoma cells to proliferate, invade or metastasize is of paramount importance in the discovery and implementation of successfully targeted therapies. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog pathways play a critical role in regulating liver cell proliferation during development and in controlling crucial functions of the adult liver in the initiation and progression of human cancers. β-catenin was identified as a protein interacting with the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin at the cell-cell junction, and has been shown to be one of the most important mediators of the Wnt signalling pathway in tumourigenesis. Investigations into the role of Dikkopf-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma have demonstrated controversial results, with a decreased expression of Dickkopf-1 and soluble frizzled-related protein in various cancers on one hand, and as a possible negative prognostic indicator of hepatocellular carcinoma on the other. In the present review, the authors focus on the Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Sonic Hedgehog pathways, and their interaction with Dikkopf-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25965442

  18. Transcription Factor IIB (TFIIB)-Related Protein (pBrp), a Plant-Specific Member of the TFIIB-Related Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Thierry; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Pontier, Dominique; Courtois, Florence; Alcaraz, Jean Pierre; Grunwald, Didier; Lam, Eric; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2003-01-01

    Although it is now well documented that metazoans have evolved general transcription factor (GTF) variants to regulate their complex patterns of gene expression, there is so far no information regarding the existence of specific GTFs in plants. Here we report the characterization of a ubiquitously expressed gene that encodes a bona fide novel transcription factor IIB (TFIIB)-related protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have shown that this protein is the founding member of a plant-specific TFIIB-related protein family named pBrp (for plant-specific TFIIB-related protein). Surprisingly, in contrast to common GTFs that are localized in the nucleus, the bulk of pBrp proteins are bound to the cytoplasmic face of the plastid envelope, suggesting an organelle-specific function for this novel class of TFIIB-related protein. We show that pBrp proteins harbor conditional proteolytic signals that can target these proteins for rapid turnover by the proteasome-mediated protein degradation pathway. Interestingly, under conditions of proteasome inhibition, pBrp proteins accumulate in the nucleus. Together, our results suggest a possible involvement of these proteins in an intracellular signaling pathway between plastids and the nucleus. Our data provide the first evidence for an organelle-related evolution of the eukaryotic general transcription machinery. PMID:12697827

  19. Experimental Analysis of Functional Variation within Protein Families: Receiver Domain Autodephosphorylation Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephani C; Immormino, Robert M; Miller, Thane H; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-09-15

    Plants and microorganisms use two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) to mediate responses to environmental stimuli. TCSs mediate responses through phosphotransfer from a conserved histidine on a sensor kinase to a conserved aspartate on the receiver domain of a response regulator. Typically, signal termination occurs through dephosphorylation of the receiver domain, which can catalyze its own dephosphorylation. Despite strong structural conservation between receiver domains, reported autodephosphorylation rate constants (kdephos) span a millionfold range. Variable receiver domain active-site residues D + 2 and T + 2 (two amino acids C terminal to conserved phosphorylation site and Thr/Ser, respectively) influence kdephos values, but the extent and mechanism of influence are unclear. We used sequence analysis of a large database of naturally occurring receiver domains to design mutant receiver domains for experimental analysis of autodephosphorylation kinetics. When combined with previous analyses, kdephos values were obtained for CheY variants that contained D + 2/T + 2 pairs found in 54% of receiver domain sequences. Tested pairs of amino acids at D + 2/T + 2 generally had similar effects on kdephos in CheY, PhoBN, or Spo0F. Acid or amide residues at D + 2/T + 2 enhanced kdephos CheY variants altered at D + 2/T + 2 exhibited rate constants for autophosphorylation with phosphoramidates and autodephosphorylation that were inversely correlated, suggesting that D + 2/T + 2 residues interact with aspects of the ground or transition states that differ between the two reactions. kdephos of CheY variants altered at D + 2/T + 2 correlated significantly with kdephos of wild-type receiver domains containing the same D + 2/T + 2 pair. Additionally, particular D + 2/T + 2 pairs were enriched in different response regulator subfamilies, suggesting functional significance. One protein family, defined by a conserved domain, can include hundreds of thousands of known

  20. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  1. F-BAR family proteins, emerging regulators for cell membrane dynamic changes-from structure to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suxuan; Xiong, Xinyu; Zhao, Xianxian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-09

    Eukaryotic cell membrane dynamics change in curvature during physiological and pathological processes. In the past ten years, a novel protein family, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain proteins, has been identified to be the most important coordinators in membrane curvature regulation. The F-BAR domain family is a member of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain superfamily that is associated with dynamic changes in cell membrane. However, the molecular basis in membrane structure regulation and the biological functions of F-BAR protein are unclear. The pathophysiological role of F-BAR protein is unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of structure and function in the BAR domain superfamily, classifies F-BAR family proteins into nine subfamilies based on domain structure, and characterizes F-BAR protein structure, domain interaction, and functional relevance. In general, F-BAR protein binds to cell membrane via F-BAR domain association with membrane phospholipids and initiates membrane curvature and scission via Src homology-3 (SH3) domain interaction with its partner proteins. This process causes membrane dynamic changes and leads to seven important cellular biological functions, which include endocytosis, phagocytosis, filopodium, lamellipodium, cytokinesis, adhesion, and podosome formation, via distinct signaling pathways determined by specific domain-binding partners. These cellular functions play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. We further summarize F-BAR protein expression and mutation changes observed in various diseases and developmental disorders. Considering the structure feature and functional implication of F-BAR proteins, we anticipate that F-BAR proteins modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes via transferring extracellular materials, regulating cell trafficking and mobility, presenting antigens, mediating extracellular matrix degradation, and transmitting

  2. The Folding process of Human Profilin-1, a novel protein associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Poggetto, Edoardo; Chiti, Fabrizio; Bemporad, Francesco

    2015-07-31

    Human profilin-1 is a novel protein associated with a recently discovered form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This urges the characterization of possible conformational states, different from the fully folded state, potentially able to initiate self-assembly. Under native conditions, profilin-1 is monomeric and possesses a well-defined secondary and tertiary structure. When incubated at low pH or with high urea concentrations, profilin-1 remains monomeric but populates unfolded states exhibiting larger hydrodynamic radius and disordered structure, as assessed by dynamic light scattering, far-UV circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence. Refolding from the urea-unfolded state was studied at equilibrium and in real-time using a stopped-flow apparatus. The results obtained with intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism indicate a single phase without significant changes of the corresponding signals before the major refolding transition. However, such a transition is preceded by a burst phase with an observed increase of ANS fluorescence, which indicates the conversion into a transiently populated collapsed state possessing solvent-exposed hydrophobic clusters. Kinetic analysis reveals that such state has a conformational stability comparable to that of the fully unfolded state. To our knowledge, profilin-1 is the first example of an amyloid-related protein where folding occurs in the absence of thermodynamically stable partially folded states.

  3. Molecular Basis for Specific Regulation of Neuronal Kinesin-3 Motors by Doublecortin Family Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Judy S.; Schubert, Christian R.; Fu, Xiaoqin; Fourniol, Franck J.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Houdusse, Anne; Stultz, Collin M.; Moores, Carolyn A.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Doublecortin (Dcx) defines a growing family of microtubule (MT)-associated proteins (MAPs) involved in neuronal migration and process outgrowth. We show that Dcx is essential for the function of Kif1a, a kinesin-3 motor protein that traffics synaptic vesicles. Neurons lacking Dcx and/or its structurally conserved paralogue, doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1), show impaired Kif1a-mediated transport of Vamp2, a cargo of Kif1a, with decreased run length. Human disease-associated mutations in Dcx's linker sequence (e.g., W146C, K174E) alter Kif1a/Vamp2 transport by disrupting Dcx/Kif1a interactions without affecting Dcx MT binding. Dcx specifically enhances binding of the ADP-bound Kif1a motor domain to MTs. Cryo-electron microscopy and subnanometer-resolution image reconstruction reveal the kinesin-dependent conformational variability of MT-bound Dcx and suggest a model for MAP-motor crosstalk on MTs. Alteration of kinesin run length by MAPs represents a previously undiscovered mode of control of kinesin transport and provides a mechanism for regulation of MT-based transport by local signals. PMID:22857951

  4. Identification of an AP2-family protein that is critical for malaria liver stage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Shiroh; Kaneko, Izumi; Kato, Tomomi; Yuda, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Liver-stage malaria parasites are a promising target for drugs and vaccines against malaria infection. However, little is currently known about gene regulation in this stage. In this study, we used the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei and showed that an AP2-family transcription factor, designated AP2-L, plays a critical role in the liver-stage development of the parasite. AP2-L-depleted parasites proliferated normally in blood and in mosquitoes. However, the ability of these parasites to infect the liver was approximately 10,000 times lower than that of wild-type parasites. In vitro assays showed that the sporozoites of these parasites invaded hepatocytes normally but that their development stopped in the middle of the liver schizont stage. Expression profiling using transgenic P. berghei showed that fluorescent protein-tagged AP2-L increased rapidly during the liver schizont stage but suddenly disappeared with the formation of the mature liver schizont. DNA microarray analysis showed that the expression of several genes, including those of parasitophorous vacuole membrane proteins, was significantly decreased in the early liver stage of AP2-L-depleted parasites. Investigation of the targets of this transcription factor should greatly promote the exploration of liver-stage antigens and the elucidation of the mechanisms of hepatocyte infection by malaria parasites.

  5. High-throughput computational structure-based characterization of protein families: START domains and implications for structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hunjoong; Li, Zhaohui; Silkov, Antonina; Fischer, Markus; Petrey, Donald; Honig, Barry; Murray, Diana

    2010-03-01

    SkyLine, a high-throughput homology modeling pipeline tool, detects and models true sequence homologs to a given protein structure. Structures and models are stored in SkyBase with links to computational function annotation, as calculated by MarkUs. The SkyLine/SkyBase/MarkUs technology represents a novel structure-based approach that is more objective and versatile than other protein classification resources. This structure-centric strategy provides a multi-dimensional organization and coverage of protein space at the levels of family, function, and genome. The concept of "modelability", the ability to model sequences on related structures, provides a reliable criterion for membership in a protein family ("leverage") and underlies the unique success of this approach. The overall procedure is illustrated by its application to START domains, which comprise a Biomedical Theme for the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium as part of the Protein Structure Initiative. START domains are typically involved in the non-vesicular transport of lipids. While 19 experimentally determined structures are available, the family, whose evolutionary hierarchy is not well determined, is highly sequence diverse, and the ligand-binding potential of many family members is unknown. The SkyLine/SkyBase/MarkUs approach provides significant insights and predicts: (1) many more family members (approximately 4,000) than any other resource; (2) the function for a large number of unannotated proteins; (3) instances of START domains in genomes from which they were thought to be absent; and (4) the existence of two types of novel proteins, those containing dual START domain and those containing N-terminal START domains.

  6. Automatic discovery of cross-family sequence features associated with protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krings Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for predicting protein function directly from amino acid sequences are useful tools in the study of uncharacterised protein families and in comparative genomics. Until now, this problem has been approached using machine learning techniques that attempt to predict membership, or otherwise, to predefined functional categories or subcellular locations. A potential drawback of this approach is that the human-designated functional classes may not accurately reflect the underlying biology, and consequently important sequence-to-function relationships may be missed. Results We show that a self-supervised data mining approach is able to find relationships between sequence features and functional annotations. No preconceived ideas about functional categories are required, and the training data is simply a set of protein sequences and their UniProt/Swiss-Prot annotations. The main technical aspect of the approach is the co-evolution of amino acid-based regular expressions and keyword-based logical expressions with genetic programming. Our experiments on a strictly non-redundant set of eukaryotic proteins reveal that the strongest and most easily detected sequence-to-function relationships are concerned with targeting to various cellular compartments, which is an area already well studied both experimentally and computationally. Of more interest are a number of broad functional roles which can also be correlated with sequence features. These include inhibition, biosynthesis, transcription and defence against bacteria. Despite substantial overlaps between these functions and their corresponding cellular compartments, we find clear differences in the sequence motifs used to predict some of these functions. For example, the presence of polyglutamine repeats appears to be linked more strongly to the "transcription" function than to the general "nuclear" function/location. Conclusion We have developed a novel and useful approach for

  7. Silibinin Treatment Inhibits the Growth of Hedgehog Inhibitor-Resistant Basal Cell Carcinoma Cells via Targeting EGFR-MAPK-Akt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeraj, Arpit; Rigby, Cynthia M; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Agarwal, Chapla; Singh, Rana P; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin malignancy. Deregulated hedgehog signaling plays a central role in BCC development; therefore, hedgehog inhibitors have been approved to treat locally advanced or metastatic BCC. However, the development of resistance to hedgehog inhibitors is the major challenge in effective treatment of this disease. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of a natural agent silibinin to overcome resistance with hedgehog inhibitors (Sant-1 and GDC-0449) in BCC cells. Silibinin (25-100 μm) treatment for 48 h strongly inhibited growth and induced death in ASZ001, Sant-1-resistant (ASZ001-Sant-1) and GDC-0449-resistant (ASZ001-GDC-0449) BCC cells. Furthermore, colony-forming ability of ASZ001, ASZ001-Sant-1 and ASZ001-GDC-0449 cells was completely inhibited by silibinin treatment. Molecular analysis showed that silibinin treatment decreased the level of phosphorylated EGFR (Tyrosine 1173) and total EGFR in ASZ001-Sant-1 cells, key signaling molecules responsible for BCC resistance toward hedgehog inhibitors. Further, silibinin treatment decreased the phosphorylated Akt (Serine 473), phosphorylated ERK1/2 (Threonine 202/Tyrosine 204), cyclin D1 and Gli-1 level but increased the SUFU expression in ASZ001-Sant-1-resistant cells. Silibinin treatment of ASZ001-Sant-1-resistant cells also decreased bcl-2 but increased cleaved caspase 3 and PARP cleavage, suggesting induction of apoptosis. Together, these results support silibinin use to target hedgehog inhibitor-resistant BCC cells. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  8. Human small Maf proteins form heterodimers with CNC family transcription factors and recognize the NF-E2 motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, T; Itoh, J; Kitazawa, J; Arai, K; Hatakeyama, K; Akasaka, J; Igarashi, K; Nomura, N; Yokoyama, M; Yamamoto, M; Ito, E

    1997-04-24

    The transcription factor NF-E2, a heterodimeric protein complex composed of p45 and small Maf family proteins, is considered crucial for the regulation of erythroid gene expression and platelet formation. To facilitate the characterization of NF-E2 functions in human cells, we isolated cDNAs encoding two members of the small Maf family, MafK and MafG. The human mafK and mafG genes encode proteins of 156 and 162 amino acid residues, respectively, whose deduced amino acid sequences show approximately 95% identity to their respective chicken counterparts. Expression of mafK mRNA is high in heart, skeletal muscle and placenta, whereas mafG mRNA is abundant in skeletal muscle and is moderately expressed in heart and brain. Both are expressed in all hematopoietic cell lines, including those of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. In electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays binding to NF-E2 sites was found to depend on formation of homodimers or heterodimers with p45 and p45-related CNC family proteins. The results suggest that the small Maf family proteins function in human cells through interaction with various basic-leucine zipper-type transcription factors.

  9. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein family and metabolic phenotype in the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutaro Ishimura

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are a family of 14-15-kDa proteins, and some FABPs have been to be used as biomarkers of tissue injury by leak from cells. However, recent studies have shown that FABPs can be secreted from cells into circulation. Here we examined determinants and roles of circulating FABPs in a general population. METHODS: From the database of the Tanno-Sobetsu Study, a study with a population-based cohort design, data in 2011 for 296 subjects on no medication were retrieved, and FABP1~5 in their serum samples were assayed. RESULTS: Level of FABP4, but not the other isoforms, showed a gender difference, being higher in females than in males. Levels of all FABPs were negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, but a distinct pattern of correlation with other clinical parameters was observed for each FABP isoform; significant correlates were alanine aminotransferase (ALT, blood pressure (BP, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP for FABP1, none besides eGFR for FABP2, age, BP, and BNP for FABP3, age, waist circumference (WC, BP, BNP, lipid variables, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, and HOMA-R for FABP4, and age, WC, BP, ALT, BNP, and HOMA-R for FABP5. FABP4 is the most strongly related to metabolic markers among FABPs. In a multivariate regression analysis, FABP4 level was an independent predictor of HOMA-R after adjustment of age, gender, WC, BP, HDL cholesterol, and hsCRP. CONCLUSIONS: Each FABP isoform level showed a distinct pattern of correlation with clinical parameters, although levels of all FABPs were negatively determined by renal function. Circulating FABP4 appears to be a useful biomarker for detecting pre-clinical stage of metabolic syndrome, especially insulin resistance, in the general population.

  10. Molecular cloning and expression of the transformation sensitive epithelial marker stratifin. A member of a protein family that has been involved in the protein kinase C signalling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1993-01-01

    tissues showed that polypeptides comigrating with proteins 9124, 9125 and 9126 are ubiquitous and highly expressed in the brain. Stratifin, however, was present only in cultured epithelial cells and was most abundant in fetal and adult human tissues enriched in stratified squamous keratinising epithelium......We have identified a family of abundant acidic human keratinocyte proteins with apparent molecular masses ranging between 30,000 and 31,100 (isoelectric focussing sample spot proteins 9109 (epithelial marker stratifin), 9124, 9125, 9126 and 9231 in the master two-dimensional gel database of human...

  11. Synergism between Hedgehog-GLI and EGFR signaling in Hedgehog-responsive human medulloblastoma cells induces downregulation of canonical Hedgehog-target genes and stabilized expression of GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Götschel

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH signaling has been identified as a key etiologic factor in many human malignancies. Signal strength, target gene specificity, and oncogenic activity of HH signaling depend profoundly on interactions with other pathways, such as epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signaling, which has been shown to cooperate with HH/GLI in basal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer. Our experimental data demonstrated that the Daoy human medulloblastoma cell line possesses a fully inducible endogenous HH pathway. Treatment of Daoy cells with Sonic HH or Smoothened agonist induced expression of GLI1 protein and simultaneously prevented the processing of GLI3 to its repressor form. To study interactions between HH- and EGF-induced signaling in greater detail, time-resolved measurements were carried out and analyzed at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. The Daoy cells responded to the HH/EGF co-treatment by downregulating GLI1, PTCH, and HHIP at the transcript level; this was also observed when Amphiregulin (AREG was used instead of EGF. We identified a novel crosstalk mechanism whereby EGFR signaling silences proteins acting as negative regulators of HH signaling, as AKT- and ERK-signaling independent process. EGFR/HH signaling maintained high GLI1 protein levels which contrasted the GLI1 downregulation on the transcript level. Conversely, a high-level synergism was also observed, due to a strong and significant upregulation of numerous canonical EGF-targets with putative tumor-promoting properties such as MMP7, VEGFA, and IL-8. In conclusion, synergistic effects between EGFR and HH signaling can selectively induce a switch from a canonical HH/GLI profile to a modulated specific target gene profile. This suggests that there are more wide-spread, yet context-dependent interactions, between HH/GLI and growth factor receptor signaling in human malignancies.

  12. Alternative oxidase (AOX) constitutes a small family of proteins in Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis L. Osb

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo Castro, Jacqueline; Drielle Gomes Ferreira, Monique; Santana Silva, Raner José; Andrade, Bruno Silva; Micheli, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) protein is present in plants, fungi, protozoa and some invertebrates. It is involved in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, providing an alternative route for the transport of electrons, leading to the reduction of oxygen to form water. The present study aimed to characterize the family of AOX genes in mandarin (Citrus clementina) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) at nucleotide and protein levels, including promoter analysis, phylogenetic analysis and C. sinens...

  13. Molecular features governing the stability and specificity of functional complex formation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Kirsty L; Ilghari, Dariush; Waters, Lorna C; Carey, Gemma; Bailey, Mark A; Williamson, Richard A; Renshaw, Philip S; Carr, Mark D

    2008-06-20

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins play essential but poorly defined roles in tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this article we report the results of detailed spectroscopic studies of several members of the CFP-10/ESAT-6 family. This work shows that the CFP-10/ESAT-6 related proteins, Rv0287 and Rv0288, form a tight 1:1 complex, which is predominantly helical in structure and is predicted to closely resemble the complex formed by CFP-10 and ESAT-6. In addition, the Rv0287.Rv0288 complex was found to be significantly more stable to both chemical and temperature induced denaturation than CFP-10.ESAT-6. This approach demonstrated that neither Rv0287.Rv0288 nor the CFP-10.ESAT-6 complexes are destabilized at low pH (4.5), indicating that even in low pH environments, such as the mature phagosome, both Rv0287.Rv0288 and CFP-10.ESAT-6 undoubtedly function as complexes rather than individual proteins. Analysis of the structure of the CFP-10.ESAT-6 complex and optimized amino acid sequence alignments of M. tuberculosis CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins revealed that residues involved in the intramolecular contacts between helices are conserved across the CFP-10/ESAT-6 family, but not those involved in primarily intermolecular contacts. This analysis identified the molecular basis for the specificity and stability of complex formation between CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins, and indicates that the formation of functional complexes with key roles in pathogenesis will be limited to genome partners, or very closely related family members, such as Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/Rv3020c.

  14. Expression of a Conserved Family of Cytoplasmic Low Molecular Weight Heat Shock Proteins during Heat Stress and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derocher, A E; Helm, K W; Lauzon, L M; Vierling, E

    1991-08-01

    Plants synthesize several families of low molecular weight (LMW) heat shock proteins (HSPs) in response to elevated temperatures. We have characterized two cDNAs, HSP18.1 and HSP17.9, that encode members of the class I family of LMW HSPs from pea (Pisum sativum). In addition, we investigated the expression of these HSPs at the mRNA and protein levels during heat stress and recovery. HSP18.1 and HSP17.9 are 82.1% identical at the amino acid level and are 80.8 to 92.9% identical to class I LMW HSPs of other angiosperms. Heat stress experiments were performed using intact seedlings subjected to a gradual temperature increase and held at a maximum temperature of 30 to 42 degrees Celsius for 4 hours. HSP18.1 and HSP17.9 mRNA levels peaked at the beginning of the maximum temperature period and declined rapidly after the stress period. Antiserum against a HSP18.1 fusion protein recognized both HSP18.1 and HSP17.9 but not members of other families of LMW HSPs. The accumulation of HSP18.1-immunodetected protein was proportional to the severity of the heat stress, and the protein had a half-life of 37.7 +/- 8 hours. The long half-life of these proteins supports the hypothesis that they are involved in establishing thermotolerance.

  15. Same same but different: sperm-activating EC1 and ECA1 gametogenesis-related family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunck, Stefanie; Hackenberg, Thomas; Englhart, Maria; Vogler, Frank

    2014-04-01

    During double fertilization in Arabidopsis thaliana, the egg cell secretes small cysteine-rich EC1 (egg cell 1) proteins, which enable the arriving sperm pair to rapidly interact with the two female gametes. EC1 proteins are members of the large and unexplored group of ECA1 (early culture abundant 1) gametogenesis-related family proteins, characterized by a prolamin-like domain with six conserved cysteine residues that may form three pairs of disulfide bonds. The distinguishing marks of egg-cell-expressed EC1 proteins are, however, two short amino acid sequence motifs present in all EC1-like proteins. EC1 genes appear to encode the major CRPs (cysteine-rich proteins) expressed by the plant egg cell, and they are restricted to flowering plants, including the most basal extant flowering plant Amborella trichopoda. Many other ECA1 gametogenesis-related family genes are preferentially expressed in the synergid cell. Functional diversification among the ECA1 gametogenesis-related family is suggested by the different patterns of expression in the female gametophyte and the low primary sequence conservation.

  16. A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Haft

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs are a family of DNA direct repeats found in many prokaryotic genomes. Repeats of 21-37 bp typically show weak dyad symmetry and are separated by regularly sized, nonrepetitive spacer sequences. Four CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families, designated Cas1 to Cas4, are strictly associated with CRISPR elements and always occur near a repeat cluster. Some spacers originate from mobile genetic elements and are thought to confer "immunity" against the elements that harbor these sequences. In the present study, we have systematically investigated uncharacterized proteins encoded in the vicinity of these CRISPRs and found many additional protein families that are strictly associated with CRISPR loci across multiple prokaryotic species. Multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models have been built for 45 Cas protein families. These models identify family members with high sensitivity and selectivity and classify key regulators of development, DevR and DevS, in Myxococcus xanthus as Cas proteins. These identifications show that CRISPR/cas gene regions can be quite large, with up to 20 different, tandem-arranged cas genes next to a repeat cluster or filling the region between two repeat clusters. Distinctive subsets of the collection of Cas proteins recur in phylogenetically distant species and correlate with characteristic repeat periodicity. The analyses presented here support initial proposals of mobility of these units, along with the likelihood that loci of different subtypes interact with one another as well as with host cell defensive, replicative, and regulatory systems. It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated.

  17. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Cammy K-M; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Hou, Ming-Hon; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-01-01

    The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG). Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA). Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), electron microscopy (EM), circular dichroism (CD), and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  18. Structural basis for the conserved binding mechanism of MDM2-inhibiting peptides and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Sung; Ha, Ji-Hyang; Yoon, Ho Sup; Lee, Chong-Kil; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2014-02-28

    The interaction between tumor suppressor p53 and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins serves a critical role in the transcription-independent apoptosis mechanism of p53. Our previous studies showed that an MDM2-inhibiting motif (residues 15-29) in the p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) mediates the interaction with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. In this study, we provided structural models of the complexes between the MDM2-inhibiting p53TAD peptide and Mcl-1, Bcl-w, and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) Bcl-2 using NMR chemical shift perturbation data. The binding mode of the MDM2-inhibiting p53TAD peptide is highly conserved among the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins despite their distinct specificities for pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. We also identified the binding of a phage-display-derived MDM2-inhibiting peptide 12-1 to anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein by using NMR spectroscopy. The structural model of the Bcl-XL/12-1 peptide complex revealed that the conserved residues Phe4, Trp8, and Leu11 in the MDM2-inhibiting peptide fit into a hydrophobic cleft of Bcl-XL in a manner similar to that of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) peptides. Our results shed light on the mechanism underlying dual-targeting of the FxxxWxxL-based α-helical motif to MDM2 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins for anticancer therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG. Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA. Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, electron microscopy (EM, circular dichroism (CD, and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  20. Potent small molecule Hedgehog agonists induce VEGF expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Katrin; Büttner, Anita; Rigol, Stephan; Eilert, Nicole; Wandel, Elke; Giannis, Athanassios

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis, SAR studies as well as biological investigations of the known Hedgehog signaling agonist SAG and a small library of its analogues. The SAG and its derivatives were analyzed for their potency to activate the expression of the Hh target gene Gli1 in a reporter gene assay. By analyzing SAR important molecular descriptors for Gli1 activation have been identified. SAG as well as compound 10c proven to be potent activators of VEGF expression in cultivated dermal fibroblasts. Importantly and in contrast to SAG, derivative 10c displayed no toxicity in concentrations up to 250 μm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Research advances in Hedgehog signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is present in many animals and plays an important role in regulating embryonic development and differentiation. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of many malignancies. Recent studies have shown that dysregulated Hh signaling pathway participates in the tumorigenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Investigation of the relationship between Hh signaling pathway and HCC will help elucidate the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis of HCC and provide a new insight into the development of novel anticancer therapy and therapeutic target.

  2. Novel protein biomarkers associated with coronary artery disease in statin-treated patients with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Sven; Phillips, Michael; Watts, Gerald F; Verhoeven, Adrie J M; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Ward, Natalie C

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common and serious monogenic disorder of lipid metabolism. The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) varies among both treated and untreated FH patients. The aim of the study was to utilize proteomics to identify novel protein biomarkers that differentiate genetically confirmed heterozygous patients with FH at high CAD risk from those at low CAD risk. Sixty genetically confirmed FH patients were recruited and stratified into (1) asymptomatic FH with low atherosclerotic burden (FH, n = 20); (2) asymptomatic FH with high atherosclerotic burden (FH + Ca, n = 20); and (3) FH with previously confirmed symptomatic CAD (FH + CAD, n = 20). Six new potential proteins were identified; leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H3, complement C4-B (C4B), complement C1q subcomponent subunit B (C1QB), monocyte differentiation antigen (CD14), and histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG). There were significant associations between gender and C4B (Z = 2.31, P = .021), C1QB (Z = 2.49, P = .013), CD14 (Z = 2.17, P = .03), and HRG (Z = 2.14, P = .033). There were significant associations between smoking and LRG1 (χ(2)2 = 6.59, P = .037), CB4 (χ(2)2 = 7.85, P = .02), and HRG (χ(2)2 = 6.11, P = .047). All the peptides were significantly associated with advanced CAD stages, independently of age and smoking. However, the absence of the proteins was the strongest marker. The most accurate association with CAD was HRG (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.922), whereas LRG1, C4B, and C1QB were also associated with CAD (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve >0.9). For either coronary atherosclerosis or CAD, LRG1, C4B, C1QB, and HRG were relatively well associated. The present study has identified 6 novel protein biomarkers that are associated with more advanced stages of atherosclerotic disease and subsequent coronary events

  3. New insights on the sialidase protein family revealed by a phylogenetic analysis in metazoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Giacopuzzi

    Full Text Available Sialidases are glycohydrolytic enzymes present from virus to mammals that remove sialic acid from oligosaccharide chains. Four different sialidase forms are known in vertebrates: the lysosomal NEU1, the cytosolic NEU2 and the membrane-associated NEU3 and NEU4. These enzymes modulate the cell sialic acid content and are involved in several cellular processes and pathological conditions. Molecular defects in NEU1 are responsible for sialidosis, an inherited disease characterized by lysosomal storage disorder and neurodegeneration. The studies on the biology of sialic acids and sialyltransferases, the anabolic counterparts of sialidases, have revealed a complex picture with more than 50 sialic acid variants selectively present in the different branches of the tree of life. The gain/loss of specific sialoconjugates have been proposed as key events in the evolution of deuterostomes and Homo sapiens, as well as in the host-pathogen interactions. To date, less attention has been paid to the evolution of sialidases. Thus we have conducted a survey on the state of the sialidase family in metazoan. Using an in silico approach, we identified and characterized sialidase orthologs from 21 different organisms distributed among the evolutionary tree: Metazoa relative (Monosiga brevicollis, early Deuterostomia, precursor of Chordata and Vertebrata (teleost fishes, amphibians, reptiles, avians and early and recent mammals. We were able to reconstruct the evolution of the sialidase protein family from the ancestral sialidase NEU1 and identify a new form of the enzyme, NEU5, representing an intermediate step in the evolution leading to the modern NEU3, NEU4 and NEU2. Our study provides new insights on the mechanisms that shaped the substrate specificity and other peculiar properties of the modern mammalian sialidases. Moreover, we further confirm findings on the catalytic residues and identified enzyme loop portions that behave as rapidly diverging regions and may

  4. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies. PMID:22981989

  5. A screen for modifiers of hedgehog signaling in Drosophila melanogaster identifies swm and mts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casso, David J; Liu, Songmei; Iwaki, D David; Ogden, Stacey K; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2008-03-01

    Signaling by Hedgehog (Hh) proteins shapes most tissues and organs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, and its misregulation has been implicated in many human diseases. Although components of the signaling pathway have been identified, key aspects of the signaling mechanism and downstream targets remain to be elucidated. We performed an enhancer/suppressor screen in Drosophila to identify novel components of the pathway and identified 26 autosomal regions that modify a phenotypic readout of Hh signaling. Three of the regions include genes that contribute constituents to the pathway-patched, engrailed, and hh. One of the other regions includes the gene microtubule star (mts) that encodes a subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. We show that mts is necessary for full activation of Hh signaling. A second region includes the gene second mitotic wave missing (swm). swm is recessive lethal and is predicted to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein with RNA binding and Zn(+) finger domains. Characterization of newly isolated alleles indicates that swm is a negative regulator of Hh signaling and is essential for cell polarity.

  6. Expansion and functional diversification of a leucyl aminopeptidase family that encodes the major protein constituents of Drosophila sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karr Timothy L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary diversification of gene families through gene creation (and loss is a dynamic process believed to be critical to the evolution of functional novelty. Previous identification of a closely related family of eight annotated metalloprotease genes of the M17 Merops family in the Drosophila sperm proteome (termed, Sperm-LeucylAminoPeptidases, S-LAPs 1-8 led us to hypothesize that this gene family may have experienced such a diversification during insect evolution. Results To assess putative functional activities of S-LAPs, we (i demonstrated that all S-LAPs are specifically expressed in the testis, (ii confirmed their presence in sperm by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, (iii determined that they represent a major portion of the total protein in sperm and (iv identified aminopeptidase enzymatic activity in sperm extracts using LAP-specific substrates. Functionally significant divergence at the canonical M17 active site indicates that the largest phylogenetic group of S-LAPs lost catalytic activity and likely acquired novel, as yet undetermined, functions in sperm prior to the expansion of the gene family. Conclusions Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed the dramatic expansion of the S-LAP gene family during Drosophila evolution and copy number heterogeneity in the genomes of related insects. This finding, in conjunction with the loss of catalytic activity and potential neofunctionalization amongst some family members, extends empirical support for pervasive "revolving door" turnover in the evolution of reproductive gene family composition and function.

  7. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis Sheds Light on the Diversity and Origin of the MLO Family of Integral Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Stefan; Pesch, Lina; Panstruga, Ralph

    2016-03-26

    Mildew resistanceLocusO(MLO) proteins are polytopic integral membrane proteins that have long been considered as plant-specific and being primarily involved in plant-powdery mildew interactions. However, research in the past decade has revealed that MLO proteins diverged into a family with several clades whose members are associated with different physiological processes. We provide a largely increased dataset of MLO amino acid sequences, comprising nearly all major land plant lineages. Based on this comprehensive dataset, we defined seven phylogenetic clades and reconstructed the likely evolution of the MLO family in embryophytes. We further identified several MLO peptide motifs that are either conserved in all MLO proteins or confined to one or several clades, supporting the notion that clade-specific diversification of MLO functions is associated with particular sequence motifs. In baker's yeast, some of these motifs are functionally linked to transmembrane (TM) transport of organic molecules and ions. In addition, we attempted to define the evolutionary origin of the MLO family and found that MLO-like proteins with highly diverse membrane topologies are present in green algae, but also in the distinctly related red algae (Rhodophyta), Amoebozoa, and Chromalveolata. Finally, we discovered several instances of putative fusion events between MLO proteins and different kinds of proteins. Such Rosetta stone-type hybrid proteins might be instructive for future analysis of potential MLO functions. Our findings suggest that MLO is an ancient protein that possibly evolved in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes, and consolidated in land plants with a conserved topology, comprising seven TM domains and an intrinsically unstructured C-terminus. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Sonic Hedgehog activation is implicated in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of human erythroleukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia Ghezali

    Full Text Available Differentiation therapy is a means to treat cancer and is induced by different agents with low toxicity and more specificity than traditional ones. Diosgenin, a plant steroid, is able to induce megakaryocytic differentiation or apoptosis in human HEL erythroleukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the exact mechanism by which diosgenin induces megakaryocytic differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we studied the involvement of Sonic Hedgehog in megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. First, we showed that different elements of the Hedgehog pathway are expressed in our model by qRT-PCR. Then, we focused our interest on key elements in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway: Smoothened receptor, GLI transcription factor and the ligand Sonic Hedgehog. We showed that Smoothened and Sonic Hedgehog were overexpressed in disogenin-treated cells and that GLI transcription factors were activated. Then, we showed that SMO inhibition using siSMO or the GLI antagonist GANT-61, blocked megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Sonic Hedgehog pathway inhibition led to inhibition of ERK1/2 activation, a major physiological pathway involved in megakaryocytic differentiation. In conclusion, our study reports, for the first time, a crucial role for the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in HEL cells.

  9. Sonic Hedgehog activation is implicated in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of human erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, Lamia; Liagre, Bertrand; Limami, Youness; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Leger, David Yannick

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation therapy is a means to treat cancer and is induced by different agents with low toxicity and more specificity than traditional ones. Diosgenin, a plant steroid, is able to induce megakaryocytic differentiation or apoptosis in human HEL erythroleukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the exact mechanism by which diosgenin induces megakaryocytic differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we studied the involvement of Sonic Hedgehog in megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. First, we showed that different elements of the Hedgehog pathway are expressed in our model by qRT-PCR. Then, we focused our interest on key elements in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway: Smoothened receptor, GLI transcription factor and the ligand Sonic Hedgehog. We showed that Smoothened and Sonic Hedgehog were overexpressed in disogenin-treated cells and that GLI transcription factors were activated. Then, we showed that SMO inhibition using siSMO or the GLI antagonist GANT-61, blocked megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Sonic Hedgehog pathway inhibition led to inhibition of ERK1/2 activation, a major physiological pathway involved in megakaryocytic differentiation. In conclusion, our study reports, for the first time, a crucial role for the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in HEL cells.

  10. Investigations on Inhibitors of Hedgehog Signal Pathway: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Cao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog signal pathway is an essential agent in developmental patterning, wherein the local concentration of the Hedgehog morphogens directs cellular differentiation and expansion. Furthermore, the Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor/stromal interaction and cancer stem cell. Nowadays searching novel inhibitors for Hedgehog Signal Pathway is drawing much more attention by biological, chemical and pharmological scientists. In our study, a solid computational model is proposed which incorporates various statistical analysis methods to perform a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR study on the inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling. The whole QSAR data contain 93 cyclopamine derivatives as well as their activities against four different cell lines (NCI-H446, BxPC-3, SW1990 and NCI-H157. Our extensive testing indicated that the binary classification model is a better choice for building the QSAR model of inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling compared with other statistical methods and the corresponding in silico analysis provides three possible ways to improve the activity of inhibitors by demethylation, methylation and hydroxylation at specific positions of the compound scaffold respectively. From these, demethylation is the best choice for inhibitor structure modifications. Our investigation also revealed that NCI-H466 served as the best cell line for testing the activities of inhibitors of Hedgehog signal pathway among others.

  11. The radial-hedgehog solution in Landau–de Gennes' theory for nematic liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    MAJUMDAR, APALA

    2011-09-06

    We study the radial-hedgehog solution in a three-dimensional spherical droplet, with homeotropic boundary conditions, within the Landau-de Gennes theory for nematic liquid crystals. The radial-hedgehog solution is a candidate for a global Landau-de Gennes minimiser in this model framework and is also a prototype configuration for studying isolated point defects in condensed matter physics. The static properties of the radial-hedgehog solution are governed by a non-linear singular ordinary differential equation. We study the analogies between Ginzburg-Landau vortices and the radial-hedgehog solution and demonstrate a Ginzburg-Landau limit for the Landau-de Gennes theory. We prove that the radial-hedgehog solution is not the global Landau-de Gennes minimiser for droplets of finite radius and sufficiently low temperatures and prove the stability of the radial-hedgehog solution in other parameter regimes. These results contain quantitative information about the effect of geometry and temperature on the properties of the radial-hedgehog solution and the associated biaxial instabilities. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2011.

  12. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    that they exhibit independent behaviour, i.e. each family forms its own part in an evolutionary tree, with enzyme specificity (protein function) being well represented within each family. The distinction between CBM20 and CBM48 families is not sharp since there are representatives in both CBM families that possess......Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several...... glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein...

  13. A holistic approach to dissecting SPARC family protein complexity reveals FSTL-1 as an inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viloria, Katrina; Munasinghe, Amanda; Asher, Sharan; Bogyere, Roberto; Jones, Lucy; Hill, Natasha J

    2016-11-25

    SPARC is a matricellular protein that is involved in both pancreatic cancer and diabetes. It belongs to a wider family of proteins that share structural and functional similarities. Relatively little is known about this extended family, but evidence of regulatory interactions suggests the importance of a holistic approach to their study. We show that Hevin, SPOCKs, and SMOCs are strongly expressed within islets, ducts, and blood vessels, suggesting important roles for these proteins in the normal pancreas, while FSTL-1 expression is localised to the stromal compartment reminiscent of SPARC. In direct contrast to SPARC, however, FSTL-1 expression is reduced in pancreatic cancer. Consistent with this, FSTL-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. The complexity of SPARC family proteins is further revealed by the detection of multiple cell-type specific isoforms that arise due to a combination of post-translational modification and alternative splicing. Identification of splice variants lacking a signal peptide suggests the existence of novel intracellular isoforms. This study underlines the importance of addressing the complexity of the SPARC family and provides a new framework to explain their controversial and contradictory effects. We also demonstrate for the first time that FSTL-1 suppresses pancreatic cancer cell growth.

  14. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A...

  15. The family of mammalian small heat shock proteins (HSPBs) : Implications in protein deposit diseases and motor neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Minoia, Melania; Carra, Serena

    2012-01-01

    A number of neurological and muscular disorders are characterized by the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins and are referred to as protein deposit or protein conformation diseases. Besides some sporadic forms, most of them are genetically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, although

  16. Numb family proteins: novel players in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingfu; Li, Jingjing

    2015-04-01

    Vertebrate heart formation is a spatiotemporally regulated morphogenic process that initiates with bilaterally symmetric cardiac primordial cells migrating toward the midline to form a linear heart tube. The heart tube then elongates and undergoes a series of looping morphogenesis, followed by expansions of regions that are destined to become primitive heart chambers. During the cardiac morphogenesis, cells derived from the first heart field contribute to the primary heart tube, and cells from the secondary heart field, cardiac neural crest, and pro-epicardial organ are added to the heart tube in a precise spatiotemporal manner. The coordinated addition of these cells and the accompanying endocardial cushion morphogenesis yield the atrial, ventricular, and valvular septa, resulting in the formation of a four-chambered heart. Perturbation of progenitor cells' deployment and differentiation leads to a spectrum of congenital heart diseases. Two of the genes that were recently discovered to be involved in cardiac morphogenesis are Numb and Numblike. Numb, an intracellular adaptor protein, distinguishes sibling cell fates by its asymmetric distribution between the two daughter cells and its ability to inhibit Notch signaling. Numb regulates cardiac progenitor cell differentiation in Drosophila and controls heart tube laterality in Zebrafish. In mice, Numb and Numblike, the Numb family proteins (NFPs), function redundantly and have been shown to be essential for epicardial development, cardiac progenitor cell differentiation, outflow tract alignment, atrioventricular septum morphogenesis, myocardial trabeculation, and compaction. In this review, we will summarize the functions of NFPs in cardiac development and discuss potential mechanisms of NFPs in the regulation of cardiac development.

  17. Mechanical stimulation promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through epigenetic regulation of Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuandong; Shan, Shengzhou; Wang, Chenglong; Wang, Jing; Li, Jiao; Hu, Guoli; Dai, Kerong; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2017-03-15

    Mechanical unloading leads to bone loss and disuse osteoporosis partly due to impaired osteoblastogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS) promotes osteoblastogenesis of BMSCs both in vivo and in vitro. Besides, we found that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway was activated in this process. Inhibition of which by either knockdown of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) or treating BMSCs with Hh inhibitors attenuated the osteogenic effect of CMS on BMSCs, suggesting that Hh signaling pathway acts as an endogenous mediator of mechanical stimuli on BMSCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Shh expression level was regulated by DNA methylation mechanism. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b) binds to Shh gene promoter, leading to DNA hypermethylation in mechanical unloading BMSCs. However, mechanical stimulation down-regulates the protein level of Dnmt3b, results in DNA demethylation and Shh expression. More importantly, we found that inhibition of Dnmt3b partly rescued bone loss in HU mice by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation regulates osteoblastic genes expression via direct regulation of Dnmt3b, and the therapeutic inhibition of Dnmt3b may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical unloading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Evidence for inclusion in the multigene family of complement-regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublin, D M; Liszewski, M K; Post, T W; Arce, M A; Le Beau, M M; Rebentisch, M B; Lemons, L S; Seya, T; Atkinson, J P

    1988-07-01

    Membrane cofactor protein (MCP), a regulatory molecular of the complement system with cofactor activity for the factor I-mediated inactivation of C3b and C4b, is widely distributed, being present on leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. MCP was purified from a human T cell line (HSB2) and the NH2-terminal 24-amino acid sequence obtained by Edman degradation. An oligonucleotide probe based on this sequence was used to identify a clone from a human monocytic (U937) cDNA library. Nucleotide sequencing showed a 43-bp 5'-untranslated region, an open reading frame of 1,152 bp, and a 335-bp 3'-untranslated region followed by a 16-bp poly(A) track. The deduced full-length MCP protein consists of a 34-amino acid signal peptide and a 350-amino acid mature protein. The protein has, beginning at the NH2 terminus, four approximately 60-amino acid repeat units that match the consensus sequence found in a multigene family of complement regulatory proteins (C3b-receptor or CR1, C3d-receptor or CR2, decay-accelerating factor, C4-binding protein, and factor H), as well as several other complement and non-complement proteins. The remainder of the MCP protein consists of 25 amino acids that are rich in serine and threonine (probable site of heavy O-linked glycosylation of MCP), 17 amino acids of unknown significance, and a 23-amino acid transmembrane hydrophobic region followed by a 33-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. The MCP gene was localized to human chromosome 1, bands 1q31-41, by analysis of human x rodent somatic cell hybrid clones and by in situ hybridization. This same genetic region contains the multigene family of complement-regulatory proteins, which is thereby enlarged to include the functionally and structurally related MCP.

  19. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein family and its transmembrane regulator from capsicum (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Castillo, Rafael A; Roy Choudhury, Swarup; León-Félix, Josefina; Pandey, Sona

    2015-05-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have created numerous mechanisms to sense and respond to their environment. One such highly conserved mechanism involves regulation by heterotrimeric G-protein complex comprised of alpha (Gα), beta (Gβ) and gamma (Gγ) subunits. In plants, these proteins play important roles in signal transduction pathways related to growth and development including response to biotic and abiotic stresses and consequently affect yield. In this work, we have identified and characterized the complete heterotrimeric G-protein repertoire in the Capsicum annuum (Capsicum) genome which consists of one Gα, one Gβ and three Gγ genes. We have also identified one RGS gene in the Capsicum genome that acts as a regulator of the G-protein signaling. Biochemical activities of the proteins were confirmed by assessing the GTP-binding and GTPase activity of the recombinant Gα protein and its regulation by the GTPase acceleration activity of the RGS protein. Interaction between different subunits was established using yeast- and plant-based analyses. Gene and protein expression profiles of specific G-protein components revealed interesting spatial and temporal regulation patterns, especially during root development and during fruit development and maturation. This research thus details the characterization of the first heterotrimeric G-protein family from a domesticated, commercially important vegetable crop. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin B Zeldovich

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  1. A correspondence between solution-state dynamics of an individual protein and the sequence and conformational diversity of its family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Friedland

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conformational ensembles are increasingly recognized as a useful representation to describe fundamental relationships between protein structure, dynamics and function. Here we present an ensemble of ubiquitin in solution that is created by sampling conformational space without experimental information using "Backrub" motions inspired by alternative conformations observed in sub-Angstrom resolution crystal structures. Backrub-generated structures are then selected to produce an ensemble that optimizes agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings (RDCs. Using this ensemble, we probe two proposed relationships between properties of protein ensembles: (i a link between native-state dynamics and the conformational heterogeneity observed in crystal structures, and (ii a relation between dynamics of an individual protein and the conformational variability explored by its natural family. We show that the Backrub motional mechanism can simultaneously explore protein native-state dynamics measured by RDCs, encompass the conformational variability present in ubiquitin complex structures and facilitate sampling of conformational and sequence variability matching those occurring in the ubiquitin protein family. Our results thus support an overall relation between protein dynamics and conformational changes enabling sequence changes in evolution. More practically, the presented method can be applied to improve protein design predictions by accounting for intrinsic native-state dynamics.

  2. Dimerization of the transmembrane domain of amyloid precursor proteins and familial Alzheimer's disease mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid precursor protein (APP is enzymatically cleaved by γ-secretase to form two peptide products, either Aβ40 or the more neurotoxic Aβ42. The Aβ42/40 ratio is increased in many cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. The transmembrane domain (TM of APP contains the known dimerization motif GXXXA. We have investigated the dimerization of both wild type and FAD mutant APP transmembrane domains. Results Using synthetic peptides derived from the APP-TM domain, we show that this segment is capable of forming stable transmembrane dimers. A model of a dimeric APP-TM domain reveals a putative dimerization interface, and interestingly, majority of FAD mutations in APP are localized to this interface region. We find that FAD-APP mutations destabilize the APP-TM dimer and increase the population of APP peptide monomers. Conclusion The dissociation constants are correlated to both the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio and the mean age of disease onset in AD patients. We also show that these TM-peptides reduce Aβ production and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios when added to HEK293 cells overexpressing the Swedish FAD mutation and γ-secretase components, potentially revealing a new class of γ-secretase inhibitors.

  3. Diverse post-translational modifications of the pannexin family of channel-forming proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuela, Silvia; Lohman, Alexander W; Lai, Wesley; Gyenis, Laszlo; Litchfield, David W; Isakson, Brant E; Laird, Dale W

    2014-01-01

    The pannexin family of channel-forming proteins is composed of 3 distinct but related members called Panx1, Panx2, and Panx3. Pannexins have been implicated in many physiological processes as well as pathological conditions, primarily through their function as ATP release channels. However, it is currently unclear if all pannexins are subject to similar or different post-translational modifications as most studies have focused primarily on Panx1. Using in vitro biochemical assays performed on ectopically expressed pannexins in HEK-293T cells, we confirmed that all 3 pannexins are N-glycosylated to different degrees, but they are not modified by sialylation or O-linked glycosylation in a manner that changes their apparent molecular weight. Using cell-free caspase assays, we also discovered that similar to Panx1, the C-terminus of Panx2 is a substrate for caspase cleavage. Panx3, on the other hand, is not subject to caspase digestion but an in vitro biotin switch assay revealed that it was S-nitrosylated by nitric oxide donors. Taken together, our findings uncover novel and diverse pannexin post-translational modifications suggesting that they may be differentially regulated for distinct or overlapping cellular and physiological functions.

  4. Snake venom metalloproteinases: structure, function and relevance to the mammalian ADAM/ADAMTS family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Soichi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Iwanaga, Sadaaki

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteinases are among the most abundant toxins in many Viperidae venoms. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are the primary factors responsible for hemorrhage and may also interfere with the hemostatic system, thus facilitating loss of blood from the vasculature of the prey. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to mammalian ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) and ADAMTS (ADAM with thrombospondin type-1 motif) family of proteins and, together with them, constitute the M12B clan of metalloendopeptidases. Large SVMPs, referred to as the P-III class of SVMPs, have a modular architecture with multiple non-catalytic domains. The P-III SVMPs are characterized by higher hemorrhagic and more diverse biological activities than the P-I class of SVMPs, which only have a catalytic domain. Recent crystallographic studies of P-III SVMPs and their mammalian counterparts shed new light on structure-function properties of this class of enzymes. The present review will highlight these structures, particularly the non-catalytic ancillary domains of P-III SVMPs and ADAMs that may target the enzymes to specific substrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50years after the discovery of lysosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  6. Functional evolution in the plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL gene family

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    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development.

  7. Drosophila DOCK family protein sponge regulates the JNK pathway during thorax development.

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    Morishita, Kazushige; Ozasa, Fumito; Eguchi, Koichi; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Yoshida, Hideki; Hiai, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    The dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family proteins that are conserved in a wide variety of species are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. The Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to the mammalian DOCK3. Specific knockdown of spg by pannir-GAL4 or apterous-GAL4 driver in wing discs induced split thorax phenotype in adults. Reduction of the Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), basket (bsk) gene dose enhanced the spg knockdown-induced phenotype. Conversely, overexpression of bsk suppressed the split thorax phenotype. Monitoring JNK activity in the wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-phosphorylated JNK (anti-pJNK) antibody together with examination of lacZ expression in a puckered-lacZ enhancer trap line revealed the strong reduction of the JNK activity in the spg knockdown clones. This was further confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis of extracts from wing discs of spg knockdown fly with anti-pJNK antibody. Furthermore, the Duolink in situ Proximity Ligation Assay method detected interaction signals between Spg and Rac1 in the wing discs. Taken together, these results indicate Spg positively regulates JNK pathway that is required for thorax development and the regulation is mediated by interaction with Rac1.

  8. Platelet-derived S100 family member myeloid-related protein-14 regulates thrombosis

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    Wang, Yunmei; Fang, Chao; Gao, Huiyun; Bilodeau, Matthew L.; Zhang, Zijie; Croce, Kevin; Liu, Shijian; Morooka, Toshifumi; Sakuma, Masashi; Nakajima, Kohsuke; Yoneda, Shuichi; Shi, Can; Zidar, David; Andre, Patrick; Stephens, Gillian; Silverstein, Roy L.; Hogg, Nancy; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the S100 calcium–modulated protein family member MRP-14 (also known as S100A9) is elevated in platelets from patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (MI) compared with those from patients with stable coronary artery disease; however, a causal role for MRP-14 in acute coronary syndromes has not been established. Here, using multiple models of vascular injury, we found that time to arterial thrombotic occlusion was markedly prolonged in Mrp14–/– mice. We observed that MRP-14 and MRP-8/MRP-14 heterodimers (S100A8/A9) are expressed in and secreted by platelets from WT mice and that thrombus formation was reduced in whole blood from Mrp14–/– mice. Infusion of WT platelets, purified MRP-14, or purified MRP-8/MRP-14 heterodimers into Mrp14–/– mice decreased the time to carotid artery occlusion after injury, indicating that platelet-derived MRP-14 directly regulates thrombosis. In contrast, infusion of purified MRP-14 into mice deficient for both MRP-14 and CD36 failed to reduce carotid occlusion times, indicating that CD36 is required for MRP-14–dependent thrombosis. Our data identify a molecular pathway of thrombosis that involves platelet MRP-14 and CD36 and suggest that targeting MRP-14 has potential for treating atherothrombotic disorders, including MI and stroke. PMID:24691441

  9. Disrupting hedgehog and WNT signaling interactions promotes cleft lip pathogenesis

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    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Iulianella, Angelo; Williams, Trevor; Trainor, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip, which results from impaired facial process growth and fusion, is one of the most common craniofacial birth defects. Many genes are known to be involved in the etiology of this disorder; however, our understanding of cleft lip pathogenesis remains incomplete. In the present study, we uncovered a role for sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling during lip fusion. Mice carrying compound mutations in hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) and patched1 (Ptch1) exhibited perturbations in the SHH gradient during frontonasal development, which led to hypoplastic nasal process outgrowth, epithelial seam persistence, and cleft lip. Further investigation revealed that enhanced SHH signaling restricts canonical WNT signaling in the lambdoidal region by promoting expression of genes encoding WNT inhibitors. Moreover, reduction of canonical WNT signaling perturbed p63/interferon regulatory factor 6 (p63/IRF6) signaling, resulting in increased proliferation and decreased cell death, which was followed by persistence of the epithelial seam and cleft lip. Consistent with our results, mutations in genes that disrupt SHH and WNT signaling have been identified in both mice and humans with cleft lip. Collectively, our data illustrate that altered SHH signaling contributes to the etiology and pathogenesis of cleft lip through antagonistic interactions with other gene regulatory networks, including the canonical WNT and p63/IRF6 signaling pathways. PMID:24590292

  10. Hedgehog Signaling Inhibitors as Anti-Cancer Agents in Osteosarcoma

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    Ram Kumar, Ram Mohan, E-mail: rkumar@research.balgrist.ch; Fuchs, Bruno [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Research, Balgrist University Hospital, Sarcoma Center-UZH University of Zurich, Zurich 8008 (Switzerland)

    2015-05-13

    Osteosarcoma is a rare type of cancer associated with a poor clinical outcome. Even though the pathologic characteristics of OS are well established, much remains to be understood, particularly at the molecular signaling level. The molecular mechanisms of osteosarcoma progression and metastases have not yet been fully elucidated and several evolutionary signaling pathways have been found to be linked with osteosarcoma pathogenesis, especially the hedgehog signaling (Hh) pathway. The present review will outline the importance and targeting the hedgehog signaling (Hh) pathway in osteosarcoma tumor biology. Available data also suggest that aberrant Hh signaling has pro-migratory effects and leads to the development of osteoblastic osteosarcoma. Activation of Hh signaling has been observed in osteosarcoma cell lines and also in primary human osteosarcoma specimens. Emerging data suggests that interference with Hh signal transduction by inhibitors may reduce osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth thereby preventing osteosarcomagenesis. From this perspective, we outline the current state of Hh pathway inhibitors in osteosarcoma. In summary, targeting Hh signaling by inhibitors promise to increase the efficacy of osteosarcoma treatment and improve patient outcome.

  11. Targeted treatment for sonic hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieran, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatment options, including targeted therapies, are needed for patients with medulloblastoma (MB), especially for those with high-risk or recurrent/relapsed disease. Four major molecular subgroups of MB have been identified, one of which is characterized by activation of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway. Preclinical data suggest that inhibitors of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway could become valuable treatment options for patients with this subgroup of MB. Indeed, agents targeting the positive regulator of the pathway, smoothened (SMO), have demonstrated efficacy in a subset of patients with SHH MB. However, because of resistance and the presence of mutations downstream of SMO, not all patients with SHH MB respond to SMO inhibitors. The development of agents that target these resistance mechanisms and the potential for their combination with traditional chemotherapy and SHH inhibitors will be discussed. Due to its extensive molecular heterogeneity, the future of MB treatment is in personalized therapy, which may lead to improved efficacy and reduced toxicity. This will include the development of clinically available tests that can efficiently discern the SHH subgroup. The preliminary use of these tests in clinical trials is also discussed herein. PMID:24951114

  12. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Hampers Sphere and Holoclone Formation in Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazán-Moga, Ana; Zarzosa, Patricia; Vidal, Isaac; Molist, Carla; Giralt, Irina; Navarro, Natalia; Soriano, Aroa; Segura, Miguel F; Alfranca, Arantza; Garcia-Castro, Javier; Sánchez de Toledo, José; Roma, Josep; Gallego, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma in children and can be divided into two main subtypes: embryonal (eRMS) and alveolar (aRMS). Among the cellular heterogeneity of tumors, the existence of a small fraction of cells called cancer stem cells (CSC), thought to be responsible for the onset and propagation of cancer, has been demonstrated in some neoplasia. Although the existence of CSC has been reported for eRMS, their existence in aRMS, the most malignant subtype, has not been demonstrated to date. Given the lack of suitable markers to identify this subpopulation in aRMS, we used cancer stem cell-enriched supracellular structures (spheres and holoclones) to study this subpopulation. This strategy allowed us to demonstrate the capacity of both aRMS and eRMS cells to form these structures and retain self-renewal capacity. Furthermore, cells contained in spheres and holoclones showed significant Hedgehog pathway induction, the inhibition of which (pharmacologic or genetic) impairs the formation of both holoclones and spheres. Our findings point to a crucial role of this pathway in the maintenance of these structures and suggest that Hedgehog pathway targeting in CSC may have great potential in preventing local relapses and metastases.

  13. Crystal structure of a BCL-W domain-swapped dimer: implications for the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erinna F; Dewson, Grant; Smith, Brian J; Evangelista, Marco; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A; Colman, Peter M; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2011-10-12

    The prosurvival and proapoptotic proteins of the BCL-2 family share a similar three-dimensional fold despite their opposing functions. However, many biochemical studies highlight the requirement for conformational changes for the functioning of both types of proteins, although structural data to support such changes remain elusive. Here, we describe the X-ray structure of dimeric BCL-W that reveals a major conformational change involving helices α3 and α4 hinging away from th