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Sample records for hebrew medical alchemist

  1. Women, bodies, and Hebrew medieval medical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero Navas, Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores different views on the female body articulated within Hebrew medieval texts on women’s health care. It also investigates whether texts also integrate women’s own perceptions of their bodies, and of their needs and care. I have analysed how this genre of Hebrew literature understood two key issues in the construction of sexed bodies: menstruation and cosmetics.

    Este trabajo examina distintas visiones sobre el cuerpo femenino que articulan los textos hebreos medievales dedicados al cuidado de la salud de las mujeres e investiga en qué medida están representadas en ellos las percepciones que las propias mujeres tienen de sus cuerpos, y de sus necesidades y preocupaciones. Para ello, he analizado el tratamiento que este género de la literatura hebrea ha dado a dos temas clave en la sexuación de los cuerpos: la menstruación y la cosmética.

  2. She will give birth immediately. Pregnancy and childbirth in medieval Hebrew medical texts produced in the Mediterranean West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Carmen Caballero

    2014-01-01

    This essay approaches the medieval Hebrew literature on women's healthcare, with the aim of analysing notions and ideas regarding fertility, pregnancy and childbirth, as conveyed in the texts that form the corpus. Firstly, the work discusses the approach of written texts to pregnancy and childbirth as key elements in the explanation of women's health and the functioning of the female body. In this regard it also explores the role of this approach in the creation of meanings for both the female body and sexual difference. Secondly, it examines female management of pregnancy and childbirth as recorded in Hebrew medical literature. It pays attention to both the attitudes expressed by the authors, translators and copyists regarding female practice, as well as to instances and remedies derived from "local" traditions--that is, from women's experience--in the management of pregnancy and childbirth, also recorded in the texts. Finally, the paper explores how medical theories alien to, or in opposition to, Judaism were adopted or not and, at times, adapted to Jewish notions with the aim of eliminating tensions from the text, on the one hand, and providing Jewish practitioners with adequate training to retain their Christian clientele, on the other.

  3. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  4. The Search for the Hero's Soul in the Alchemist

    OpenAIRE

    Kremenik, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The Alchemist touches upon two major themes in mythology : The hero journey and a person's spiritual quest to find out his or her true nature. Coelho is asking his reader to take the same journey his character Santiago does. Coelho believes that if we do we will be better people and in turn the world will be a better place.

  5. The Hebrew adverbial bixlal

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    Ruti Bardenstein

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Modern Hebrew adverbial bixlal (at all /any /actually/in fact /even /anyway /in general/ generally /altogether /in the first place seems puzzling from a synchronic point of view since it functions both as a NPI lo..bixlal /bixlal lo (not…any/at all and as a Discourse Marker(DM in positive environments, being interpreted either as an 'in general' DM when focused (stressed or as an 'actually' DM when unfocused (unstressed. As a result, it has been the focus of various papers examining both its semantics and discursive use (Migron 2003, Ziv 2012, Greenberg and Khrizman 2012, Kadmon and Sevi, 2014, as well as its possible grammaticization path (Tsirkin-Sadan 2015. The Solution that we offer is that bixlalis a polysemy and its multiple meanings difference can be explained diachronically. We shall provide historical evidence as well as provide bridging examples which explain the shift from one stage to another down the grammaticization path.

  6. NIH announces the launch of 3 integrated precision medicine trials: ALCHEMIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials, or ALCHEMIST, will identify early-stage lung cancer patients with tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against

  7. [Dreams in ancient Hebrew sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottek, Samuel S

    2009-01-01

    As in many cultures dreams are, in Hebrew sources, the object of numerous questions where are dreams from? Which is their function? Are they a physical or metaphysical phenomenon? The article analyzes the topic of nature of dreams in the Bible, with a particolar attention devoted to the Joseph's history. Talmudic text are, in particular, rich in references.

  8. [An alchemist or swindler? The case of Zbigniew Dunikowski].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łotysz, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    In early 1930s the newspapers and street journals in Europe and the United States were frequently reporting on a case of Zbigniew Dunikowski, a Polish engineer, who claimed to be in possession of a secret formula allowing production of gold from ordinary sand and rocks. He believed that most of those materials contain some particles of gold. For the precious metal however, it takes millions of years to precipitate into the ledges that could be mined. His method was based on a conviction, that the process can be accelerated. Although he was nicknamed "Polish alchemist" very soon, his vain promises attracted attention of financiers and even some European political leaders. After few years of futile experiments, he was sued by his impatient financial backers, and arrested. While in detention, he was allowed to make the last attempt to produce gold and regain his repute and freedom. When this attempt failed, the judge sentenced him for two years in prison and ordered him to repay some 3 million francs ($100,000) to his investors. He was also fined with ... 100 francs fine (some 4 dollars). It can not be definitively stated, whether Dunikowski was truly convicted that his formula for making gold could have been working or he acted as a swindler from the very beginning. He exclaimed that the accusation of fraud was caused by bankers, who would never let his method to undermine the status quo of world's economy. The experiments conducted in Ecole Centrale in Paris during his trial, were assisted buy several eminent French scientist. But although the judge sentenced, that Dunikowki's "secret process for turning sand into gold is an impracticable combination of absurdities and contradictions," Polish engineer was still able to find other backers after being released from French prison. We find the traces of his further activity in Italy, Switzerland, Belgium and Philippines. Finally, in early 1950s he ended his journey in the United States as a political refugee.

  9. Anarchic alchemists : dissident androgyny in Anglo-American gothic fiction from Godwin to Melville

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    Leeuwen, Evert Jan van

    2006-01-01

    The dissertation Anarchic Alchemists: Dissident Androgyny in Anglo-American Gothic Fiction from Godwin to Melville investigates the close generic links between British and American Gothic fictions from the late eighteenth-century up to the middle of the nineteenth century, including studies on Willi

  10. Anarchic alchemists : dissident androgyny in Anglo-American gothic fiction from Godwin to Melville

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Evert Jan van

    2006-01-01

    The dissertation Anarchic Alchemists: Dissident Androgyny in Anglo-American Gothic Fiction from Godwin to Melville investigates the close generic links between British and American Gothic fictions from the late eighteenth-century up to the middle of the nineteenth century, including studies on

  11. Code-Switching Functions in Modern Hebrew Teaching and Learning

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    Gilead, Yona

    2016-01-01

    The teaching and learning of Modern Hebrew outside of Israel is essential to Jewish education and identity. One of the most contested issues in Modern Hebrew pedagogy is the use of code-switching between Modern Hebrew and learners' first language. Moreover, this is one of the longest running disputes in the broader field of second language…

  12. Morphological Processing in Hebrew-Speaking Students with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Rachel; Ravid, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Marking number/gender agreement on Hebrew adjectives is a case in point: It is a challenging task requiring lexical and grammatical insight, a well-known source of processing errors in Hebrew usage. The current study examined impaired processing of noun and adjective inflection in adult speakers of Hebrew with dyslexia. Thirty normally reading…

  13. A New Transliteration of Hebrew into Standard Characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Amnon

    1988-01-01

    EKTB, a new transliteration scheme for Hebrew based on the historical development of the alphabet, treats Latin characters as graphic variants of Hebrew letters and permits Hebrew to be used with standard equipment while maintaining its traditional writing methodology. (Author/CB)

  14. Hebrew-Arabic bilingual schooling in Israel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Carmit Romano

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the policies and practices employed in the teaching of Arabic and Hebrew at a school belonging to the “Hand In Hand Centre for Jewish-Arab Education in Israel”. Its focus is on strategies that the school has developed in order to support the acquisition of biliteracy...... was perceived as a bi-product that would come about as a result of the equal amount of time and resources allocated to both Arabic and Hebrew in the curriculum. However, there are a number of challenges such as the hegemony and dominance of Hebrew, the imbalance in knowledge of the two languages among...... the teaching stuff and the parents population (the Jewish teachers and parents have little or no knowledge of Arabic while the Arab teachers and parents are virtually bilinguals), the absence of bilingual teacher-training programs and lack of bilingual teaching materials production, that have to be addressed...

  15. Determination of the noun in Biblical Hebrew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    2000-01-01

    The article investigates the claim that the definite article in biblical Hebrew can be unrelated to determination. This claim is found in the standard grammars of Joüon/Muraoka and Gesenius/Kautzsch and in an article by James Barr. Barr argues that it is a diachronic feature, the biblical texts...

  16. The contribution of Qumran to historical Hebrew linguistics: Evidence from the syntax of participial negation

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    Jacobus A. Naudé

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine how Qumran Hebrew can contribute to our knowledge of historical Hebrew linguistics. The premise of this paper is that Qumran Hebrew reflects a distinct stage in the development of Hebrew which sets it apart from Biblical Hebrew. It is further assumed that these unique features are able to assist us to understand the nature of the development of Biblical Hebrew in a more precise way. Evidence from the syntax of participial negation at Qumran as opposed to Biblical Hebrew provides evidence for this claim.Keywords: Qumran Hebrew; Biblical Hebrew; historical linguistics;l Dead Sea Scrolls

  17. The Neurologist Lipman Halpern—Author of the Oath of the Hebrew Physician

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    Moshe Feinsod

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipman Halpern was born in 1902 into a family of Grand Rabbis who lived in Bialystok from the mid-nineteenth century. Inspired by his son’s decision to study medicine, Halpern’s father authored a comprehensive and innovative book on medicine according to Rabbinic Law. After completing his initial medical studies in Königsberg, Halpern went on to specialize in neuropsychiatry in Berlin and then in Zurich. In 1934, Halpern immigrated to Eretz-Israel (then Palestine, where he founded and expanded the Department of Neurology at the Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem. Under his guidance, the department became a leader in clinical neurology, clinical and basic neurological research, and teaching. For the graduation of the first class of the Faculty of Medicine of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1952, he authored the “Oath of the Hebrew Physician,” which went on to become the official oath for all new physicians graduating from Israeli faculties of medicine. Halpern authored many clinical and research articles in English, German, French, and Hebrew. His studies on the relationship between the vestibular, cerebellar, and visual systems resulted in the description of the phenomenon of “monocular disequilibrium” and the “sensorimotor induction syndrome,” also known as “Halpern’s syndrome.” In 1953 he became the first Israel Prize laureate in Medicine. Halpern died in 1968 while serving his second term as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Hebrew University.

  18. [The centenary of the Israel Medical Association].

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    Levy, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    On January 12th 1912, six Jewish physicians and one pharmacist assembled in Tel-Aviv to proclaim the founding of the Jaffa Hebrew Medical Society. One year later the Jewish doctors of Jerusalem established the "Society of Hebrew Speaking Physicians". On 28th December, 1918 a few weeks after the end of World War 1, both organizations merged into the Hebrew Medical Association which later became the Israel Medical Association (I.M.A.). The Association played a leading role in the advancement of medicine in the Holy Land and was instrumental in imposing the Hebrew medical terminology in the newly founded State of Israel.

  19. Vowel Representation in Written Hebrew: Phonological, Orthographic and Morphological Contexts

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    Schiff, Rachel; Ravid, Dorit

    2004-01-01

    The study investigates adult Hebrew readers' perception of words containing the grapheme[Hebrew] in different orthographic and morphological contexts. In the first experiment, 38 third-year education students were asked to make lexical decisions regarding 24 pointed words (presented with vowel marks) in a sentential context in two conditions--with…

  20. Emotional distress in the Hebrew Bible. Somatic or psychological?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, D B

    1992-01-01

    A systematic search was made in the Hebrew Bible for expressions of emotional distress. A wide range of somatic and psychological vocabulary was found, especially in the Psalms and other poetic literature. Somatic expressions most frequently involved the heart, bowels, belly, bones, and eyes. Head symptoms were rare. Metaphors referring to the heart were common; other somatic expressions appeared to be descriptions of actual physical sensations. Usually somatic and psychological expressions were paired together, utilising the 'parallelism' of Hebrew verse form. Biblical Hebrew thus incorporated a powerful and sophisticated language of emotional expression.

  1. Defending the Concept of Time in the Hebrew Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundvad, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of reflection on time as an independent subject in the Hebrew Bible, there has been a scholarly tendency to consider biblical time conception more limited than our own, perhaps even nonexistent. This article confronts the scholarly skepticism regarding the ability of the bibli......Due to the scarcity of reflection on time as an independent subject in the Hebrew Bible, there has been a scholarly tendency to consider biblical time conception more limited than our own, perhaps even nonexistent. This article confronts the scholarly skepticism regarding the ability...... of the biblical authors to think about time, defending the presence of time conceptualization in the Hebrew Bible. In the article I discuss central research contributions to the subject of biblical time, in particular Sacha Stern’s thesis that the concept of time is entirely absent from the Hebrew Bible and from...

  2. Content words in Hebrew child-directed speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi-Bensaid, L; Ben-David, A; Tubul-Lavy, G

    2015-08-01

    The goal of the study was to examine whether the 'noun-bias' phenomenon, which exists in the lexicon of Hebrew-speaking children, also exists in Hebrew child-directed speech (CDS) as well as in Hebrew adult-directed speech (ADS). In addition, we aimed to describe the use of the different classes of content words in the speech of Hebrew-speaking parents to their children at different ages compared to the speech of parents to adults (ADS). Thirty infants (age range 8:5-33 months) were divided into three stages according to age: pre-lexical, single-word, and early grammar. The ADS corpus included 18 Hebrew-speaking parents of children at the same three stages of language development as in the CDS corpus. The CDS corpus was collected from parent-child dyads during naturalistic activities at home: mealtime, bathing, and play. The ADS corpus was collected from parent-experimenter interactions including the parent watching a video and then being interviewed by the experimenter. 200 utterances of each sample were transcribed, coded for types and tokens and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results show that in CDS, when speaking to infants of all ages, parents' use of types and tokens of verbs and nouns was similar and significantly higher than their use of adjectives or adverbs. In ADS, however, verbs were the main lexical category used by Hebrew-speaking parents in both types and tokens. It seems that both the properties of the input language (e.g. the pro-drop parameter) and the interactional styles of the caregivers are important factors that may influence the high presence of verbs in Hebrew-speaking parents' ADS and CDS. The negative correlation between the widespread use of verbs in the speech of parents to their infants and the 'noun-bias' phenomenon in the Hebrew-child lexicon will be discussed in detail.

  3. Anything But Ordinary--hebrew.cri.cn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嘉

    2014-01-01

    In the present era of accelerated technological development with its proliferation of new digital media, PC and Internet, the main questions concerning communication practices examine the patterns of interaction between these practices and the use of‘old’ media, such as print, the electronic and audio-visual media, television, radio and VCR, which have all dominated the communication scene until fairly recently. Definitely we can say that the internet has become a family member that no one can live without it, especially the new types electronic products’ sale in the markets and the development of the wireless (wifi) ,what’s more , the high click rates of facebook, youtube ,twitter and so on . This great change also have happened in China that you can see the first thing for everyone in the morning is connecting the internet so as to read weibo (micro blog, its function is similar to twitter, now it is the most popular and famous micro blog in China), youku (similar to ytube), xiaonei (like facebook) and so on. Therefore a great many ‘old’ media in China is now experiencing the large reform. CRI (China Radio International) cannot lag behind. In this paper, I am trying to introduce one website from CRI which is called “hebrew.cri.cn” as a landscape to state her“birth”,“grow up (development)”and her“future”.

  4. Reading Hebrews through Akan ethnicity and social identity

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    Seth Kissi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Akan people of Ghana have concepts of ethnicity and social identity which are similar to those found in the Mediterranean world, which find expression in the issues addressed in the letter to the Hebrews. This similarity makes the reading of Hebrews in light of Akan ethnicity and social identity possible, giving one the expected meaning from the perspective of those concepts as within the original context of the audience. This article therefore discusses some theories on ethnicity and social identity as well as the Akan people of Ghana and their concepts of ethnicity and social identity. It further explains the social context of the letter of Hebrews against which Hebrews is then read in light of Akan ethnicity and social identity. The focus of this reading is on how the ethnic identity of the readers presented in Hebrews enhances the social identity of the readers and provides the means by which the author’s appeal to his readers for their faithfulness to God becomes meaningful and urgent.

  5. The Distribution of Visual Information in the Vertical Dimension of Roman and Hebrew Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimron, Joseph; Navon, David

    1980-01-01

    English and Hebrew native speakers read texts mutilated by removing strips at the top or bottom of lines. Reading English texts was impaired more by mutilating the top, but the reverse was found for Hebrew texts, due to the different ways information is distributed along the vertical axis of Roman and Hebrew letters. (Author/GT)

  6. Subject Realization in Early Hebrew/English Bilingual Acquisition: The Role of Crosslinguistic Influence

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    Hacohen, Aviya; Schaeffer, Jeannette

    2007-01-01

    This study reports on the use of (c)overt subjects and subject-verb agreement in Hebrew in the spontaneous speech of a child, EK, acquiring Hebrew and English simultaneously from birth and of five slightly younger Hebrew monolingual controls. Analysis shows that EK's production of pragmatically inappropriate overt subjects is more than three times…

  7. Defending the Concept of Time in the Hebrew Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundvad, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of reflection on time as an independent subject in the Hebrew Bible, there has been a scholarly tendency to consider biblical time conception more limited than our own, perhaps even nonexistent. This article confronts the scholarly skepticism regarding the ability...... of the biblical authors to think about time, defending the presence of time conceptualization in the Hebrew Bible. In the article I discuss central research contributions to the subject of biblical time, in particular Sacha Stern’s thesis that the concept of time is entirely absent from the Hebrew Bible and from...... ancient Judaism more widely. I explore linguistic and anthropological assumptions which underpin large parts of the discussion on time within biblical studies, arguing that one cannot assume on the basis of either that the biblical authors lacked a concept of time. Finally, I suggest that the ability...

  8. The Meaning of Nature for Santiago in His Efforts to Find the Real Happiness in The Alchemist

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    Nani Indrajani T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Santiago, the main character in the novel The Alchemist, is trying to find the real happiness in his life. Having dreamt of exactly the same thing twice, he wants to have his dreams come true. He is eager to find the hidden treasure that was shown in the Egyptian Pyramids in his dreams since he has the faith he will not be able to be happy and peaceful, unless he could find the hidden treasure. Using the literary philosophy theory on transcendentalism, particularly Emerson’s theory written in McKinnon’s (1985 book, this article discusses how nature can help Santiago in his process of finding the real happiness, namely the hidden treasure, in his life. Though he has to undergo a great deal of difficulties, threats, and dangers in his effort to find the treasure, he eventually succeeds in finding the treasure; namely the girl he loves dearly and his own happiness.

  9. The contribution of Qumran to historical Hebrew linguistics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-24

    Jun 24, 2016 ... became the main language of public life from the Persian period. After hellenisation .... important in considering the classification of Qumran Hebrew. Some ... Naudé (2012:70–73) adds also the factor of the nature of written ...

  10. Zionism and the Fate of "Politeness" in Modern Israeli Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Douglas J.

    This study investigated the relationship between ideology and speech patterns in Modern Israeli Hebrew. Eighty native speakers of university age were provided with descriptions of events in which some desired object or information was the goal, then asked what they would say to attain the goal and to construct examples of stylized uses of speech…

  11. Pharyngeal related non-lexical vowels in Sephardic Modern Hebrew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pariente, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines non-lexical vowels in Sephardic Modern Hebrew. It is argued that two kinds of vowel, which are triggered by the pharyngeal consonants, should be identified: (a) true epenthetic vowels that emerge on the surface to repair illicit (marked) syllable structures. (b) "Echo-vowels" tha

  12. The Prosodic Basis of the Tiberian Hebrew System of Accents.

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    Dresher, Bezalel Elan

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that the Tiberian system of accents that annotate the text of the Hebrew Bible has a prosodic basis. Tiberian representation can best be understood by integrating results of phonological, phonetic, and psycholinguistic research on prosodic structure. (93 references) (Author/LB)

  13. "Good Citizenship" through Bilingual Children Literature: Arabic and Hebrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Sara; Baratz, Lea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the research has been to evaluate the contribution of the genre of bilingual literature, Arabic and Hebrew, to citizenship education. Since the Israeli society is a multicultural society comprised of both nations, Arabs and Jews who live in conflicted environment, one must regard those textbooks as civic agents. Literature is a…

  14. The Role of Vowel Signs in Hebrew: Beyond Word Recognition.

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    Shimron, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Examines contributions of vowel signs in reading Hebrew on memory and comprehension. Finds that vowel signs speeded up recognition memory of words in third graders, and improved recall of words printed in the context of mixed lists in sixth graders. Finds also that vowelization improved memory and comprehension of some prose texts. (RS)

  15. The Judaeo-Karaite Reception of the Hebrew Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabih, Joshua

    DESCRIPTION: The Karaites emerged as a school of thought within Middle Eastern Judaism in the 8th century. The Karaites were a “reading community” whose intellectual activity and daily lives were based around the divine scriptures. Over time Karaism became one of the two main competing schools of...... between the Rabbinate and the Karaite reception and interpretation of the Hebrew Bible....

  16. Samaria, Samaritans and the Composition of the Hebrew Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Examination of supersessionism and competition over cult and belief inherent in narratives and structures of the Hebrew Bible. While discussions over cult  places are presented in a variety of extra-biblical sources as taking place in post-exilic times, biblical narratives anachronistically place...

  17. Late Hebrew Immersion at Mt. Scopus College, Melbourne: Towards Complete Hebrew Fluency for Jewish Day School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, S. C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates a Hebrew immersion program for Jewish day school students at Mt. Scopus College in Melbourne, Australia. Specific sections address the following: (1) the first year; (2) the second year; (3) designing the evaluation of the program; (4) results of the evaluation (including academic outcomes, student and parent…

  18. Late Hebrew Immersion at Mt. Scopus College, Melbourne: Towards Complete Hebrew Fluency for Jewish Day School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, S. C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates a Hebrew immersion program for Jewish day school students at Mt. Scopus College in Melbourne, Australia. Specific sections address the following: (1) the first year; (2) the second year; (3) designing the evaluation of the program; (4) results of the evaluation (including academic outcomes, student and parent…

  19. Mercury and sulphur among the High Medieval alchemists: from Rāzī and Avicenna to Albertus Magnus and pseudo-Roger Bacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, William R

    2014-11-01

    This essay challenges the often expressed view that the principles of metals, namely mercury and sulphur, were generally viewed by alchemists as being of a 'metaphysical' character that made them inaccessible to the tools and operations of the laboratory. By examining a number of Arabo-Latin and Latin alchemical texts in circulation before the end of the thirteenth century, the author presents evidence that most alchemists of the period considered mercury and sulphur to be materials subject to techniques of purification in the same way that naturally occurring salts and minerals could be freed of their impurities or dross. The article also points to the immense influence of Avicenna and Albertus Magnus in formulating the theory that mercury and sulphur were compounds of different materials, containing both fixed and unfixed components. Finally, the author briefly examines the relationship between this materialist approach to the principles and the chymical atomism of early modern authors who were deeply aware of medieval alchemical literature.

  20. The role of allophony and frequency in the acquisition of the Hebrew rhotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Evan-Gary; Ben-David, Avivit

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the role of allophonic variation in phoneme acquisition and the clinical implications of this role. Specifically, we investigate the Hebrew rhotic /ʁ/. We analyse its production by Hebrew-acquiring children in various corpora, comparing the deletion, substitution and production in word-initial onset, intervocalic and word-final coda positions. The results are compared to the frequency of rhotics in a child-directed speech (CDS) corpus and in a Hebrew lexicon analysis. The study shows rhotics are acquired first in word-final codas, then in intervocalic position and finally as word-initial onsets. The order of acquisition, demonstrated by the deletion and substitution patterns, and the actual production of Hebrew rhotics correlate with the degree of allophonic variation. It does not, however, correlate with the frequency patterns observed in CDS and the Hebrew lexicon. Further study of allophonic variation and acquisition should include additional phonemes in Hebrew, as well as other languages.

  1. Immigrant Adjustment in Israel: Literacy and Fluency in Hebrew and Earnings

    OpenAIRE

    Chiswick, Barry R.; Repetto, Gaston

    2000-01-01

    This paper is an analysis of the determinates of Hebrew language speaking and writing skills and the determinates of earnings among adult male Jewish immigrants in Israel, using the 1972 Census of Israel. Among other findings, Hebrew speaking skills and Hebrew literacy are shown to increase with level of schooling and duration in Israel, but to decrease with age at migration and if many others in the area in which the respondent lives speak the same origin language. Country of origin and fami...

  2. Family Language Policies, Reported Language Use and Proficiency in Russian-Hebrew Bilingual Children in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Carmit; Burstein Feldman, Zhanna; Yitzhaki, Dafna; Armon Lotem, Sharon; Walters, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between family language policy (FLP) and language choice, language use, proficiency in Russian and Hebrew, codeswitching (CS) and linguistic performance was studied in Russian-speaking immigrant parents and their Russian-Hebrew bilingual preschool children. By means of Glaser's Grounded Theory, the content of sociolinguistic…

  3. Letter-Transposition Effects Are Not Universal: The Impact of Transposing Letters in Hebrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velan, Hadas; Frost, Ram

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of letter-transposition in Hebrew in three masked-priming experiments. Hebrew, like English has an alphabetic orthography where sequential and contiguous letter strings represent phonemes. However, being a Semitic language it has a non-concatenated morphology that is based on root derivations. Experiment 1 showed that…

  4. Reading Development in Upper Elementary Language Minority Readers of Hebrew: The Specific Challenge of Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar-Yames, Daphna; Prior, Anat

    2017-01-01

    We examined reading proficiency, focusing on fluency, in 56 Russian-speaking language minority (LM) students and 56 native Hebrew-speaking (NH) peers. Fifth-grade students completed measures of Hebrew reading accuracy and fluency from word to text level as well as phonological awareness (PA), RAN and vocabulary. LM students read single words less…

  5. Phonological Awareness in Hebrew (L1) and English (L2) in Normal and Disabled Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russak, Susie; Saiegh-Haddad, Elinor

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined cross-linguistic relationships between phonological awareness in L1 (Hebrew) and L2 (English) among normal (N = 30) and reading disabled (N = 30) Hebrew native speaking college students. Further, it tested the effect of two factors: the lexical status of the stimulus word (real word vs. pseudoword) and the linguistic…

  6. The Meanings of Hebrew: Defining Bilingual Education in a Dual-Language Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Using a discourse analytic framework that draws on theories of language ideologies, this paper analyzes the semiotics of a heritage language as it moves from the context of parochial education to the realm of public schooling. Specifically, it examines how Hebrew undergoes resemioticization when a Hebrew language charter school in the District of…

  7. Psychometric Evaluation of the Hebrew Language Version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaby, Dana; Jarus, Tal; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    The satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) is a widely accepted and widely used tool for measuring well-being. Although its potential as a cross-cultural index is recognized, an introduction and systematic validation of the Hebrew version is needed. Thus, the purpose of this study is: (1) to describe the process of developing the Hebrew version of…

  8. The Role of Vowels in Reading Semitic Scripts: Data from Arabic and Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rabia, Salim

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of vowels and context on reading accuracy of skilled adult native Arabic speakers in Arabic and in Hebrew, their second language. Reveals a significant effect for vowels and for context across all reading conditions in Arabic and Hebrew. Finds that the vowelized texts in Arabic and the pointed and unpointed texts in Hebrew…

  9. The Role of Emergent Bilingualism in the Development of Morphological Awareness in Arabic and Hebrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mila; Taha, Haitham; Assad, Hanan; Khamaisi, Ferdos; Eviatar, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of dual language development and cross-linguistic influence on morphological awareness in young bilinguals' first language (L1) and second language (L2). We examined whether (a) the bilingual children (L1/L2 Arabic and L1/L2 Hebrew) precede their monolingual Hebrew- or…

  10. The Hebrew Language in Quevedo’s España defendida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Cohen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the use of Hebrew in one of the famous writings of Francisco de Quevedo, España defendida. The work considers aspects in the book where Quevedo’s knowledge of Hebrew can be studied from different linguistic perspectives: phonetics, morphology, etymology and, in this specific case, graphematics. Also, in addition to the above, it is interesting to notice how Quevedo is frequently making cultural and literary deductions that, in many cases, are to be considered with his view of Hebrew. Certainly, in the early stages of the work of Quevedo as an author and thinker, he demonstrated a plentitude of exquisite ability of writing about erudite topics. To the point where the analysis of the Hebrew language from socio-linguistic standpoint coincide with his view about the identity of the Spanish people in relation to tradition and religion, from the Hebrews to Christianity and Spain.

  11. Learning to Read a Semitic Abjad: The Triplex Model of Hebrew Reading Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, David L; Bar-On, Amalia

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a model of Hebrew reading development that emphasizes both the universal and script-specific aspects of learning to read a Semitic abjad. At the universal level, the study of Hebrew reading acquisition offers valuable insights into the fundamental dilemmas of all writing systems-balancing the competing needs of the novice versus the expert reader (Share, 2008). At the script-specific level, pointed Hebrew initially employs supplementary vowel signs, providing the beginning reader a consistent, phonologically well-specified script while helping the expert-to-be unitize words and morphemes via (consonantal) spelling constancy. A major challenge for the developing Hebrew reader is negotiating the transition from pointed to unpointed Hebrew, with its abundance of homographs. Our triplex model emphasizes three phases of early Hebrew reading development: a progression from lower-order, phonological (sublexical) sequential spelling-to-sound translation (Phase 1, Grade 1) to higher-order, string-level (lexical) lexico-morpho-orthographic processing (Phase 2, Grade 2) followed, in the upper elementary grades, by a supralexical contextual level (Phase 3) essential for dealing with the pervasive homography of unpointed Hebrew.

  12. On Biblical Hebrew and Computer Science: Inspiration, Models, Tools, And Cross-fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Eep Talstra's work has been an inspiration to maby researchers, both within and outside of the field of Old Testament scholarship. Among others, Crist-Jan Doedens and the present author have been heavily influenced by Talstra in their own work within the field of computer science. The present...... of the present author. In addition, the tools surrounding Emdros, including SESB, Libronis, and the Emdros Query Tool, are described. Ecamples Biblical Hebrew scholar. Thus the inspiration of Talstra comes full-circle: from Biblical Hebrew databases to computer science and back into Biblical Hebrew scholarship....

  13. On Biblical Hebrew and Computer Science: Inspiration, Models, Tools, And Cross-fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Eep Talstra's work has been an inspiration to maby researchers, both within and outside of the field of Old Testament scholarship. Among others, Crist-Jan Doedens and the present author have been heavily influenced by Talstra in their own work within the field of computer science. The present...... of the present author. In addition, the tools surrounding Emdros, including SESB, Libronis, and the Emdros Query Tool, are described. Ecamples Biblical Hebrew scholar. Thus the inspiration of Talstra comes full-circle: from Biblical Hebrew databases to computer science and back into Biblical Hebrew scholarship....

  14. Early Hebrew education and its significance for present-day educational theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schoeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Early Hebrew education and its significance for present-day educational theory and practice The history of education in antiquity is not without relevance to present-day educational theory and practice. The focus in this article is on the early Hebrews and their education. A study of early Hebrew education may in itself not provide solutions to current educational problems, but it may be useful in offering new perspectives, encouragement and suggestions for a juture South African educational dispensation.

  15. Descriptive currents in philosophy of religion for Hebrew Bible studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus W. Gericke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argued that the utilisation of philosophy of religion in the study of the Hebrew Bible is possible if we look beyond the stereotype of erroneously equating the auxiliary field with natural theology, apologetics or atheological criticism. Fruitful possibilities for interdisciplinary research are available in the form of descriptive varieties of philosophy of religion primarily concerned with understanding and the clarification of meaning rather than with the stereotypical tasks of propositional justification or critical evaluation. Three examples are discussed in the article: analytic traditions (Wittgensteinianism and ordinarylanguage philosophy, phenomenological perspectives involving reduction (bracketing and comparative philosophy of religion that works in tandem with the history of religion and comparative religion.

  16. The Hebrew Bible in contemporary philosophy of religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus W. Gericke

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Some dialogue among these specialists, especially between biblical scholars and philosophers of religion, is unquestionably long overdue.(Stump 1985:1�Over the last few decades, there has been an increased concern for the establishment of more sustained interdisciplinary dialogue between biblical scholars and philosophers of religion. In this article, aimed at biblical scholars, the author as biblical scholar offers a descriptive and historical overview of some samples of recourse to the Hebrew Bible in philosophical approaches in the study of religion. The aim is to provide a brief glimpse of how some representative philosophers from both the analytic and continental sides of the methodological divide have related to the biblical traditions in the quest for a contemporary relevant Christian philosophy of religion.

  17. The unfolding of God’s revelation in Hebrews 1:1–2a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Coetsee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction to his sermon, the writer of Hebrews suggests that God’s revelation unfolded from his so-called ‘Old Testament’ revelation to his ‘New Testament’ revelation in his Son (Heb. 1:1–2a. By doing a thorough exegesis of Hebrews 1:1–2a, the author’s view of such an unfolding revelation is confirmed. From this conclusion, certain hermeneutical implications of the unfolding of God’s revelation are drawn for believers and scholars today. Among others, it is determined that God’s revelation is progressive, that his revelation in his Son is superior, climactic and final, and that God’s final revelation in his Son can only be understood within the context of his Old Testament revelation, and vice versa.Keywords: Hebrews; Hebrews 1:1-2a; unfolding; revelation; hermeneutics

  18. The Old Testament or Hebrew Bible in Africa: Challenges and prospects for interpretation and translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloo O. Mojola

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Old Testament or Hebrew Bible is much loved in Africa. It is however encountered almost exclusively in translation, either through translation into local indigenous languages or translation into foreign, non-local languages. The source language Hebrew text is inaccessible to the vast majority of readers, including Christian pastors or theological students who would naturally be expected to have access by virtue of their profession. Knowledge of the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible is thus mediated through existing translations and interpretations, and through the popular or scholarly writings of Old Testament or Hebrew Bible experts. In many parts of Africa the latter are in very short supply. This article is an attempt to engage and critically reflect further on some of the issues arising out of this situation with specific reference to the work of Knut Holter, as well as others. This situation and the challenges posed for a full and unencumbered encounter with the Hebrew scriptures and prospects for the future is explored.Intradisciplinary and/or�interdisciplinary�implications: It is expected that the translation of the Hebrew scriptures involves interaction with local cultures and belief systems opening space for new interpretations from the perspectives of local world views and practices. The challenges for local Christian theologies and Christian doctrine in general arising from this are unavoidable.

  19. Cultural Palimpsest:On Coelho’s The Alchemist%文化重写本--评《牧羊少年奇幻之旅》

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖; 韩艳

    2015-01-01

    The Alchemist, written by Paulo Coelho, is a kind of cultural palimpsest. He has used No. 351 story from The Thousand and One Nights as an outline, picked up biblical stories and allusions as his materials, then blended up everything and turned it into his story of an alchemist. Though readers are familiar with these stories, they would get a new reading experience because of the different contexts that Coelho puts them into. In light of intertextuality, this essay intends to interpret the overlaying and repetition of different texts in the novel. With the merging and clashing of different inter-texts, both Arabian culture and Judeo-Christian culture have sent forth new glamour.%巴西作家保罗•柯艾略的《牧羊少年奇幻之旅》堪称一个“文化重写本”。《一千零一夜》的第351故事为其底稿,在此之上,柯艾略以《圣经》故事设色铺陈,又加以炼金术士的笔触点化成金。读者虽对这些故事耳熟能详,却因柯艾略将其放置在不同背景中,而获得了新的阅读体验。本文拟从互文性的角度解读小说中不同文本的叠加与重复。在几个互文本的撞击与晕染中,阿拉伯文化、犹太教文化以及基督教文化散发出了新的魅力。

  20. Anything But Ordinary ——hebrew.cri.cn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嘉

    2014-01-01

    In the present era of accelerated technological development with its proliferation of new digital media,PC and Internet,the main questions concerning communication practices examine the patterns of interaction between these practices and the use of‘old’media,such as print,the electronic and audiovisual media,television,radio and VCR,which have all dominated the communication scene until fairly recently.Definitely we can say that the internet has become a family member that no one can live without it,especially the new types electronic products’sale in the markets and the development of the wireless(wifi),what’s more,the high click rates of facebook,youtube,twitter and so on.This great change also have happened in China that you can see the first thing for everyone in the morning is connecting the internet so as to read weibo(micro blog,its function is similar to twitter,now it is the most popular and famous micro blog in China),youku(similar to ytube),xiaonei(like facebook)and so on.Therefore a great many‘old’media in China is now experiencing the large reform.CRI(China Radio International)cannot lag behind.In this paper,I am trying to introduce one website from CRI which is called"hebrew.cri.cn"as a landscape to state her"birth","grow up(development)"and her"future".

  1. Reading Accuracy and Speed of Vowelized and Unvowelized Scripts among Dyslexic Readers of Hebrew: The Road Not Taken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Rachel; Katzir, Tami; Shoshan, Noa

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of orthographic transparency on reading ability of children with dyslexia in two Hebrew scripts. The study explored the reading accuracy and speed of vowelized and unvowelized Hebrew words of fourth-grade children with dyslexia. A comparison was made to typically developing readers of two age groups: a group…

  2. The Importance of Vowel Diacritics for Reading in Hebrew: What Can Be Learned from Readers with Prelingual Deafness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the importance of vowel diacritics for the reading of Hebrew in individuals with different levels of phonological control. A paradigm calling for written ordered-recall of 12 lists of 8 consecutively displayed Hebrew nouns was used as a test tool. Item presentation and between-item interval were computer-controlled. Half of…

  3. Evidence for Language-Specific Influence on the Preference of Stress Patterns in Infants Learning an Iambic Language (Hebrew)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Osnat; Kishon-Rabin, Liat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability of infants to develop recognition of a common stress pattern that is language specific has been tested mainly in trochaic languages with a strong-weak (SW) stress pattern. The goals of the present study were: (a) to test Hebrew-learning infants on their stress pattern preference in the Hebrew language, for which the…

  4. Reading Accuracy and Speed of Vowelized and Unvowelized Scripts among Dyslexic Readers of Hebrew: The Road Not Taken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Rachel; Katzir, Tami; Shoshan, Noa

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of orthographic transparency on reading ability of children with dyslexia in two Hebrew scripts. The study explored the reading accuracy and speed of vowelized and unvowelized Hebrew words of fourth-grade children with dyslexia. A comparison was made to typically developing readers of two age groups: a group…

  5. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences.

  6. Educating "Good Citizenship" through Bilingual Children Literature Arabic and Hebrew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zamir

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research has been to evaluate the contribution of the genre of bilingual literature, Arabic and Hebrew, to citizenship education. Since the Israeli society is a multicultural society comprised of both nations, Arabs and Jews who live in conflicted environment, one must regard those textbooks as civic agents. Literature is a socialization agent and as such it is an active influential factor in children's mental environment. The responsible citizens act responsibly in their community. They obey rules and regulation, acts kindly to his surroundings and occasionally donates out of their own resources. The participatory citizen actually participates in the social life of the community, at local, state and national levels by joining established systems. The justice citizen calls for attention to matters of injustice and to the importance of pursuing social goals. The content analysis procedure, revealed that most the  stories, hence, ten out the  thirteen  deal  with the  two elevated types  of citizenship,  namely,  the participatory citizen and the justice citizen.  Inspire  of  the  fact   that  we  are  dealing with  children's literature, the  authors  of  bilingual  children literature do not belittle the capacity of  children to  grasp  their role  as citizens in multicultural  society.

  7. Evidence for language-specific influence on the preference of stress patterns in infants learning an Iambic language (Hebrew).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Osnat; Kishon-Rabin, Liat

    2012-10-01

    The ability of infants to develop recognition of a common stress pattern that is language specific has been tested mainly in trochaic languages with a strong-weak (SW) stress pattern. The goals of the present study were: (a) to test Hebrew-learning infants on their stress pattern preference in the Hebrew language, for which the weak-strong (WS) stress pattern is the common one, and (b) to test whether the infants would generalize any preference for the common stress pattern in Hebrew to English words, which belong to a different rhythmic class. Fifty-six 9-month-old Hebrew-learning infants were tested on their preference for SW and WS stress patterns using Hebrew and English bisyllabic words with the head-turn preference procedure. The infants showed preference for WS Hebrew words but not for SW English words. Hebrew-learning infants recognize the common stress pattern in their native language, supporting language-specific distributional learning by infants. This recognition, however, is not generalized to a foreign language with different prosodic characteristics.

  8. Learning of Letter Names Follows Similar Principles across Languages: Evidence from Hebrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Rebecca; Levin, Iris; Kessler, Brett

    2007-01-01

    Letter names play an important role in early literacy. Previous studies of letter name learning have examined the Latin alphabet. The current study tested learners of Hebrew, comparing their patterns of performance and types of errors with those of English learners. We analyzed letter-naming data from 645 Israeli children who had not begun formal…

  9. A Developmental Study of Prepositional Phrases in Hebrew Written Text Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Gilad; Ravid, Dorit

    2017-01-01

    Prepositional phrases (PPs) are considered an important feature of mature written expression. However, little is known about the development of PPs during the school years. The study examined the use of PPs in 160 narrative and expository texts, written by Hebrew-users in grades 4, 7, and 11, and adults. PPs were identified, counted, and…

  10. Hebrew Brain vs. English Brain: Language Modulates the Way It Is Processed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Atira S.; Goelman, Gadi; Frost, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Is language processing universal? How do the specific properties of each language influence the way it is processed? In this study, we compare the neural correlates of morphological processing in Hebrew--a Semitic language with a rich and systematic morphology, to those revealed in English--an Indo-European language with a linear morphology. Using…

  11. Hebrew and Palestinian Arabic in Israel: Linguistic Frameworks and Speech-Language Pathology Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel-Karl, Sigal; Kanaan, Fadi; Yifat, Rachel; Meir, Irit; Abugov, Netta; Ravid, Dorit

    2014-01-01

    This article is the result of cooperation between Israeli Jewish and Arab psycholinguists and speech-language disorders specialists. It presents two facets of the Israeli communications disorders scene: (1) a review of some linguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic facets of Hebrew and Palestinian Arabic, two Semitic languages whose…

  12. More on the Acquisition of Locative Prepositions: An Analysis of Hebrew Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromi, Esther

    1979-01-01

    The acquisition and use of locative prepositions by 30 Hebrew-speaking children aged two to three years was investigated in a cross-sectional study. Both the order of acquisition and the role of linguistic complexity in determining that order were examined. (Author/AM)

  13. Child Bilingualism in an Immigrant Society: Implications of Borrowing in the Hebrew 'Language of Games.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Adon, Aaron

    The first waves of immigrants arriving in Palestine were faced with the problem of forming a new culture and creating a new language, actually, reviving Hebrew, an ancient language. The children were faced with creating their own traditions, games, and folklore; in so doing, through straight borrowing, spontaneous translation (loan translation),…

  14. The Hebrew Liturgical Poetry of Byzantine Palestine : Recent Research and New Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bekkum, Wout Jac.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a striking growth of interest in the study of Hebrew (and Aramaic) liturgical poetry, or pjyut, in Byzantine Palestine. Scholars have published a substantial number of texts and studies and have started to produce several translations. The issues and observat

  15. Balfour's Mission to Palestine: Science, Strategy, and the Inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Roy

    2008-01-01

    In 1925, A.J. Balfour, first Earl Balfour and author of the famous "Balfour Declaration", attended the inauguration of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His education and experience of foreign policy equipped him to take a prominent role. However, the conditions of strife-torn Palestine weighed heavily upon him, and raised wider…

  16. Peace Education through Bilingual Children's Literature Written in Arabic and in Hebrew: Different Narratives, Different Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research has been to evaluate the contribution of the emerging Israeli genre of bilingual literature, Arabic and Hebrew, to peace education. Since Israeli society is a multicultural one comprised of two nations, Arabs and Jews who live in an environment of conflict, one must regard those textbooks as political socialization agents.…

  17. Health journalism in the service of power: 'moral complacency' and the Hebrew media in the Gaza-Israel conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birenbaum-Carmeli, Daphna

    2014-05-01

    The power of health news as a vehicle in the production of meaning in the service of power is the core of this article. Tracking the media coverage of a medical service, it shows how a routine practice can be invoked at a time of armed conflict so as to enhance a benevolent state image. The case at hand is the medical treatment of Gaza children in Israeli hospitals. A series of Internet searches revealed a group of publications on the subject in the Hebrew media, during and shortly after Israel's assault on Gaza in the winter of 2008-2009. In the press articles the treatments were invariably constituted as the epitome of Israel's compassion towards the enemy's children. This image relied, however, on a simultaneous silencing of other aspects of these treatments, which would have challenged this image. The monolithic depictions give rise to the notion of reversed moral panic or 'moral complacency', wherein the media amplifies a little-known social phenomenon into an epitome of societal values and charges it with significance on a national scale. The article ends with considering some features that possibly render health news an especially convenient domain for state-supportive media presentations. © 2014 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Pedagogy of social transformation in the Hebrew Bible: Allowing Scripture to inform our interpretive strategy for contemporary application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Moloney

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hebrew Bible itself teaches its readers and listeners how to learn. Its pedagogy of social transformation instructs contemporary Christians how to interpret and apply lessons from Scripture in a manner that is consistent with the orientation, priorities and methods inherent in the text. This article demonstrates that relationship and identity are the necessary precursors to biblical education. It then considers the educational perspective for social transformation within the Hebrew Bible. The analysis explores the purpose and process of education for social transformation and the pastorally oriented pedagogy that the Bible utilises to advance moral development and prevent hermeneutic bias. Lastly, the article considers how the narrative, Law, prophets and wisdom texts in the Hebrew Bible train in social critique. This article helps Christians to develop a biblically based hermeneutic of the Hebrew Scripture’s social transformation for application today.

  19. Word reading and reading-related skills in Hebrew-speaking adolescents with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Antebi, Vered

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated word reading and reading-related skills in 17 Hebrew-speaking individuals with Williams syndrome, ages 11-22. Reading of real words was at the third grade level, yet six participants could not read nonce words at all. The relatively high percentage of nonreaders could be a consequence of the special characteristics of Hebrew orthography, which realizes consonants as letters and vowels as diacritic dots and dashes below and above the line. In the group as a whole, reading real and nonce words did not correlate with rapid naming. Yet, contrary to research on dyslexia, word reading correlated with IQ as well as with performance on phonological awareness tasks.

  20. Phonological and orthographic visual word recognition in the two cerebral hemispheres: Evidence from Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Eva; Eviatar, Zohar

    2006-09-01

    Studies on the cerebral mechanisms of reading have mostly used Latin-based writing systems and assume that the left, but not the right, cerebral hemisphere is capable of phonological processing. The present study used Hebrew as the test language to examine the effects of phonological and orthographic information in the two hemispheres. In unvoweled Hebrew script, words are read via consonant information alone. We used two naming tasks with an interference paradigm, where phonemically, orthographically, and figurally incorrect vowel information conflicted with the consonant information of words presented in the left, right, or central visual fields. Interference patterns indicated that the left hemisphere automatically transforms graphemes into phonemes (Experiments 1 and 2), whereas the right hemisphere processes vowel diacritics as visual objects (Experiment 1), although it possesses some phonological categories (Experiment 2). The significance of these findings for models of visual word recognition in the cerebral hemispheres is discussed.

  1. An Unusual use of the Definite Article in Biblical and Post-Biblical Hebrew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    1999-01-01

    The article investigates the claim that the definite article in mishnaic Hebrew can be unrelated to determination. This claim is found in the standard grammars of Moshe Azar and in the work of Gabriel Birnbaum. The article argues that this interpretation of the use of the article is based on a mi...... on a misunderstanding, and the instances of article use that might seem to be unrelated to determination in fact are perfectly related to determination when analysed carefully....

  2. Oral-diadochokinetic rates for Hebrew-speaking healthy ageing population: non-word versus real-word repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Icht, Michal

    2017-05-01

    Oral-diadochokinesis (oral-DDK) tasks are extensively used in the evaluation of motor speech abilities. Currently, validated normative data for older adults (aged 65 years and older) are missing in Hebrew. The effect of task stimuli (non-word versus real-word repetition) is also non-clear in the population of older adult Hebrew speakers. (1) To establish a norm for oral-DDK rate for older adult (aged 65 years and older) Hebrew speakers, and to investigate the possible effect of age and gender on performance rate; and (2) to examine the effects of stimuli (non-word versus real word) on oral-DDK rates. In experiment 1, 88 healthy older Hebrew speakers (60-95 years, 48 females and 40 males) were audio-recorded while performing an oral-DDK task (repetition of /pataka/), and repetition rates (syllables/s) were coded. In experiment 2, the effect of real-word repetition was evaluated. Sixty-eight older Hebrew speakers (aged 66-95 years, 43 females and 25 males) were asked to repeat 'pataka' (non-word) and 'bodeket' (Hebrew real word). Experiment 1: Oral-DDK performance for older adult Hebrew speakers was 5.07 syllables/s (SD = 1.16 syllables/s), across age groups and gender. Comparison of this data with Hebrew norms for younger adults (and equivalent data in English) shows the following gradient of oral-DDK rates: ages 15-45 > 65-74 > 75-86 years. Gender was not a significant factor in our data. Experiment 2: Repetition of real words was faster than that of non-words, by 13.5%. The paper provides normative values for oral-DDK rates for older Hebrew speakers. The data show the large impact of ageing on oro-motor functions. The analysis further indicates that speech and language pathologists should consider separate norms for clients of 65-74 years and those of 75-86 years. Hebrew rates were found to be different from English norms for the oldest group, shedding light on the impact of language on these norms. Finally, the data support using a dual-protocol (real- and non

  3. Mereological concepts for modelling parthood relations between אלהים and natural phenomena in the Hebrew Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus W. Gericke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Hebrew Bible, some texts represent what we would call �natural� phenomena as being in some way related to entities classed to be אלהים in some sense of the Hebrew term; that is, God, gods, divine, deity, etc. Although various perspectives on these relations already exist in the available research on the topic, no philosophical approach to the data has of yet been conceived. In order to facilitate the latter, this study brackets the question as to what the relations between אלהים and natural phenomena in any given biblical context actually were. Yet its contribution lies in the way it aims to offer an introductory overview of some of the potentially relevant core concepts in mereology (parthood theory in metaphysics that may be of aid in any future attempt at modelling such relations, however they were conceived.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article challenges the tradition of non-philosophical discourse in Old Testament theology, particularly with reference to the relational properties of Yhwh vis-a-vis natural phenomena. Its meta-theoretical application of concepts in formal descriptive mereological analysis represents an interdisciplinary supplementation of current ways of modelling God/World in the text.Keywords: Hebrew Bible; natural phenomena; philosophy; mereology; parthood; relations

  4. A study of color: Uses of לָבָן in the Hebrew Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Santos Carretero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of color allows us to make assumptions about the correlation (and no correlation between psychological, social, symbolic elements and language itself. And the Hebrew Bible does not escape from this. With regard to the magnitude of this project, this paper reflects the first stage of my work studying colors in the Masoretic text, specifically on לָבָן, term commonly translated as ‘white.’ In addition, there are various verbal forms containing the verbal root לבן. If we compare לָבָן with the rest of terms of color, we find that this is the most common of them all, which makes it to be considered a primary and widely documented term. But its antiquity is also proof of its opacity. A detailed reading of לָבָן reinforces the idea that the translation of this term as ‘white’ is incomplete. It actually refers to something whose chromatism is low but bright at the same time. Such “vague nature” is what makes לָבָן so present throughout the Hebrew Bible. This paper aims to provide a complete picture of the לָבָן in the Hebrew Bible, establishing the sensory chromatic perception of the term.

  5. Adaptation and psychometric assessment of the Hebrew version of the Recovery Promoting Relationships Scale (RPRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Galia S; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Garber-Epstein, Paula; Roe, David

    2014-03-01

    Recovery is supported by relationships that are characterized by human centeredness, empowerment and a hopeful approach. The Recovery Promoting Relationships Scale (RPRS; Russinova, Rogers, & Ellison, 2006) assesses consumer-provider relationships from the consumer perspective. Here we present the adaptation and psychometric assessment of a Hebrew version of the RPRS. The RPRS was translated to Hebrew (RPRS-Heb) using multiple strategies to assure conceptual soundness. Then 216 mental health consumers were administered the RPRS-Heb as part of a larger project initiative implementing illness management and recovery intervention (IMR) in community settings. Psychometric testing included assessment of the factor structure, reliability, and validity using the Hope Scale, the Working Alliance Inventory, and the Recovery Assessment Scale. The RPRS-Heb factor structure replicated the two factor structures found in the original scale with minor exceptions. Reliability estimates were good: Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.94. An estimate of 0.93 for the Recovery-Promoting Strategies factor, and 0.86 for the Core Relationship. Concurrent validity was confirmed using the Working Alliance Scale (rp = .51, p relationships with Hebrew speaking population.

  6. Is the adjective distinct from the noun as a grammatical category in biblical Hebrew?

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    Cynthia L. Miller-Naudé

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The adjective is a beleaguered category in biblical Hebrew grammar with many grammars of biblical Hebrew denying that the adjective is a category distinct from substantives. Within a variety of linguistic theories, the status of the adjective as a grammatical category is also debated. Cross-linguistically adjectives exhibit extraordinary variety: in some languages showing similarities to nouns, in others to verbs and in still others to both nouns and verbs. The debate concerning the status of the adjective is mirrored by the broader debate within contemporary linguistics concerning how the issue of grammatical categorisation ought to be approached. In this article, we re-examine the question of whether or not the adjective is a distinct grammatical category from the noun in biblical Hebrew. We approach the question of the status of the adjective as a grammatical category from two perspectives: morphology and syntax.

  7. The Use of Locative Prepositions by Hebrew Speaking Children 2:0 - 3:0 Years Old. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromi, Esther

    The use of locative prepositions in the spontaneous speech of 30 Hebrew speaking children two to three years old was studied. The rank order of locative prepositions is determined according to the correct use in obligatory contexts, and tentative conclusions are drawn concerning the order of acquisition of these terms in Hebrew. An attempt is made…

  8. Typological effects on spelling development: a crosslinguistic study of Hebrew and Dutch.

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    Gillis, Steven; Ravid, Dorit

    2006-08-01

    This study investigates the role of phonological and morphological information in children's developing orthographies in two languages with different linguistic typologies: Hebrew, a Semitic language with a highly synthetic morphology, and Dutch, a Germanic language with a sparse morphology. 192 Israeli and 192 Belgian monolingual schoolchildren in grades 1-6 (aged 6;0-12;0) were administered respective dictation tasks in which homophonous segments were the targets. In each language, these phonologically distinct segments are neutralized phonetically but are nevertheless represented orthographically. In both languages the target segments in the test words differed along two dimensions: (1) their morphological function as part of a stem or root versus as part of an affix; and (2) their morphophonological recoverability. The spelling tests in both languages consisted of four conditions which differed in the number and type of cues for retrieving the correct spelling of homophonous graphemes. The cues were of two types: morphological cues, which offer spellers clues to the correct spelling through consistent orthography/morphology mapping regularities; and morphophonological cues, which offer spellers clues to the correct spelling through the manipulation of orthography/morphophonology conversion procedures. A central finding of this study is the differential treatment of morphological cues by Dutch and Hebrew spelling learners. When faced with neutralized segments with and without morphological function, Hebrew-speaking children find morphology an enormously helpful tool. Dutch-speaking children, in contrast, do not find morphology a good cue provider. The impact of typology on the interface between spoken and written language is invoked as an explanation of the main findings.

  9. Psychometric properties of the hebrew translation of the patient activation measure (PAM-13.

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    Racheli Magnezi

    Full Text Available "Patient activation" reflects involvement in managing ones health. This cross-sectional study assessed the psychometric properties of the Hebrew translation (PAM-H of the PAM-13.A nationally representative sample of 203 Hebrew-speaking Israeli adults answered the PAM-H, PHQ-9 depression scale, SF-12, and Self-efficacy Scale via telephone.Mean PAM-H scores were 70.7±15.4. Rasch analysis indicated that the PAM-H is a good measure of activation. There were no differences in PAM-H scores based on gender, age or education. Subjects with chronic disease scored lower than those without. Scores correlated with the Self-efficacy Scale (0.47, Total SF-12 (0.39 and PHQ-9 (-0.35, P<0.0001, indicating concurrent validity. Discriminant validity was reflected by a significant difference in the mean PAM-H score of those who scored below 10 (72.1±14.8 on the PHQ-9 (not depressed compared to those scoring ≥10 (i.e. probable depression (59.2±15.8; t 3.75; P = 0.001.The PAM-H psychometric properties indicate its usefulness with the Hebrew-speaking Israeli population.PAM-H can be useful for assessing programs aimed at effecting changes in patient compliance, health behaviors, etc. Researchers in Israel should use a single translation of the PAM-13 so that findings can be compared, increasing understanding of patient activation.

  10. Tense and finiteness in the speech of children with specific language impairment acquiring Hebrew.

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    Leonard, L B; Dromi, E; Adam, G; Zadunaisky-Ehrlich, S

    2000-01-01

    Verb morphology is often an area of extraordinary difficulty for children with specific language impairment (SLI). However, in Hebrew, this difficulty appears to be more circumscribed than in other languages. In a recent study by Dromi et al., the limitations exhibited by a group of Hebrew-speaking children with SLI were confined primarily to the use of agreement inflections within past tense. This difficulty was interpreted as being due to the fact that the agreement paradigm within past tense is rather complex (involving person, number, and gender, along with tense). This study explores another possibility--that these inflections were difficult because they required past tense in particular. Also determined was whether the children's frequent use of the morphologically simplest forms (such as past third person masculine singular) in place of the correct forms could be interpreted as their selection of a non-finite default form. A group of Hebrew-speaking children with SLI (age 4.2 to 6.1) participated, along with a group of age controls, and a group of younger normally developing children matched for mean length of utterance (MLU). The children listened to stories that were accompanied by pictures. During each story, the children completed the experimenter's incomplete sentences using appropriate verbs. To complete the sentences accurately, the children had to alter the tense or finiteness of the verb used by the experimenter in the preceding sentence. The results indicated that the children with SLI had more difficulty than both comparison groups in the production of basic present and past forms and infinitive forms of verbs that required use of one particular phonological template or 'binyan'. However, for the verbs requiring the remaining three phonological templates, the children with SLI were as capable as MLU controls in their command of past as well as present tense, and in their use of infinitive forms. It is concluded that tense and finiteness probably

  11. Linking the shapes of alphabet letters to their sounds: the case of Hebrew

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    Treiman, Rebecca; Levin, Iris; Kessler, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Learning the sounds of letters is an important part of learning a writing system. Most previous studies of this process have examined English, focusing on variations in the phonetic iconicity of letter names as a reason why some letter sounds (such as that of b, where the sound is at the beginning of the letter’s name) are easier to learn than others (such as that of w, where the sound is not in the name). The present study examined Hebrew, where variations in the phonetic iconicity of letter...

  12. 14C dates from Tel Rehov: Iron-Age chronology, pharaohs, and Hebrew kings.

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    Bruins, Hendrik J; van der Plicht, Johannes; Mazar, Amihai

    2003-04-11

    Stratified radiocarbon dates provide an independent chronological link between archaeological layers and historical data. The invasion by Pharaoh Shoshenq I (Shishak) is a key historical synchronism, approximately 925 B.C.E., mentioned in both Egyptian inscriptions and the Hebrew Bible. The list of places raided by Shoshenq, mentioned at Karnak (Egypt), includes Rehov (Israel). The site yielded a consistent series of radiocarbon dates from the 12th to 9th century B.C.E. Our results (i) suggest a revised Iron-Age chronology; (ii) date an archaeological stratum to Shoshenq's campaign; (iii) indicate the similarity of "Solomonic" and "Omride" pottery; and (iv) provide correlation with Greece and Cyprus.

  13. The concept of wisdom in the Hebrew Bible � A comparative-philosophical analysis

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    Jacobus W. Gericke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief comparative philosophical clarification of the concept of wisdom in the Hebrew Bible. Utilising the format of a presentation presented by Ryan (2008, four philosophical definitions of wisdom were compared with similar sentiments in ancient Israelite religion: (1 wisdom as epistemic humility, (2 wisdom as factual knowledge, (3 wisdom as useful knowledge, and (4 wisdom as successful living. Cumulatively the four criteria might approximate a functional list of individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for instantiating the property of being wise.

  14. Biographical Dictionary of the First Generation of Professors at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

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    Eva Telkes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the model of studies carried out at the Institut d'histoire moderne et contemporaine on the elites in France, and more specifically on the model of the biographical dictionaries of the professors of the Sorbonne and the Collège de France, we aim at making a biographical dictionary of the professors of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in its first period (1925-1948. This research complements the works of Israeli researchers who, since the seminar organized by Michael Heyd, Israel B...

  15. The Occult: Diabolica to Alchemists

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    Delaney, Oliver J.

    1971-01-01

    The 91 items in this bibliography deal with works of occult science. The material is subdivided into biographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, noteworthy histories, indices, annuals, and a few miscellany works with treatises. (95 references) (Author)

  16. Shallow and deep orthographies in Hebrew: the role of vowelization in reading development for unvowelized scripts.

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    Schiff, Rachel

    2012-12-01

    The present study explored the speed, accuracy, and reading comprehension of vowelized versus unvowelized scripts among 126 native Hebrew speaking children in second, fourth, and sixth grades. Findings indicated that second graders read and comprehended vowelized scripts significantly more accurately and more quickly than unvowelized scripts, whereas among fourth and sixth graders reading of unvowelized scripts developed to a greater degree than the reading of vowelized scripts. An analysis of the mediation effect for children's mastery of vowelized reading speed and accuracy on their mastery of unvowelized reading speed and comprehension revealed that in second grade, reading accuracy of vowelized words mediated the reading speed and comprehension of unvowelized scripts. In the fourth grade, accuracy in reading both vowelized and unvowelized words mediated the reading speed and comprehension of unvowelized scripts. By sixth grade, accuracy in reading vowelized words offered no mediating effect, either on reading speed or comprehension of unvowelized scripts. The current outcomes thus suggest that young Hebrew readers undergo a scaffolding process, where vowelization serves as the foundation for building initial reading abilities and is essential for successful and meaningful decoding of unvowelized scripts.

  17. Mount Sinai and Mount Zion: Discontinuity and continuity in the book of Hebrews

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    Hulisani Ramantswana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The author of Hebrews draws significant contrasts between Mount Sinai and Mount Zion which both played a major role in the old covenant. For the author of Hebrews the former mountain, Mount Sinai, only had limited significance with respect to the new covenant, whereas the latter mountain, Mount Zion, continued to have significance in the new covenant. Mount Zion was viewed as a shadow of the heavenly reality, which is the true destination for the pilgrimage community. Mount Sinai as the locus of encounter or meeting between God and Israel only played a transitory role, whereas Mount Zion had perpetual significance as the destination, the dwelling place of God and his people.Berg Sinai en Berg Sion: Diskontinuïteit en kontinuïteit in die brief aan die Hebreërs. Die skrywer van Hebreërs wys op betekenisvolle teenstellings tussen Berg Sinai en Berg Sion, wat elkeen ’n beduidende rol in die ou verbond gespeel het. Vir die Hebreërskrywer het Berg Sinai egter beperkte betekenis vir die nuwe verbond, terwyl Sion nog steeds betekenis het. Berg Sion word as skaduwee van die hemelse werklikheid beskou, wat die uiteindelike bestemming van die pelgrimsgemeenskap is. Berg Sinai, as die lokus van ontmoeting tussen God en Israel, speel slegs ‘n oorgangsrol, terwyl Berg Sion steeds beduidende betekenis het as bestemming en woonplek van God en sy volk.

  18. Environmental script affects lateral asymmetry of word recognition: A study of French-Hebrew bilinguals tested in Israel and in France.

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    Siéroff, Eric; Haehnel-Benoliel, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    A written word is identified more easily when it is presented in the right than in the left visual field. This right visual field superiority (RVFS) may be explained by the left hemisphere's role in reading and by reading direction in left-to-right scripts. However, the comparison of left-to-right and right-to-left scripts had not resulted in systematic differences. It had also been found that the linguistic environment has an effect on visuospatial bias. We hypothesized that the linguistic environment might also affect RVFS. In an identification task, French and Hebrew words were presented in each visual field to four groups of 24 neurologically healthy participants, all of whom read French and Hebrew as a first or second language: native French speakers in France, native French speakers in Israel, native Hebrew speakers in Israel, and native Hebrew speakers in France. Results showed a greater RVFS with French than with Hebrew words in all groups except the native Hebrew speakers in Israel. Thus, at least for native Hebrew speakers, the country where participants lived also had an effect on the differential RVFS between languages, suggesting an effect of environmental script or reading practice.

  19. "Why Do We Know Hebrew and They Do Not Know Arabic?" Children's Meta-Linguistic Talk in Bilingual Preschool

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    Schwartz, Mila; Gorbatt, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Language-focused listening to young children's talk provides insight into their internal thinking mechanisms regarding language as they engage in language learning. The aim of this exploratory longitudinal study was to examine and analyze children's meta-linguistic talk and its main characteristics in a bilingual Arabic-Hebrew-speaking preschool.…

  20. Reading Sacred Texts in the Classroom: The Alignment between Students and Their Teacher's Interpretive Stances When Reading the Hebrew Bible

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    Hassenfeld, Ziva R.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the voices of students interpreting Hebrew Bible texts in one fourth-grade classroom. Through think-alouds on the Biblical text with each student, exit interviews, teacher interviews, and classroom observations, this study found that those students whose interpretive stances were more aligned with the teacher's were given…

  1. Selective deficit of second language: a case study of a brain-damaged Arabic-Hebrew bilingual patient

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    Ibrahim Raphiq

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of how two languages are represented in the human brain is best obtained from studies of bilingual patients who have sustained brain damage. The primary goal of the present study was to determine whether one or both languages of an Arabic-Hebrew bilingual individual are disrupted following brain damage. I present a case study of a bilingual patient, proficient in Arabic and Hebrew, who had sustained brain damage as a result of an intracranial hemorrhage related to herpes encephalitis. Methods The patient's performance on several linguistic tasks carried out in the first language (Arabic and in the second language (Hebrew was assessed, and his performance in the two languages was compared. Results The patient displayed somewhat different symptomatologies in the two languages. The results revealed dissociation between the two languages in terms of both the types and the magnitude of errors, pointing to aphasic symptoms in both languages, with Hebrew being the more impaired. Further analysis disclosed that this dissociation was apparently caused not by damage to his semantic system, but rather by damage at the lexical level. Conclusion The results suggest that the principles governing the organization of lexical representations in the brain are not similar for the two languages.

  2. The Effects of Orthographic Transparency and Familiarity on Reading Hebrew Words in Adults with and without Dyslexia

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    Yael, Weiss; Tami, Katzir; Tali, Bitan

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of transparency and familiarity on word recognition in adult Hebrew dyslexic readers with a phonological processing deficit as compared to typical readers. We measured oral reading response time and accuracy of single nouns in several conditions: diacritics that provide transparent but less familiar…

  3. Oral-Diadochokinetic Rates for Hebrew-Speaking Healthy Ageing Population: Non-Word versus Real-Word Repetition

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    Ben-David, Boaz M.; Icht, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral-diadochokinesis (oral-DDK) tasks are extensively used in the evaluation of motor speech abilities. Currently, validated normative data for older adults (aged 65 years and older) are missing in Hebrew. The effect of task stimuli (non-word versus real-word repetition) is also non-clear in the population of older adult Hebrew…

  4. "Children of Our Future": Climate, Degeneration and Education in Hebrew Society in Mandatory Palestine (1917-1948)

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    Seltenreich, Yair

    2016-01-01

    "Children of Our Future" was a short essay published in 1929 in the Hebrew Teachers' Association jubilee book. It boldly claimed that future offspring of European Jews in Palestine were all fatally doomed due to the degenerative characteristics of the local climate. Such concepts stood in clear opposition to the dream of creating a…

  5. Models of Academic Governance during a Period of Nation-Building: The Hebrew University in the 1920s-1960s

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    Cohen, Uri; Sapir, Adi

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the development of the structures of university governance at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem between the 1920s and 1960s. The model that ultimately prevailed, a "state-sponsored model" of governance, dominated the higher education system in Israel until the early 2000s and was characterised by the dominance of…

  6. The devil as (convicted prosecutor: Some ideas on the devil in 1 Peter and Hebrews

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    Sebastian Fuhrmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests that the relationship between Christ’s death and the defeat of the devil (Heb 2:14, as well as the metaphor of the devil as an adversary prowling like a roaring lion (1 Pt 5:8 possibly share the same background – i.e., the ancient Roman judicial phenomenon of  crimen calumniae. This legal practice was established to stop prosecutors from bringing forward false charges. Convicted calumniators were removed from office and suffered additional punishments. This background might help explain the fact that the devil was defeated according to Hebrews by way of false accusation, and that the devil in 1 Peter does not attack the believers, but is only on the prowl for justified accusations.

  7. Masorah of the Hebrew Bible – introduction into the problem

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    Marcin Majewski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Masorah (oral and written tradition of transmitting the Bible text is an important library of information about Sacred Scripture on the stage of its formation. It provides informations without which it is difficult and sometimes impossible to read or interpret correctly the biblical text. One of the barriers involved studying the Masorah of the Hebrew Bible is the lack od introductory literature on the subject, especially on the field of polish language. Here we can not find any comprehensive and useful study for the Masorah, including exercises and examples how to read and take advantage of Masorah. Since the system of Masoretic notes is very carefully printed in Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, and even more in Biblia Hebraica Quinta, we require such a study of masoretic notes’ system in Polish biblical studies. This article is an announcement of such an elaboration.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Hebrew short version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory.

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    Orkibi, Hod

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a short Hebrew version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory that can be easily administered by health professionals in research, therapy, and counseling. First, the empirical links of time perspective (TP) to subjective well-being and health protective and health risk behaviors are reviewed. Then, a brief account of the instrument's previous modifications is provided. Results of confirmatory factor analysis (N = 572) verified the five-factor structure of the short version and yielded acceptable internal consistency reliability for each factor. The correlation coefficients between the five subscales of the short (20 items) and the original (56 items) instruments were all above .79, indicating the suitability of the short version for assessing the five TP factors. Support for the discriminant and concurrent validity was also achieved, largely in agreement with previous findings. Finally, limitations and future directions are addressed, and potential applications in therapy and counseling are offered.

  9. Of Lions and Foxes: Power and Rule in Hebrew Medieval Fables

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    Revital Refael-Vivante

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between the lion and the fox as an expression of the disposition of powers in the political-governmental arena and their relationship to the governed, in ancient and medieval philosophical thought. This article will also examine the mutual relationships between rulers and their advisors and between rulers and subjects in a kingdom or within a court under their rule, with a focus on Hebrew medieval fables. This article is based on two examples: one from Mishle Shualim by Berechiah Hanakdan (England / Provence, at the end of the 12th century or the first half of the 13th century and the other from Meshal Haqadmoni, by Isaac Ibn Sahula (Spain, 1281. The characters of the lion and the fox as metaphors are reflected as well as in modern political thought in theories that discuss the ruling elite, and their relevance seems applicable to our times.

  10. The Implications of The Sociopolitical Context on Arab Teachers in Hebrew Schools

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    Hezi Y. Brosh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of Arabic in Israel by a native speaker is unique; it has ramifications different from the teaching of, say, English by a native speaker. It is not just the nativity issue per se but, even more, the interaction between the native speaker and the status and role of the language in society in a given context. This paper investigates the extent to which language teachers from one ethnic group can integrate themselves into another ethnic group and still effectively teach their language. The paper describes how contextual variables impact the ability of the native language teacher to work in a nonnative educational network under conditions of cultural and political duress. In particular, the paper highlights the special circumstances confronting an Arab language teacher teaching Arabic in Israeli Hebrew schools, and the effects that this native teacher has on a learner's motivation to acquire the language in the first place. The teaching of Arabic in Israel by a native speaker is unique; it has ramifications different from the teaching of, say, English by a native speaker. It is not just the nativity issue per se but, even more, the interaction between the native speaker and the status and role of the language in society in a given context. This paper investigates the extent to which language teachers from one ethnic group can integrate themselves into another ethnic group and still effectively teach their language. The paper describes how contextual variables impact the ability of the native language teacher to work in a nonnative educational network under conditions of cultural and political duress. In particular, the paper highlights the special circumstances confronting an Arab language teacher teaching Arabic in Israeli Hebrew schools, and the effects that this native teacher has on a learner's motivation to acquire the language in the first place.

  11. The Implications of The Sociopolitical Context on Arab Teachers in Hebrew Schools

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    Hezi Y. Brosh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of Arabic in Israel by a native speaker is unique; it has ramifications different from the teaching of, say, English by a native speaker. It is not just the nativity issue per se but, even more, the interaction between the native speaker and the status and role of the language in society in a given context. This paper investigates the extent to which language teachers from one ethnic group can integrate themselves into another ethnic group and still effectively teach their language. The paper describes how contextual variables impact the ability of the native language teacher to work in a nonnative educational network under conditions of cultural and political duress. In particular, the paper highlights the special circumstances confronting an Arab language teacher teaching Arabic in Israeli Hebrew schools, and the effects that this native teacher has on a learner's motivation to acquire the language in the first place. The teaching of Arabic in Israel by a native speaker is unique; it has ramifications different from the teaching of, say, English by a native speaker. It is not just the nativity issue per se but, even more, the interaction between the native speaker and the status and role of the language in society in a given context. This paper investigates the extent to which language teachers from one ethnic group can integrate themselves into another ethnic group and still effectively teach their language. The paper describes how contextual variables impact the ability of the native language teacher to work in a nonnative educational network under conditions of cultural and political duress. In particular, the paper highlights the special circumstances confronting an Arab language teacher teaching Arabic in Israeli Hebrew schools, and the effects that this native teacher has on a learner's motivation to acquire the language in the first place.

  12. A Grammar of Biblical Hebrew: Nova Reedição de Gramática Clássica do Hebraico Bíblico

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    Edson de Faria Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resenha de Joüon, Paul; Muraoka, Takamitsu. A Grammar of Biblical Hebrew. Second Reprint of the Second Edition, with Corrections. Subsidia Biblica 27. Roma: Gregorian & Biblical Press, 2009. xliv + 772p.

  13. E-Books as a Support for Young Children's Language and Literacy: The Case of Hebrew-Speaking Children

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    Korat, Ofra; Shamir, Adina; Segal-Drori, Ora

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a series of studies performed in the last decade that examined the contribution of e-books reading to the language and literacy of young Hebrew-speaking children. Children worked with two e-books designed by the researchers to achieve this aim. We present the effect of reading these e-books on the language and literacy of…

  14. Hebrew and Latin astrology in the twelfth century: the example of the location of pain.

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    Burnett, Charles

    2010-06-01

    The formative period of Latin and Hebrew astrology occurred virtually simultaneously in both cultures. In the second quarter of the twelfth century the terminology of the subject was established and the textbooks which became authoritative were written. The responsibility for this lay almost entirely with two scholars: John of Seville for the Latins, and Abraham ibn Ezra for the Jews. It is unlikely to have been by coincidence that the same developments in astrology occurred in these two cultures. John of Seville and Abraham ibn Ezra were both brought up within the Islamic culture of Spain, and their astrology was Arabic astrology. Moreover, some scholars have thought that John's origins were Jewish, while Ibn Ezra is known to have collaborated with Latin scholars (whose names are not recorded). It cannot be a coincidence that they forged the science of astrology for their respect co-religionists at almost the same time. Yet, very little research has been done on the possible relations between the two scholars. The purpose of this paper is to begin to explore this relationship, and to illustrate it in particular by their shared doctrine concern the location of pain.

  15. Many ways to read your vowels--Neural processing of diacritics and vowel letters in Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yael; Katzir, Tami; Bitan, Tali

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined the effect of orthographic transparency and familiarity on brain mechanisms involved in word recognition in adult Hebrew readers. We compared the effects of diacritics that provide transparent but less familiar information and vowel letters that increase orthographic transparency without compromising familiarity. Brain activation was measured in 18 adults during oral reading of single words, while manipulating the presence of diacritic marks, the presence of a vowel letter, and word length (3 vs. 4 consonants). We found opposite effects of diacritics and vowel letters on temporo-parietal regions associated with mapping orthography to phonology. The increase in activation for diacritic marks and the decrease in activation for vowel letters in these regions suggest that the greater familiarity of vowel letters compared to diacritics overrides the effect of orthographic transparency. Vowel letters also reduced activation in regions associated with semantic processing in unpointed words, and were thus distinct from the effect of an additional consonant. Altogether the results suggest that both orthographic transparency and familiarity contribute to word recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Representing written vowels in university students with dyslexia compared with normal Hebrew readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Rachel; Ravid, Dorit

    2004-06-01

    The study investigates dyslexic and normal Hebrew readers' perception of words containing a vowel letter in different orthographic and morphological contexts. In the first experiment, 72 undergraduate education students (half diagnosed with reading disabilities and half normal readers) were asked to judge pointed words with different morphological structures with and without the grapheme W. Half of the words had consistent (obligatory) W and half had inconsistent (optional) W. In the second experiment, the same procedure was repeated using the same words without pointing marks. Response latencies and accuracy were measured. In both experiments, dyslexic readers did less well than normal readers, they had lower scores on accurate lexical decisions, and they took more time over these decisions. They also exhibited some deviant patterns indicating that they cannot make use of orthographic and morphological cues which are available to normal readers, especially in the pointed experiment. Processing pointed words placed a heavier cognitive burden on the dyslexic readers. These findings are in line with other studies of adult dyslexic reader/writers, and support a reading / spelling processing model, which claims that internal orthographic representations of words are increasingly strengthened with each exposure during reading, but not all graphemes are strengthened equally. The general implication is that the ambiguities that exist in the relationships between orthography, phonology and morphology underlie spelling knowledge and are particularly difficult for dyslexic readers.

  17. Comparing online opportunities and risks among Israeli children and youth Hebrew and Arabic speakers

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    Blau, Ina

    2014-10-01

    This study explores the relationships between application usage, online communication patterns, problematic Internet use (PIU) of online applications, and online self-disclosure among children from culturally different groups. An online survey was administered in Hebrew and Arabic among 3867 Israeli 7-17 year old, including Jews, Arabs, and Bedouins. The level of PIU was relatively low-only 9.5% scored "very high" in the PIU index. For all the groups the highest level of communication was reported for safe interactions with family and friends, lower level for purely virtual communication with online acquaintances, and the lowest level for meeting online acquaintances face-to-face. However, various forms of the online communication patterns and use of applications differed across the groups, suggesting cultural diversity in Internet usage among children in the same country. PIU and self-disclosure explained 47.3% of variance in risky e-communication activities (e.g. sending ones' photos to online acquaintances, providing them with a school or home address, and meeting them face-to-face), as well as 34.4% of variance in exposure to unpleasant online experiences (e.g. receiving messages, pictures, or videos that make the children feel uncomfortable). However, both PIU and self-disclosure were unrelated to educational activities and to the use of educational applications.

  18. Development of a Slow Positron Facility at Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Aidan

    2013-03-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy provides both depth of penetration to study bulk defects in materials as well as nano-scale resolution. This measurement range is achieved by slowing positrons from a radioactive source, typically 22Na, by sending them through a moderator, typically W or solid Ne. The nearly thermal positrons are then accelerated to the desired energy by means of an electrostatic potential. The SPOT project at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem proposes to increase the luminosity of the beam by applying the best practices currently in us, as well as using a short-lived source of positrons, 18F. Simulations based on our current designs indicate this project will be able to deliver positrons in the energy range of 50-50000eV with an energy resolution of 1eV is possible. We will present the unique technical challenges of using this source of positrons, how we plan to overcome them, the results of simulations, and facility construction progress.

  19. Synesthetic grapheme-color percepts exist for newly encountered Hebrew, Devanagari, Armenian and Cyrillic graphemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Christopher David; Berryhill, Marian E

    2013-09-01

    Grapheme-color synesthetes experience color, not physically present, when viewing symbols. Synesthetes cannot remember learning these associations. Must synesthetic percepts be formed during a sensitive period? Can they form later and be consistent? What determines their nature? We tested grapheme-color synesthete, MC2, before, during and after she studied Hindi abroad. We investigated whether novel graphemes elicited synesthetic percepts, changed with familiarity, and/or benefited from phonemic information. MC2 reported color percepts to novel Devanagari and Hebrew graphemes. MC2 monitored these percepts over 6months in a Hindi-speaking environment. MC2 and synesthete DN, reported synesthetic percepts for Armenian graphemes, or Cyrillic graphemes+phonemes over time. Synesthetes, not controls, reported color percepts for novel graphemes that gained consistency over time. Phonemic information did not enhance consistency. Thus, synesthetes can form and consolidate percepts to novel graphemes as adults. These percepts may depend on pre-existing grapheme-color relationships but they can flexibly shift with familiarity.

  20. Transfer of L1 Visual Word Recognition Strategies during Early Stages of L2 Learning: Evidence from Hebrew Learners Whose First Language Is Either Semitic or Indo-European

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Tal; Degani, Tamar; Peleg, Orna

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined visual word recognition processes in Hebrew (a Semitic language) among beginning learners whose first language (L1) was either Semitic (Arabic) or Indo-European (e.g. English). To examine if learners, like native Hebrew speakers, exhibit morphological sensitivity to root and word-pattern morphemes, learners made an…

  1. The images of scientists and science among Hebrew- and Arabic-speaking pre-service teachers in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Edna; Cohen, Ariel

    2003-07-01

    This study investigated the image of scientists held by Israeli pre-service teachers, the majority of whom were female. The population consisted of students belonging to two cultures, Hebrew-speaking and Arabic-speaking. The DAST ('Draw-a-Scientist-Test') tool and other tools, some of which were developed specifically for this research, tested the image of the scientist as perceived by the participants. It was found that the image of the scientist is perceived as predominantly male, a physicist or a chemist, working in a laboratory typical of the eighteenth, nineteenth or the early-twentieth century. Students did not differentiate between scientists and inventors. Different images were held in the two cultures. Most of the Arabic-speaking students put Classical Islamic scientists near the top of their lists and thought of the scientist as an Arab male, while the Hebrew-speaking students' was as a typical Western male. Recommendations, resulting from the findings, for developing a new learning unit for the purpose of altering stereotypes are suggested.

  2. The effects of orthographic transparency and familiarity on reading Hebrew words in adults with and without dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Weiss; Tami, Katzir; Tali, Bitan

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of transparency and familiarity on word recognition in adult Hebrew dyslexic readers with a phonological processing deficit as compared to typical readers. We measured oral reading response time and accuracy of single nouns in several conditions: diacritics that provide transparent but less familiar information and vowel letters that increase orthographic transparency without compromise familiarity. In line with former studies with adult dyslexics, Hebrew-speaking adults with dyslexia were significantly slower than controls. However, both dyslexic and typical readers read unpointed words faster when vowel letters were present, indicating that they may benefit from increase in orthographic transparency, when the graphemic representations are familiar. Only dyslexics read pointed words slower than unpointed words and were more sensitive to word frequency. In unpointed words, only typical readers benefitted from the reduced competition of orthographic neighbors of longer words. Results indicate that both orthographic transparency and familiarity play an important role in word recognition. Dyslexics are impaired in decoding of smaller units and are more sensitive to reduction in the familiarity of words.

  3. Oral-diadochokinetic rates for Hebrew-speaking school-age children: real words vs. non-words repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icht, Michal; Ben-David, Boaz M

    2015-02-01

    Oral-diadochokinesis (DDK) tasks are a common tool for evaluating speech disorders. Usually, these tasks involve repetitions of non-words. It has been suggested that repeating real words can be more suitable for preschool children. But, the impact of using real words with elementary school children has not been studied yet. This study evaluated oral-DDK rates for Hebrew-speaking elementary school children using non-words and real words. The participants were 60 children, 9-11 years old, with normal speech and language development, who were asked to repeat "pataka" (non-word) and "bodeket" (Hebrew real word). Data replicate the advantage generally found for real word repetition with preschoolers. Children produced real words faster than non-words for all age groups, and repetition rates were higher for the older children. The findings suggest that adding real words to the standard oral-DDK task with elementary school children may provide a more comprehensive picture of oro-motor function.

  4. The Critical Period for Second Language Pronunciation: Is There Such a Thing? Ten Case Studies of Late Starters who Attained a Native-like Hebrew Accent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Kehat, Simona

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the critical period hypothesis (CPH) for the acquisition of a second language sound system (phonology) in a naturalistic setting. Ten cases of successful late-starters with a native-like Hebrew pronunciation are presented in an effort to determine possible variables that may account for their exceptional accomplishment. The…

  5. Predicting reading comprehension of narrative and expository texts among Hebrew-speaking readers with and without a reading disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primor, Liron; Pierce, Margaret E; Katzir, Tami

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which cognitive and reading-related linguistic skills contribute to reading comprehension of narrative and expository texts. The study examined an Israeli national database of Hebrew-speaking readers in fourth grade, from which a subsample of 190 readers with a reading disability (RD) and 190 readers with no reading disability (NRD) was selected. IQ, text reading, reading comprehension, and various linguistic and cognitive skills were assessed. Structural equation modeling results suggested that both groups rely on lower level processes such as text reading accuracy and orthographic knowledge for reading comprehension of both genres. However, RD readers depend more heavily upon these lower level processes compared with NRD for whom higher level processes contribute more to reading comprehension. The various variables accounted for only 25-34% of reading comprehension variance, and possible explanations are discussed. Taken together, these findings highlight the variety of factors influencing reading comprehension and its multidimensional nature.

  6. Enhancement and character recognition of the erased colophon of a 15th-century Hebrew prayer book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Derek J.; Easton, Roger L., Jr.; Knox, Keith T.; Heimbueger, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A handwritten codex often included an inscription that listed facts about its publication, such as the names of the scribe and patron, date of publication, the city where the book was copied, etc. These facts obviously provide essential information to a historian studying the provenance of the codex. Unfortunately, this page was sometimes erased after the sale of the book to a new owner, often by scraping off the original ink. The importance of recovering this information would be difficult to overstate. This paper reports on the methods of imaging, image enhancement, and character recognition that were applied to this page in a Hebrew prayer book copied in Florence in the 15th century.

  7. Breaking the Barriers of a "Silenced Identity": Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards the Bilingual Presentation in Hebrew and Amharic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baratz Lea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the attitudes of students in a teacher training college training regarding the bilingual presentation of children's literature -- in Hebrew and Amharic. A questionnaire on the importance of bilingual books was used with a group of students of Ethiopian descent (of the Beta Israel community and a group of students who do not belong to this community, with the expectation that a substantial difference would be found between the attitudes of the two groups. The study population, students training to be literature teachers, was aware of the qualities that make "a good story". The main findings emphasize that participants have a substantial understanding of the significance of bilingual books, both in terms of its function in the curriculum and in building a cultural narrative in order to break out of the silenced identity and eliminate cultural visibility.

  8. 希伯来圣经性别结构批判%Critique of the Gender Structure of the Hebrew Bible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒也

    2011-01-01

    The Hebrew Bible is an important cultural text in the history. There is a hidden gender structure based on male centralism in the Hebrew Bible. There are different signs of patriarchy in the Ontological hermeneutic, anthropological hermeneutic, historical hermeneutic and gender hermeneutic in the Hebrew Bible. The Hebrew Bible is a text of gender discrimination, showing the dominatingdominated relationship of man and woman. By revealing the male-centered structure of the Bible this paper appeals to go out of the Egypt of patriarchy church and construct a totally new value system.%希伯来圣经是人类历史上的一部文化经典,其潜在的性别结构有着深层的男性中心主义特征。圣经在本体论阐释、人类阐释、历史阐释以及价值阐释等诸多方面均表现出了父权制的遗痕。圣经是一部男尊女卑的书,是一部在两性关系上统治与被统治的经典,面对这样一种不平等的权力结构,女性的独立与解放有必要从自身的价值出发,以人类与自身的需要和权利为基础来建构一个全新的价值体系。

  9. Psychometric properties of responses by clinicians and older adults to a 6-item Hebrew version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D6)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachner, Yaacov G; O'Rourke, Norm; Goldfracht, Margalit

    2013-01-01

    The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) is commonly used as a screening instrument, as a continuous measure of change in depressive symptoms over time, and as a means to compare the relative efficacy of treatments. Among several abridged versions, the 6-item HAM-D6 is used most widely in lar...... degree because of its good psychometric properties. The current study compares both self-report and clinician-rated versions of the Hebrew version of this scale....

  10. Headache in the writings of Moses Maimonides and other Hebrew sages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, F

    1993-06-01

    In the history of philosophy, theology, and medicine, Maimonides shares the limelight with Arabic scholars such as Ibn Rushd, Ibn Sinna and Ibn Zuhr, chronologically between the great intellectuals of classical Greece and Rome and those of the later Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Maimonides was a very great philosopher and theologian, usually underrated by the historians. He was also an outstanding medical practitioner and teacher. Moses Maimonides had an incredible literary ability and an encyclopedic knowledge. He wrote extensively in the fields of theology, mathematics, law, philosophy, astronomy, ethics, and, of course, medicine. His medical writings are varied, comprising extracts from Greek medicine, a series of monographs on health in general and several diseases in particular, and a pharmacopoiea. The present essay extracts, primarily from Maimonides' medical writings, his pronouncements dealing with headache. Since most of Maimonides' pronouncements about headache in his Medical Aphorisms were derived from Graeco-Roman medical writers such as Hippocrates, and especially Galen, in regard to these statements Maimonides was merely a compiler--not an innovator. Some of his concepts about the causes of headaches being related to a dysequilibrium of the body humors are clearly medieval in origin. Other statements demonstrate this concern with preventive medicine and the maintenance of a healthy regimen of daily living. Medications to treat illness should only be used if non-medicinal means such as diet and exercise are not effective. The heritage of Maimonides' writings is being more and more appreciated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Yhwh, the Goddess and Evil: Is 'monotheism' an adequate concept to describe the Hebrew Bible's discourses about the God of Israel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. R�mer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of �monotheism� has become a matter of debate in Hebrew Bible scholarship. This article investigates whether the concept should still be used, starting with Second Isaiah, who in the early Persian period elaborated a discourse that presented Yhwh as the only god. Therefore he had to integrate into this deity functions traditionally attributed to goddesses and to demons or evil gods. However, this attempt did not succeed. The goddess, whose elimination is probably reflected in Zechariah 5, returned in a certain way through the personification of Wisdom in Proverbs 8, and the �dark sides� of the gods were materialised in the figure of Satan, who experienced an impressive career in the following centuries. The question of evil is not resolved in the Hebrew Bible. Some texts admit the autonomy of evil, whereas Isaiah 45 claims that Yhwh himself is at the origin of evil. This diversity makes it difficult to characterise the Hebrew Bible as the result of a straightforward evolution from polytheism to monotheism.

  12. Framing the Holocaust in popular knowledge: 3 articles about the Holocaust in English, Hebrew and Polish Wikipedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wolniewicz-Slomka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Framing the Holocaust in popular knowledge: 3 articles about the Holocaust in English, Hebrew and Polish Wikipedia The goal of this article is to examine how different events and phenomena related to the Second World War and the Holocaust are framed via Wikipedia articles written in Polish, Hebrew and English. Departing from the pillars of the theory of framing in mass media, the article conducts a content analysis of three articles, in three different languages. The articles under analysis are the following: “Auschwitz-Birkenau Camp”, “The Pogrom in Jedwabne”, and “Righteous Among the Nations”. The analysis will use the four roles of frames as categories, determined by Entman: definition of the problem/phenomenon, causal interpretation, moral evaluation, and treatment recommendation. Analyzing how the articles fulfill each of the roles in the different languages, the research hypothesis is that the framing of the phenomena will differ between the versions, and each version will follow pillars of the collective memory of the Holocaust in its respective country. Findings, however, are not in complete compliance with this hypothesis.   Kształtowanie popularnej wiedzy o Holocauście na przykładzie trzech artykułów z polskiej, hebrajskiej i angielskiej Wikipedii Celem artykułu jest zbadanie, jak przedstawiane są wybrane wydarzenia i zjawiska, związane z historią II wojny światowej oraz Holokaustem, w internetowej encyklopedii „Wikipedia” w różnych językach. Prezentowana analiza treści opiera się na teorii framingu w mass mediach i obejmuje trzy artykuły: „Auschwitz-Birkenau”, „Pogrom w Jedwabnem” oraz „Sprawiedliwy wśród Narodów Świata”, opublikowane w językach polskim, angielskim oraz hebrajskim. W analizie wykorzystano cztery role „ram” (frames, sformułowane przez Entmana: definicja problemu/zjawiska, interpretacja przyczyn, ewaluacja moralna oraz propozycja rozwiązań. Autor, badając to, jak

  13. The phonology-morphology interface in the speech of Hebrew-speaking children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, A J; Dromi, E; Leonard, L B

    2001-01-01

    Phonological deficits are common in children with specific language impairment (SLI). However, the degree to which they constitute an area of extraordinary difficulty, and their contribution to the morphological deficits of these children are largely unknown. In this investigation, we studied a group of young children with SLI who were acquiring Hebrew, a language in which phonology and morphology are closely linked. The phonology of these children lagged behind that of same-age peers as well as younger normally developing children matched according to mean number of morphemes per utterance. Furthermore, the children with SLI were more likely to commit phonological errors that neutralized important morphological distinctions in their language. These findings have implications for both assessment and therapy. As a result of this activity, the following learning outcomes will be achieved: The participant will be able to: (1) describe the differences in phonology between children with SLI and typically developing children; (2) describe the impact ofphonological disorders on the assessment of the morphological systems of children with SLI; and (3) explain the necessary modifications to a therapy program for children with a combination of morphological and phonological disorders.

  14. Effect of phonological and morphological awareness on reading comprehension in Hebrew-speaking adolescents with reading disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Rachel; Schwartz-Nahshon, Sarit; Nagar, Revital

    2011-06-01

    This research explored phonological and morphological awareness among Hebrew-speaking adolescents with reading disabilities (RD) and its effect on reading comprehension beyond phonological and word-reading abilities. Participants included 39 seventh graders with RD and two matched control groups of normal readers: 40 seventh graders matched for chronological age (CA) and 38 third graders matched for reading age (RA). We assessed phonological awareness, word reading, morphological awareness, and reading comprehension. Findings indicated that the RD group performed similarly to the RA group on phonological awareness but lower on phonological decoding. On the decontextualized morphological task, RD functioned on par with RA, whereas in a contextualized task RD performed above RA but lower than CA. In reading comprehension, RD performed as well as RA. Finally, results indicated that for normal readers contextual morphological awareness uniquely contributed to reading comprehension beyond phonological and word-reading abilities, whereas no such unique contribution emerged for the RD group. The absence of an effect of morphological awareness in predicting reading comprehension was suggested to be related to a different recognition process employed by RD readers which hinder the ability of these readers to use morphosemantic structures. The lexical quality hypothesis was proposed as further support to the findings, suggesting that a low quality of lexical representation in RD students leads to ineffective reading skills and comprehension. Lexical representation is thus critical for both lexical as well as comprehension abilities.

  15. Validity and Reliability of the Hebrew Version of the SpREUK Questionnaire for Religiosity, Spirituality and Health: An Application for Oral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D. Sgan-Cohen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has examined the connection between religiosity, spirituality (SpR and health, and the potential of these variables to prevent, heal and cope with disease. Research indicated that participation in religious meetings or services was associated with a lower risk of developing oral disease. We intended to test a Hebrew version of the SpREUK 1.1 questionnaire, which is reported to be a reliable and valid measure of distinctive issues of SpR, and to test its relevance in the context of oral illness among a Jewish population. Methods: In order to validate the SpREUK-Hebrew instrument, minor translational and cultural/religious adaptations were applied. Reliability and factor analyses were performed, using standard procedures, among 134 Jewish Israeli subjects (mean age 38.4 years. Results: Analysis of reliability for internal consistency demonstrated an intra-class correlation of Cronbach's alpha = 0.90 for the intrinsic religiosity/spiritual and the appraisal scales, and of 0.90 for the support through spirituality/religiosity scales. Inter reliability agreement by kappa ranged between 0.7 and 0.9. We were able to approve the previously described factorial structure, albeit with some unique characteristics in the Jewish population. Individuals´ time spent on spiritual activity correlated with the SpREUK scales. The instrument discriminated well between religious subgroups (i.e., ultra Orthodox, conventional religious and less-religious. Preliminary results indicate an association between measures of spirituality and oral health. Conclusions: The traditional and cultural adaptation of the tool was found to be appropriate. SpREUK-Hebrew was reliable and valid among a Jewish population. This method could therefore be employed in comparative studies among different cultural and religious backgrounds.

  16. Compound reading in Hebrew text-based neglect dyslexia: the effects of the first word on the second word and of the second on the first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Naama; Gvion, Aviah

    2014-01-01

    In many Hebrew compounds, which are two-word phrases, the first word is marked morphophonologically, and often also orthographically, as the head of the compound. Because Hebrew is read from right to left, this allowed us to ask whether a right-hand word that is marked orthographically as a compound-head, and hence signals that another word is expected, causes readers with text-based neglect to continue shifting attention to the left and read the second word. We also asked whether the second, left-hand, word affects the reading of the first word. The effect of the second word was assessed in a condition in which the second word semantically disambiguated the first word, a biased heterophonic homograph, and a condition in which the second word formed a compound with the first and hence required reading the first in the morphophonological form of a compound-head. The two participants were Hebrew-speaking men with acquired left text-level neglect dyslexia, without word-based neglect dyslexia. They read 294 two-word compounds and control phrases, composed of five conditions that assessed the effect of the first word on the second word, and of the second on the first. The results indicated that morphosyntax modulates reading in neglect dyslexia. When the first, right-hand, word included an orthographic cue indicating that a second word follows, fewer words on the left were omitted than when no such cue existed. The second word, however, did not affect the reading of the first, and the first word was read as if the patients did not look ahead to the second.

  17. The image at the service of the text: figured masorah in the biblical hebrew manuscript BH Mss1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Contreras, Elvira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Masoretic notes that appear alongside the biblical text written in geometric or figured shapes are little studied to date. The few existing studies usually focus on the form without paying attention to the content. The biblical Hebrew manuscript BH Mss1 (M1 has a huge number of Masoretic notes in figured patterns and while the existence of figured Masorah has been addressed, their designs have not been described and studied in relation to their content. This paper focuses on the figured Masorah notes, their location, shape and content. From a joint analysis of the form and content it is possible to conclude that the main purpose behind writing the Masorah in figured patterns in M1 is a practical one: to record all the information in the available space.Las noticias masoréticas escritas en formas geométricas o figurativas que aparecen junto al texto bíblico han sido poco estudiadas hasta la fecha. Los escasos estudios existentes se suelen centrar en la forma, sin tener en cuenta el contenido. El manuscrito bíblico BH Mss1 (M1 contiene un gran número de noticias masoréticas en forma figurativa que, si bien ya habían sido mencionadas, sus diseños no han sido descritos ni estudiados en relación con su contenido. El presente trabajo se centra en las noticias de Masora figurativa, su localización, forma y contenido. El análisis conjunto de la forma y el contenido de las noticias permite concluir que la razón principal para escribir la Masora en forma figurativa en M1 es práctica.

  18. Practical theology as life science: Fides Quaerens Vivendi and its connection to Hebrew thinking (Hālak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël J. Louw

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The term practical theology is complex and, due to many different religious and cultural settings, a many layered concept. During the past 40 years the paradigm in theory formation for an academic and disciplinary approach to practical theology shifted from the clerical and ecclesial paradigm of ministerial actions to experiences of faith with the emphasis on an empirical based epistemology. Rather than a deductive approach, the shift is towards a more inductive approach within the methodological framework of phenomenology. Currently, in the international discourse on theory formation, there is a tendency towards a hermeneutical approach with the focus on the networking, relational dynamics of civil society Thus, the attempt to describe practical theology as a kind of ‘life science’ (the concern for the mundane and existential reality of everyday life – Alltagsreligion. Within the context of African spiritualties, with its emphasis on the communal dynamics of vital, human relationships, the focus on lifestyles becomes vital. In light of an ontology of life (l’energie spirituelle – Henri Bergson, the notion of fides quaerens vivendi [faith seeking lifestyles] is researched. With reference to the theory of complexification and chaosmos as well as the impact thereof on different theories in life sciences, the connection between sapientia and the vivid praxis of God is critically explored. The focus of this article is on the question: What is the impact of an ontology of life on both praxis thinking and theological reflection? Instead of the Cartesian framework of causative definitions, the notion of the ‘infinition of God’ is proposed within the praxis of Hebrew, wisdom thinking.

  19. Pedagogical attitude toward the audience. Reflexions on St. John Chrysostom’s Homilies on the Epistle to the Hebrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Żelazny

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The fascination with St. Paul’s activity was one of St. John Chrysostom characteristic features. In the attitude of the Antiochian we can see not only true admiration but also  the will to imitate St. Paul as a guiding light of Christian involvement and activity. St. John Chrysostom has often underlined the pedagogical attitude of the Apostle towards the audi- ence in his letters. Such appraisal of the activity of the Apostle of Nations by the Patriarch of Constantinople determined his own pastoral attitude. As a result of this one of the char- acteristic features of St. John Chrysostom’s preaching is the concern for the audience that accompanied the preacher of Antioch in his homiletic activity. Chrysostom was a master of words, a tutor always dedicated to his audience. This helped with his choice of themes, the topics he discussed or the choice of time in which he undertook particular deliberations. So, controversial texts didn’t give a chance for an insightful dogmatic analysis, although none of the topics were passed over. In other words he was concerned not only with what he would convey, but also when and how he would reach the topic with the audience. St. John Chrys- ostom was aware of the perceptual limitations of his audience hence his caution. Such an approach implies great caution in dealing with his works and at the same time explains why on the one hand some allusions in the commentary to particular parts of the Holy Scripture lack, as well as, the fact that all crucial topics have been discussed by the saint of Antioch. An example of this are the homilies to Corpus Paulinum, and especially the analyzed parts from St. John Chrysostom’s Homilies to the Epistle to the Hebrews.

  20. It does exist! A left-to-right spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect among native Hebrew speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar-Shai, Bar; Tzelgov, Joseph; Karni, Avi; Rubinsten, Orly

    2017-04-01

    Several studies, starting with Dehaene, Bossini, and Giraux (1993), have reported that, in parity-judgment tasks, the difference in response latencies generated by the right and left hand are negatively correlated with number magnitudes. This SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) effect is in line with the notion that the "mental number line" extends from left to right. The SNARC effect has been found mainly in native speakers of Germanic/Romanic languages; it has been suggested that the SNARC effect may derive from the experience of reading from left to right. To date, there is no evidence that the SNARC (or reverse SNARC) effect exists in parity judgments in native speakers of Hebrew readers. Here we provide the first demonstration of a horizontal, left-to-right SNARC effect in native speakers of Hebrew performing the parity task. Although we found no SNARC effect using the standard parity task, a reliable SNARC effect was found when we succeeded in reducing the MARC (markedness association of response codes) effect. We succeeded in reducing the MARC effect by implementing the parity task in 2 sessions, on 2 different days, each time using a different mapping of the parity-to-response side. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The expurgation of medical books in sixteenth-century Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Front, D

    2001-01-01

    Medical books figured prominently on lists of scientific books censured or expurgated by ecclesiastic authorities in the second half of the sixteenth century. A systematic examination of this censorship is still wanting. The following study, which describes and explains the mechanism of expurgation of centuria iv in Amatus Lusitanus's description of medical cases (Lyons edition, 1580), is an example of the sort of questions and information that can be drawn from such an examination. In particular, the expurgation of Amatus's discussion of false conception suffered by a nun is analyzed. Amatus did not rule out the possibility of natural virginal pregnancy, and in doing so he relied on medical authorities (Averroes) as well as on a Hebrew rabbinical source (Alphabet of Ben Sira).

  2. The Effects of Orthographic Consistency on Reading Development: A within and between Cross-Linguistic Study of Fluency and Accuracy among Fourth Grade English- and Hebrew-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Tami; Schiff, Rachel; Kim, Young-Suk

    2012-01-01

    The different level of transparency of letter-sound mapping in various orthographies has been found to influence reading development across languages. The Hebrew orthography represents a special case of within language design with two versions of the script, a transparent (vowelized) and an opaque one (unvowelized). In this study we conducted a…

  3. Malachi 4:4−6 (Heb 3:22−24 as a point of convergence in the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible: A consideration of the intra and intertextual relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. (Fanie Snyman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malachi 4:4−6 (Heb 3:22−24 occupies a special place in the canon of Scriptures. In Malachi 4:4−6 (Heb 3:22−24 not only the book of Malachi comes to a close but the whole of the Prophets (Nebi’im, and the second part of the Hebrew Bible. In the Christian Bible the book of Malachi is the last book in the Old Testament, which is concluded with this passage, before one turns to the New Testament. In this article it was argued the these three verses serve not only as the conclusion to the book of Malachi but also as a fitting close to the second part of the Hebrew Bible. It also serves as a link to both the Pentateuch as the first part, and the Psalms as the third part, of the Hebrew canon of Scriptures. In this sense Malachi 4:4−6 (Heb 3:22−24 can be viewed as a point of convergence in the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible.

  4. A bibliai héber nevek megjelenítése a nemzeti bibliafordításokban, különös tekintettel a legújabb protestáns bibliafordításainkra [The equivalents of biblical Hebrew names in national Bible translations and the latest Hungarian Protestant Bible translations in particular

    OpenAIRE

    Kustár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The transcription of biblical Hebrew names may seem a relatively easy subtask of Bible translation, but, in reality, it is a serious challenge, requiring clearly established philological principles, transcription rules, and – with respect to church use – a high degree of willingness to compromise. The paper examines the origins of those forms of biblical Hebrew personal and place names which were borrowed from Greek and Latin and appear in contemporary Hungarian Protestant Bible translatio...

  5. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  6. On the Hebrew Medical Culture in the Holy Bible%《圣经》中希伯来医学文化探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马月兰

    2008-01-01

    医学文化是希伯来文明的重要组成部分,是世界非物质文化遗产.在圣经时代,希伯来人的医学与宗教紧密结合.一些宗教戒律逐渐演变成希伯来的民俗年口传统文化.希伯来人治疗心理疾病主要通过宗教仪式和祈祷求得上帝的拯救;在保健和预防疾病方面是保持圣洁.犹太教的一些戒律具有养生保健作用.犹太教在希伯来医学的发展中打下了深刻的烙印.

  7. The Pronunciation of Hebrew in the Western Sephardic Settlements (XVIth-XXth Centuries. First Part: Early Modern Venice and Ferrara (2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    di Leone Leoni, Aron

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In or around 1552, Isac Cavallero in Venice and Yomtob Atias in Ferrara published various Spanish translations of the Hebrew prayer-book. Almost at the same time in Ferrara, Abraham Usque produced some new vulgarizations of the Hebrew ritual. These works were conceived mainly for the former Marranos who had embraced the Jewish religion but were still unfamiliar with Hebrew. In order to enable them to recite at least a part of the most important prayers, the authors of these vulgarizations transliterated into Latin characters some passages of different prayers and blessings. These translations of the prayer-book were repeatedly reprinted throughout the following centuries in Venice, Amsterdam and in several North-European cities. The subsequent editions followed very closely the pattern of the Ferrara prototypes, however several re-issues bore different additions. Of particular interest are the transliterations of new and wider passages from various prayers and hymns. By carrying on an extensive graphematic analysis of these prayer-books as well as of other texts such as grammar-books, registers of the deliberations of the Sephardic communities, notarial deeds and other documents, it was possible to ascertain the features of the Sephardi pronunciation in the early modern communities of Venice and Ferrara and in the West-European settlements. The main differences and analogies between the Sephardi, the Judeo-Italian and the Ashkenazi pronunciation were also examined. Special attention has been paid to the consonant 'Ayin which, in the 16th century, had a phonetic value equal to zero or tending to zero.En torno a 1552, Isac Cavallero en Venecia y Yomtob Atías en Ferrara publicaron varias traducciones al español del oracional judío. De manera casi simultánea en Ferrara,Abraham Usque publicó nuevas versiones del ritual judío en lengua vernácula. Estas obras estaban concebidas principalmente para individuos de origen converso que hab

  8. Subtypes of reading disability in a shallow orthography: a double dissociation between accuracy-disabled and rate-disabled readers of Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shany, Michal; Share, David L

    2011-06-01

    Whereas most English language sub-typing schemes for dyslexia (e.g., Castles & Coltheart, 1993) have focused on reading accuracy for words varying in regularity, such an approach may have limited utility for reading disability sub-typing beyond English in which fluency rather than accuracy is the key discriminator of developmental and individual differences in reading ability. The present study investigated the viability of an accuracy/fluency-based typology in a regular orthography, pointed Hebrew. We sought evidence of true or "hard" accuracy/rate subtypes in the strict (double dissociation) sense of selective impairment on only one dimension in the presence of normal levels of performance on the other dimension. In a nationally representative sample of fourth graders, we were able to identify a specific accuracy-disabled sub-group as well as an equally specific rate-disabled subgroup. Validating this subdivision, we show that the nature of reading performance in these subgroups and their converging cognitive/linguistic profiles are unique and distinctive on variables other than the measures used to define them. While the rate-specific disability appeared to reflect a general deficit in speed of processing affecting reading rate, and rapid automatized naming of print-related material, the accuracy-only disability subgroup displayed selective deficits in phonological awareness and morphological knowledge. Biosocial, demographic, and instructional factors, furthermore, did not explain the sub-group differences. It appears that both these subtypes are equally prevalent each counting close to 10% of the population.

  9. Cabala Chymica or Chemia Cabalistica - Early Modern Alchemists and Cabala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forshaw, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    This essay investigates the relationships between early modern alchemy and the Jewish mystical tradition of Kabbalah, following its introduction to the Christian West by Giovanni Pico della Mirandola at the end of the fifteenth century, and its promulgation by Johannes Reuchlin in the early sixteent

  10. Cabala Chymica or Chemia Cabalistica - Early Modern Alchemists and Cabala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Forshaw

    2013-01-01

    This essay investigates the relationships between early modern alchemy and the Jewish mystical tradition of Kabbalah, following its introduction to the Christian West by Giovanni Pico della Mirandola at the end of the fifteenth century, and its promulgation by Johannes Reuchlin in the early sixteent

  11. Medical marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized ...

  12. A bibliai héber nevek megjelenítése a nemzeti bibliafordításokban, különös tekintettel a legújabb protestáns bibliafordításainkra [The equivalents of biblical Hebrew names in national Bible translations and the latest Hungarian Protestant Bible translations in particular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kustár, Zoltán

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The transcription of biblical Hebrew names may seem a relatively easy subtask of Bible translation, but, in reality, it is a serious challenge, requiring clearly established philological principles, transcription rules, and – with respect to church use – a high degree of willingness to compromise. The paper examines the origins of those forms of biblical Hebrew personal and place names which were borrowed from Greek and Latin and appear in contemporary Hungarian Protestant Bible translations; reiterates a translator’s main dilemma of retaining these familiar name forms or transcribing them based on pronunciation of the original Hebrew forms. Then presents the practical problems stemming from the use of long established name forms in the translation and spelling of the names of biblical characters. The author describes the methods used in the 1975 new Protestant Bible translation and its 1990 and 2014 revised versions, in some cases also quoting relevant examples from the Károli Bible and from its 1908 revised version. The author concludes that Hungarian Protestant Bible translations and their revised versions – in accordance with international and Hungarian ecumenical trends – are firmly moving from the use of traditional name forms towards the usage of name forms transcribed from the Hebrew pronunciation of names. This may pave the way for an ecumenical rapprochement and possibly for the completion of an ecumenical Bible translation.

  13. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  14. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  15. "You are a number, not a human being": Israeli breast cancer patients' experiences with the medical establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sered, S; Tabory, E

    1999-06-01

    In the course of interviews with Israeli women who had recently been treated for breast cancer, we found that our informants tended to offer us "treatment narratives" rather than, or sometimes in addition to, the "illness narratives" made famous by Arthur Kleinman. For the women we interviewed, treatment narratives constitute verbal platforms on which to explore what it means to be human during a period in which one's body, spirit, and social identity are undergoing intense transformations. A central theme in these narratives is the Hebrew word yachas, loosely translated as "attitude," "attention," or "relationship." The women consistently contrasted the good yachas of medical staff who treated them "like humans" or like "real friends" with the bad yachas of staff who treated them like numbers, machines, or strangers. We argue that the women used language (in various contexts) as a means of resisting the medical culture's pattern of treating patients as "nonhumans."

  16. Medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism is a burgeoning industry in our region. It involves patients travelling outside of their home country for medical treatment. This article provides an outline of the current research around medical tourism, especially its impact on Australians. Patients are increasingly seeking a variety of medical treatments abroad, particularly those involving cosmetic surgery and dental treatment, often in countries in South-East Asia. Adverse events may occur during medical treatment abroad, which raises medico-legal and insurance issues, as well as concerns regarding follow-up of patients. General practitioners need to be prepared to offer advice, including travel health advice, to patients seeking medical treatment abroad.

  17. Medical Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective position...

  18. Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  19. Medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  20. Medical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Medical scientists, except epidemiologists 19- ...

  1. [Euthanasia: medications and medical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossignol, D

    2008-09-01

    The Belgian law relative to euthanasia has been published in 2002. A physician is allowed to help a patient with intractable suffering (physical or psychological). Legal conditions are clear. However, nothing is said about medical procedures or medications to be used. The present paper will present specific clinical situations at the end of life, practical procedures and medications. A special focus is made on psychological impact of euthanasia.

  2. Odontology or philologic: medical disputation about the teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Curt Gerhard; Lorber, Wilma Dorotheé

    2007-01-01

    The dissertation, here rendered, was published at the gymnasium of Hof in 1669. It is remarkable that the respondent, who was probably also its author, declared in the title page that he intends to do his task "following the custom of the blessed Hebrews and any other conventions of true Israelites" and cites in the following text repeated proverbs of Rabbis. Therefore, we suppose him to have been a Jew converted to the Christian faith. His Odontology is a large collection of knowledge about the teeth, the etymology of this term, the question of them belonging to the bones, their anatomy and fixation in the jaws, and their tasks in the crushing of foods and helping in pronunciation, and in animals for self-protection. With respect to their removal, he emphasizes that one read Sennert's Institutiones Medicae. The points of view discussed by the author depended more heavily on philological than on medical authors. Nevertheless, there are mentioned also "paramedical" opinions of the general population. The monograph seems to us important for the history of dentistry.

  3. History of evolution of the concept of medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sisir K

    2003-01-01

    "Time present and time past are both perhaps present in time future and time future contained in time past".--Thomas Steams Eliot (1888-1965), Noble Literature Laureate, 1948. History and evolution of the concept of Medical Ethics is the classical example of this poetic expression. Virtually, every human society has some forces of myth to explain the origin of morality. Indian ethics was philosophical from its very birth. In the Vedas (1500 B.C.), ethics was an integral aspect of philosophical and religious speculation about the nature of reality. The Vedas says how people ought to live and is the oldest philosophical literature in the world. It was the first account of philosophical ethics in human history. The old Testament of (c. 200 B.C.) the Hebrew Bible (Greek--ta biblia--"the books") gives account of God giving the Ten Commandments--the oral and written Law engraved on tablets of Stone to Moses around 13th century B.C. on Mount Sinai (Arabic--Gebel Musa) the Mountain near the tip of the Sinai Peninsula in West Asia.

  4. Du russe à l’hébreu : une création en version originale ? From Russian to Hebrew: A Creation in Original Version? מרוסית לעברית

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Tauber

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mélanges de langues chez les écrivains israéliens originaires de Russie. De plus en plus d’écrivains israéliens nés en Russie écrivent désormais en hébreu. Parmi eux, Alona Kimhi, Boris Zaidman, Miri Litvak, Marina Grosslerner, Alex Epstein, ainsi que les femmes poètes Gali-Danah Singer et Sivan Beskin.Nous limiterons notre étude à deux auteurs qui sont traduits en français : Alona Kimhi et Boris Zaidman. On pourrait se demander : quelle est la version originale d'un livre qui n'a pas été écrit dans la langue maternelle de l'auteur ? Le russe ? L'hébreu ? Ou un entrelacement des deux, quand l’humour et la nostalgie se font l'écho d'une langue à l'autre?La combinaison entre ces différentes langues - le yiddish semble être également très présent - crée une fusion étonnante où émerge une nouvelle langue : une mélodie polyphonique qui sonne simultanément vernaculaire et poétique.More and more Israeli writers born in Russia write nowadays in Hebrew. Among them Alona Kimhi, Boris Zaidman, Miri Litvak, Marina Grosslerner, Alex Epstein, as well as the women-poets Gali-Danah Singer and Sivan Beskin. We shall limit our study to two authors who are translated into French: Alona Kimhi and Boris Zaidman. One could ask: what is the original version of a book which has not been written in the author’s mother tongue? Russian? Hebrew? Or an intertwining of both when humor and nostalgia are echoing from one language to the other? The combination between various languages – Yiddish appears to be also very much present – creates an amazing fusion where a new language emerges: a polyphonic melody that sounds simultaneously vernacular and poetical.יותר ויותר ספרים ישראלים ילידי רוסיה כותבים היום בעברית. ביניהם: אלונה קמחי, בוריס זיידמן, מירי ליטבק, מרינה גרוסלרנר, אלכס אפשטיין והמשוררות

  5. Medical Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin; Guilbert, Edith; Bernardin, Jeanne; Black, Amanda; Dunn, Sheila; Fitzsimmons, Brian; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Soon, Judith; Trouton, Konia; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Wiebe, Ellen; Gold, Karen; Murray, Marie-Ève; Winikoff, Beverly; Reeves, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This guideline reviews the evidence relating to the provision of first-trimester medical induced abortion, including patient eligibility, counselling, and consent; evidence-based regimens; and special considerations for clinicians providing medical abortion care. Gynaecologists, family physicians, registered nurses, midwives, residents, and other healthcare providers who currently or intend to provide pregnancy options counselling, medical abortion care, or family planning services. Women with an unintended first trimester pregnancy. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library between July 2015 and November 2015 using appropriately controlled vocabulary (MeSH search terms: Induced Abortion, Medical Abortion, Mifepristone, Misoprostol, Methotrexate). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, and observational studies published from June 1986 to November 2015 in English. Additionally, existing guidelines from other countries were consulted for review. A grey literature search was not required. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force for Preventive Medicine rating scale (Table 1). Medical abortion is safe and effective. Complications from medical abortion are rare. Access and costs will be dependent on provincial and territorial funding for combination mifepristone/misoprostol and provider availability. Introduction Pre-procedure care Medical abortion regimens Providing medical abortion Post-abortion care Introduction Pre-procedure care Medical abortion regimens Providing medical abortion Post-abortion care. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical Malpractice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grembi, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    MM first came to the attention of policy makers primarily in the USA where, from the 1970s, healthcare providers denounced problems in getting insurance for medical liability, pointing out to a crisis in the MM insurance market (Sage WM (2003) Understanding the first malpractice crisis of the 21th...... in the last decades also among European countries (Hospitals of the European Union (HOPE) (2004) Insurance and malpractice, final report. Brussels, www.hope.be; OECD (2006) Medical malpractice, insurance and coverage options, policy issues in insurance n.11; EC (European Commission, D.G. Sanco) (2006) Special...... eurobarometer medical errors)...

  7. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  8. Medical error

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Michael Berk. Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Australia .... inaccurate and inflammatory media reports their community accepted the ex- ... non-medical situations such as the aviation industry and nuclear power tech- nology ...

  9. Medical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accredited programs prepare students for a career in academic or research health science centers, industry, or consulting. As members of the health career profession with strong communication skills, medical illustrators work closely with clients to interpret ...

  10. Medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.

  11. Medical intellectuals: resisting medical orientalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aull, Felice; Lewis, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose analogies between medical discourse and Edward Said's "Orientalism." Medical discourse, like Orientalism, tends to favor institutional interests and can be similarly dehumanizing in its reductionism, textual representations, and construction of its subjects. To resist Orientalism, Said recommends that critics--"intellectuals"--adopt the perspective of exile. We apply Said's paradigm of intellectual-as-exile to better understand the work of key physician-authors who cross personal and professional boundaries, who engage with patients in mutually therapeutic relationships, and who take on the public responsibility of representation and advocacy. We call these physician-authors "medical intellectuals" and encourage others to follow in their path.

  12. Medical Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology.

  13. Queen Cleopatra and the other 'Cleopatras': their medical legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Kousoulis, Antonis A; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Karamanou, Marianna; Papagrigoriou-Theodoridou, Maria; Androutsos, George

    2014-05-01

    Cleopatra is a female figure widespread in Greece (especially in Macedonian territory), Egypt and Syria during the Hellenistic era. Ancient women doctors bearing the name Cleopatra have been identified by a systematic search through the ancient Greek, Latin and Egyptian bibliography, including original resources from the first century BC. Fictional and non-fictional figures have been distinguished and their works identified. Queen Cleopatra of Egypt, Galen's physician assistant, the outcast Metrodora, Cleopatra the Alchemist and Cleopatra the Gynaecologist deliver a story of medicine and name-giving that confuses researchers of the past and intrigues those of the present.

  14. Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Biscari, C.

    2014-12-19

    The use of accelerators for medical applications has evolved from initial experimentation to turn-key devices commonly operating in hospitals. New applications are continuously being developed around the world, and the hadrontherapy facilities of the newest generation are placed at the frontier between industrial production and advanced R&D. An introduction to the different medical application accelerators is followed by a description of the hadrontherapy facilities, with special emphasis on CNAO, and the report closes with a brief outlook on the future of this field.

  15. Medical emplotment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions...... philosophy and building on theory on narrative reasoning, the dissertation offers the notions of emplotment and re-emplotment to describe how physicians marshal information from various sources, including the medical record, the patient and coSummary to form a narrative, when making sense of patients...

  16. Medical leasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements.

  17. Medical emplotment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions...... philosophy and building on theory on narrative reasoning, the dissertation offers the notions of emplotment and re-emplotment to describe how physicians marshal information from various sources, including the medical record, the patient and coSummary to form a narrative, when making sense of patients...

  18. Medical Transcriptionists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... employed in 2014. Most medical transcriptionists work for hospitals or in ... risk management, legal issues relating to healthcare documentation, and English ...

  19. Glaucoma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Bora; Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay; Desai, Manishi

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common eye condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide, making it the second-leading cause of blindness. Because glaucoma is associated with increased IOP level, the primary goal in treatment of glaucoma includes lowering IOP to prevent further progression of the disease. While various surgical interventions exist, medical therapy is currently the first line of treatment. Medical treatment of glaucoma includes topical beta-blockers, alpha-2 agonists, prostaglandins, parasympathomimetics and CAIs. Anti-glaucoma agents help reduce IOP by affecting the production of aqueous humor or increasing the outflow of aqueous through the trabecular or uveoscleral pathway. Choosing an appropriate medical regimen can be challenging and various factors such as efficacy, safety, cost and patient compliance must be considered. First-line treatment is often topical beta-blockers or prostaglandin analogs. However, beta-blocking agents can be associated with systemic side effects and need to be used cautiously in patients with serious concomitant cardiopulmonary disease. Alpha-2 agonists and parasympathomimetics are often considered second- or third-line treatment options but good adjunctive agents. Oral CAIs are often indicated for patients with elevated IOP in an acute setting or for patients resistant to other glaucoma medications and patients who are not good surgical candidates.

  20. Medic Bleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Medic Bleep is a secure instant messaging app that enables clinicians to discuss patient care quickly, securely and legally. It looks and feels like WhatsApp, but has been designed for the healthcare market to enable staff to communicate with each other, and to help speed up conversations between clinicians to increase efficiency.

  1. Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Proprietary Names (PDF - 146KB) Draft Guidance for Industry: Best Practices in Developing Proprietary Names for Drugs (PDF - 279KB) ... or (301) 796-3400 druginfo@fda.hhs.gov Human Drug ... in Medication Errors Resources for You Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: ...

  2. Medication Errors - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  3. Medication Errors - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  4. 普世与特殊--论希伯来智慧思想的两极结构和教育空间%Universality and Particularity:The Two-Pole Structure and Pedagogic Space of Hebrew Wisdom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林德平

    2015-01-01

    This article is written out of the author’s interest in the interface between educational and biblical studies. It is part of his ongoing effort to develop a canonical perspective on education. Informed by contemporary studies in wisdom literature, the paper argues for a common pattern of thought between theBook of Proverbs and theWisdom of Ben Sira (Sirach in Greek and Ecclesiasticus in Latin), despite their universalistic and nationalistic outlook demonstrated most notably inProverbs 8 andSirach 24 respectively. Against a common view that Proverbs reflects the international outlook of sages in the First Temple period and Sirach “the nationalization of Wisdom” in the Second Temple period, this paper aims to demonstrate a subtle co-existence of universal and particular horizons in both books and an ever-present tension therein. Disclosing the dual horizons of sapiential practice that includes observing, reflecting and teaching is significant for three reasons. First, the universal perspective of Hebrew sages is an Axial-age breakthrough no less signiifcant than the contribution made by the prophets. Second, such a universal horizon in the wisdom literature, which is different from that associated with organized missionary movements, provides the impetus to recover the sapiential dimension of biblical ideas of education eclipsed by the instrumental notion of education as a proselytizing strategy. Finally, the reclamation of the dual horizons in sapiential practice is pivotal in the development of a wisdom approach to religious education that will enable the community of faith to engage the world in a prudent and authentic manner.

  5. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  6. Medical physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, J.A. (Plymouth College (UK))

    1989-01-01

    A book on 'Medical Physics' is written in three parts. Part I discusses the physics of the human body including the expenditure of energy, human mechanics and the human response to light and sound. Part II describes the monitoring of various physiological parameters, such as temperatures and pressure using specialized transducers and systems employing radiotelemetric, ultrasonic and fibre-optic techniques. Part III on ionizing radiations discusses the production, properties and detection of the different radiations and the elements of dosimetry. The different types of radiation detectors are also described. Finally the diagnostic applications of radioactive tracer studies are discussed. The material selected for inclusion in this book reflects the requirements of the Joint Matriculation Board's A-level option on Medical Physics and at the end of each of the 15 chapters, there are questions on the content. Part III of the book has been selected and indexed separately. (UK).

  7. Medical robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    In this book, we present medical robotics, its evolution over the last 30 years in terms of architecture, design and control, and the main scientific and clinical contributions to the field. For more than two decades, robots have been part of hospitals and have progressively become a common tool for the clinician. Because this domain has now reached a certain level of maturity it seems important and useful to provide a state of the scientific, technological and clinical achievements and still open issues. This book describes the short history of the domain, its specificity and constraints, and

  8. Medical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Voto Bernales, Juan; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Medical Physics is to study the physical phenomena that occur in the body and exert action on the agents. It also addresses the manner taught natural agents in the study and exploration of the human body and in the way in the same agents for use in the treatment of disease can be used. La Física Médica tiene por objeto estudiar los fenómenos físicos que se realizan en el organismo y la acción que sobre el ejercen los agentes. Se ocupa, además, de enseñar la manera cómo pueden utilizarse lo...

  9. Medical revolution in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarin, V L; Isoardi, R A

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the major Argentineans contributors, medical physicists and scientists, in medical imaging and the development of medical imaging in Argentina. The following are presented: history of medical imaging in Argentina: the pioneers; medical imaging and medical revolution; nuclear medicine imaging; ultrasound imaging; and mathematics, physics, and electronics in medical image research: a multidisciplinary endeavor.

  10. Medical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  11. Smoking cessation medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... Creating a plan to help you deal with smoking urges. Getting support from a doctor, counselor, or ...

  12. Medical telesensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Trinidad L.; Crilly, P. B.; Smith, S. F.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Britton, Charles L., Jr.; Morrison, Gilbert W.; Ericson, M. N.; Hedden, D.; Bouldin, Donald W.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Wig, A. G.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    1998-05-01

    Medical telesensors are self-contained integrated circuits for measuring and transmitting vital signs over a distance of approximately 1-2 meters. The circuits are unhoused and contain a sensor, signal processing and modulation electronics, a spread-spectrum transmitter, an antenna and a thin-film battery. We report on a body-temperature telesensor, which is sufficiently small to be placed on a tympanic membrane in a child's ear. We also report on a pulse-oximeter telesensor and a micropack receiver/long- range transmitter unit, which receives form a telesensor array and analyzes and re-transmits the vital signs over a longer range. Signal analytics are presented for the pulse oximeter, which is currently in the form of a finger ring. A multichip module is presented as the basic signal-analysis component. The module contains a microprocessor, a field=programmable gate array, memory elements and other components necessary for determining trauma and reporting signals.

  13. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment.

  14. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and ... Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation ...

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation ...

  16. Medication/Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... immediate or delayed. What Is an Allergy to Medication/Drugs? Allergies to drugs/medications are complicated, because ...

  17. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications ... Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral ...

  18. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    15-001098 Copy Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks Sarah K...other national challenges. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks...noted that the ability of the Military Health System to provide operational healthcare is measured by the readiness of its medical personnel and

  19. Medical muddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis.

  20. MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Drinovec

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to restrictions imposed on a clinical freedom, interest for professionalism in healthcare has been getting bigger not only in medicine literature and various mass media but also in teaching and organisation of healthcare. Professionalism stands not only for a medicine’s contract with society, recognition of a physician status, privilege and monopoly but also for a genuine physician’s commitment to professional responsibilities.Analysis. In 2002 European and American associations approved a document on medical professionalism in the new millenium, so-called Physician Charter. This document includes fundamental principles of professionalism such as altruism, patient autonomy and social justice. In particular, it analyses a physician’s professional competency, honesty with patients, patient confidentiality, appropriate relations with patients, improvements regarding a healthcare quality, healthcare access, just distribution of finite funds, commitment to scientific knowledge, trust maintenance by managing conflicts of interest and a professional responsibility.Conclusions. Physician’s professionalism means philosophycal and sociological analysis of his/her profession and its position in a society. It includes a concern for improvements of his/ her own scientific knowledge, skills, a genuine ethic interest for an individual patient bearing in mind principles of equality and justice in society. Whether performing an organisational and public work or participating in professional health organizations, physician’s interest for a patient must prevail.

  1. Turkish Medical Information System and Medical Librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huriye Çolaklar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, medical information is supported at state level according to national policies. However, although the history of medical libraries in Turkey goes back to the 13th century in Anatolia, modern medical library applications adopted since the 1950s have not received much state support. In the past thirteen years a few medical libraries joined forces under ÜNAK (the Association of University and Research Librarians to contribute to the organization and development of Turkish Medical Information through the establishment of a "Medical Working Group" in 2000.

  2. moral realism in the hebrew bible

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-10

    Dec 10, 2009 ... of…universal human norms. .... Consider the role of a judge vis-à-vis the law – a judge does not make the ... Rather, a judge acknowledges the law as ..... Hare, J., 1997, The moral gap: Kantian ethics, human limits, and God's.

  3. Zechariah and the Dating of Biblical Hebrew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    2006-01-01

    The data presented in the article indicate clearly that the ability to write proper EBH did not end with the exile; but when did it end? In the course of the fifth century, or the fourth century, or even later? This is difficult to resolve, on linguistic grounds. On linguistic grounds, can we say...... conclusions of most biblical scholars. Considering only linguistic data, texts in EBH could have been composed after the exile. Other, non-linguistic considerations can make this unlikely, but we can raise no objections from a linguistic viewpoint to such a dating....

  4. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will be able to find. Medical identification products can help ensure proper treatment in an ...

  5. Implantable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  6. When Medication Is Prescribed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression When Medication Is Prescribed Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you have about the medicine. —NIMH Types of Medications There are several types of medications used to ...

  7. Medication Use during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Medication Use During Pregnancy Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... are taking only medications that are necessary. What Medications Can Cause Birth Defects? We know that taking ...

  8. Your Pet's Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Your Pet's Medications When your pet has a medical condition, ... authorized. What you can do to keep your pet safe When the medication is prescribed Let your ...

  9. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  10. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, ...

  11. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, ...

  12. MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional attitudes improvement. One hundred and two medical students were selected randomly in different steps of education and were questioned and their opinions correlation with stage of education and gender were evaluated. There was a significant difference between female viewpoint (in roles of ethic course which is presented in preclinical step in professional attitude improvement (P = 0.009 and also a significant difference was seen in the viewpoint score between student stage with intern stage (P = 0.031. Medical students in educational student stage believe ethic course improve medical professionalism. Since there is no special course to train medical students in professionalism, some interventions are required in this field to improve this aspect of physicians' professional life.

  13. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

  14. Transmutation of Matter in Byzantium: The Case of Michael Psellos, the Alchemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiampoura, Gianna

    2008-01-01

    There is thus nothing paradoxical about the inclusion of alchemy in the ensemble of the physical sciences nor in the preoccupation with it on the part of learned men engaged in scientific study. In the context of the Medieval model, where discourse on the physical world was ambiguous, often unclear, and lacking the support of experimental…

  15. Picasso alquimista: Una lectura de "Las Meninas" Alchemist Picasso: a Reading of "Las Meninas"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Lucero

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Este texto presenta una lectura de la serie Las meninas según Velázquez que Picasso realizó en 1957, articulada en tres momentos: 1 revisión de las interpretaciones clásicas de Las Meninas, que poco después de la aparición de la serie picassiana se reactivan en torno al clásico texto de Michel Foucault que preludia Las palabras y las cosas; 2 presentación de la serie a la luz de una dialéctica de la falsificación y 3 análisis del vínculo forma-contenido a partir de la problematización de la noción misma de "variación", buscando algunas resonancias con la lógica musical de la variación. Consideramos que la radicalidad del ejercicio picassiano se encuentra en el centro de lo que se le reprocha: su potencia falsificante.The objective of this essay is to reflect on Picasso's Las meninas según Velázquez, painted in 1957. We have chosen three moments to develop our thesis: in the first place, we will develop a critical revisión of the classical lectures on Las Meninas since Foucault published his essay in Les mots et les choses (1966; secondly, and taking as a starting point Rosalind Krauss' essay on Picasso, The Picasso Papers, we will read the series as a dialectic of fake and falsification, and finally we will analyze the relationship between form and content through the problem-posing of musical variation. We would like to point out that what is revolutionary in Picasso's series is indeed their fake power.

  16. Transmutation of Matter in Byzantium: The Case of Michael Psellos, the Alchemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiampoura, Gianna

    2008-01-01

    There is thus nothing paradoxical about the inclusion of alchemy in the ensemble of the physical sciences nor in the preoccupation with it on the part of learned men engaged in scientific study. In the context of the Medieval model, where discourse on the physical world was ambiguous, often unclear, and lacking the support of experimental…

  17. Hangout with CERN: ISOLDE - The dream of the alchemists (S03E06)

    CERN Multimedia

    Kahle, Kate

    2013-01-01

    In this week's hangout scientists from the ISOLDE facility at CERN explain how the facility fulfils the old alchemical dream of changing one element into another!This hangout follows on from last week's hangout, where we spoke about the latest ISOLDE news of pear-shaped atomic nuclei and a fundamental property of the rarest element on Earth (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8Jdu9...).Host ATLAS physicist Steven Goldfarb is joined by student Ruth Cook, in the ISOLDE visitor room are Thierry Stora, Carla Babcock and Bruce Marsh; ISOLDE group leader Maria Jose Garcia Borge connects from Vancouver and Tim Chupp connects from the University of Michigan, with Kate Kahle monitoring social media. Read more about ISOLDE here: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experim...Recorded live on 30th May 2013.

  18. STS-3 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  19. Machine medical ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  20. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  1. Teaching Medical Sociology in Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Gerard J.; Sobal, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    Provides 11 teaching guidelines for presentation of sociological material to medical students and addresses the problems of dense scheduling and competition for time in a medical school curriculum. Considers career implications for sociologists in this setting as well as resources available. (NL)

  2. Matching Medical Websites to Medical Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Rak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of medical texts provided to general public on the Internet is a serious issue nowadays. Unfortunately the only feasible way to approve the adequacy of the medical information content is human verification today. Best practices in medicine are systematically captured by medical guidelines (MGLs, which are provided by renowned medical societies. We propose a simple approach to exploiting MGL content as ’gold standard’ for the assessment of content quality in medical web sites (WS, based on the idea that the information content is reflected in the domain terminology used. Concept candidates discovered in a MGL and in the tested web pages are matched to the UMLS terminological system. In a small case study, MGLs and WSs have been analyzed for similarity at term and concept level. The research is a step towards automated evaluation of WS content on the basis of MGLs as the quality standard.

  3. STS-1 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  4. Medical spa marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Neil S; Dinkes, Adam; Oskin, Larry

    2008-07-01

    Medical spas are different. We are not just selling medical and dermatology services; we are offering clients viable new solutions to their skin care, body care, and hair care challenges. Traditional medical marketing becomes blurred today, as the expansion and acceptance of medical spas helps you to effectively compete with traditional skin care clinics, salons, and spas, while offering more therapeutic treatments from professionally licensed doctors, nurses, aestheticians, massage therapists, spa professionals, and medical practitioners. We recommend that you make the choice to successfully and competitively become a market-driven medical spa with an annual strategic plan, rather than an operationally driven business.

  5. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ...

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ...

  7. Medications for Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments > Medications for Memory Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/ ... Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Medications for Memory Treatments for Behavior For Sleep Changes Alternative Treatments ...

  8. American Medical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMA provides to help members save money. Residency & Career Planning Find out resources for a range of medical ... clinical questions using our reference tool View the Career Planning Resource Refinance your medical student loans Find leadership ...

  9. Choosing Your Medical Specialty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMA provides to help members save money. Residency & Career Planning Find resources for a range of medical career ... Fellowships Back to top Home Life & Career Residency & Career Planning Choosing a Medical Specialty Back to top Choosing ...

  10. Tanzania Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal publishes any contribution that advances medical science or ... these core objectives the journal publishes papers on original scientific research, short ... The Tanzania Medical Journal is an international Journal - ISSN: 0856-0719 ...

  11. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  12. Medical Device Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  13. Medical Treatments for Fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Medical Treatments for Fibroids Skip sharing on social media ... Page Content Your health care provider may suggest medical treatments to reduce the symptoms of fibroids or ...

  14. Medical Computational Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Tatar, Deborah Gail; Rosen, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) in medicine means deliberating when to pursue computer-mediated solutions to medical problems and evaluating when such solutions are worth pursuing in order to assist in medical decision making. Teaching computational thinking (CT) at medical school should be aligned...... with learning objectives, teaching and assessment methods, and overall pedagogical mission of the individual medical school in relation to society. Medical CT as part of the medical curriculum could help educate novices (medical students and physicians in training) in the analysis and design of complex...... healthcare organizations, which increasingly rely on computer technology. Such teaching should engage novices in information practices where they learn to perceive practices of computer technology as directly involved in the provision of patient care. However, medical CT as a teaching and research field...

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by a physician who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS Take ...

  16. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ... Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ...

  17. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy Print ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  18. Polymyositis: Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Polymyositis (PM) is a highly treatable disease. Some ... PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find your MDA Care Center Current Clinical ...

  19. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy A ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  20. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain and the gut. Antidepressant medications can reduce the intensity of pain signals going from gut to brain. Read more about antidepressant medications. Newer IBS-Targeted ...

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atropine (Lomotil) Read more about antidiarrheal agents. Anti-anxiety medications – can be helpful for some people with ... who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and specialized motility and/ ...

  2. Medications (for IBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ...

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ...

  4. Medications: Myths Versus Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are good, but they should never replace the statins.” Dr. Fletcher said. Natural supplements are better than ... medication . Many include stimulants that can have an adverse reaction with blood pressure medication, Dr. Fletcher said. “ ...

  5. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain and the gut. Antidepressant medications can reduce the intensity of pain signals going from gut to brain. Read more about antidepressant medications. Newer IBS-Targeted ...

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications Details Medications ...

  7. Understanding Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study ... when reading or listening to reports of new medical findings. Some questions that can help you evaluate ...

  8. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to physician counseling and dietary manipulations. What's a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts ... the drug package or on your prescription label. Medications for IBS First line treatment has traditionally been ...

  9. Giving Medication to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Giving Medication to Children Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... the upper limit. back to top Q: Are medications that are intended for children clinically tested on ...

  10. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications Details Medications ...

  11. [Perspectives in medical liability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro W, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The progressive increase of medical negligence law suits requires an updated analysis of the current situation of medical liability in Chile. The application of a new criminal procedure will avoid criminal prosecution of doctors, transferring to the civil courts the pecuniary sanctions for malpractice. Medical negligence and damage inflicted by doctors that require compensation are explained. The most likely evolution of medical liability is proposed, through an increase in civil liability insurance and the necessary standardization of rules applicable to professional liability.

  12. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” ...

  13. [Historiography of medical objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Felip

    2008-01-01

    It has become acceptable among historians of medicine to profess a predilection for the historiography of medical ideas. But it is justified all the same to ask whether the logical connection really caused the origin, the change, or the disappearance of the medical objects. The interaction of ideas and medical objects assure as much objectivity as possible. In consequence, the contents of the museums, medical objects, is an aspect rather that a branch of the history of medicine.

  14. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  15. A smoke-free medical campus in Jerusalem: data for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Itamar; Donchin, Milka; Levine, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Establishing smoke-free environments is a major component of tobacco control policy. The introduction of a smoke-free policy in medical campuses may serve as a role model for other educational and health institutions but little has been published about their prevalence or impact. In 2012, the Faculty of Medicine at Hebrew University-Hadassah in Jerusalem, Israel launched a smoke-free Medical Campus initiative. This study examined smoking behaviours, cigarette smoke exposure and attitudes towards the smoke-free campus policy among students and employees. Using a self-administered questionnaire, data was collected from medical, dental and pharmacy students, as well as employees of the school of pharmacy. We approached the entire target population in 2013 (N = 449), with a response rate of 72.5 % (N = 313). The rate of smoking was 8.3 % (95 % CI 5.5-11.9 %). Most participants reported daily exposure or exposure several times a week to cigarette smoke (65.8 %). Overall, 98.0 % had reported seeing people smoke in open campus areas and 27.2 % indoors. Most participants supported the smoking ban inside buildings (94.2 %) but fewer supported (40.8 %) a complete ban of smoking throughout the campus, including outside areas. Only 18.4 % agreed that a policy prohibiting smoking was unfair to smokers. A multivariable analysis showed that support for a complete ban on smoking on campus was higher among non-smokers than for smokers (OR = 9.5, 95 % CI 2.2-31.5, p = 0.02). The smoke-free policy does not have total compliance, despite the strong support among both students and employees for a smoke-free medical campus. The data collected will assist policy makers move towards a total smoke-free medical campus and will aid tobacco control efforts in Israel and other countries.

  16. Medical Physics Data Book,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Medical Physics Data Book is a collection of physical and chemical data useful in medical physics . The information has been extracted from other...ionizing Radiation. Carried out by the Medical Physics Data Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, this compilation is meant to

  17. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Your Medical Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Your Medical Records A ... Records? en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  18. Mission Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  19. MANAGEMENT OF MEDICAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBU MARIA-MAGDALENA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The offer of medical services depends on medical personnel and more than this, on the management in the medical field since any resource not managed well or not managed at all is only a lost one, regardless its value. Management is therefore the key, the

  20. Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarine, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

  1. Medical Issues in Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Medical Issues in Adoption KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Issues in Adoption Print A A A What's ... some things to know about the health and medical care of an adopted child, before, during, and ...

  2. Conducting the Medical History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Martin A.; Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    A key portion of the medical evaluation of child sexual abuse is the medical history. This differs from interviews or histories obtained by other professionals in that it is focuses more on the health and well-being of the child. Careful questions should be asked about all aspects of the child's medical history by a skilled, compassionate,…

  3. Medical Assisting Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a medical assisting program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the medical assisting field, such as medical law and ethics, typing,…

  4. Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarine, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

  5. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative ...

  6. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    of articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework......Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews...

  7. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Alexan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” as it holds the medication dispensing parameters for the drugs it contains: dispensing time and date and name. Based on this information, the actual dispensing is done.

  8. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews...... of articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework...

  9. [Unravelling medical leadership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Judith J; van Rensen, Elizabeth L J; Noordegraaf, Mirko; Schneider, Margriet M E

    2015-01-01

    Medical leadership is a popular topic in the Netherlands, and several interest groups now incorporate medical leadership into postgraduate medical education. However, there is no consensus on what this concept entails. By conducting a discourse analysis, a qualitative method which uses language and text to reveal existing viewpoints, this article reveals three perspectives on medical leadership: administrative leadership, leadership within organisations and leadership within each doctor's daily practice. Text analysis shows that the first two perspectives refer to medical leadership mainly in a defensive manner: by demonstrating medical leadership doctors could 'take the lead' once again; patient care only seems to play a small part in the process. These perspectives are not free of consequences, they will determine how the medical profession is constructed. For this reason, it is argued that there should be more emphasis on the third perspective, in which the quality of care for patients is of primary importance.

  10. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  11. Medical Physicists and AAPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amols, Howard

    2006-03-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), a member society of the AIP is the largest professional society of medical physicists in the world with nearly 5700 members. Members operate in medical centers, university and community hospitals, research laboratories, industry, and private practice. Medical physics specialties include radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. The majority of AAPM members are based in hospital departments of radiation oncology or radiology and provide technical support for patient diagnosis and treatment in a clinical environment. Job functions include support of clinical care, calibration and quality assurance of medical devices such as linear accelerators for cancer therapy, CT, PET, MRI, and other diagnostic imaging devices, research, and teaching. Pathways into a career in medical physics require an advanced degree in medical physics, physics, engineering, or closely related field, plus clinical training in one or more medical physics specialties (radiation therapy physics, imaging physics, or radiation safety). Most clinically based medical physicists also obtain certification from the American Board of Radiology, and some states require licensure as well.

  12. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Effects of Medications on Voice Effects of Medications on Voice Patient Health Information ... entnet.org . Could Your Medication Be Affecting Your Voice? Some medications including prescription, over-the-counter, and ...

  13. Medication Use Before Your Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical Support Groups Recursos en Español (Spanish Resources) Medication Use Before Your Operation Your medications may have ... restart taking these drugs. (See list.) List of medications that affect blood clotting:* Antiplatelet Medication: Anagrelide (Agrylin®), ...

  14. Medical education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Victor K E

    2008-01-01

    Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty.

  15. Medical design anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventura, Jonathan; Gunn, Wendy

    Barnard and Spencer define medical anthropology in the Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology as "Medical anthropology is, as the phrase implies, unavoidably concerned with the paradigm of modern Western medicine, whether implicitly or explicitly" (2002: 541). Recently there is a new...... focus in medical sociology and anthropology, which is patient's practices and influence on wider global health environment (see for example vol. 36(2) of Sociology of Health & Illness). While various social science theoreticians have written about agentic abilities of objects, there is a gap...... in literature concerning various levels of socio-cultural influence of the medical environment through medical products. In our research we have outlined the importance of medical design anthropology (MDA) to the practice and theory of design (Ventura and Gunn, 2016). In this paper, we study the ways in which...

  16. Organising medication discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nixon, Michael; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Discontinuing medications is a complex decision making process and an important medical practice. It is a tool in reducing polypharmacy, reducing health system expenditure and improving patient quality of life. Few studies have looked at how general practitioners (GPs) discontinue...... a medication, in agreement with the patients, from a professional perspective. Three research questions were examined in this study: when does medication discontinuation occur in general practice, how is discontinuing medication handled in the GP’s practice and how do GPs make decisions about discontinuing...... medication? Methods: Twenty four GPs were interviewed using a maximum variation sample strategy. Participant observations were done in three general practices, for one day each, totalling approximately 30 consultations. Results: The results show that different discontinuation cues (related to the type...

  17. Fundamentals of Medical Ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Postema, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    This book sets out the physical and engineering principles of acoustics and ultrasound as used for medical applications. It covers the basics of linear acoustics, wave propagation, non-linear acoustics, acoustic properties of tissue, transducer components, and ultrasonic imaging modes, as well as the most common diagnostic and therapeutic applications. It offers students and professionals in medical physics and engineering a detailed overview of the technical aspects of medical ultrasonic imaging, whilst serving as a reference for clinical and research staff.

  18. Medical tourism in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment.

  19. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses: on telephone: 73802 by e-mail: Service.Medical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  20. Reminder from Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2004-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses on telephone: 73802 by e-mail: Service.Medical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  1. Medical waste management plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  2. Medical student-mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julie; Macnamara, Marina; Groskin, Anna; Petras, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Medical training is challenging and parenting is a full-time responsibility. Balancing a family with the significant demands of medical school is a daunting endeavor. Yet there is little research available to guide students, faculty, or administrators. Using one U.S. medical school as a case study, this article provides a comprehensive overview of the common personal and professional challenges that medical students who are also mothers face during their undergraduate medical education, and practical strategies and resources useful in navigating such challenges. This article is also a resource guide for the faculty and administrators who teach, advise, and mentor medical-student parents. For leaders in medical education, the article concludes with suggestions to better support the health and educational experience of medical student-parents: 1) a systematic network of career advisors, 2) scheduling flexibility, 3) formal breastfeeding policies and workplace support, 4) institutionally supported childcare, and 5) how student-parents may foster the educational health mission of medical schools.

  3. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  4. Medical equipment management

    CERN Document Server

    Willson, Keith; Tabakov, Slavik

    2013-01-01

    Know What to Expect When Managing Medical Equipment and Healthcare Technology in Your Organization As medical technology in clinical care becomes more complex, clinical professionals and support staff must know how to keep patients safe and equipment working in the clinical environment. Accessible to all healthcare professionals and managers, Medical Equipment Management presents an integrated approach to managing medical equipment in healthcare organizations. The book explains the underlying principles and requirements and raises awareness of what needs to be done and what questions to ask. I

  5. [Anxiety--medical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiak, M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the author presented themes connected with anxiety disorder in general medical practice. Pathogenesis, classification, dependence between anxiety and somatic and psychical diseases were described there.

  6. Medical Certification System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Provides automated risk-based decision making capability in support of medical certification and clearances processing associated fees and supporting surveillance of...

  7. Medical Services: Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Aeromedical Epidemiological Data Repository to support research and clinical studies for aircrew medical standards and policy. (5) Be the designated...Edentulous areas requiring prostheses but not on an immediate basis. (4) Periodontal disease or periodontium exhibiting: (a) Requirement for oral...materials but for which protective coverage is indicated. (3) Periodontal diseases or periodontium exhibiting: (a) Acute gingivitis or pericoronitis. (b

  8. The Intersection of Medical Child Abuse and Medical Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petska, Hillary W; Gordon, John B; Jablonski, Debra; Sheets, Lynn K

    2017-02-01

    Children with medical complexity and victims of medical child abuse may have similar clinical presentations. Atypical or unexplained signs and symptoms due to rare diseases may lead providers to suspect medical child abuse when not present. Conversely, medical child abuse may be the cause of or coexist with medical complexity. Careful consideration of whether or not medical child abuse is present is essential when assessing a child with medical complexity since either diagnosis has significant consequences for children and families.

  9. Medical Equipment Maintenance Programme Overview WHO Medical device technical series

    CERN Document Server

    Organization, World Health

    2011-01-01

    WHO and partners have been working towards devising an agenda an action plan tools and guidelines to increase access to appropriate medical devices. This document is part of a series of reference documents being developed for use at the country level. The series will include the following subject areas: . policy framework for health technology . medical device regulations . health technology assessment . health technology management . needs assessment of medical devices . medical device procurement . medical equipment donations . medical equipment inventory management . medical equipment maint

  10. History of Medical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical…

  11. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 168 by Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, 2015 at 12:18:55 PM ... Selecting a CAM Practitioner Hypnosis for IBS ...

  12. Catastrophic Medical Expenditure Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Flores (Gabriela); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMedical expenditure risk can pose a major threat to living standards. We derive decomposable measures of catastrophic medical expenditure risk from reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. We propose a quantile regression based method of estimating risk exposure from cross-section

  13. Maintaining medical competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. I recently renewed my Arizona medical license and meet all the requirements. I far exceed the required CME hours and have no Medical Board actions, removal of hospital privileges, lawsuits, or felonies. None of the bad things are likely since I have not seen patients since July 1, 2011 and I no longer have hospital privileges. However, this caused me to pause when I came to the question of “Actively practicing”? A quick check of the status of several who do not see patients but are administrators, retired or full time editors of other medical journals revealed they were all listed as “active”. I guess that “medical journalism” is probably as much a medical activity as “administrative medicine” which is recognized by the Arizona Medical Board. This got me to thinking about competence and the Medical Board’s obligation to ensure competent physicians. Medical boards focused on preventing the unlicensed practice …

  14. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  15. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  16. Catastrophic Medical Expenditure Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Flores (Gabriela); O.A. O'Donnell (Owen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMedical expenditure risk can pose a major threat to living standards. We derive decomposable measures of catastrophic medical expenditure risk from reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. We propose a quantile regression based method of estimating risk exposure from cross-section

  17. Medicalized weapons & modern war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    "Medicalized" weapons--those that rely on advances in neuroscience, physiology, and pharmacology--offer the prospect of reducing casualties and protecting civilians. They could be especially useful in modern asymmetric wars in which conventional states are pitted against guerrilla or insurgent forces. But may physicians and other medical workers participate in their development?

  18. South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Medical Journal is published by the South African Medical Association, ... Guest Editorial: Growing wilderness and expedition medicine education in ... Does access to private healthcare influence potential lung cancer cure rates? ... Cardiovascular risk factors and mortality in children with chronic kidney ...

  19. Medical Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kent A.

    1986-01-01

    Description of information services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) highlights a new system for retrieving information from NLM's databases (GRATEFUL MED); a formal Regional Medical Library Network; DOCLINE; the Unified Medical Language System; and Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Research and development and the…

  20. Continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, D

    1987-04-01

    With the rapid advances in medical science and increasing complexities of patient care, the need for continuing medical education (CME) is widely accepted by the profession. CME follows general and higher professional training, and should be a life long process. Teaching hospitals and postgraduate professional institutions play vital roles in organising, promoting, and monitoring this activity. CME directorates should be established. University authorities must recognise the important role of medical teachers in postgraduate and continuing medical education, and the staff establishment and terms of service should be held regularly. Medical libraries should have easy borrowing facilities. Self-assessment and audio-visual material are particularly helpful to the busy practitioner and inexpensive local or regional journals of quality can provide pertinent and up-to-date information. All charges for attending scientific meetings and educational material should be tax deductible or subsidized. The effectiveness of CME is difficult to assess and participation is almost impossible to enforce. Much depends on the standard of medical practice wanted by society. Recertification of general practitioners or specialists poses many problems. On the other hand, completion of self-assessment programmes, active participation at medical meetings, contributions to scientific literature, and membership of medical societies with built-in peer review could be monitored and regularly used to evaluate professional status.

  1. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... family doctor. When it comes to asking for medical records, different health care providers have different ways of doing things. Some might ... are needed faster — like when a patient needs medical treatment — the health care provider holding the records usually releases them immediately. If ...

  2. Ending pregnancy with medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or an emergency room. Getting Ready for a Medical Abortion The health care provider will: Do a physical exam and ultrasound Go ... vaginal intercourse for about a week after a medical abortion. You can ... care provider about what birth control to use. You should ...

  3. Spectator Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, L

    1992-01-01

    Recent world events-including the fear of terrorism during last year's Super Bowl-illustrate how vulnerable spectators can be to medical emergencies during sporting events. A physician who studies and coordinates crowd care for events ranging from the Super Bowl to local fairs gives tips on planning and executing a spectator medical plan.

  4. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor.For information, call the Nurses- on Telephone73802- by electronic mailInfirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.chJanet.Doody@cern.chMireille.Vosdey@cern.chMedical Service

  5. Medical Virtual Public Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia SURUGIU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare enterprises are very disconnected. This paper intends to propose a solution that will provide citizens, businesses and medical enterprises with improved access to medical virtual public services. Referred medical services are based on existing national medical Web services and which support medically required services provided by physicians and supplementary health care practitioners, laboratory services and diagnostic procedures, clinics and hospitals’ services. Requirements and specific rules of these medical services are considered, and personalization of user preferences will to be supported. The architecture is based on adaptable process management technologies, allowing for virtual services which are dynamically combined from existing national medical services. In this way, a comprehensive workflow process is set up, allowing for service-level agreements, an audit trail and explanation of the process to the end user. The process engine operates on top of a virtual repository, providing a high-level semantic view of information retrieved from heterogeneous information sources, such as national sources of medical services. The system relies on a security framework to ensure all high-level security requirements are met. System’s architecture is business oriented: it focuses on Service Oriented Architecture - SOA concepts, asynchronously combining Web services, Business Process Management – BPM rules and BPEL standards.

  6. [Ethics in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The title of this reflection evokes several contents that may encompass from ethics in research; fraud in science; ethics in medical advertising and relations between sponsors and science; and, finally, papers related to ethic content. This paper is limited to the ethic responsibilities of the medical writers or "scriptwriters."

  7. Commercial Crew Medical Ops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbaugh, Randall; Cole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Provide commercial partners with: center insight into NASA spaceflight medical experience center; information relative to both nominal and emergency care of the astronaut crew at landing site center; a basis for developing and sharing expertise in space medical factors associated with returning crew.

  8. Medical negligence: Criminal prosecution of medical professionals, importance of medical evidence: Some guidelines for medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Pandit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modern medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. On the one hand, there can be unfavorable results of treatment and on the other hand the patient suspects negligence as a cause of their suffering. There is an increasing trend of medical litigation by unsatisfied patients. The Supreme Court has laid down guidelines for the criminal prosecution of a doctor. This has decreased the unnecessary harassment of doctors. As the medical profession has been brought under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986, the patients have an easy method of litigation. There should be legal awareness among the doctors that will help them in the proper recording of medical management details. This will help them in defending their case during any allegation of medical negligence.

  9. Medication safety in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirke, C

    2009-01-01

    Medication error and adverse drug reactions occur frequently, leading to a high burden of patient harm in the hospital setting. Many Irish hospitals have established medication safety initiatives, designed to encourage reporting and learning to improve medication use processes and therefore patient safety. Eight Irish hospitals or hospital networks provided data from voluntary medication safety incident and near miss reporting programmes for pooled analysis of events occurring between 1st January 2006 and 30th June 2007. 6179 reports were received in total (mean 772 per hospital; range 96-1855). 95% of reports did not involve patient harm. Forty seven percent of reports related to the prescribing stage of the medication use process, 40% to the administration stage and 9% to the pharmacy dispensing stage. This data is published to increase awareness of this key patient safety issue, to share learning from these incidents and near misses and to encourage a more open patient safety culture.

  10. Medication-overuse headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Bendtsen, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a debilitating condition in which frequent and prolonged use of medication for the acute treatment of pain results in the worsening of the headache. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature on MOH and discuss future avenues for research....... MOH accounts for a substantial share of the global burden of disease. Prevalence is often reported as 1-2% but can be as high as 7% overall, with higher proportions among women and in those with a low socioeconomic position. Management consists of withdrawing pain medication, focusing on prophylactic...... and nonmedical treatments, and limiting acute symptomatic medication. Stress reduction and lifestyle interventions may support the change towards rational pain medication use. Support, follow up, and education are needed to help patients through the detoxification period. There is fertile ground for research...

  11. SIMULATION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Palés Argullós

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In last twenty years, we are seeing increasingly widespread use of simulations in the training of doctors and other professionals of health sciences at the different stages of their educational continuum (undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education. So much so that the concept of simulations-based medical education has emerged and it is now recognized as a vital tool to ensure the learning of medical students and doctors, and to improve patient safety. This article will describe the reasons for the introduction and development of this new methodology, its advantages and the different models and currently available resources. We will describe also the characteristics of so-called simulation centres or clinical skills laboratories that have been developed worldwide, where the simulation-based medical education take place. Moreover, we will refer briefly to the situation in our country and finally to the principles of a good development of the simulation-based medical education.

  12. Style in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Smith, D E

    1983-10-15

    A study of medical journals from 1962 showed a constant preoccupation with style. Editors and contributors on both sides of the Atlantic revile unnecessary obscurity and complexity and the use of jargon, barbarisms, vogue words, and weak impersonal constructions. They bewail the pompous use of verbiage and the "medspeak" typified by acronyms and neologisms created by affixation. Suggestions for possible causes of poor medical style range from editorial demands for compression and a general ignorance of the principles of good writing to faulty logic and the subordination of communication to status seeking. The consequences of bad writing may include the fragmentation of knowledge, an increase in the importance of abstracting services, a trend towards free glossy medical newspapers, and, as remedial measures, workshops and courses in medical writing. Some implications for English language teachers working with foreign medical graduates and preclinical students are discussed.

  13. MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunčica Ivanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of interest in this article is the importance of knowing and connecting medical ethics and medical law for the category of health workers. The author believes that knowledge of bioethics which as a discipline deals with the study of ethical issues and health care law as a legal discipline, as well as medical activity in general, result in the awareness of health professionals of human rights, and since the performance of activities of health workers is almost always linked to the question of life and death, then the lack of knowledge of basic legal acts would not be justified at all. The aim of the paper was to present the importance of medical ethics and medical law among the medical staff. A retrospective analysis of the medical literature available on the indexed base KOBSON for the period 2005-2010 was applied. Analysis of all work leads to the conclusion that the balance between ethical principles and knowledge of medical law, trust and cooperation between the two sides that appear over health care can be considered a goal that every health care worker should strive for. This study supports the attitude that lack of knowledge and non-compliance with the ethical principles and medical law when put together can only harm the health care worker. In a way, this is the message to health care professionals that there is a need for the adoption of ethical principles and knowledge of medical law, because the most important position of all health workers is their dedication to the patient as a primary objective and the starting point of ethics.

  14. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  15. Medical Services: Standards of Medical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-28

    formation (701.4), if the tendency is marked or interferes with the wearing of military equipment. m. Leprosy (030.9), any type. n. Lichen planus...p. Leukemia cutis or mycosis fungoides or cutaneous T–Cell lymphoma. (See also para 3–42.) q. Lichen planus. Generalized and not responsive to...exam if clinically indicated, and laboratory screening tests for DNA , HIV, and drug/alcohol testing will be accomplished. This medical screening and

  16. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  17. Medical marijuana: medical necessity versus political agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter A; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-12-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government's stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights.

  18. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  19. Medical Virology in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaw Bing Chua

    2009-01-01

    Virology is a branch of biological science dealing with the study of viruses, and medical virology focuses on the study and control of diseases due to viruses that is of medical importance. The development of medical virology in Malaysia has its beginning in the Institute for Medical Research (IMR), following the establishment of the Division of Medical Zoology and Virus Research in the institute on 23 March 1953. The second institution in the country to establish diagnostic and research work in medical virology was Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya. This was followed by University Kebangsaan Malaysia, University Sains Malaysia and University of Sarawak Malaysia. The National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) is the latest institution to establish a laboratory in 2003 for virus isolation and services to support country surveillance and outbreak investigation of infectious diseases due to viruses. In the field of medical virology, Malaysia contributed substantially in the areas of virus diagnostic services, development and research ranging from survey and documentation on the existence and prevalence of viruses causing diseases in Malaysia, clinical presentation and epidemiological features of virus diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic tests to pathogenesis of viral diseases. Malaysia contributed to the discoveries of at least 12 new viruses in the world. ASEAN plus Three (China, Japan, Republic of Korea) Emerging Infectious Programme was established to overcome the challenges and impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in this region. Malaysia as the co-ordinator of the laboratory component of the programme, contributed to strengthen the regional laboratory capability, capacity, laboratory-based surveillance and networking. The future of medical virology in Malaysia in terms of integration of diagnostic, reference and research to support the country's need will be enhanced and strengthened with the on

  20. Medical Service Information

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The Medical Service is pleased to inform you that a psychologist specialising in psychotherapy (member of the Swiss Federation of Psychologists- FSP), Mrs Sigrid Malandain, will be starting work at the CERN on 1 November 2010, in the premises of the Medical Service, Building 57-1-024. Members of CERN personnel can request individual consultations, by appointment, in French or in English, on Tuesdays and Thursdays by calling 78435 (Medical Service secretariat) or sending an e-mail to psychologist-me@cern.ch.

  1. Promising Medicated Diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ The founding conference of World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies-Special Committee of Medicated Diet & Dietotherapy(WFCMS-SCMDAD).and the first world medicated diet and life nurturing academic seminar was held in the Great Hall of the People.Beijing,China,on August 11.A total of 400 experts and professors on medicated diet and life nurturing from 17 countries and regions including Japan,ROK,U.S.,Canada,U.K.,ect.Honorary President Professor Cai Guangxian delivered a welcoming speech to declare the organization's found.

  2. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  3. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  4. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  5. Medical marijuana and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Sam

    2014-11-01

    Medical marijuana is legal for use by minors in many states, but not Delaware. Anecdotes have accumulated suggesting efficacy in managing seizures in children and several other conditions in adults. Currently well-designed studies in children are lacking. Challenges to effective pediatric medical marijuana use remain at the level of biochemistry, the individual patient, and society. Appropriate and effective use of medical marijuana in children will require significant legislative changes at the state and federal level, as well as high-quality research and standardization of marijuana strains.

  6. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Self-medication practice was highly prevalent among the medical students, with 87 % reporting that ... The increase in self-medication is due to a number of ..... resistant strains and increased cost and morbidity. ... Conflict of Interest.

  7. Medication wrong-route administrations in relation to medical prescriptions

    OpenAIRE

    GIMENES, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Marques, Tatiane Cristina; Teixeira,Thalyta Cardoso Alux; MOTA, Maria Lurdemiler Sabóia; Silva,Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence of medical prescriptions' writing on the occurrence of medication errors in the medical wards of five Brazilian hospitals. This descriptive study used data obtained from a multicenter study conducted in 2005. The population was composed of 1,425 medication errors and the sample included 92 routes through which medication was wrongly administered. The pharmacological classes most frequently involved in errors were cardiovascular agents (31.5%), medication that...

  8. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ... in treating IBS in multi-center, high quality clinical trials. These are prescription medications intended for specific ...

  9. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Gynecological Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptom Diary Testing in IBS Changes You Should Not Ignore if ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ...

  10. How About Medical Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Cites the increasing need for physicists in medicine. Sketches the qualifications needed to pursue a Master of Science degree (MS) in medical physics fields and provides a brief discussion of Ph.D programs in the field. (CP)

  11. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  12. MDR (Medical Device Reporting)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database allows you to search the CDRH's database information on medical devices which may have malfunctioned or caused a death or serious injury during the...

  13. Kids' Medical Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tendons Word! Tinnitus Word! Tobacco Word! Tonsillectomy Word! Tonsillitis Word! Trachea Word! Tragus Word! Triggers Word! Tympanogram ... purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  14. Medical Issues in Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kids, particularly those who have been living in poverty, to get colds, minor infections, upset stomachs, and ... better you'll be able to make informed decisions about medical care and ease the transition into ...

  15. Secure medical digital libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, I; Chrissikopoulos, V; Polemi, D

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, a secure medical digital library is presented. It is based on the CORBA specifications for distributed systems. The described approach relies on a three-tier architecture. Interaction between the medical digital library and its users is achieved through a Web server. The choice of employing Web technology for the dissemination of medical data has many advantages compared to older approaches, but also poses extra requirements that need to be fulfilled. Thus, special attention is paid to the distinguished nature of such medical data, whose integrity and confidentiality should be preserved at all costs. This is achieved through the employment of Trusted Third Parties (TTP) technology for the support of the required security services. Additionally, the proposed digital library employs smartcards for the management of the various security tokens that are used from the above services.

  16. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What's a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be ... When you take something for a long-term therapeutic effect, tell your doctor about it. He or ...

  17. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... IBS Awareness Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About ... IBS Awareness Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications ...

  19. Understanding Medical Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Medical Words Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... Medicine that teaches you about many of the words related to your health care Do you have ...

  20. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) The annual flu shot is recommended for ... second or third trimester. Read more about the flu vaccine . Immunotherapy (allergy shots) Allergy shots should not be ...

  1. Mycetoma medical therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment...

  2. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... discomfort, usually if the symptoms occur soon after eating. Examples include dicyclomine (Bentyl), and hyoscyamine (Levsin). Read ... who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and specialized motility and/ ...

  3. Medications for Arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child about this before the doctor visit. Medicine Management Tools For Patients Keeping Track / Developing a System ... while you're out. Some pharmacists will prepare blister packs for daily or weekly medications. Ask your ...

  4. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually treating the abnormal heart rhythm with medications to restore the heart rhythm to normal (also known as chemical/pharmacological cardioversion). Significant side effects may occur, and your healthcare provider will most ...

  5. Medical problems in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Bhaskar; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of medical problems in pregnancy is increasing because of a complex interplay between demographic and lifestyle factors, and developments in modern medicine. Maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from treatable medical conditions, such as venous thromboembolism, epilepsy and autoimmune disease, have not decreased in recent years. This is despite a marked decrease in overall maternal mortality. It is vital that all physicians acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of medical problems in pregnancy. This includes prepregnancy measures such as counselling and optimisation of medical therapy, as well as multidisciplinary management throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute and chronic illness is of clear benefit, and most drugs and many radiological investigations may be used in pregnancy.

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological ... with healthcare providers are an important part of managing life with a long-term digestive disorder. Working with Your Physician Doctor Visit Worksheet How ...

  7. Catastrophic medical expenditure risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriela; O'Donnell, Owen

    2016-03-01

    We propose a measure of household exposure to particularly onerous medical expenses. The measure can be decomposed into the probability that medical expenditure exceeds a threshold, the loss due to predictably low consumption of other goods if it does and the further loss arising from the volatility of medical expenses above the threshold. Depending on the choice of threshold, the measure is consistent with a model of reference-dependent utility with loss aversion. Unlike the risk premium, the measure is only sensitive to particularly high expenses, and can identify households that expect to incur such expenses and would benefit from subsidised, but not actuarially fair, insurance. An empirical illustration using data from seven Asian countries demonstrates the importance of taking account of informal insurance and reveals clear differences in catastrophic medical expenditure risk across and within countries. In general, risk is higher among poorer, rural and chronically ill populations.

  8. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ... limited by prescription only. It might be a drug or a supplement; manufactured or "natural." It might ...

  9. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) ...

  10. East- African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol 83 No. 8 August 2006 ... urology, ENT and orthopaedic groups and these ... no significant difference in orthopaedic patients mortality' with standard; we .... applying TRISS analysis to pediatric blunt trauma.

  11. Color Medical Image Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 20th century, medical imaging has been dominated by monochrome imaging modalities such as x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, color information has been overlooked in medical image analysis applications. Recently, various medical imaging modalities that involve color information have been introduced. These include cervicography, dermoscopy, fundus photography, gastrointestinal endoscopy, microscopy, and wound photography. However, in comparison to monochrome images, the analysis of color images is a relatively unexplored area. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for monochrome images are often not directly applicable to multichannel images. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the utilization of color information in medical image analysis.

  12. Other Injectable Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 17, 2013 Last Edited: February 22, 2017 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cg-infusion-sets,meds-bg-injectables,cg-injection-aids, In this section Treatment and Care Medication Insulin & ...

  13. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and specially equipped facilities. You may need care in the hospital emergency room (ER). Doctors and nurses there treat emergencies, ...

  14. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-12-12

    Dec 12, 2004 ... postoperative hospitals stay and mortality results for all patients were obtained. Results: ... co-existing medical illness and providing appropriate nutrition support. INTROD ..... results after simple closure in the elderly. Wurizl.

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ... limited by prescription only. It might be a drug or a supplement; manufactured or "natural." It might ...

  16. Tanzania Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The manuscripts should be prepared in the following order: Title, Abstract, Text, ... Average values must be accompanied by standard errors or standard deviations. .... Authorship: The Tanzania Medical Journal defines an 'author' according to ...

  17. Animals in Medical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    developed and tested in animals, for treatment and management of both human and animal ailments. Medical research ... Animal model experimental is one approach among .... comparative study of male reproductive problems. These and ...

  18. Strengthening Medical Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Mainland and Taiwan negotiators settle on health care cooperation chinese mainland and Taiwan negotiators signed a medical and health care I cooperation agreement in Taipei on December 21 in a move to jointly

  19. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  20. Kinking of medical tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS IBS Patients' Experience ...

  2. Mental Health Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The most common anti-anxiety medications are called benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines can treat generalized anxiety disorder. In the case ... panic disorder or social phobia (social anxiety disorder), benzodiazepines are usually second-line treatments, behind SSRIs or ...

  3. Medical management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S

    2001-10-01

    Obesity has become a major health problem in many countries because of its high prevalence and causal relationship with serious medical complications. Many of the medical complications associated with obesity improve with intentional weight in a dose-dependent fashion, and even a modest weight loss of 50% of initial weight has beneficial effects. This article reviews the nonsurgical approaches for achieving weight loss in obese persons.

  4. The Automated Medical Office

    OpenAIRE

    Petreman, Mel

    1990-01-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a c...

  5. Medical Information Security

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Figg, Ph.D.; Hwee Joo Kam, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Modern medicine is facing a complex environment, not from medical technology but rather government regulations and information vulnerability. HIPPA is the government’s attempt to protect patient’s information yet this only addresses traditional record handling. The main threat is from the evolving security issues. Many medical offices and facilities have multiple areas of information security concerns. Physical security is often weak, office personnel are not always aware of security needs an...

  6. The Automated Medical Office

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a c...

  7. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses - on telephone: 73802 - by e-mail: Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  8. Reducing medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nute, Christine

    2014-11-25

    Most nurses are involved in medicines management, which is integral to promoting patient safety. Medicines management is prone to errors, which depending on the error can cause patient injury, increased hospital stay and significant legal expenses. This article describes a new approach to help minimise drug errors within healthcare settings where medications are prescribed, dispensed or administered. The acronym DRAINS, which considers all aspects of medicines management before administration, was devised to reduce medication errors on a cardiothoracic intensive care unit.

  9. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses - on telephone: 73802 - by e-mail: Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  10. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor.For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802 or by electronic mail:Infirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.chMedicalService

  11. Reminder from Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, contact the nurses on telephone: 73802 by e-mail: Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  12. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, staff members or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the nurses - on telephone: 73802 - by e-mail:Service.Médical@cern.ch Francoise.Lebrun-Klauser@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Katie.Warrillow-Thomson@cern.ch Medical Service

  13. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on telephone: 73802. by electronic mail to: Infirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch Medical Service

  14. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites,be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor.For information, call the Nurseson telephone: 73802.by electronic mail to:Infirmary.Service@cern.chMarion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.chMedicalService

  15. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Medical Laboratory Science is a Quarterly Publication of the Association of ... It Publishes Original Research and Review Articles in All Fields of ... Covering Medical Microbiology, Medical Parasitology, Clinical Chemistry, ...

  16. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intracraneal en Espanol. STORE Shop the IHRF Store Medication and Surgery Medication and Surgery Both drugs and surgery are used ... to treat the headache that accompanies chronic IH. Medications for chronic headache like tricyclic anti-depressants, beta- ...

  17. Medical coding in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deven Babre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  18. Osteoporosis Treatment: Medications Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis treatment: Medications can help Osteoporosis treatment may involve medication along with lifestyle change. A Mayo Clinic specialist answers some of the most common questions about osteoporosis ...

  19. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five-rights - medication; Medication administration - hospital; Medical errors - medication; Patient safety - medication safety ... Medication safety means you get the right medicine, the right dose, at the right times. During your ...

  20. Polymeric materials in medication

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles

    1985-01-01

    The art of using chemical agents for medication dates back into antiquity, although most of the earliest examples used plants, herbs, and other natural materials. The old Egyptian medical papyri, which date from before 1400 B. C. , contain dozens of examples of such medicinal plants and animal extracts. In the Old Testament of the Bible, we can find references to using oil to soften the skin and sores (Isaiah 1:6), the use of tree leaves for medicine (Ezekiel 47:12) and various medical balms (Jeremiah 8:22). Not all these recipes were effective in curing the ailments for which they were used and sometimes the treatment was worse than the disease. Nevertheless, the art of using chemical derived agents for medicines continued to develop and received great impetus during the present century with the rise of synthetic organic chemistry. One of the most vexing problems has always been to achieve specifici­ ty with the medications. While some medical agents do indeed possess a relatively high degree of specificity...

  1. Standards for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Nigel; Lloyd-Jones, Gaynor

    2003-02-01

    In the current UK socio-political climate of mounting regulation of professional practice, a debate on the topic of standards amongst medical teachers seems timely. The role of teacher is increasingly recognised as a core professional activity for all doctors and one that cannot be left to chance, aptitude or inclination. As a consequence, faculties have developed a plethora of teacher training programmes for medical teachers. But what is good medical teaching? Unless we know what it is, how can we develop it? One possible approach is to develop clear and comprehensive standards, defining what we mean by competent or effective clinical teaching. In this article we have evaluated and compared two models of standards for clinical educators. The first is the outcome-based approach developed at Dundee Medical School and the second is the scholarship model devised initially by Boyer and then elaborated by Glassick and Fincher et al. The key features of both models are briefly described and their comparative strengths and problematic aspects explored. Both models offer interesting and stimulating ideas and together they provide an instructive contrast. They make a valuable contribution to the ongoing process of improving the provision of medical education.

  2. Medical education in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Stefan; Brännström, Thomas; Hanse, Eric; Ledin, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Gunnar; Sandler, Stellan; Tidefelt, Ulf; Donnér, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors.

  3. Financing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersdorf, R G

    1991-02-01

    The cost of a medical education may dissuade qualified young people from entering the medical profession or may so load them with debt that they cannot pursue relatively low-paid careers in primary care or clinical investigation. Three aspects of this problem are examined: (1) the cost of medical school, (2) the magnitude of student indebtedness, and (3) the effects of this indebtedness on career choices. High tuition and fees require many students to assume sizable educational debts, some of which are so large that the trainees will be unable to repay them unless they enter highly remunerative specialties. Also, high levels of indebtedness may increase default levels once graduates feel the full impact of scheduled repayments. Several steps would help to alleviate this problem, but are unlikely to solve it. First, medical schools should lower tuition or at least declare a moratorium on increases. Second, limits should be imposed on the amount of total education debt a student is allowed to assume. Third, hospitals with extensive residency programs should assume some responsibility for helping trainees manage their finances. Fourth, the government should institute a loan forgiveness program that addresses the need for physician-investigators, primary care physicians, those willing to practice in underserved areas, and those from underrepresented minorities. And fifth, all institutions involved in medical training and its finance should work together to advise students on managing their debts.

  4. Accounting for Medication Particularities: Designing for Everyday Medication Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Lea Gulstav; Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    Several projects have shown that self-management of medication in private homes can be challenging. Many projects focused on specific illness-related approaches (e.g. diabetes) or practical issues such as how to handle medication while travelling. However, designing for everyday medication...... management involves more than just specific illness-related strategies and should take into account the broad set of activities conforming people’s everyday life. This study investigates how older adults manage their medication in everyday life. To inform the design of pervasive healthcare medication...... management systems (PHMMS), the study calls for attention to medication-specific particularities that account for: according to need medication, the heterogeneous care network, the substitute medication, the medication informational order, the shared responsibility and the adjustment of medication intake...

  5. Personalized Medical Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Suarez Coloma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increasing needs in telemedicine and healthcare, accentuate the need of well-adapted medical alert systems. Such alert systems may be used by a variety of patients and medical actors, and should allow monitoring a wide range of medical variables. This paper proposes Tempas, a personalized temporal alert system. It facilitates customized alert configuration by using linguistic trends. The trend detection algorithm is based on data normalization, time series segmentation, and segment classification. It improves state of the art by treating irregular and regular time series in an appropriate way, thanks to the introduction of an observation variable valid time. Alert detection is enriched with quality and applicability measures. They allow a personalized tuning of the system to help reducing false negatives and false positives alerts.

  6. The medicalization of love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Brian D; Sandberg, Anders; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. Although such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to the 'medicalization' of human love and heartache--for some, a source of a serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the medicalization of love need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have either good or bad consequences depending upon how it unfolds. By anticipating some of the specific ways in which these technologies could yield unwanted outcomes, bioethicists and others can help to direct the course of love's medicalization--should it happen to occur--more toward the 'good' side than the 'bad.'

  7. Refusal to medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, G; Herreros, B; Pacho, E

    2014-10-01

    Refusal to medical interventions is the not acceptance, voluntary and free, of an indicated medical intervention. What the physician should do in case of refusal? It is understandable that the rejection of a validated medical intervention is difficult to accept by the responsible physician when raises the conflict protection of life versus freedom of choice. Therefore it is important to follow some steps to incorporate the most relevant aspects of the conflict. These steps include: 1) Give complete information to patients, informing on possible alternatives, 2) determine whether the patient can decide (age, competency and level of capacity), 3) to ascertain whether the decision is free, 4) analyze the decision with the patient, 5) to persuade, 6) if the patient kept in the rejection decision, consider conscientious objection, 7) take the decision based on the named criteria, 8) finally, if the rejection is accepted, offer available alternatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Seniors and cardiovascular medications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesová, H Matejovská; Weber, P; Meluzínová, H; Matejovský, J

    2011-06-01

    Authors analyze the situation in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases--unsatisfactory situation especially from the dyslipidaemia point of view. Different groups of medications are discussed and their risks for elderly patients. Angiotensin converting enzyme blockers and their influence on the endothelial dysfunction, but the risk of hyperpotassemia are showed. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during the treatment with antiagregants and anticoagulants, the risk of bradycardia in beta-blockade, possible interactions with other medications lowering the heart rate are discussed. Attention is paid to calcium channel blockers, diuretics and digoxin. The table containing possible clinical symptoms of unwanted side effect of most frequently used cardiovascular medications in elderly is added as the conclusion of the article.

  9. Photosensitizing medications and photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Susan M; Murphy, Gillian M

    2014-02-01

    Photosensitivity is an exaggerated or abnormal response to ultraviolet (UV) or visible light exposure. Many current medications are known photosensitizers; however, the effects of the sensitization can be subclinical and go unnoticed by the person affected. While some of these drugs are used for short and defined periods, others are used indefinitely for the treatment of chronic disease. The question of whether either of these practices translates into an increased risk of skin cancer is an important one. Numerous medications have real, distinct and well-elucidated mechanisms that potentiate the development of skin cancer, while with some medications the mechanism for the observed carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this article we will discuss the clinical, mechanistic and epidemiological evidence supporting photochemical genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

  10. Exploring medical identity theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Desla; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2009-09-16

    The crime of medical identity theft is a growing concern in healthcare institutions. A mixed-method study design including a two-stage electronic survey, telephone survey follow-up, and on-site observations was used to evaluate current practices in admitting and registration departments to reduce the occurrence of medical identity theft. Survey participants were chief compliance officers in acute healthcare organizations and members of the Health Care Compliance Association. Study results indicate variance in whether or how patient identity is confirmed in healthcare settings. The findings of this study suggest that information systems need to be designed for more efficient identity management. Admitting and registration staff must be trained, and compliance with medical identity theft policies and procedures must be monitored. Finally, biometric identity management solutions should be considered for stronger patient identification verification.

  11. Medical Yoga Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for strengthening the body, medical yoga also incorporates appropriate breathing techniques, mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness, depression and anxiety. PMID:28208599

  12. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  13. Medical database security evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, G J

    1993-01-01

    Users of medical information systems need confidence in the security of the system they are using. They also need a method to evaluate and compare its security capabilities. Every system has its own requirements for maintaining confidentiality, integrity and availability. In order to meet these requirements a number of security functions must be specified covering areas such as access control, auditing, error recovery, etc. Appropriate confidence in these functions is also required. The 'trust' in trusted computer systems rests on their ability to prove that their secure mechanisms work as advertised and cannot be disabled or diverted. The general framework and requirements for medical database security and a number of parameters of the evaluation problem are presented and discussed. The problem of database security evaluation is then discussed, and a number of specific proposals are presented, based on a number of existing medical database security systems.

  14. Medical uses of nitinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelton, A.R.; Stoeckel, D.; Duering, T.W. [Nitinol Devices and Components - Cordis Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The growth of nitinol in the medical industries has exploded in the past ten years. Patients and care providers have encouraged the transition from traditional open-surgical procedures, which require long hospital stays, to less-invasive techniques, which are often performed in out-patient clinics. This demand for minimally invasive procedures has allowed novel instrumentation and implants to be designed. An increasing number of these devices use nitinol as the critical component. Examples of medical applications range from orthodontic archwires and endoscopic instruments to endovascular stents. This paper will focus on key performance attributes of nitinol that make it an ideal material for medical applications. Specific applications will be introduced through their use of the enabling features. (orig.)

  15. Medical Practitioners Act 2007: the increased medical record burden.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, D

    2010-03-01

    New medical record keeping obligations are implemented by the Medical Practitioners Act (2007), effective July 2009. This audit, comprising review of 347 medical entries in 257 charts on one day, investigated compliance with the Act together with the general standard of medical record keeping. The Medical Council requirement was absent all but 3 (0.9%) of entries; there was no unique identifier or signature in 28 (8%) and 135 (39%) of entries respectively. The case for change is discussed.

  16. Medical Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The MD Image System, a true-color image processing system that serves as a diagnostic aid and tool for storage and distribution of images, was developed by Medical Image Management Systems, Huntsville, AL, as a "spinoff from a spinoff." The original spinoff, Geostar 8800, developed by Crystal Image Technologies, Huntsville, incorporates advanced UNIX versions of ELAS (developed by NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory for analysis of Landsat images) for general purpose image processing. The MD Image System is an application of this technology to a medical system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer, and can accept, store and analyze images from other sources such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  17. Paternalism and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-06-29

    In one of a series of articles on philosophical medical ethics, Gillon considers various moral arguments in support of medical paternalism. He maintains that the utilitarian principle of maximizing happiness by improving health, minimizing suffering, and prolonging life is not promoted by granting physicians the authority to deceive patients or to make decisions for them in areas of moral and subjective choice. If one wants to do good for a patient, one generally needs to find out what the patient wants one to do. Gillon concludes that many utilitarians agree with deontologists that respect for autonomy is required if human welfare really is to be maximized.

  18. Religion and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ronald M

    2013-01-01

    Religious traditions of medical ethics tend to differ from more secular approaches by stressing limitations on autonomous decision-making, by more positively valuing the experience of suffering, and by drawing on beliefs and values that go beyond empiric verification. I trace the impact of these differences for some of the world's great religious traditions with respect to four issues: (1) religious conscientious objection to medical treatments; (2) end-of life decision-making, including euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and the withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining treatments; (3) definitions of moral personhood (defining life's beginning and end); and (4) human sexuality.

  19. Solid medical waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udofia, Emilia Asuquo; Gulis, Gabriel; Fobil, Julius

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Solid medical waste (SMW) in households is perceived to pose minimal risks to the public compared to SMW generated from healthcare facilities. While waste from healthcare facilities is subject to recommended safety measures to minimize risks to human health and the environment, similar......-demographic characteristics, medication related practices, the belief that one is at risk of diseases associated with SMW, SMW disposal practices and reported harm associated with SMW at home and in the community. RESULTS: Eighty percent and 89% of respondents discarded unwanted medicines and sharps in household refuse bins...

  20. Readmissions of medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooksley, T.; Nanayakkara, P. W. B.; Nickel, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    of readmission but have not been validated in international populations. AIM: To perform an external independent validation of the HOSPITAL and LACE scores. DESIGN: An unplanned secondary cohort study. METHODS: Patients admitted to the medical admission unit at the Hospital of South West Jutland (10...... power of both scores decreased with increasing age. CONCLUSION: Readmissions are a complex phenomenon with not only medical conditions contributing but also system, cultural and environmental factors exerting a significant influence. It is possible that the heterogeneity of the population and health...

  1. Medical Sensor Network Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    is required, such as taking a blood sample, mailing it to a lab, where it is analysed and the result returned by mail. Due to the continuing size and cost reduction of electronic equipment, future medical sensors will be much smaller, cheaper and often disposable. Furthermore, integration of these sensors...... a short while. This tension between simple use and security in a low-power clinical environment is the main theme of this dissertation. Un-secure medical equipment will never pass official certification by national health authorities, but on the other hand, experience shows that if using the equipment...

  2. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    Classification is extensively used in the context of medical image analysis for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. In order to classify image content correctly, one needs to extract efficient features with discriminative properties and build classifiers based on these features. In addition...... to segment breast tissue and pectoral muscle area from the background in mammogram. The second focus is the choices of metric and its influence to the feasibility of a classifier, especially on k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) algorithm, with medical applications on breast cancer prediction and calcification...

  3. The automated medical office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreman, M

    1990-08-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a clinic shows that practical thinking linked to advanced technology can greatly improve office efficiency.

  4. Medical applications of accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Sandro

    1998-01-01

    At Present, about five thousands accelerators are devoted to biomedical applications. They are mainly used in radiotherapy, research and medical radioisotopes production. In this framework oncological hadron-therapy deserves particular attention since it represents a field in rapid evolution thanks to the joint efforts of laboratories with long experiences in particle physics. It is the case of CERN where the design of an optimised synchrotron for medical applications has been pursued. These lectures present these activities with particular attention to the new developments which are scientifically interesting and/or economically promising.

  5. Merton and medical sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes E.D.

    2007-01-01

    The article is about the main contributions of the North-American sociologist Robert King Merton (1910-2003), particularly those related to the field of medical sociology. Merton was first to conduct research on medical education, and the working team he formed was fundamental for the introduction of social thought in the medicine field (Patrícia Kendall, Renée Fox, Samuel Bloom and others). Of particular importance are Merton's vocation for sociology and the unique trajectory of his research...

  6. Medical pedagogical resources management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliquen, Bruno; Le Duff, Franck; Delamarre, Denis; Cuggia, Marc; Mougin, Fleur; Le Beux, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to help the management of training resources for students using a pedagogical network available at the Medical School of Rennes. With the increase of the number of connections and the number of medical documents available on this network, the management of new contents requires a lot of efforts for the webmaster. In order to improve the management of the resources, we implemented an automatic web engine for teachers, able to manage the links for the most interesting resources for their practice.

  7. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  8. [Accreditation of medical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Andrea Rita; Ring, Rózsa; Fehér, Miklós; Mikó, Tivadar

    2003-07-27

    In Hungary, the National Accreditation Body was established by government in 1995 as an independent, non-profit organization, and has exclusive rights to accredit, amongst others, medical laboratories. The National Accreditation Body has two Specialist Advisory Committees in the health care sector. One is the Health Care Specialist Advisory Committee that accredits certifying bodies, which deal with certification of hospitals. The other Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is directly involved in accrediting medical laboratory services of health care institutions. The Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is a multidisciplinary peer review group of experts from all disciplines of in vitro diagnostics, i.e. laboratory medicine, microbiology, histopathology and blood banking. At present, the only published International Standard applicable to laboratories is ISO/IEC 17025:1999. Work has been in progress on the official approval of the new ISO 15189 standard, specific to medical laboratories. Until the official approval of the International Standard ISO 15189, as accreditation standard, the Hungarian National Accreditation Body has decided to progress with accreditation by formulating explanatory notes to the ISO/IEC 17025:1999 document, using ISO/FDIS 15189:2000, the European EC4 criteria and CPA (UK) Ltd accreditation standards as guidelines. This harmonized guideline provides 'explanations' that facilitate the application of ISO/IEC 17025:1999 to medical laboratories, and can be used as a checklist for the verification of compliance during the onsite assessment of the laboratory. The harmonized guideline adapted the process model of ISO 9001:2000 to rearrange the main clauses of ISO/IEC 17025:1999. This rearrangement does not only make the guideline compliant with ISO 9001:2000 but also improves understanding for those working in medical laboratories, and facilitates the training and education of laboratory staff. With the

  9. Medication Overuse Headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, Signe B; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication overuse headache (MOH) affects between 1% and 2% of the general population but is present in up to 50% of patients seen in headache centers. There are currently no internationally accepted guidelines for treatment of MOH. METHODS: A review of the current literature on MOH...... treatment and pathophysiology. RESULTS: We conclude that headache frequency can be reduced to episodic headache in more than 50% of the patients by simple detoxification and information. Approximately half the patients will not have need for prophylactic medication after withdrawal. Pain perception...

  10. Political and medical views on medical marijuana and its future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubens, Muni

    2014-01-01

    The policies, laws, politics, public opinions, and scientific inferences of medical marijuana are rapidly changing as the debate on medical use of marijuana has always been political, rather than scientific. Federal law has barred the use of medical marijuana though 18 state governments and Washington, DC, support the medical use of marijuana. Unfortunately, not many studies exist on medical marijuana to back these laws and policies. The judiciary, on the other hand, has elicited a diverse response to medical marijuana through its rulings over several decades. Some rulings favored the federal government's opinion, and others supported the larger public view and many state governments with legalized medical marijuana. Public opinion on legalizing medical marijuana has always favored the use of medical marijuana. The movement of scientific knowledge of medical marijuana follows an erratic, discontinuous pathway. The future place of medical marijuana in U.S. society remains unknown. The three forces-scientific knowledge, social-political acceptance, and laws-play a role in the direction that medical marijuana takes in society. Overcoming political-social forces requires a concerted effort from the scientific community and political leaders. The results of scientific research must guide the decisions for laws and medical use of marijuana. This article aims to trace the political dilemma and contradictory views shared by federal and state governments and predict the future of medical marijuana by tracing the past history of medical marijuana with its bumpy pathway in the social-political arena.

  11. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help......-Seeking Behavior of the Urban Poor Chapter 5: Spatial Organization and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 6: Conclusion...

  12. Self‐medication patterns among medical students in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitasha Bhat

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSelf-medication results in wastage of resources, increases resistance of pathogens and generally causes serious health hazards such as adverse drug reactions, prolonged suffering and drug dependence. This study was undertaken to determine the reasons for self-medication and the pattern of self-medication among medical students.MethodThis cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the K.S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. The participants were medical students from first to final year. Medical students were selected through convenience sampling. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS version 16 and the results expressed as proportions.ResultsA total of 200 students, 121 (60.5% female and 79 (39.5% male, were included in the study. Of the medical students surveyed, self-medication was reported among 92%. The respondents who used self-medication found it to be time-saving in providing relief from minor ailments. The most common ailments for which self-medication were used were: the common cold (69%, fever (63% and headache (60%. The students consulted their textbooks (39% and seniors or classmates (38% for the medications. Antipyretics (71%, analgesics (65%, antihistamines (37% and antibiotics (34% were the most common self-medicated drugs. Of the respondents, 33% were unaware of the adverse effects of the medication and 5% had experienced adverse reactions. The majority (64% of students advised medications to others, more often to family and friends.ConclusionThe prevalence of self-medication among medical students is high, facilitated by the easy availability of drugs and information from textbooks or seniors. A significant number of students are unaware of the adverse effects of the medication that they themselves take and suggest to others. Therefore, potential problems of self-medication should be emphasised to the students.

  13. Features of Medical English Vocabulary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翠萍

    2015-01-01

    Medical English is relatively more difficult than general English,especially its vocabulary.Those medical English words are long and complex,making it hard to remember.But medical English vocabulary has its own features,which would help us in learning vocabulary.On the basis of many medical English materials,the paper explores the features of etymology,affixes and roots of medical English.

  14. Features of Medical English Vocabulary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翠萍

    2015-01-01

    Medical English is relatively more difficult than general English,especially its vocabulary.Those medical English words are long and complex,making it hard to remember. But medical English vocabulary has its own features,which would help us in learning vocabulary.On the basis of many medical English materials,the paper explores the features of etymology,affixes and roots of medical English.

  15. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality.

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians.Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran.Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhibit the quality of medical services. Qu...

  16. Shipboard Medical Backpack: Engineering Drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    7 A-36804 SHIPBOARD MEDICAL BACKPACK : ENGINEERING DRAWINGS(U) 1/l NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO CA R W KATAOKA JUN 83 NOSC/Tfl-603...Document 603 SHIPBOARD MEDICAL BACKPACK : ENGINEERING DRAWINGS R. W. Kataoka June 1983 Prepared for Naval Medical Research and Development Command CL. (Code...Commande Technical Director ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION This report is one in a series on the Shipboard Medical Backpack sponsored by the Naval Medical

  17. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Larry D. Gruppen; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international tr...

  18. [straus: The Two Medical Sociologies].

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Robert Straus' pioneer work, The nature and status of Medical Sociology, written in 1957, was reviewed. Straus, one of the founders of medical sociology, made major contributions to this field and created the first department of behavior sciences in a medical school. In the work reviewed, Straus establishes the differences between sociology in medicine and medical sociology. Comments are made on the current perspective of medical sociology and about the author.

  19. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  20. Medical Spending in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Gørtz, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Using full population longitudinal data from merged administrative registers for Denmark, we document that medical spending is highly concentrated in the population, and persistent through time at the individual level. In addition, we provide overviews of institutional details of the Danish health...

  1. Motivation in medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis wer

  2. Communication in medical encounters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide a theoretical and empirical basis for the concept of communication as the core instrument in the medical encounter. Adequate communication, embedded in a warm and caring relationship, has always been recognized as essential to the concept of good doctoring, but

  3. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  4. Inpatients’ medical prescription errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Melo Santos Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and quantify the most frequent prescription errors in inpatients’ medical prescriptions. Methods: A survey of prescription errors was performed in the inpatients’ medical prescriptions, from July 2008 to May 2009 for eight hours a day. Rresults: At total of 3,931 prescriptions was analyzed and 362 (9.2% prescription errors were found, which involved the healthcare team as a whole. Among the 16 types of errors detected in prescription, the most frequent occurrences were lack of information, such as dose (66 cases, 18.2% and administration route (26 cases, 7.2%; 45 cases (12.4% of wrong transcriptions to the information system; 30 cases (8.3% of duplicate drugs; doses higher than recommended (24 events, 6.6% and 29 cases (8.0% of prescriptions with indication but not specifying allergy. Cconclusion: Medication errors are a reality at hospitals. All healthcare professionals are responsible for the identification and prevention of these errors, each one in his/her own area. The pharmacist is an essential professional in the drug therapy process. All hospital organizations need a pharmacist team responsible for medical prescription analyses before preparation, dispensation and administration of drugs to inpatients. This study showed that the pharmacist improves the inpatient’s safety and success of prescribed therapy.

  5. Medical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, A.M.; Vries, M. de; Scherer, L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the field of medical decision making. It distinguishes the levels of decision making seen in health-care practice and shows how research in judgment and decision making support or improve decision making. Most of the research has been done at the micro level, par

  6. Antidepressant medications and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y

    2012-01-01

    Use of antidepressant medications that act on the serotonin system has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), and to osteoporosis. This article reviews current evidence for such effects, and identifies themes for future research. Serotonin receptors are found in all major...

  7. Misconduct in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengoechea, Jaime; Moreno, Socorro; Ruiz, Alvaro

    2008-12-01

    Medical students, subject to unique challenges and stressors, frequently engage in misconduct. In this observational study, carried out in a medical school in Colombia, we developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing factors, such as sex, age and academic year. Of the 433 students that responded to our survey, 97.9% did not fully disagree with at least one of the mentioned misconducts and 99.8% admitted to at least one transgression. Based on a scale we developed, 61.4% of the students consistently agreed with misconduct and 44.9% frequently engaged in misconduct. A logistic regression model suggests that being male (OR 1.90, CI 95% 1.27-2.84) and stress (OR 1.04, CI 95% 1.01-1.06) may increase the likelihood of misconduct. In a subgroup of students, excluding those in their last year of studies, higher academic semester (OR 1.25, CI 95%: 1.10-1.42) may also be a risk factor for misconduct. Most of the observed variation in the data, however, is not explained by these factors. Other modifiers, such as student personality and sub-culture, may play a greater role in determining misconduct. The proportion of medical students that engage in misconduct is very high and warrants the attention of the medical education community.

  8. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  9. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  10. Mycetoma Medical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oliverio Welsh; Hail Mater Al-Abdely; Mario Cesar Salinas-Carmona; Ahmed Hassan Fahal

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  11. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliverio Welsh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  12. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  13. Innovation of Medical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Bach, Karin Friis; Schmiegelow, Merete

    2016-01-01

    , the pharmaceutical industry, universities, payers, and patient organizations. Regulatory science is the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to evaluate the efficacy, safety, quality, and performance of medical products in order to assess benefit/risk and facilitate a sound and transparent...

  14. Motivation in medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusurkar, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The importance of motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched and proven in general education, but much less in medical education. There is sometimes focus on increasing the quantity of motivation, but the how and why need more evidence. The aims of this thesis

  15. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Segerink, L.I.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the

  16. [Medical mythology and etymologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albou, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The lecture is an allusion to Sournia's work and his book "Mythologies de la médecine moderne". (P.U.F 1969). The author evokes the origins of medical terms such as psyche, hermaphrodite, nymphomania, aphrodisiac, marcissism, hypnotism, etc.

  17. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-10-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  18. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliverio Welsh; Hail Mater Al-Abdely; Mario Cesar Salinas-Carmona; Ahmed Hassan Fahal

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  19. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  20. [Medical emergency teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, G.; Lund, C.; Petersen, John Asger

    2008-01-01

    The aim of medical emergency teams (MET) is to identify and treat deteriorating patients on general wards, and to avoid cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission and death. The effectiveness of METs has yet to be proven, as the only two randomised, controlled trials on the subject...

  1. Tactical emergency medical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnert, Kathy J; Hall, William L

    2002-11-01

    As increases in criminal activity collide with more aggressive law enforcement postures, there is more contact between police officers and violent felons. Civilian law enforcement special operations teams routinely engage suspects in these violent, dynamic, and complex interdiction activities. Along with these activities comes the substantial and foreseeable risk of death or grievous harm to law officers, bystanders, hostages, or perpetrators. Further, law enforcement agencies who attempt to apprehend dangerous, heavily armed criminals with a special operations team that lacks the expertise to treat the medical consequences that may arise from such a confrontation may be negligent of deliberate indifference. Meanwhile, evidence exists within the military, civilian law enforcement, and medical literature that on-scene TEMS serves to improve mission success and team safety and health, while decreasing morbidity and mortality in the event of an injury or illness suffered during operations. National professional organizations within law enforcement and emergency medicine have identified and support the fundamental need for mission safety and the development of a standard model to train and incorporate TEMS into law enforcement special operations. The overall objective of TEMS is to minimize the potential for injury and illness and to promote optimal medical care from the scene of operations to a definitive care facility. The design, staffing, and implementation of a TEMS program that maximally uses the community resources integrates previously disparate law enforcement, EMS, and emergency medical/trauma center functions to form a new continuum of care [55].

  2. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torović Ljilja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered dieticians, standardized terminology as well as nutrition diagnosis categorization. It consists of four distinct, but interrelated and connected steps: (a nutrition assessment, (b nutrition diagnosis, (c nutrition intervention, and (d nutrition monitoring and evaluation. An individual approach is essential for successful medical nutrition therapy. Nutrition guidelines facilitate the process of understanding and application of medical nutrition therapy. Conclusion. The Nutrition Care process provides dietetic professionals information on high-quality client nutrition care. The success of medical nutrition therapy rests not only upon the advice of the dietician, but also upon the client’s compliance.

  3. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  4. Pain medications - narcotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it can make the pain difficult to control. Taking narcotics to control the pain of cancer or other medical problems does not itself lead to dependence. Store narcotics safely and securely ... When taking a narcotic, do not drink alcohol, drive, or ...

  5. Sahel Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to international conferences in medical and health sciences in Nigeria, and (4) to promote ... Other websites related to this journal: http://www.smjonline.org/ ... Effect of physical activity on body water in sedentary young underweight and obese ... The effect of aerobic exercise on some diabetic risk factors in obese women ...

  6. Professionalism in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  7. Fomepizole (orphan medical).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, P

    2001-06-01

    Orphan Medical has developed fomepizole as a potential treatment for both ethylene glycol and methanol poisoning. The drug was launched as Antizol in January 1998 for the treatment of ethylene glycol poisoning [273949] after US marketing approval was grantedin December 1997 [271563]. It has also received US approval for methanol poisoning [393217] and UK approval for ethylene glycol poisoning [329495]. In 1999, Orphan Medical's partner, Cambridge Laboratories, intended to pursue European approval under the mutual recognition procedure [329495]. However, by September 2000, Cambridge Laboratories had discontinued their involvement with fomepizole and IDIS World Medicines had licensed the rights to distribute the drug in the UK [412142]. In February 2000, the Canadian Therapeutic Products Programme (TPP) granted fomepizole Priority Review, provided that an NDA was submitted by March 14, 2000 [354665]. In August 2000, the TPP accepted this NDA and set a target date for approval in the fourth quarter of 2000 [379474]. The TPP granted fomepizole a Notice of Compliance permitting the sale of fomepizole in Canada in December 2000. The company's marketing partner in Canada, Paladin Labs had launched fomepizole by January 2001 [396953]. In June 2000, Tucker Anthony Cleary Gull stated that the Orphan Drug status which Orphan Medical had obtained for fomepizole would provide marketing exclusivity through December 2004. The analysts also stated that fomepizole had accounted for 40% of Orphan Medical's revenue in financial year 1999, although +/- 30% of sales were estimated to be due to stockpiling [409606].

  8. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    additional37 subjects were consented. The research with the bedside medication administration system has revealed an increase of near miss occurrences...as well as documentation changes for the nurse. These efforts have resulted in a significant decrease in near miss occuiTences as well as a 50

  9. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  10. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  11. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  12. Medications and International Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-12

    This podcast answers a listener's question about her medications and an international trip she's planning.  Created: 4/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/12/2011.

  13. Medications: Using Them Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children. Store a medication syringe in a safe place out of the reach of kids. Other options ... Keep this number posted in an easily visible place in case you need it. Safe Disposal Do not give leftover medicine to others. ...

  14. Advances in Medical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Buzug, Thorsten M

    2007-01-01

    Presents research and development trends of physics, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences in biomedical engineering. This work uses contributions from industry, clinics, universities and research labs with foci on medical imaging, computer-assisted surgery, and others to give insight to engineering, clinical and mathematical studies.

  15. Architecture and Design of Medical Processor Units for Medical Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ahamed, Syed V; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2602

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces analogical and deductive methodologies for the design medical processor units (MPUs). From the study of evolution of numerous earlier processors, we derive the basis for the architecture of MPUs. These specialized processors perform unique medical functions encoded as medical operational codes (mopcs). From a pragmatic perspective, MPUs function very close to CPUs. Both processors have unique operation codes that command the hardware to perform a distinct chain of subprocesses upon operands and generate a specific result unique to the opcode and the operand(s). In medical environments, MPU decodes the mopcs and executes a series of medical sub-processes and sends out secondary commands to the medical machine. Whereas operands in a typical computer system are numerical and logical entities, the operands in medical machine are objects such as such as patients, blood samples, tissues, operating rooms, medical staff, medical bills, patient payments, etc. We follow the functional overlap betw...

  16. Attitudes Toward Medical Cannabis Legalization Among Serbian Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujcic, Isidora; Pavlovic, Aleksandar; Dubljanin, Eleonora; Maksimovic, Jadranka; Nikolic, Aleksandra; Sipetic-Grujicic, Sandra

    2017-07-29

    Currently, medical cannabis polices are experiencing rapid changes, and an increasing number of nations around the world legalize medical cannabis for certain groups of patients, including those in Serbia. To determine medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization and to examine the factors influencing their attitudes. Fourth-year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, had participated in a cross-sectional study. Data were collected by an anonymous questionnaire. Overall, 63.4% students supported medical cannabis legalization, and only 20.8% supported its legalization for recreational use. Students who previously used marijuana (p marijuana recreational use was also related to prior marijuana (p cancer (90.4%) and chronic pain (74.2%) were correctly reported approved medical indications by more than half the students. Students who supported medical cannabis legalization showed better knowledge about indications, in contrast to opponents for legalization who showed better knowledge about side effects. Beliefs that using medical cannabis is safe and has health benefits were correlated with support for legalization, and previous marijuana and alcohol use, while beliefs that medical cannabis poses health risks correlated most strongly with previous marijuana use. Conclusions/Importance: The medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization were significantly correlated with previous use of marijuana and alcohol, knowledge about medical indications and side effects, and their beliefs regarding medical cannabis health benefits and risks.

  17. Automated Medical Literature Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hawking

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The constantly growing publication rate of medical research articles puts increasing pressure on medical specialists who need to be aware of the recent developments in their field. The currently used literature retrieval systems allow researchers to find specific papers; however the search task is still repetitive and time-consuming. Aims In this paper we describe a system that retrieves medical publications by automatically generating queries based on data from an electronic patient record. This allows the doctor to focus on medical issues and provide an improved service to the patient, with higher confidence that it is underpinned by current research. Method Our research prototype automatically generates query terms based on the patient record and adds weight factors for each term. Currently the patient’s age is taken into account with a fuzzy logic derived weight, and terms describing blood-related anomalies are derived from recent blood test results. Conditionally selected homonyms are used for query expansion. The query retrieves matching records from a local index of PubMed publications and displays results in descending relevance for the given patient. Recent publications are clearly highlighted for instant recognition by the researcher. Results Nine medical specialists from the Royal Adelaide Hospital evaluated the system and submitted pre-trial and post-trial questionnaires. Throughout the study we received positive feedback as doctors felt the support provided by the prototype was useful, and which they would like to use in their daily routine. Conclusion By supporting the time-consuming task of query formulation and iterative modification as well as by presenting the search results in order of relevance for the specific patient, literature retrieval becomes part of the daily workflow of busy professionals.

  18. The Medical Physics Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D

    2017-02-01

    The medical physics workforce comprises approximately 24,000 workers worldwide and approximately 8,200 in the United States. The occupation is a recognized, established, and mature profession that is undergoing considerable growth and change, with many of these changes being driven by scientific, technical, and medical advances. Presently, the medical physics workforce is adequate to meet societal needs. However, data are emerging that suggest potential risks of shortages and other problems that could develop within a few years. Some of the governing factors are well established, such as the increasing number of incident cancers thereby increasing workload, while others, such as the future use of radiation treatments and changes in healthcare economic policies, are uncertain and make the future status of the workforce difficult to forecast beyond the next several years. This review examines some of the major factors that govern supply and demand for medical physicists, discusses published projections and their uncertainties, and presents other information that may help to inform short- and long-term planning of various aspects of the future workforce. It includes a description of the general characteristics of the workforce, including information on its size, educational attainment, certification, age distribution, etc. Because the supply of new workers is governed by educational and training pathways, graduate education, post-doctoral training, and residency training are reviewed, along with trends in state and federal support for research and education. Selected professional aspects of the field also are considered, including professional certification and compensation. We speculate on the future outlook of the workforce and provide recommendations regarding future actions pertaining to the future medical physics workforce.

  19. MEDICAL TOURISM : Demand for Cuban Medical Tourism by Russian Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Ulanova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism, often addressed as health tourism, is a new concept in terms of tourism industry in general, and it is also one of the rapidly developing and growing ones. This thesis gives information on the medical tourism in general and its history. It also revises the development stages of the medical tourism in the world. Cuban medical tourism is analyzed on its own, as well as Russian medical tourism and the demand for it. Medical tourism is rather popular among Russians due to various...

  20. Emphasizing humanities in medical education: Promoting the integration of medical scientific spirit and medical humanistic spirit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    In the era of the biological-psychological-social medicine model, an ideal of modern medicine is to enhance the humanities in medical education, to foster medical talents with humanistic spirit, and to promote the integration of scientific spirit and humanistic spirit in medicine. Throughout the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), other Western countries, and some Asian countries like Japan, many medical universities have already integrated the learning of medical humanities in their curricula and recognized their value. While in China, although medical education reform over the past decade has emphasized the topic of medical humanities to increase the professionalism of future physicians, the integration of medical humanity courses in medical universities has lagged behind the pace in Western countries. In addition, current courses in medical humanities were arbitrarily established due to a lack of organizational independence. For various reasons like a shortage of instructors, medical universities have failed to pay sufficient attention to medical humanities education given the urgent needs of society. The medical problems in contemporary Chinese society are not solely the purview of biomedical technology; what matters more is enhancing the humanities in medical education and fostering medical talents with humanistic spirit. Emphasizing the humanities in medical education and promoting the integration of medical scientific spirit and medical humanistic spirit have become one of the most pressing issues China must address. Greater attention should be paid to reasonable integration of humanities into the medical curriculum, creation of medical courses related to humanities and optimization of the curriculum, and actively allocating abundant teaching resources and exploring better methods of instruction.

  1. Optimization of Medical Teaching Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the goal of medical education, medicine and adapt to changes in the way doctors work, with the rapid medical teaching methods of modern science and technology must be reformed. Based on the current status of teaching in medical colleges method to analyze the formation and development of medical teaching methods, characteristics, about how to achieve optimal medical teaching methods for medical education teachers and management workers comprehensive and thorough change teaching ideas and teaching concepts provide a theoretical basis.

  2. Status of medical mycology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, William J; Mitchell, Thomas G; Schell, Wiley A; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Coico, Richard F; Walsh, Thomas J; Perfect, John R

    2003-12-01

    The number of immunocompromised patients and subsequent invasive fungal infections continues to rise. However, the education of future medical mycologists to engage this growing problem is diminishing. While there are an increasing number of publications and grants awarded in mycology, the time and detail devoted to teaching medical mycology in United States medical schools are inadequate. Here we review the history in medical mycology education and the current educational opportunities. To accurately gauge contemporary teaching we also conducted a prospective survey of microbiology and immunology departmental chairpersons in United States medical schools to determine the amount and content of contemporary education in medical mycology.

  3. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  4. Architecture and Design of Medical Processor Units for Medical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed V. Ahamed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper1 introduces analogical and deductive methodologies for the design medical processor units(MPUs. From the study of evolution of numerous earlier processors, we derive the basis for thearchitecture of MPUs. These specialized processors perform unique medical functions encoded as medicaloperational codes (mopcs. From a pragmatic perspective, MPUs function very close to CPUs. Bothprocessors have unique operation codes that command the hardware to perform a distinct chain of subprocessesupon operands and generate a specific result unique to the opcode and the operand(s. Inmedical environments, MPU decodes the mopcs and executes a series of medical sub-processes and sendsout secondary commands to the medical machine. Whereas operands in a typical computer system arenumerical and logical entities, the operands in medical machine are objects such as such as patients, bloodsamples, tissues, operating rooms, medical staff, medical bills, patient payments, etc. We follow thefunctional overlap between the two processes and evolve the design of medical computer systems andnetworks.

  5. Prescription opiate medications: medical uses and consequences, laws and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Norman S

    2004-12-01

    The proposed analysis and evaluation of the data elements in the OPP and other similar regulatory programs will support the following potential impact on the patients and physicians in Michigan and other states: Reduced rates of addictive use of prescriptions of Schedule II medications. Reduced rates of addictive patterns of prescribing of Schedule II medications. Improved the prescribing of Schedule II medication for pain disorders. Improved the prescribing of Schedule II medications in addictive disorders. Establish the need and direction for development of curriculum for Schedule II drugs for undergraduate medical education and continuing medical education. Establish the need and direction for development of curriculum for use of Schedule II medications in patients with addictive and pain disorders. Explore the need and direction for development of the monitoring system medical curriculum for Schedule III, IV, and V drugs. Demonstrate link between diversion and adverse effects on health caused by an addictive pattern of use and prescribing of Schedule II drugs

  6. Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Ian; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    A nonsecular medical anthropology insists on the ways medicine and science have constituted 'the secular' itself through the 'secular self'-how medical knowing has been used to craft the secular political subject. As James Boon noted, too often in social theory, "religion gets safely tucked away-restricted theoretically to 'meaning' rather than power" (1998:245). The authors of the six articles in this special issue 'untuck' religiosity from within the norms and numbers of medicine itself, and examine how 'secular' medicine has relied on religious traditions to produce political secularity. These articles demonstrate that 'secular' medicine relies on religious others whose exclusion bespeaks latent religious commitments of citizenship in the modern political realm of health.

  7. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  8. [Medical politics. Graffiti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelli, P

    1991-03-20

    If doctors want to play a role in future health promotion, they have to leave their citadel, and come closer to life and society. Modern preventive medicine cannot be dissociated from basic political, cultural and religious values and processes. Genetic counseling and engineering, influencing lifestyle, community intervention and changing the health culture among patients and doctors all require ethical and political competence rather than traditional medical skills. The author advocates the development of a new discipline, medical politics, with two major commitments: -To define basic health rights -To study the public health consequences of political systems and decisions. In a polemic and provocative style the article enlightens the potentials and dangers associated with an expanded concept of preventive medicine.

  9. [Medical quality assurance today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Both the quality and performance of health systems are strongly influenced by the number and the qualification of the professional staff. Quality assurance programs help to analyse causalities which are responsible for medical malpractice. On the basis of the experiences gained by the performance of established Quality Assurance Programs (QAP) in the North Rhine area since 1982 various aspects of the efficiency of these programs will be discussed. The implementation of legal regulations making these programs mandatory is criticised not only for its bureaucratic effect but also for the attempt to exclude professional experts from the interpretation of results. It is recommended to liberalize these regulations in order to facilitate improvement of methods and participation of the medical profession.

  10. Classification in Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen

    Classification is extensively used in the context of medical image analysis for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. In order to classify image content correctly, one needs to extract efficient features with discriminative properties and build classifiers based on these features. In addition......, a good metric is required to measure distance or similarity between feature points so that the classification becomes feasible. Furthermore, in order to build a successful classifier, one needs to deeply understand how classifiers work. This thesis focuses on these three aspects of classification...... to segment breast tissue and pectoral muscle area from the background in mammogram. The second focus is the choices of metric and its influence to the feasibility of a classifier, especially on k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) algorithm, with medical applications on breast cancer prediction and calcification...

  11. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  12. MEDICAL MANUFACTURING INNOVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Sorin Cosmin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of these studies was to improve the design and manufacturing process by selective laser melting, of new medical implants. After manufacturing process, the implants were measured, microscopically and mechanical analyzed. Implants manufactured by AM can be an attractive option for surface coatings to improve the osseointegration process. The main advantages of customized implants made by AM process are: the precise adaptation to the region of implantation, better cosmesis, reduced surgical times and better performance over their generic counterparts. These medical manufacturing changes the way that the surgeons are planning surgeries and engineers are designing custom implant. AM process has eliminated the constraints of shape, size, internal structure and mechanical properties making it possible for fabrication of implants that conform to the physical and mechanical requirements of implantation according to CT images. This article will review some custom implants fabricated in DME using biocompatible titanium.

  13. Medical consequences of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Victor J; Kopelman, Peter G

    2004-01-01

    The obese are subject to health problems directly relating to the carriage of excess adipose tissue. These problems range from arthritis, aches and pains, sleep disturbance, dyspnea on mild exertion, and excessive sweating to social stigmatization and discrimination, all of which may contribute to low quality of life and depression (Table 1). The most serious medical consequences of obesity are a result of endocrine and metabolic changes, most notably type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of cancer. Not all obesity comorbidities are fully reversed by weight loss. The degree and duration of weight loss required may not be achievable by an individual patient. Furthermore, "weight cycling" may be more detrimental to both physical and mental health than failure to achieve weight loss targets with medical and lifestyle advice.

  14. Justice and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-07-20

    Justice, in the sense of fair adjudication between conflicting claims, is held to be relevant to a wide range of issues in medical ethics. Several differing concepts of justice are briefly described, including Aristotle's formal principle of justice, libertarian theories, utilitarian theories, Marxist theories, the theory of John Rawls, and the view--held, for example, by W.D. Ross--that justice is essentially a matter of reward for individual merit.

  15. Commercializing medical technology

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, Kevin J.; Lieberman, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880’s, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical i...

  16. Emergency Medical Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Lewis Research Center helped design the complex EMS Communication System, originating from space operated telemetry, including the telemetry link between ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services. In emergency medical use telemetry links ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services and allows transmission of physiological data -- an electrocardiogram from an ambulance to a hospital emergency room where a physician reads the telemetered message and prescribes emergency procedures to ambulance attendants.

  17. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    For medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802 by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch  

  18. REMINDER FROM MEDICAL SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    iFor medical problems, we would like to remind all personnel working on the CERN sites, be they staff or from outside firms, that they are welcome at the Infirmary, building 57, ground floor. For information, call the Nurses on Telephone: 73802. by electronic mail: Infirmary.Service@cern.ch Marion.Diedrich@cern.ch Janet.Doody@cern.ch Mireille.Vosdey@cern.ch

  19. Medical emergencies in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddichha Sahoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most emergencies in Goa arise due to road traffic accidents and drowning, which have been compounded by the rise in number of recorded accidents in 2007 to be above 4000. It is believed that 11 people meet with an accident on Goa′s roads every day and this is expected to rise by 10% by next year. Similar is the case with drownings and other medical emergencies. We therefore aimed to conduct a cross-sectional survey of medical emergencies and identify various types of emergencies presenting to emergency departments. Materials and Methods: Using a stratified random sampling design, all emergencies presenting to the three government hospitals in Goa, which handle 90% of all emergencies currently, were studied on specially designed data sheets in order to collect data. Emergency medical technicians (ETs were placed in the Casualty Ward of the medical colleges and they recorded all emergencies on the data sheet. The collected data were then analyzed for stratification and mapping of emergencies. Results: GMC Hospital attended to majority of emergencies (62%, which were mainly of the nature of accidents or assaults (17% and fever related (17%. Most emergencies were noncritical and about 1% expired. Maximum emergencies also presented from Salcette and Bardez, and occurred among young males in the age group of 19-45 years. Males were also more prone to accidents while females had pregnancies as emergencies. Conclusion: Potential emergency services need to target young males with higher concentrations required in Salcette in South Goa and Bardez in North Goa.

  20. Branding your medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Catherine; Baum, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Branding is the process of differentiating your medical practice from all other practices in the industry. Branding takes into account the "look and feel" of your office, you and your staff your materials, and every other detail that gives your patients clues as to who you are and what you value. This article will review the strategies that go into building your own solid brand so your existing patients, as well as prospective ones, are attracted and loyal to you and your brand.

  1. Capturing medical students' idealism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janice K; Weaver, Donna B

    2006-01-01

    Students' idealism and desire to work with underserved populations decline as they progress from preclinical training through clerkships and residency. With an increasingly diverse population and increasing health disparities, academic health centers need to incorporate changes in their curricula to train socially responsible and idealistic physicians. International electives can provide valuable learning experiences to help achieve these goals. Sixty-six preclinical medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch participated in an international elective from 1997 to 2005. After 1 week of didactics, they spent 3 weeks as part of a multidisciplinary medical team in rural Nicaragua. Postelective questionnaires were administered. From students' responses, we identified common learning themes and grouped them under the categories of attitudes, awareness, and skills. Limitations included a self-selection bias, lack of a control group, and limited follow-up. After the elective, students had an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarian efforts, and working with underserved populations both in the United States and abroad, as well as more compassion toward the underserved. Students also reported a heightened awareness of social determinants of health and public health, and a broadened global perspective, as well as increased self-awareness. Our findings illustrate that a well-structured, mentored experience in international health can have a positive impact on preclinical students' attitudes, including their compassion, volunteerism, and interest in serving under-served populations, all measures of idealism.

  2. Capturing Medical Students’ Idealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janice K.; Weaver, Donna B.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Students’ idealism and desire to work with underserved populations decline as they progress from preclinical training through clerkships and residency. With an increasingly diverse population and increasing health disparities, academic health centers need to incorporate changes in their curricula to train socially responsible and idealistic physicians. International electives can provide valuable learning experiences to help achieve these goals. METHODS Sixty-six preclinical medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch participated in an international elective from 1997 to 2005. After 1 week of didactics, they spent 3 weeks as part of a multidisciplinary medical team in rural Nicaragua. Postelective questionnaires were administered. From students’ responses, we identified common learning themes and grouped them under the categories of attitudes, awareness, and skills. Limitations included a self-selection bias, lack of a control group, and limited follow-up. RESULTS After the elective, students had an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarian efforts, and working with underserved populations both in the United States and abroad, as well as more compassion toward the underserved. Students also reported a heightened awareness of social determinants of health and public health, and a broadened global perspective, as well as increased self-awareness. CONCLUSIONS Our findings illustrate that a well-structured, mentored experience in international health can have a positive impact on preclinical students’ attitudes, including their compassion, volunteerism, and interest in serving under-served populations, all measures of idealism. PMID:17003160

  3. Training medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J

    1987-09-01

    Nigerian 4th year medical students from University of Ibadan spend 8 weeks training in primary health care and public health in the rural Ibarapa Community Health Programme in Oyo State, with ORT as part of the training. Their course of study there includes epidemiological projects, collecting data on diarrhea prevalence, cultural and behavioral practices, assessment and treating children with diarrhea, and teaching ORT to the community. Students worked on the ORT unit on a rotating basis, preparing ORS, monitoring children and talking to mothers. They learned that most mothers recognized diarrhea symptoms, 2/3 had heard about ORS, but less than 1/5 considered it a first step in managing diarrhea. Most would eliminate beans from the child's diet, substituting bland maize porridge. Talking with mothers made them realize that teething children put dirty objects into their mouths and that presence of visible children's feces is associated with diarrhea. Use of soap for hand washing, and availability of clean tap water, rather than well water, decreased incidence of diarrhea. After their training, medical students knew how to prepare ORS correctly, and understand its efficacy. This should increase the acceptance by the medical professionals of ORT as a desirable part of diarrhea control.

  4. Medical treatment of hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Hahn, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Hirsutism is usually the result of an underlying adrenal, ovarian, or central endocrine abnormality mainly due to polycystic ovary syndrome but may also be idiopathic or drug induced. The aim of medical treatment of hirsutism is to rectify any causal hormonal balance, slow down or stop excessive hair growth, and improve the aesthetic appearance of hirsutism, thereby positively affecting the patient's quality of life. Today, for the majority of women, a monotherapy with oral contraceptives that have antiandrogenic activity is recommended as a first-line treatment for hirsutism. Combining an oral contraceptive pill with an antiandrogen is recommended if clinical improvement of hirsutism is insufficient after 6-9 months' monotherapy. In women who present with hirsutism, hyperandrogenism, and insulin resistance, insulin sensitizers are effective for the hirsutism as well as the hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism, and infertility but there is no convincing evidence that they are effective for hirsutism alone. Topical eflornithine is a medical therapy that can be a useful adjuvant for hirsutism when used in conjunction with systemic medications or with laser/photoepilation.

  5. Medical genetics in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascurra de Duarte, Marta

    2004-01-01

    Paraguay is a developing country with low levels of health coverage, with 81% of the population without health insurance, a proportion that reaches 98.1% among the poor, 93% among the rural population and 91.7% among the mainly Guarani-speaking population. The infant mortality rate is 19.4 per 1,000, although there is gross under-reporting. Maternal mortality rate is alarmingly high at 110.9 per 100,000 livebirths, reaching 420.5 in rural areas. There are only two clinical geneticists and four biochemists trained in human genetics, and virtually all genetic services in the country are concentrated in the 'Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud' (IICS) from the National University. The teaching of medical genetics in medical schools is included in physiology and pathology courses, while at the postgraduate level, training in medical genetics is limited to pediatrics and gynecology. In 1999, a pilot newborn screening program was initiated to determine the frequency of congenital hypothyroidism and phenylketonuria and to provide early treatment for affected babies. Another pilot project recently launched by the Ministry of Health is the Program for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects, mandating folic acid fortification of flour, but as of the end of 2003 it had not been implemented. Paraguay lacks adequate resources to provide accurate diagnoses and treatment of genetic conditions.

  6. [Merton and medical sociology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2007-01-01

    The article is about the main contributions of the North-American sociologist Robert King Merton (1910-2003), particularly those related to the field of medical sociology. Merton was first to conduct research on medical education, and the working team he formed was fundamental for the introduction of social thought in the medicine field (Patrícia Kendall, Renée Fox, Samuel Bloom and others). Of particular importance are Merton's vocation for sociology and the unique trajectory of his research, which was marked by studies on subjects that were not common in the early XX century, particularly the relationships between science, technology, and society. We provide the most important theoretical ad conceptual contribution brought by the author, as well as the expressions he created and which were soon adopted by researchers, such as 'focused interview', 'Matthew effects, 'Pygmalion effect', 'nonplanned consequences of social actions', 'manifest function', and 'latent function'. The highlight in the field of medical sociology is his work on the socialization process of the student of medicine.

  7. High Performance Medical Classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoukis, S. G.; Bekakos, M. P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, parallelism methodologies for the mapping of machine learning algorithms derived rules on both software and hardware are investigated. Feeding the input of these algorithms with patient diseases data, medical diagnostic decision trees and their corresponding rules are outputted. These rules can be mapped on multithreaded object oriented programs and hardware chips. The programs can simulate the working of the chips and can exhibit the inherent parallelism of the chips design. The circuit of a chip can consist of many blocks, which are operating concurrently for various parts of the whole circuit. Threads and inter-thread communication can be used to simulate the blocks of the chips and the combination of block output signals. The chips and the corresponding parallel programs constitute medical classifiers, which can classify new patient instances. Measures taken from the patients can be fed both into chips and parallel programs and can be recognized according to the classification rules incorporated in the chips and the programs design. The chips and the programs constitute medical decision support systems and can be incorporated into portable micro devices, assisting physicians in their everyday diagnostic practice.

  8. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division

    1998-03-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country`s main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  9. Whatever happened to medical politics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    This paper argues the case for coming to see 'medical politics' as a topic or subject within medical education. First, its absence is noted from the wide array of paramedical subjects (medical ethics, history of medicine, the medical humanities, etc) currently given attention in both the medical education literature and in specific curricula. Second the author suggests that 'the political' is implicitly recognisable in the historical roots of medical ethics education, specifically in certain of the London Medical Group's activities, and also that the medical profession, or indeed any profession, cannot be understood as an apolitical form of social organisation either in its institutional or scientific (epistemic) forms. Some brief suggestions for introductory and advanced topics in medical politics are discussed and the degree to which medical politics ought to be taken seriously and delivered as part of medical education is considered. Ultimately the author concludes that medical politics might be considered a useful subject within medical education, but it is perhaps best understood as a perspective or approach that can contribute to the development of a more expansive perspective within the extant paramedical subjects.

  10. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  11. [The mandatory medical insurance through eyes of medical personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, V Yu; Lakunin, K Yu; Livshits, S A

    2014-01-01

    The article considers the results of sociological survey carries out among medical personnel of the Moscowskaya oblast in August-September 2013. The purpose of the study was to examine opinions of medical personnel about system of mandatory insurance in conditions of implementation of the new law regulating system of mandatory medical insurance during last three years. The sampling included 932 respondents that corresponds approximately 1% of all medical personnel in the oblast. It is established that even 20 years later after the moment of organization of the system of mandatory medical insurance not all medical personnel is oriented in it. More than 70% of respondents consider this system too convoluted and over bureaucratized and only 22.2% of respondents assume that medical insurance organizations defense interests of patient and 25.8% feel no impact of mandatory medical insurance funds on functioning of medical organizations. Most of respondents consider functions of mandatory medical insurance organizations and mandatory medical insurance funds as controlling only. Only 31% of respondents support the actual system of mandatory medical insurance.

  12. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  13. Commercializing medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Kevin J; Lieberman, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880's, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical industries. The impact of those new employees and their groundbreaking compounds had a profound influence on medicine and medical education in Germany between 1880 and 1930. Germany dominated international science during this period and was a training center for scientists worldwide. This model of synergy between education and business was envied and admired in Europe, Asia and America. British science soon after evolved to dominate the field of science during the prewar and post World War (1930's-1970's) because the German scientists fled Hitler's government. These expatriated scientists had a profound influence on the teaching and training of British scientists, which lead to advances in medicine such as antibiotics. After the Second World War, the US government wisely funded the development of the medical infrastructure that we see today. British and German scientists in medicine moved to America because of this bountiful funding for their research. These expatriated scientists helped drive these medical advances into commercialized products by the 1980's. America has been the center of medical education and advances of biotechnology but will it continue? International scientists trained in America have started to return to Europe and Asia. These American-trained scientists and their governments are very aware of the commercial potential of biotechnology. Those governments are now more prepared to play an active role this new science. Germany, Ireland, Britain, Singapore

  14. Hyperglycemia and antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, D W; Newcomer, J W

    2001-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance are associated with antipsychotic treatment. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance include abdominal adiposity, age, ethnic status, and certain neuropsychiatric conditions. While impaired glucose metabolism was first described in psychotic patients prior to the introduction of antipsychotic medications, treatment with antipsychotic medications is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, exacerbation of existing type 1 and 2 diabetes, new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus, and diabetic ketoacidosis, a severe and potentially fatal metabolic complication. The strength of the association between antipsychotics and diabetes varies across individual medications, with the largest number of reports for chlorpromazine, clozapine, and olanzapine. Recent controlled studies suggest that antipsychotics can impair glucose regulation by decreasing insulin action, although effects on insulin secretion are not ruled out. Antipsychotic medications induce weight gain, and the potential for weight gain varies across individual agents with larger effects observed again for agents like chlorpromazine, clozapine, and olanzapine. Increased abdominal adiposity may explain some treatment-related changes in glucose metabolism. However, case reports and recent controlled studies suggest that clozapine and olanzapine treatment may also be associated with adverse effects on glucose metabolism independent of adiposity. Dyslipidemia is a feature of type 2 diabetes, and antipsychotics such as clozapine and olanzapine have also been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, with agents such as haloperidol, risperidone, and ziprasidone associated with reductions in plasma triglycerides. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to both acute (e.g., diabetic ketoacidosis) and long-term (e.g., cardiovascular disease) complications. A progressive relationship between plasma glucose levels and

  15. Medical Microbiology: Deficits and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabridge, Michael G.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiology is a typical medical science in which basic information can have direct application. Yet, surveys and questionnaires of recent medical school graduates indicate a serious lack of retentiion in regard to basic biological science. (Author)

  16. Current issues in medical education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing, virtual reality, the use ol' simulated subjects, e learn- ing, and the new .... leges (AAMCÏ proposed a group oi' leaming objectives as guide- lines for medical schools. .... Suggestions for action research studies of cli- mates in medical ...

  17. Medical Dictionary: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/mplusdictionary.html Medical Dictionary To use the sharing features on this ... Search term GO GO Visit the tutorial, Understanding Medical Words You may also be interested in these ...

  18. Medical Encyclopedia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/encyclopedia.html Medical Encyclopedia To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. The A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia includes over 4,000 articles about diseases, ...

  19. Medical Microbiology: Deficits and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabridge, Michael G.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiology is a typical medical science in which basic information can have direct application. Yet, surveys and questionnaires of recent medical school graduates indicate a serious lack of retentiion in regard to basic biological science. (Author)

  20. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...