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Sample records for heavy-ion storage ring

  1. Heavy ion storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  2. Heavy ion storage ring without linear dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A possible method to realize a dispersion-free storage ring is described. The simultaneous use of a magnetic field B and an electric field E in bending regions, where the two fields are set perpendicular to each other, enables us to control the effect of momentum dispersion. When the relation (1+1/γ_{0}^{2}E(ρ=-v_{0}×B is satisfied for a beam with the velocity v_{0}, the linear dispersion can be completely eliminated all around the ring. It is shown that the acceleration and deceleration induced by the electrostatic deflector counteracts the heating mechanism due to the shearing force from dipole magnets. The dispersion-free system is thus beneficial to producing ultracold beams. It looks probable that the technique will allow one to achieve three-dimensional crystalline beams. At ICR Kyoto University, an ion cooler storage ring S-LSR oriented for various beam physics purposes is now under construction. The application of the present idea to S-LSR is discussed and the actual design of the dispersionless bend is given.

  3. Cooler storage ring accomplished at heavy ion facility in Lanzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFLCSR),a flagship facility of basic research in China,passed the acceptance check under auspices of the State Development and Reform Commission on 30 July in Lanzhou,capital of Gansu Province.The event was jointly presided over by the Commission's Vice Minister ZHANG Xiaoqian and CAS Executive Vice President BAI Chunli.

  4. The heavy ion cooler-storage-ring project (HIRFL-CSR) at Lanzhou

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, J W; Wei, B W; Yuan, Y J; Song, M T; Zhang, W Z; Yang, X D; Yuan Ping; Gao, D Q; Zhao, H W; Yang, X T; Xiao, G Q; Man, K T; Dang, J R; Cai, X H; Wang, Y F; Tang, J Y; Qiao, W M; Rao, Y N; He, Y; Mao, L Z; Zhou, Z Z

    2002-01-01

    HIRFL-CSR, a new ion Cooler-Storage-Ring (CSR) project, is the post-acceleration system of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). It consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). From the HIRFL cyclotron system the heavy ions will be accumulated, cooled and accelerated in the CSRm, then extracted fast to produce radioactive ion beams (RIB) or highly charged heavy ions. Those secondary beams will be accepted and stored by the CSRe for many internal-target experiments with electron cooling.

  5. The KACST Heavy-Ion Electrostatic Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuqhim, A. A.; Alshammari, S. M.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-01

    A novel Electrostatic Storage Ring (ESR) for beams at energies up to 30keV/q is now being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring is designed to be the core of a highly flexible experimental platform that will combine a large package of complementary beam techniques for atomic and molecular physics and related fields. The lattice design had to cover the different experimental techniques that the ring will be equipped with, such as e.g. Electron-Ion, Laser-Ion, Ion-Ion or Ion-Neutral beams, in both crossed and merged-beam configurations. The development of such an ESR is realized in a staged approach, in which a simple and early-run adaptation of the ring is built first, and then this basic version is upgraded to a higher symmetry of the ultimate version of the ring. Here, we report a general overview of this technical development with a focus on the layout of the first built stage of the ring.

  6. Ion Optics of the HESR storage ring at FAIR for operation with heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Dolinskyy, Oleksiy; Litvinov, Yuri; Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR project is primarily designed for internal target experiments with stored and cooled antiprotons, which is the main objective of the PANDA collaboration. However, the HESR storage ring also appears to have remarkable properties to carry out physics experiments with heavy ions. This paper proposes a new ion optical design allowing for the heavy ion operation mode of the HESR. The main goal was to provide an optics which meets the requirements of the future experiments with heavy ion beams. In connection, issues like closed orbit correction, dynamic aperture as well as other characteristics of beam dynamics of the new ion optical setup are under analysis in this study.

  7. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  8. Ionization and Recombination Measurements at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Storage Ring TSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, D. W.; Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Novonty, O.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.

    2011-05-01

    Reliable ionization balance calculations are needed to analyze spectra from a wide range of cosmic sources including photoionized objects such as AGNs and X-ray binaries and electron ionized objects such as as stars, supernovae, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. These theoretical charge state distributions (CSD) depend in turn upon the underlying atomic data. Of particular importance are reliable rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination (DR), which is the dominant electron-ion recombination recombination mechanism for most ions, and for electron impact ionization (EII). We are carrying out DR and EII measurements of astrophysically important ions using the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries. Storage ring measurements therefore result in more precise DR and EII reaction rate measurements. The measured rate coefficients can be used in modeling cosmic and laboratory plasmas as well as in the benchmarking of theoretical atomic calculations. Here we report results for selected recent DR and EII measurements.

  9. Mini-proceedings of the workshop on heavy ion physics and instrumentation for a 15-Tm booster and storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-11-01

    The goal of this workshop was to probe in depth a few of the areas of possible physics made possible by the availability of an intermediate energy heavy-ion physics facility. There was a special emphasis on physics that would be possible only with a storage/cooler ring. Topics discussed were nuclei far from stability, quantum electrodynamics, giant resonances and photonuclear reactions, and high energy gamma-ray production. Individual papers in this meeting were abstracted separately.

  10. CsI-Silicon Particle detector for Heavy ions Orbiting in Storage rings (CsISiPHOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, M. A.; Dillmann, I.; Bosch, F.; Faestermann, T.; Gao, B.; Gernhäuser, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Sanjari, M. S.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Weick, H.

    2016-11-01

    A heavy-ion detector was developed for decay studies in the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. This detector serves as a prototype for the in-pocket particle detectors for future experiments with the Collector Ring (CR) at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). The detector includes a stack of six silicon pad sensors, a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD), and a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector. It was used successfully in a recent experiment for the detection of the β+-decay of highly charged 142Pm60+ ions. Based on the ΔE / E technique for particle identification and an energy resolution of 0.9% for ΔE and 0.5% for E (Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM)), the detector is well-suited to distinguish neighbouring isobars in the region of interest.

  11. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  12. Resonant pickups for non-destructive single-particle detection in heavy-ion storage rings and first experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjari, Mohammad Shahab

    2013-04-26

    Nuclear astrophysics studies on highly charged radionuclides benefit from accelerator facilities with storage rings, where exotic nuclides produced with small yields can be efficiently investigated. Currently there are two accelerator facilities capable of storing highly charged heavy ions, GSI in Darmstadt and IMP in Lanzhou. Non-destructive detection methods are often used for in-flight measurements based on frequency analysis. The sensitivity of such detection systems are of primary importance specially when number of stored ions is small. Furthermore, since the exotic nuclides of interest are as a rule short-lived, the detectors must be fast. One common form of such detectors are parallel plate SCHOTTKY monitors, on which particles induce a mirror charge at each passage. This method has been successfully used at ESR experimental storage ring of GSI since 1991. In this work we describe a new resonant SCHOTTKY pickup operating as a high sensitive cavity current monitor which was mounted and commissioned in the ESR early 2010. It was successfully used in several storage ring experiments. A very similar pickup was mounted in CSRe at IMP Lanzhou in 2011. First in-ring tests have been performed and new experimental results are pending. The spectral analysis of acquired signals by the new detector has enabled a broad range of new physics experiments. The theory of operation and first experimental results and future perspectives are presented in this thesis.

  13. Recombination and Ionization Measurements at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Storage Ring TSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Bernhardt, D.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Krantz, C.; Grieser, M.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.

    2011-05-01

    Knowledge of the charge state distribution (CSD) of astrophysical plasmas is important for the interpretation of spectroscopic data. To accurately calculate CSDs, reliable rate coefficients are needed for dielectronic recombination (DR), which is the dominant electron-ion recombination mechanism for most ions, and for electron impact ionization (EII). We are carrying out DR and EII measurements of astrophysically important ions using the TSR storage ring at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries, resulting in more unambiguous DR and EII reaction rate measurements. The measured data can be used in plasma modelling as well as for benchmarking theoretical atomic calculations.

  14. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  15. CsI-silicon heavy-ion telescope for storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, Mohammad Ali [TU Muenchen (Germany); JLU Giessen (Germany); Dillmann, Iris [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); JLU Giessen (Germany); Bosch, Fritz; Gao, Bingshui; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Litvinov, Sergey A.; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Nolden, Fritz; Popp, Ulrich; Sanjari, Mohammad Shahab; Spillmann, Uwe; Steck, Markus; Stoehlker, Thomas; Weick, Helmut [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Boehmer, Michael; Faestermann, Thomas; Gernhaeuser, Roman; Maier, Ludwig [TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    A multi-purpose particle detector was developed for heavy-ion experiments at the ESR in GSI Darmstadt, and also as a prototype for future ILIMA and EXL experiments at FAIR. The detector was designed and developed at the TU Muenchen, and was used successfully for the measurement of the decay rate of {sup 142}Pm ions in October 2014. The detector has an active area of 60 x 40 mm{sup 2} and includes a stack of six silicon pad detectors, a DSSD, and a CsI scintillator (24 x 24 x 10 mm{sup 3}) that stops the beam after a passive degrader. The excellent resolution of the detector allows an unambiguous identification of the incident particles. The relative resolution (FWHM) of the detector is 1% for the energy deposit (ΔE), and 0.9% for the residue energy (E{sub csi}), and 0.8% for the total summed energy. We report on the design, development, and the preliminary results from the experiment.

  16. Development of Low Level RF Control Systems for Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerators, Electron Synchrotrons and Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Kolesov, Sergej; Pekeler, Michael; Piel, Christian; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001 ACCEL Instruments is supplying low level RF control systems together with turn key cavity systems. The early LLRF systems used the well established technology based on discrete analogue amplitude and phase detectors and modulators. Today analogue LLRF systems can make use of advanced vector demodulators and modulators combined with a fast computer controlled analogue feed back loop. Feed forward control is implemented to operate the RF cavity in an open loop mode or to compensate for predictable perturbations. The paper will introduce the general design philosophy and show how it can be adapted to different tasks as controlling a synchrotron booster nc RF system at 500 MHz, or superconducting storage ring RF cavities, as well as a linear accelerator at 176 MHz formed by a chain of individually driven and controlled superconducting λ/2 cavities.

  17. Parameter optimization for Doppler laser cooling of a low-energy heavy ion beam at the storage ring S-LSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Kazuya; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    S-LSR is a compact ion storage ring constructed at Kyoto University several years ago. The ring is equipped with a Doppler laser cooling system aimed at beam crystallization. Bearing in mind hardware limitations in S-LSR, we try to find an optimum set of primary experimental parameters for the production of an ultracold heavy ion beam. Systematic molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for this purpose. It is concluded that the detuning and spot size of the cooling laser should be chosen around -42 MHz and 1.5 mm, respectively, for the most efficient cooling of 40 keV ^{24}Mg^+ beams in S-LSR. Under the optimum conditions, the use of the resonant coupling method followed by radio-frequency field ramping enables us to reach an extremely low beam temperature on the order of 0.1 K in the transverse degrees of freedom. The longitudinal degree of freedom can be cooled to close to the Doppler limit; i.e., to the mK range. We also numerically demonstrate that it is possible to establish a stable, long one-dimensionally ordered state of ions.

  18. Simulation of longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled and RF-bunched C3+ ion beams at heavy ion storage ring CSRe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ni; Wen, Wei-Qiang; Du, Heng; Li, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Hu, Xue-Jing; Qu, Guo-Feng; Li, Zhong-Shan; Ge, Wen-Wen; Li, Jie; Wang, Han-Bing; Xia, Jia-Wen; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Wen; Yuan, You-Jin

    2017-07-01

    Laser cooling of Li-like C3+ and O4+ relativistic heavy ion beams is planned at the experimental Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe). Recently, a preparatory experiment to test important prerequisites for laser cooling of relativistic 12C3+ ion beams using a pulsed laser system has been performed at the CSRe. Unfortunately, the interaction between the ions and the pulsed laser cannot be detected. In order to study the laser cooling process and find the optimized parameters for future laser cooling experiments, a multi-particle tracking method has been developed to simulate the detailed longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled ion beams at the CSRe. Simulations of laser cooling of the 12C3+ion beams by scanning the frequency of the RF-buncher or continuous wave (CW) laser wavelength have been performed. The simulation results indicate that ion beams with a large momentum spread could be laser-cooled by the combination of only one CW laser and the RF-buncher, and show the requirements of a successful laser cooling experiment. The optimized parameters for scanning the RF-buncher frequency or laser frequency have been obtained. Furthermore, the heating effects have been estimated for laser cooling at the CSRe. The Schottky noise spectra of longitudinally modulated and laser-cooled ion beams have been simulated to fully explain and anticipate the experimental results. The combination of Schottky spectra from the highly sensitive resonant Schottky pick-up and the simulation methods developed in this paper will be helpful to investigate the longitudinal dynamics of RF-bunched and ultra-cold ion beams in the upcoming laser cooling experiments at the CSRe. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405237, 11504388)

  19. Split ring resonator for the Argonne superconducting heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A split-ring resonator for use in the ANL superconducting heavy-ion linac was constructed and is being tested. The electromagnetic characteristics of the 98-MHz device are the same as the unit described earlier, but the housing is formed of a new material consisting of niobium sheet explosively bonded to copper. The niobium provides the superconducting path and the copper conducts heat to a small area cooled by liquid helium. This arrangement greatly simplified the cryogenic system. Fabrication of the housing was relatively simple, with the result that costs have been reduced substantially. The mechanical stability of the resonator and the performance of the demountable superconducting joints are significantly better than for the earlier unit.

  20. Nuclear Physics Experiments with Ion Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinova, Yu A; Blaum, K; Bosch, F; Brandau, C; Chen, L X; Dillmann, I; Egelhof, P; Geissel, H; Grisenti, R E; Hagmann, S; Heil, M; Heinz, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Knöbel, R; Kozhuharov, C; Lestinsky, M; Ma, X W; Nilsson, T; Nolden, F; Ozawa, A; Raabe, R; Reed, M W; Reifarth, R; Sanjari, M S; Schneider, D; Simon, H; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T; Sun, B H; Tu, X L; Uesaka, T; Walker, P M; Wakasugi, M; Weick, H; Winckler, N; Woods, P J; Xu, H S; Yamaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Zhang, Y H

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades a number of nuclear structure and astrophysics experiments were performed at heavy-ion storage rings employing unique experimental conditions offered by such machines. Furthermore, building on the experience gained at the two facilities presently in operation, several new storage ring projects were launched worldwide. This contribution is intended to provide a brief review of the fast growing field of nuclear structure and astrophysics research at storage rings.

  1. Heavy ion fusion program. Half-year report, October 1978--March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Research activities in heavy ion fusion from October 1978 to March 1979 are reported. Primary areas covered include: induction linac systems; R.F. linac/storage ring systems; theory; and heavy ion fusion notes. (GHT)

  2. Storage rings, internal targets and PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    Storage rings with internal targets are described, using PEP as an example. The difference between electrons and heavier particles such as protons, antiprotons, and heavy ions is also discussed because it raises possibilities of bypass insertions for more exotic experiments. PEP is compared to other rings in various contexts to verify the assertion that it is an ideal ring for many fundamental and practical applications that can be carried on simultaneously. (LEW)

  3. A heavy ion and proton radiation belt inside of Jupiter's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Haggerty, D. K.; Rymer, A. M.; Santos-Costa, D.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Allegrini, F.; Valek, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Levin, S.; Bolton, S.

    2017-06-01

    Energetic charged particle measurements by the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) on board Juno have revealed a radiation belt of hundreds of keV ions up to the atomic mass of sulfur, located between Jupiter's rings and atmosphere. Proton energy spectra display an unusual intensity increase above 300 keV. We suggest that this is because charge exchange in Jupiter's neutral environment does not efficiently remove ions at such high energies. Since this innermost belt includes heavy ions, it cannot be exclusively supplied by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay, which is an important source at Earth and Saturn but only supplies protons and electrons. We find indications that the stripping of energetic neutral atoms in Jupiter's high atmosphere might be the ion source. Since the stripped off electrons are of low energy, this hypothesis is consistent with observations of the ratio of energetic electrons to ions being much less than 1.

  4. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  5. Storage ring at HIE-ISOLDE Technical design report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieser, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Raabe, R.; Blaum, K.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Butler, P. A.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Andreyev, A.; Artemyev, A.; Atanasov, D.; Aumann, T.; Balabanski, D.; Barzakh, A.; Batist, L.; Bernardes, A. -P.; Bernhardt, D.; Billowes, J.; Bishop, S.; Borge, M.; Borzov, I.; Boston, A. J.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.; Catherall, R.; Cederkall, J.; Cullen, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dracoulis, G.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Egelhof, P.; Estrade, A.; Fischer, D.; Flanagan, K.; Fraile, L.; Fraser, M. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P.; Grisenti, R. E.; Habs, D.; von Hahn, R.; Hagmann, S.; Hausmann, M.; He, J. J.; Heil, M.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Joss, D. T.; Kadi, Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kay, B. P.; Kiselev, O.; Kluge, H. -J.; Kowalska, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kreim, S.; Kroell, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lestinsky, M.; Lotay, G.; Ma, X. W.; Marta, M.; Meng, J.; Muecher, D.; Mukha, I.; Mueller, A.; Murphy, A. St J.; Neyens, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Page, R. D.; Pasini, M.; Petridis, N.; Pietralla, N.; Pfuetzner, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Reed, M. W.; Reifarth, R.; Reiter, P.; Repnow, R.; Riisager, K.; Rubio, B.; Sanjari, M. S.; Savin, D. W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schippers, S.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Shubina, D.; Siesling, E.; Simon, H.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Steck, M.; Stora, T.; Stoehlker, T.; Sun, B.; Surzhykov, A.; Suzaki, F.; Tarasov, O.; Trotsenko, S.; Tu, X. L.; Van Duppen, P.; Volpe, C.; Voulot, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wildner, E.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H. S.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zuber, K.; Bosch, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose to install a storage ring at an ISOL-type radioactive beam facility for the first time. Specifically, we intend to setup the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored secondary beams tha

  6. Modern Ives-Stilwell Experiments At Storage Rings: Large Boosts Meet High Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Gwinner, G; Geppert, C; Huber, G; Karpuk, S; Krieger, A; Nörtershäuser, W; Novotny, C; Kühl, T; Sanchez, R; Stöhlker, T; Bing, D; Schwalm, D; Wolf, A; Hänsch, T W; Reinhardt, S; Saathoff, G

    2013-01-01

    We give a brief overview of time dilation tests using high-resolution laser spectroscopy at heavy-ion storage rings. We reflect on the various methods used to eliminate the first-order Doppler effect and on the pitfalls encountered, and comment on possible extensions at future facilities providing relativistic heavy ion beams at $\\gamma \\gg 1$.

  7. European heavy ion ICF driver development

    CERN Document Server

    Plass, Günther

    1996-01-01

    Approaches in Europe to heavy ion induced Inertial Confinement Fusion are oriented toward the linac-plus- storage ring technique. Despite the very limited support of this work, technical pro gress was achieved in some important areas. For the immediate future, a substantial intensity upgrade of the GSI accelerator facilities at Darmstadt is being implemented, leading to specific energy depositions of the order of 100 kJ/g and plasma temperatures of 10 to 20 eV. For the longer term, a conceptual design study of a heavy ion based Ignition Facility is being initiated.

  8. Surface modifications of hydrogen storage alloy by heavy ion beams with keV to MeV irradiation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Tokuhira, Shinnosuke; Uchida, Hirohisa; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    This study deals with the effect of surface modifications induced from keV to MeV heavy ion beams on the initial reaction rate of a hydrogen storage alloy (AB5) in electrochemical process. The rare earth based alloys like this sample alloy are widely used as a negative electrode of Ni-MH (Nickel-Metal Hydride) battery. We aimed to improve the initial reaction rate of hydrogen absorption by effective induction of defects such as vacancies, dislocations, micro-cracks or by addition of atoms into the surface region of the metal alloys. Since defective layer near the surface can easily be oxidized, the conductive oxide layer is formed on the sample surface by O+ beams irradiation, and the conductive oxide layer might cause the improvement of initial reaction rate of hydriding. This paper demonstrates an effective surface treatment of heavy ion irradiation, which induces catalytic activities of rare earth oxides in the alloy surface.

  9. SPARC Collaboration: New Strategy for Storage Ring Physics at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Bräuning-Demian, Angela; Lestinsky, Michael; Herfurth, Frank; Maier, Rudolf; Prasuhn, Dieter; Schuch, Reinhold; Steck, Markus

    2014-01-01

    SPARC collaboration at FAIR pursues the worldwide unique research program by utilizing storage ring and trapping facilities for highly-charged heavy ions. The main focus is laid on the exploration of the physics at strong, ultra-short electromagnetic fields including the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei as well as on the experiments at the border between nuclear and atomic physics. Very recently SPARC worked out a realization scheme for experiments with highly-charged heavy-ions at relativistic energies in the High-Energy Storage Ring HESR and at very low-energies at the CRYRING coupled to the present ESR. Both facilities provide unprecedented physics opportunities already at the very early stage of FAIR operation. The installation of CRYRING, dedicated Low-energy Storage Ring (LSR) for FLAIR, may even enable a much earlier realisation of the physics program of FLAIR with slow anti-protons.

  10. Storage rings for investigation of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-08-01

    In this survey, we give a brief description of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, and examples for their use in ion-atom collision physics. The compression of the phase space distribution of the ions by electron cooling, and the gain factors of in-ring experiments compared to single-pass experiments are explained. Some examples of a new generation of ion-atom collision experiments which may become feasible with storage rings are given. These include the studies of angular differential single- and double-electron capture cross sections, the production of slow highly charged recoil ions, and atomic collision processes using decelerated and crossed beam. 30 refs.

  11. Storage-ring ionization and recombination experiments with multiply charged ions relevant to astrophysical and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Past and ongoing research activities at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage-ring TSR are reviewed which aim at providing accurate absolute rate coefficients and cross sections of atomic collision processes for applications in astrophysics and magnetically confined fusion. In particular, dielectronic recombination and electron impact ionization of iron ions are discussed as well as dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions.

  12. Cooler Storage Ring at China Institute of Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wen-Xia, Jia; Zhan, W

    2005-01-01

    CSR, a new ion cooler-storage-ring project in China IMP, is a double ring system, and consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). The two existing cyclotrons SFC (K=69) and SSC (K=450) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) will be used as its injector system. The heavy ion beams with the energy range of 7-30 MeV/nucleus from the HIRFL will be accumulated, cooled and accelerated to the higher energy range of 100-500 MeV/ nucleus in CSRm, and then extracted fast to produce radioactive ion beams or highly charged heavy ions. Those secondary beams will be accepted and stored or decelerated by CSRe for many internal-target experiments or high precision spectroscopy with beam cooling. On the other hand, the beams with the energy range of 100-1000MeV/ nucleus will also be extracted from CSRm by using slow extraction or fast extraction for many external-target experiments. CSR project was started in the end of 1999 and will be finished in 2006. In this paper the outline and the act...

  13. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: yamaguti@phy.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Suzaki, F. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [RI Center, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Miyazawa, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Morimoto, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kuboki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Momota, S. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Nagae, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  14. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. The Ring Counter (RCo): A high resolution IC-Si-CsI(Tl) device for heavy ion reaction studies at 10-30 MeV/A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, A.; Brambilla, S.; Giussani, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Milan (Italy); Bruno, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezionedi Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bardelli, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Florence (Italy); Barlini, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Casini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Florence (Italy); Cavaletti, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezionedi Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Chiari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Florence (Italy); Cortesi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezionedi Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: dagostino@bo.infn.it; De Sanctis, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezionedi Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Geraci, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezionedi Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Giordano, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Napoli (Italy); Gramegna, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Guiot, B. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezionedi Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Kravchuk, V.; Lanchais, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)] [and others

    2006-01-15

    An annular detector (Ring Counter, RCo) is presented, which has been designed and built to detect and identify in mass and charge light charged particles and fragments with very low energy thresholds and high energy resolution. It complements the GARFIELD apparatus, operating at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, to detect the forward emitted products of nuclear heavy ion reactions. It consists of eight sectors of a three-stage telescope, each one formed by an ionization chamber followed by eight strips of a silicon detector and by two CsI(Tl) scintillators. Construction features and performances are described and discussed in details.

  16. The Ring Counter (RCo): A high resolution IC Si CsI(Tl) device for heavy ion reaction studies at 10 30 MeV/A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, A.; Bruno, M.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Brambilla, S.; Casini, G.; Cavaletti, R.; Chiari, M.; Cortesi, A.; D'Agostino, M.; De Sanctis, J.; Geraci, E.; Giordano, G.; Giussani, A.; Gramegna, F.; Guiot, B.; Kravchuk, V.; Lanchais, A.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Piantelli, S.; Vannini, G.; Vannucci, L.

    2006-01-01

    An annular detector (Ring Counter, RCo) is presented, which has been designed and built to detect and identify in mass and charge light charged particles and fragments with very low energy thresholds and high energy resolution. It complements the GARFIELD apparatus, operating at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, to detect the forward emitted products of nuclear heavy ion reactions. It consists of eight sectors of a three-stage telescope, each one formed by an ionization chamber followed by eight strips of a silicon detector and by two CsI(Tl) scintillators. Construction features and performances are described and discussed in details.

  17. Sulfur hexafluoride transfer and storage system of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: some thermodynamic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, W.T.

    1978-02-01

    The transfer of SF/sub 6/ insulating gas from the 25 MV accelerator pressure vessel (volume = 80,000 ft/sup 3/) into liquid storage tanks (volume = 6,000 ft/sup 3/) is accomplished by means of two three-stage piston compressors operating in parallel. Gas from the first and second compression stages is passed through heat exchangers prior to injection into subsequent stages while gas from the third stage is cooled and/or liquified by a third exchanger/condenser. Tabulated thermodynamic data were used in calculating the SF/sub 6/ transfer rate, stage compression ratios and heat transfer rates as a function of the fraction of the total inventory of SF/sub 6/ (270,000 lbs) which has been transferred. The SF/sub 6/ temperature, pressure and liquid fraction are also calculated at various points throughout the system. Operating parameters and procedures are recommended which should eliminate the possibility that liquid SF/sub 6/ is injected into a compressor cylinder and prevent the generation of excessive pressure in the storage tanks.

  18. Unicell structure for superconducting storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanically integrated, magnetically decoupled storage rings were designed for a heavy ion collider for 100 GeV/amu Au, at B = 2.7T. New concepts were developed, including detailed engineering design and cost estimates. A ''unicell'' contains a half-cell of both rings within a single He vessel. The unicell design is optimized for economical mass production. Survey pads welded to the laminations provide external fiducials to locate the magnet cores. Roller bearing self aligning supports accommodate cool-down shrinkage. The design tolerates relative motion of components resulting from longitudinal shrinkage in the approx.15 m long unicell without affecting performance. Magnetic and physical lengths are the same, eliminating waste space. ''Achromatic'' quadrupoles with sextupoles at both ends are located on a common precision beam tube which aligns and supports a pick-up electrode. The unicell accommodates longer dipoles compared to conventional designs, reducing B/sub max/, stored energy, and the volume of iron and superconductor. Applications to future machines will be discussed.

  19. Unicell structure for superconducting storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-10-01

    Mechanically integrated, magnetically decoupled storage rings were designed for a heavy ion collider for 100 GeV/amu Au, at B=2.7T. New concepts were developed, including detailed engineering design and cost estimates. A ''unicell'' contains a half-cell of both rings within a single He vessel. The unicell design is optimized for economical mass production. Survey pads welded to the laminations provide external fiducials to locate the magnet cores. Roller bearing self aligning supports accommodate cool-down shrinkage. The design tolerates relative motion of components resulting from longitudinal shrinkage in the about15 m long unicell without affecting performance. Magnetic and physical lengths are the same, eliminating waste space. ''Achromatic'' quadrupoles with sextupoles at both ends are located on a common precision beam tube which aligns and supports a pick-up electrode. The unicell accommodates longer dipoles compared to conventional designs, reducing B /SUB max'/ stored energy, and the volume of iron and superconductor. Applications to future machines will be discussed.

  20. Autumn study on storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  1. A new storage-ring light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  2. An outlook of heavy ion driven plasma research at IMP-Lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongtao; Xiao, Guoqing; Xu, Hushan; Zhao, Hongwei; Xia, Jiawen; Jin, Genming; Ma, Xinwen; Liu, Yong; Yang, Zhihu; Zhang, Pengming; Wang, Yuyu; Li, Deihui; Zhao, Huanyu; Zhan, Wenlong; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhao, Di; Li, Fuli; Chen, Ximeng

    2009-01-01

    Since the successful completion of the cooling storage ring (CSR) project in China at the end of 2007, high qualitative heavy ion beams with energy ranging from keV to GeV/u have been available at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou (HIRFL). More than 10 9 1 GeV/u C 6+ particles or 10 8 235 MeV/u Xe particles can be stored in the CSR main-ring and extracted within hundred nano-seconds during the test running, the beam parameters will be improved in the coming years so that high energy density (HED) conditions could be achieved and investigated there. Recent scientific results from the experiments relevant to plasma research on HIRFL are summarized. Dense plasma research with intense heavy ion beams of CSR is proposed here.

  3. Towards the heavy-ion program at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chujo, T. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Gunji, T. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Harada, H. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kaneta, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kinsho, M. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Liu, Y. [J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nagamiya, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nishio, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ozawa, K. [J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Saha, P.K. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakaguchi, T. [Broohaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sato, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tamura, J. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A future heavy-ion program at J-PARC has been discussed. The QCD phase structure in high baryon density regime will be explored with heavy ions at the beam momenta of around 10 A GeV/c at the beam rate of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} Hz. For this quest, a large acceptance spectrometer is designed to measure electrons and muons, and rare probes such as multi-strangeness and charmed hadrons/nuclei. A heavy-ion acceleration scheme is under study with a new heavy-ion linac and a new booster ring, which accelerate and inject beams into the existing Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron and Main Ring synchrotron. An overview of the heavy-ion program and an accelerator design, as well as physics goals and a conceptual design of the heavy-ion experiment are discussed.

  4. Fourth-generation storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, J. N.

    1999-11-16

    It seems clear that a linac-driven free-electron laser is the accepted prototype of a fourth-generation facility. This raises two questions: can a storage ring-based light source join the fourth generation? Has the storage ring evolved to its highest level of performance as a synchrotrons light source? The answer to the second question is clearly no. The author thinks the answer to the first question is unimportant. While the concept of generations has been useful in motivating thought and effort towards new light source concepts, the variety of light sources and their performance characteristics can no longer be usefully summed up by assignment of a ''generation'' number.

  5. APS storage ring vacuum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Neutrino Signals in Electron-Capture Storage-Ring Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Gal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino signals in electron-capture decays of hydrogen-like parent ions P in storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the storage-ring quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions D in two-body decays P → D + ν e . It is argued that, to the extent that daughter ions are detected, these detection rates might exhibit modulations with periods of order seconds, similar to those reported in the GSI storage-ring experiments for two-body decay rates. New dedicated experiments in storage rings, or using traps, could explore these modulations.

  7. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  8. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  9. Ion beam polarization in storage rings. Production, controlling and preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prozorov, A. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). V.A. Fock Research Institute for Physics; Labzowsky, L. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). V.A. Fock Research Institute for Physics]|[St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Plunien, G. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Fritzsche, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.]|[Max-Planck Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Surzhykov, A. [Max-Planck Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    The present paper reports on the actual status of the theoretical concepts for the production of polarized heavy ion beams in storage rings and for methods to control online the degree of polarization as well as investigations of the preservation of the polarization during the ion movement across the magnetic system of the ring. It is argued that for hydrogen-like ions beam polarization can be built up efficiently by optical pumping of the Zeeman sublevels of ground-state hyperfine levels and that the maximal achievable nuclear polarization exceeds 90%. Of special interest are polarized helium-like ions which can be produced by the capture of one electron, because in selected cases parity nonconservation effects are found to be of unprecedented size in Atomic Physics. The measurements of these effects require online-diagnostics of the degree of the ion beam polarization. It is shown that this can be accomplished by an online-detection of the linear polarization of the X-rays which are emitted with the capture of the electron. In order to investigate the preservation of the polarization of the ions stored in the ring, the concept of an instantaneous quantization axis is introduced. The dynamics of this axis and the behaviour of the polarization with respect to it are explored in detail. (orig.)

  10. Ion beam polarization in storage rings. Production, controlling and preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prozorov, A. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). V.A. Fock Research Institute for Physics; Labzowsky, L. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). V.A. Fock Research Institute for Physics]|[St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Plunien, G. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Fritzsche, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.]|[Max-Planck Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Surzhykov, A. [Max-Planck Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    The present paper reports on the actual status of the theoretical concepts for the production of polarized heavy ion beams in storage rings and for methods to control online the degree of polarization as well as investigations of the preservation of the polarization during the ion movement across the magnetic system of the ring. It is argued that for hydrogen-like ions beam polarization can be built up efficiently by optical pumping of the Zeeman sublevels of ground-state hyperfine levels and that the maximal achievable nuclear polarization exceeds 90%. Of special interest are polarized helium-like ions which can be produced by the capture of one electron, because in selected cases parity nonconservation effects are found to be of unprecedented size in Atomic Physics. The measurements of these effects require online-diagnostics of the degree of the ion beam polarization. It is shown that this can be accomplished by an online-detection of the linear polarization of the X-rays which are emitted with the capture of the electron. In order to investigate the preservation of the polarization of the ions stored in the ring, the concept of an instantaneous quantization axis is introduced. The dynamics of this axis and the behaviour of the polarization with respect to it are explored in detail. (orig.)

  11. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  12. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  13. The Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, Robert; Berg, Felix; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; Fadil, Hisham; Fellenberger, Florian; Froese, Michael; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth A; Heber, Oded; Herwig, Philipp; Karthein, Jonas; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Laux, Felix; Lohmann, Svenja; Menk, Sebastian; Meyer, Christian; Mishra, Preeti M; Novotný, Oldřich; Connor, Aodh P O; Orlov, Dmitry A; Rappaport, Michael L; Repnow, Roland; Saurabh, Sunny; Schippers, Stefan; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Schwalm, Dirk; Schweikhard, Lutz; Sieber, Thomas; Shornikov, Andrey; Spruck, Kaija; Kumar, Sudhakaran Sunil; Ullrich, Joachim; Urbain, Xavier; Vogel, Stephen; Wilhelm, Patrick; Wolf, Andreas; Zajfman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 $\\pm$ 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion) and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas den...

  14. Proceedings of the 1979 workshop on beam current limitations in storage rings, July 16-27, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The Workshop on Beam Current Limitations in Storage Rings was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory from July 16 to 27, 1979. The purpose of this Workshop was to discuss the physical mechanisms limiting the beam current or current density in accelerators or storage rings. Many of these machines are now being built or planned for a variety of applications, such as colliding beam experiments, synchrotron light production, heavy ion beams. This diversity was reflected in the Workshop and in the papers which have been contributed to these Proceedings. The twenty-one papers from the workshop were incorporated individually in the data base. (GHT)

  15. Design considerations for a digital feedback system to control self-bunching in ion-storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ziemann

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the feasibility of a digital feedback system to cure self-bunching of the electron-cooled coasting ion beam in ion-storage rings such as CELSIUS [S. Holm, A. Johansson, S. Kullander, and D. Reistad, Phys. Scr. 34, 513–532 (1986]. Such a system is based on a fast digital filter that acts as a tunable artificial wake potential. It may also aid stable operation of accumulator rings for future spallation neutron sources or heavy ion rings used for inertial fusion energy production.

  16. Beam Measurements in Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Albert

    1996-05-01

    Beam measurements in storage rings are made to diagnose performance limitations and to gain knowledge of the beam behavior in view of improvements and to the benefit for other machines. In beam optics the measurement of the orbit or the trajectory with beam position monitors distributed around the ring reveals deflection errors. The overall focusing is checked by measuring the betatron frequency (tune) using a pulse or continuous excitation of the oscillation. Observing this oscillation with all the beam position monitors around the ring the beta function and the betatron phase advance are obtained. This measurement done for different momenta, i.e. RF-frequencies, gives the local chromaticity and its correction. The tune dependence on quadrupole strength gives the value of the local beta function. Synchrotron radiation is a powerful diagnostics tool and can give the beam cross section. Beam instabilities are investigated with similar methods. The growth or damping rates and frequencies of betatron and synchrotron oscillations, observed as a function of intensity, give a convolution of the resistive and reactive part of the transverse and longitudinal impedance with the spectrum of the oscillation mode. Coupled bunch instabilities are caused by narrow band impedances at particular frequencies while single traversal effects, including energy loss and bunch lengthening, are due to a broad band impedance. A model of the impedance can be constructed from such measurements done with different bunch lengths, tunes and other parameters. In some cases the element causing an instability can be identified. The dependence of the orbit and phase advance around the ring on intensity can give the location of impedances. To probe the impedance at very high frequencies the effects on very short bunches or the energy loss of a continuous beam due to its Schottky noise are measured. The beam energy, usually known from magnetic measurements, can be obtained directly with high

  17. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected.

  18. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs.

  19. The cryogenic storage ring project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Robert von; Blaum, Klaus; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; George, Sebastian; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Herwig, Philipp; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Repnow, Roland; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    At MPIK the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR is nearing completion. At beam energies of 20 to 300 keV per charge unit and 35 m circumference the CSR will allow experiments in a cryogenic environment providing conditions of extremely low vacuum and heat radiation. By using liquid helium at 2 K for cryopumping, the projected vacuum (confirmed at a prototype) lies at 1E-13 mbar or below, ensuring long storage times for slow singly charged and highly charged ions, molecules and clusters. Moreover, phase space cooling by electrons will be implemented. The internal quantum states of molecular and cluster ions can be cooled to low temperature, yielding well defined vibrational and for smaller systems also rotational structures. In the CSR construction, the cryogenic ion beam vacuum system has been set up. Extensive tests confirming the criteria on heat flow, alignment and high-voltage stability were successfully completed on the first quadrant. In addition beam diagnostic units for electric pickup signals and spatial profiles, detectors for neutral and charged fragments, the injection beam line, and an electron cooling device are under construction.

  20. Development of Si-based detectors for intermediate energy heavy-ion physics at a storage-ring accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, H.J.; Jaworowski, J.; Leandersson, M.; El Bouanani, M. [Lund Institute of Technology, Solvegatan Lund, (Sweden). Department of Nuclear Physics; Jakobsson, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cosmic and Subatomic Physics; Romanski, J.; Westerberg, L.; Van Veldhuizen, E.J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); The Chicsi Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) compatible Si detectors are being developed by the CELSIUS Heavy lon Collaboration (CHIC) for measuring the energy and identity of Intermediate Mass Fragments (IMF) with Z {approx} 3 - 12 and energies of 0.7 - I 0 A MeV. Here we give an overview of the development of Si {delta}E-E detector telescopes and investigations on IMF identification based on the pulse shape from Si-detectors where the particles impinge on the rear-face of the detector. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Bucharest heavy ion accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceausescu, V.; Dobrescu, S.; Duma, M.; Indreas, G.; Ivascu, M.; Papureanu, S.; Pascovici, G.; Semenescu, G.

    1986-02-15

    The heavy ion accelerator facility of the Heavy Ion Physics Department at the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest is described. The Tandem accelerator development and the operation of the first stage of the heavy ion postaccelerating system are discussed. Details are given concerning the resonance cavities, the pulsing system matching the dc beam to the RF cavities and the computer control system.

  2. The "g-2" Muon Storage Ring

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The "g-2" muon storage ring, shortly before completion in June 1974. Bursts of pions (from a target, hit by a proton beam from the 26 GeV PS) are injected and polarized muons from their decay are captured on a stable orbit. When the muons decay too, their precession in the magnetic field of the storage ring causes a modulation of the decay-electron counting rate, from which the muon's anomalous magnetic moment can be determined. In 1977, the "g-2" magnets were modified to build ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment), a proton and antiproton storage ring for testing stochastic and electron cooling. Later on, the magnets had a 3rd life, when the ion storage ring CELSIUS was built from them in Uppsala. For later use as ICE, see 7711282, 7802099, 7809081,7908242.

  3. Storage-ring Electron Cooler for Relativistic Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Application of electron cooling at ion energies above a few GeV has been limited due to reduction of electron cooling efficiency with energy and difficulty in producing and accelerating a high-current high-quality electron beam. A high-current storage-ring electron cooler offers a solution to both of these problems by maintaining high cooling beam quality through naturally-occurring synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. However, the range of ion energies where storage-ring electron cooling can be used has been limited by low electron beam damping rates at low ion energies and high equilibrium electron energy spread at high ion energies. This paper reports a development of a storage ring based cooler consisting of two sections with significantly different energies: the cooling and damping sections. The electron energy and other parameters in the cooling section are adjusted for optimum cooling of a stored ion beam. The beam parameters in the damping section are adjusted for optimum damping of the electron beam. The necessary energy difference is provided by an energy recovering SRF structure. A prototype linear optics of such storage-ring cooler is presented.

  4. Inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was held on 16 October 1971. Kjell Johnsen is seen in the picture handing a symbolic key to the ISR to Edoardo Amaldi. From left to right on the podium: Victor Frederik Weisskopf, former Director-General; M Antonioz; Willibald Jentschke as Director-General of CERN, and on the other side Werner Heisenberg.

  5. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, Roderick [Lyncean Technologies, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  6. First interactions from the Intersecting Storage Rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    On 27 January 1971, Kjell Johnsen, who led the construction team which built the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), announced that the first ever interactions from colliding protons had been recorded. On the left are Franco Bonaudi, who was responsible for the civil engineering and Dirk Neet, who later took charge of ISR operations.

  7. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  8. A new digital pulse power supply in heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongkun; Chen, Youxin; Huang, Yuzhen; Gao, Daqing; Zhou, Zhongzu; Yan, Huaihai; Zhao, Jiang; Shi, Chunfeng; Wu, Fengjun; Yan, Hongbin; Xia, Jiawen; Yuan, Youjin

    2013-11-01

    To meet the increasing requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), a new digital pulse power supply, which employs multi-level converter, was designed. This power supply was applied with a multi H-bridge converters series-parallel connection topology. A new control model named digital power supply regulator system (DPSRS) was proposed, and a pulse power supply prototype based on DPSRS has been built and tested. The experimental results indicate that tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of this design. The achievement of prototype provides a perfect model for HIRFL-CSR power supply system.

  9. Perspective for a compact electrostatic storage ring : Miniature quadrilateral electrostatic storage ring

    OpenAIRE

    El Ghazaly, Mohamed ,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; A flexible, compact-sized electrostatic storage ring is being designed at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The design features a quadratic shaped ring with four 90° bending corners and relies exclusively on quadrupoles to act on the stored ion beam.

  10. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  11. The Heidelberg High Current Injector A Versatile Injector for Storage Ring Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hahn, R; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Welsch, C P

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Injector (HCI) was designed and built as a dedicated injector for the Test Storage Ring in Heidelberg to deliver mainly singly charged Li- and Be-ions. After start for routine operation in 1999 the HCI delivered stable beams during the following years for about 50 % of the experiments with very high reliability. Due to the requirements from the experiment the HCI changed during that period from a machine for singly charged positive ions to an injector for a large variety of molecules as well as positively or negatively charged light ions. After successful commissioning of the custom built 18 GHz high power ECR-source at its present test location various modifications and additions were made in preparation of a possible conversion into an injector for highly charged heavy ions as a second phase. This paper gives an overview of the experience gained in the passed 5 years and presents the status of the upgrade of the HCI.

  12. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists.

  13. Storage-ring Electron Cooler for Relativistic Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, F; Douglas, D; Guo, J; Johnson, R P; Krafft, G; Morozov, V S; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Application of electron cooling at ion energies above a few GeV has been limited due to reduction of electron cooling efficiency with energy and difficulty in producing and accelerating a high-current high-quality electron beam. A high-current storage-ring electron cooler offers a solution to both of these problems by maintaining high cooling beam quality through naturally-occurring synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. However, the range of ion energies where storage-ring electron cooling can be used has been limited by low electron beam damping rates at low ion energies and high equilibrium electron energy spread at high ion energies. This paper reports a development of a storage ring based cooler consisting of two sections with significantly different energies: the cooling and damping sections. The electron energy and other parameters in the cooling section are adjusted for optimum cooling of a stored ion beam. The beam parameters in the damping section are adjusted for optimum damping of the...

  14. Asymmetric Laser Radiant Cooling in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    Laser pulses with small spatial and temporal dimensions can interact with a fraction of the electron bunches circulating in Compton storage rings. We studied synchrotron dynamics of such bunches when laser photons scatter off from the electrons with energy higher than the synchronous energy. In this case of ‘asymmetric cooling', as shown theoretically, the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering; the oscillations are damped faster. Coherent oscillations of large amplitude may be damped in one synchrotron period, which makes this method feasible for injection the bunches into a ring in the longitudinal phase space. The theoretical results are validated with simulations.

  15. Conceptional Design of Heavy Ion Linac Injector for HIRFL-CSRm

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaohu; Xia, Jiawen; Yin, Xuejun; Yin, Dayu; Li, Xiaoni; Xie, Xiucui; Du, Heng; Li, zhongshan

    2013-01-01

    A room temperature heavy ion linac has been proposed as a new injector of CSRm (the main Cooler Storage Ring) at HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou), which is expected to improve the performance of HIRFL. The linac injector can supply heavy ion with maximum mass to charge ratio of 7 and injection kinetic energy of 7.272MeV/u for CSRm, and the pulsed beam intensity is 3emA with the duty factor of 3%. Compared with the present cyclotron injector SFC (Sector Focusing Cyclotron), the beam current from linac can be improved by 10-100 times. As the pre-accelerator of the linac, the 108.48MHz 4-rod RFQ accelerates ion beam from 4keV/u to 300keV/u, which achieves the transmission efficiency of 95.3% with 3.07m long vanes. The phase advance has been taken into account to analysis the error tolerance, and parametric resonance have been carefully avoided by adjusting the structure parameters. KONUS IH-DTLs, which follow the RFQ, accelerate the ions up to the energy of 7.272MeV/u and inject into HIRFL-CSRm. Th...

  16. Therapeutic techniques applied in the heavy-ion therapy at IMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Sihver, Lembit

    2011-04-01

    Superficially-placed tumors have been treated with carbon ions at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), since November 2006. Up to now, 103 patients have been irradiated in the therapy terminal of the heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) at IMP, where carbon-ion beams with energies up to 100 MeV/u can be supplied and a passive beam delivery system has been developed and commissioned. A number of therapeutic and clinical experiences concerning heavy-ion therapy have been acquired at IMP. To extend the heavy-ion therapy project to deep-seated tumor treatment, a horizontal beam line dedicated to this has been constructed in the cooling storage ring (CSR), which is a synchrotron connected to the HIRFL as an injector, and is now in operation. Therapeutic high-energy carbon-ion beams, extracted from the HIRFL-CSR through slow extraction techniques, have been supplied in the deep-seated tumor therapy terminal. After the beam delivery, shaping and monitoring devices installed in the therapy terminal at HIRFL-CSR were validated through therapeutic beam tests, deep-seated tumor treatment with high-energy carbon ions started in March 2009. The therapeutic techniques in terms of beam delivery system, conformal irradiation method and treatment planning used at IMP are introduced in this paper.

  17. Development of heavy-ion accelerators as drivers for inertially confined fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1979-06-01

    The commercialization of inertial confinement fusion is discussed in terms of power costs. A chapter on heavy ion accelerators covers the prinicpal components, beam loss mechanisms, and theoretical considerations. Other tyopics discussed include the following: (1) heavy ion fusion implementation plan, (2) driver with accumulator rings fed by an rf LINAC, (3) single pass driver with an induction LINAC, and (4) implementation scenarios.

  18. TSR: A Storage Ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, P A; Blaum, K; Grieser, M; Davinson, T; Woods, P J; Flanagan, K; Freeman, S J; Lazarus, I H; Litvinov, Yu A; Raabe, R; Siesling, E; Wenander, F

    2016-01-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  19. TSR: A storage and cooling ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, P.A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Davinson, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Flanagan, K.; Freeman, S.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lazarus, I.H. [S.T.F.C. Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lotay, G. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Page, R.D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Raabe, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Siesling, E.; Wenander, F. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Woods, P.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  20. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I., E-mail: ilya.agapov@xfel.eu

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500–1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  1. Chaotic dynamics in a storage-ring Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G; Bruni, C; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of a storage-ring Free Electron Laser is here investigated with particular attention to the case in which an external modulation is applied to the laser-electron beam detuning. The system is shown to produce bifurcations, multi-furcations as well as chaotic regimes. The peculiarities of this phenomenon with respect to the analogous behavior displayed by conventional laser sources are pointed out. Theoretical results, obtained by means of a phenomenological model reproducing the evolution of the main statistical parameters of the system, are shown to be in a good agreement with experiments carried out on the Super-ACO Free Electron Laser.

  2. Study of the heavy ion bunch compression in CSRm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Da-Yu; LIU Yong; YUAN You-Jing; YANG Jian-Cheng; LI Peng; LI Jie; CHAI Wei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of attaining nanosecond pulse length heavy ion beam is studied in the main ring (CSRm)of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou.Such heavy ion beam can be produced by non-adiabatic compression,and it is implemented by a fast rotation in the longitudinal phase space.In this paper,the possible beam parameters during longitudinal bunch compression are studied with the envelope model and Particle in Cell simulation,and the results are compared.The result shows that the short bunch 238U28+ with the pulse duration of about 50 ns at the energy of 200 MeV/u can be obtained which can satisfy the research of high density plasma physics experiment.

  3. Heavy ions: Report from Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sonia Kabana

    2012-10-01

    We review selected highlights from the experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) exploring the QCD phase diagram. A wealth of new results appeared recently from RHIC due to major recent upgrades, like for example the $\\Upsilon$ suppression in central nucleus-nucleus collisions which has been discovered recently in both RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, we discuss RHIC results from the beam energy scan (BES) program aiming to search for a possible critical point and to map out the QCD phase diagram.

  4. Recent progress in heavy ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.J.

    1977-03-01

    A summary is given of the progress during the last several years in the technology of sources of high charge state positive heavy ions and negative heavy ions. Subjects covered include recent results in ECR and EBIS source development and comparison of various source types for high charge state heavy ions.

  5. RHIC heavy ion operations performance

    CERN Document Server

    Satogata, T; Ferrone, R; Pilat, F

    2006-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) completed its fifth year of operation in 2005, colliding copper ion beams with ps=200 GeV/u and 62.4 GeV/u[1]. Previous heavy ion runs have collided gold ions at ps=130 GeV/u, 200 GeV/u, and 62.4 GeV/u[2], and deuterons and gold ions at ps=200 GeV/u[3]. This paper discusses operational performance statistics of this facility, including Cu- Cu delivered luminosity, availability, calendar time spent in physics stores, and time between physics stores. We summarize the major factors affecting operations efficiency, and characterize machine activities between physics stores.

  6. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Preis, Florian

    2017-03-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  7. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-01-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  8. Relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, Rajeev S

    2014-01-01

    The field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is introduced to the high-energy physics students with no prior knowledge in this area. The emphasis is on the two most important observables, namely the azimuthal collective flow and jet quenching, and on the role fluid dynamics plays in the interpretation of the data. Other important observables described briefly are constituent quark number scaling, ratios of particle abundances, strangeness enhancement, and sequential melting of heavy quarkonia. Comparison is made of some of the basic heavy-ion results obtained at LHC with those obtained at RHIC. Initial findings at LHC which seem to be in apparent conflict with the accumulated RHIC data are highlighted.

  9. Heavy Ion Physics in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G; Chatrchyan, Serguei; Contardo, Didier; Damgov, Jordan; De Min, Alberto; Denegri, Daniel; Drapier, Olivier; Geist, Walter; Genchev, Vladimir; Haroutunian, Roger; Hayrapetyan, M G; Hencken, K; Jenkovszky, L L; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Kharlov, Yuri; Kodolova, Olga; Kotlinski, Danek; Kruglov, Nikolai A; Kva, R

    2000-01-01

    This note summarizes the CMS potential for Heavy Ions Collisions studies. The main physics topic is the study of Y to muon pair decays in view of Y family supression studies, with a detailed discussion of muon reconstruction efficiencies and purities in conditions of central Pb-Pb collisions. We also discuss energy flow and impact parameter measurements, the observability of continuum muon pairs and of Z to mu + mu decays, and of jets and hard direct photons as a means to study jet quenching. We also discuss pA interactions as well as gamma-gamma physics. The instrumental specificities of CMS for heavy ion running are discussed, including trigger and data acquisition aspects.

  10. Timescales in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lisa, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The study of high energy collisions between heavy nuclei is a field unto itself, distinct from nuclear and particle physics. A defining aspect of heavy ion physics is the importance of a bulk, self-interacting system with a rich space-time substructure. I focus on the issue of timescales in heavy ion collisions, starting with proof from low-energy collisions that femtoscopy can, indeed, measure very long timescales. I then discuss the relativistic case, where detailed measurements over three orders of magnitude in energy reveal a timescale increase that might be due to a first-order phase transition. I discuss also consistency in evolution timescales as determined from traditional longitudinal sizes and a novel analysis using shape information.

  11. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  12. Introductory statistical mechanics for electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, John M.

    1987-02-01

    These lectures concentrate on statistical phenomena in electron storage rings. A stored electron beam is a dissipative, fluctuating system far from equilibrium whose mathematical description can be based upon non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Stochastic differential equations are used to describe the quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation which is the main cause of randomness in electron dynamics. Fluctuating radiation reaction forces can be described via stochastic terms in Hamilton's equations of motion. Normal modes of particle motion, radiation damping effects, quantum diffusion in single-particle phase space are all discussed in this statistical formalism. (AIP)

  13. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Storage ring electric dipole moment experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, William M.; Storage Ring EDM Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Dedicated electric dipole moment (edm) searches have been done only for neutral systems. We discuss in this talk dedicated storage ring proposals for measuring edms of charged particles. The statistical error dominates over the systematic error for the neutron and mercury atom edm searches. Large numbers of particles are available today from modern polarized sources at several accelerators. A proposed proton edm experiment at BNL would improve the present proton edm limit by a factor of 104. A "precursor" deuteron edm experiment has been proposed at COSY, Juelich, Germany. This would be the first measurement of the deuteron edm.

  15. Central collisions of heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  16. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered. (GHH)

  17. Progress Toward Heavy Ion IFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R; Logan, B G; Waldron, W L; Sabbi, G L; Callahan-Miller, D A; Peterson, P F; Goodin, D T

    2002-01-17

    Successful development of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) will require scientific and technology advances in areas of targets, drivers and chambers. Design work on heavy ion targets indicates that high gain (60-130) may be possible with a -3-6 MJ driver depending on the ability to focus the beams to small spot sizes. Significant improvements have been made on key components of heavy ion drivers, including sources, injectors, insulators and ferromagnetic materials for long-pulse induction accelerator cells, solid-state pulsers, and superconducting quadrupole magnets. The leading chamber concept for HIF is the thick-liquid-wall HYLEE-II design, which uses an array of flibe jets to protect chamber structures from x-ray, debris, and neutron damage. Significant progress has been made in demonstrating the ability to create and control the types of flow needed to form the protective liquid blanket. Progress has also been made on neutron shielding for the final focus magnet arrays with predicted lifetimes now exceeding the life of the power plant. Safety analyses have been completed for the HYLEE-II design using state-of-the-art codes. Work also continues on target fabrication and injection for HE. A target injector experiment capable of > 5 Hz operation has been designed and construction will start in 2002. Methods for mass production of hohlraum targets are being evaluated with small-scale experiments and analyses. Progress in these areas will be reviewed.

  18. Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, B.

    1966-11-01

    High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

  19. Search for electric dipole moments in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenisa Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The JEDI collaboration aims at making use of storage ring to provide the most precise measurement of the electric dipole moments of hadrons. The method makes exploits a longitudinal polarized beam. The existence an electric dipole moment would generate a torque slowly twisting the particle spin out of plan of the storage ring into the vertical direction. The observation of non zero electric dipole moment would represent a clear sign of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Feasiblity tests are presently undergoing at the COSY storage ring Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany, to develop the novel techniques to be implemented in a future dedicated storage ring.

  20. Characterization of a new electrostatic storage ring for photofragmentation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H. B., E-mail: hbjp@phys.au.dk; Svendsen, A.; Harbo, L. S.; Kiefer, H. V.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lammich, L.; Andersen, L. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Toker, Y. [Departement of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002 (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    We describe the design of and the first commissioning experiments with a newly constructed electrostatic storage ring named SAPHIRA (Storage Ring in Aarhus for PHoton-Ion Reaction Analysis). With an intense beam of Cu{sup −} at 4 keV, the storage ring is characterized in terms of the stored ion beam decay rate, the longitudinal spreading of an injected ion bunch, as well as the direct measurements of the transverse spatial distributions under different conditions of storage. The ion storage stability in SAPHIRA was investigated systematically in a selected region of its electrical configuration space.

  1. The Toledo heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haar, R.R. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Beideck, D.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Curtis, L.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Kvale, T.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Sen, A. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Schectman, R.M. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Stevens, H.W. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The recently installed 330 kV electrostatic positive ion accelerator at the University of Toledo is described. Experiments have been performed using ions ranging from H[sup +] to Hg[sup 2+] and exotic molecules such as HeH[sup +]. Most of these experiments involve the beam-foil studies of the lifetimes of excited atomic states and the apparatus used for these experiments is also described. Another beamline is available for ion-implantation. The Toledo heavy ion accelerator facility welcomes outside users. (orig.)

  2. The MAX IV storage ring project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Pedro F; Leemann, Simon C; Sjöström, Magnus; Andersson, Ake

    2014-09-01

    The MAX IV facility, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, features two electron storage rings operated at 3 GeV and 1.5 GeV and optimized for the hard X-ray and soft X-ray/VUV spectral ranges, respectively. A 3 GeV linear accelerator serves as a full-energy injector into both rings as well as a driver for a short-pulse facility, in which undulators produce X-ray pulses as short as 100 fs. The 3 GeV ring employs a multibend achromat (MBA) lattice to achieve, in a relatively short circumference of 528 m, a bare lattice emittance of 0.33 nm rad, which reduces to 0.2 nm rad as insertion devices are added. The engineering implementation of the MBA lattice raises several technological problems. The large number of strong magnets per achromat calls for a compact design featuring small-gap combined-function magnets grouped into cells and sharing a common iron yoke. The small apertures lead to a low-conductance vacuum chamber design that relies on the chamber itself as a distributed copper absorber for the heat deposited by synchrotron radiation, while non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating provides for reduced photodesorption yields and distributed pumping. Finally, a low main frequency (100 MHz) is chosen for the RF system yielding long bunches, which are further elongated by passively operated third-harmonic Landau cavities, thus alleviating collective effects, both coherent (e.g. resistive wall instabilities) and incoherent (intrabeam scattering). In this paper, we focus on the MAX IV 3 GeV ring and present the lattice design as well as the engineering solutions to the challenges inherent to such a design. As the first realisation of a light source based on the MBA concept, the MAX IV 3 GeV ring offers an opportunity for validation of concepts that are likely to be essential ingredients of future diffraction-limited light sources.

  3. Astrochemistry at the Cryogenic Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreckel, Holger; Becker, Arno; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth; Heber, Oded; Karthein, Jonas; Krantz, Claude; Meyer, Christian; Mishra, Preeti; Novotny, Oldrich; O'Connor, Aodh; Saurabh, Sunny; Schippers, Stefan; Spruck, Kaija; Kumar, S. Sunil; Urbain, Xavier; Vogel, Stephen; von Hahn, Robert; Wilhelm, Patrick; Wolf, Andreas; Zajfman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Almost 200 different molecular species have been identified in space, and this number continues to grow steadily. This surprising molecular diversity bears witness to an active reaction network, in which molecular ions are the main drivers of chemistry in the gas phase. To study these reactions under controlled conditions in the laboratory is a major experimental challenge. The new Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) that has recently been commissioned at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg will serve as an ideal testbed to study cold molecular ions in the gas phase. With residual gas densities of CSR will allow for merged beams collision studies involving molecular ions, neutral atoms, free electrons and photons under true interstellar conditions.

  4. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Riepe, K.B.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.

    1985-10-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10 X torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column. The column consists of two 28-inch diameter insulator modules made of 85 percent Al2O3 ceramic rings brazed to niobium feedthrough rings to which the electrodes are mechanically attached. Field shaping is used to minimize electron avalanche induced flashover along the inside surface of the ceramic rings. The column is self-supporting and is cantilevered from one end of the containment vessel. A brazed assembly was chosen to provide the required bond strength and high vacuum capability. The HV pulsed power supply is a 2MV Marx generator cantilevered from the opposite end of the containment vessel. The stainless steel pressure vessel (PV) contains a 65 psig mixture of SF6(30%) and nitrogen (70%) to provide the electrical insulation.

  5. Design study of the storage ring EUTERPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Boling; Botman, J. I. M.; Timmermans, C. J.; Hagedoorn, H. L.

    1992-05-01

    At present the 400 MeV electron storage ring EUTERPE is being constructed at the Eindhoven University of Technology. It is a university project set up for studies of charged particle beam dynamics and applications of synchroton radiation, and for the education of students in these fields. The design of the ring is described in this paper. Considering the requirements of users in different fields, a lattice based on a so-called triple bend achromat structure with a high flexibility has been chosen. With this lattice, different optical options, including the HBSB (high brightness, small beam), the SBL (short bunch length) and the HLF (high light flux) modes can be realized. A small emittance of 7 nm rad and a short bunch length of the order of several mm can be achieved. In the first phase the synchrotron radiation in the UV and XUV region (the critical wavelength is 8.3 nm) will be provided from the regular dipole magnets. Later on, a 10 T wiggler magnet and other special inserters will be added, and other applications and beam dynamics studies will be feasible. Bending magnets are of the parallel faced C configuration. The effective aperture of the vacuum chamber is 2.3 cm (vertical) in the bending magnets and 4.7 cm elsewhere with a working vacuum condition of 10-9 Torr. Collective effects have been studied initially. First calculations indicate that a lifetime of several hours, influenced by the Touschek effect and residual gas scattering will be achievable for a 200 mA beam in the HLF mode for the standard rf parameters. A 70 MeV racetrack microtron will serve as injector for the ring.

  6. Heavy Inertial Confinement Energy: Interactions Involoving Low charge State Heavy Ion Injection Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Robert D

    2006-04-14

    During the contract period, absolute cross sections for projectile ionization, and in some cases for target ionization, were measured for energetic (MeV/u) low-charge-state heavy ions interacting with gases typically found in high and ultra-high vacuum environments. This information is of interest to high-energy-density research projects as inelastic interactions with background gases can lead to serious detrimental effects when intense ion beams are accelerated to high energies, transported and possibly confined in storage rings. Thus this research impacts research and design parameters associated with projects such as the Heavy Ion Fusion Project, the High Current and Integrated Beam Experiments in the USA and the accelerator upgrade at GSI-Darmstadt, Germany. Via collaborative studies performed at GSI-Darmstadt, at the University of East Carolina, and Texas A&M University, absolute cross sections were measured for a series of collision systems using MeV/u heavy ions possessing most, or nearly all, of their bound electrons, e.g., 1.4 MeV/u Ar{sup +}, Xe{sup 3+}, and U{sup 4,6,10+}. Interactions involving such low-charge-state heavy ions at such high energies had never been previously explored. Using these, and data taken from the literature, an empirical model was developed for extrapolation to much higher energies. In order to extend our measurements to much higher energies, the gas target at the Experimental Storage Ring in GSI-Darmstadt was used. Cross sections were measured between 20 and 50 MeV/u for U{sup 28+}- H{sub 2} and - N{sub 2}, the primary components found in high and ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage lifetime measurements, information inversely proportional to the cross section, were performed up to 180 MeV/u. The lifetime and cross section data test various theoretical approaches used to calculate cross sections for many-electron systems. Various high energy density research projects directly benefit by this information. As a result, the general

  7. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  8. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  9. Heavy Ion Physics at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Veres, Gabor

    2017-01-01

    In the present proceedings recent heavy ion results from the Compact Muon Solenoid collaboration at the LHC are presented. These contain comparisons between small and large collision systems, as well as studies of energy evolution, thus include data collected in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV (2015 and 2016), proton-proton and lead-lead collisions at 5 TeV (2015), and proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV and 8 TeV (2016) center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair. They provide new insights into the properties of the extremely high density and high temperature matter created in heavy ion collisions, while pointing out similarities and differences in comparison to smaller collision systems. These include gluon distribution functions in the lead nucleus; the azimuthal anisotropy of final state particle distributions in all the three different collision systems; charge separation signals from proton-lead collisions and consequences for the Chiral Magnetic Effect; new studies of parton energy loss and its dependence on...

  10. Heavy ion physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schükraft, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    The field of ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics, which started some 15 years ago at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS with fixed target experiments, is entering today a new era with the recent start-up of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC and preparations well under way for a new large heavy ion experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At this crossroads, the article will give a summary of the experimental program and our current view of heavy ion physics at the LHC, concentrating in particular on physics topics that are different or unique compared to current facilities.

  11. Bunch transverse emittance increase in electron storage rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a theoretical framework to estimate the bunch transverse emittance growing in electron storage rings due to short range transverse wakefield of the machine is established. New equilibrium emittance equations are derived and applied to explain the experimentally obtained results in ATF damping ring. This equation will be useful for linear collider damping ring design.

  12. QCD in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Iancu, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    These lectures provide a modern introduction to selected topics in the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions which shed light on the fundamental theory of strong interactions, the Quantum Chromodynamics. The emphasis is on the partonic forms of QCD matter which exist in the early and intermediate stages of a collision -- the colour glass condensate, the glasma, and the quark-gluon plasma -- and on the effective theories that are used for their description. These theories provide qualitative and even quantitative insight into a wealth of remarkable phenomena observed in nucleus-nucleus or deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and/or the LHC, like the suppression of particle production and of azimuthal correlations at forward rapidities, the energy and centrality dependence of the multiplicities, the ridge effect, the limiting fragmentation, the jet quenching, or the dijet asymmetry.

  13. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  14. Relativistic heavy-ion physics: Experimental overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Itzhak Tserruya

    2003-04-01

    The field of relativistic heavy-ion physics is reviewed with emphasis on new results and highlights from the first run of the relativistic heavy-ion collider at BNL and the 15 year research programme at the super proton synchrotron (SPS) at CERN and the AGS at BNL.

  15. Probing QED Vacuum with Heavy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann; Müller, Berndt; Reinhardt, Joachim; Greiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We recall how nearly half a century ago the proposal was made to explore the structure of the quantum vacuum using slow heavy-ion collisions. Pursuing this topic we review the foundational concept of spontaneous vacuum decay accompanied by observable positron emission in heavy-ion collisions and describe the related theoretical developments in strong fields QED.

  16. Conceptional design of a heavy ion linac injector for HIRFL-CSRm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Yuan, You-Jin; Xia, Jia-Wen; Yin, Xue-Jun; Du, Heng; Li, Zhong-Shan

    2014-10-01

    A room temperature heavy ion linac has been proposed as a new injector of the main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), which is expected to improve the performance of HIRFL. The linac injector can supply heavy ions with a maximum mass to charge ratio of 7 and an injection kinetic energy of 7.272 MeV/u for CSRm; the pulsed beam intensity is 3 emA with the duty factor of 3%. Compared with the present cyclotron injector, the Sector Focusing Cyclotron (SFC), the beam current from linac can be improved by 10-100 times. As the pre-accelerator of the linac, the 108.48 MHz 4-rod Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerates the ion beam from 4 keV/u to 300 keV/u, which achieves the transmission efficiency of 95.3% with a 3.07 m long vane. The phase advance has been taken into account in the analysis of the error tolerance, and parametric resonances have been carefully avoided by adjusting the structure parameters. Kombinierte Null Grad Struktur Interdigital H-mode Drift Tube Linacs (KONUS IH-DTLs), which follow the RFQ, accelerate ions up to the energy of 7.272 MeV/u for CSRm. The resonance frequency is 108.48 MHz for the first two cavities and 216.96 MHz for the last 5 Drift Tube Linacs (DTLs). The maximum accelerating gradient can reach 4.95 MV/m in a DTL section with the length of 17.066 m, and the total pulsed RF power is 2.8 MW. A new strategy, for the determination of resonance frequency, RFQ vane voltage and DTL effective accelerating voltage, is described in detail. The beam dynamics design of the linac will be presented in this paper.

  17. Beam losses in heavy ion drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafin, E R; Hofmann, I; Spiller, P J

    2002-01-01

    While beam loss issues have hardly been considered in detail for heavy ion fusion scenarios, recent heavy ion machine developments in different labs (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC)) have shown the great importance of beam current limitations due to ion losses. Two aspects of beam losses in heavy ion accelerators are theoretically considered: (1) secondary neutron production due to lost ions, and (2) vacuum pressure instability due to charge exchange losses. Calculations are compared and found to be in good agreement with measured data. The application to a Heavy-Ion Driven Inertial Fusion (HIDIF) scenario is discussed. 12 Refs.

  18. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  19. Active spot-scanning test with heavy ions at HIRFL-CSR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhong-Ying; LI Qiang; LIU Xin-Guo; JIN Xiao-Dong; HUANG Qi-Yan; XIAO Guo-Qing

    2012-01-01

    An active spot beam delivery system for heavy ion therapy has been developed based on the Cooling Storage Ring at HIRFL-CSR,where the pencil carbon-ion beams were scanned within a target volume transversely by a pair of orthogonal (horizontal and vertical) dipole magnets to paint the slices of the target volume and longitudinally by active energy variation of the synchrotron slice by slice.The unique techniques such as dose shaping via active energy variation and magnetic deflection constitute a promising three-dimensional conformal even intensity-modulated radiotherapy with heavy ions at HIRFL-CSR.In this paper,the verification of active energy variation and the calibration of steerable beam deflection are shown,as the basic functionality components of the active spot-scanning system.Additionally,based on the capability of creating homogeneous irradiation fields with steerable pencil beams,a radiobiological experiment like cell survival measurement has been performed aiming at comparison of the radiobiological effects under active and passive beam deliveries.

  20. Calibration of the linear optics in the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shunqiang; LIU Guimin; ZHANG Wenzhi; LI Haohu; ZHANG Manzhou; HOU Jie; CHEN Guangling

    2008-01-01

    Phase Ⅰ commissioning of the SSRF storage ring at 3.0 GeV was ended with encouraging results. Distortions and calibrations of the linear optics during the storage ring commissioning are discussed in this paper. The calibration procedure has reduced sextupole-additional focusing effects by minimizing closed orbit deviation and corrected quadrupole magnetic coefficients with the linear optics from closed orbit (LOCO) technique. After fitting the closed orbit response matrix, linear optics of the storage ring is substantially corrected, and the measured parameters agree well with the design. Four optics modes were commissioned, and relevant machine physics studies were carried out. Their results are summarized.

  1. A new digital pulse power supply in heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rongkun, E-mail: wangrongkun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Youxin; Huang, Yuzhen; Gao, Daqing; Zhou, Zhongzu; Yan, Huaihai [Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Zhao, Jiang; Shi, Chunfeng; Wu, Fengjun [Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yan, Hongbin; Xia, Jiawen; Yuan, Youjin [Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, 730000 (China)

    2013-11-01

    To meet the increasing requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), a new digital pulse power supply, which employs multi-level converter, was designed. This power supply was applied with a multi H-bridge converters series-parallel connection topology. A new control model named digital power supply regulator system (DPSRS) was proposed, and a pulse power supply prototype based on DPSRS has been built and tested. The experimental results indicate that tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of this design. The achievement of prototype provides a perfect model for HIRFL-CSR power supply system. -- Highlights: • The converters topology of series-parallel connection improves the power supply's performance. • The SOPC based on dual Nios II processors improves the real-time performance of system. • Pulse mode is implemented in digital power supply based on FPGA, with a smaller tracking error.

  2. Design of a novel electrostatic ion storage ring at KACST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazaly, M.O.A., E-mail: maelghazaly@kacst.edu.sa [National Center for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdulaziz City for Sciences and Technology (KACST), P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Alshammari, S.M. [National Center for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdulaziz City for Sciences and Technology (KACST), P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Welsch, C.P. [Cockcroft Institute and the University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Alharbi, H.H. [National Center for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdulaziz City for Sciences and Technology (KACST), P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-05-01

    A new electrostatic storage ring for beams at energies up to 30 keV·q is currently under development at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring design is based on the existing electrostatic storage rings, but stretches significantly beyond them in that it shall form the core of a unique flexible experimental facility at KACST. The lattice of this ring has been designed in a way that enables the use of state-of-the-art experimental methods to study electron–ion, laser-ion, and ion-neutral beams interactions. The lattice design also allows for a future upgrade of the ring to a double storage ring structure that would enable ion–ion beam interactions to be performed. In this paper, we present the design of this ring with a focus on beam dynamics calculations for the 7° single-bend racetrack layout. The study is principally based on the SIMION8 program. We complemented this study further by using purpose-written routine and MAD-X simulation code. An in-depth investigation into beam stability under consideration of non-linear field components in the electrostatic optical elements, is presented. Finally, different working points and stability regions are discussed. -- Highlights: ► The design for a highly flexible electrostatic storage ring is carried out. ► It is shown this design can be upgraded to a double storage ring structure. ► SIMION can be used in ray-tracing simulations to compute aberrations in the ring. ► Non-linear effects in an electrostatic ring can potentially disturb the stored beam. ► An electrostatic ring can store low-energy beams in spite of existing fringe fields.

  3. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wei; BAI ZhengHe; GAO WeiWei; FENG GuangYao; LI WeiMin; WANG Lin; HE DuoHui

    2012-01-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources,whose main characteristics are higher brilliance,better transverse coherence and better stability.The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance.Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design.As an example of application,partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source),which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source,was introduced.Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect,which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance,was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed.It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  4. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  5. Benchmarking of Heavy Ion Transport Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Ronningen, Reginald M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Heilbronn, Lawrence [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in designing and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  6. Thermal analysis of the beam missteering in APS storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, I.C.; Howell, J.; Sharma, S.

    1993-08-01

    Several bending magnet beam missteering cases have been investigated for the 7-GeV storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). One of the critical missteering events is presented in this paper. Finite element analyses are performed to solve for both temperature and stress fields. Thermally induced deflections are determined by using beam bending theory. A safe current limit is established for the storage ring chambers.

  7. Estimates of CSR Instability Thresholds for Various Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We review the key predictions and conditions by several authors for the onset of longitudinal instabilities due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), and evaluate them numerically for various storage rings, namely the KEKB High Energy Ring (HER) & Low Energy Ring (LER), SuperKEKB HER & LER, old and new designs of the SuperKEKB Damping Ring (DR), SuperB HER & LER, CLIC DR (2009 and 2010 design parameters), SLC DR, and ATF DR. We show that the theoretical uncertainty in the instability onset is at least at the level of 20-30% in bunch intensity. More importantly, we present some doubts about the general applicability for many of these storage rings of some commonly used formulae. To cast further light on these questions, an experiment at lower beam energy on the ATF Damping Ring is proposed.

  8. Proceedings of the heavy ion fusion workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R C [ed.

    1978-01-01

    These proceedings contain reviews of current laboratory programs dealing with inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions, as well as several individually abstracted invited talks, workshop reports and contributed papers.

  9. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  10. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  11. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  12. Exact solutions for the spin tune for model storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Mane, S R

    2002-01-01

    We present exact analytical expressions for the spin tune for arbitrary values of the orbital action for several storage ring models. The models we treat contain Siberian Snakes, the use of which is essential to preserve the polarization of beams in high-energy proton storage rings. Our solutions contain some novel features. We also prove a previously conjectured claim about the behavior of spin tuneshifts in rings with multiple Snakes. The conjecture is based on numerical simulations, but our proof is analytical, and also nonperturbative.

  13. Crystalline beams in dispersion-free storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Generating a multidimensional crystalline beam in a storage ring has been known to be difficult without a special cooling force, i.e., tapered cooling, because of the momentum dispersion induced by bending magnets. It is, however, possible to eliminate the dispersion all around the ring by adding an electric dipole field in each magnetic bending region. A storage ring with such unique deflectors should enable us to reach multidimensional crystalline states with an ordinary untapered cooling force. In order to verify this expectation, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study beam crystallization in several dispersion-free storage rings including the S-LSR at Kyoto University. The present results show that various crystalline states can be established without relying on the tapered force.

  14. Design of a novel electrostatic ion storage ring at KACST

    CERN Document Server

    Ghazaly, M O A El; Welsch, C P; Alharbi, H H

    2013-01-01

    A new electrostatic storage ring for beams at energies up to 30keV.q is currently under development at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring design is based on the existing electrostatic storage rings, but stretches significantly beyond them in that it shall form the core of a unique flexible experimental facility at KACST. The lattice of this ring has been designed in a way that enables the use of state-of-the-art experimental methods to study electron-ion, laser-ion, and ion-neutral beams interactions. The lattice design also allows for a future upgrade of the ring to a double storage ring structure that would enable ion-ion beam interactions to be performed. In this paper, we present the design of this ring with a focus on beam dynamics calculations for the 7o single-bend racetrack layout. The study is principally based on the SIMION8 program. We complemented this study further by using purpose-written routine and MAD-X simu...

  15. Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Benaroya, R.; Clifft, B.E.; Jaffey, A.H.; Johnson, K.W.; Khoe, T.K.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, Y.Z.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the status of a project to develop and build a small superconducting linac to boost the energy of heavy ions from an existing tandem electrostatic accelerator. The design of the system is well advanced, and construction of major components is expected to start in late 1976. The linac will consist of independently-phased resonators of the split-ring type made of niobium and operating at a temperature of 4.2/sup 0/K. The resonance frequency is 97 MHz. Tests on full-scale resonators lead one to expect accelerating fields of approximately 4 MV/m within the resonators. The linac will be long enough to provide a voltage gain of at least 13.5 MV, which will allow ions with A less than or approximately 80 to be accelerated above the Coulomb barrier of any target. The modular nature of the system will make future additions to the length relatively easy. A major design objective is to preserve the good quality of the tandem beam. This requires an exceedingly narrow beam pulse, which is achieved by bunching both before and after the tandem. Focusing by means of superconducting solenoids within the linac limit the radial size of the beam. An accelerating structure some 15 meters downstream from the linac will manipulate the longitudinal phase ellipse so as to provide the experimenter with either very good energy resolution (..delta..E/E approximately equal to 2 x 10/sup -4/) or very good time resolution (..delta.. t approximately equal to 30 psec).

  16. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    Experimental studies of heavy and highly charged ions have made remarkable progress in recent years. Today it is possible to produce virtually any ion up to hydrogen-like uranium; to study collisions of those ions with atoms, electrons, and solid surfaces; to excite such an ion and accurately measure the radiation emitted. This progress is largely due to the development of new experimental methods, for instance, the high-energy ion accelerators, laser-produced plasmas, advanced ion sources and ion traps (such as EBIS, EBIT, ECR, etc.), high temperature magnetically confined plasmas and heavy-ion storage rings. The motivations for studies of collisions with highly charged ions and for the understanding of the structure of heavy atomic systems are multi-faceted. Besides of the basic scientific aspects which are mainly the subject of this symposium, much incentive is experienced by applications, e.g., the interpretation of spectra from space (solar corona, solar flares and hot stars), the modelling of stellar atmospheres, the diagnostics of fusion plasma impurities, and the development of X-ray lasers. Since quite some time highly charged ions play a key role for high-precision metrology of atomic structure. These studies have been benchmarks for tests of advanced theories, including many-body theories of interelectronic correlations, relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic (QED) effects, effects due to the finite size of the nucleus and to parity non-conservation (PNC). The interest in QED effects in heavy ions has increased drastically in the last few years. The remarkable experiment on Li-like uranium, recently reported from Berkeley, has stimulated several groups to perform very accurate Lamb-shift calculations on such systems, and reports from three groups were given about such work. The agreement between the calculations as well as with experiment was generally very good, which implies that the problem of evaluating the first-order Lamb shift for any element is

  17. Simulation of Spin-orbit Dynamics in Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A.; Andrianov, S.; Senichev, Yu.

    2016-09-01

    In the article a mapping approach based on nonlinear matrix integration for longterm spin-orbit dynamics simulation is briefly described. Using this technique the nonlinear effects of spin dynamics in an electrostatics storage ring are investigated. Namely, the fringe fields, the energy conservation law and the random field errors are considered. The necessity of examination of such effects arises, for example, in the storage ring design for search the Electrical Dipole Moment of proton and deuteron. The EDM ring is proposed to measure EDM using the spin transformation of polarized particle in the magneto-electrostatic elements of the ring. The article consists of short description of the spin-orbit simulation results based on the nonlinear model.

  18. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-30

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems. (LEW)

  19. Track creation after swift heavy ion irradiation of insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, N.; Osmani, O.; Rethfeld, B.; Schleberger, M.

    2010-10-01

    The dynamics of structural modifications of insulators irradiated with swift heavy ions were investigated theoretically applying a combination of Monte-Carlo method (MC), used to describe SHI penetration and following excitation and relaxation of the electronic subsystem, with Two Temperature Model (TTM) describing the heating of the lattice. This MC-TTM combination demonstrates that secondary ionizations play a very important role for the track formation process. They lead to an additional term in the heat diffusion equation related to energy stored in the hole subsystem. This storage of energy causes a significant delay of heating and prolongs the timescales up to tens of picoseconds.

  20. Heavy Ion Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2002-01-01

    The abundance enhancements of heavy ions Ne, Mg, Si and Fe in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) eventsare explained by a plasma acceleration mechanism. In consideration of the fact that the coronal plasma is mainlycomposed of hydrogen and helium ions, we think that theion-ion hybrid wave and quasi-perpendicular wave can.be excited by the energetic electron beam in impulsive solar flares. These waves may resonantly be absorbed byheavy ions when the frequencies of these waves are close to the second-harmonic gyrofrequencies of these heavyions. This requires the coronal plasma temperature to be located in the range ofT ~ (5 - 9) × 106 K in impulsivesolar flares and makes the average ionic charge state of these heavy ions in impulsive SEP events higher than theaverage ionic charge state of these heavy ions in gradual SEP events. These pre-heated and enhanced heavy ionsin impulsive SEP events.

  1. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  2. Heavy ions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Dainese, A; Armesto, N; d'Enterria, D; Jowett, J M; Lansberg, J -P; Milhano, J G; Salgado, C A; Schaumann, M; van Leeuwen, M; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonioli, P; Apolinario, L; Bass, S; Beraudo, A; Bilandzic, A; Borsanyi, S; Braun-Munzinger, P; Chen, Z; Mendez, L Cunqueiro; Denicol, G S; Eskola, K J; Floerchinger, S; Fujii, H; Giubellino, P; Greiner, C; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Ko, C -M; Kotko, P; Krajczar, K; Kutak, K; Laine, M; Liu, Y; Lombardo, M P; Luzum, M; Marquet, C; Masciocchi, S; Okorokov, V; Paquet, J -F; Paukkunen, H; Petreska, E; Pierog, T; Ploskon, M; Ratti, C; Rezaeian, A H; Riegler, W; Rojo, J; Roland, C; Rossi, A; Salam, G P; Sapeta, S; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Stachel, J; Uphoff, J; van Hameren, A; Watanabe, K; Xiao, B -W; Yuan, F; Zaslavsky, D; Zhou, K; Zhuang, P

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study is aimed at assessing the physics potential and the technical feasibility of a new collider with centre-of-mass energies, in the hadron-hadron collision mode, seven times larger than the nominal LHC energies. Operating such machine with heavy ions is an option that is being considered in the accelerator design studies. It would provide, for example, Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 39 and 63 TeV, respectively, per nucleon-nucleon collision, with integrated luminosities above 30 nb^-1 per month for Pb-Pb. This is a report by the working group on heavy-ion physics of the FCC Study. First ideas on the physics opportunities with heavy ions at the FCC are presented, covering the physics of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, of gluon saturation, of photon-induced collisions, as well as connections with other fields of high-energy physics.

  3. Quasi-isochronous storage ring for enhanced FEL performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgaki, H.; Robin, D.; Yamazaki, T.

    1996-02-01

    A compact storage ring is designed to be used as driver for a free electron laser (FEL). This ring can be operated very close to zero momentum compaction factor (α) to increase the electron density and thus the gain of the FEL. In order to control α with zero dispersion in the straight sections we use an inverted dipole located between the bending magnets and 4 families of quadrupoles. By using 3 families of sextupoles we can control the 2 transverse chromaticities and 2nd order momentum compaction. We find that the ring has sufficient dynamic aperture for good performance.

  4. Experimental Verification of Heavy Ion Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe investigation of radiation damage induced by high dose neutrons and/or protons is a currently interesting topic in nuclear power, ADS etc., The lack of high dose neutron and proton sources hampers this investigation. The advent of heavy ion accelerators opens up a way to study radiation damage caused by high dose neutron and/or proton irradiation[1]. The displacement rate of heavy ions is much higher than that of neutrons and protons. Higher displacement rate leads to short irradiation time. An irradiation dose of -20 dpa takes about a year in a reactor, while only a few minutes or hours by

  5. Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  6. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  7. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15\\%. %The rapidity profile of the charge is wider than the profile of the local energy density. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  8. Isochronicity Correction in the CR Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinov, S; Weick, H; Dolinskii, A

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for nuclear physics is to measure masses of exotic nuclei up to the limits of nuclear existence which are characterized by low production cross sections and short half-lives. The large acceptance Collector Ring (CR) at FAIR tuned in the isochronous ion-optical mode offers unique possibilities for measuring short-lived and very exotic nuclides. However, in a ring designed for maximal acceptance, many factors limit the resolution. One point is a limit in time resolution inversely proportional to the transverse emittance. But most of the time aberrations can be corrected and others become small for large number of turns. We show the relations of the time correction to the corresponding transverse focusing and that the main correction for large emittance corresponds directly to the chromaticity correction for transverse focusing of the beam. With the help of Monte-Carlo simulations for the full acceptance we demonstrate how to correct the revolution times so that in principle resolutions of dm/m=1E-6 ...

  9. Applying Frequency Map Analysis to the Australian Synchrotron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yaw-Ren E; Le Blanc, Gregory Scott

    2005-01-01

    The technique of frequency map analysis has been applied to study the transverse dynamic aperture of the Australian Synchrotron Storage Ring. The results have been used to set the strengths of sextupoles to optimise the dynamic aperture. The effects of the allowed harmonics in the quadrupoles and dipole edge effects are discussed.

  10. Acceleration for the mu-Storage Ring Neutrino Source

    OpenAIRE

    Neuffer, David

    2000-01-01

    A muon storage ring neutrino source uses an induction linac for muon capture, a 200 MHz copper cavity system for cooling, and 200 and 400 MHz superconducting rf systems for acceleration to a final energy of up to 50 GeV. These systems and their requirements are discussed in this paper.

  11. Design studies for the electron storage ring EUTERPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi Boling

    1995-05-18

    The 400 MeV electron storage ring EUTERPE is under construction at Eindhoven University of Technology. The ring is to be used as an experimental tool for accelerator physics studies and synchroton radiation applications. The main task of the current research work is the electron optical design of the ring. Lattice design is a basis for machine design as a whole. Design aspects regarding the basic lattice, based on single particle dynamics, include determination of the equilibrium beam size and bunch length, design of achromatic bending sections, selection of tune values, correction of chromaticity, and minimization of the natural emittance in the ring. The basic lattice designed for the EUTERPE ring has a high flexibility so that different electron optical modes can be realized easily. In low energy storage rings with a high beam current, collective effects can cause a significant change in the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime. In order to ensure a good optical performance for the ring, the choice of suitable parameters concerning the vacuum and RF system are essential as far as collective effects are concerned. An estimation of the collective effects in the ring is given. The injector for EUTERPE is a 75 MeV racetrack microtron which is injected from a 10 MeV linac. In order to get sufficient beam current in the ring, a special procedure of continuous injection with an adjustable locally shifted closed orbit has been presented. Details of the injection procedure and numerical simulations are given. (orig./HSI).

  12. Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.K.

    2005-04-12

    This paper reports the first observations of an anomalous hollow electron beam in the Duke storage ring. Created by exciting the single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, the hollow beam consists of a solid core inside and a large ring outside. We report the detailed measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern, spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying the transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wake field and the lattice nonlinearity. In addition, the hollow beam can be used as a powerful tool to study the linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  13. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  14. A heavy load for heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 25 September, the two large coils for the dipole magnet of ALICE, the LHC experiment dedicated to heavy ions, arrived at Point 2 on two heavy load trucks after a 1200 km journey from their assembly in Vannes, France.

  15. Heavy ion isotope resolution with polymer detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal-Quadras Roca, Alejo; Ortega Girón, Manuel; Fernández Moreno, Francisco; Font Garcia, Josep Lluís; Casas Ametller, Montserrat; Baixeras Divar, Carmen; Gonzalo Cestero, Miguel

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion mass resolution power of polymer detectors Lexan and cellulose nitrate is systematically studied both for accelerator and for cosmic ions. It is concluded that a satisfactory isotopic discrimination, better than 1 u, is hardly attainable with these detectors. Peer Reviewed

  16. HIGH DENSITY QCD WITH HEAVY-IONS

    CERN Multimedia

    The Addendum 1 to Volume 2 of the CMS Physics TDR has been published The Heavy-Ion analysis group completed the writing of a TDR summarizing the CMS plans in using heavy ion collisions to study high density QCD. The document was submitted to the LHCC in March and presented in the Open Session of the LHCC on May 9th. The study of heavy-ion physics at the LHC is promising to be very exciting. LHC will open a new energy frontier in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The collision energy of heavy nuclei at sNN = 5.5 TeV will be thirty times larger than what is presently available at RHIC. We will certainly probe quark and gluon matter at unprecedented values of energy density. The prime goal of this research programme is to study the fundamental theory of the strong interaction - Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) - in extreme conditions of temperature, density and parton momentum fraction (low-x). Such studies, with impressive experimental and theoretical advances in recent years thanks to the wealth of high-qua...

  17. The quarkonium saga in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tserruya, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    J/psi suppression was proposed more than 25 years ago as an unambiguous signature for the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma in relativistic heavy ion collisions. After intensive efforts, both experimental and theoretical, the quarkonium saga remains exciting, producing surprising results and not fully understood. This talk focuses on recent results on quarkonium production at RHIC and the LHC.

  18. "Super" Cocktails for Heavy Ion Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael B; Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Galloway, Michelle; Leitner, Daniela; Morel, James R.; Gimpel, ThomasL.; Ninemire, Brien F.; Siero, Reba; Thatcher, Raymond K.

    2007-07-21

    The 4.5 MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail at the 88-Inch Cyclotron has been expanded by incorporating beams from solid material to fill in the linear energy transfer curve. This supercocktail is available by special request and is useful when only normal incidence between the beam and the device under test is possible or desirable.

  19. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  20. Heavy-Ion Physics in a Nutshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Tetsufumi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The physics of quark gluon plasma (QGP and heavy ion collisions at the collider energies is briefly reviewed. We first discuss about the discovery of a nearly perfect fluidity of the QGP. We also highlights recent topics on responses of the QGP to initial deformation and propagation of a jet.

  1. Quarkonium production in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of quarkonium states plays a crucial role among the probes to investigate the formation of the plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP in heavy-ion collisions. A review of the charmonium and bottomonium production, mainly focussing on the latest results from the LHC experiments, is presented.

  2. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS: A THEORETICAL OVERVIEW.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2004-03-28

    This is a mini-review of recent theoretical work in the field of relativistic heavy ion physics. The following topics are discussed initial conditions and the Color Glass Condensate; approach to thermalization and the hydrodynamic evolution; hard probes and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Some of the unsolved problems and potentially promising directions for future research are listed as well.

  3. Ion-Trapping Effect in UVSOR Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Toshio; Yonehara, Hiroto; Kinoshita, Toshio; Hasumoto, Masami

    1985-09-01

    UVSOR is an electron-stage ring dedicated to vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation research. The first beam was stored in the ring in November 1983, and from that time on, efforts have been devoted to improving the performance of the ring. Some inconvenient phenomena have been found during the accelerator studies. One of the most serious problems is the growth of the vertical size of the electron beam. This phenomenon is explained by the ion-trapping effect, in which the ions trapped in the electron beam change the operating point of the storage ring and enhance the coupling between horizontal and vertical oscillations, resulting in a considerable increase in the vertical beam size. This ion trapping was successfully cured by the RF knockout method, which excited the betatron oscillation.

  4. First experiments for precise Lamb shift measurements on hydrogen-like heavy ions with low temperature calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Meier, J.P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Univ. Mainz (Germany); Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Gumberidse, A.; Kluge, H.J.; Popp, U.; Reuschl, R.; Stoehlker, T.; Trotsenko, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kilbourne, C. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); McCammon, D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The precise determination of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields, not accessible otherwise. To increase the accuracy of the Lamb shift measurement on stored heavy ions at the ESR storage ring at GSI, a calorimetric low temperature detector for hard X-rays was developed. The experimental requirements for the detector are the high absorption efficiency and a relative energy resolution of about 10{sup -3} for 50-100 keV X-rays. A prototype array consisting of 8 pixels with silicon thermistors and Sn or Pb absorbers was recently applied in first experiments with stored {sup 238}U{sup 91+} and {sup 208}Pb{sup 81+} ions interacting with an internal gas-jet target. A total detection efficiency of 1 x 10{sup -7} for the Lyman-{alpha} lines was reached and an energy resolution of 150 eV was obtained under the present experimental conditions. The results on the absolute energy determination of the Lyman-{alpha} lines will be discussed and the design of a new 32-pixel detector for future experiments will be presented. (orig.)

  5. Bunch length modulation in highly dispersive storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Biscari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of the bunch length in an electron storage ring appears with the combination of a high rf voltage derivative and large dispersion in the dipoles, producing drifting of the longitudinal phase plane along the closed orbit. The comparison is done between two different regimes: the one corresponding to high momentum compaction structures, in which the drifting in all dipoles has always the same direction, and the other one corresponding to low momentum compaction in which the drifting changes sign along the ring. Expressions for the longitudinal Twiss functions, energy spread and longitudinal emittance are given. The generalization to multiple rf systems is mentioned.

  6. Ion-Induced Beam Instability in an Electron Storage Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-Jun; JIN Yu-Ming; LI Wei-Min; LIU Zu-Ping

    2000-01-01

    In a small electron storage ring, such as the Hefei Light Source (HLS) ring, the newly generated ions, which can not escape from the beam potential and then are trapped from turn to turn, will lead to the beam instability. The ions created by the leading bunches can perturb the trailing bunches and also themselves during their subsequent passage, which will make the amplitude of beam oscillation be damped and anti-damped periodically. A computer simulation based on the strong-weak model shows a good agreement with our analytical model using the linear theory.

  7. Some properties of the central heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wazir, Z; Khan, E U; Haseeb, Mahnaz Q; Ajaz, M; Khan, K H

    2009-01-01

    Some experimental results are discussed in connection with the properties of the central heavy ion collisions. These experiments indicate the regime changes and saturation at some values of the centrality. This phenomenon is considered to be a signal of the percolation cluster formation in heavy ion collisions at high energies. Keywords: heavy ion collisions, theoretical models, centrality, phase transition.

  8. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Bosch, F. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The proposed new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will open up exciting and far-reaching perspectives for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions: it will provide the highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei. In combination with the strongest possible electromagnetic fields produced by the nuclear charge of the heaviest nuclei, this will allow to extend atomic spectroscopy up to the virtual limits of atomic matter. Based on the experience and results already achieved at the experimental storage ring (ESR), a substantial progress in atomic physics research has to be expected in this domain, due to a tremendous improvement of intensity, energy and production yield of both stable and unstable nuclei.

  9. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  10. Window frame or ''superferric'' magnet design for low B(< 3T) heavy ion storage ring study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-10-01

    Double magnets share common laminations without magnetic coupling. Single layer coils of rectangular conductor are dry wound on extruded bore tubes. Magnet construction requires no molding or prestress. Absence of superconducting (SC) magnetization fields in the aperture results in very large dynamic range. The coil is wound continuously across the midplane to give unusually large dynamic aperture. Above about2.2 T saturation is corrected by simple sextupole windings with no inductive coupling to the dipole. Ultrastable design requires no internal quench protection. A quadrupole pair of novel design gives excellent field quality to B > 2 T without corrections, with no SC magnetization. Experience shows magnets are accurate enough for the assembly to take place at its final location. No training is required. Test procedures (measurements with search coils or with the beam) and cooldown properties are discussed.

  11. Window frame or ''superferric'' magnet design for low B(<3T) heavy ion storage ring study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G., Lee, Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repata, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-01-01

    Double magnets share common laminations without magnetic coupling. Single layer coils of rectangular conductor are dry wound on extruded bore tubes. Magnet construction requires no molding or prestress. Absence of superconducting (SC) magnetization fields in the aperture results in very large dynamic range. The coil is wound continuously across the modplane to give unusually large dynamic aperture. Above approx.2.2 T saturation is corrected by simple sextupole windings with no inductive coupling to the dipole. Ultrastable design requires no internal quench protection. A quadrupole pair of novel design gives excellent field quality to B > 2 T without corrections, with no SC magnetization. Experience shows magnets are accurate enough for the assembly to take place at its final location. No training is required. Test procedures (measurements with search coils or with the beam) and cooldown properties are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Synchronization of Chaotic Storage-Ring Free-Electron Laser by Bi-Directional Coupling Scheme with the Coupling Strength Varied Periodically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Liang-Yu; LUO Xiao-Shu

    2006-01-01

    @@ We analyse the chaotic dynamics of storage-ring free-electron lasers and report a bi-directional coupled scheme with the coupling strength varied periodically to synchronize two chaotic storage-ring free-electron lasers.

  13. Stabilization of betatron tune in Indus-2 storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Jena; Yadav, S.; K. Agrawal, R.; D. Ghodke, A.; Pravin, Fatnani; A. Puntambekar, T.

    2014-06-01

    Indus-2 is a synchrotron radiation source that is operational at RRCAT, Indore, India. It is essentially pertinent in any synchrotron radiation facility to store the electron beam without beam loss. During the day to day operation of Indus-2 storage ring, difficulty was being faced in accumulating higher beam current. After examination, it was found that the working point was shifting from its desired value during accumulation. For smooth beam accumulation, a fixed desired tune in both horizontal and vertical plane plays a significant role in avoiding beam loss via the resonance process. This required a betatron tune feedback system to be put in the storage ring. After putting ON this feedback, the beam accumulation was smooth. The details of this feedback and its working principle are described in this paper.

  14. Storage Ring Measurements of Electron Impact Ionization for Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-07-01

    The interpretation of astrophysical spectra requires knowledge of the charge state distribution (CSD) of the plasma. The CSD is determined by the rates of ionization and recombination. Thus, accurate electron impact ionization (EII) data are needed to calculate the CSD of the solar atmosphere as well as for other electron-ionized astrophysical objects, such as stars, supernovae, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. We are studying EII for astrophysically important ions using the TSR storage ring located at the Max Plank Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries, resulting in unambiguous EII data. We have found discrepancies of about 10% - 30% between our measured cross sections and those commonly used in CSD models. Because it is impractical to perform experimental measurements for every astrophysically relevant ion, theory must provide the bulk of the necessary EII data. These experimental results provide an essential benchmark for such EII calculations.

  15. Normal conducting superbend in an ultralow emittance storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saeidi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF is a new 3 GeV synchrotron radiation laboratory in the Middle East. As the main radiation source, the ILSF storage ring is based on a five-bend achromat lattice providing an ultralow horizontal beam emittance of 0.48 nm rad. In order to produce very bright high energy radiation from the bending magnet, a superbend electromagnet is designed to replace the central low-field dipole of the bare lattice. In this paper, we present some design features of the ILSF storage ring bending magnet radiation source and discuss the detailed physical and mechanical design of the normal conducting superbend electromagnet. The related beam dynamics issues have been investigated as well.

  16. Lattice study for the HLS-Ⅱ storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Zheng-He; WANG Lin; JIA Qi-Ka; LI Wei-Min

    2013-01-01

    The Hefei Light Source (HLS) is undergoing a major upgrade project,named HLS-Ⅱ,in order to obtain lower emittance and more insertion device straight sections.Undulators are the main insertion devices in the HLS-Ⅱstorage ring.In this paper,based on the database of lattice parameters built for the HLS-Ⅱ storage ring obtained by the global scan method,we use the quantity related to the undulator radiation brightness to more directly search for high brightness lattices.Lattice solutions for achromatic and non-achromatic modes are easily found with lower emittance,smaller beta functions at the center of the insertion device straight sections and lower dispersion in nonzero dispersion straight sections compared with the previous lattice solutions.In this paper,the superperiod lattice with alternating high and low horizontal beta functions in long straight sections for the achromatic mode is studied using the multiobjective particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  17. Feasibility of beam crystallization in a cooler storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Yuri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been known theoretically that a charged-particle beam circulating in a storage ring exhibits an “ordered” configuration at the space-charge limit. Such an ultimate state of matter is called a crystalline beam whose emittance is ideally equal to zero except for quantum noise. This paper discusses how close one can come to various ordered states by employing currently available accelerator technologies. The dynamic nature of ultracold beams and conditions required for crystallization are briefly reviewed. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the feasibility of this unique phenomenon, considering practical situations in general cooling experiments. It is pointed out that several essential obstacles must be overcome to reach a three-dimensional crystalline state in a storage ring. Doppler laser cooling of ion beams is also numerically simulated to explore the possibility of beam crystallization in an existing machine.

  18. TNSA Heavy Ion Measurements using the Time-Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnane, M. K.; Kousar, B.; Slish, J.; Palmisano, K.; Mandanas, S.; Padalino, S. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Regan, S.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    The MTW Laser at LLE utilizes an ultra-intense laser to produce high-energy heavy ion pulses through Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). Using the Time-Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup (TRTF) the total number of heavy ions produced by TNSA can be determined, which is needed for stellar nuclear reaction cross section measurements. TNSA heavy ions stop within the thin walled front cup, while light ions pass through it and deposit their remaining charge in the back cup. A two channel storage scope measures voltages produced by the beam currents collected in the cups, respectively. The charge state fraction of plasma ions is modified by passing the heavy ions through a charge-exchange foil at the TRTF entrance. While passing through the foil, ions equilibrate to known charge states based on their velocities. Using time of flight, the total heavy ion current can be normalized to the correct charge state fraction. A pair of dipole magnets deflect relativistic TNSA electrons from the cup's entrance. They also prevent secondary electrons from escaping the front and back cups. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  19. Working group report: Heavy ion physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jan-E Alam; K Assamagan; S Chattopadhyay; R Gavai; Sourendu Gupta; B Layek; S Mukherjee; R Ray; Pradip K Roy; A Srivastava

    2004-12-01

    The 8th workshop on high energy physics phenomenology (WHEPP-8) was held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India during January 5–16, 2004. One of the four working groups, group III was dedicated to QCD and heavy ion physics (HIC). The present manuscript gives a summary of the activities of group III during the workshop (see also [1] for completeness). The activities of group III were focused to understand the collective behaviours of the system formed after the collisions of two nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies from the interactions of the elementary degrees of freedom, i.e. quarks and gluons, governed by non-abelian gauge theory, i.e. QCD. This was initiated by two plenary talks on experimental overview of heavy ion collisions and lattice QCD and several working group talks and discussions.

  20. Recent results on relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munhoz, Marcelo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The study of relativistic heavy ion collisions is a very important tool in order to understand the strong interaction described by QCD. The formation of the Quark-Gluon Plasma and the study of its properties is a very challenging quest. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) generates ultra-relativistic Pb + Pb collisions at the TeV scale inaugurating a new era for such studies. Three experiments, ATLAS, CMS and ALICE are able to measure the products of such collisions. In special, the ALICE experiment was designed specifically for the study of heavy ion collisions. In this presentation, I'll discuss the latest results that shed light in the QGP understanding. (author)

  1. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan Hvidkjær

    2010-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by relativistic bare heavy ions penetrating ordinary matter is investigated. Our main aim is to determine the bremsstrahlung which we define as the radiation emitted when the projectile does not break up. It pertains to collisions without nuclear contact...... ("ultraperipheral collisions"). Requirement of coherent action of the nucleons in order to keep the penetrating projectile intact limits bremsstrahlung to relatively soft photons. The spectrum shows a resonance structure with peak position near 2γ times the position of the giant dipole resonance, that is, near 25γ....... As a result of its relative softness, bremsstrahlung never dominates the energy-loss process for heavy ions. As to the emission of electromagnetic radiation in collisions with nuclear break-up, it appears modest when pertaining to incoherent action of the projectile nucleons in noncontact collisions...

  2. Diffraction radiation from relativistic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyna, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the relativistic heavy ion beams at new accelerator facilities are allowed to obtain some new interesting results (see, for instance, Datz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (18) (1997) 3355; Ladyrin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 404 (1998) 129). The problem of non-destructive heavy ion beam diagnostics at these accelerators is highly pressing. The authors of the papers (Rule et al., Proceedings of the Seventh Beam Instrumentation Workshop, Argonne IL, AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 390, NY, 1997; Castellano, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 394 (1997) 275) suggested to use diffraction radiation (DR) appearing when a charge moves close to a conducting surface (Bolotovskii and Voskresenskii, Sov. Phys. Usp. 9 (1966) 73) for non-destructive electron beam diagnostics. The DR characteristics are defined by both Lorentz-factor and the particle charge, and do not depend on its mass. The estimation of feasibility of using DR for relativistic ion beam diagnostics is undoubtedly interesting.

  3. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is a remarkable phenomenon that stems from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. It is of fundamental importance to search for the CME in experiments. The heavy ion collisions provide a unique environment where a hot chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma is created, gluonic topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields $|\\vec{\\bf B}|\\sim m_\\pi^2$ are present during the early stage of such collisions. Significant efforts have been made to look for CME signals in heavy ion collision experiments. In this contribution we give a brief overview on the status of such efforts.

  4. Dynamical processes in heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-07-25

    In this report I review the physical assumptions of the Boltzmann Master Equation (BME). Comparisons of the model with experimental neutron spectra gated on evaporation residues for a range of incident projectile energies and masses are presented; next, I compare n spectra gated on projectile-like fragments, followed by comparisons with ungated, inclusive proton spectra. I will then consider secondary effects from the nucleon-nucleon processes involved in the heavy ion relaxation processes, specifically the high energy ..gamma..-rays which have been observed at energies up to 140 MeV in collisions of heavy ions of 20/endash/84 MeV/..mu... Another secondary effect, subthreshold pion production, was covered in the XVII School and will not be repeated. 39 refs., 16 figs.

  5. Optical Faraday Cup for Heavy Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, Frank; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-06-25

    We have been using alumina scintillators for imaging beams in heavy-ion beam fusion experiments in 2 to 4 transverse dimensions [1]. The scintillator has a limited lifetime under bombardment by the heavy ion beams. As a possible replacement for the scintillator, we are studying the technique of imaging the beam on a gas cloud. A gas cloud for imaging the beam may be created on a solid hole plate placed in the path of the beam, or by a localized gas jet. It is possible to image the beam using certain fast-quenching optical lines that closely follow beam current density and are independent of gas density. We describe this technique and show preliminary experimental data. This approach has promise to be a new fast beam current diagnostic on a nanosecond time scale.

  6. A new method for beam stacking in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Recently, I developed a new beam stacking scheme for synchrotron storage rings called 'longitudinal phase-space coating' (LPSC). This scheme has been convincingly validated by multi-particle beam dynamics simulations and has been demonstrated with beam experiments at the Fermilab Recycler. Here, I present the results from both simulations and experiments. The beam stacking scheme presented here is the first of its kind.

  7. Physics of Superpulses in Storage Ring Free-Electron Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Litvinenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contradictory to the widespread perception, storage ring free-electron lasers with substantial net gain can generate peak lasing power reaching GW levels in the so-called superpulse mode. This power level is sufficient for studies of nonlinear processes and efficient intracavity harmonic generation. This letter describes the physics of the superpulses and a phase-space refreshment in the electron beam responsible for this phenomenon.

  8. SR front ends of VEPP-4M storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, M G; Kuz'minykh, V S; Mironenko, L A; Mishnev, S I; Panchenko, V E; Protopopov, I Ya; Rachkova, V V; Rukhlyada, L P; Selivanov, A N

    2001-01-01

    The VEPP-4M storage ring system of SR front ends is described. SR is released by means of 14 front ends. Eleven of them are intended for beamlines of experimental stations. One front end is technical. For the permanent stabilization of an orbit of a beam with respect to a coordinate and angle in the vertical direction, two monitoring front ends are used. They take out SR from emission regions, which are at a large distance from one another.

  9. Bunch lengthening with bifurcation in electron storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-San; Hirata, Kohji [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    The mapping which shows equilibrium particle distribution in synchrotron phase space for electron storage rings is discussed with respect to some localized constant wake function based on the Gaussian approximation. This mapping shows multi-periodic states as well as double bifurcation in dynamical states of the equilibrium bunch length. When moving around parameter space, the system shows a transition/bifurcation which is not always reversible. These results derived by mapping are confirmed by multiparticle tracking. (author)

  10. Application of Accelerators and Storage Rings: Accelerators in Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, U

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '11.3 Accelerators in Medicine' of the Chapter '11 Application of Accelerators and Storage Rings' with the content: 11.3 Accelerators in Medicine 11.3.1 Accelerators and Radiopharmaceuticals 11.3.2 Accelerators and Cancer Therapy

  11. Design of the Main Magnets of the SESAME Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Shehab, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the magnetic design of the main magnets of the SESAME storage ring. The 16 dipoles are combined function bending magnets, designed with an adjustable iron shimming scheme. The 64 quadrupoles are of two different lengths and strengths. The 64 sextupoles are optimized for field quality in 3D without end pole chamfers and they include additional coils to provide a horizontal/vertical dipole and a skew quadrupole terms.

  12. General spin precession and betatron oscillation in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Spin precession of particles having both anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments (EDMs) is considered. We give the generalized expression of spin precession of these particles injected with transversal extent in magnetic storage rings. This is the generalization of the Farley’s pitch correction [F. J. N. Farley, Phys. Lett. B 42, 66 (1972)], including radial oscillation as well as vertical one. The transversal betatron oscillation formulae of these particles are also reproduced.

  13. Scale Down Experiments for a Stellarator type Magnetostatic Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Niebuhr, H; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The beam transport experiments in toroidal magnets were first described in EPAC08 [1] within the framework of a proposed low energy ion storage ring at Frankfurt University. The experiments with two room temperature 30 degree toroids are needed to design the accumulator ring with closed longitudinal magnetic field levels up to 6-8 T. The test setup aims on developing a ring injection system. The primary beam line for the experiments was installed and successfully commissioned in 2009. A special probe for ion beam detection was installed. This modular technique allows online diagnostics of the ion beam along the beam path. In this paper, we present new results on beam transport experiments and discuss transport and transverse beam injection properties of that system.

  14. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  15. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  16. Size Effects in Heavy Ions Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Barrañon, A; Dorso, C O

    2003-01-01

    Rise-Plateau Caloric curves for different Heavy Ion collisions have been obtained, in the range of experimental observations. Limit temperature decreases when the residual size is increased, in agreement with recent theoretical analysis of experimental results reported by other Collaborations. Besides, promptly emitted particles influence on temperature plateau is shown. LATINO binary interaction semiclassical model is used to reproduce the inter-nucleonic forces via Pandharipande Potential and fragments are detected with an Early Cluster Recognition Algorithm.

  17. Surface spectroscopy using high energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, B.L.; Cocke, C.L.; Gray, T.J.; Justiniano, E.; Peercy, P.S.

    1983-04-01

    Surface atoms ionized by high energy heavy ions have been detected by time-of-flight and quadrupole mass spectroscopic techniques. The experimental arrangements are described and potential applications are suggested. Both techniques are demonstrated to produce significant improvements in the detection of atomic hydrogen, with the TOF method producing a nine order of magnitude increase in the sensitivity of atomic hydrogen compared to standard nuclear analysis methods.

  18. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Riepe, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL). The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10/sup -7/ torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column.

  19. Heavy ion fusion 2 MV injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.] [and others

    1995-04-01

    A heavy-ion-fusion driver-scale injector has been constructed and operated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector has produced 2.3 MV and 950 mA of K{sup +}, 15% above original design goals in energy and current. Normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr was measured over a broad range of parameters. The head-to-tail energy flatness is less than {+-} 0.2% over the 1 {micro}s pulse.

  20. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-15

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  1. Heavy Ion Physics with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Takai, H

    2003-01-01

    I guess the first thing that comes to people's mind is why is an experiment such as ATLAS interested in heavy ion physics. What is heavy ion physics anyway? The term heavy ion physics refers to the study of collisions between large nuclei such as lead, atomic number 208. But why would someone collide something as large and extensive as lead nuclei? When two nuclei collide there is a unique opportunity to study QCD at extreme energy densities. This said why do we think ATLAS is a good detector to study this particular physics? Among many of the simultaneous collisions that takes place when two nuclei encouter, hard scattering takes place. The unique situation now is that before hadronization partons from hard scattering may feel the surrounding media serving as an ideal probe for the matter formed in these collisions. As a consequence of this, jets may be quenched and their properties, e.g. fragmentation function or cone radius, modified when compared to proton-proton collisions. This is precisely where ATL...

  2. Linear induction accelerator for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, D.

    1976-09-01

    There is considerable recent interest in the use of high energy (..gamma.. = 1.1), heavy (A greater than or equal to 100) ions to irradiate deuterium--tritium pellets in a reactor vessel to constitute a power source at the level of 1 GW or more. Various accelerator configurations involving storage rings have been suggested. A discussion is given of how the technology of Linear Induction Accelerators--well known to be matched to high current and short pulse length--may offer significant advantages for this application.

  3. Observation of snake resonances at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; Courant, E.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gill, R.; Glenn, J.; Huang, H.; Litvinenko, V.; Luccio, A.; Luo, Y.; Pilat, F.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Svirida, D.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The Siberian snakes are powerful tools in preserving polarization in high energy accelerators has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the Siberian snakes also introduce a new set of depolarization resonances, i.e. snake resonances as first discoverd by Lee and Tepikian [1]. The intrinsic spin resonances above 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV which raises the challenge to preserve the polarization up to 250 GeV. In 2009, polarized protons collided for the first time at the RHIC design store energy of 250 GeV. This paper presents the experimental measurements of snake resonances at RHIC. The plan for avoiding these resonanances is also presented.

  4. Compensation for booster leakage field in the Duke storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Popov, Victor; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2017-01-01

    The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is an accelerator-driven Compton gamma-ray source, providing high flux gamma-ray beam from 1 MeV to 100 MeV for photo-nuclear physics research. The HIGS facility operates three accelerators, a linac pre-injector (0.16 GeV), a booster injector (0.16—1.2 GeV), and an electron storage ring (0.24—1.2 GeV). Because of the proximity of the booster injector to the storage ring, the magnetic field of the booster dipoles close to the ring can significantly alter the closed orbit in the storage ring being operated in the low energy region. This type of orbit distortion can be a problem for certain precision experiments which demand a high degree of energy consistency of the gamma-ray beam. This energy consistency can be achieved by maintaining consistent aiming of the gamma-ray beam, and therefore a steady electron beam orbit and angle at the Compton collision point. To overcome the booster leakage field problem, we have developed an orbit compensation scheme. This scheme is developed using two fast orbit correctors and implemented as a feedforward which is operated transparently together with the slow orbit feedback system. In this paper, we will describe the development of this leakage field compensation scheme, and report the measurement results, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  5. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend

  6. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  7. Ultra-low energy storage ring at FLAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsch, Carsten P., E-mail: c.p.welsch@liverpool.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute and the University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Papash, A. I.; Gorda, O. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Harasimowicz, J. [Cockcroft Institute and University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Karamyshev, O.; Karamysheva, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Newton, D. [Cockcroft Institute and University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Panniello, M. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Putignano, M.; Siggel-King, M. R. F. [Cockcroft Institute and University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Smirnov, A. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR) at the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) will provide cooled beams of antiprotons in the energy range between 300 keV down to 20 keV and possibly less. The USR has been completely redesigned over the past three years. The ring structure is based on a 'split achromat' lattice that allows in-ring experiments with internal gas jet target. Beam parameters might be adjusted in a wide range: from very short pulses in the nanosecond regime to a Coasting beam. In addition, a combined fast and slow extraction scheme was developed that allows for providing external experiments with cooled beams of different time structure. Detailed investigations of the USR, including studies into the ring's long term beam dynamics, life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with an internal target were carried out. New tools and beam handling techniques for diagnostics of ultra-low energy ions at beam intensities less than 10{sup 6} were developed by the QUASAR Group. In this paper, progress on the USR project will be presented with an emphasis on the expected beam parameters available to the experiments at FLAIR.

  8. Fast cooling of bunches in compton storage rings*

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    We propose an enhancement of laser radiative cooling by utilizing laser pulses of small spatial and temporal dimensions, which interact only with a fraction of an electron bunch circulating in a storage ring. We studied the dynamics of such electron bunch when laser photons scatter off the electrons at a collision point placed in a section with nonzero dispersion. In this case of ‘asymmetric cooling’, the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering where the laser spot size is larger than the electron beam; and the synchrotron oscillations are damped faster. Coherent oscillations of large amplitude may be damped within one synchrotron period, so that this method can support the rapid successive injection of many bunches in longitudinal phase space for stacking purposes. Results of extensive simulations are presented for the performance optimization of Compton gamma-ray sources and damping rings.

  9. Measurement of sextupole orbit offsets in the APS storage ring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, M.

    1999-04-16

    Horizontal orbit errors at the sextuples in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring can cause changes in tune and modulation of the beta functions around the ring. To determine the significance of these effects requires knowing the orbit relative to the magnetic center of the sextuples. The method considered here to determine the horizontal beam position in a given sextupole is to measure the tune shift caused by a change in the sextupole strength. The tune shift and a beta function for the same plane uniquely determine the horizontal beam position in the sextupole. The beta function at the sextupole was determined by propagating the beta functions measured at nearby quadrupoles to the sextupole location. This method was used to measure the sextupole magnetic center offset relative to an adjacent beam position monitor (BPM) at a number of sextupole locations. We report on the successes and problems of the method as well as an improved method.

  10. Direct photons in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeuchle, Bjoern

    2010-12-13

    Direct photon emission from heavy-ion collisions has been calculated and compared to available experimental data. Three different models have been combined to extract direct photons from different environments in a heavy-ion collision: Thermal photons from partonic and hadronic matter have been extracted from relativistic, non-viscous 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations. Thermal and non-thermal photons from hadronic interactions have been calculated from relativistic transport theory. The impact of different physics assumptions about the thermalized matter has been studied. The models used for the determination of photons from both hydrodynamic and transport calculations have been elucidated and their numerical properties tested. The origin of direct photons, itemised by emission stage, emission time, channel and baryon number density, has been investigated for various systems, as have the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow patterns of direct photons. Taking into account the full (vacuum) spectral function of the rho-meson decreases the direct photon emission by approximately 10% at low photon transverse momentum. In all systems that have been considered -- heavy-ion collisions at E{sub lab}=35 AGeV and 158 AGeV, (s{sub NN}){sup 1/2}=62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV -- thermal emission from a system with partonic degrees of freedom is greatly enhanced over that from hadronic systems, while the difference between the direct photon yields from a viscous and a non-viscous hadronic system (transport vs. hydrodynamics) is found to be very small. Predictions for direct photon emission in central U+U-collisions at 35 AGeV have been made. (orig.)

  11. ELASR – An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics at KACST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed O.A. El Ghazaly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new ELectrostAtic Storage Ring (ELASR has been designed and built at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was developed to be the core of a new storage ring laboratory for atomic and molecular physics at KACST. ELASR follows the standard design of the pioneering storage ring ELISA and it thereby features a racetrack single-bend shaped ring. Complementary simulation code packages were used to work out the design under the requirements of the projected experiments. This paper reports a short description of the ELASR storage ring through an overview of its design and construction.

  12. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul's data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  13. Multifragmentation and dynamics in heavy ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Roy

    2001-07-01

    A midrapidity zone formed in heavy-ion collisions has been investigated through special selections of light particles and intermediate mass fragments detected in the reaction 35Cl on 12C at 43 MeV/nucleon and the reactions 58Ni on 12C, 24Mg, and 197Au at 34.5 MeV/nucleon, and of neutron energy spectra measured in the reaction 35Cl on natTa. Properties of the observables have been examined to characterize the neck-like structure formed between the two reaction partners.

  14. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzetta, E. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  15. Thermodynamical Aspects in Heavy Ion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; D'Agostino, M.; de Sanctis, J.; Fabbri, S.; Fuschini, E.; Geraci, E.; Guiot, B.; Vannini, G.; Verondini, E.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Barlini, S.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.; Lanchais, A.; Vannucci, L.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Margagliotti, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    The excited nuclear systems formed in heavy ion collisions can be studied from a thermodynamical point of view. Charged finite systems have different behaviors with respect to infinite ones. After experimental selection of such equilibrated systems the extraction of thermodynamic coordinates is performed. Different signals compatible with a liquid-gas phase transition have been obtained. In particular a bimodal distribution of the asymmetry between the first two heaviest fragments is presented. Abnormally large fluctuations, which in thermodynamic equilibrium are associated to a negative branch of the heat capacity give indications of a first order phase transition. Perspectives for new generation experiments are indicated.

  16. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Belov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron–positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  17. Charmonium physics with heavy ions: experimental results

    CERN Document Server

    Scomparin, E

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the suppression of charmonium production in heavy-ion collisions was first proposed as an unambiguous signature for the formation of a Quark-Gluon Plasma. Since then, experiments at fixed-target accelerators (SPS) and hadronic colliders (RHIC, LHC) have investigated this observable and discovered a wide range of effects, that have been related to the original proposal but at the same time have also prompted a strong development in the underlying theory concepts. In this contribution, I will review the main achievements of this field, with emphasis on recent results obtained by LHC experiments.

  18. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  19. Helicity separation in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Baznat, Mircea; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    We study the P-odd effects related to the vorticity of the medium formed in noncentral heavy ion collisions. Using the kinetic Quark-Gluon Strings Model we perform the numerical simulations of the vorticity and hydrodynamical helicity for the various atomic numbers, energies and centralities. We observed the vortical structures typically occupying the relatively small fraction of the fireball volume. In the course of numerical simulations the noticeable hydrodanamical helicity was observed manifesting the specific mirror behaviour with respect to the reaction plane. The effect is maximal at the NICA and FAIR energy range.

  20. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  1. Radiation Damage of Polypropylene Fiber Targets in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rohdjess, H; Bisplinghoff, J; Bollmann, R; Büsser, K; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Igelbrink, M; Langkau, R; Maier, R; Mosel, F; Müller, M; Muenstermann, M; Prasuhn, D; Von Rossen, P; Scheid, H; Schirm, N; Schwandt, F; Scobel, W; Trelle, H J; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    2004-01-01

    Thin polypropylene (CH$_2$) fibers have been used for internal experiments in storage rings as an option for hydrogen targets. The change of the hydrogen content due to the radiation dose applied by the circulating proton beam has been investigated in the range $1\\cdot10^6$ to $2\\cdot10^8$~Gy at beam momenta of 1.5 to 3 GeV/c by comparing the elastic pp-scattering yield to that from inelastic p-carbon reactions. It is found that the loss of hydrogen as a function of applied dose receives contributions from a fast and a slow component.

  2. Design and manufacturing of the antechamber for BEPCII storage rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Antechamber which composes the arc vacuum chamber of storage rings is one of the key devices of BEPCII. It has the characteristic of various specifications, large size, complex structure, and high dimension accuracy. This paper gives a review on the structure features and the procedure of production, including the mechanical machining process, cleaning and welding process of high vacuum aluminum alloy, ultrahigh vacuum test and so on. In view of the occurrence of the concave deformation, the reasons are analyzed and the correction method developed is introduced too.

  3. Beam loss studies at the ANKA storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertle, Edmund; Smale, Nigel; Goetsch, Tobias; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Wegh, Frans; Worms, Kai [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The real time study and the post mortem analysis of beam loss are powerful tools for the optimization of a storage ring's performance. It allows, for example, a fast identification of failing hardware components or can be used to improve the beam lifetime by a reduction of the losses. This needs a sophisticated beam loss monitor system with appropriate spatial and temporal resolution. This presentation gives an overview of the loss monitor system under study at the ANKA synchrotron radiation facility of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

  4. Application of permanent magnets in accelerators and electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, K.

    1985-04-01

    The use of permanent-magnet systems in high-energy accelerators and as sources of synchrotron radiation in electron-storage rings is discussed in a review of recent experimental investigations. Consideration is given to the generic advantages of permanent magnets over electromagnets (higher field strength per magnet size) in small-scale configurations; the magnetic properties of some charge-sheet-equivalent-permanent-magnet materials (CSEMs); and the design of pure-CSEM and CSEM-Fe-hybrid multipole magnetic lenses, dipoles, and undulator/wiggler systems for use in free-electron lasers and the production of elliptically polarized synchrotron light. Drawings and diagrams are provided.

  5. Study of orbit stability in the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhi-Min; LIU Gui-Min; HUANG Nan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, analysis of the beam orbit stability and conceptual study of the dynamic orbit feedback inthe SSRF storage ring are presented. It is shown that beam orbit position movement at the photon source points issmaller than the orbit stability requirements in horizontal plane, but exceeds the orbit stability requirements in verticalplane. A dynamic global orbit feedback system, which consists of 38 high-bandwidth air-coil correctors and 40high-precise BPMs, is proposed to suppress the vertical beam orbit position movement. Numerical simulations showthat this dynamic orbit feedback system can stabilize the vertical beam orbit position movement in the frequencyrange up to 100 Hz.

  6. The injection septum magnets of the SPring-8 storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Keiko; Matsui, Sakuo [JAERI-RIKEN, Hyogo (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    Three DC septum magnets and a pulsed septum magnet are used for the injection of the SPring-8 storage ring. This paper describes the design principle of these injection septum magnets and the electromagnetic performances of a prototype pulsed magnet. The peak strength of the magnetic stray field of the pulsed septum magnet is 1.3 gauss on the bump orbit, and is lower than the limit of sensitivity of the measurement on the reference orbit when the field strength in the magnet gap is 5,600 gauss and the pulse width is 65 {mu}sec.

  7. Minimum emittance in storage rings with uniform or nonuniform dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-xi Wang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple treatment of minimum emittance theory in storage rings is presented, favoring vector and matrix forms for a more concise picture. Both conventional uniform dipoles and nonuniform dipoles with bending radius variation are treated. Simple formulas are given for computing the minimum emittance, optimal lattice parameters, as well as effects of nonoptimal parameters. For nonuniform dipoles, analytical results are obtained for a three-piece sandwich dipole model. Minimization of the effective emittance for light sources is given in detail. Usefulness of gradient and/or nonuniform dipoles for reducing the effective emittance is addressed.

  8. Synchrobetatron resonant coupling mechanism in a storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Jimbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A clear synchrobetatron resonant coupling of Mg ion beam was observed experimentally in the horizontal laser beam cooling experiment in small laser equipped storage ring. Synchrotron and horizontal betatron motions were intentionally coupled in a rf cavity. Using the Hamiltonian which is composed of coasting, synchrotron and betatron motions, physical mechanism of the coupling is analyzed to explain the observed horizontal betatron tune jump near the synchrobetatron resonant coupling point. There energy exchange between the synchrotron oscillation and the horizontal betatron oscillation was mediated by coasting particles and the freedom of the horizontal direction is connected with the freedom of the longitudinal direction.

  9. Measurement of electric dipole moments at storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg Pretz JEDI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) is a fundamental property of a particle, like mass, charge and magnetic moment. What makes this property in particular interesting is the fact that a fundamental particle can only acquire an EDM via {P} and {T} violating processes. EDM measurements contribute to the understanding of the matter over anti-matter dominance in the universe, a question closely related to the violation of fundamental symmetries. Up to now measurements of EDMs have concentrated on neutral particles. Charged particle EDMs can be measured at storage ring. Plans at Forschungszentrum Jülich and results of first test measurements at the COoler SYnchrotron COSY will be presented.

  10. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  11. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  12. Multiplicity and theremalization time in heavy-ions collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'eva, Irina

    2016-10-01

    We present a concise review of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ions collisions within the holographic approach. In particular, we discuss how to get the total multiplicity in heavy ions collision to fit the recent experimental data. We also discuss theoretical estimations of time formation of QGP in heavy ions collision and show that different observables can give the different times of QGP formation.

  13. Multiplicity and theremalization time in heavy-ions collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref’eva Irina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a concise review of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ions collisions within the holographic approach. In particular, we discuss how to get the total multiplicity in heavy ions collision to fit the recent experimental data. We also discuss theoretical estimations of time formation of QGP in heavy ions collision and show that different observables can give the different times of QGP formation.

  14. Resonance propagation in heavy-ion scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bijoy Kundu; B K Jain

    2001-06-01

    The formalism developed earlier by us for the propagation of a resonance in the nuclear medium in proton–nucleus collisions has been modified to the case of vector boson production in heavy-ion collisions. The formalism includes coherently the contribution to the observed di-lepton production from the decay of a vector boson inside as well as outside the nuclear medium. The medium modification of the boson is incorporated through an energy dependent optical potential. The calculated invariant mass distributions are presented for the -meson production using optical potentials estimated within the VDM and the resonance model. The shift in the invariant mass distribution is found to be small. To achieve the mass shift (of about 200 MeV towards lower mass) as indicated in the high energy heavy-ion collision experiments, an unusually strong optical potential of about -120 MeV is required. We also observe that, for not so heavy nuclear systems and/or for fast moving resonances, the shape, magnitude and peak position of the invariant mass distribution is substantially different if the contributions from the resonance decay inside and outside are summedup at the amplitude level (coherently) or at the cross section level (incoherently).

  15. QCD and Heavy Ions RHIC Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the most violent heavy ion collisions available to experimental study occur at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. There, gold ions collide at psNN = 200 GeV. The early and most striking RHIC results were summarised in 2005 by its four experiments, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR, in their so-called white papers [1, 2, 3, 4] that will be largely referenced thereafter. Beyond and after this, a wealth of data has been collected and analysed, providing additional information about the properties of the matter created at RHIC. It is categorically impossible to give a comprehensive review of these results in a 20 minutes talk or a 7 pages report. Here, I have made a selection of some of the most striking or intriguing signatures: jet quenching in Section 2, quarkonia suppressions in Section 3 and thermal photons in Section 4. A slightly longer and older version of this review can be found in [5]. Some updates are given here, as well as emphasis on new probes ...

  16. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Craig L., E-mail: clolson66@msn.com

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  17. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  18. Overview of the Heavy Ion Fusion Program

    CERN Document Server

    Celata, C M

    2000-01-01

    The world Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program for inertial fusion energy is looking toward the development and commissioning of several new experiments. Recent and planned upgrades of the facilities at GSI, in Russia, and in Japan greatly enhance the ability to study energy deposition in hot dense matter. Worldwide target design developments have focused on non-ignition targets for nearterm experiments and designs which, while lowering the energy required for ignition, tighten accelerator requirements. The U.S program is transitioning between scaled beam dynamics experiments and high current experiments with power-plant-driver-scale beams. Current effort is aimed at preparation for the next-step large facility, the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)-- an induction linac accelerating multiple beams to a few hundred MeV, then focusing to deliver tens of kilojoules to a target. The goal is to study heavy ion energy deposition, and to test all of the components and physics needed for an engineering test of a power p...

  19. Future of the ATLAS heavy ion program

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS-Collaboration, The; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of the heavy ion program at the LHC is to study the properties of deconfined strongly interacting matter, often referred to as ``quark-gluon plasma'' (QGP), created in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. That matter is found to be strongly coupled with a viscosity to entropy ratio near a conjectured quantum lower bound. ATLAS foresees a rich program of studies using jets, Upsilons, measurements of global event properties and measurements in proton-nucleus collisions that will measure fundamental transport properties of the QGP, probe the nature of the interactions between constituents of the QGP, elucidate the origin of the strong coupling, and provide insight on the initial state of nuclear collisions. The heavy ion program through the third long shutdown should provide one inverse nb of 5.5~TeV Pb+Pb data. That data will provide more than an order of magnitude increase in statistics over currently available data for high-pT observables such as gamma-jet and Z-jet pairs. However, potentia...

  20. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  1. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE).The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development. The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  2. Recent progress in molecule modification with heavy ion beam irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The research into heavy ion beam biology started in the 1960s, and so far it has become an important interdisciplinary study. Heavy ion beam is more suitable for molecule modification than other sorts of radiation, for it has many superiorities such as the energy transfer effect and the mass deposition effect. Molecule modification with heavy ion beam irradiation can be applied to developing new medicines and their precursors, genetic engineering, protein engi neering, outer space radiobiology, etc. Retrospect and prospect of the research and development of molecule modifica tion with heavy ion beam irradiation are given.

  3. Beam based alignment of the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Man-Zhou; LI Hao-Hu; JIANG Bo-Cheng; LIU Gui-Min; LI De-Ming

    2009-01-01

    There are 140 beam position monitors (BPMs) in the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring used for measuring the closed orbit. As the BPM pickup electrodes are assembled directly on the vacuum chamber, it is important to calibrate the electrical center offset of the BPM to an adjacent quadrupole magnetic center. A beam based alignment (BBA) method which varies individual quadrupole magnet strength and observes its effects on the orbit is used to measure the BPM offsets in both the horizontal and vertical planes. It is a completely automated technique with various data processing methods. There are several parameters such as the strength change of the correctors and the quadrupoles which should be chosen carefully in real measurement. After several rounds of BBA measurement and closed orbit correction, these offsets are set to an accuracy better than 10 μm. In this paper we present the method of beam based calibration of BPMs, the experimental results of the SSRF storage ring, and the error analysis.

  4. Octupole Focusing Relativistic Self-Magnetometer Electric Storage Ring "Bottle"

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A method proposed for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of a charged fundamental particle such as the proton, is to measure the spin precession caused by a radial electric bend field $E_r$, acting on the EDMs of frozen spin polarized protons circulating in an all-electric storage ring. The dominant systematic error limiting such a measurement comes from spurious spin precession caused by unintentional and unknown average radial magnetic field $B_r$ acting on the (vastly larger) magnetic dipole moments (MDM) of the protons. Along with taking extreme magnetic shielding measures, the best protection against this systematic error is to use the storage ring itself, as a "self-magnetometer"; the exact magnetic field average $\\langle B_r\\rangle$ that produces systematic EDM error, is nulled to exquisite precision by orbit position control. By using octupole rather than quadrupole focusing the restoring force can be vanishingly small for small amplitude vertical betatron-like motion yet strong enough at larg...

  5. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    CESAR (CERN Electron Storage and Accumulation Ring) was built as a study-model for the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings). The model had to be small (24 m circumference) and yet the particles had to be highly relativistic, which led to the choice of electrons. On the other hand, in order to model the behaviour of protons, effects from synchrotron radiation had to be negligible, which meant low magnetic fields (130 G in the bending magnets) and a corresponding low energy of 1.75 MeV. All the stacking (accumulation) procedures envisaged for the ISR were proven with CESAR, and critical aspects of transverse stability were explored. Very importantly, CESAR was the test-bed for the ultrahigh vacuum techniques and components, essential for the ISR, with a final pressure of 6E-11 Torr. The CESAR project was decided early in 1960, design was completed in 1961 and construction in 1963. After an experimental period from 1964 to 1967, CESAR was dismantled in 1968.

  6. CESAR, 2 MeV electron storage ring; general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1964-01-01

    CESAR (CERN Electron Storage and Accumulation Ring) was built as a study-model for the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings). The model had to be small (24 m circumference) and yet the particles had to be highly relativistic, which led to the choice of electrons. On the other hand, in order to model the behaviour of protons, effects from synchrotron radiation had to be negligible, which meant low magnetic fields (130 G in the bending magnets) and a corresponding low energy of 1.75 MeV. All the stacking (accumulation) procedures envisaged for the ISR were proven with CESAR, and critical aspects of transverse stability were explored. Very importantly, CESAR was the test-bed for the ultrahigh vacuum techniques and components, essential for the ISR, with a final pressure of 6E-11 Torr. The CESAR project was decided early in 1960, design was completed in 1961 and construction in 1963. After an experimental period from 1964 to 1967, CESAR was dismantled in 1968.

  7. STRIPLINE KICKER DESIGN FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, W.; Blednykh, A.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    In the NSLS2 storage ring, there are four stripline kickers/pickups. Two long striplines with electrode length of 30cm will be used as bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback actuators. Two short stripline kickers/pickups with 15cm length will mainly used for tune measurement excitation or signal pickup for the beam stability monitor. High shunt impedance of the long stripline kickers is demanded to produce 200 {micro}s damping time. Meanwhile the beam impedance should be minimized. The design work for these two types of stripline is discussed in this paper. NSLS2 is a third-generation light source under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The machine will have < 1nm.rad horizontal emittance by using weak dipoles together with damping wigglers. For the storage ring of 792m circumference, geometric impedance, resistive wall impedance and ion effects are expected to be significant. A transverse bunch-by-bunch feedback system has been designed to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities. More information can be found in previous paper.

  8. Strangeness Production in 19.6 GeV Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    the universe. As of now, Quark-Giuon Plasma, QGP , is what scientists be lieve existed at the beginning. QGP is studied through the STAR Experiment at...Labs PHOBOS - One of the other experiments at Brookhaven National Labs QGP – Quark Gluon Plasma RHIC – Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RICH – Ring...dynamics of the first three milliseconds of the universe. As of now, Quark-Gluon Plasma, QGP , is what scientists believe existed at the beginning. QGP is a

  9. Status and upgrade of the VEPP-4 storage-ring facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levichev, E. B.

    2016-12-01

    The VEPP-4 facility is an e + e - collider with a beam energy up to 2 GeV. The scientific program includes topics in high-energy and nuclear physics, as well as various investigations using synchrotron radiation and polarized or unpolarized charged-particle beams. An energy upgrade to 5 GeV is planned, and reliable and efficient operation of the storage-ring complex upon increased energy must be provided. We discuss the recent experimental results and the opportunities to be created by the energy upgrade.

  10. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  11. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  12. Electromagnetic probes in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Hees H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their penetrating nature, electromagnetic probes, i.e., lepton-antilepton pairs (dileptons and photons are unique tools to gain insight into the nature of the hot and dense medium of strongly-interacting particles created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, including hints to the nature of the restoration of chiral symmetry of QCD. Of particular interest are the spectral properties of the electromagnetic current-correlation function of these particles within the dense and/or hot medium. The related theoretical investigations of the in-medium properties of the involved particles in both the partonic and hadronic part of the QCD phase diagram underline the importance of a proper understanding of the properties of various hadron resonances in the medium.

  13. Dilepton Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, R

    2013-01-01

    The properties of electromagnetic radiation from hot fireballs as created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. We first outline how the medium effects in the electromagnetic spectral function, which governs thermal production rates, relate to the (partial) restoration of chiral symmetry. In particular, we show how chiral and QCD sum rules, together with constraints from lattice QCD, can render these relations quantitative. Turning to dilepton data, we elaborate on updates in the space-time evolution and quark-gluon plasma emission rates from lattice-QCD calculations. With a now available excitation function in dilepton spectra from the RHIC beam-energy scan connecting down to SPS energies, we argue that a consistent interpretation of dilepton data emerges. Combining well-constrained space-time evolutions with state-of-the-art emission rates identifies most of the radiation to emanate from around the pseudo-critical temperature, and thus confirms resonance melting as the prevalent mechanism...

  14. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.

    1994-10-01

    Various mutagenic effects by heavy ions were studied in bacteria, irradiated at accelerators in Dubna, Prague, Berkeley or Darmstadt. Endpoints investigated are histidine reversion (B. subtilis, S. typhimurium), azide resistance (B. subtilis), mutation in the lactose operon (E. coli), SOS chromotest (E. coli) and λ-prophage induction (E. coli). It was found that the cross sections of the different endpoints show a similar dependence on energy. For light ions (Z = 26) it increases with energy up to a maximum or saturation. The increment becomes steeper with increasing Z. This dependence on energy suggests a ``mutagenic belt'' inside the track that is restricted to an area where the density of departed energy is low enough not to kill the cell, but high enough to induce mutations.

  15. System size in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yang-Yang; ZHAO Lin-Jie; YUAN Zhong-Sheng; ZHANG Dan-Dan; FANG Wei; XU Ming-Mei

    2011-01-01

    System size is more than a geometrical quantity in relativistic heavy ion collisions; it is closely related to evolution process,i.e.a different system size corresponds to a different evolution process,and whether QGP is produced depends on the system size.We propose that the system size should be under the same level when comparing the measurements from different colliding nuclei.The equivalence of the peripheral collisions of Au-Au and the central collisions of smaller nuclei is studied using the Monte Carlo method.Comparing the transverse overlapping area of the colliding nuclei,the number of participant nucleons and the number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions in various colliding nuclei,we give an estimate of the correspondence in system size.This is helpful in the experimental comparison of the measurements from different colliding nuclei.

  16. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards

  17. Theory overview of Heavy Ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, T

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses some recently active topics in the theoretical interpretation of high energy heavy ion collisions at the LHC and at RHIC. We argue that the standard paradigm for understanding the spacetime evolution of the bulk of the matter produced in the collision is provided by viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, which can be used to systematically extract properties of the QCD medium from experimental results. The initial conditions of this hydrodynamical evolution are increasingly well understood in terms of gluon saturation, and can be quantified using Classical Yang-Mills fields and QCD effective kinetic theory. Hard and electromagnetic probes of the plasma provide additional constraints. A particularly fascinating subject are high multiplicity proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, where some of the characteristics previously attributed to only nucleus-nucleus collisions have been observed.

  18. Hydrodynamic Approaches in Relativistic Heavy Ion Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza, Rafael Derradi; Kodama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation with the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to...

  19. Heavy Ion results from RHIC-BNL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esumi Shinlchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from heavy ion collision experiments from RHIC at BNL are presented and discussed in terms of Quark Gluon Plasm properties, such as partonic collectivity and partonic energy loss. The experimental results with direct photons and heavy quarks have given important additional insights of the plasma on top of what has been known with light hadrons. Higher order event anisotropies and the related results have provided the geometrical, temporal and dynamical information of the plasma. The beam energy dependence of the various measurements could reveal the structure of QCD phase diagram and possibly the critical point in the diagram, where the properties of phase transition are expected to change drastically.

  20. Identifying multiquark hadrons from heavy ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  1. Application of hydrodynamics to heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felsberger, Lukas

    2014-12-02

    The Bjorken model is a simple tool for making rough predictions of the hydrodynamic evolution of the thermalized matter created in a heavy ion collision. The advantage of the model clearly lies in its simplicity, rather than accuracy. As it is still used for making rough estimations 'by hand', in this thesis, I investigate in which cases the Bjorken model gives useful results and in which it is not recommended. For central collisions, I show which critical size the nuclei should have so that the Bjorken model can be applied. For non-central collisions, I demonstrate that using Glauber initial conditions combined with the Bjorken evolution, leads to reasonable results up to large impact parameters. Finally, I study the case of a non-ideal (viscous) description of the thermalized matter which leads to strongly differing results if first- or second-order hydrodynamics is applied.

  2. Ion sources for heavy ion fusion (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Simon S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Tauschwitz, A.; Grote, D.; Deadrick, F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of ion sources for heavy ion fusion will be reported with particular emphasis on a recently built 2 MV injector. The new injector is based on an electrostatic quadrupole configuration, and has produced pulsed K+ ions of 950 mA peak from a 6.7 in. curved alumino silicate source. The ion beam has reached 2.3 MV with an energy flatness of ±0.2% over 1 μs. The measured normalized edge emittance of less than 1 π mm mrad is close to the source temperature limit. The design, construction, performance, and comparisons with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations will be described.

  3. Production of Charge in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, Scott; Ratti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    By analyzing preliminary experimental measurements of charge-balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic-Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), it is found that pictures where balancing charges are produced in a single surge, and therefore separated by a single length scale, are inconsistent with data. In contrast, a model that assumes two surges, one associated with the formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma and a second associated with hadronization, provides a far superior reproduction of the data. A statistical analysis of the model comparison finds that the two-surge model best reproduces the data if the charge production from the first surge is similar to expectations for equilibrated matter taken from lattice gauge theory. The charges created in the first surge appear to separate by approximately one unit of spatial rapidity before emission, while charges from the second wave appear to have separated by approximately a half unit or less.

  4. Holography, Hydrodynamization and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michal P

    2016-01-01

    In the course of the past several years holography has emerged as an ab initio tool in exploring strongly-time-dependent phenomena in gauge theories. These lecture notes overview recent developments in this area driven by phenomenological questions concerning applicability of hydrodynamics under extreme conditions occurring in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. The topics include equilibration time scales, holographic collisions and hydrodynamization from the point of view of the asymptotic character of the hydrodynamic gradient expansion. The emphasis is put on concepts rather than calculational techniques and particular attention is devoted to present these developments in the context of the most recent advances and some of the open problems.

  5. Particle Interferometry in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W

    1997-01-01

    By measuring hadronic single-particle spectra and two-particle correlations in heavy-ion collisions, the size and dynamical state of the collision fireball at freeze-out can be reconstructed. I discuss the relevant theoretical methods and their limitations. By applying the formalism to recent pion correlation data from Pb+Pb collisions at CERN we demonstrate that the collision zone has undergone strong transverse growth before freeze-out (by a factor 2-3 in each direction), and that it expands both longitudinally and transversally. From the thermal and flow energy density at freeze-out the energy density at the onset of transverse expansion can be estimated from conservation laws. It comfortably exceeds the critical value for the transition to color deconfined matter.

  6. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  7. Prompt processes in heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann Master Equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons partition the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho and from reactions of /sup 40/Ar or /sup 40/Ca. We point out ambiguities in deducing angle-integrated energy spectra from double differential spectra. With no additional free parameters, our model successfully reproduces a large body of high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra by assuming an incoherent n-p-bremsstrahlung mechanism. 45 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-11-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 239/Np and /sup 240/Pu are /sup 100/Zr, /sup 104/Mo, /sup 106/Mo and /sup 106/Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for /sup 234/U - the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  9. High energy heavy ion tracks in bubble detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, S L; Guo, H Y; Tu, C Q; Wang, Y L; Doke, T; Kato, T; Ozaki, K; Kyan, A; Piao, Y; Murakami, T

    1999-01-01

    Bubble detectors which are commonly used as neutron detectors have been demonstrated through this study to be good detectors for registration of high energy heavy ion tracks. Large size bubble detectors made in China Institute of Atomic Energy were irradiated to heavy ions Ar and C up to 650 MeV/u and 400 MeV/u, respectively. Very clear features of stringy tracks of high energy heavy ions and their fragmentations are manifested and distinguishable. A single track created by a specific high energy heavy ion is composed of a line of bubbles, which is visible by naked eyes and retained for months without reduction in size. The creation of heavy ion tracks in bubble detectors is governed by a threshold whose essence is approximately a critical value of energy loss rate (dE/dX) sub c similar to that of etch track detectors. Ranges of heavy ions in bubble detectors are apparent and predictable by existing formulas. Identification of high energy heavy ions and the applications to heavy ion physics, cosmic rays, exot...

  10. PRISMA - a magnetic spectrometer for heavy ions at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latina, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Beghini, S.; Behera, B.R.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; De Rosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Gulmini, M.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Maron, G.; Menegazzo, R.; Marginean, N.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D.R.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Scarlassara, F.; Szilner, S.; Toniolo, N.; Trotta, M.; Wu, Y.W

    2004-04-05

    The heavy-ion magnetic spectrometer PRISMA was recently installed at Laboratori Naz. di Legnaro, in order to exploit the heavy-ion beams of the XTU Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex, with masses up to A{approx_equal}200 at energies {approx_equal}5-10 MeV MeV A.

  11. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  12. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    McLerran, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark Gluon Plasma, the Color Glass Condensate, the Glasma and Quarkyonic Matter. A novel effect that may be associated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts and explain how they may be seen in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  13. Quarkonia at finite temperature in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saumen Datta

    2015-05-01

    The behaviour of quarkonia in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. After a detailed discussion of the current theoretical understanding of quarkonia in a static equilibriated plasma, we discuss quarkonia yield from the fireball created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision experiments. We end with a brief discussion of the experimental results and outlook.

  14. Theoretical foundations of synchrotron and storage ring RF systems

    CERN Document Server

    Klingbeil, Harald; Lens, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    This course-tested text is an ideal starting point for engineers and physicists entering the field of particle accelerators. The fundamentals are comprehensively introduced, derivations of essential results are provided, and a consistent notation style used throughout the book allows readers to quickly familiarize themselves with the field, providing a solid theoretical basis for further studies.   Emphasis is placed on the essential features of the longitudinal motion of charged particle beams, together with the corresponding RF generation and power amplification devices for synchrotron and storage ring systems. In particular, electrical engineering aspects such as closed-loop control of system components are discussed.   The book also offers a valuable resource for graduate students in physics, electronics engineering, or mathematics looking for an introductory and self-contained text on accelerator physics.

  15. Spin Motion and Resonances in Accelerators and Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant,E.

    2008-01-01

    Some of the basic aspects of the spin dynamics of accelerators and storage rings are reviewed. Since the components of spin parallel and perpendicular to the particle velocity behave differently it is desirable to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a frame of reference that exhibits this difference explicitly. The conventional treatment employs a coordinate system derived from a reference orbit. An alternate coordinate system, based on the actual trajectory of the particle, leads to simplified equations of spin motion but, contrary to a conjecture presented in a previous note, resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical, as pointed out by Kondratenko. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  16. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  17. Coupling measurement and correction at the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Brightness is an important parameter for 3rd generation light source. Correcting the emittance coupling is a realistic way to increase brightness without any additional equipment in a machine under operation. The main sources of emittance coupling are betatron coupling and vertical dispersion. At the SSRF storage ring, tune split and LOCO are used to measure the respective betatron and emittance coupling. Both of these sources can be corrected by skew quadrupoles. By measuring the skew quadrupole-coupling response matrix, betatron coupling can be changed from 0.014% to 2%. But the vertical dispersion changes at the same time. LOCO can find the suitable setting to correct simultaneously the betatron coupling and vertical dispersion. The emittance coupling can be reduced to 0.17% by this method. More simulations show the potential for smaller emittance coupling if more skew quadrupoles are employed.

  18. Emittance growth induced by electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Coppa, G

    2006-01-01

    In proton and positron storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can accumulate in the beam pipe due to various mechanisms (photoemission, residual gas ionization, beam-induced multipacting). The so-formed electron cloud interacts with the positively charged bunches, giving rise to instabilities, emittance growth and losses. This phenomenon has been observed in several existing machines such as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), whose operation has been constrained by the electron-cloud problem, and it is a concern for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud has features which cannot be fully taken into account by the conventional and known theories from accelerators and plasma physics. Computer simulations are indispensable for a proper prediction and understanding of the instability dynamics. The main feature which renders the beam-cloud interactions so peculiar is that the the electron cloud...

  19. Pulsed neutron fields measurements around a synchrotron storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresana, Marco; Ballerini, Marcello; Ulfbeck, David Garf; Hertel, Niels; Manessi, Giacomo Paolo; Søgaard, Carsten

    2017-09-01

    A measurement campaign was performed for characterizing the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), in selected positions at ISA, Aarhus, Denmark, around the ASTRID and ASTRID2 storage rings. The neutron stray radiation field is characterized here by very intense radiation bursts with a low repetition rate, which result in a comparatively low average H*(10) rate. As a consequence, devices specifically conceived for operating in pulsed neutron fields must be employed for efficiently measuring in this radiation environment, in order to avoid severe underestimations of the H*(10) rate. The measurements were performed with the ELSE NUCLEAR LUPIN 5401 BF3-NP rem counter, a detector characterized by an innovative working principle that is not affected by dead time losses. This allowed characterizing both the H*(10) and the time structure of the radiation field in the pre-selected positions.

  20. Performance of the OK-4/Duke storage ring FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, V N; Pinayev, I V; Wu, Y

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report measured parameters of the OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring. The OK-4 FEL was being operated continuously for 2 yr in the broad wavelength range for user applications utilising spontaneous and coherent XUV and UV radiation as well as Compton back-scattered gamma-rays in the range of 2-58 MeV. During this time, the OK-4 FEL lased in the range from 193.7 to about 730 nm using five sets of mirrors and electron beam energies from 240 to 800 MeV. Our predictions for the OK-4 FEL are compared with measured performance, both in the CW and in the giant pulse mode. We discuss our future plans for the OK-4 FEL operation as well as the construction and commissioning of the OK-5 FEL with helical wigglers.

  1. Heavy ion radiobiology for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Research in the field of biological effects of heavy charged particles is needed for both heavy-ion therapy (hadrontherapy) and protection from the exposure to galactic cosmic radiation in long-term manned space missions. Although the exposure conditions (e.g. high- vs. low-dose rate) and relevant endpoints (e.g. cell killing vs. neoplastic transformation) are different in the two fields, it is clear that a substantial overlap exists in several research topics. Three such topics are discussed in this short review: individual radiosensitivity, mixed radiation fields, and late stochastic effects of heavy ions. In addition, researchers involved either in experimental studies on space radiation protection or heavy-ion therapy will basically use the same accelerator facilities. It seems to be important that novel accelerator facilities planned (or under construction) for heavy-ion therapy reserve a substantial amount of beamtime to basic studies of heavy-ion radiobiology and its applications in space radiation research.

  2. Heavy ion tracks in polycarbonate. Comparison with a heavy ion irradiated model compound (diphenyl carbonate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferain, E.; Legras, R.

    1993-09-01

    The chemical modifications induced by energetic heavy ion irradiation of polycarbonate (PC) film are determined by GPC, HPLC, ESR, TGA, IR and UV spectrophotometry. The main results of the irradiation are creation of radicals, chain scission, cross-linking and appearance of new chemical groups in the main polymer chain. As far as the creation of new groups is concerned, they are determined by means of a model compound of PC: the diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The following compounds are identified after energetic heavy ion irradiation of DPC: salicylic acid, phenol, 4,4'-biphenol, 2,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol, 2-phenoxyphenol, phenyl ether, phenyl benzoate, phenyl salicylate, 2-phenylphenol and 2-phenoxyphenyl benzoate. A similarity between the heavy ion irradiation and a heat treatment has also been established with DPC. On the basis of these results, we try to give an explanation of the preferential attack along the tracks of the irradiated film. Also, an explanation of the well-known beneficial effect of an UV exposition of the irradiated film on the selectivity of this preferential chemical attack is suggested.

  3. Design study of a resonant Schottky pick-up for the Rare-RI Ring project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzaki, F., E-mail: suzaki@ribf.riken.jp [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Zenihiro, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamaguchi, T., E-mail: yamaguti@phy.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Uesaka, T.; Wakasugi, M.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The heavy-ion storage ring project, the Rare-RI Ring, is ongoing at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. • The Rare-RI Ring will enable precision isochronous mass spectrometry of r-process nuclei. • A resonant Schottky pick-up will be used for the precise tuning of isochronous optics of the storage ring. • Simulation results of 3D electromagnetic field calculations show a high sensitivity of stored single-ion detection. -- Abstract: The new heavy-ion storage ring project Rare-RI Ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory launched in 2012 aims at precision isochronous mass spectrometry for single ions of exotic nuclides. To precisely tune the storage-ring ion optical conditions to the isochronous field setting, Schottky noise pick-up technique will be employed. Pillbox-type resonant cavity, similar to the Schottky pick-up system successfully operating at the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI, is adopted for the pick-up probe. To determine the design values of the cavity, we systematically performed a simulation study of three-dimensional electromagnetic field calculations in the high frequency region. High shunt impedance obtained in the simulation will enable us to detect stored single ions with charge down to q≃15.

  4. Numerical simulation of crystalline ion beams in storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkov, I.; Möhl, D.; Katayama, T.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Syresin, E.; Trubnikov, G.; Tsutsui, H.

    2004-10-01

    The use of crystalline ion beams can increase luminosity in the collider and in experiments with targets for investigation of rare radioactive isotopes. The ordered state of circulating ion beams was observed at several storage rings: NAP-M (Proceedings of the Fourth All Union Conference on Charged Particle Accelerators, Vol. 2, Nauka, Moscow, 1975 (in Russian); Part. Accel. 7 (1976) 197; At. Energy 40 (1976) 49; Preprint CERN/PS/AA 79-41, Geneva, 1979) (Novosibirsk), ESR (Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 3803) and SIS (Proceedings of EPAC'2000, 2000) (Darmstadt), CRYRING (Proceedings of PAC'2001, 2001) (Stockholm) and PALLAS (Proceedings of the Conference on Applications of Accelerators in Research and Industry, AIP Conference Proceedings, p. 576, in preparation) (München). New criteria of the beam orderliness are derived and verified with a new program code. Molecular dynamics technique is inserted in BETACOOL program (Proceedings of Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Bad Honnef, Germany, 2001) and used for numerical simulation of crystalline beams. The sudden reduction of momentum spread in the ESR experiment is described with this code. The simulation shows a good agreement with the experimental results. The code has then been used to calculate characteristics of the ordered state of ion beams for the MUSES Ion Ring (IR) (MUSES Conceptual Design Report, RIKEN, Japan, 2001) in collider mode. A new strategy of the cooling process is proposed which permits to increase significantly the linear density of the ordered ion beam and thereby the luminosity of electron-ion colliding experiments.

  5. Low-emittance tuning at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Shanks, James; Sagan, David

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 the Cornell Electron/Positron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured from an electron/positron collider to serve as a testbed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings. One of the primary goals of the CESR Test Accelerator (CesrTA) project is to develop low emittance tuning techniques to achieve sub-10pm geometric vertical emittance at 2.085 GeV. This paper discusses the tuning methods used at CesrTA to achieve low-emittance conditions. A minimum vertical emittance of 8.7 +2.9/-3.4(sys) +/-0.2(stat) pm has been achieved at 2.085 GeV. In various configurations and beam energies the correction technique routinely achieves vertical emittance <15 pm after correction. Beam-based measurement and correction requires about 15 minutes. Simulations modeling the effects of magnet misalignments, BPM errors, and emittance correction algorithm suggest the residual vertical emittance measured at the conclusion of the tuning procedure is dominated by sources other than optics errors and misalignments...

  6. EDM searches at storage rings with Wien filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleev, Artem [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Nikolaev, Kolya [Landau Institute, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Collaboration: JEDI-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Future searches of an EDM of protons and deuterons at COSY storage ring in Juelich, envision the use of Wien filter acting as spin rotator. Crucial idea is that Wien filter produces spin kicks which give a growth of the EDM signal. In all approaches one starts with the injection of the vertically polarized beam. Radiofrequency Wien filter modulates spin tune of stored particles. If EDM is non-zero this modulation conspires with the EDM-induced rotation of the spin in the motional electric field in the ring and generates the EDM signal - the in-plane horizontal polarization. We discuss the duality between RF spin flipper and RF Wien filter and we argue why spin coherence time is equal for two devices. Another case is static Wien filter with constant fields. Behavior of spin vector is the same, but the machine is operated exactly at imperfection resonance (for protons, Gγ=2), which drastically decreases spin coherence time. Last case is more promising but it needs supercompensated magnetic lattice, an option which has to be studied further.

  7. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.J. (ed.)

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  8. Ultimate storage ring based on fourth-order geometric achromats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Cai

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have designed an “ultimate” storage ring for a future light source that would be resided in the positron-electron-project (PEP tunnel and achieves the diffraction-limited emittances (at 1.5 Å of 12 pm-rad in both horizontal and vertical planes with a 4.5-GeV electron beam. These emittances include the contribution of intrabeam scattering at a nominal current of 200 mA in 3300 bunches. This quality beam in conjunction with a conventional 4-m undulator in a straight section can generate synchrotron radiation having a spectral brightness above 10^{22}  [photons/s/mm^{2}/mrad^{2}/0.1%BW] at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes this design competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In addition, the beam lifetime is several hours and the dynamic aperture is large enough to allow off-axis injection. The alignment and stability tolerances, though challenging, are achievable. A ring with all these properties is only possible because of several major advances in mitigating the effects of nonlinear resonances.

  9. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  10. New Results from Experiments at the HERA Storage Ring and from ARGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, D.

    1994-10-01

    Recent results from the ep storage ring HERA and from the e+e- storage ring DORIS II are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the specific layout of the detectors and to the progress in calorimetry achieved in the last few years. The impact of the ARGUS experiment on B- and π-physics is discussed.

  11. Analytical solutions for spin response functions in model storage rings with Siberian Snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, S.R. [Convergent Computing Inc., P.O. Box 561, Shoreham, NY 11786 (United States)], E-mail: srmane@optonline.net

    2009-03-01

    I present analytical solutions for the spin response functions for radial field rf dipole spin flippers in models of storage rings with one Siberian Snake or two diametrically opposed orthogonal Siberian Snakes. The solutions can serve as benchmarks tests for computer programs. The spin response functions can be used to calculate the resonance strengths for radial field rf dipole spin flippers in storage rings.

  12. Coherent Harmonic Generation using the Elettra Storage-Ring Optical Klystron A Numerical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Curbis, F

    2005-01-01

    Coherent harmonic generation can be obtained by means of frequency up-conversion of a high-power external laser focused into the first undulator of an optical klystron. The standard configuration is based on a single-pass device, where the seed laser is synchronized with an electron beam entering the first undulator of the optical klystron after being accelerated using a linear accelerator. As an alternative, the optical klystron may be installed on a storage ring, where it is normally used as interaction region for an oscillator free-electron laser. In this case, removing the optical cavity and using an external seed, one obtains a configuration which is similar to the standard one but also presents some peculiar characteristics. In this paper we investigate the possibility of harmonic generation using the Elettra storage-ring optical klystron. We explore different experimental set-ups varying the beam energy, the seed characteristics and the strength of the optical-klystron dispersive section. We also study...

  13. Commissioning of the Cryogenic Plant for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at Heidelberg

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, R; Grieser, M; Haberstroh, C; Kaiser, D; Lange, M; Laux, F; Menk, S; Orlov, D A; Repnow, R; Sieber, T; Quack, H; Varju, J; Wolf A

    2009-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for low velocity atomic and molecular ion beams is under construction. In contrast to existing electrostatic storage rings, the Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR will be cooled down to temperatures below 2 K. Thus acting as a large cryopump it will provide long storage times and, in addition, open a new field of quantum state controlled molecular physics due to a low heat radiation background from space-like environment. A concept for cooling the storage ring has been developed and is presently tested by means of a linear trap as a prototype with a length of 1/10 of the planned ring. A commercial refrigerator with 21 W at 2 K has been successfully commissioned and was connected to the prototype. This paper presents the status of the cryogenic plant after the commissioning and one year of operation.

  14. Steady State Analysis of Short-wavelength, High-gainFELs in a Large Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.; Bane, K.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Hettel, R.; /SLAC; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2007-10-15

    Storage ring FELs have operated successfully in the low-gain regime using optical cavities. Discussions of a high-gain FEL in a storage ring typically involve a special bypass to decouple the FEL interaction from the storage ring dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the coupled dynamics of a high-gain FEL in a large storage ring such as PEP and analyze the equilibrium solution. We show that an FEL in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes can be integrated into a very bright storage ring and potentially provides three orders of magnitude improvement in the average brightness at these radiation wavelengths. We also discuss possibilities of seeding with HHG sources to obtain ultra-short, high-peak power EUV and soft x-ray pulses.

  15. CHICO, a heavy ion detector for Gammasphere

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, M W; Wu, C Y; Gray, R W; Teng, R; Long, C

    2000-01-01

    A 4 pi position-sensitive heavy-ion detector system, CHICO, has been developed primarily for use in conjunction with the 4 pi gamma-ray facility, Gammasphere. The CHICO detector comprises an array of 20 Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs) covering 12 deg.

  16. Heavy Ion Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Morsch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for HEP99, Tampere, Finland, 15-21 July 1999The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN is also planned as a heavy ion collider with lead ions colliding at an energy of 5.5 TeV. This corresponds to collisions of matter with cosmic rays of the highest energies observed so far promising the study of new and exciting aspects of physics. In addition to the heaviest system (Pb--Pb), collisions of lower mass ions are foreseen as a means to study collisions at different energy density and proton-nucleus (p--A) collisions provide indispensable reference data for the A--A collisions.ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only detector fully dedicated to the physics of nuclear collisions. It is designed to cover the full richness of hadronic and leptonic signals expected at the LHC allowing to establish and to study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter, the quark gluon plasma (QGP). The CMS experiment is optimised for the study of hard proce...

  17. Heavy ion acceleration at parallel shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Galinsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of alpha particle acceleration at parallel shock due to an interaction with Alfvén waves self-consistently excited in both upstream and downstream regions was conducted using a scale-separation model (Galinsky and Shevchenko, 2000, 2007. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped and hence where particles will be pitch-angle scattered. It considers the total distribution function (for the bulk plasma and high energy tail, so no standard assumptions (e.g. seed populations, or some ad-hoc escape rate of accelerated particles are required. The heavy ion scattering on hydromagnetic turbulence generated by both protons and ions themselves is considered. The contribution of alpha particles to turbulence generation is important because of their relatively large mass-loading parameter Pα=nαmα/npmp (mp, np and mα, nα are proton and alpha particle mass and density that defines efficiency of wave excitation. The energy spectra of alpha particles are found and compared with those obtained in test particle approximation.

  18. Strange Particles and Heavy Ion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassalleck, Bernd [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Fields, Douglas [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-04-28

    This very long-running grant has supported many experiments in nuclear and particle physics by a group from the University of New Mexico. The gamut of these experiments runs from many aspects of Strangeness Nuclear Physics, to rare Kaon decays, to searches for exotic Hadrons such as Pentaquark or H-Dibaryon, and finally to Spin Physics within the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC. These experiments were performed at a number of laboratories worldwide: first and foremost at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), but also at CERN, KEK, and most recently at J-PARC. In this Final Technical Report we summarize progress and achievements for this award since our last Progress Report, i.e. for the period of fall 2013 until the award’s termination on November 30, 2015. The report consists of two parts, representing our two most recent experimental efforts, participation in the Nucleon Spin Physics program of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL – Task 1, led by Douglas Fields; and participation in several Strangeness Nuclear Physics experiments at J-PARC, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Center in Tokai-mura, Japan – Task 2, led by Bernd Bassalleck.

  19. Reaction mechanisms in heavy ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubian J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the reaction mechanisms involved in heavy ion fusion. We begin with collisions of tightly bound systems, considering three energy regimes: energies above the Coulomb barrier, energies just below the barrier and deep sub-barrier energies. We show that channel coupling effects may influence the fusion process at above-barrier energies, increasing or reducing the cross section predicted by single barrier penetration model. Below the Coulomb barrier, it enhances the cross section, and this effect increases with the system’s size. It is argued that this behavior can be traced back to the increasing importance of Coulomb coupling with the charge of the collision partners. The sharp drop of the fusion cross section observed at deep sub-barrier energies is addressed and the theoretical approaches to this phenomenon are discussed. We then consider the reaction mechanisms involved in fusion reactions of weakly bound systems, paying particular attention to the calculations of complete and incomplete fusion available in the literature.

  20. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Bangerter, R.O. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Bock, R. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  1. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bangerter, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bock, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  2. Electromagnetic Radiations from Heavy Ion Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we have discussed the different sources of photons and dileptons produced in heavy ion collision (HIC. The transverse momentum (pT spectra of photons for different collision energies are analyzed with a view of extracting the thermal properties of the system formed in HIC. We showed the effect of viscosity on pT spectra of produced thermal photons. The dilepton productions from hot hadrons are considered including the spectral change of light vector mesons in the thermal bath. We have analyzed the pT and invariant mass (M spectra of dileptons for different collision energies too. As the individual spectra are constrained by certain unambiguous hydrodynamical inputs, so we evaluated the ratio of photon to dilepton spectra, Rem, to overcome those quantities. We argue that the variation of the radial velocity extracted from Rem with M is indicative of a phase transition from the initially produced partons to hadrons. In the calculations of interferometry involving dilepton pairs, it is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of HBT radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in HIC. Elliptic flow (v2 of dilepton is also studied at sNN=2.76 TeV for 30–40% centrality using the (2+1d hydrodynamical model.

  3. High Gluon Densities in Heavy Ions Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of heavy ion collisions are dominated by high density systems of gluons that carry each a small fraction $x$ of the momenta of the colliding nucleons. A distinguishing feature of such systems is the phenomenon of "saturation" which tames the expected growth of the gluon density as the energy of the collision increases. The onset of saturation occurs at a particular transverse momentum scale, the "saturation momentum", that emerges dynamically and that marks the onset of non-linear gluon interactions. At high energy, and for large nuclei, the saturation momentum is large compared to the typical hadronic scale, making high density gluons amenable to a description with weak coupling techniques. This paper reviews some of the challenges faced in the study of such dense systems of small $x$ gluons, and of the progress made in addressing them. The focus is on conceptual issues, and the presentation is both pedagogical, and critical. Examples where high gluon density could play a visible role in hea...

  4. A radial TPC for heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Garabatos, C

    2000-01-01

    The CERES experiment at the CERN SPS has been recently upgraded with a TPC with radial drift field, the first one of its sort. Constructed during 1998, it has been successfully operated in commissioning and physics runs, with muon, proton, and heavy-ion beams. A high voltage electrode of about 0.5 m radius is surrounded by sixteen 2 m long readout chambers, placed at a radius of 1.3 m, with chevron-shaped readout pads. The field cage is enclosed by two low-mass voltage degraders at each end of the cylindrical structure. A Ne-CO/sub 2/ [80-20] gas mixture allows for a safe operation and good transport properties under drift fields ranging from 200 to 600 V/cm. A spatial resolution better than 700 microns and 350 microns in r and rdelta (phi), respectively, has been achieved in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field. Details of its construction as well as results of the operation and performance in a high multiplicity environment are presented. (0 refs).

  5. Heavy ion acceleration using femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (<200 nm) gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the time history of the laser bullet is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 mkm and energy 27 Joules the calculated reflection, transmission and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80 %, 5 % and 15 %, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8 %. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon and flux . Analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the Radiation Pressure Acceleration regime and the onset of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleratio...

  6. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James Ritman

    2006-05-01

    As a result of the rapid rise of the coupling constant at low momentum transfers, perturbation theory is not an appropriate method to describe the strong interaction. In this kinematic regime other methods such as lattice QCD or effective field theories are more appropriate to investigate the appearance of a still unsettled phenomena: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. Furthermore, the confinement of quarks and gluons to hadrons allows crucial tests of fundamental symmetries that are inherent to the QCD Lagrangian but are broken in hadronic systems. Thus, high precision measurements of the production and decay of specific hadronic states provides decisive benchmarks to investigate the properties of QCD in this regime. A new series of experiments are being prepared using nearly full acceptance detectors for neutral and charged particles around internal targets in high intensity, phase-space-cooled hadronic beams. Later this year, it is planned to transfer the WASA detector from the CELSIUS to the COSY ring in order to measure the production and various decay channels of the and ' mesons, thereby investigating the violation of P, C, T, and combinations thereof, as well as isospin violation. The experimental and theoretical techniques employed here will provide an important basis to extend these investigations to the static and dynamical properties of hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. Additional related perspectives will be opened at the new facility ranging from the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter to measurements of the nucleon's transverse spin distribution in the valence quark region using polarized antiprotons.

  7. Heavy ion fusion experiments at LBNL and LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahle, L

    1998-08-19

    The long-range goal of the US Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is to develop heavy ion accelerators capable of igniting inertial fusion targets to generate fusion energy for electrical power production. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion consist of several subsystems: ion sources, injectors, matching sections, combiners, induction acceleration sections with electric and magnetic focusing, beam compression and bending sections, and a final-focus system to focus the beams onto the target. We are currently assembling or performing experiments to address the physics of all these subsystems. This paper will discuss some of these experiments.

  8. A short introduction to heavy-ion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sourendu

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions provide the only laboratory tests of relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature. Understanding these is a necessary step in understanding the origins of our universe. These lectures introduce the subject to experimental particle physicists, in the hope that they will be useful to others as well. The phase diagram of QCD is briefly touched upon. Kinematic variables which arise in the collisions of heavy-ions beyond those in the collisions of protons or electrons are introduced. Finally, a few of the signals studied in heavy-ion collisions, and the kind of physics questions which they open up are discussed.

  9. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Almási, Gábor András

    2014-01-01

    We have considered the equilibration in a relativistic heavy ion collision using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c which time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have also shown that the mass spectra of broad resonances immediately follows their in-medium spectral functions.

  10. An EBIS-based heavy ion injector for the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.; Raparia, D.

    1994-09-01

    An electron beam ion source (EBIS), followed by a heavy ion RFQ and superconducting linac, can be considered as a heavy ion injector for high energy accelerators, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A test EBIS, on long term loan from Sandia National Laboratory, is presently being commissioned at BNL. Experiments on this source will be used in evaluating the parameters for an EBIS-based RHIC injector. Some results of this commissioning, as well as the conceptual designs of the RFQ and linac, are presented.

  11. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for heavy ion physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2005-05-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics at present and at the next generation heavy ion facilities is given with a special emphasis on the conditions for heavy ion detection and the potential advantage of cryogenic detectors for applications in heavy ion physics. Two types of calorimetric low temperature detectors for the detection of energetic heavy ions have been developed and their response to the impact of heavy ions was investigated systematically for a wide range of energies (E=0.1-360 MeV/amu) and ion species ({sup 4}He.. {sup 238}U). Excellent results with respect to energy resolution, {delta}E/E ranging from 1 to 5 x 10{sup -3} even for the heaviest ions, and other basic detector properties such as energy linearity with no indication of a pulse height defect, energy threshold, detection efficiency and radiation hardness have been obtained, representing a considerable improvement as compared to conventional heavy ion detectors based on ionization. With the achieved performance, calorimetric low temperature detectors bear a large potential for applications in various fields of basic and applied heavy ion research. A brief overview of a few prominent examples, such as high resolution nuclear spectroscopy, high resolution nuclear mass determination, which may be favourably used for identification of superheavy elements or in direct reaction experiments with radioactive beams, as well as background discrimination in accelerator mass spectrometry, is given, and first results are presented. For instance, the use of cryogenic detectors allowed to improve the sensitivity in trace analysis of {sup 236}U by one order of magnitude and to determine the up to date smallest isotope ratio of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U = 6.1 x 10{sup -12} in a sample of natural uranium. Besides the detection of heavy ions, the concept of cryogenic detectors also

  12. The electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR - Mechanical concept and realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Kühnel, K.-U.; Lange, M.; Menk, S.; Laux, F.; Orlov, D. A.; Repnow, R.; Schröter, C. D.; Shornikov, A.; Sieber, T.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.; Zajfman, D.

    2011-12-01

    A new and technologically challenging project, the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR, is presently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Applying liquid helium cooling, the CSR, with 35 m circumference, will provide a low temperature environment of only a few Kelvin and an extremely high vacuum of better than 10 -13 mbar. To realize these conditions the mechanical design has been completed and now the first quarter section is in the construction phase. For the onion skin structure of the cryogenic system we have at the outer shell the cryostat chambers, realized by welded rectangular stainless steel frames with aluminum plates. The next two shells are fabricated as aluminum shields kept at 80 and 40 K. The inner vacuum chambers for the experimental vacuum consist of stainless steel chambers cladded with external copper sheets connected to the LHe lines for optimized thermal equilibration and cryopumping. Additional large surface 2 K units are installed for cryogenic pumping of H 2. The mechanical concepts and the realization will be presented in detail.

  13. Design of the muon collider isochronous storage ring lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbojevic, D.; Ng, K. Y.; Courant, E. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Johnstone, C.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.; Tepikian, S.

    1996-04-01

    The muon collider would extend the limitations of e+ e- colliders and provide new physics potentials, with possible discovery of the heavy Higgs bosons. At the maximum energy of 2 TeV the projected luminosity is of the order of 1035 cm-2 s-1. The colliding μ+ μ- bunches have to be focused to a very small transverse size of 2.8 μm, which is accomplished by the betatron functions at the crossing point of β*=3 mm. This requires a longitudinal space of the same length, 3 mm. These very short bunches at 2 TeV could circulate only in a quasi-isochronous storage ring where the momentum compaction is very close to zero. We report on a design of a muon collider isochronous lattice. The momentum compaction is brought to zero by having the average value of the dispersion function through dipoles equal to zero. This is accomplished by a combination of FODO cells with a low-beta insertion. The dispersion function oscillates between negative and positive values.

  14. Historic moment as SESAME begins storage ring installation

    CERN Multimedia

    JORDAN

    2016-01-01

    The first of the 16 cells of SESAME (link is external)’s storage ring was installed recently in the shielding tunnel in the Centre’s experimental hall in Allan, Jordan. SESAME will be the Middle East’s first synchrotron light source. The installation was led by SESAME’s Technical Director, Erhard Huttel, with help from members of CERN forming part of the CESSAMag (CERN-EC Support for SESAME Magnets) team as well as scientists and technicians from the SESAME region. Each cell consists of magnets (dipole, quadrupoles and sextupoles) and the vacuum chamber, supported by a girder. After many years in the making, commissioning of SESAME is scheduled to begin in 2016, serving a growing community of some 300 scientists from the region. The initial research programme will cover topics as diverse as the search for new cancer drugs to the exploration of the regions shared cultural heritage. SESAME is also a pioneer in promoting international cooperation in the region. The laboratory is expected

  15. Effects of insertion device on SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), one of the third generation light sources, aims to produce high brightness and/or high flux X-ray source for users; therefore insertion devices (IDs) are important magnetic elements for SSRF. In this paper, the linear perturbations due to IDs toward its storage ring lattice, such as beta function distortions, tune shifts, emittance growths, and energy spreads are estimated by using analytical formulae, and the nonlinear effects from IDs, especially dynamic aperture, are simulated by using Racetrack code. The results show that (a) the reduction of dynamic aperture from single undulator is negligible, since electron beam energy of 3.5 GeV is high and ID's magnetic field is low, and the beta functions in the middle of straight sections, where ID is located, are well optimized; (b) however, the reduction from single wigglers, especially super-conducting wiggler, is visible, because of its higher magnetic field; (c) effects of each ID on emittance growths and energy spreads are less than 7%.

  16. Long-term stability of the APS storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

    1999-10-26

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne ''National Laboratory and has been fully-operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATS). The 7-GeV synchrotrons light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/ environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

  17. Resonant beam behavior studies in the Proton Storage Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cousineau

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We present studies of space-charge-induced beam profile broadening at high intensities in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We investigate the profile broadening through detailed particle-in-cell simulations of several experiments and obtain results in good agreement with the measurements. We interpret these results within the framework of coherent resonance theory. With increasing intensity, our simulations show strong evidence for the presence of a quadrupole-mode resonance of the beam envelope with the lattice in the vertical plane. Specifically, we observe incoherent tunes crossing integer values, and large amplitude, nearly periodic envelope oscillations. At the highest operating intensities, we observe a continuing relaxation of the beam through space charge forces leading to emittance growth. The increase of emittance commences when the beam parameters encounter an envelope stop band. Once the stop band is reached, the emittance growth balances the intensity increase to maintain the beam near the stop band edge. Additionally, we investigate the potential benefit of a stop band correction to the high intensity PSR beam.

  18. Storage ring lattice calibration using resonant spin depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Wootton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents measurements of the GeV-scale electron beam energy for the storage rings at the synchrotron light source facilities Australian Synchrotron (AS and SPEAR3 at SLAC. Resonant spin depolarization was employed in the beam energy measurement, since it is presently the highest precision technique and an uncertainty of order 10^{-6} was achieved at SPEAR3 and AS. Using the resonant depolarization technique, the beam energy was measured at various rf frequencies to measure the linear momentum compaction factor. This measured linear momentum compaction factor was used to evaluate models of the beam trajectory through combined-function bending magnets. The main bending magnets of both lattices are rectangular, horizontally defocusing gradient bending magnets. Four modeling approaches are compared for the beam trajectory through the bending magnet: a circular trajectory, linear and nonlinear hyperbolic cosine trajectories, and numerical evaluation of the trajectory through the measured magnetic field map. Within the uncertainty of the measurement the momentum compaction factor is shown to agree with the numerical model of the trajectory within the bending magnet, and disagree with the hyperbolic cosine approximation.

  19. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  20. Development of Detector Systems for Internal and Fixed Target Heavy Ion Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Pavel

    2003-04-01

    This thesis deals with intermediate energy heavy ion reactions with the particular aim to study the nuclear matter equation of state which defines the relation between statistical parameters of a fermionic system. The development of equipment for two experiments, CA47 at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden and R16 at Kernfysisch Versneller Inst. (KVI), Groningen, The Netherlands, are described. CA47 contains the CHICSi detector, a modular, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible, multi-detector system, covering a solid angle of 3pi sr around the collision point. Together with two auxiliary detector systems CHICSi is placed at the cluster-jet target chamber of the CELSIUS storage ring. This thesis gives a technical overview of the detector and the development carried out in order to achieve the desired detection performance. Some laboratory and in-beam tests are described and the analysis of the first experimental results is discussed. The nuclear intensity interferometry experiment (R16) was performed in a dedicated beam-line of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron. Small-angle two-particle correlations were measured for the E/A = 61 MeV {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al, {sup 112}Sn, {sup 124}Sn reactions, together with singles spectra. The experimental energy distributions of neutrons and light charged particles for the {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al reaction have been analyzed with a Maxwellian multi-source prescription. These results, together with correlation function data, are used to extract information on the size of the emitting sources and their time evolution.

  1. Development of Detector Systems for Internal and Fixed Target Heavy Ion Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Pavel

    2003-04-01

    This thesis deals with intermediate energy heavy ion reactions with the particular aim to study the nuclear matter equation of state which defines the relation between statistical parameters of a fermionic system. The development of equipment for two experiments, CA47 at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden and R16 at Kernfysisch Versneller Inst. (KVI), Groningen, The Netherlands, are described. CA47 contains the CHICSi detector, a modular, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible, multi-detector system, covering a solid angle of 3pi sr around the collision point. Together with two auxiliary detector systems CHICSi is placed at the cluster-jet target chamber of the CELSIUS storage ring. This thesis gives a technical overview of the detector and the development carried out in order to achieve the desired detection performance. Some laboratory and in-beam tests are described and the analysis of the first experimental results is discussed. The nuclear intensity interferometry experiment (R16) was performed in a dedicated beam-line of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron. Small-angle two-particle correlations were measured for the E/A = 61 MeV {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al, {sup 112}Sn, {sup 124}Sn reactions, together with singles spectra. The experimental energy distributions of neutrons and light charged particles for the {sup 36}Ar + {sup 27}Al reaction have been analyzed with a Maxwellian multi-source prescription. These results, together with correlation function data, are used to extract information on the size of the emitting sources and their time evolution.

  2. Planning and Prototyping for a Storage Ring Measurement of the Proton Electric Dipole Moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talman, Richard [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Electron and proton EDM's can be measured in "frozen spin" (with the beam polarization always parallel to the orbit, for example) storage rings. For electrons the "magic" kinetic energy at which the beam can be frozen is 14.5 MeV. For protons the magic kinetic energy is 230 MeV. The currently measured upper limit for the electron EDM is much smaller than the proton EDM upper limit, which is very poorly known. Nevertheless, because the storage ring will be an order of magnitude cheaper, a sensible plan is to first build an all-electric electron storage ring as a prototype. Such an electron ring was successfully built at Brookhaven, in 1954, as a prototype for their AGS ring. This leaves little uncertainty concerning the cost and performance of such a ring. (This is documentedin one of the Physical Review papers mentioned above.)

  3. Cabling design of booster and storage ring construction progress of TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y.-S.; Liu, K.-B.; Liu, C.-Y.; Wang, b.-S.

    2017-06-01

    The 2012 Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) cable construction project started after 10 months to complete the cable laying and installation of power supply. The circumference of the booster ring (BR) is 496.8 m, whereas that of the storage ring (SR) is 518.4 m. Beam current is set to 500 mA at 3.3 GeV. The paper on grounding systems discusses the design of the ground wire (bending dipole; the cable size of its stranded wire measures 250 mm2, with a total length of 5000 m. Booster ring and storage ring quadrupoles have 150 magnets; the cable size of their stranded wire is 250 mm2, with a total length of 17000 m. Storage ring dipole consists of 48 magnets; the cable size of its stranded wire is 325 mm2, with a total length of 6000 m. This study discusses the power supply cabling design of the storage ring and booster ring construction progress of TPS. The sections of this paper are divided into discussions of the construction of the control and instrument area, cabling layout of booster ring and storage ring, as well as the installation and commission machine. This study also discusses the use of a high-impedance meter to determine the effect of cabling insulation and TPS power supply machine on energy transfer to ensure the use of safe and correct magnet.

  4. The Potential of an Ultimate Storage Ring for Future Light Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, M.; Borland, M.; Cai, Y.; Elleaume, P.; Gerig, R.; Harkay, K.; Emery, L.; Hutton, A.; Hettel, R.; Nagaoka, R.; Robin, D.; Steier, C.

    2010-10-01

    This paper is the report of the working group on Ultimate Storage Rings at the Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Physics of Future Light Sources, which took place in Gaithersburg, Maryland on September 15-17, 2009. In this report we address the accelerator design issues related to the next generation of storage ring light sources, deemed "ultimate" storage rings. In our estimation, storage rings have the potential to provide an increase in photon brightness and coherent flux that is two orders of magnitude above that projected for rings currently under construction. In addition to photon brightness and coherent flux, we discuss other directions, such as shorter pulses, tailored bunches, and partial lasing, in which rings could evolve. For the most part we envision ultimate storage rings as an evolutionary advance from existing rings that faces no fundamental technological obstacles. Nevertheless we identify several important areas of R&D that should be pursued to enable the realization of the full potential of ultimate ring light sources.

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samit Mandal; J Gerl; H Geissel; K Hauschild; M Hellström; Z Janas; I Kojouharov; Y Kopatch; R C Lemmon; P Mayet; Z Podolyak; P H Regan; H Schaffner; C Schlegel; J Simpson; H J Wollersheim

    2001-07-01

    Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  6. Heavy ion physics with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zampolli, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    ALICE is the experiment at the LHC collider at CERN dedicated to heavy ion physics. In this report, the ALICE detector will be presented, together with its expected performance as far as some selected physics topics are concerned.

  7. Report of the heavy-ion fusion task group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, G.A.; Booth, L.A.; Henderson, D.B.; Jameson, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.; Knapp, E.A.; Pollock, R.; Talbert, W.L.; Thode, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of heavy-ion fusion has been completed. Energetic heavy ions, for example 10-GeV uranium, provided by an rf linac or an induction linac, are used as alternatives to laser light to drive inertial confinement fusion pellets. The assessment has covered accelerator technology, transport of heavy-ion beams, target interaction physics, civilian power issues, and military applications. It is concluded that particle accelerators promise to be efficient pellet drivers, but that there are formidable technical problems to be solved. It is recommended that a moderate level research program on heavy-ion fusion be pursued and that LASL should continue to work on critical issues in accelerator development, beam transport, reactor systems studies, and target physics over the next few years.

  8. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  9. Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)...

  10. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  11. Failure Analysis of Heavy-Ion-Irradiated Schottky Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Megan C.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Campola, Michael J.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we use high- and low-magnitude optical microscope images, infrared camera images, and scanning electron microscope images to identify and describe the failure locations in heavy-ion-irradiated Schottky diodes.

  12. Status of Chemical Equilibrium in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Cleymans, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Recent work on chemical equilibrium in heavy ion collisions is reviewed. The energy dependence of thermal parameters is discussed. The centrality dependence of thermal parameters at SPS energies is presented.

  13. Two alpha, three alpha and multiple heavy-ion radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M. (Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania))

    1985-07-01

    New decay modes by spontaneous emission of two and three ..cap alpha.. particles and two identical or different heavy ions, are predicted. The analytical variant of the superasymmetric fission model is used to estimate the half lives.

  14. Two alpha, three alpha and multiple heavy-ion radioactivities

    OpenAIRE

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.

    1985-01-01

    New decay modes by spontaneous emission of two and three α particles and two identical or different heavy ions, are predicted. The analytical variant of the superasymmetric fission model is used to estimate the half lives.

  15. Silicon Carbide Power Device Performance Under Heavy-Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Topper, Alyson; Wilcox, Edward; Phan, Anthony; Ikpe, Stanley; LaBel, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion induced degradation and catastrophic failure data for SiC power MOSFETs and Schottky diodes are examined to provide insight into the challenge of single-event effect hardening of SiC power devices.

  16. Status of chemical equilibrium in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Cleymans

    2003-04-01

    Recent work on chemical equilibrium in heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. The energy dependence of thermal parameters is discussed. The centrality dependence of thermal parameters at SPS energies is presented.

  17. Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)...

  18. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  19. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  20. CERN achievements in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Giuseppe Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years after a Letter of Intent by the GSI and LBL groups for the “Study of particle production and target fragmentation in central 20Ne on Pb reactions, at 12 GeV per nucleon energy of the CERN PS external beam" [1], based on the results found by the NA45/CERES, NA49, NA50, and WA97/NA57 experiments at the SPS, CERN announced compelling evidence for the formation of a new state of matter in heavyion collisions at CERN-SPS energies [2]. Some of the experiments were indeed the 2nd or 3rd generation successors of the apparatuses originally proposed by the GSI-LBL collaboration. Actually, the CERN ion program initiated at the SPS with the acceleration of oxygen ions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon only in 1986, and continued with sulphur ions at 200 GeV/nucleon up to 1993. The rest is history: lead-ion beams at 160 GeV/nucleon became available at the SPS in 1994; the LHC accelerated and collided lead beams at a center of mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 2.76 TeV in 2010. Heavy ion physics is definitely in the future program of CERN: ALICE will operate a major upgrade of its detectors during the second long shutdown of the LHC, in 2018-2019, and the associated physics program will span the third and fourth LHC runs, till late 2020s.

  1. String theory and relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Joshua J.

    It has long been known that string theory describes not only quantum gravity, but also gauge theories with a high degree of supersymmetry. Said gauge theories also have a large number of colors in a regime with a large effective coupling constant that does not depend on energy scale. Supersymmetry is broken in nature, if it is present at all, however the gauge theory described by string theory shares many common features with QCD at temperatures above the quark deconfinement transition. It is generally though not entirely accepted that collisions of gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) produce a thermalized Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) at temperatures distinctly above the transition temperature as determined from lattice simulations. Hence, we might hope that a string theoretic description of gauge dynamics can elucidate some otherwise intractable physics of the strongly coupled plasma. Here we use string theory to calculate the outgoing energy flux from a RHIC process called "jet quenching", in which a high-momentum quark or gluon traverses a large distance in the QGP. Our setup is in the context of the highly supersymmetric string dual gauge theory, but we nevertheless find that the gross features of the resulting stress-energy tensor match reasonably well with experimental data. We will furthermore discuss the technology behind computations of the leading-order corrections to gauge theory observables that are uniquely string-induced, and we will describe a potential solution to string theory that could resolve a number of discrepancies between the traditional highly supersymmetric setup and QCD---in particular, a significant reduction in the amount of supersymmetry, and a finite effective coupling that is still greater than unity but does depend on energy scale.

  2. Phenomenology of Heavy Flavors in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Isayev, A A

    2010-01-01

    Some recent experimental results obtained in collisions of heavy nuclei ($\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV) at BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are discussed. The probes of dense matter created in heavy-ion collision by quarkonia, $D$ and $B$ mesons containing heavy charm and beauty quarks are considered. The centrality, rapidity and transverse momentum dependences of the nuclear modification factor and elliptic flow coefficient are presented and their possible theoretical interpretation is provided.

  3. Spiraling Beam Illumination Uniformity on Heavy Ion Fusion Target

    OpenAIRE

    Kurosaki, T; Kawata, S.; Noguchi, K.; Koseki, S; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.; Barnard, J. J.; Logan, B. G.

    2012-01-01

    A few percent wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF) by a spiraling beam axis motion in the paper. So far the wobbling heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and s...

  4. Experimental results on charge fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K; Pant, L M; Mohanty, A K

    2016-01-01

    We present a subset of experimental results on charge fluctuation from the heavy-ion collisions to search for phase transition and location of critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Measurements from the heavy-ion experiments at the SPS and RHIC energies observe that total charge fluctuations increase from central to peripheral collisions. The net-charge fluctuations in terms of dynamical fluctuation measure $\

  5. Current experimental situation in heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, D.K.

    1978-06-01

    A detailed survey of the present experimental situation in heavy-ion physics is presented. The discussion begins by considering the simple excitation of discrete states in elastic scattering, transfer, and compound-nucleus reactions; it then turns to more drastic perturbations of the nucleus high in the continuum through fusion, fission, and deeply inelastic scattering, and concludes with the (possibly) limiting asymptotic phenomena of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. 138 figures, 5 tables, 451 references. (RWR)

  6. Classical gluon production amplitude in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirilli Giovanni Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of quarks and gluons produced in the initial stages of nuclear collisions, known as the initial condition of the Quark-Gluon Plasma formation, is the fundamental building block of heavy-ion theory. I will present the scattering amplitude, beyond the leading order, of the classical gluon produced in heavy-ion collisions. The result is obtained in the framework of saturation physics and Wilson lines formalism.

  7. FAIR—Status and relevance for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiller, P., E-mail: P.Spiller@gsi.de; Barth, W.

    2014-01-01

    The chosen design concepts and technical approaches as described in the Heavy Ion Driver Ignition Facility (HIDIF) study are compared with the present status of accelerator technologies and the experiences gained in the operation of the heavy ion accelerator facilities at GSI. Novel advanced technologies, as developed e.g. for the FAIR Project, may be used for a more compact and realistic driver layout. Major differences between a single shot and a high repetition rate facility will be discussed.

  8. Heavy ions at the LHC: Physics perspectives and experimental program

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Schukraft

    2001-08-01

    Ultrarelativistic heavy ion physics is entering the new era of collider experiments with the start-up of RHIC at BNL and construction for detectors at LHC well under way. At this crossroads, the article will give a summary of the experimental program and our current view of heavy ion physics at the LHC, concentrating in particular on physics topics that are different or unique compared to current facilities.

  9. Users program for storage-ring based FEL and synchrotron sources of the Duke FEL Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, K.D.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B. [and others

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring at the Duke FEL Laboratory was first operated with a stored e-beam in November, 1994. It has now achieved operation energies in excess 1 GeV with more than 100 mA current at 280 MeV. The ring has several ports for FEL and synchrotron light source research. The circulating ring current can be synchronized with the seperate Mark III FEL operating in the 2-9.5 {mu}m IR region. This allows low optical jitter (10-20 ps) between the two sources and thus pump-probe operation. The ring has been configured to drive a number of light sources including the OK-4 FEL system capable of FEL operation between 400 and 65 nm, an inverse Compton scattering source using this undulator which will yield 4-200 MeV gammas, an undulator source at approximately 40 {angstrom} (not an FEL), a mm FEL with inverse compton scattering providing 1-100 keV x-rays and two synchrotron ports from the bend magnets for which the {lambda}{sub c} = 11-12 {angstrom} for 1 GeV. The broadly tunable FEL sources and their associated inverse compton scattering are extremely bright. The initial research proposals, submitted to the Laboratory emphasizes photoelectron spectroscopy, PEEM, high resolution vacuum UV of gases, solid spectroscopy and photochemistry in the UV, X-ray microprobe studies, X-ray microscopy, X-ray holography, X-ray crystallography, Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron production, photon activation therapy and broadband synchrotron as a probe of fast reaction in the IR and near IR.

  10. The phase slip factor of the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    To determine the momentum spread of an ion beam from the measured revolution frequency distribution, the knowledge of the phase slip factor of the storage ring is necessary. The slip factor was measured for various working points of the cryogenic storage ring CSR at MPI for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and was compared with simulations. The predicted functional relationship of the slip factor and the horizontal tune depends on the different islands of stability, which has been experimentally verified. This behavior of the slip factor is in clear contrast to that of magnetic storage rings.

  11. On contribution of energetic and heavy ions to the plasma pressure: Storm Sept 27 - Oct 4, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, E. A.; Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Dandouras, I. S.; Daly, P. W.; Welling, D. T.; Grigorenko, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Contribution of the energetic ions (>> 40 keV) and of heavy ions into the total plasma pressure is often neglected. In this study we evaluate the contribution of these components for the storm observed from September 27 to October 4 in 2002. The thermal component of the pressure for the protons, helium and oxygen at 0--40 keV/q is measured by the Cluster/CIS/CODIF sensor. The contribution of the energetic ions at energies >> 40 keV is calculated from the Cluster/RAPID/IIMS observations. The results show that before the storm has initiated, the contribution of the energetic ions in to the total pressure is indeed negligible in the tail plasma sheet, less than ˜1%. However, with the storm development contribution of the energetic part becomes significant, up to ˜30%, towards the recovery phase and cannot be neglected. Heavy ions contribute to the 27% of the total pressure and half of them are energetic. The contribution of energetic ions to the pressure of the ring current (L≃5) is significant. The heavy ions play a dominant role in the plasma pressure, about 62% during the main phase of the magnetic storm. Half of them are energetic ions. The SWMF/BATS-R-US MHD model underestimates the contribution of the energetic and heavy ions in to the ion distribution in the magnetotail plasma sheet and the ring current. The ring current plasma pressure distorts the terrestrial internal magnetic field and defines magnetic storm. Therefore, it is essential to take in to account the contribution of the energetic and heavy ions.

  12. Beam dynamics and expected performance of Sweden’s new storage-ring light source: MAX IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Leemann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available MAX IV will be Sweden’s next-generation high-performance synchrotron radiation source. The project has recently been granted funding and construction is scheduled to begin in 2010. User operation for a broad and international user community should commence in 2015. The facility is comprised of two storage rings optimized for different wavelength ranges, a linac-based short-pulse facility and a free-electron laser for the production of coherent radiation. The main radiation source of MAX IV will be a 528 m ultralow emittance storage ring operated at 3 GeV for the generation of high-brightness hard x rays. This storage ring was designed to meet the requirements of state-of-the-art insertion devices which will be installed in nineteen 5 m long dispersion-free straight sections. The storage ring is based on a novel multibend achromat design delivering an unprecedented horizontal bare lattice emittance of 0.33 nm rad and a vertical emittance below the 8 pm rad diffraction limit for 1 Å radiation. In this paper we present the beam dynamics considerations behind this storage-ring design and detail its expected unique performance.

  13. Analytical Approach to Eigen-Emittance Evolution in Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Boaz; /SLAC

    2006-05-16

    This dissertation develops the subject of beam evolution in storage rings with nearly uncoupled symplectic linear dynamics. Linear coupling and dissipative/diffusive processes are treated perturbatively. The beam distribution is assumed Gaussian and a function of the invariants. The development requires two pieces: the global invariants and the local stochastic processes which change the emittances, or averages of the invariants. A map based perturbation theory is described, providing explicit expressions for the invariants near each linear resonance, where small perturbations can have a large effect. Emittance evolution is determined by the damping and diffusion coefficients. The discussion is divided into the cases of uniform and non-uniform stochasticity, synchrotron radiation an example of the former and intrabeam scattering the latter. For the uniform case, the beam dynamics is captured by a global diffusion coefficient and damping decrement for each eigen-invariant. Explicit expressions for these quantities near coupling resonances are given. In many cases, they are simply related to the uncoupled values. Near a sum resonance, it is found that one of the damping decrements becomes negative, indicating an anti-damping instability. The formalism is applied to a number of examples, including synchrobetatron coupling caused by a crab cavity, a case of current interest where there is concern about operation near half integer {nu}{sub x}. In the non-uniform case, the moment evolution is computed directly, which is illustrated through the example of intrabeam scattering. Our approach to intrabeam scattering damping and diffusion has the advantage of not requiring a loosely-defined Coulomb Logarithm. It is found that in some situations there is a small difference between our results and the standard approaches such as Bjorken-Mtingwa, which is illustrated by comparison of the two approaches and with a measurement of Au evolution in RHIC. Finally, in combining IBS

  14. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  15. Ring wall storages. An essential contribution of the geotechnics to te energy storage; Ringwallspeicher. Ein essentieller Beitrag der Geotechnik zur Energiespeicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Matthias [Matthias Popp Ingenieurbuero Erneuerbare Energien, Energiespeicherung, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on ring wall storages as an essential contribution to the geotechnical engineering for energy storage. At first, renewable energies as well as the storage requirements for the compensation of the volatility of electricity from wind power and solar energy are described. Subsequently, the storage technologies for energy management requirements as well as the need for water and land area of pumped storage systems are presented with special emphasis of ring wall storages.

  16. Theory and analysis of nonlinear dynamics and stability in storage rings: A working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Audy, P.; Courant, E.D.; Forest, E.; Guignard, G.; Hagel, J.; Heifets, S.; Keil, E.; Kheifets, S.; Mais, H.; Moshammer, H.; Pellegrini, C.; Pilat, F.; Suzuki, T.; Turchetti, G.; Warnock, R.L.

    1988-07-01

    A summary and commentary of the available theoretical and analytical tools and recent advances in the nonlinear dynamics, stability and aperture issues in storage rings are presented. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  17. The European UV/VUV storage ring FEL at ELETTRA: first operation and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, R P; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle; Dattoli, Giuseppe; Eriksson, M; Garzella, D; Giannessi, L; Marsi, M; Poole, M W; Renault, E; Roux, R; Trovò, M; Werin, S; Wille, K

    2001-01-01

    A European project to develop the first storage ring free-electron laser on a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility is presented, including a description of the main features, initial performance at 350 and 220 nm and future prospects.

  18. Response of Charged Particles in a Storage Ring to Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dong; HUANG Chao-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravitational waves on the charged particles in a storage ring is studied. It shows thatthe gravitational waves might be directly detected by monitoring the motion of charged particles in a storage ring. Theangular velocity of the charged particles is continually adjustable by changing the initial energy of particles and thestrength of the magnetic field. This feature is very useful for finding the gravitational waves with different frequencies.

  19. Response of Charged Particles in a Storage Ring to Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGDong; HUANGChao-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravitational waves on the charged particles in a storage ring is studied. It shows that the gravitational waves might be directly detected by monitoring the motion of charged particles in a storage ring. The angular velocity of the charged particles is continually adjustable by changing the initial energy of particles and the strength of the magnetic field. This feature is very useful for finding the gravitational waves with different frequencies.

  20. ETEAPOT: symplectic orbit/spin tracking code for all-electric storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Proposed methods for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton use an intense, polarized proton beam stored in an all-electric storage ring "trap". At the "magic" kinetic energy of 232.792 MeV, proton spins are "frozen", for example always parallel to the instantaneous particle momentum. This paper describes an accelerator simulation code, ETEAPOT, a new component of the Unified Accelerator Libraries (UAL), to be used for long term tracking of particle orbits and spins in electric bend accelerators, in order to simulate EDM storage ring experiments. Though qualitatively much like magnetic rings, the non-constant particle velocity in electric rings give them significantly different properties, especially in weak focusing rings. Like the earlier code TEAPOT (for magnetic ring simulation) this code performs \\emph{exact tracking in an idealized (approximate) lattice} rather than the more conventional approach, which is \\emph{approximate tracking in a more nearly exact lattice.} The BMT equation des...

  1. Pion correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Heavy Ion Spectrometer Systems (HISS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, W.B. Jr.

    1990-05-01

    This thesis contains the setup, analysis and results of experiment E684H Multi-Pion Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions''. The goals of the original proposal were: (1) To initiate the use of the HISS facility in the study of central Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions (RHIC). (2) To perform a second generation experiment for the detailed study of the pion source in RHIC. The first generation experiments, implied by the second goal above, refer to pion correlation studies which the Riverside group had performed at the LBL streamer chamber. The major advantage offered by moving the pion correlation studies to HISS is that, being an electronic detector system, as opposed to the Streamer Chamber which is a visual detector, one can greatly increase the statistics for a study of this sort. An additional advantage is that once one has written the necessary detector and physics analysis code to do a particular type of study, the study may be extended to investigate the systematics, with much less effort and in a relatively short time. This paper discusses the Physics motivation for this experiment, the experimental setup and detectors used, the pion correlation analysis, the results, and the conclusions possible future directions for pion studies at HISS. If one is not interested in all the details of the experiment, I believe that by reading the sections on intensity interferometry, the section the fitting of the correlation function and the systematic corrections applied, and the results section, one will get a fairly complete synopsis of the experiment.

  2. Preliminary study of EEHG-based superradiant undulator radiation at the HLS-II storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei-Wei; Li, He-Ting; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-01

    We investigate storage ring-based Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) superradiant undulator radiation as a possible scheme to obtain shorter wavelengths at the HLS-II (Hefei Light Source-II) storage ring. In this paper we give the designation of the storage ring based EEHG up to the 26th harmonic, where 31 nm vacuum ultraviolet light is radiated from an 800 nm seeded laser. The novelty of our design is that both the two dispersion sections of EEHG are realized by the storage ring’s own magnet structure. In particular, the whole ring is used as the first dispersion section, and two modulators of the traditional EEHG can be done with the same undulator. These two dispersion sections are realized by changing the superperiod of the present lattice structure, and more precisely by changing the focusing strengths of the present structure. Since no additional magnets and chicanes are used, the beam circulates around the storage ring repeatedly, and thus this storage ring-based EEHG can have a higher repetition rate than a linac-based EEHG. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305170)

  3. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H. [Ritsumeikan Univ., Shiga (Japan); Amano, D.; Miyade, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tanashi-City (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  4. A review of methods for experimentally determining linear optics in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safranek, J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to maximize the brightness and provide sufficient dynamic aperture in synchrotron radiation storage rings, one must understand and control the linear optics. Control of the horizontal beta function and dispersion is important for minimizing the horizontal beam size. Control of the skew gradient distribution is important for minimizing the vertical size. In this paper, various methods for experimentally determining the optics in a storage ring will be reviewed. Recent work at the National Synchrotron Light Source X-Ray Ring will be presented as well as work done at laboratories worldwide.

  5. Morphology of High-Multiplicity Events in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Naselsky, P; Christensen, P R; Damgaard, P H; Frejsel, A; Gaardhøje, J J; Hansen, A; Hansen, M; Kim, J; Verkhodanov, O; Wiedemann, U A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss opportunities that may arise from subjecting high-multiplicity events in relativistic heavy ion collisions to an analysis similar to the one used in cosmology for the study of fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). To this end, we discuss examples of how pertinent features of heavy ion collisions including global characteristics, signatures of collective flow and event-wise fluctuations are visually represented in a Mollweide projection commonly used in CMB analysis, and how they are statistically analyzed in an expansion over spherical harmonic functions. If applied to the characterization of purely azimuthal dependent phenomena such as collective flow, the expansion coefficients of spherical harmonics are seen to contain redundancies compared to the set of harmonic flow coefficients commonly used in heavy ion collisions. Our exploratory study indicates, however, that these redundancies may offer novel opportunities for a detailed characterization of those event-wise fluctuations t...

  6. Ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions: the first billion seconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baym, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    I first review the early history of the ultrarelativistic heavy ion program, starting with the 1974 Bear Mountain Workshop, and the 1983 Aurora meeting of the U.S. Nuclear Science Committtee, just one billion seconds ago, which laid out the initial science goals of an ultrarelativistic collider. The primary goal, to discover the properties of nuclear matter at the highest energy densities, included finding new states of matter - the quark-gluon plasma primarily - and to use collisions to open a new window on related problems of matter in cosmology, neutron stars, supernovae, and elsewhere. To bring out how the study of heavy ions and hot, dense matter in QCD has been fulfilling these goals, I concentrate on a few topics, the phase diagram of matter in QCD, and connections of heavy ion physics to cold atoms, cosmology, and neutron stars.

  7. Benchmarking of neutron production of heavy-ion transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, I. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Ronningen, R. M. [Michigan State Univ., National Superconductiong Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Heilbronn, L. [Univ. of Tennessee, 1004 Estabrook Rd., Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required. (authors)

  8. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  9. Storage life of silicone rubber sealing ring used in solid rocket motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Weikai; He Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    It is urgent to carry out detailed research on storage performance of rubber sealing ring to get the criterion for its storage life. This paper acquires material ageing regularity by theoretical analysis and experimental confirmation. On this condition, failure mode and failure criterion of typ-ical sealing structure is studied, and the failure mechanism is found. Thus by analyzing the stress distribution, the relationship between ageing state and sealing condition is established. Rationaliza-tion proposal is put forward and storage life of sealing ring is evaluated. The research mentioned-above has special reference to the design of sealing structures and can provide reference for prolong-ing their service life.

  10. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  11. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  12. Development of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for Heavy Ion Drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Manahan, R; Lietzke, A F

    2001-09-10

    Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is exploring a promising path to a practical inertial-confinement fusion reactor. The associated heavy ion driver will require a large number of focusing quadrupole magnets. A concept for a superconducting quadrupole array, using many simple racetrack coils, was developed at LLNL. Two, single-bore quadrupole prototypes of the same design, with distinctly different conductor, were designed, built, and tested. Both prototypes reached their short sample currents with little or no training. Magnet design, and test results, are presented and discussed.

  13. Complexified boost invariance and holographic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S

    2015-01-01

    At strong coupling holographic studies have shown that heavy ion collisions do not obey normal boost invariance. Here we study a modified boost invariance through a complex shift in time, and show that this leads to surprisingly good agreement with numerical holographic computations. When including perturbations the agreement becomes even better, both in the hydrodynamic and the far-from-equilibrium regime. One of the main advantages is an analytic formulation of the stress-energy tensor of the longitudinal dynamics of holographic heavy ion collisions.

  14. Search for Exotic Strange Dibaryon in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOChong-Shou

    2003-01-01

    The exotic strange dibaryon particle (ΩΩ)0+ with S = -6 can be produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The yields of this kind of exotic strange dibaryon particles can increase signitlcantly soon as the formation of QGP does exhibit after the collision. If there is no phase transition after the collision, the upper bound of the production of this diomega can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclear matter. The relative yield ratio of diomega to deuteron is less than 0.000205, this means that if there is no QGP creation it is difficult to observe the production of diomega in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  15. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  16. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  17. Hydrodynamics in heavy-ion collisions: recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Amaresh

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics has been quite successful in explaining the collective behaviour of the QCD matter produced in high energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We briefly review the latest developments in the hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Essential ingredients of the model such as the hydrodynamic evolution equations, dissipation, initial conditions, equation of state, and freeze-out process are reviewed. We discuss observable quantities such as particle spectra and anisotropic flow as well as the event-by-event fluctuations of these quantities. We also discuss the extraction of transport coefficients of the hot and dense QCD matter from the experimental data of collective flow.

  18. Swift heavy ions for materials engineering and nanostructuring

    CERN Document Server

    Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Ion beams have been used for decades for characterizing and analyzing materials. Now energetic ion beams are providing ways to modify the materials in unprecedented ways. This book highlights the emergence of high-energy swift heavy ions as a tool for tailoring the properties of materials with nanoscale structures. Swift heavy ions interact with materials by exciting/ionizing electrons without directly moving the atoms. This opens a new horizon towards the 'so-called' soft engineering. The book discusses the ion beam technology emerging from the non-equilibrium conditions and emphasizes the power of controlled irradiation to tailor the properties of various types of materials for specific needs.

  19. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  20. Laser-driven multicharged heavy ion beam acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Y.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. The laser pulse of ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated. This is achieved by the high intensity laser field of ˜ 1021Wcm-2 interacting with the solid density target. The demonstrated iron ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M) is difficult to be achieved by the conventional heavy ion source technique in the accelerators.

  1. High-Intensity, High Charge-State Heavy Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Alessi, J

    2004-01-01

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions will be reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. The benefits and limitations for these type sources will be described, for both dc and pulsed applications. Possible future improvements in these type sources will also be discussed.

  2. Quark vs Gluon jets in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Drauksas, Simonas

    2017-01-01

    The project concerned quark and gluon jets which are often used as probes of Quantum Chromodynamics(QCD) matter created in nuclear collisions at collider energies. The goal is to look for differences between quark and gluon jets, study their substructure, look for distinguishing features in unquenched (pp collisions) and quenched (heavy ion collisions) jets by using multi-variate analysis which was carried out with the help of ROOT's \\href{https://root.cern.ch/tmva}{TMVA} tool. Mapping out the modification of jets due to medium interactions could give valuable input to constraining the time evolution of the Quark Gluon Plasma created in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Spin tune mapping as a novel tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleev, A.; Nikolaev, N. N.; Rathmann, F.; Augustyniak, W.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Bai, M.; Barion, L.; Berz, M.; Chekmenev, S.; Ciullo, G.; Dymov, S.; Eversmann, D.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Grzonka, D.; Guidoboni, G.; Heberling, D.; Hejny, V.; Hempelmann, N.; Hetzel, J.; Hinder, F.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koop, I.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maanen, P.; Macharashvili, G.; Magiera, A.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Mey, S.; Müller, F.; Nass, A.; Pesce, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Pretz, J.; Rosenthal, M.; Schmidt, V.; Semertzidis, Y.; Senichev, Y.; Shmakova, V.; Silenko, A.; Slim, J.; Soltner, H.; Stahl, A.; Stassen, R.; Stephenson, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Talman, R.; Engblom, P. Thörngren; Trinkel, F.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Valetov, E.; Vassiliev, A.; Weidemann, C.; Wrońska, A.; Wüstner, P.; Zuprański, P.; Zurek, M.; JEDI Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Precision experiments, such as the search for electric dipole moments of charged particles using storage rings, demand for an understanding of the spin dynamics with unprecedented accuracy. The ultimate aim is to measure the electric dipole moments with a sensitivity up to 15 orders in magnitude better than the magnetic dipole moment of the stored particles. This formidable task requires an understanding of the background to the signal of the electric dipole from rotations of the spins in the spurious magnetic fields of a storage ring. One of the observables, especially sensitive to the imperfection magnetic fields in the ring is the angular orientation of stable spin axis. Up to now, the stable spin axis has never been determined experimentally, and in addition, the JEDI collaboration for the first time succeeded to quantify the background signals that stem from false rotations of the magnetic dipole moments in the horizontal and longitudinal imperfection magnetic fields of the storage ring. To this end, we developed a new method based on the spin tune response of a machine to artificially applied longitudinal magnetic fields. This novel technique, called spin tune mapping, emerges as a very powerful tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings. The technique was experimentally tested in 2014 using polarized deuterons stored in the cooler synchrotron COSY, and for the first time, the angular orientation of the stable spin axis at two different locations in the ring has been determined to an unprecedented accuracy of better than 2.8 μ rad .

  4. The new 1.5 GeV storage ring for synchrotron radiation: MAX II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Å.; Eriksson, M.; Lindgren, L.-J.; Röjsel, P.; Werin, S.

    1995-02-01

    The MAX laboratory at Lund University, Sweden, today operates an accelerator system consisting of a 100 MeV racetrack microtron and a 550 MeV storage ring (MAX I). At the moment (July 1994) a new storage ring MAX II is near completion and will start first injections within 2 months. This work gives an overview of the MAX II project including the first beamlines and a description of the accelerator system. MAX II is a 1.5 GeV third generation light source optimized for the VUV and soft-x-ray region. It consists of a ten cell double bend achromat lattice forming the 90 m circumference ring. Injection is done at 500 MeV from the existing storage ring MAX I, and ramping up to full energy will take place in MAX II. The straight sections have a length of 3.2 m and eight sections are free to house insertion devices. At start up the ring will be equipped with one 7.5 T superconducting wiggler and one 1.8 T multipole wiggler. Two more undulators are ordered and under construction. To be able to achieve the project a few shortcuts have been made in the design of the storage ring: (1) Nonzero dispersion is allowed in the straight sections, (2) chromaticity correction is built into the quadrupole magnets, and (3) the length of the straight sections is limited to 3.2 m. The project is progressing on time. Extraction of an electron beam from the MAX I storage ring has been achieved and has successfully been transported into the MAX II building. The MAX II ring is under assembly with most of the sections already mounted. First injection is planned to take place in August 1994.

  5. Gauge/String Duality, Hot QCD and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Liu, Hong; Mateos, David; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2014-06-01

    1. Opening remarks; 2. A heavy ion phenomenology primer; 3. Results from lattice QCD at nonzero temperature; 4. Introducing the gauge/string duality; 5. A duality toolbox; 6. Bulk properties of strongly coupled plasma; 7. From hydrodynamics for far-from-equilibrium dynamics; 8. Probing strongly coupled plasma; 9. Quarkonium mesons in strongly coupled plasma; 10. Concluding remarks and outlook; Appendixes; References; Index.

  6. Electron cloud studies for heavy-ion and proton machines

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, F; Weiland, Th

    2013-01-01

    Electron cloud effects are a known problem in various accelerator facilities around the world. Electron clouds cause instabilities and emittance growth in positron and proton beams as well as in heavy ion beams. Most of the hadron machines experience the build-up of EC due to the multipacting. In LHC and in positron machines production of electrons due to the synchrotron radiation becomes as important as the build-up due to the secondary emission. The main source of seed electrons in heavy ion machines is the residual gas ionization. FAIR facility in Darmstadt will operate with heavy-ion and proton beams. However, the beam parameters are such that the multipacting will start to play a role only for the unconditioned wall with the secondary emission yieldmore than 1.8. In this paperwe study the electron cloud build-up and its effect on the beam stability for FAIR heavy-ion coasting beams. These beams will be used during slow extraction. Electron scattering on the beam ions and its effect on the final neutraliz...

  7. Evolution of clusters in energetic heavy ion bombarded amorphous graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, M N; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Carbon clusters have been generated by a novel technique of energetic heavy ion bombardment of amorphous graphite. The evolution of clusters and their subsequent fragmentation under continuing ion bombardment is revealed by detecting various clusters in the energy spectra of the direct recoils emitted as a result of collision between ions and the surface constituents.

  8. Subthreshold photons in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, G

    1998-01-01

    In the present talk, I discuss about the properties of the energetic photons produced in heavy-ion reactions. I show that they are sensitive to the maximum density reached in the first stage of the nuclear reaction. Then, the existence of a thermal contribution to the photon differential cross-secti

  9. Ionization of Sodium Cluster by Heavy Ion Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Energetic ions have recently been used as an efficient means to produce highly charged cold clusters~[1]. There are two ways to obtain highly-charged clusters: low-fluence nano-second lasers irradiation and energetic highly charged ions impact. Compared to the low-density laser, heavy ions, e.g. delivered by ECR sources, have the

  10. Charm resonance production in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of charmonium states plays an important role among the probes to investigate the formation of a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP in heavy-ion collisions. A review of the main J/ψ and ψ(2S results is presented, focussing on the most recent achievements from the LHC experiments.

  11. A detection system for energetic light heavy ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, C.P.M. van; Jelmersma, R.; Brink, A. van den; Kamermans, R.

    1984-01-01

    A light heavy ion detection system which consists of a gas-filled ionization chamber (IC) connected to a scattering chamber via a time-of-flight (TOF) system has been constructed. The entrance window of the IC has an area of 14 × 40 cm2, the active depth is 115 cm. Filled with CF4 at a pressure of 3

  12. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-01-01

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  13. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-10-01

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  14. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-10-15

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  15. A short course on relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01

    Some ideas/concepts in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. To a large extent, the discussions are non-comprehensive and non-rigorous. It is intended for fresh graduate students of Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kolkata Centre, who are intending to pursue career in theoretical /experimental high energy nuclear physics. Comments and criticisms will be appreciated.

  16. Correlations and fluctuations in high energy heavy ion collision experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dai-Mei; WANG Ya-Ping; WEI Li-Hua; CAI Xu

    2008-01-01

    An overview of research status of soft physics in high energy heavy-ion collision experiments and recent experimental results are presented.The experimental status on fluctuations and correlations has been reviewed and the outlook for research status of soft physics in LHC/ALICE has been introduced in this paper.

  17. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, J.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Currie, P.J. [Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, Alberta T0J 0Y0 (Canada); Davies, J.A. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Siegele, R. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Wallace, S.G. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Zelenitsky, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    1996-06-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as {sup 209}Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass {<=}100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors. (orig.).

  18. Collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Bhalerao

    2003-11-01

    A brief introduction is given to the field of collective flow, currently being investigated experimentally at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is followed by an outline of the work that I have been doing in this field, in collaboration with Nicolas Borghini and Jean-Yves Ollitrault.

  19. Experimental Investigation of DNA Damage Induced by Heavy Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    DNA is considered the critical target for radiobiological effects. It is highly important to study DNAdamage induced by ionizing radiation. Especially DNA double strand breaks have been identified as themost initial damage. In this experiment, DNA double strand breaks induced by heavy ions wereinvestigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  20. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  1. Theory of heavy ion collision physics in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.

  2. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  3. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, Michaela

    2015-04-29

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton-proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term ''heavy-ion collisions'' refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter luminosity lifetimes. As the production cross-sections for various physics processes under study of the experiments are still small at energies reachable with the LHC and because the heavy-ion run time is limited to a few days per year, it is essential to obtain the highest possible collision rate, i.e. maximise the instantaneous luminosity, in order to obtain enough events and therefore low statistical errors. Within this thesis, the past performance of the LHC in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair, is analysed and potential luminosity limitations are identified. Tools are developed to predict future performance and techniques are presented to further increase the luminosity. Finally, a perspective on the future of high energy heavy-ion colliders is given.

  4. A Study of Storage Ring Requirements for an Explosive Detection System Using NRA Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tai-Sen

    2005-01-01

    The technical feasibility of an explosives detection system based on the nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma rays in nitrogen-rich materials was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1993 by using an RFQ proton accelerator and a tomographic imaging prototype.* The study is being continued recently to examine deployment of such an active interrogation system in realistic scenarios. The approach is to use a cyclotron and electron-cooling-equipped storage rings(s) to provide the high quality and high current proton beam needed in a practical application. In this work, we investigate the storage ring requirements for a variant of the airport luggage inspection system considered in the earlier LANL experiments. Estimations are carried out based on the required inspection throughput, the gamma ray yield, the proton beam emittance growth due to scattering with the photon-production target, beam current limit in the storage ring, and the electron cooling rate. Studies using scaling and reas...

  5. The injector of the storage ring ANKA; Der Injektor der Speicherringanlage ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, D.; Pont, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). FGS

    2000-07-01

    The injector of the ANKA storage ring should create a beam of electrons and accelerate them to 500 MeV ready to be injected into the storage ring. This is accomplished with a combination of a microtron and a booster synchrotron, which we call the injector system of ANKA. The microtron delivers a pulse of 1 {mu}sec length with a current of 10 mA. The energy of the electrons when leaving the microtron is 53 MeV. The injection transfer line transports this beam to the booster synchrotron where the electron beam is accelerated to 500 MeV. At 500 MeV another transfer line, the so called extraction transfer line transports the beam to the storage ring. The repetition rate is 1 Hz. (orig.)

  6. Intense X-ray sources based on compton scattering in laser electron storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The main problem of the designing of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage ring is associated with large steady-state electron beam energy spread. In paper the principles of the development of compact storage ring lattice with large RF-acceptance and negligible chromatic effects at interaction point are considered. The storage ring with electron beam energy over the range 100-400 MeV that allows generating intense VUV from bending magnets, X-ray up to 280 keV with rate up to 10 sup 1 sup 4 photons/s and gamma-beam up to 2.8 MeV for neutron generation on beryllium target is proposed.

  7. Ultrashort x-ray pulse generation by electron beam slicing in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. He

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses using focused short low energy (∼20  MeV electron bunches to create short slices of electrons from the circulating electron bunches in a synchrotron radiation storage ring. When a low energy electron bunch crosses from the top of a high energy storage ring electron bunch, its Coulomb force will kick a short slice from the core of the storage ring electron bunch. The separated slices, when passing through an undulator, will radiate ultrashort x-ray pulses at about 160 fs. We discuss the advantages, challenges, and provide data which confirm the feasibility of this new method.

  8. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgun, E; Grossman, JC

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  9. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  10. Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2012-09-06

    Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

  11. Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2012-09-06

    Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics FOCUS ON HEAVY IONS IN BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Interest in energetic heavy ions is rapidly increasing in the field of biomedicine. Heavy ions are normally excluded from radiation protection, because they are not normally experienced by humans on Earth. However, knowledge of heavy ion biophysics is necessary in two fields: charged particle cancer therapy (hadrontherapy), and radiation protection in space missions. The possibility to cure tumours using accelerated heavy charged particles was first tested in Berkeley in the sixties, but results were not satisfactory. However, about 15 years ago therapy with carbon ions was resumed first in Japan and then in Europe. Heavy ions are preferable to photons for both physical and biological characteristics: the Bragg peak and limited lateral diffusion ensure a conformal dose distribution, while the high relative biological effectiveness and low oxygen enhancement ration in the Bragg peak region make the beam very effective in treating radioresistant and hypoxic tumours. Recent results coming from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba (see the paper by Dr Tsujii and co-workers in this issue) and GSI (Germany) provide strong clinical evidence that heavy ions are indeed an extremely effective weapon in the fight against cancer. However, more research is needed in the field, especially on optimization of the treatment planning and risk of late effects in normal tissue, including secondary cancers. On the other hand, high-energy heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic radiation and, although they are rare as compared to protons, they give a major contribution in terms of equivalent dose to the crews of manned space exploratory-class missions. Exploration of the Solar System is now the main goal of the space program, and the risk caused by exposure to galactic cosmic radiation is considered a serious hindrance toward this goal, because of the high uncertainty on late effects of energetic heavy nuclei, and the lack of effective countermeasures. Risks

  13. Commissioning of the DESIREE storage rings - a new facility for cold ion-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchell, M.; Schmidt, H. T.; Thomas, R. D.; Rosén, S.; Reinhed, P.; Löfgren, P.; Brännholm, L.; Blom, M.; Björkhage, M.; Bäckström, E.; Alexander, J. D.; Leontein, S.; Hanstorp, D.; Zettergren, H.; Liljeby, L.; Källberg, A.; Simonsson, A.; Hellberg, F.; Mannervik, S.; Larsson, M.; Geppert, W. D.; Rensfelt, K. G.; Danared, H.; Paál, A.; Masuda, M.; Halldén, P.; Andler, G.; Stockett, M. H.; Chen, T.; Källersjö, G.; Weimer, J.; Hansen, K.; Hartman, H.; Cederquist, H.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the ongoing commissioning of the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. Beams of atomic carbon anions (C-) and smaller carbon anion molecules (C-2, C-3, C-4 etc.) have been produced in a sputter ion source, accelerated to 10 keV or 20 keV, and stored successfully in the two electrostatic rings. The rings are enclosed in a common vacuum chamber cooled to below 13 Kelvin. The DESIREE facility allows for studies of internally relaxed single isolated atomic, molecular and cluster ions and for collision experiments between cat- and anions down to very low center-of-mass collision energies (meV scale). The total thermal load of the vacuum chamber at this temperature is measured to be 32 W. The decay rates of stored ion beams have two components: a non-exponential component caused by the space charge of the beam itself which dominates at early times and an exponential term from the neutralization of the beam in collisions with residual gas at later times. The residual gas limited storage lifetime of carbon anions in the symmetric ring is over seven minutes while the 1/e lifetime in the asymmetric ring is measured to be about 30 seconds. Although we aim to improve the storage in the second ring, the number of stored ions are now sufficient for many merged beams experiments with positive and negative ions requiring milliseconds to seconds ion storage.

  14. Design Work for the High-Energy Storage Ring for Antiprotons of the Future GSI Project

    CERN Document Server

    Lehrach, Andreas; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Bongardt, Klaus; Dietrich, J; Dolinskii, Alexei V; Eichhorn, Ralf; Gålnander, B; Hinterberger, Frank; Lorentz, Bernd; Maier, Rudolf; Martin, Siegfried; Prasuhn, Dieter; Reistad, Dag; Senichev, Yurij; Senicheva, Eugenia; Steck, Markus; Stockhorst, Hans; Tölle, Raimund; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2005-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the future international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton cooler and storage ring in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. The design work for the HESR is organized by a consortium with scientists from FZ Jülich, GSI Darmstadt and TSL Uppsala. An important feature of the new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams with internal targets, resulting in demanding beam parameter in two operation modes: high luminosity mode with beam intensities up to few times 1011

  15. Design and fabrication of the first quadrupole magnet for the ILSF storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Saeidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF is a new 3 GeV third generation synchrotron light source which is consisted of several pre-accelerators and a storage ring with the beam current of 400 mA. Based on the main lattice candidate, the storage ring includes of 100 dipoles, 320 quadrupoles and 320 sextupole magnets. To develop fabrication procedures and techniques and to compare the measurement results with the design data, a series of lattice magnets have been fabricated inside Iran with internal industries. In this article the first prototype quadrupole magnet fabrication process has been described

  16. Preliminary application of turn-by-turn data analysis to the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-Hui; ZHAO Zhen-Tang

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing the beam position monitor turn-by-turn (TBT) data to debug accelerators. TBT data can be used to determine the linear optics, coupled optics and nonlinear behaviors of the storage ring lattice. This is not only a useful complement to other methods of determining the linear optics such as LOCO, but also provides a possibility to uncover more hidden phenomena. In this paper, a preliminary application of a β function measurement to the SSRF storage ring is presented.

  17. A Genetic Algorithm for Chromaticity Correction in Diffraction Limited Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrlichman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    An multi-objective genetic algorithm is developed for optimizing nonlinearities in diffraction limited storage rings. This algorithm determines sextupole and octupole strengths for chromaticity correction that deliver optimized dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. The algorithm makes use of dominance constraints to breed desirable properties into the early generations. The momentum aperture is optimized indirectly by constraining the chromatic tune footprint and optimizing the off-energy dynamic aperture. The result is an effective and computationally efficient technique for correcting chromaticity in a storage ring while maintaining optimal dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. This framework was developed for the Swiss Light Source (SLS) upgrade project.

  18. New chromaticity compensation approach and dynamic aperture increase in the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shun-Qiang; HOU Jie; CHEN Guang-Ling; LIU Gui-Min

    2008-01-01

    Strong chromatic sextupoles used to compensate natural chromaticities in the third generation light source storage ring usually reduce dynamic aperture drastically.Many optimization methods can be used to find solutions that provide large dynamic apertures.This paper discusses a new optimization approach of sextupole strengths with step-by-step procedure,which is applied in the SSRF storage ring,and a better solution is obtained.Investigating driving terms generated by the sextupoles in every step can analyze their convergences and guide the weight setting among different terms in object function of the single resonance approach based on the perturbation theory.

  19. Optics for the lattice of the compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Pei-Cheng; WANG Yu; SHEN Xiao-zhe; HUANG Wen-Hui; YAN Li-xin; DU Ying-Chao; LI Ren-Kai; TANG Chuan-Xiang

    2009-01-01

    We present two types of optics for the lattice of a compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source.The optics design for different operation modes of the storage ring are discussed in detail.For the pulse mode optics,an IBS-suppression scheme is applied to optimize the optics for lower IBS emittance growth rate;as for the steady mode,the method to control momentum compact factor is adopted[Gladkikh P,Phys.Rev.ST Accel.Beams 8,050702]to obtain stability of the electron beam.

  20. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d' Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise

  1. An Experimental Review on Elliptic Flow of Strange and Multistrange Hadrons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusu Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strange hadrons, especially multistrange hadrons, are good probes for the early partonic stage of heavy ion collisions due to their small hadronic cross sections. In this paper, I give a brief review on the elliptic flow measurements of strange and multistrange hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC and Large Hadron Collider (LHC.

  2. Track structure and energy deposition distribution of heavy ions in liquid water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 卫增泉

    1996-01-01

    Progress in theoretical research into track structure and energy deposition distribution of heavy ions in introduced,and some research results are given,such as a Monte Carlo model of heavy ion track structure calculation,frequency distribution of energy deposition inside a electron track and radial dose distribution around a heavy ion path.Moreover,research direction in future is also analysed.

  3. Effects of heavy-ion beams on chromosomes of common wheat, Triticum aestivum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Saito, Yoshinaka [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroyuki [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Hisashi, E-mail: tsujim@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    To investigate the nature of plant chromosomes irradiated by heavy-ion beams, the effects of nitrogen (N) and neon (Ne) ion beams on hexaploid wheat chromosomes were compared with those of X-ray. Chromosome aberrations, such as short, ring and dicentric chromosomes appeared in high frequency. The average numbers of chromosome breaks at LD-50 by irradiation with X-ray, N and Ne ion beams were 32, 20 and 20, respectively. These values may be underestimated because chromosome rearrangement without change in chromosome morphology was not counted. Thus, we subsequently used a wheat line with a pair of extra chromosomes from an alien species (Leymus racemosus) and observed the fate of the irradiated marker chromosomes by genomic in situ hybridization. This analysis revealed that 50 Gy of neon beam induced about eight times more breaks than those induced by X-ray. This result suggests that heavy-ion beams induce chromosome rearrangement in high frequency rather than loss of gene function. This suggests further that most of the novel mutations produced by ion beam irradiation, which have been used in plant breeding, may not be caused by ordinary gene disruption but by chromosome rearrangements.

  4. Target design for the cylindrical compression of matter driven by heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A.R. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es; Temporal, M. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lopez Cela, J.J. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Grandjouan, N. [LULI, UMR 7605, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Tahir, N.A. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Serna Moreno, M.C. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Portugues, R.F. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-21

    The compression of a cylindrical sample of hydrogen contained in a hollow shell of Pb or Au has been analyzed in the framework of the experiments to be performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 to be constructed at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. The target implosion is driven by an intense beam of heavy ions with a ring-shaped focal spot. We report the results of a parametric study of the final state of the compressed hydrogen in terms of the target and beam parameters. We consider the generation of the annular heated region by means of a radio-frequency wobbler that rotates the beam at extremely high frequencies in order to accommodate symmetry constraints. We have also studied the hydrogen conditions that can be achieved with a non-rotating beam with Gaussian focal spot and the possibility to use a beam stopper as an alternative way to avoid the direct heating of the sample. Finally, we report the analysis of the hydrodynamic instabilities that affect the implosion and the mitigating effects of the elastoplastic properties of the shell.

  5. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  6. Interplay of Touschek scattering, intrabeam scattering, and rf cavities in ultralow-emittance storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Leemann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The latest generation of storage ring-based light sources employs multibend achromat lattices to achieve ultralow emittance. These lattices make use of a large number of weak bending magnets which considerably reduces the amount of power radiated in the dipoles in comparison to power radiated from insertion devices. Therefore, in such storage rings, parameters such as emittance, energy spread, and radiated power are—unlike 3rd generation storage rings—no longer constant during a typical user shift. Instead, they depend on several varying parameters such as insertion device gap settings, bunch charge, bunch length, etc. Since the charge per bunch is usually high, intrabeam scattering in medium-energy storage rings with ultralow emittance becomes very strong. This creates a dependence of emittance on stored current. Furthermore, since the bunch length is adjusted with rf cavities but is also varied as insertion device gaps change, the emittance blowup from intrabeam scattering is not constant either. Therefore, the emittance, bunch length, and hence the resulting Touschek lifetime have to be calculated in a self-consistent fashion with 6D tracking taking into account not only the bare lattice and rf cavity settings, but also momentary bunch charge and gap settings. Using the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring as an example, this paper demonstrates the intricate interplay between transverse emittance (insertion devices, emittance coupling, longitudinal emittance (tuning of main cavities as well as harmonic cavities, and choice of stored current in an ultralow-emittance storage ring as well as some implications for brightness optimization.

  7. Design of the SSRF storage ring magnet lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is a proposed 3rd generation light source with 3.5 GeV in energy. It is composed of 20 DBA cells resulting in a ring that is about 10 nm(rad in emittance and 396 m in circumference, and provides 10 straight sections of 7.24 m and other 10 straight sections of 5.0 m for the inclusion of insertion devices, injection components and RF cavities. The lattice has high flexibility, and the tunes and beta functions can be easily adjusted within a wide range to meet the requirements for different operation modes, including high beta mode and hybrid beta mode with and/or without dispersion in straight sections. In this paper, the results of linear optics design and dynamic aperture study are presented.

  8. Spiraling Beam Illumination Uniformity on Heavy Ion Fusion Target

    CERN Document Server

    Kurosaki, T; Noguchi, K; Koseki, S; Barada, D; Ma, Y Y; Ogoyski, A I; Barnard, J J; Logan, B G

    2012-01-01

    A few percent wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF) by a spiraling beam axis motion in the paper. So far the wobbling heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may contribute to the reduction of the HIBs illumination nonuniformity. The wobbling HIBs can be generated in HIB accelerators and the oscillating frequency may be several 100MHz-1GHz. Three-dimensional HIBs illumination computations presented here show that the few percent wobbling HIBs illumination nonuniformity oscillates successfully with the same wobbling HIBs frequency.

  9. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filippo E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion collisions (HIC have been widely used to extract the parametrization of symmetry energy term of nuclear equation of state as a function of barionic density. HIC in fact are a unique tool in terrestrial laboratories to explore the symmetry energy around the saturation density (ρ0 = 0.16fm−3 from sub-saturation densities (Fermi energies towards compressed nuclear matter (ρ > 2 − 3ρ0 that can be reached at relativistic energies, as a function of different conditions of temperature, mass asymmetry and isospin. One of the main study at present is to reach a coherent description of EOS of asymmetric nuclear matter from heavy ion collisions of stable and exotic nuclei, nuclear structure studies and astrophysical observations. In this work an overview of the current status of the research is shortly reviewed together with new perspectives aimed to reduce the present experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  10. Heavy ion physics : Exhibition Lepton-Photon 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    High-energy Heavy Ion Physics studies strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities.QCD predicts that at such densities hadronic matter turns into a plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons,the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP).Matter in the Universe must have existed in this state up to about 10 ms after the Big Bang.Today QGP might exist in the c re of neutron stars.The study of the phase diagram of matter is a new approach to investigate QCD at its natural scale,L QCD ,and to address the fundamental questions of confinement and chiral-symmetry breaking.The combined results obtained by the SPS heavy ion experiments,in particular those obtained with the Pb beam,pr vide compelling evidence for the existence of a new state of matter featuring many of the characteristics predicted for the QGP.The ALICE experiment will carry this research into the LHC era.

  11. Development of heavy-ion radiotherapy technology with HIMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Since 1994, HIMAC has carried out clinical studies and treatments for more than 9000 cancer patients with carbon-ion beams. During the first decade of the HIMAC study, a single beam-wobbling method, adopted as the HIMAC beam-delivery technique, was improved for treatments of moving tumors and for obtaining more conformal dose distribution. During the second decade, a pencil-beam 3D scanning method has been developed toward an “adaptive cancer treatment” for treatments of both static and moving tumors. A new treatment research facility was constructed with HIMAC in order to verify the developed 3D scanning technology through a clinical study that has been successfully conducted since 2011. As the next stage, a compact heavy-ion rotating gantry with a superconducting technology has been developed for the more accurate and shorter-course treatments. The twenty-year development of the heavy-ion radiotherapy technologies including accelerator technologies with HIMAC is reviewed.

  12. Jet studies in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slovak, Radim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced. Jets are produced at the early stages of this collision and are known to become attenuated as they propagate through the hot matter. One manifestation of this energy loss is a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects. ATLAS has provided a quantification of this jet suppression by the jet Raa measurement in run 1 of LHC. A factor of two suppression was seen in central heavy ion collisions with respect to pp collisions. The Raa exhibited only a week, if any, rapidity dependence, and a slow rise with increasing jet momentum. This talk summarizes the run 1 results on the inclusive jet production and the new results on dijet measurements.

  13. Low- to medium-β cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Acceleration of low- and medium-β heavy ions by means of superconducting (SC) linear accelerators (linacs) was made possible by the development, during four decades, of a particular class of cavities characterized by low operation frequency, several different shapes and different electromagnetic modes of operation. Their performance, initially rather poor in operating accelerators, have steadily increased along with the technological progress and nowadays the gap with the high-β, elliptical cavities is close to be filled. Initially confined to a very small number of applications, this family of cavities evolved in many directions becoming one of the most widespread in linacs. Nowadays it is present in the majority of superconducting radio-frequency ion linac projects worldwide. An overview of low- and medium-β SC cavities for heavy ions, focused on their recent evolution and achievements, will be given.

  14. Selected Experimental Results from Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranbir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energy sNN=2.76 TeV for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.

  15. Heavy ion acceleration in the Breakout Afterburner regime

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from an ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by sub-picosecond lasers is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations we identified two highly efficient ion acceleration schemes. By varying the laser pulse duration we observed a transition from Radiation Pressure Acceleration to the Breakout Afterburner regime akin to light ions. The underlying physics and ion acceleration regimes are similar to that of light ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the acceleration of heavy ions more challenging. Two laser systems are studied in detail: the Texas Petawatt Laser and the Trident laser, the former having pulse duration 180 fs, intermediate between very short femtosecond pulses and picosecond pulses. Both laser systems generated directional gold ions beams (~10 degrees half-angle) with fluxes in excess of 1011 ion/sr and normalized energy >10 MeV/nucleon.

  16. Charged Hadron Multiplicity Distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews facts and problems concerning charge hadron production in high energy collisions. Main emphasis is laid on the qualitative and quantitative description of general characteristics and properties observed for charged hadrons produced in such high energy collisions. Various features of available experimental data, for example, the variations of charged hadron multiplicity and pseudorapidity density with the mass number of colliding nuclei, center-of-mass energies, and the collision centrality obtained from heavy-ion collider experiments, are interpreted in the context of various theoretical concepts and their implications. Finally, several important scaling features observed in the measurements mainly at RHIC and LHC experiments are highlighted in the view of these models to draw some insight regarding the particle production mechanism in heavy-ion collisions.

  17. COLLIMATORS AND MATERIALS FOR HIGH INTENSITY HEAVY ION SYNCHROTRONS

    CERN Document Server

    Stadlmann, J; Kollmus, H; Spiller, P; Strasik, I; Tahir, N A; Tomut, M; Trautmann, C

    2012-01-01

    The operation of high power high brightness accelerators requires huge efforts for beam cleaning and machine protection. Within the WP 8 (ColMat) of the EU research framework EuCARD[1] we investigate new materials and methods for beam collimation and machine protection. We present an overview of these activities at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f¨ur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. Simulations of accidental beam losses in LHC and SIS100 have been performed. Scenarios for halo collimation of heavy ions and protons in SIS100 routine operation have been investigated. A prototype of a cryogenic collimator for charge exchange losses during intermediate charge state heavy ion operation in SIS100 has been build and tested with beam. Several candidates of advanced composite materials for collimation system upgrades of present and future high power accelerators have been irradiated and their properties are being characterized. Most deliverables and milestones of the R&D programme were already reached before the end of...

  18. Anti-biofilm activity of Fe heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R. P.; Hareesh, K.; Bankar, A.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-10-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) polymers were investigated before and after high energy heavy ion irradiation for anti-bacterial properties. These PC films were irradiated by Fe heavy ions with two energies, viz, 60 and 120 MeV, at different fluences in the range from 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. UV-Visible spectroscopic results showed optical band gap decreased with increase in ion fluences due to chain scission mainly at carbonyl group of PC which is also corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results. X-ray diffractogram results showed decrease in crystallinity of PC after irradiation which leads to decrease in molecular weight. This is confirmed by rheological studies and also by differential scanning calorimetric results. The irradiated PC samples showed modification in their surfaces prevents biofilm formation of human pathogen, Salmonella typhi.

  19. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Freire Soler, Victor M. [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Brökers, Lara [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ban-d' Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCBN), 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Schleberger, Marika, E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS{sub 2} and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS{sub 2} does not.

  20. Probing transverse momentum broadening in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, A. H.; Wu, Bin; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-12-01

    We study the dijet azimuthal de-correlation in relativistic heavy ion collisions as an important probe of the transverse momentum broadening effects of a high energy jet traversing the quark-gluon plasma. We take into account both the soft gluon radiation in vacuum associated with the Sudakov logarithms and the jet PT-broadening effects in the QCD medium. We find that the Sudakov effects are dominant at the LHC, while the medium effects can play an important role at RHIC energies. This explains why the LHC experiments have not yet observed sizable PT-broadening effects in the measurement of dijet azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions. Future investigations at RHIC will provide a unique opportunity to study the PT-broadening effects and help to pin down the underlying mechanism for jet energy loss in a hot and dense medium.

  1. Scaled beam merging experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Seidl

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy ion fusion drivers. However, the resultant transverse phase space dilution must be minimized so as not to sacrifice focusability at the target. A prototype combining experiment has been completed employing four 3-mA Cs^{+} beams injected at 160 keV. The focusing elements upstream of the merge consist of four quadrupoles and a final combined-function element (quadrupole and dipole. Following the merge, the resultant single beam is transported in a single alternating gradient channel where the subsequent evolution of the distribution function is diagnosed. The results are in fair agreement with particle-in-cell simulations. They indicate that for some heavy ion fusion driver designs, the phase space dilution from merging is acceptable.

  2. <span class="hlt">Heavy-Ion</span> Imaging Applied To Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J. I.; Tobias, C. A.; Capp, M. P.; Benton, E. V.; Holley, W. R.; Gray, Joel E.; Hendee, William R.; Haus, Andrew G.; Properzio, William S.

    1980-08-18

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  3. Limitation on the luminosity of e+e- storage rings due to beamstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Telnov, V I

    2013-01-01

    Particle loss due to the emission of single energetic beamstrahlung photons in beam collisions is shown to impose a fundamental limit on storage-ring luminosities at energies greater than 2E~140 GeV for head-on collisions and 2E~40 GeV for crab-waist collisions. Above these threshold energies, the suppression factor due to beamstrahlung scales as 1/E^{4/3}, and for a fixed power of synchrotron radiation, the luminosity L is proportional to R/E^{13/3}, where R is the collider radius. For 2E > 150 GeV, both collision schemes have similar luminosity limits. The luminosities attainable at storage-ring and linear-collider (LC) 2E=240 GeV Higgs factories are comparable; at higher energies, LCs are preferable. This conference paper is based on my recent PRL publication [1], supplemented with additional comments on linac-ring e+e- colliders and ring e+e- colliders with charge compensation (four-beam collisions).

  4. Effects of CSR Generated from Upstream Bends in a Laser Plasma Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.

    2013-08-28

    The recent proposal [1] of a Laser Plasma Storage Ring (LPSR) envisions the use of a laser-plasma (LP) acceleration module to inject an electron beam into a compact 500 MeV storage ring. Electron bunches generated by LP methods are naturally very short (tens of femtoseconds), presenting peak currents on the order of 10 kA or higher. Of obvious concern is the impact of collective effects and in particular Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. Available simulation codes (e.g. Elegant [2]) usually include transient CSR effects but neglect the contribution of radiation emitted from trailing magnets. In a compact storage ring, with dipole magnets close to each other, cross talking between different magnets could in principle be important.In this note we investigate this effect for the proposed LPSR and show that, in fact, this effect is relatively small. However our analysis also indicates that CSR effects in general would be quite strong and deserve a a careful study.

  5. Effects of CSR Generated from Upstream Bends in a Laser Plasma Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.

    2013-08-28

    The recent proposal [1] of a Laser Plasma Storage Ring (LPSR) envisions the use of a laser-plasma (LP) acceleration module to inject an electron beam into a compact 500 MeV storage ring. Electron bunches generated by LP methods are naturally very short (tens of femtoseconds), presenting peak currents on the order of 10 kA or higher. Of obvious concern is the impact of collective effects and in particular Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. Available simulation codes (e.g. Elegant [2]) usually include transient CSR effects but neglect the contribution of radiation emitted from trailing magnets. In a compact storage ring, with dipole magnets close to each other, cross talking between different magnets could in principle be important.In this note we investigate this effect for the proposed LPSR and show that, in fact, this effect is relatively small. However our analysis also indicates that CSR effects in general would be quite strong and deserve a a careful study.

  6. Compact storage ring to search for the muon electric dipole moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelmann, A.; Kirch, K.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Schietinger, T.

    2010-01-01

    We present the concept of a compact storage ring of less than 0.5 m orbit radius to search for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the muon (d(mu)) by adapting the 'frozen spin' method. At existing muon facilities a statistics limited sensitivity of d(mu) similar to 7 x 10(-23) e cm can be achieved

  7. Analysis and correction of linear optics errors, and operational improvements in the Indus-2 storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Riyasat; Ghodke, A. D.

    2017-08-01

    Estimation and correction of the optics errors in an operational storage ring is always vital to achieve the design performance. To achieve this task, the most suitable and widely used technique, called linear optics from closed orbit (LOCO) is used in almost all storage ring based synchrotron radiation sources. In this technique, based on the response matrix fit, errors in the quadrupole strengths, beam position monitor (BPM) gains, orbit corrector calibration factors etc. can be obtained. For correction of the optics, suitable changes in the quadrupole strengths can be applied through the driving currents of the quadrupole power supplies to achieve the desired optics. The LOCO code has been used at the Indus-2 storage ring for the first time. The estimation of linear beam optics errors and their correction to minimize the distortion of linear beam dynamical parameters by using the installed number of quadrupole power supplies is discussed. After the optics correction, the performance of the storage ring is improved in terms of better beam injection/accumulation, reduced beam loss during energy ramping, and improvement in beam lifetime. It is also useful in controlling the leakage in the orbit bump required for machine studies or for commissioning of new beamlines.

  8. Spin flip by RF-field at storage rings with siberian snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koop, I.; Shatunov, Y. [Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russia)

    1995-09-01

    The beam dynamics and optics of spin flipping polarized beams with an RF field in storage rings with Siberian Snakes is discussed. The dispersion relations are determined and depolarization of the beams are discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Laser-rf double-resonance spectroscopy in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, M.; Hangst, J. S.; Jessen, P. S.; Nielsen, J. S.; Poulsen, O.; Shi, P.

    1992-10-01

    Laser-rf double-resonance spectroscopy of the hyperfine transition between F''=0 and F'=1 in the metastable 3S1 state of 6Li+ was performed in 100-keV beam in the storage ring ASTRID. High efficiency of optical pumping was demonstrated for complex pumping schemes. A broadband (dc-6 GHz) rf device was designed and used for rf spectroscopy in the storage ring. The possibility of obtaining coherent rf signals (Ramsey fringes) from successive interactions with the same field was investigated. Important limitations for the coherences due to magnetic-field inhomogeneities were observed. These led to randomization of the atomic polarization during only one turn in the storage ring and completely prevented observation of Ramsey fringes. This situation is different from the case of fundamental particles in a storage ring, where the polarization may be preserved for many round-trips. Limits were put on the demands to beam quality, beam positioning, and magnetic-field quality to overcome the problem. The effects of the rf device on the external degrees of freedom of the ion beam were investigated. Its small aperture substantially reduced the beam lifetime, and at very low rf frequencies the electric field in the rf device was able to excite external transverse resonances in the beam.

  10. Stability of Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap with storage-ring-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Niels; Mølhave, Kristian; Drewsen, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We report experiments on the stability of ion Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap with storage-ring-like confinement. The transverse dynamics of charged particles in a trap of this type is analogous to that of a fast beam traveling through a channel with periodic, magnetic alternating gradient...

  11. How (non-) linear is the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collisions?

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Beraudo, Andrea; Del Zanna, Luca; Inghirami, Gabriele; Rolando, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We provide evidence from full numerical solutions that the hydrodynamical evolution of initial density fluctuations in heavy ion collisions can be understood order-by-order in a perturbative series in deviations from a smooth and azimuthally symmetric background solution. To leading linear order, modes with different azimuthal wave numbers do not mix. Quadratic and higher order corrections are small and can be understood as overtones with corresponding wave numbers.

  12. Heavy-ion Results of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Boimska, B

    2016-01-01

    An overview of selected heavy-ion results of the CMS experiment is presented. Jet quenching, quarkonia suppression and two-particle angular correlation results are discussed. The measurements have been performed for lead–lead, proton–lead and proton–proton data samples recorded for Run 1 of the LHC accelerator. In the correlation analysis, low pile-up proton–proton collisions at an energy of 13 TeV (from Run 2) have been used as well

  13. Aspects of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolschin, G. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    Three aspects of relativistic heavy-ion collisions are considered in this article: (1) Stopping and baryon transport in a QCD-based approach, (2) charged-hadron production in a nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM), and (3) quarkonia suppression and in particular, Υ suppression in PbPb at the current LHC energy of √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76TeV.

  14. BRAHMS collaboration results for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsene, I.

    2008-12-01

    In this work we review very briefly a few of the most important results obtained by the BRAHMS Collaboration on the properties of the collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies. The discussion is general and aims to illustrate the most important achievements of our collaboration during the RHIC run period with short discussions and references to articles that treat the subjects in more detail.

  15. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  16. Search for Tetraquarks in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhong-Biao; GAO Chong-Shou

    2006-01-01

    Tetraquarks can be produced in relativistic heavy-ion collision. The yield of this kind of tetraquarks can increase significantly soon as the formation of QGP after the collision. If there is no phase transition after collision, the upper bound of the production of this four-quark states can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclearmatter. The relative yield ratio of tetraquark cs(s)(s) to Ω is less than 0.0164.

  17. Chimera microscopic approach to heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukasik, J.; Majka, Z. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland). Inst. Fizyki

    1993-12-01

    A microscopic model based on a molecular dynamics concept is presented. The model simulates some quantum effects and thus enables studies of large fermionic systems. It was devised to investigate the dynamics of heavy ion collision at intermediate energies. The model was applied to study an early phase of the {sup 84}Kr+{sup 159}Tb reaction at 45 MeV/nucleon. (author). 30 refs, 9 figs.

  18. Microscopic descriptions of high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    The essentials of the equation-of-motion (EOM) approach are given and some of its significant and interesting results are described. A framework for the theoretical description of high-energy heavy-ion (HE-HI) collisions is presented; specifically included are a critical assessment of various approaches--EOM calculations, Boltzmann equations/cascade calculations, and hydrodynamics--their relationships and their respective domains of applicability, if any, to HE-HI collisions. 11 figures, 3 tables. (RWR)

  19. Heavy ion beam transmission in the AGOR cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, Ayanangsha

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the TRImP program initiated at the KVI in 2002, the AGOR cyclotron was used to accelerate low energy heavy ion beams up to a beam intensity (>=10^12 particles per second). Typical beam ions are: 206Pb accelerated to 8 MeV/amu and 20Ne accelerated to 25 MeV/amu. In the course of b

  20. Transverse Flow of Kaons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玉明; 储自力; FUCHS Christian; FAESSLER Amand; 肖武; 华大平; 阎玉鹏

    2002-01-01

    The transverse flow of positively charged kaons from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energy is investigatedwithin the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculated results show that the experi-mental data are only consistent with those including the kaon mean-field potential from the chiral Lagrangian.This indicates that the transverse flow pattern of kaons is a useful probe of the kaon potential in a nuclearmedium.

  1. Isotope analysis in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; D'Agostino, M.; de Sanctis, J.; Giussani, A.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Marini, P.; Moroni, A.; Nannini, A.; Olmi, A.; Ordine, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Nucl-Ex Collaboration

    2007-11-01

    Symmetry energy is a key quantity in the study of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies, performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, can be used to extract information on the symmetry energy coefficient Csym, which is currently poorly known but relevant both for astrophysics and for deeper knowledge of the structure of exotic nuclei.

  2. What have we learned from relativistic heavy-ion collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Larry McLerran

    2003-04-01

    In this talk, I present what I believe we have learned from the recent RHIC heavy ion experiments. The goal of these experiments is to make and study matter at very high energy densities, greater than an order of magnitude larger than that of nuclear matter. Have we made such matter? What have we learned about the properties of this matter? What do we hope and expect to learn in the future?

  3. Scaling of elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Torrieri, Giorgio; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2012-01-01

    The common interpretation of $v_2$ in heavy ion collisions is that it is produced by hydrodynamic flow at low transverse momentum and by parton energy loss at high transverse momentum. In this talk we discuss this interpretation in view of the dependence of $v_2$ with energy, rapidity and system size, and show that it might not be trivial to reconcile these models with the relatively simple scaling found in experiment

  4. Neutron dose equivalent rate for heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiGui-Sheng; ZhangTian-Mei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The fluence rate distribution of neutrons in the reactionsof 50MeV/u 18O-ion on thick Be,Cu and Au targets have been measured with an activation method of threshold detectors andthe neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1m from the tqrgets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area are obtained by using the conversion factors from neutron fluence rate to neutron doseequivalent rate.

  5. Range and etching behaviour of swift heavy ions in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Samra, Kawaljeet Singh; Singh, Ravinder

    Aliphatic (CR-39) and aromatic (Lexan polycarbonate) polymers have been irradiated with a variety of heavy ions such as 58Ni, 93Nb, 132Xe, 139La, 197Au, 208Pb, 209Bi, and 238U having energy ranges of 5.60-8.00 MeV/n in order to study the range and etching kinetics of heavy ion tracksE The ion fluence (range ˜104-105 ions/cm2) was kept low to avoid the overlapping of etched tracks. The measured values of maximum etched track length were corrected due to bulk etching and over etching to obtain the actual range. The experimental results of range profiles were compared with those obtained by the most used procedures employed in obtaining range and stopping power. The range values of present ions have been computed using the semiempirical codes (SRIM-98, SRIM-2003.26, and LISE++:0-[Hub90]) in order to check their accuracy. The merits and demerits of the adopted formulations have been highlighted in the present work. It is observed that the range of heavy ions is greater in aromatic polymers (Lexan polycarbonate) as compared to the aliphatic polymers (CR-39) irradiated with similar ions having same incident energies. The SRIM-98 and SRIM2003.26 codes don't show any significant trend in deviations, however, LISE++:0-[Hub90] code provides overall good agreement with the experimental values. The ratio of track etch rate (along projectile trajectory) to the bulk etch rate has also been studied as a function of energy loss of heavy ions in these polymers.

  6. An integrated systems model for heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangerter, R O; Faltens, A; Meier, W R

    1998-09-02

    A source-to-target computer model for an induction linac driver for heavy ion fusion has been developed and used to define a reference case driver that meets the requirements of one current target design. Key features of the model are discussed, and the design parameters of the reference case design are described. Examples of the systems analyses leading to the point design are given, and directions for future work are noted.

  7. Coherent rho(0) production in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-12-30

    The STAR Collaboration reports the first observation of exclusive rho(0) photoproduction, AuAu-->AuAurho(0), and rho(0) production accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation, AuAu-->Au*Au*rho(0), in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions. The rho(0) have low transverse momenta, consistent with coherent coupling to both nuclei. The cross sections at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV agree with theoretical predictions treating rho(0) production and Coulomb excitation as independent processes.

  8. Azimuthal Correlation of Collective Motion in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Lei; ZHANG Wei-Ning; CHEN Xiang-Jun; TANG Gui-Xin; ZHANG Jing-Bo

    2001-01-01

    The out-of-plane squeeze-out effect in relativistic heavy ion collisions is used to estimate the reaction plane by performing a modified transverse momentum analysis. A technique for investigating the azimuthal correlation between the out-of-plane squeeze-out and directed in-plane flow is described. A clear signature of the azimuthal correlation is evidenced in the 600 A MeV Au + Au reaction from the quantum molecular dynamic model calculations.

  9. Applications of heavy ion microprobe for single event effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Robert A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)]. E-mail: robert.reed@vanderbilt.edu; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Pellish, Jonathan A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Sierawski, Brian [Institute for Space and Defense Electronics, Vanderbilt University, Box 351821 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Warren, Kevin M. [Institute for Space and Defense Electronics, Vanderbilt University, Box 351821 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Porter, Mark [Medtronic Microelectronics Center, 2343 W. Medtronic Way, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Wilkinson, Jeff [Medtronic, CRDM Device Technology, 7000 Central Avenue NE, Minneapolis, MN 55432 (United States); Marshall, Paul W. [NASA consultant, Brookneal, VA 24528 (United States); Niu, Guofu [Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36894 (United States); Cressler, John D. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Schrimpf, Ronald D. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Tipton, Alan [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Weller, Robert A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The motion of ionizing-radiation-induced rogue charge carriers in a semiconductor can create unwanted voltage and current conditions within a microelectronic circuit. If sufficient unwanted charge or current occurs on a sensitive node, a variety of single event effects (SEEs) can occur with consequences ranging from trivial to catastrophic. This paper describes the application of heavy ion microprobes to assist with calibration and validation of SEE modeling approaches.

  10. Stopping of relativistic hydrogen- and heliumlike heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Soerensen, A H

    2002-01-01

    The stopping power for hydrogen- and heliumlike heavy ions penetrating matter at energies of 100-1000 MeV/u is calculated. For hydrogenlike ions the difference in dE/dx for an extended and a collapsed electron distribution is at the level of 1% and nonperturbative effects easily account for half of the difference. Differences of this magnitude have drastic effects on charge-exchange straggling. The theoretical results lead to good agreement with experimental values when applied in simulations.

  11. Isotope analysis in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, E; Bardelli, L; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Bruno, M; Cannata, F; Casini, G; Chiari, M; D'Agostino, M; De Sanctis, J; Giussani, A; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Lanchais, A L; Marini, P; Moroni, A; Nannini, A; Olmi, A; Ordine, A; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Poggi, G; Vannini, G

    2006-01-01

    Symmetry energy is a key quantity in the study of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies, performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, can be used to extract information on the symmetry energy coefficient Csym, which is currently poorly known but relevant both for astrophysics and for structure of exotic nuclei.

  12. Modular TPCs for relativistic heavy-ion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Lindenbaum, S.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA) City Coll., New York (USA)); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A. (City Coll., New York (USA)); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA)); Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Krishna, N.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Phillips, G.C.; Roberts, J.B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA))

    1989-11-10

    A description is given of a TPC system that operates in a relativistic heavy-ion beam and yields good track reconstruction efficiency in very-high-multiplicity events. The mechanical construction of the chamber is discussed. A set of custom hybrid circuits are used to build a very compact, cost-effective electronics system mounted directly on the chamber. Results from running in test beams and from preliminary experimental runs are given. (orig.).

  13. Observations And Measurements of Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.K.; Li, J.; /Duke U.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    Anomalous hollow electron beams have been recently observed in the Duke storage ring. With a single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, a hollow beam can be created. This beam consists of a solid core beam inside and a large ring beam outside. In this paper, we report the measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern and spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wakefield and lattice nonlinearity. The hollow beam can also be used as a tool to study linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  14. NSLS-II storage ring insertion device and front-end commissioning and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G., E-mail: gwang@bnl.gov; Shaftan, T.; Amundsen, C.; Bassi, G.; Bengtsson, J.; Blednykh, A.; Blum, E.; Cheng, W.; Choi, J.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Davidsaver, M.; Doom, L.; Guo, W.; Harder, D.; Hidaka, Y.; Hu, Y.; Ilinski, P.; Kitegi, C.; Kramer, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); and others

    2016-07-27

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3 GeV third generation light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During spring/ summer of 2014, the storage ring was commissioned up to 50 mA without insertion devices. In the fall of 2014, we began commissioning of the project beamlines, which included seven insertion devices on six ID ports. Beamlines IXS, HXN, CSX-1, CSX-2, CHX, SRX, and XPD-1 consist of elliptically polarized undulator (EPU), damping wigglers (DW) and in-vacuum undulators (IVU) covering from VUV to hard x-ray range. In this paper, experience with commissioning and operation is discussed. We focus on reaching storage ring performance with IDs, including injection, design emittance, compensation of orbit distortions caused by ID residual field, source point stability, beam alignment and tools for control, monitoring and protection of the ring chambers from ID radiation.

  15. Towards the ultimate storage ring: the lattice design for Beijing Advanced Photon Source

    CERN Document Server

    Gang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A storage ring-based light source, Beijing Advanced Photon Source (BAPS) is proposed to store 5-GeV low-emittance electron beam and to provide high-brilliance coherent radiation. In this paper, we report our efforts of pushing down the emittance of BAPS to approach the so-called ultimate storage ring, while fixing the circumference to about 1200 m. To help dealing with the challenge of beam dynamics associated with the intrinsic very strong nonlinearities in an ultralow-emittance ring, a combination of several progressive technologies is used in the linear optics design and nonlinear optimization, such as modified theoretical minimum emittance cell with small-aperture magnets, quasi-3rd-order achromat, theoretical analyzer based on Lie Algebra and Hamiltonian analysis, multi-objective genetic algorithm, and frequency map analysis. These technologies enable us to obtain satisfactory beam dynamics in one lattice design with natural emittance of 75 pm.

  16. Gauge/String Duality, Hot QCD and Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, both experimental and theoretical advances have brought the need for strong coupling techniques in the analysis of deconfined QCD matter and heavy ion collisions to the forefront. As a consequence, a fruitful interplay has developed between analyses of strongly-coupled non-abelian plasmas via the gauge/string duality (also referred to as the AdS/CFT correspondence) and the phenomenology of heavy ion collisions. We review some of the main insights gained from this interplay to date. To establish a common language, we start with an introduction to heavy ion phenomenology and finite-temperature QCD, and a corresponding introduction to important concepts and techniques in the gauge/string duality. These introductory sections are written for nonspecialists, with the goal of bringing readers ranging from beginning graduate students to experienced practitioners of either QCD or gauge/string duality to the point that they understand enough about both fields that they can then appreciate their in...

  17. Heavy ions: Results from the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak

    2012-10-01

    On November 8, 2010 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN collided the first stable beams of heavy ions (Pb on Pb) at the centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. The LHC worked exceedingly well during its one month of operation with heavy ions, delivering about 10 −1 of data, with peak luminosity reaching to $L_{O} = 2 × 10^{25}$ cm-2 s-1 towards the end of the run. Three experiments, ALICE, ATLAS and CMS, recorded their first heavy-ion data, which were analysed in a record time. The results of the multiplicity, flow, fluctuations and Bose–Einstein correlations indicate that the fireball formed in nuclear collisions at the LHC is hotter, lives longer, and expands to a larger size at freeze-out as compared to lower energies. We give an overview of these as well as new results on quarkonia and heavy flavour suppression, and jet energy loss.

  18. Strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Edward

    2017-07-01

    A decade ago, a brief summary of the field of the relativistic heavy ion physics could be formulated as the discovery of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, sQGP for short, a near-perfect fluid with surprisingly large entropy-density-to-viscosity ratio. Since 2010, the LHC heavy ion program added excellent new data and discoveries. Significant theoretical efforts have been made to understand these phenomena. Now there is a need to consolidate what we have learned and formulate a list of issues to be studied next. Studies of angular correlations of two and more secondaries reveal higher harmonics of flow, identified as the sound waves induced by the initial state perturbations. As in cosmology, detailed measurements and calculations of these correlations helped to make our knowledge of the explosion much more quantitative. In particular, their damping had quantified the viscosity. Other kinetic coefficients—the heavy-quark diffusion constants and the jet quenching parameters—also show enhancements near the critical point T ≈Tc. Since densities of QGP quarks and gluons strongly decrease at this point, these facts indicate large role of nonperturbative mechanisms, e.g., scattering on monopoles. New studies of the p p and p A collisions at high multiplicities reveal collective explosions similar to those in heavy ion A A collisions. These "smallest drops of the sQGP" revived debates about the initial out-of-equilibrium stage of the collisions and mechanisms of subsequent equilibration.

  19. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  20. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banaś, D., E-mail: d.banas@ujk.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Fijał-Kirejczyk, I. [The Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A. [The National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kretschmer, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Mukoyama, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Trautmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Universität Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster–Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L{sub 2}-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  1. Results from the first heavy ion run at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schukraft, J

    2012-01-01

    Early November 2010, the LHC collided for the first time heavy ions, Pb on Pb, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. This date marked both the end of almost 20 years of preparing for nuclear collisions at the LHC, as well as the start of a new era in ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics at energies exceeding previous machines by more than an order of magnitude. This contribution summarizes some of the early results from all three experiments participating in the LHC heavy ion program (ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS), which show that the high density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like the very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid discovered at RHIC. Some surprising and even puzzling results are seen in particle ratios, jet-quenching, and Quarkonia suppression observables. The overall experimental conditions at the LHC, together with its set of powerful and state-of-the-art detectors, should allow for precision measurements of quark-gluon-plasma parameters like v...

  2. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)696614; Stahl, Achim; Jowett, John M

    2015-10-09

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton–proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term “heavy-ion collisions” refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter l...

  3. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  4. Breit interaction effect on dielectronic recombination of heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high temperature plasmas, including astrophysical plasmas such as solar corona and artificial plasmas such as fusion reactor plasmas. Therefore it has been well studied to date, both theoretically and experimentally, to accumulate the atomic data required for understanding or controlling such plasmas. However, there still remains interesting subjects that receive remarkable attention from the atomic physics point of view. One of them, which is the subject of this review, is substantially large Breit interaction effects on the resonance recombination process called dielectronic recombination. The Breit interaction is a relativistic effect in the electron-electron interaction potential; it is thus generally important for highly charged heavy ions. However, in the calculation of the energy levels for heavy ions, the Breit interaction is still a small perturbation compared with the main Coulomb term. On the other hand for the dielectronic recombination, it was found that the Breit interaction can enhance the cross sections significantly. It was also found that the Breit interaction can play not only an important, but even a dominant role in determining the angular distribution of x-rays emitted in the recombination processes. This topical review introduces the recent experimental and theoretical activities to clarify the essential origin of the strong effects.

  5. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  6. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  7. Spin tune mapping as a novel tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Precision experiments, such as the search for electric dipole moments of charged particles using storage rings, demand for an understanding of the spin dynamics with unprecedented accuracy. The ultimate aim is to measure the electric dipole moments with a sensitivity up to 15 orders in magnitude better than the magnetic dipole moment of the stored particles. This formidable task requires an understanding of the background to the signal of the electric dipole from rotations of the spins in the spurious magnetic fields of a storage ring. One of the observables, especially sensitive to the imperfection magnetic fields in the ring is the angular orientation of stable spin axis. Up to now, the stable spin axis has never been determined experimentally, and in addition, the JEDI collaboration for the first time succeeded to quantify the background signals that stem from false rotations of the magnetic dipole moments in the horizontal and longitudinal imperfection magnetic fields of the storage ring. To this end, we developed a new method based on the spin tune response of a machine to artificially applied longitudinal magnetic fields. This novel technique, called spin tune mapping, emerges as a very powerful tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings. The technique was experimentally tested in 2014 using polarized deuterons stored in the cooler synchrotron COSY, and for the first time, the angular orientation of the stable spin axis at two different locations in the ring has been determined to an unprecedented accuracy of better than 2.8  μ  rad.

  8. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3-30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  9. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Papash

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF^{+} ions at 93  keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3–30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  10. Recent studies in heavy ion induced fission reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R. K.

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear fission process involves large scale shape changes of the nucleus, while it evolves from a nearly spherical configuration to two separated fission fragments. The dynamics of these shape changes in the nuclear many body system is governed by a strong interplay of the collective and single particle degrees of freedom. With the availability of heavy ion accelerators, there has been an impetus to study the nuclear dynamics through the investigations of nucleus--nucleus collisions involving fusion and fission process. From the various investigations carried out in the past years, it is now well recognized that there is large scale damping of collective modes in heavy ion induced fission reactions, which in other words implies that nuclear motion is highly viscous. In recent years, there have been many experimental observations in heavy ion induced fission reactions at medium bombarding energies, which suggest possible occurrence of various non-equilibrium modes of fission such as quasi-fission, fast fission and pre-equilibrium fission, where some of the internal degrees of freedom of the nucleus is not fully equilibrated. We have carried out extensive investigations on the fission fragment angular distributions at near barrier bombarding energies using heavy fissile targets. The measured fragment anisotropies when compared with the standard saddle point model (SSPM) calculations show that for projectile-target systems having zero or low ground state spins, the angular anisotropy exhibits a peak-like behaviour at the sub barrier energies, which cannot be explained by the SSPM calculations. For projectiles or targets with large ground state spins, the anomalous peaking gets washed out due to smearing of the K-distribution by the intrinsic entrance channel spins. Recently studies have been carried out on the spin distributions of fission fragments through the gamma ray multiplicity measurements. The fission fragments acquire spin mainly from two sources: (i) due to

  11. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Pal

    2015-05-01

    We review the transport models that are widely used to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We show that transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression of hadron yields at high transverse momentum, provide exciting new information on the properties of the plasma formed.

  12. A new multi-strip ionization chamber used as online beam monitor for heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhiguo [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Mao, Ruishi [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China); Duan, Limin, E-mail: lmduan@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China); She, Qianshun; Hu, Zhengguo; Li, He; Lu, Ziwei; Zhao, Qiecheng; Yang, Herun; Su, Hong; Lu, Chengui; Hu, Rongjiang; Zhang, Junwei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-11-21

    A multi-strip ionization chamber has been built for precise and fast monitoring of the carbon beam spatial distribution at Heavy Ion Researched Facility of Lanzhou Cooling Storing Ring (HIRFL-CSR). All the detector's anode, cathode and sealed windows are made by 2μm aluminized Mylar film in order to minimize the beam lateral deflection. The sensitive area of the detector is (100×100)mm{sup 2}, with the anode segmented in 100 strips, and specialized front-end electronics has been developed for simplifying the data acquisition and quick feedback of the relevant parameters to beam control system. It can complete one single beam profile in 200μs.

  13. Symplectic orbit and spin tracking code for all-electric storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    Proposed methods for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton use an intense, polarized proton beam stored in an all-electric storage ring "trap." At the "magic" kinetic energy of 232.792 MeV, proton spins are "frozen," for example always parallel to the instantaneous particle momentum. Energy deviation from the magic value causes in-plane precession of the spin relative to the momentum. Any nonzero EDM value will cause out-of-plane precession—measuring this precession is the basis for the EDM determination. A proposed implementation of this measurement shows that a proton EDM value of 10-29e -cm or greater will produce a statistically significant, measurable precession after multiply repeated runs, assuming small beam depolarization during 1000 s runs, with high enough precision to test models of the early universe developed to account for the present day particle/antiparticle population imbalance. This paper describes an accelerator simulation code, eteapot, a new component of the Unified Accelerator Libraries (ual), to be used for long term tracking of particle orbits and spins in electric bend accelerators, in order to simulate EDM storage ring experiments. Though qualitatively much like magnetic rings, the nonconstant particle velocity in electric rings gives them significantly different properties, especially in weak focusing rings. Like the earlier code teapot (for magnetic ring simulation) this code performs exact tracking in an idealized (approximate) lattice rather than the more conventional approach, which is approximate tracking in a more nearly exact lattice. The Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi (BMT) equation describing the evolution of spin vectors through idealized bend elements is also solved exactly—original to this paper. Furthermore the idealization permits the code to be exactly symplectic (with no artificial "symplectification"). Any residual spurious damping or antidamping is sufficiently small to permit reliable tracking for the

  14. Experimental modelling of the dipole magnet for the electron storage ring DELSY

    CERN Document Server

    Meshkov, I N; Syresin, E M

    2003-01-01

    In the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) the project of Dubna Electron Synchrotron (DELSY) with an electron energy of 1.2 GeV is developed. The electron storage ring in the DELSY project is planned to be created on the basis of magnetic elements, which were used earlier in the storage ring AmPS (NIKHEF, Amsterdam). The optics of the ring is necessary to be changed, its perimeter to be reduced approximately in one and a half time, the energy of electrons to be increased. The paper is devoted to the development of a modified dipole magnet of the storage ring. The preliminary estimation of geometry of the magnet pole is carried out by means of computer modelling using two- and three- dimensional codes of the magnetic field calculation SUPERFISH and RADIA. The experimental stand for the measurements of the dipole magnetic field is described. As the result of calculational and experimental modelling for the dipole magnet, the geometry of its poles was estimated, providing in the horizontal aperture +- 3...

  15. Effectiveness of rf phase modulation for increasing bunch length in electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini; Mosnier

    2000-04-01

    Aiming at increasing the apparent bunch length and hence the beam lifetime in electron storage rings, rf phase modulation near one parametric resonance has been experimentally investigated. Since the possible benefit of this technique depends greatly on the ring parameters, we studied the effect of such a modulation for different rf parameters on the longitudinal emittance. Theoretical predictions and results of simulations are compared and discussed. It is shown that synchrotron radiation tends to spoil the parametric resonance. In particular, a criterion for island survival has been found.

  16. Calibration of the Nonlinear Accelerator Model at the Diamond Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Riccardo; Rowland, James; Martin, Ian; Schmidt, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The correct implementation of the nonlinear ring model is crucial to achieve the top performance of a synchrotron light source. Several dynamics quantities can be used to compare the real machine with the model and eventually to correct the accelerator. Most of these methods are based on the analysis of turn-by-turn data of excited betatron oscillations. We present the experimental results of the campaign of measurements carried out at the Diamond. A combination of Frequency Map Analysis (FMA) and detuning with momentum measurements has allowed a precise calibration of the nonlinear model capable of reproducing the nonlinear beam dynamics in the storage ring

  17. First storage of ion beams in the Double Electrostatic Ion-Ring Experiment: DESIREE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. T.; Thomas, R. D.; Gatchell, M.; Rosen, S.; Reinhed, P.; Loefgren, P.; Braennholm, L.; Blom, M.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Baeckstroem, E.; Alexander, J. D.; Leontein, S.; Zettergren, H.; Liljeby, L.; Kaellberg, A.; Simonsson, A.; Hellberg, F.; Mannervik, S.; Larsson, M.; Geppert, W. D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2013-05-15

    We report on the first storage of ion beams in the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. We have produced beams of atomic carbon anions and small carbon anion molecules (C{sub n}{sup -}, n= 1, 2, 3, 4) in a sputter ion source. The ion beams were accelerated to 10 keV kinetic energy and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring enclosed in a vacuum chamber at 13 K. For 10 keV C{sub 2}{sup -} molecular anions we measure the residual-gas limited beam storage lifetime to be 448 s {+-} 18 s with two independent detector systems. Using the measured storage lifetimes we estimate that the residual gas pressure is in the 10{sup -14} mbar range. When high current ion beams are injected, the number of stored particles does not follow a single exponential decay law as would be expected for stored particles lost solely due to electron detachment in collision with the residual-gas. Instead, we observe a faster initial decay rate, which we ascribe to the effect of the space charge of the ion beam on the storage capacity.

  18. The Mesozoic Era of relativistic heavy ion physics and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.W.

    1994-03-01

    In order to understand how matter 15 billion years ago in the form of quarks, gluons and leptons at a temperature of 2 {times} 10{sup 12} {degrees}K evolved to become today`s Universe, the goal of relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics is to understand the equation of state of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. This quest is of cross-disciplinary interest. The phase transition from partonic matter to hadronic matter tens of micro-seconds after the beginning of the universe is of interest to cosmology. Fluctuations during this phase transition would influence nucleosynthesis and the understanding of baryonic inhomogeneities in the universe. The nuclear matter equation of state, which describes the incompressibility of nuclear matter, governs neutron star stability. It determines the possible existence of strange quark matter stars and the dynamics of supernova expansion in astrophysics. The existence of collective nuclear phenomena in nuclear physics is also determined by the nuclear equation of state. In relativistic heavy ion collisions collective nuclear flow has been observed and is being studied extensively to obtain a better understanding of the incompressibility of nuclear matter. In high energy nuclear and particle physics, production and excitations of hadronic final states have been studied in detail and are important to an overall understanding of the equation of state of nuclear matter at finite temperature. The possibility in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions to create and study highly excited hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom provides a unique opportunity for understanding the behavior of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. Study of the QCD vacuum, of particular interest in particle physics, would provide a better understanding of symmetry-breaking mechanisms and the origins of the masses of the various quarks and particles.

  19. Charge Transfer and Ionization by Intermediate-Energy Heavy Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L. H. [East Carolina University; McLawhorn, S. L. [East Carolina University; McLawhorn, R. A. [East Carolina University; Evans, N. L. [East Carolina University; Justiniano, E. L. B. [East Carolina University; Shinpaugh, J. L. [East Carolina University; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Reinhold, Carlos O [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u-1 or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7+, 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approx. 11+, and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C+ ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u-1 are described.

  20. Charge transfer and ionisation by intermediate-energy heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L H; McLawhorn, S L; McLawhorn, R A; Evans, N L; Justiniano, E L B; Shinpaugh, J L; Schultz, D R; Reinhold, C O

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u(-1) or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7(+), 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approximately 11(+), and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C(+) ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u(-1) are described.