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Sample records for heavy-chain epitopes inhibits

  1. Binding of human beta 2-microglobulin to murine EL4 thymoma cells upregulates MHC class I heavy-chain epitopes, inhibits IL-2 secretion and induces resistance to killing by natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1994-01-01

    A variety of murine tumor cell lines was studied for its binding of exogeneously added human beta 2-microglobulin (h beta 2m). Three T lymphomas and one IL-2-dependent T-cell line (HT-1) bound substantial amounts of h beta 2m, whereas P815 mastocytoma cells, an Abelson virus-infected pre-B cell....... EL4 cells which had bound h beta 2m decreased their rate of constitutive IL-2 secretion and became resistant to activated natural killer (NK) cell killing. The present data suggest the binding of h beta 2m to mouse T cells leads to conformational changes of MHC-I heavy chains which influence both...

  2. Epitope mapping of antibodies against ferritin heavy chain in giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große, K; Schmidt, R E; Witte, T; Baerlecken, N T

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study we found an association between antibodies against the human ferritin heavy chain (HFC) protein and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and/or polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), especially in GCA/PMR patients prior to glucocorticoid treatment. Antibodies against the N-terminal part of ferritin were present in 92% of untreated patients, 69% of patients with disease flare, and 13% of patients in remission. These antibodies appeared to be markers for the early detection of a disease complex usually diagnosed with considerable delay. Our aim in this study was to optimize the diagnostic test by epitope mapping of antibodies against HFC using peptide antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). We evaluated serum samples from a selected group of GCA/PMR patients in whom the sensitivity of antibodies against the N-terminal ferritin peptide was only 35%. Patients with late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA), patients with fever, patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), patients without any autoimmune disease at age > 65 years, and blood donors served as controls. By combining different ELISAs we were able to increase the frequency of human ferritin peptide antibodies in GCA/PMR (p < 0.0001) without significantly altering the false-positive rate (FPR) of the diagnostic test. The frequency of antibodies against human ferritin peptide increased from 53% to 74% in GCA/PMR patients with disease flare, from 29% to 40% in GCA/PMR patients in partial remission, and from 8% to 45% in GCA/PMR patients in complete remission. The potential diagnostic test for GCA/PMR can be improved by combining three human ferritin peptide antibodies.

  3. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy chain ... disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy chain ...

  4. A catalytic antibody heavy chain HpU-2 degrading its epitope peptide and H. pylori urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifumi, Emi; Yamada, Yukiko; Uda, Taizo

    2006-02-28

    The HpU-2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against Helicobacter pylori urease mainly recognized the alpha-subunit of the urease. On the other hand, the heavy chain of HpU-2 mAb (HpU-2-H) isolated from the parent mAb recognized both the alpha- and beta-subunit, in which the beta-subunit was recognized more strongly than the beta-subunit. HpU-2-H cleaved a peptide, SVELIDIGGNRRIFGFNALVD, which is the epitope sequence recognized by HpU-2 mAb, showing a double-phase reaction profile at 25 degrees C in a phosphate buffer. After an induction time of 24h, the cleavage of the peptide was initiated by HpU-2-H at a high rate and it was completed at 80 h of incubation. By mass spectroscopy, two main fragmented peptides, SVELIDIGGNRR and SVELIDIGGNRRIFG, were identified. In addition, many small peptide fragments were produced by successive cleavage of the fragmented peptides. Cleavage tests for H. pylori urease by HpU-2-H revealed that the beta-subunit of the urease was cleaved first and completely decomposed at 20 h of incubation. Cleavage of the alpha-subunit started after the complete decomposition of the beta-subunit. These cleavage results were in good agreement with the immunological features of HpU-2-H. The irrelevant proteins, BSA and HSA, were hardly cleaved by HpU-2-H.

  5. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

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    Colin J Powers

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  6. Intermediate filament-co-localized molecules with myosin heavy chain epitopes define distinct cellular domains in hair follicles and epidermis

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    Hughes Simon M

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins linking intermediate filaments to other cytoskeletal components have important functions in maintaining tissue integrity and cell shape. Results We found a set of monoclonal antibodies raised against specific human sarcomeric myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms labels cells in distinct regions of the mammalian epidermis. The antigens co-localize with intermediate filament-containing structures. A slow MyHC-related antigen is punctate on the cell surface and co-localizes with desmoplakin at desmosomal junctions of all suprabasal epidermal layers from rat fœtal day 16 onwards, in the root sheath of the hair follicle and in intercalated disks of cardiomyocytes. A fast MyHC-related antigen occurs in cytoplasmic filaments in a subset of basal cells of skin epidermis and bulb, but not neck, of hair follicles. A fast IIA MyHC-related antigen labels filaments of a single layer of cells in hair bulb. This 230 000 Mr antigen co-purifies with keratin. No obvious candidate for any of the antigens appears in the literature. Conclusions We describe a set of molecules that co-localize with intermediate filament in specific cell subsets in epithelial tissues. These antigens presumably influence intermediate filament structure or function.

  7. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    of Mts1. The short C-terminal fragment of the myosin heavy chain was totally soluble in the presence of an equimolar amount of Mts1 at low ionic conditions (50 mM NaCl). Depolymerization was found to be calcium-dependent and could be blocked by EGTA. Our data suggest that Mts1 can increase myosin...... a regulatory role in the myosin assembly. In the presence of calcium, Mts1 binds at the C-terminal end of the myosin heavy chain close to the site of phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2 (Ser1944). In the present study, we have shown that interaction of Mts1 with the human platelet myosin or C......-terminal fragment of the myosin heavy chain inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin heavy chain by protein kinase CK2 in vitro. Mts1 might also bind directly the beta subunit of protein kinase CK2, thereby modifying the enzyme activity. Our results indicate that myosin oligomers were disassembled in the presence...

  8. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  9. A heterodimer of a VHH (variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only) antibody that inhibits anthrax toxin cell binding linked to a VHH antibody that blocks oligomer formation is highly protective in an anthrax spore challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leysath, Clinton E; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Vrentas, Catherine; Crown, Devorah; Leppla, Stephen H; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2015-03-06

    Anthrax disease is caused by a toxin consisting of protective antigen (PA), lethal factor, and edema factor. Antibodies against PA have been shown to be protective against the disease. Variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs) with affinity for PA were obtained from immunized alpacas and screened for anthrax neutralizing activity in macrophage toxicity assays. Two classes of neutralizing VHHs were identified recognizing distinct, non-overlapping epitopes. One class recognizes domain 4 of PA at a well characterized neutralizing site through which PA binds to its cellular receptor. A second neutralizing VHH (JKH-C7) recognizes a novel epitope. This antibody inhibits conversion of the PA oligomer from "pre-pore" to its SDS and heat-resistant "pore" conformation while not preventing cleavage of full-length 83-kDa PA (PA83) by cell surface proteases to its oligomer-competent 63-kDa form (PA63). The antibody prevents endocytosis of the cell surface-generated PA63 subunit but not preformed PA63 oligomers formed in solution. JKH-C7 and the receptor-blocking VHH class (JIK-B8) were expressed as a heterodimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA). This VNA displayed improved neutralizing potency in cell assays and protected mice from anthrax toxin challenge with much better efficacy than the separate component VHHs. The VNA protected virtually all mice when separately administered at a 1:1 ratio to toxin and protected mice against Bacillus anthracis spore infection. Thus, our studies show the potential of VNAs as anthrax therapeutics. Due to their simple and stable nature, VNAs should be amenable to genetic delivery or administration via respiratory routes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Transchromosomally derived Ig heavy chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K.L.; Kingzette, M.; Crane, M.A. [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    During an immune response, activated B cells undergo isotype switching and begin to express isotypes other than IgM and IgD. Isotype switching occurs when downstream C{gamma}, C{alpha}, or C{epsilon} genes are rearranged into the S{mu} chromosomal region, resulting in the deletion of the region in between. These rearrangements usually occur in cis, i.e., intrachromosomally. In previous studies, we analyzed allotypic specificities of rabbit secretory IgA and identified a substantial number of IgA heavy chains with V{sub h} and C{alpha} allotypes that were encoded by V{sub h} and C{alpha} genes in trans. In those studies, however, we could not determine whether the trans association of V{sub H} and C{alpha} occurred during VDJ gene rearrangement or during isotype switching. Here, we cloned rabbit cDNA which encodes these trans IgA heavy chains and determined the chromosomal origin of the V{sub H}, J{sub H}, and C{alpha} regions. To determine whether the trans association occurred during VDJ gene rearrangement, we analyzed the nucleotide polymorphism of the J{sub H} region and the V{sub H} allotype encoded by the cDNA. We found that the V{sub H} and J{sub H} genes used in the VDJ gene rearrangements were from the same chromosome, indicating that the V{sub H}, D, and J{sub H} gene rearrangements occurred in cis. Furthermore, we analyzed the DNA polymorphisms of J{sub H} and C{alpha} and showed that the VDJ and C{alpha} genes encoding the trans IgA molecules were derived from different parental chromosomes. We suggest that the trans association occurred during isotype switching. This study shows that V{sub H} and C{sub H} can associate transchromosomally as part of a normal immune response. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Two Cases of Heavy Chain MGUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van Keer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy chain diseases are rare variants of B-cell lymphomas that produce one of three classes of immunoglobulin heavy chains, without corresponding light chains. We describe two patients with asymptomatic heavy chain monoclonal gammopathy. The first patient is a 51-year-old woman with alpha paraprotein on serum immunofixation. The second case is a 46-year-old woman with gamma paraprotein on urine immunofixation. Neither patient had corresponding monoclonal light chains. Workup for multiple myeloma and lymphoma was negative in both patients. These two cases illustrate that heavy chain monoclonal gammopathy can exist in the absence of clinically apparent malignancy. Only a few reports of “heavy chain MGUS” have been described before. In the absence of specialized guidelines, we suggest a similar follow-up as for MGUS, while taking into account the higher probability of progression to lymphoma than to myeloma.

  12. A recombinant heavy chain antibody approach blocks ART2 mediated deletion of an iNKT cell population that upon activation inhibits autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuplein, Felix; Rissiek, Björn; Driver, John P; Chen, Yi-Guang; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Serreze, David V

    2010-03-01

    The ectoenzyme ADP-ribosyltransferase 2.2 (ART2.2) can apoptotically delete various T-cell subsets. Depending on the involved apoptotic T-cell subset, enhanced ART2.2 activity could result in immunosuppression or autoimmunity. Diminished activity of the CD38 ectoenzyme that normally represents a counter-regulatory competitor for the NAD substrate represents one mechanism enhancing ART2.2 activity. Hence, it would be desirable to develop an agent that efficiently blocks ART2.2 activity in vivo. While the llama derived recombinant s+16 single domain antibody overcame the difficulty of specifically targeting the ART2.2 catalytic site potential therapeutic use of this reagent is limited due to short in vivo persistence. Thus, we tested if a modified version of s+16 incorporating the murine IgG1 Fc tail (s+16Fc) mediated long-term efficient in vivo suppression of ART2.2. We reasoned an ideal model to test the s+16Fc reagent were NOD mice in which genetic ablation of CD38 results in an ART2.2 mediated reduction in already sub-normal numbers of immunoregulatory natural killer T-(NKT) cells to a level that no longer allows them when activated by the super-agonist alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) to elicit effects inhibiting autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. Treatment with s+16Fc efficiently mediated long-term in vivo inhibition of ART2.2 activity in NOD.CD38(null) mice, restoring their iNKT cell numbers to levels that upon alpha-GalCer activation were capable of inhibiting T1D development. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

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    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  14. Epitope mapping and features of the epitope for monoclonal antibodies inhibiting enzymatic activity of Helicobacter pylori urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ryoji; Morihara, Fumiko; Oku, Takashi; Hifumi, Emi; Uda, Taizo

    2004-05-20

    Two characteristic monoclonal antibodies (HpU-2 and -18) out of 26 monoclonal antibodies (HpU-1 approximately 26) produced against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) urease showed a strong inhibitory effect against the enzymatic activity of the urease. Epitope mapping about some monoclonal antibodies of the HpU-series inhibiting enzymatic activity was performed by using a surface plasmon resonance apparatus and by digesting H. pylori urease with trypsin, followed by mass spectroscopy. The sequences of the epitopes recognized by HpU-2 and -18 were SVELIDIGGNRRIFGFNALVDR (22 mer) and IFGFNALVDR (10 mer), respectively. The former sequence is present as a part of a loop structure at a position close to the C-terminal of the alpha-subunit of H. pylori urease, although it has been suggested that the active site of the urease resides in the beta-subunit. The above peptide (22 mer) was chemically synthesized in a linear and cyclic form, and its conjugate with BSA was immunized in rabbits. The resultant serum induced by the linear form could specifically bind to H. pylori infecting human gastric mucosa. These results suggest that the above sequence (22 mer) must be an important epitope, although it locates in the alpha-subunit but not in the beta-subunit. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22. GR Klinefelter1, JE Welch*1, HDM Moore*2, K Bobseine*1, J Suarez*1 ,N Roberts*1 ,R Zucker *1 1U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC and 2University of Sheffield...

  16. Broad phylogenetic expression of heavy-chain determinants detected by rabbit antisera to VHa allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenshein, I L; Marchalonis, J J

    1985-10-01

    Immunoglobulin molecules from diverse vertebrate species were examined, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for the expression of determinants detectable by rabbit antisera to VHa allotypes. The data indicate that immunoglobulins of elasmobranchs, teleosts, amphibians and birds express determinants cross-reactive with those specified by the a1, a2 and a3 alleles in the domestic rabbit. We localize VHa cross-reactive specificity to the denatured heavy chain of a primitive vertebrate, the Galapagos shark (Carcharhinus galapagensis). Furthermore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the shark heavy chain shows significant homology with rabbit heavy chains of known VHa type at positions where allotype-correlated differences have been implicated. VHa-related determinants are shared by immunoglobulins of a wide range of vertebrates from sharks to man and thus seem to be epitopes which have been conserved during vertebrate evolution. The determinants detected on immunoglobulins of lower vertebrates by rabbit anti-VHa allotype sera most probably are VH-subgroup rather than allotypic markers. Their distribution demonstrates a strong phylogenetic conservation of VH-regions.

  17. The relationship between colonization and haemagglutination inhibiting and B cell epitopes of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    KELLY, C G; BOOTH, V; KENDAL, H; SLANEY, J M; CURTIS, M A; LEHNER, T

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with the monoclonal antibody 61BG1.3 selectively prevents colonization by Porphyromonas gingivalis in humans (Booth V, Ashley FP, Lehner T. Infect Immun 1996; 64:422-7). The protective MoAb recognizes the j3 component of the RI protease of P. gingivalis which is formed by proteolytic processing of a polyprotein precursor termed PrpRl. This subunit is both a haemagglutinin and an antigen which is recognized by sera from patients with periodontitis. In this study the relationship was investigated between a colonization epitope which is recognized by the MoAb 61BG1.3, a haemagglutinating and B cell epitope which are recognized by sera from patients with periodontitis. B cell epitopes were mapped by Western blotting with a series of truncated recombinant polypeptides spanning the adhesion domain within residues 784–1130 of PrpRl and by ELISA using a panel of synthetic peptides spanning the same sequence. The epitope which is recognized by the protective MoAb was mapped within residues 907–931 of PrpRl, while serum responses of patients were directed predominantly to the adjacent carboxy-terminal sequence within residues 934–1042. The haemagglutinating epitope was mapped to residues 1073–1112. In view of our previous findings that the MoAb 61BG1.3 prevents colonization of P. gingivalis in vivo and inhibits haemagglutination, these two epitopes may be in proximity in the native protein. Active or passive immunization strategies which target the protective or haemagglutinating epitopes of the adhesion domain of PrpRl may provide a means of preventing infection with P. gingivalis. PMID:9367414

  18. Diversity Analysis of the Immunoglobulin M Heavy Chain Gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A full-length cDNA encoding the immunoglobulin (IgM) heavy chain gene of Nile tilapia was successfully cloned using the 5' and 3' RACE techniques. The complete cDNA of the Nile tilapia IgM heavy chain gene is 1,921 bp in length and has an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,740 bp, which corresponds to 580 amino acid ...

  19. Surface Epitope Coverage Affects Binding Characteristics of Bisphenol-A Functionalized Nanoparticles in a Competitive Inhibition Assay

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    Yang Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomolecule interface is a key element in immunosensor fabrication, which can greatly influence the sensor performance. This paper explores the effects of surface epitope coverage of small molecule functionalized nanoparticle on the apparent affinity (avidity of antibody in a competitive inhibition assay using bisphenol-A (BPA as a model target. An unconventional two-antibody competitive inhibition ELISA (ci-ELISA using thiolated BPA modified gold nanoparticles (cysBPAv-AuNP as a competing reagent was devised for this study. It was shown that the antibody complexation with cysBPAv-AuNPs required a minimum number of surface epitopes on the nanoparticle to form a sufficiently strong interaction and reliable detection. The binding of cysBPAv-AuNP to anti-BPA antibodies, for limited antibody binding sites, was enhanced by a greater number of epitope-modified nanoparticles (cysBPAv-AuNP as well as with higher epitope coverage. Increasing the molar concentration of epitope present in an assay enhanced the binding between anti-BPA antibodies and cysBPAv-AuNP. This implies that, to increase the limit of detection of a competitive inhibition assay, a reduced molar concentration of epitope should be applied. This could be achieved by either lowering the epitope coverage on each cysBPAv-AuNP or the assay molar concentration of cysBPAv-AuNP or both of these factors.

  20. Epitope guided engineering of monobody binders for in vivo inhibition of Erk-2 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jasdeep K.; Wood, Jordan F.; Stephan, Anne Fleur; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Ferkey, Denise M.; Park, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Although the affinity optimization of protein binders is straightforward, engineering epitope specificity is more challenging. Targeting a specific surface patch is important because the biological relevance of protein binders depends on how they interact with the target. They are particularly useful to test hypotheses motivated by biochemical and structural studies. We used yeast display to engineer monobodies that bind a defined surface patch on the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), Erk-2. The targeted area (“CD” domain) is known to control the specificity and catalytic efficiency of phosphorylation by the kinase by binding a linear peptide (“D” peptide) on substrates and regulators. An inhibitor of the interaction should thus be useful for regulating Erk-2 signaling in vivo. Although the CD domain constitutes only a small percentage of the surface area of the enzyme (~ 5%), sorting a yeast displayed monobody library with wild type (wt) Erk-2 and a rationally designed mutant led to isolation of high affinity clones with desired epitope specificity. The engineered binders inhibited the activity of Erk-2 in vitro and in mammalian cells. Furthermore, they specifically inhibited the activity of Erk-2 orthologs in yeast and suppressed a mutant phenotype in round worms caused by overactive MAPK signaling. The study therefore shows that positive and negative screening can be used to bias the evolution of epitope specificity and predictably design inhibitors of biologically relevant protein-protein interaction. PMID:23227961

  1. Stability of llama heavy chain antibody fragments under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Camelids have next to their normal antibodies, a unique subset of antibodies lacking light chains. The resulting single binding domain, VHH, of these heavy chain antibodies consequently have unique properties. A high stability is one of these properties, which was investigated in this thesis. The

  2. Humanization of Antibodies Using Heavy Chain Complementarity-determining Region 3 Grafting Coupled with in Vitro Somatic Hypermutation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Peter M.; Neben, Tamlyn Y.; Tomlinson, Geoffery L.; Dalton, Jennifer L.; Altobell, Larry; Zhang, Xue; Macomber, John L.; Wu, Betty F.; Toobian, Rachelle M.; McConnell, Audrey D.; Verdino, Petra; Chau, Betty; Horlick, Robert A.; King, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A method for simultaneous humanization and affinity maturation of monoclonal antibodies has been developed using heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3 grafting combined with somatic hypermutation in vitro. To minimize the amount of murine antibody-derived antibody sequence used during humanization, only the CDR3 region from a murine antibody that recognizes the cytokine hβNGF was grafted into a nonhomologous human germ line V region. The resulting CDR3-grafted HC was paired with a CDR-grafted light chain, displayed on the surface of HEK293 cells, and matured using in vitro somatic hypermutation. A high affinity humanized antibody was derived that was considerably more potent than the parental antibody, possessed a low pm dissociation constant, and demonstrated potent inhibition of hβNGF activity in vitro. The resulting antibody contained half the heavy chain murine donor sequence compared with the same antibody humanized using traditional methods. PMID:23355464

  3. Humanization of antibodies using heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 grafting coupled with in vitro somatic hypermutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Peter M; Neben, Tamlyn Y; Tomlinson, Geoffery L; Dalton, Jennifer L; Altobell, Larry; Zhang, Xue; Macomber, John L; Wu, Betty F; Toobian, Rachelle M; McConnell, Audrey D; Verdino, Petra; Chau, Betty; Horlick, Robert A; King, David J

    2013-03-15

    A method for simultaneous humanization and affinity maturation of monoclonal antibodies has been developed using heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3 grafting combined with somatic hypermutation in vitro. To minimize the amount of murine antibody-derived antibody sequence used during humanization, only the CDR3 region from a murine antibody that recognizes the cytokine hβNGF was grafted into a nonhomologous human germ line V region. The resulting CDR3-grafted HC was paired with a CDR-grafted light chain, displayed on the surface of HEK293 cells, and matured using in vitro somatic hypermutation. A high affinity humanized antibody was derived that was considerably more potent than the parental antibody, possessed a low pm dissociation constant, and demonstrated potent inhibition of hβNGF activity in vitro. The resulting antibody contained half the heavy chain murine donor sequence compared with the same antibody humanized using traditional methods.

  4. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

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    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  5. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3' enhancer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Collins, John T; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-23

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3' enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3' heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3' enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3' enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to approximately 1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3' enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene.

  6. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3′ enhancer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John T.; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3′ enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3′ heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3′ enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3′ enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to ∼1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3′ enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene. PMID:19887393

  7. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  8. Regional Myosin heavy chain distribution in selected paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Gilad J; Kim, Choll W; Thacker, Bryan E; Tomiya, Akihito; Garfin, Steven R; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2010-06-01

    Cross-sectional study with repeated measures design. To compare the myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution within and between paraspinal muscles and to test the theory that fiber-type gradients exist as a function of paraspinal muscle depth. There is still uncertainty regarding the fiber-type distributions within different paraspinal muscles. It has been previously proposed that deep fibers of the multifidus muscle may contain a higher ratio of type I to type II fibers, because, unlike superficial fibers, they primarily stabilize the spine, and may therefore have relatively higher endurance. Using a minimally invasive surgical approach, using tubular retractors that are placed within anatomic intermuscular planes, it was feasible to obtain biopsies from the multifidus, longissimus, iliocostalis, and psoas muscles at specific predefined depths. Under an institutional review board-approved protocol, muscle biopsies were obtained from 15 patients who underwent minimally invasive spinal surgery, using the posterior paramedian (Wiltse) approach or the minimally invasive lateral approach. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform distribution was analyzed using SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) electrophoresis. Because multiple biopsies were obtained from each patient, MyHC distribution was compared using both within- and between-muscle repeated measures analyses. The fiber-type distribution was similar among the posterior paraspinal muscles and was composed of relatively high percentage of type I (63%), compared to type IIA (19%) and type IIX (18%) fibers. In contrast, the psoas muscle was found to contain a lower percentage of type I fibers (42%) and a higher percentage of type IIA (33%) and IIX fibers (26%; Pmuscles. Fiber-type distribution between the posterior paraspinal muscles is consistent and is composed of relatively high percentage of type I fibers, consistent with a postural function. The psoas muscle, on the other hand, is

  9. Thioreductase containing epitopes inhibit the development of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin eMalek Abrahimians

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoreactive CD4+ T cells recognizing islet-derived antigens play a primary role in type 1 diabetes. Specific suppression of such cells therefore represents a strategic target for the cure of the disease. We have developed a methodology by which CD4+ T cells acquire apoptosis-inducing properties on antigen-presenting cells after cognate recognition of natural sequence epitopes. We describe here that inclusion of a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (thioreductase motif within the flanking residues of a single MHC class II-restricted GAD65 epitope induces GAD65-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells (cCD4+ T. The latter, obtained either in vitro or by active immunization, acquire an effector memory phenotype and lyse APCs by a Fas-FasL interaction. Further, cCD4+ T cells eliminate by apoptosis activated bystander CD4+ T cells recognizing alternative epitopes processed by the same APC. Active immunization with a GAD65 class II-restricted thioreductase-containing T cell epitope protects mice from diabetes and abrogates insulitis. Passive transfer of in vitro-elicited cCD4+ T cells establishes that such cells are efficient in suppressing autoimmunity. These findings provide strong evidence for a new vaccination strategy to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  10. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  11. Variable fragments of heavy chain antibodies (VHHs): a new magic bullet molecule of medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Dorota; Bertrand, Olivier; Czerwinski, Marcin

    2012-06-14

     Serum of animals belonging to the Camelidae family (camels and llamas) contains fully active antibodies that are naturally devoid of light chains. Variable domains derived from heavy chain antibodies (hcAb) called VHHs or nanobodies™ can bind antigens as effectively as full-length antibodies and are easy to clone and express. Because of their potential, VHHs are being intensively studied as potential therapeutic, diagnostic and imaging tools. The paper reviews the molecular background of heavy chain antibodies and describes methods of obtaining recombinant fragments of heavy chain antibodies as well as their therapeutic, diagnostic and other applications.

  12.  Variable fragments of heavy chain antibodies (VHHs: a new magic bullet molecule of medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Smolarek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Serum of animals belonging to the Camelidae family (camels and llamas contains fully active antibodies that are naturally devoid of light chains. Variable domains derived from heavy chain antibodies (hcAb called VHHs or nanobodies™ can bind antigens as effectively as full-length antibodies and are easy to clone and express. Because of their potential, VHHs are being intensively studied as potential therapeutic, diagnostic and imaging tools. The paper reviews the molecular background of heavy chain antibodies and describes methods of obtaining recombinant fragments of heavy chain antibodies as well as their therapeutic, diagnostic and other applications.

  13. HLA Epitopes: The Targets of Monoclonal and Alloantibodies Defined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim El-Awar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA in organ transplant patients causes graft rejection, according to the humoral theory of transplantation. Sensitization is almost ubiquitous as anti-HLA antibodies are found in almost all sera of transplant recipients. Advances in testing assays and amino acid sequencing of HLA along with computer software contributed further to the understanding of antibody-antigen reactivity. It is commonly understood that antibodies bind to HLA antigens. With current knowledge of epitopes, it is more accurate to describe that antibodies bind to their target epitopes on the surface of HLA molecular chains. Epitopes are present on a single HLA (private epitope or shared by multiple antigens (public epitope. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity in HLA testing, often explained as cross-reactive groups (CREGs of antigens with antibody, can be clearly explained now by public epitopes. Since 2006, we defined and reported 194 HLA class I unique epitopes, including 56 cryptic epitopes on dissociated HLA class I heavy chains, 83 HLA class II epitopes, 60 epitopes on HLA-DRB1, 15 epitopes on HLA-DQB1, 3 epitopes on HLA-DQA1, 5 epitopes on HLA-DPB1, and 7 MICA epitopes. In this paper, we provide a summary of our findings.

  14. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Functional and Comparative Investigations of Heavy-Chain Immunoglobulins in New World Camelids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, L. P.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Duffy, M. S.; Smith, M. C.; Appleton, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Of the three immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotypes described to occur in camelids, IgG2 and IgG3 are distinct in that they do not incorporate light chains. These heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs) constitute approximately 50% of the IgG in llama serum and as much as 75% of the IgG in camel serum. We have produced isotype-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in order to investigate the roles of HCAbs in camelid immunity. Seventeen stable hybridomas were cloned, and three MAbs that were specific for epitopes on the γ chains of llama IgG1, IgG2, or IgG3 were characterized in detail. Affinity chromatography revealed that each MAb bound its isotype in solution in llama serum. The antibodies bound to the corresponding alpaca IgGs, to guanaco IgG1 and IgG2, and to camel IgG1. Interestingly, anti-IgG2 MAbs bound three heavy-chain species in llama serum, confirming the presence of three IgG2 subisotypes. Two IgG2 subisotypes were detected in alpaca and guanaco sera. The MAbs detected llama serum IgGs when they were bound to antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and were used to discern among isotypes induced during infection with a parasitic nematode. Diseased animals, infected with Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, did not produce antigen-specific HCAbs; rather, they produced the conventional isotype, IgG1, exclusively. Our data document the utility of these MAbs in functional and physiologic investigations of the immune systems of New World camelids. PMID:15753251

  15. Serial cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels in severe Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dujmovic, I.; Lunn, M.P.; Reilly, M.M.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal axonotmesis results in the release of neurofilament (Nf) proteins into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). High CSF levels of the phosphorylated form of Nf-heavy chain (NfH

  16. Frequency patterns of T-cell exposed motifs in immunoglobulin heavy chain peptides presented by MHCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Bremel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEM. TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM. Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of T-cell exposed motif re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by clonal expansion that develop along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  17. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  18. Novel mutations in beta-myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin-I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 3. Novel mutations in beta-myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin-I genes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Indian population. Ushasree Boda Shivani Vadapalli Narsimhan Calambur Pratibha Nallari. Research Note Volume 88 Issue 3 December 2009 pp ...

  19. Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins with a high pH24 value. Jin Hun Kang, Woo Young Bang, Eun Jung Kwon, Yong Hwa Lee, Da Hye Park, Eun Seok Cho, Min Ji Kim, Jong-Soon Choi, Hwa Chun Park, Beom Young Park, Chul Wook Kim ...

  20. Improving properties of llama heavy chain antibodies using in silico analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutje Hulsik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311457517

    2009-01-01

    Microbicides offer a promising way to prevent HIV infection in developing countries. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHHs) that neutralize HIV are an ideal candidate for usage as active microbicide component. A VHH is the smallest intact antigen binding domain which allows it to reach for

  1. Expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (VHHs) by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Gouka, R.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Verrips, C.T.; Lokman, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (VHHs) by Aspergillus awamori. Fragments encoding VHHs were cloned in a suitable Aspergillus expression vector and transformants secreting VHH fragments were analysed for integrated gene copy-numbers, mRNA

  2. The motion planning problem and exponential stabilization of a heavy chain. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Grabowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of paper [P. Grabowski, The motion planning problem and exponential stabilization of a heavy chain. Part I, to appear in International Journal of Control], where a model of a heavy chain system with a punctual load (tip mass in the form of a system of partial differential equations was interpreted as an abstract semigroup system and then analysed on a Hilbert state space. In particular, in [P. Grabowski, The motion planning problem and exponential stabilization of a heavy chain. Part I, to appear in International Journal of Control] we have formulated the problem of exponential stabilizability of a heavy chain in a given position. It was also shown that the exponential stability can be achieved by applying a stabilizer of the colocated-type. The proof used the method of Lyapunov functionals. In the present paper, we give other two proofs of the exponential stability, which provides an additional intrinsic insight into the exponential stabilizability mechanism. The first proof makes use of some spectral properties of the system. In the second proof, we employ some relationships between exponential stability and exact observability.

  3. Excessive amounts of mu heavy chain block B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingqiao; Chang, Cheong-Hee; Dunnick, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    Antigen-independent B-cell development occurs in several stages that depend on the expression of Ig heavy and light chain. We identified a line of mice that lacked mature B cells in the spleen. This mouse line carried approximately 11 copies of a transgene of the murine heavy chain constant region locus, and B-lineage cells expressed excessive amounts of the intracellular μ heavy chain. B-cell development failed in the bone marrow at the pro/pre B-cell transition, and examination of other lines with various copy numbers of the same transgene suggested that deficiencies in B-cell development increased with increased transgene copy number. Expression of a transgenic (Tg) light chain along with the Tg μ heavy chain led to minimal rescue of B-cell development in the bone marrow and B cells in the spleen. There are several potential mechanisms for the death of pro/pre B cells as a consequence of excess heavy chain expression.

  4. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of young sedentary men (28 +/- 0.4 years, mean +/- SE, n = 4) and male body builders (25 +/- 2.0 years, n = 4) was analysed with a sensitive one-dimensional electrophoretic technique. Compared with sedentary men...

  5. Improved production and function of llama heavy chain antibody fragments by molecular evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der R.H.; Geus, de B.; Frenken, G.J.; Peters, H.; Verrips, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve production level of llama heavy chain antibody fragments (V (HH)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae while retaining functional characteristics. For this purpose, the DNA shuffling technique was used on llama V (HH) fragments specific for the azo-dye reactive red-6. In

  6. HEAVY-CHAIN DISEASES AND MYELOMA-ASSOCIATED FANCONI SYNDROME: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The heavy chain diseases (HCDs are rare B-cell malignancies characterized by the production of a monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain without an associated light chain. There are three types of HCD, defined by the class of immunoglobulin heavy chain produced: IgA (α-HCD, IgG (γ-HCD, and IgM (μ-HCD. Alpha-HCD is the most common and usually occurs as intestinal malabsorption in a young adult from a country of the Mediterranean area. Gamma- and μ-HCDs are more rare and associated to a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that produces an abnormal Ig heavy chain. These patients may occasionally be diagnosed with a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. Fanconi syndrome, on the other hand, can be primary (inherited or secondary (acquired. The only exception to this rule is the idiopathic form. Adult acquired Fanconi syndrome can be a rare complication of a monoclonal gammopathy. At diagnosis, most patients have a MGUS or smoldering multiple myeloma, with renal failure and evidence of osteomalacia. During follow-up, patients can develop end-stage renal disease. Chemotherapy provides little benefit on renal function.

  7. Llama heavy-chain V regions consist of at least four distinct subfamilies revealing novel sequence features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuls, R.C.; Nijman, I.J.; Niewold, T.A.; Frenken, L.G.J.; Geus, de B.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies (Abs), camelids possess Abs consisting of only heavy chains. The variable domain of such a heavy-chain Ab (VHH) is fully capable of antigen (Ag) binding. Earlier analysis of 47 VHHs showed sequence features unique to VHH domains. These include the presence of

  8. Depletion of conventional mature B cells and compromised specific antibody response in bovine immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min ZHANG,Xueqian CHENG,Dan CHU,Jingwen LIANG,Yi SUN,Li MA,Beilei XU,Min ZHENG,Meili WANG,Liming REN,Xiaoxiang HU,Qingyong MENG,Ran ZHANG,Ying GUO,Yunping DAI,Robert AITKEN,Ning LI,Yaofeng ZHAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduced the bovine immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain gene (the orphaned gene on BTA11 into mouse germline cells. Bovine IgM was highly expressed in selected transgenic lines, and it largely inhibited rearrangements of the endogenous immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH genes in these lines. The forced expression of bovine IgM resulted in reduced numbers of pro- and pre-B cells but increased the number of immature B cells in the transgenic mice. Bovine IgM-expressing B cells can migrate from the bone marrow to the spleen, but most of the cells are arrested at the T1 transitional B cell stage, leading to a significantly lower number of T2 transitional and mature B cells in the spleen. Although the serum concentrations of endogenous IgM and IgG in the transgenic mice were significantly decreased, the IgA levels were slightly increased compared to the WT mice. The bovine IgM level in the serum was only one-tenth to one-fifth of that of endogenous mouse IgM, suggesting that most of the serum immunoglobulin were contributed by endogenous IgH gene-expressing B cells. These transgenic mice also exhibited a lower frequency of unique complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3 sequences in their VH repertoire and V&Kgr; repertoire but exhibited an increased frequency of unique CDR3 in their V&Lgr; repertoire. Compared to the WT mice, the transgenic mice had a significantly higher percentage of mouse IgM-expressing B cells that expressed &Lgr; chains. Finally, we showed that the transgenic mice were deficient in a specific antibody response to antigen stimulation.

  9. Frequency Patterns of T-Cell Exposed Amino Acid Motifs in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Peptides Presented by MHCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremel, Robert D; Homan, E Jane

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV) to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs). TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide, which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM). Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of TCEM re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by T-cell clonal expansion that develops along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  10. Clathrin heavy chain is important for viability, oviposition, embryogenesis and, possibly, systemic RNAi response in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    Full Text Available Clathrin heavy chain has been shown to be important for viability, embryogenesis, and RNA interference (RNAi in arthropods such as Drosophila melanogaster. However, the functional roles of clathrin heavy chain in chelicerate arthropods, such as the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis, remain unknown. We previously showed that dsRNA ingestion, followed by feeding on spider mites, induced systemic and robust RNAi in M. occidentalis females. In the current study, we performed a loss-of-function analysis of the clathrin heavy chain gene in M. occidentalis using RNAi. We showed that ingestion of clathrin heavy chain dsRNA by M. occidentalis females resulted in gene knockdown and reduced longevity. In addition, clathrin heavy chain dsRNA treatment almost completely abolished oviposition by M. occidentalis females and the few eggs produced did not hatch. Finally, we demonstrated that clathrin heavy chain gene knockdown in M. occidentalis females significantly reduced a subsequent RNAi response induced by ingestion of cathepsin L dsRNA. The last finding suggests that clathrin heavy chain may be involved in systemic RNAi responses mediated by orally delivered dsRNAs in M. occidentalis.

  11. Expression of heavy chain-only antibodies can support B-cell development in light chain knockout chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schusser, Benjamin; Collarini, Ellen J; Pedersen, Darlene; Yi, Henry; Ching, Kathryn; Izquierdo, Shelley; Thoma, Theresa; Lettmann, Sarah; Kaspers, Bernd; Etches, Robert J; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Harriman, William; Leighton, Philip A

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery of antibody-producing B cells in chickens six decades ago, chickens have been a model for B-cell development in gut-associated lymphoid tissue species. Here we describe targeting of the immunoglobulin light chain locus by homologous recombination in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) and generation of VJCL knockout chickens. In contrast to immunoglobulin heavy chain knockout chickens, which completely lack mature B cells, homozygous light chain knockout (IgL(-/-) ) chickens have a small population of B lineage cells that develop in the bursa and migrate to the periphery. This population of B cells expresses the immunoglobulin heavy chain molecule on the cell surface. Soluble heavy-chain-only IgM and IgY proteins of reduced molecular weight were detectable in plasma in 4-week-old IgL(-/-) chickens, and antigen-specific IgM and IgY heavy chain proteins were produced in response to immunization. Circulating heavy-chain-only IgM showed a deletion of the CH1 domain of the constant region enabling the immunoglobulin heavy chain to be secreted in the absence of the light chain. Our data suggest that the heavy chain by itself is enough to support all the important steps in B-cell development in a gut-associated lymphoid tissue species. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Isotype modulates epitope specificity, affinity, and antiviral activities of anti-HIV-1 human broadly neutralizing 2F5 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Daniela; Yu, Huifeng; Maupetit, Julien; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Bouceba, Tahar; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Lopalco, Lucia; Tuffery, Pierre; Bomsel, Morgane

    2012-07-31

    The constant heavy chain (CH1) domain affects antibody affinity and fine specificity, challenging the paradigm that only variable regions contribute to antigen binding. To investigate the role of the CH1 domain, we constructed IgA2 from the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 2F5 IgG1, and compared 2F5 IgA2 and IgG binding affinity and functional activities. We found that 2F5 IgA2 bound to the gp41 membrane proximal external region with higher affinity than IgG1. Functionally, compared with IgG1, 2F5 IgA2 more efficiently blocked HIV-1 transcytosis across epithelial cells and CD4(+) cell infection by R5 HIV-1. The 2F5 IgG1 and IgA2 acted synergistically to fully block HIV-1 transfer from Langerhans to autologous CD4(+) T cells and to inhibit CD4(+) T-cell infection. Epitope mapping performed by screening a random peptide library and in silico docking modeling suggested that along with the 2F5 IgG canonical ELDKWA epitope on gp41, the IgG1 recognized an additional 3D-conformational epitope on the gp41 C-helix. In contrast, the IgA2 epitope included a unique conformational motif on the gp41 N-helix. Overall, the CH1 region of 2F5 contributes to shape its epitope specificity, antibody affinity, and functional activities. In the context of sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1/AIDS, raising a mucosal IgA-based vaccine response should complement an IgG-based vaccine response in blocking HIV-1 transmission.

  13. Isotype modulates epitope specificity, affinity, and antiviral activities of anti–HIV-1 human broadly neutralizing 2F5 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Daniela; Yu, Huifeng; Maupetit, Julien; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Bouceba, Tahar; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Lopalco, Lucia; Tuffery, Pierre; Bomsel, Morgane

    2012-01-01

    The constant heavy chain (CH1) domain affects antibody affinity and fine specificity, challenging the paradigm that only variable regions contribute to antigen binding. To investigate the role of the CH1 domain, we constructed IgA2 from the broadly neutralizing anti–HIV-1 2F5 IgG1, and compared 2F5 IgA2 and IgG binding affinity and functional activities. We found that 2F5 IgA2 bound to the gp41 membrane proximal external region with higher affinity than IgG1. Functionally, compared with IgG1, 2F5 IgA2 more efficiently blocked HIV-1 transcytosis across epithelial cells and CD4+ cell infection by R5 HIV-1. The 2F5 IgG1 and IgA2 acted synergistically to fully block HIV-1 transfer from Langerhans to autologous CD4+ T cells and to inhibit CD4+ T-cell infection. Epitope mapping performed by screening a random peptide library and in silico docking modeling suggested that along with the 2F5 IgG canonical ELDKWA epitope on gp41, the IgG1 recognized an additional 3D-conformational epitope on the gp41 C-helix. In contrast, the IgA2 epitope included a unique conformational motif on the gp41 N-helix. Overall, the CH1 region of 2F5 contributes to shape its epitope specificity, antibody affinity, and functional activities. In the context of sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1/AIDS, raising a mucosal IgA-based vaccine response should complement an IgG-based vaccine response in blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:22723360

  14. Differential susceptibility on myosin heavy chain isoform following eccentric-induced muscle damage

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-01-01

    Based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, human skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into three fiber types, type I, IIa, IIx fibers, and each fiber type has different characteristics. Typical characteristics are difference in force production, shortening velocity, and fatigue resistance. When the muscle is contract and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle, contraction-induced muscle damage frequently occurs. Several experimental models involving b...

  15. Nanobodies and Nanobody-Based Human Heavy Chain Antibodies As Antitumor Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bannas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized cancer therapy. However, delivery to tumor cells in vivo is hampered by the large size (150 kDa of conventional antibodies. The minimal target recognition module of a conventional antibody is composed of two non-covalently associated variable domains (VH and VL. The proper orientation of these domains is mediated by their hydrophobic interface and is stabilized by their linkage to disulfide-linked constant domains (CH1 and CL. VH and VL domains can be fused via a genetic linker into a single-chain variable fragment (scFv. scFv modules in turn can be fused to one another, e.g., to generate a bispecific T-cell engager, or they can be fused in various orientations to antibody hinge and Fc domains to generate bi- and multispecific antibodies. However, the inherent hydrophobic interaction of VH and VL domains limits the stability and solubility of engineered antibodies, often causing aggregation and/or mispairing of V-domains. Nanobodies (15 kDa and nanobody-based human heavy chain antibodies (75 kDa can overcome these limitations. Camelids naturally produce antibodies composed only of heavy chains in which the target recognition module is composed of a single variable domain (VHH or Nb. Advantageous features of nanobodies include their small size, high solubility, high stability, and excellent tissue penetration in vivo. Nanobodies can readily be linked genetically to Fc-domains, other nanobodies, peptide tags, or toxins and can be conjugated chemically at a specific site to drugs, radionuclides, photosensitizers, and nanoparticles. These properties make them particularly suited for specific and efficient targeting of tumors in vivo. Chimeric nanobody-heavy chain antibodies combine advantageous features of nanobodies and human Fc domains in about half the size of a conventional antibody. In this review, we discuss recent developments and perspectives for applications of nanobodies and nanobody

  16. Purification and quantification of heavy-chain antibodies from the milk of bactrian camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongqiang; Zhang, Min; Li, Yi; Yao, Jirimutu; Meng, He; Yu, Siriguleng

    2017-09-01

    Camel milk has a unique composition with naturally occurring heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs), which exert rehabilitating potencies in infection and immunity. To characterize HCAb in camel milk, immunoglobulin G (IgG) was isolated from the milk of Camelus bactrianus by a combination of affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to purify and size-fractionate protein A and protein G, which were further identified by Western blotting, and were quantified by bicinchoninic acid (BCA) and ELISA. The results indicated that IgG1 fraction contains molecules of 50 kDa heavy chains and 36 kDa light chains. The HCAbs (IgG2 and IgG3 fractions) devoid of light chains, contain heavy chains of 45 kDa and 43 kDa, respectively, the amounts of which were significantly higher than that of the IgG1 in the milk of bactrian camels. Above all, we revealed the considerable amounts of HCAbs in the milk of bactrian camels, and developed a novel method for their purification and quantification. These findings provide the basis for developing potential effects of camel milk and its interface with the dairy industry, as well as future investigations of HCAb and its roles in human health and diseases. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Non-muscle (NM) myosin heavy chain phosphorylation regulates the formation of NM myosin filaments, adhesome assembly and smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Gunst, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    Non-muscle (NM) and smooth muscle (SM) myosin II are both expressed in smooth muscle tissues, however the role of NM myosin in SM contraction is unknown. Contractile stimulation of tracheal smooth muscle tissues stimulates phosphorylation of the NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 and causes NM myosin filament assembly at the SM cell cortex. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable NM myosin mutant, NM myosin S1943A, in SM tissues inhibits ACh-induced NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction, and also inhibits the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes during contractile stimulation. NM myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation but not SM myosin RLC phosphorylation is regulated by RhoA GTPase during ACh stimulation, and NM RLC phosphorylation is required for NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction. NM myosin II plays a critical role in airway SM contraction that is independent and distinct from the function of SM myosin. The molecular function of non-muscle (NM) isoforms of myosin II in smooth muscle (SM) tissues and their possible role in contraction are largely unknown. We evaluated the function of NM myosin during contractile stimulation of canine tracheal SM tissues. Stimulation with ACh caused NM myosin filament assembly, as assessed by a Triton solubility assay and a proximity ligation assay aiming to measure interactions between NM myosin monomers. ACh stimulated the phosphorylation of NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 in tracheal SM tissues, which can regulate NM myosin IIA filament assembly in vitro. Expression of the non-phosphorylatable mutant NM myosin S1943A in SM tissues inhibited ACh-induced endogenous NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation, NM myosin filament formation, the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes and tension development. The NM myosin cross-bridge cycling inhibitor blebbistatin suppressed adhesome complex assembly and SM contraction without inhibiting NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation or NM myosin filament assembly. Rho

  18. A Novel Method to Measure Glucose Uptake and Myosin Heavy Chain Isoform Expression of Single Fibers From Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKrell, James G.; Cartee, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle includes many individual fibers with diverse phenotypes. A barrier to understanding muscle glucose uptake at the cellular level has been the absence of a method to measure glucose uptake by single fibers from mammalian skeletal muscle. This study’s primary objective was to develop a procedure to measure glucose uptake by single fibers from rat skeletal muscle. Rat epitrochlearis muscles were incubated ex vivo with [3H]-2-deoxy-d-glucose, with or without insulin or AICAR, before isolation of ~10–30 single fibers from each muscle. Fiber type (myosin heavy chain [MHC] isoform) and glucose uptake were determined for each single fiber. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (which was cytochalasin B inhibitable) varied according to MHC isoform expression, with ~2-fold greater values for IIA versus IIB or IIX fibers and ~1.3-fold greater for hybrid (IIB/X) versus IIB fibers. In contrast, AICAR-stimulated glucose uptake was ~1.5-fold greater for IIB versus IIA fibers. A secondary objective was to assess insulin resistance of single fibers from obese versus lean Zucker rats. Genotype differences were observed for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and inhibitor κB (IκB)-β abundance in single fibers (obese less than lean), with decrements for glucose uptake (44–58%) and IκB-β (25–32%) in each fiber type. This novel method creates a unique opportunity for future research focused on understanding muscle glucose uptake at the cellular level. PMID:22396201

  19. Growth and Muscle Defects in Mice Lacking Adult Myosin Heavy Chain Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Acakpo-Satchivi, Leslie J.R.; Edelmann, Winfried; Sartorius, Carol; Lu, Brian D.; Wahr, Philip A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Metzger, Joseph M.; Leinwand, Leslie; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1997-01-01

    The three adult fast myosin heavy chains (MyHCs) constitute the vast majority of the myosin in adult skeletal musculature, and are >92% identical. We describe mice carrying null mutations in each of two predominant adult fast MyHC genes, IIb and IId/x. Both null strains exhibit growth and muscle defects, but the defects are different between the two strains and do not correlate with the abundance or distribution of each gene product. For example, despite the fact that MyHC-IIb accounts for >7...

  20. Early Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Diagnosed with Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Molecular Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT, a low grade B-cell lymphoma, arises in the lung it is referred to as bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT lymphoma. We describe a patient with a history of Sjögren’s syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis with dyspnea and imaging consistent with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP. However, while histology and immunohistochemistry lacked definitive features of a lymphoma, immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH polymerase chain reaction testing demonstrated B-cell monoclonality, consistent with an early BALT lymphoma.

  1. The catabolism of human γG immunoglobulins of different heavy chain subclasses. III. The catabolism of heavy chain disease proteins and of Fc fragments of myeloma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, H. L.; Fishkin, B. G.

    1972-01-01

    The catabolism of 131I and 125I paired labelled Fc fragments of myeloma proteins and of H chain disease proteins of different heavy chain subclasses was studied in men and monkeys. In contrast to the previously demonstrated catabolic heterogeneity of intact γG immunoglobulins, the Fc fragments and H chain disease proteins of all subclasses tested were catabolized at a similar rate. These data suggest that structures not present on the Fc fragments are responsible for the faster turnover rate of γG3 immunoglobulins and for the differences in half-lives of myeloma proteins within a given subclass. The catabolic features of the H chain disease proteins differed from those of intact γG. Although the whole body half-lives of the two proteins were similar, the fractional turnover rate of the H chain disease proteins was higher than that of γG, on the average 8% of the intravascular pool/day as compared to 4% for γG. One-half to 1% of the intravascular pool of the H chain disease protein and less than 0·1% of the γG was excreted into the urine. An average of 24% of the H chain disease proteins and 44% of the γG equilibrated into the intravascular compartment. PMID:4624553

  2. Antibody Heavy Chain Variable Domains of Different Germline Gene Origins Diversify through Different Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Kirik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available B cells produce antibodies, key effector molecules in health and disease. They mature their properties, including their affinity for antigen, through hypermutation events; processes that involve, e.g., base substitution, codon insertion and deletion, often in association with an isotype switch. Investigations of antibody evolution define modes whereby particular antibody responses are able to form, and such studies provide insight important for instance for development of efficient vaccines. Antibody evolution is also used in vitro for the design of antibodies with improved properties. To better understand the basic concepts of antibody evolution, we analyzed the mutational paths, both in terms of amino acid substitution and insertions and deletions, taken by antibodies of the IgG isotype. The analysis focused on the evolution of the heavy chain variable domain of sets of antibodies, each with an origin in 1 of 11 different germline genes representing six human heavy chain germline gene subgroups. Investigated genes were isolated from cells of human bone marrow, a major site of antibody production, and characterized by next-generation sequencing and an in-house bioinformatics pipeline. Apart from substitutions within the complementarity determining regions, multiple framework residues including those in protein cores were targets of extensive diversification. Diversity, both in terms of substitutions, and insertions and deletions, in antibodies is focused to different positions in the sequence in a germline gene-unique manner. Altogether, our findings create a framework for understanding patterns of evolution of antibodies from defined germline genes.

  3. High-resolution description of antibody heavy-chain repertoires in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Arnaout

    Full Text Available Antibodies' protective, pathological, and therapeutic properties result from their considerable diversity. This diversity is almost limitless in potential, but actual diversity is still poorly understood. Here we use deep sequencing to characterize the diversity of the heavy-chain CDR3 region, the most important contributor to antibody binding specificity, and the constituent V, D, and J segments that comprise it. We find that, during the stepwise D-J and then V-DJ recombination events, the choice of D and J segments exert some bias on each other; however, we find the choice of the V segment is essentially independent of both. V, D, and J segments are utilized with different frequencies, resulting in a highly skewed representation of VDJ combinations in the repertoire. Nevertheless, the pattern of segment usage was almost identical between two different individuals. The pattern of V, D, and J segment usage and recombination was insufficient to explain overlap that was observed between the two individuals' CDR3 repertoires. Finally, we find that while there are a near-infinite number of heavy-chain CDR3s in principle, there are about 3-9 million in the blood of an adult human being.

  4. High-Resolution Description of Antibody Heavy-Chain Repertoires in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Ramy; Lee, William; Cahill, Patrick; Honan, Tracey; Sparrow, Todd; Weiand, Michael; Nusbaum, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies' protective, pathological, and therapeutic properties result from their considerable diversity. This diversity is almost limitless in potential, but actual diversity is still poorly understood. Here we use deep sequencing to characterize the diversity of the heavy-chain CDR3 region, the most important contributor to antibody binding specificity, and the constituent V, D, and J segments that comprise it. We find that, during the stepwise D-J and then V-DJ recombination events, the choice of D and J segments exert some bias on each other; however, we find the choice of the V segment is essentially independent of both. V, D, and J segments are utilized with different frequencies, resulting in a highly skewed representation of VDJ combinations in the repertoire. Nevertheless, the pattern of segment usage was almost identical between two different individuals. The pattern of V, D, and J segment usage and recombination was insufficient to explain overlap that was observed between the two individuals' CDR3 repertoires. Finally, we find that while there are a near-infinite number of heavy-chain CDR3s in principle, there are about 3–9 million in the blood of an adult human being. PMID:21829618

  5. A comprehensive analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuoxiang LIANG,Tao WANG,Yi SUN,Wenlong YANG,Zhihong LIU,Jing FEI,Ying GUO,Qingwei MA,Qingjie PAN,Liming REN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heavy chain only antibodies (HCAbs represent a rare type of antibody that is devoid of light chains and the CH1 domain that have been reported in cartilaginous fish and camelids. By analyzing transcript data and genome sequences, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of Bactrian camel immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. Based on the transcript data, one μ gene, five γ genes, one α gene and one ε gene were found. Additionally, the variable region of HCAbs (VHH and the conventional antibodies (VH sequences associated with the γ3, γ1a/b and μ genes were amplified. Based on these genome sequences, seven DH, six JH, μ, γ2a, γ2c, α, and ε genes and a portion of a γ3 gene were observed. Different Kozak sequences within different VH families were found in our analysis, and the variability index differed between the VHH3 and VH3 families. Phylogenetic analysis of the constant regions of the camelid immunoglobulin genes indicates that these genes appeared before the evolutionary divergence of Bactrian camels and dromedaries.

  6. Antibody Heavy Chain Variable Domains of Different Germline Gene Origins Diversify through Different Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirik, Ufuk; Persson, Helena; Levander, Fredrik; Greiff, Lennart; Ohlin, Mats

    2017-01-01

    B cells produce antibodies, key effector molecules in health and disease. They mature their properties, including their affinity for antigen, through hypermutation events; processes that involve, e.g., base substitution, codon insertion and deletion, often in association with an isotype switch. Investigations of antibody evolution define modes whereby particular antibody responses are able to form, and such studies provide insight important for instance for development of efficient vaccines. Antibody evolution is also used in vitro for the design of antibodies with improved properties. To better understand the basic concepts of antibody evolution, we analyzed the mutational paths, both in terms of amino acid substitution and insertions and deletions, taken by antibodies of the IgG isotype. The analysis focused on the evolution of the heavy chain variable domain of sets of antibodies, each with an origin in 1 of 11 different germline genes representing six human heavy chain germline gene subgroups. Investigated genes were isolated from cells of human bone marrow, a major site of antibody production, and characterized by next-generation sequencing and an in-house bioinformatics pipeline. Apart from substitutions within the complementarity determining regions, multiple framework residues including those in protein cores were targets of extensive diversification. Diversity, both in terms of substitutions, and insertions and deletions, in antibodies is focused to different positions in the sequence in a germline gene-unique manner. Altogether, our findings create a framework for understanding patterns of evolution of antibodies from defined germline genes. PMID:29180996

  7. Knockdown of embryonic myosin heavy chain reveals an essential role in the morphology and function of the developing heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Catrin Sian; Polo-Parada, Luis; Ehler, Elisabeth; Alibhai, Aziza; Thorpe, Aaran; Suren, Suganthi; Emes, Richard D.; Patel, Bhakti; Loughna, Siobhan

    2011-01-01

    The expression and function of embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMYH) has not been investigated within the early developing heart. This is despite the knowledge that other structural proteins, such as alpha and beta myosin heavy chains and cardiac alpha actin, play crucial roles in atrial septal development and cardiac function. Most cases of atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy are not associated with a known causative gene, suggesting that further analysis into candidate genes is required. Expression studies localised eMYH in the developing chick heart. eMYH knockdown was achieved using morpholinos in a temporal manner and functional studies were carried out using electrical and calcium signalling methodologies. Knockdown in the early embryo led to abnormal atrial septal development and heart enlargement. Intriguingly, action potentials of the eMYH knockdown hearts were abnormal in comparison with the alpha and beta myosin heavy chain knockdowns and controls. Although myofibrillogenesis appeared normal, in knockdown hearts the tissue integrity was affected owing to apparent focal points of myocyte loss and an increase in cell death. An expression profile of human skeletal myosin heavy chain genes suggests that human myosin heavy chain 3 is the functional homologue of the chick eMYH gene. These data provide compelling evidence that eMYH plays a crucial role in important processes in the early developing heart and, hence, is a candidate causative gene for atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy. PMID:21862559

  8. Epitope tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzard, Bill

    2008-04-01

    Epitope tagging is widely used in the characterization of newly discovered proteins. This review presents an overview of how the technique evolved and how it is being used today, with a focus on its use in the study of protein-protein interactions. In addition, the evolution of the technique for proteomic analyses is described.

  9. Developmental expression and cardiac transcriptional regulation of Myh7b, a third myosin heavy chain in the vertebrate heart

    OpenAIRE

    Warkman, Andrew S.; Whitman, Samantha A; Miller, Melanie K.; Garriock, Robert J.; Schwach, Catherine M.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Krieg, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian heart expresses two myosin heavy chain genes (Myh6 and Myh7), which are major components of the thick filaments of the sarcomere. We have determined that a third myosin heavy chain, MYH7B, is also expressed in the myocardium. Developmental analysis shows Myh7b expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle of Xenopus, chick and mouse embryos, and in smooth muscle tissues during later stages of mouse embryogenesis. Myh7b is also expressed in the adult human heart. The promoter region ...

  10. Myosin heavy chain expression in rodent skeletal muscle: effects of exposure to zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Herrick, R. E.; Adams, G. R.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study ascertained the effects of 9 days of zero gravity on the relative (percentage of total) and calculated absolute (mg/muscle) content of isomyosin expressed in both antigravity and locomotor skeletal muscle of ground control (CON) and flight-exposed (FL) rats. Results showed that although there were no differences in body weight between FL and CON animals, a significant reduction in muscle mass occurred in the vastus intermedius (VI) (P muscle protein and myofibril protein content were not different between the muscle regions examined in the FL and CON groups. In the VI, there were trends for reductions in the relative content of type I and IIa myosin heavy chains (MHCs) that were offset by increases in the relative content of both type IIb and possibly type IIx MHC protein (P > 0.05). mRNA levels were consistent with this pattern (P antigravity skeletal muscle during exposure to zero gravity that could affect muscle function.

  11. Myosin heavy chain isoforms in single fibres from m. vastus lateralis of sprinters: influence of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J L; Klitgaard, H; Saltin, B

    1994-06-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. vastus lateralis of a group of male sprint athletes (n = 6) was analysed, before and after a three months period of intensive strength- and interval-training, using a sensitive gel electrophoretic technique. Significant improvements were observed after training in almost all of a series of performance tests. After training the sprinters revealed a decrease in fibres containing only MHC isoform I (52.0 +/- 3.0% vs. 41.2 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- SE) (P training (12.9 +/- 5.0% vs. 5.1 +/- 3.1% (P sprinters seems therefore to contain both MHC isoforms IIA and IIB. Sprint-training appears to induce an increased expression of MHC isoform IIA in skeletal muscles. This seems related to a bi-directional transformation from both MHC isoforms I and IIB towards MHC isoform IIA.

  12. Trans-chromosomal recombination within the Ig heavy chain switch region in B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingzette, Mae; Spieker-Polet, Helga; Yam, Pi-Chen; Zhai, Shi-Kang; Knight, Katherine L.

    1998-01-01

    Somatic DNA rearrangements in B lymphocytes, including V(D)J gene rearrangements and isotype switching, generally occur in cis, i. e., intrachromosomally. We showed previously, however, that 3 to 7% of IgA heavy chains have the VH and Cα regions encoded in trans. To determine whether the trans-association of VH and Cα occurred by trans-chromosomal recombination, by trans-splicing, or by trans-chromosomal gene conversion, we generated and analyzed eight IgA-secreting rabbit hybridomas with trans-associated VH and Cα heavy chains. By ELISA and by nucleotide sequence analysis we found that the VH and Cα regions were encoded by genes that were in trans in the germline. We cloned the rearranged VDJ-Cα gene from a fosmid library of one hybridoma and found that the expressed VH and Cα genes were juxtaposed. Moreover, the juxtaposed VH and Cα genes originated from different IgH alleles. From the same hybridoma, we also identified a fosmid clone with the other expected product of a trans-chromosomal recombination. The recombination breakpoint occurred within the Sμ/Sα region, indicating that the trans-association of VH and Cα genes occurred by trans-chromosomal recombination during isotype switching. We conclude that trans-chromosomal recombination occurs at an unexpectedly high frequency (7%) within the IgH locus of B lymphocytes in normal animals, which may explain the high incidence of B-cell tumors that arise from oncogene translocation into the IgH locus. PMID:9751752

  13. Noninvasive Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Trained and Untrained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Andrew C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel B; Weir, Joseph P; Beck, Travis W; Schilling, Brian K; Miller, Jonathan D; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-09-01

    Fry, AC, Housh, TJ, Cramer, JB, Weir, JP, Beck, TW, Schilling, BK, Miller, JD, and Nicoll, JX. Noninvasive assessment of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain expression in trained and untrained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2355-2362, 2017-Numerous conditions and types of physical activity (e.g., exercise, aging, and muscle-related diseases) can influence muscle fiber types and the proteins expressed. To date, muscle fibers can only be characterized by actually obtaining a tissue sample using the invasive muscle biopsy procedure. Mechanomyography (MMG) is the assessment of the vibration properties of contracting skeletal muscle and has been proposed as a possible noninvasive method for muscle fiber analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of using MMG and muscle performance measures to noninvasively assess muscle fiber characteristics. Fifteen men (5 endurance-trained, 5 weight-trained, and 5 sedentary) provided muscle samples from their vastus lateralis muscle. These samples were analyzed for relative myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein expression, which is highly correlated with % muscle fiber type areas. Additionally, each subject performed several muscle performance tests, and MMG of the quadriceps was assessed during a knee extension exercise. Multiple regression was used to develop prediction equations for determining relative muscle content of MHC types I, IIa, and IIx. A combination of MMG and knee extension performance variables estimated types I, IIa, and IIx MHCs with approximately 80% accuracy. Although preliminary, these data suggest that muscle performance tests in addition to MMG assessments during a simple muscle performance task (knee extension) can be used to estimate muscle fiber type composition in a healthy male population. Such methods could ultimately be used to noninvasively monitor muscle health and fitness.

  14. The 3D-structure of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus: implications for long-range genomic interactions [supplemental data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Jhunjhunwala (Suchit); M.C. van Zelm (Menno); M.M. Peak (Mandy); S. Cutchin (Steve); R. Riblet (Roy); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Murre (Cornelis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus is organized into distinct regions that contain multiple variable (VH), diversity (DH), joining (JH) and constant (CH) coding elements. How the Igh locus is structured in 3D space is unknown. To probe the topography of the Igh locus,

  15. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3’ immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region

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    Barbara K Birshtein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination. Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully-differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ~1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5′ constant region gene, Cμ; and an ~40 kb 3′ regulatory region (3′ RR that is located downstream of the most 3′ CH gene, Cα. The 3′ RR is a candidate for an end of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3′ RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4, which are essential for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3′ RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3’ RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3’ RR with its CTCF binding region interacts with target sequences in the VH, Eμ and CH regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh

  16. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  17. Electrophoretic Mobility of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Revisited: Application of MALDI TOF/TOF Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Arnostova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of two cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in response to the thyroid status was studied in left ventricles (LVs of Lewis rats. Major MyHC isoform in euthyroid and hyperthyroid LVs had a higher mobility on SDS-PAGE, whereas hypothyroid LVs predominantly contained a MyHC isoform with a lower mobility corresponding to that of the control soleus muscle. By comparing the MyHC profiles obtained under altered thyroid states together with the control soleus, we concluded that MyHCα was represented by the lower band with higher mobility and MyHCβ by the upper band. The identity of these two bands in SDS-PAGE gels was confirmed by western blot and mass spectrometry. Thus, in contrast to the literature data, we found that the MyHCα possessed a higher mobility rate than the MyHCβ isoform. Our data highlighted the importance of the careful identification of the MyHCα and MyHCβ isoforms analyzed by the SDS-PAGE.

  18. A Mouse Neurodegenerative Dynein Heavy Chain Mutation Alters Dynein Motility and Localization in Neurospora crassa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is responsible for the transport and delivery of cargoes in organisms ranging from humans to fungi. Dysfunction of dynein motor machinery due to mutations in dynein or its activating complex dynactin can result in one of several neurological diseases in mammals. The mouse Legs at odd angles (Loa) mutation in the tail domain of the dynein heavy chain has been shown to lead to progressive neurodegeneration in mice. The mechanism by which the Loa mutation affects dynein function is just beginning to be understood. In this work, we generated the dynein tail mutation observed in Loa mice into the Neurospora crassa genome and utilized cell biological and complementing biochemical approaches to characterize how that tail mutation affected dynein function. We determined that the Loa mutation exhibits several subtle defects upon dynein function in N. crassa that were not seen in mice, including alterations in dynein localization, impaired velocity of vesicle transport, and in the biochemical properties of purified motors. Our work provides new information on the role of the tail domain on dynein function and points out areas of future research that will be of interest to pursue in mammalian systems. PMID:22991199

  19. Iron Deposition and Ferritin Heavy Chain (Fth Localization in Rodent Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An iron rich layer on the labial surface is characteristic of the enamel of rodent incisors. In order to address a role for iron content in continuously growing incisors during odontogenesis, we studied iron deposition patterns in enamel and dentine using Perls’ blue staining and ferritin heavy chain (Fth immunolocalization. Fth expression is regulated by iron level; therefore its localization can be used as a sensitive indicator for iron deposition. Results Sagittal sections of 4-week old rat incisors showed a gradual increase in iron level in the enamel organ from secretory to maturation stages. In addition, iron was detected in ameloblasts of erupting third molars of 4-week old rats, suggesting iron plays a role in both incisor and molar development. In odontoblasts, the presence of iron was demonstrated, and this is consistent with iron’s role in collagen synthesis. Using postnatal 3-, 6-, 9-day old mice, the spatial and temporal expression of Fth in tooth development again indicated the presence of iron in mature ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Conclusions While these data do not explain what functional role iron has in tooth formation, it does highlight a significant molecular activity associated with the formation of the rodent dentition.

  20. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Myosin heavy chain composition of skeletal muscles in young rats growing under hypobaric hypoxia conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigard, A X; Sanchez, H; Birot, O; Serrurier, B

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of the soleus (Sol) and plantaris muscles (Pla) in rats developing under hypobaric choronic hypoxia (CH) conditions during 4 wk in comparison with those of control rats maintained under local barometric pressure conditions (C) or rats pair-fed an equivalent quantity of food to that consumed by CH animals (PF). Compared with C animals, sedentary rats subjected to CH conditions showed a significant decrease in type I MHC in Sol (-12%, P difference in the MHC profile of Sol was shown between CH active and C active rats. The MHC distribution in Sol of PF rats was not significantly different from that found in C animals. CH resulted in a significant decrease in type I (P fast shift in the MHC profile was unaffected by spontaneous running activity. These results suggest that running exercise suppresses the hypoxia-induced slow-to-fast transition in the MHC expression in Sol muscles only. The hypoxia-induced decrease in food intake has no major influence on MHC expression in developing rats.

  2. Ozz-E3 ubiquitin ligase targets sarcomeric embryonic myosin heavy chain during muscle development.

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    Yvan Campos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contractile proteins are expressed as a series of developmental isoforms that are in constant dynamic remodeling during embryogenesis, but how obsolete molecules are recognized and removed is not known. Ozz is a developmentally regulated protein that functions as the adaptor component of a RING-type ubiquitin ligase complex specific to striated muscle. Ozz(-/- mutants exhibit defects in myofibrillogenesis and myofiber differentiation. Here we show that Ozz targets the rod portion of embryonic myosin heavy chain and preferentially recognizes the sarcomeric rather than the soluble pool of myosin. We present evidence that Ozz binding to the embryonic myosin isoform within sarcomeric thick filaments marks it for ubiquitination and proteolytic degradation, allowing its replacement with neonatal or adult isoforms. This unique function positions Ozz within a system that facilitates sarcomeric myosin remodeling during muscle maturation and regeneration. Our findings identify Ozz-E3 as the ubiquitin ligase complex that interacts with and regulates myosin within its fully assembled cytoskeletal structure.

  3. Lampreys Have a Single Gene Cluster for the Fast Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5′-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny. PMID:24376886

  4. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ikeda

    Full Text Available Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod, a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans. We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  5. Association between a common immunoglobulin heavy chain allele and rheumatic heart disease risk in Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Tom; Mirabel, Mariana M; Kado, Joseph; Auckland, Kathryn; Nowak, Jaroslaw; Rautanen, Anna; Mentzer, Alexander J; Marijon, Eloi; Jouven, Xavier; Perman, Mai Ling; Cua, Tuliana; Kauwe, John K; Allen, John B; Taylor, Henry; Robson, Kathryn J; Deane, Charlotte M; Steer, Andrew C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2017-05-11

    The indigenous populations of the South Pacific experience a high burden of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of RHD susceptibility in 2,852 individuals recruited in eight Oceanian countries. Stratifying by ancestry, we analysed genotyped and imputed variants in Melanesians (607 cases and 1,229 controls) before follow-up of suggestive loci in three further ancestral groups: Polynesians, South Asians and Mixed or other populations (totalling 399 cases and 617 controls). We identify a novel susceptibility signal in the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) locus centring on a haplotype of nonsynonymous variants in the IGHV4-61 gene segment corresponding to the IGHV4-61*02 allele. We show each copy of IGHV4-61*02 is associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of RHD (odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence intervals 1.27-1.61, P=4.1 × 10(-9)). These findings provide new insight into the role of germline variation in the IGH locus in disease susceptibility.

  6. Requirement for enhancer specificity in immunoglobulin heavy chain locus regulation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Igor I.; Bagaeva, Ludmila; Young, Faith M.; Bottaro, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The intronic Eμ enhancer has been implicated in immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus transcription, VDJ recombination, class switch recombination (CSR)2 and somatic hypermutation (SHM). How Eμ controls these diverse mechanisms is still largely unclear, but transcriptional enhancer activity is thought to play a central role. Here we compare the phenotype of mice lacking the Eμ element (ΔEμ) with that of mice in which Eμ was replaced with the ubiquitous SV40 transcriptional enhancer (SV40eR mutation), and show that SV40e cannot functionally complement Eμ loss in pro-B cells. Surprisingly, in fact, the SV40eR mutation yields a more profound defect than ΔEμ, with an almost complete block in μ0 germline transcription in pro-B cells. This active transcriptional suppression caused by enhancer replacement appears to be specific to the early stages of B cell development, as mature SV40eR B cells express μ0 transcripts at higher levels than ΔEμ mice, and undergo complete DNA demethylation at the IgH locus. These results indicate an unexpectedly stringent, developmentally-restricted requirement for enhancer specificity in regulating IgH function during the early phases of B cell differentiation, consistent with the view that coordination of multiple independent regulatory mechanisms and elements is essential for locus activation and VDJ recombination. PMID:18490744

  7. Cross Talk between Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Transcription and RNA Surveillance during B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Aurélien; Chemin, Guillaume; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes naturally acquire frequent premature termination codons during the error-prone V(D)J recombination process. Although B cell differentiation is linked to the expression of productive Ig alleles, the transcriptional status of nonfunctionally recombined alleles remains unclear. Here, we tracked transcription and posttranscriptional regulation for both Ig heavy-chain (IgH) alleles in mice carrying a nonfunctional knock-in allele. We show that productively and nonproductively VDJ-rearranged alleles are transcribed throughout B cell development, carry similar active chromatin marks, and even display equivalent RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) loading after B cell stimulation. Hence, these results challenge the idea that the repositioning of one allele to heterochromatin could promote the silencing of nonproductive alleles. Interestingly, the efficiency of downstream RNA surveillance mechanisms fluctuates according to B cell activation and terminal differentiation: unspliced nonfunctional transcripts accumulate in primary B cells, while B cell activation promotes IgH transcription, RNA splicing, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Altogether, IgH transcription and RNA splicing rates determine by which RNA surveillance mechanisms a B cell can get rid of nonproductive IgH mRNAs. PMID:22037763

  8. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Nasibeh; Jeddi, Sajad; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH) in rats has not been elucidated thus far. The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and β-MHC isoforms. Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201%) and α- MHC expression was lower (47%) than control. Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  9. Hypoxia favors myosin heavy chain beta gene expression in an Hif-1alpha-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binó, Lucia; Procházková, Jiřina; Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Kučera, Jan; Kudová, Jana; Pacherník, Jiří; Kubala, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    The potentiation of the naturally limited regenerative capacity of the heart is dependent on an understanding of the mechanisms that are activated in response to pathological conditions such as hypoxia. Under these conditions, the expression of genes suggested to support cardiomyocyte survival and heart adaptation is triggered. Particularly important are changes in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. We propose here that alterations in the expression profiles of MHC genes are induced in response to hypoxia and are primarily mediated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). In in vitro models of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, we showed that hypoxia (1% O2) or the pharmacological stabilization of HIFs significantly increased MHCbeta (Myh7) gene expression. The key role of HIF-1alpha is supported by the absence of these effects in HIF-1alpha-deficient cells, even in the presence of HIF-2alpha. Interestingly, ChIP analysis did not confirm the direct interaction of HIF-1alpha with putative HIF response elements predicted in the MHCalpha and beta encoding DNA region. Further analyses showed the significant effect of the mTOR signaling inhibitor rapamycin in inducing Myh7 expression and a hypoxia-triggered reduction in the levels of antisense RNA transcripts associated with the Myh7 gene locus. Overall, the recognized and important role of HIF in the regulation of heart regenerative processes could be highly significant for the development of novel therapeutic interventions in heart failure. PMID:29137374

  10. Alpaca (Lama pacos) as a convenient source of recombinant camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHHs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, David R.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Pernthaner, Anton; Shoemaker, Charles B.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that derive from the unusual camelid heavy chain only IgG class (HCAbs) have many favourable properties compared with single-chain antibodies prepared from conventional IgG. As a result, VHHs have become widely used as binding reagents and are beginning to show potential as therapeutic agents. To date, the source of VHH genetic material has been camels and llamas despite their large size and limited availability. Here we demonstrate that the smaller, more tractable and widely available alpaca is an excellent source of VHH coding DNA. Alpaca sera IgG consists of about 50% HCAbs, mostly of the short-hinge variety. Sequencing of DNA encoding more than 50 random VHH and hinge domains permitted the design of PCR primers that will amplify virtually all alpaca VHH coding DNAs for phage display library construction. Alpacas were immunized with ovine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and a VHH phage display library was prepared from a lymph node that drains the sites of immunizations and successfully employed in the isolation of VHHs that bind and neutralize ovine TNFα. PMID:17568607

  11. Combination of neurofilament heavy chain and complement c3 as CSF biomarkers for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; An, Jiyan; Shaw, Christopher E; Shaw, Gerry; Lacomis, David; Bowser, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease with an average survival of 3 years from symptom onset. Rapid and conclusive early diagnosis is essential if interventions with disease-modifying therapies are to be successful. Cytoskeletal modification and inflammation are known to occur during the pathogenesis of ALS. We measured levels of cytoskeletal proteins and inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of ALS, disease controls and healthy subjects. We determined threshold values for each protein that provided the optimal sensitivity and specificity for ALS within a training set, as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Interestingly, the optimal assay was a ratio of the levels for phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain and complement C3 (pNFH/C3). We next applied this assay to a separate test set of CSF samples to verify our results. Overall, the predictive pNFH/C3 ratio identified ALS with 87.3% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity in a total of 71 ALS subjects, 52 disease control subjects and 40 healthy subjects. In addition, the level of CSF pNFH correlated with survival of ALS patients. We also detected increased pNFH in the plasma of ALS patients and observed a correlation between CSF and plasma pNFH levels within the same subjects. These findings support large-scale prospective biomarker studies to determine the clinical utility of diagnostic and prognostic signatures in ALS. PMID:21418221

  12. Expression cloning and production of Human Heavy Chain Only antibodies from murine transgenic plasma cells

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    Dubravka Drabek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several technologies have been developed to isolate human antibodies against different target antigens as a source of potential therapeutics, including hybridoma technology, phage and yeast display systems. For conventional antibodies this involves either random pairing of VH and VL domains in combinatorial display libraries, or isolation of cognate pairs of VH and VL domains from human B cells or from transgenic mice carrying human immunoglobulin loci followed by single cell sorting, single cell RT-PCR and bulk cloning of isolated natural VH-VL pairs. Heavy chain only antibodies (HCAbs that naturally occur in camelids require only heavy immunoglobulin chain cloning. Here, we present an automatable novel, high-throughput technology, for rapid direct cloning and production of fully human HCAbs from sorted population of transgenic mouse plasma cells carrying a human HCAb locus. Utility of the technique is demonstrated by isolation of diverse sets of sequence unique, soluble, high affinity influenza A strain X-31 hemagglutinin (HA specific HCAbs

  13. Phosphorylated Neurofilament Heavy Chain Correlations to Visual Function, Optical Coherence Tomography, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasol, Joshua; Feuer, William; Yang, Cui; Shaw, Gerry; Kardon, Randy; Guy, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To correlate visual and neurologic clinical scores and treatment of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with assays of serum phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of axonal loss. Design/Methods. The Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial (ONTT) randomized 457 patients with acute optic neuritis to intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) followed by oral prednisone, oral prednisone or placebo treatment arms. We quantified serum pNF-H levels in 175 ONTT patients 5 years after study entry. We performed OCT measurements of macular volume and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in a subset of 51 patients at year 15. Results. Elevated pNF-H levels at year 5 correlated to poorer visual function at study entry. Lower 15 year macular volumes and RNFL thickness correlated better with follow-up than with baseline visual function measures. With IVMP treatment, 15 year RNFL differences of the fellow eye (FE) minus the affected eye (SE) RNFLFEmSE correlated with five-year pNF-H levels. PNF-H was reduced by half with IVMP relative to placebo or by 40% relative to prednisone. Conclusions/Relevance. Acute optic neuritis patients who have more severe visual loss during initial presentation have a higher incidence of axonal loss that was slightly suppressed with IVMP treatment. PMID:22096624

  14. Differential binding of heavy chain variable domain 3 antigen binding fragments to protein A chromatography resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Julia; Lewis, Nathaniel; Maggiora, Kathy; Gillespie, Alison J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-08-28

    This work examines the binding of 15 different VH3 IgGs and their corresponding F(ab')2 fragments to two different protein A chromatography resins: MabSelect(®), which utilizes a recombinant protein A ligand, and MabSelect SuRe(®) (SuRe), which utilizes a tetrameric Z domain ligand. The results show that VH3 F(ab')2 fragments can exhibit a variety of binding behaviours for the two resins. Contrary to previously published data, a subset of these molecules show strong interaction with the Z domain of SuRe(®). Furthermore, the results show that sequence variability of residue 57 in the VH3 heavy chain CDR2 domain correlates with binding behaviour on MabSelect(®) and SuRe(®). Site-directed mutagenesis of this residue confers gain or loss of VH3 F(ab')2 binding to these resins in 3 mAbs, demonstrating that it plays a key role in both recombinant protein A and Z domain interaction. A fourth mAb with a longer CDR2 loop was not affected by mutation of residue 57, indicating that CDR2 domain length may alter the binding interface and lead to the involvement of other residues in protein A binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Designing the epitope flanking regions for optimal generation of CTL epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, Nicholas J; Currier, Jeffrey R; Jobe, Ousman; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Marovich, Mary A; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Mangala

    2014-06-12

    The flanking amino acids that surround epitopes are critical for effective antigen processing and maintenance of epitope integrity. In the present study, the frequency and characteristics of each amino acid that flanked the peptides generated from the proteasomal degradation of three different subtypes of HIV-1 Gag-p24 were determined. Synthetic flanking regions were designed based on the highest and the lowest frequencies of amino acid with the ideal characteristics at positions upstream and downstream of the proteasomal cleavage site. Peptides were synthesized that contained known CD8+ CTL-epitopes from HIV-1 Gag, CMV pp65, and vaccinia proteins HRP-2, and C16, flanked by amino acid sequences specifically designed to either generate or inhibit the known CD8+ CTL-epitopes. As predicted, the known CD8+ CTL-epitopes were effectively generated from the peptides with synthetic flanking regions specifically designed to promote epitope generation in a proteasome-dependent manner. The majority of the proteasome-generated epitopes were cleaved immediately after the C-terminal amino acid of the specific CTL-epitope. The synthetic peptide sequences containing known CD8+ CTL-epitopes with the flanking regions that promote epitope generation were effectively processed and presented to epitope specific CD8+ T-cells resulting in the production of IFN-γ. These results highlight the importance of flanking regions in promoting efficient antigen processing and presentation. This concept can have important implications in vaccine design and development strategies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. A monocyte chemotaxis inhibiting factor in serum of HIV infected men shares epitopes with the HIV transmembrane protein gp41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, M.; Drexhage, H. A.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes that gp41, the transmembranous envelope protein of HIV, is able to inhibit monocyte chemotaxis (measured as FMLP-induced polarization). To study the presence of such immunosuppressive HIV env proteins in the circulation of HIV-infected men, fractions were prepared from serum

  17. Expression profiles of myostatin, myogenin, and Myosin heavy chain in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds differing in growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Liangde; Xie, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lei, Min; Li, Congyan; Ren, Yongjun; Zheng, Jie; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cuixia; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare mRNA levels of myostatin (MSTN), myogenin (MyoG), and fiber type compositions in terms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds with different body sizes and growth rates. Longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles of 16 Californian rabbits (CW) and 16 Germany great line of ZIKA rabbits (GZ) were collected at the ages of 35d and 84d (slaughter age). The results showed that the live weights of GZ rabbits of 35d and 84d old were approximately 36% and 26% greater than those of CW rabbits, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that at the age of 84d GZ rabbits contained significantly lower MSTN mRNA level and higher MyoG mRNA level in both longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles than CW rabbits, and mRNA levels of MSTN and MyoG exhibited opposite changes from the age of 35d to 84d, suggesting that GZ rabbits were subjected to less growth inhibition from MSTN at slaughter age, which occurred most possibly in skeletal muscles. Four types of fiber were identified by real-time PCR in rabbit muscles, with MyHC-1 and MyHC-2D, MyHC-2B were the major types in biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi muscles, respectively. At the age of 84d, GZ rabbits contained greater proportion of MyHC-1 and decreased proportion of MyHC-2D and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity in biceps femoris than CW rabbits, and the results were exactly opposite in longissimus dorsi, suggesting that GZ rabbits show higher oxidative capacity in biceps femoris muscle than CW rabbits. In conclusion, the trends of mRNA levels of MSTN and fiber types in GZ rabbits' skeletal muscles might be consistent with the putative fast growth characteristic of GZ rabbits compared to CW rabbits.

  18. Epitope specificity of myeloperoxidase antibodies: identification of candidate human immunodominant epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, B F; Vista, E S; Wynn, D M; James, J A

    2011-06-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) are a common feature of systemic vasculitides and have been classified as autoimmune conditions based, in part, on these autoantibodies. ANCA are subdivided further based on their primary target: cytoplasm (c-ANCA) or perinuclear region (p-ANCA). p-ANCAs commonly target myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme with microbicidal and degradative activity. MPO antibodies are non-specific for any single disease and found in a variety of vasculitides, most commonly microscopic polyangiitis. Despite their prevalence, their role in human disease pathogenesis remains undefined. We sought to characterize the sequential antigenic determinants of MPO in vasculitis patients with p-ANCA. Of 68 patients with significant levels of p-ANCA, 12 have significant levels of MPO antibodies and were selected for fine specificity epitope mapping. Sequential antigenic targets, including those containing amino acids (aa) 213-222 (WTPGVKRNGF) and aa 511-522 (RLDNRYQPMEPN), were commonly targeted with a prevalence ranging from 33% to 58%. Subsequent analysis of autoantibody binding to the RLDNRYQPMEPN peptide was assessed using a confirmatory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format, with six patients displaying significant binding using this method. Antibodies against this epitope, along with four others (aa 393-402, aa 437-446, aa 479-488 and aa 717-726), were reactive to the heavy chain structure of the MPO protein. One epitope, GSASPMELLS (aa 91-100), was within the pro-peptide structure of MPO. B cell epitope prediction algorithms identified all or part of the seven epitopes defined. These results provide major common human anti-MPO immunodominant antigenic targets which can be used to examine further the potential pathogenic mechanisms for these autoantibodies. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  19. The repertoire of heavy chain immunoglobulin genes in B‑cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Russia and Belarus

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    B. V. Biderman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutation status of the heavy chain variable region genes has long been known as an important factor in long‑term prognosis in B‑cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B‑CLL. A more detailed study of the gene sequences of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgVH led to the discovery of stereotyped antigen receptors (SAR — receptors that have the same set of VH‑, D‑ and JH‑genes used. Cells with SARs have been found almost in a quarter of all B‑CLL cases. This phenomenon is not observed in other lymphatic tumors. In our study, we confirmed and extended the basic observations concerning the repertoire of IgVH in B‑CLL. Differences in the B‑CLL IgVH gene repertoirs between Russia, Вelarus and other countries are also analysed and discussed.

  20. Aedes aegypti ferritin heavy chain homologue: feeding of iron or blood influences message levels, lengths and subunit abundance

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    Boris C. Dunkov

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Secreted ferritin in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, has several subunits that are the products of at least two genes, one encoding a homologue of the vertebrate heavy chain (HCH and the other the light chain homologue (LCH. Here we report the developmental and organ specific pattern of expression of the ferritin HCH messages and of both subunit types in control sugar-fed mosquitoes, in those exposed to high levels of dietary iron, and after blood feeding.

  1. Sulfation of the bikunin chondroitin sulfate chain determines heavy chain·hyaluronan complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Day, Anthony J; Youssef, Peter; Zhuo, Lisheng; Watanabe, Hideto; Caterson, Bruce; Whitelock, John M

    2013-08-09

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI) is a complex comprising two heavy chains (HCs) that are covalently bound by an ester bond to chondroitin sulfate (CS), which itself is attached to Ser-10 of bikunin. IαI is essential for the trans-esterification of HCs onto hyaluronan (HA). This process is important for the stabilization of HA-rich matrices during ovulation and some inflammatory processes. Bikunin has been isolated previously by anion exchange chromatography with a salt gradient up to 0.5 M NaCl and found to contain unsulfated and 4-sulfated CS disaccharides. In this study, bikunin-containing fractions in plasma and urine were separated by anion exchange chromatography with a salt gradient of 0.1-1.0 M NaCl, and fractions were analyzed for their reactivity with the 4-sulfated CS linkage region antibody (2B6). The fractions that reacted with the 2B6 antibody (0.5-0.8 M NaCl) were found to predominantly contain sulfated CS disaccharides, including disulfated disaccharides, whereas the fractions that did not react with this antibody (0.1-0.5 M NaCl) contained unsulfated and 4-sulfated CS disaccharides. IαI in the 0.5-0.8 M NaCl plasma fraction was able to promote the trans-esterification of HCs to HA in the presence of TSG-6, whereas the 0.1-0.5 M NaCl fraction had a much reduced ability to transfer HC proteins to HA, suggesting that the CS containing 4-sulfated linkage region structures and disulfated disaccharides are involved in the HC transfer. Furthermore, these data highlight that the structure of the CS attached to bikunin is important for the transfer of HC onto HA and emphasize a specific role of CS chain sulfation.

  2. Directed evolution of human heavy chain variable domain (VH using in vivo protein fitness filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sik Kim

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable domains (VH are promising scaffolds for antigen binding. However, VH is an unstable and aggregation-prone protein, hindering its use for therapeutic purposes. To evolve the VH domain, we performed in vivo protein solubility selection that linked antibiotic resistance to the protein folding quality control mechanism of the twin-arginine translocation pathway of E. coli. After screening a human germ-line VH library, 95% of the VH proteins obtained were identified as VH3 family members; one VH protein, MG2x1, stood out among separate clones expressing individual VH variants. With further screening of combinatorial framework mutation library of MG2x1, we found a consistent bias toward substitution with tryptophan at the position of 50 and 58 in VH. Comparison of the crystal structures of the VH variants revealed that those substitutions with bulky side chain amino acids filled the cavity in the VH interface between heavy and light chains of the Fab arrangement along with the increased number of hydrogen bonds, decreased solvation energy, and increased negative charge. Accordingly, the engineered VH acquires an increased level of thermodynamic stability, reversible folding, and soluble expression. The library built with the VH variant as a scaffold was qualified as most of VH clones selected randomly were expressed as soluble form in E. coli regardless length of the combinatorial CDR. Furthermore, a non-aggregation feature of the selected VH conferred a free of humoral response in mice, even when administered together with adjuvant. As a result, this selection provides an alternative directed evolution pathway for unstable proteins, which are distinct from conventional methods based on the phage display.

  3. Effects of voluntary wheel running on cardiac function and myosin heavy chain in chemically gonadectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydock, David S; Lien, Chia-Ying; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2007-12-01

    Reducing testosterone and estrogen levels with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist such as Zoladex (i.e., chemical gonadectomy) is a common treatment for many prostate and breast cancer patients, respectively. There are reports of surgical gonadectomy inducing cardiac dysfunction, and exercise has been shown to be cardioprotective under these circumstances. Minimal research has been done investigating the effects of chemical gonadectomy and increased physical activity on cardiac function. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of chemical gonadectomy and physical activity on cardiac function. Male (M) and female (F) Sprague-Dawley rats received either Zoladex treatment (Zol) that suppressed gonadal function for 8 wk or control implants (Con) and either were allowed unlimited access to voluntary running wheels (WR) or remained sedentary (Sed) throughout the treatment period. In vivo and ex vivo left ventricle (LV) function were then assessed, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was analyzed to help explain LV functional differences. Hearts from M Sed+Zol exhibited significantly lower aortic blood flow velocity, developed pressure, and maximal rate of pressure development and higher beta-MHC expression than M Sed+Con. Hearts from F Sed+Zol exhibited significantly lower LV wall thicknesses, fractional shortening, and developed pressure and higher beta-MHC expression than F Sed+Con. This cardiac dysfunction was not evident in hearts from M or F WR+Zol, and this was associated with a preservation of the MHC isoform distribution. Thus an 8-wk chemical gonadectomy with Zoladex promoted cardiac dysfunction in male and female rats, and voluntary wheel running protected against this cardiac dysfunction.

  4. Catabolism of human γG-immunoglobulins of different heavy chain subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Hans L.; Fishkin, Ben G.; Grey, Howard M.

    1968-01-01

    The rates of catabolism of human γG-immunoglobulins of subclasses γG1, γG2, γG3, and γG4 were studied by determining the rates of elimination from the circulation of pairs of 131I-and 125I-labeled γG-myeloma proteins in 57 patients suffering from cancer other than multiple myeloma. On the average, γG1-, γG2-, and γG4-myeloma proteins were catabolized at a rate similar to that of normal γG-immunoglobulin, whereas γG3-myeloma proteins were catabolized more rapidly than normal γG-immunoglobulin. The average half-lives for the myeloma proteins were 12.3 days for normal γG, 11.6 days for γG1, 12.4 days for γG2, 8.2 days for γG3, and 11.3 days for γG4. However, significant differences in catabolic rates were observed when individual myeloma proteins of a single subclass were compared. These individual variations were present within all four heavy chain subclasses. The extent of differences ranged from 10 to 47%. The catabolic rate of normal γG was in an intermediate range when compared with myeloma proteins of relatively long and short half-lives. The rate of catabolism of an individual myeloma protein did not correlate with its light chain type, Gm factor, carbohydrate content, or electrophoretic mobility. These findings indicate that the structure(s) related to the catabolism of γG-immunoglobulins are complex and differ from one immunoglobulin molecule to another. Images PMID:4175542

  5. The Ig heavy chain switch region is a hotspot for insertion of transfected DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baar, J.; Shulman, M.J. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-08-15

    The Ig heavy chain switch usually occurs by breaking and rejoining DNA in the switch (S) regions, which consist of tandemly repeated sequences 5{prime} of the constant region exons. Various studies have suggested that S DNA can also recombine with non-S sequences. To measure the frequency of such recombination events, the hybridoma cell line igm692, a deletion mutant that lacks the C{mu}1 and C{mu}2 exons and the 3{prime} end of the S{mu} region, was transfected with a fragment bearing the C{mu}1-2 exons, but no S{mu} DNA. Insertion of this fragment into the residual VDJ-C{mu} intron of igm692 can restore a functional {mu} gene, yielding a transformant that is detected as a plaque-forming cell (PFC). PFCs comprise {approximately}8 x 10{sup -7} of the surviving transfected cells. In 10 of 12 PFCs, the C{mu}1-2 fragment inserted into the 2.5-kb residual S{mu} region, whereas insertion in two cases occurred in the 3.5-kb segment 5{prime} of S{mu}. Using a PCR assay to measure the frequency of insertion of the tranferred fragment elsewhere in the hybridoma genome, we found that {approximately}9% of the surviving tranfected cells had stably acquired the C{mu}1-2 fragment. These results indicate that the S{mu} region is {approximately}100-fold more recombinogenic than the average genomic site, and {approximately}7-fold more recombinogenic than the non-S{mu} segment of the residual VDJ-C{mu}, i.e., the S{mu} region is a hotspot for insertion of transfected DNA.

  6. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasibeh Yousefzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH in rats has not been elucidated thus far. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC and β-MHC isoforms. Methods: Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Results: Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p < 0.05 and heart rate (217 ± 11 vs. 273 ± 6 beat/min, p < 0.05 were lower in the FH rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201% and α- MHC expression was lower (47% than control. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  7. Immunoglobulin light and heavy chain amyloidosis AL/AH: renal pathology and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picken, Maria M

    2007-01-01

    Among the varied and biochemically diverse group of protein folding disorders that are collectively known as the amyloidoses, AL-amyloidosis where deposits are derived from the immunoglobulin light chain fragments, is the most prevalent systemic form of the disease found in the western world. In contrast, AH-amyloidosis, resulting from the deposition of immunoglobulin heavy chains, is a rare disease with very few cases thus far reported. Both diseases primarily affect older individuals and are always associated with some form of plasma cell/B cell lymphoproliferative process. The overwhelming majority of monoclonal light chains are nephrotoxic leading to frequent renal involvement, although a wide variety of other organ systems may be involved. The most common clinical presentation is proteinuria and the disease is often diagnosed by renal biopsy. The kidneys are the most frequent site of amyloid fibril deposition in AL and light microscopic examination of Congo red stained sections is the prime means of detection. Electron microscopy may be helpful in the detection of small deposits and in the differentiation of amyloid from other types of renal fibrillar deposits. Current treatment of systemic amyloidoses depends upon the type of amyloid deposits; thus, accurate typing, using a panel of antibodies, is of paramount importance. While the differential diagnosis of amyloidoses continues to expand with increased awareness of hereditary types, currently, the main challenge is diagnosis of AL/AH with confidence. Future goals include the development of more precise and sensitive diagnostic tools. This chapter presents the pathology of AL/AH, current standards of diagnosis and the differential diagnosis. Whenever possible, the most recent references, considered as being particularly useful to clinicians and pathologists serving patients with renal amyloidosis, have been selected.

  8. Role of kinesin heavy chain in Crumbs localization along the rhabdomere elongation in Drosophila photoreceptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett P League

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crumbs (Crb, a cell polarity gene, has been shown to provide a positional cue for the extension of the apical membrane domain, adherens junction (AJ, and rhabdomere along the growing proximal-distal axis during Drosophila photoreceptor morphogenesis. In developing Drosophila photoreceptors, a stabilized microtubule structure was discovered and its presence was linked to polarity protein localization. It was therefore hypothesized that the microtubules may provide trafficking routes for the polarity proteins during photoreceptor morphogenesis. This study has examined whether Kinesin heavy chain (Khc, a subunit of the microtubule-based motor Kinesin-1, is essential in polarity protein localization in developing photoreceptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because a genetic interaction was found between crb and khc, Crb localization was examined in the developing photoreceptors of khc mutants. khc was dispensable during early eye differentiation and development. However, khc mutant photoreceptors showed a range of abnormalities in the apical membrane domain depending on the position along the proximal-distal axis in pupal photoreceptors. The khc mutant showed a progressive mislocalization in the apical domain along the distal-proximal axis during rhabdomere elongation. The khc mutation also led to a similar progressive defect in the stabilized microtubule structures, strongly suggesting that Khc is essential for microtubule structure and Crb localization during distal to proximal rhabdomere elongation in pupal morphogenesis. This role of Khc in apical domain control was further supported by khc's gain-of-function phenotype. Khc overexpression in photoreceptors caused disruption of the apical membrane domain and the stabilized microtubules in the developing photoreceptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we examined the role of khc in the regulation of the apical Crb domain in developing photoreceptors. Since the rhabdomeres in

  9. Analysis of Heavy-Chain Antibody Responses and Resistance to Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in Experimentally Infected Alpacas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, S. R.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Lefman, S.; Hamel, P. J. S.; Ku, S.; Mainini, T.; Hoyt, G.; Justus, K.; Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Duffy, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Parelaphostrongylus tenuis is an important cause of neurologic disease of camelids in central and eastern North America. The aim of this study was to determine whether alpacas develop resistance to disease caused by P. tenuis in response to a previous infection or a combination of controlled infection and immunization. Alpacas were immunized with a homogenate of third-stage larvae (L3) and simultaneously implanted subcutaneously with diffusion chambers containing 20 live L3. Sham-treated animals received adjuvant alone and empty chambers. The protocol was not effective in inducing resistance to oral challenge with 10 L3, and disease developed between 60 and 71 days following infection. Immediately following the onset of neurologic disease, affected animals were treated with a regimen of anthelmintic and anti-inflammatory drugs, and all recovered. One year later, a subset of alpacas from this experiment was challenged with 20 L3 and the results showed that prior infection induced resistance to disease. Primary and secondary infections induced production of conventional and heavy-chain IgGs that reacted with soluble antigens in L3 homogenates but did not consistently recognize a recombinant form of a parasite-derived aspartyl protease inhibitor. Thus, the latter antigen may not be a good candidate for serology-based diagnostic tests. Antibody responses to parasite antigens occurred in the absence of overt disease, demonstrating that P. tenuis infection can be subclinical in a host that has been considered to be highly susceptible to disease. The potential for immunoprophylaxis to be effective in preventing disease caused by P. tenuis was supported by evidence of resistance to reinfection. PMID:22593238

  10. Enhanced factor VIII heavy chain for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingxia; Lu, Hui; Wang, Jinhui; Sarkar, Rita; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Hongli; High, Katherine A; Xiao, Weidong

    2009-03-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy using recombinant adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been hampered by the size of the factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA. Previously, splitting the FVIII coding sequence into a heavy-chain (HC) fragment and a light-chain (LC) fragment for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery has been successfully explored. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is a "chain imbalance" problem in which LC secretion is approximately 1-2 logs higher than that of HC, and therefore, the majority of protein synthesized is nonfunctional. To improve HC secretion, we constructed alternate FVIII HCs based on our observation that LC facilitates HC secretion. To our surprise, most of the new HC molecules exhibited enhanced expression over the traditional HC molecule (HC(745)). The optimized HC mutein, HC(HL), including additional acidic-region-3 (ar3) sequences, exhibited three- to fivefold higher activity in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assay in in vitro testing. Further characterization suggested ar3 sequences increased HC secretion, rather than promoting HC synthesis. Intravenous delivery of AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC or AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC achieved phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Mice receiving AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC achieved three- to fourfold higher HC expression than AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC, consistent with the FVIII functional assays. HC(HL) should be substituted for HC(745) in a dual AAV vector strategy due to its enhanced expression.

  11. Postnatal development of cerebellar zones revealed by neurofilament heavy chain protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J White

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is organized into parasagittal zones that control sensory-motor behavior. Although the architecture of adult zones is well understood, very little is known about how zones emerge during development. Understanding the process of zone formation is an essential step towards unraveling how circuits are constructed to support specific behaviors. Therefore, we focused this study on postnatal development to determine the spatial and temporal changes that establish zonal patterns during circuit formation. We used a combination of wholemount and tissue section immunohistochemistry in mice to show that the cytoskeletal protein neurofilament heavy chain (NFH is a robust marker for postnatal cerebellar zonal patterning. The patterned expression of NFH is initiated shortly after birth, and compared to the domains of several known zonal markers such as zebrin II, HSP25, neurogranin, and phospholipase Cβ4 (PLCβ4, NFH does not exhibit transient expression patterns that are typically remodeled between stages, and the adult zones do not emerge after a period of uniform expression in all lobules. Instead, we found that throughout postnatal development NFH gradually reveals distinct zones in each cerebellar lobule. The boundaries of individual NFH zones sharpen over time, as zones are refined during the second and third weeks after birth. Double labeling with neurogranin and PLCβ4 further revealed that although the postnatal expression of NFH is spatially and temporally unique, its pattern of zones respects a fundamental and well-known molecular topography in the cerebellum. The dynamics of NFH expression support the hypothesis that adult circuits are derived from an embryonic map that is refined into zones during the first three-weeks of life.

  12. Serum phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain levels in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresle, M M; Liu, Y; Dagley, L F; Haartsen, J; Pearson, F; Purcell, A W; Laverick, L; Petzold, A; Lucas, R M; Van der Walt, A; Prime, H; Morris, D R; Taylor, B V; Shaw, G; Butzkueven, H

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated whether the measurement of serum phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) titre is likely to be a valid biomarker of axonal injury in multiple sclerosis (MS). Serum pNF-H concentrations were measured by ELISA in cases with relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS (n=81), secondary progressive (SP) MS (n=13) and primary progressive (PP)-MS; n=6) MS; first demyelinating event (FDE; n=82); and unaffected controls (n=135). A subset of MS cases (n=45) were re-sampled on one or multiple occasions. The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) and MRI measures were used to evaluate associations between serum pNF-H status, disease severity and cerebral lesion load and activity. We confirmed the presence of pNF-H peptides in serum by ELISA. We showed that a high serum pNF-H titre was detectable in 9% of RR-MS and FDE cases, and 38.5% of SP-MS cases. Patients with a high serum pNF-H titre had higher average MSSS scores and T2 lesion volumes than patients with a low serum pNF-H titre. Repeated sampling of a subset of MS cases showed that pNF-H levels can fluctuate over time, likely reflecting temporal dynamics of axonal injury in MS. A subset of FDE/MS cases was found to have a high serum pNF-H titre, and this was associated with changes in clinical outcome measures. We propose that routine measurement of serum pNF-H should be further investigated for monitoring axonal injury in MS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. The saponin D39 blocks dissociation of non-muscular myosin heavy chain IIA from TNF receptor 2, suppressing tissue factor expression and venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ke-Feng; Zheng, Jin-Rong; Tang, You-Mei; Li, Fang; Lv, Yan-Ni; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Gao, Zhen; Qi, Jin; Yu, Bo-Yang; Kou, Jun-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Non-muscular myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC IIA) plays a key role in tissue factor expression and venous thrombosis. Natural products might inhibit thrombosis through effects on NMMHC IIA. Here, we have shown that a natural saponin, D39, from Liriope muscari exerted anti-thrombotic activity in vivo, by targeting NMMHC IIA. Expression and activity of tissue factor in endothelial cells were analysed in vitro by Western blot and simplified chromogenic assays. Interactions between D39 and NMMHC IIA were assessed by serial affinity chromatography and molecular docking analysis. D39-dependent interactions between NMMHC IIA and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) were measured by immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays. Anti-thrombotic activity of D39 in vivo was evaluated with a model of inferior vena cava ligation injury in mice. D39 inhibited tissue factor expression and procoagulant activities in HUVECs and decreased thrombus weight in inferior vena cava-ligated mice dose-dependently. Serial affinity chromatography and molecular docking analysis suggested that D39 bound to NMMHC IIA. In HEK293T cells, D39 inhibited tissue factor expression evoked by NMMHC IIA overexpression. This effect was blocked by NMMHC IIA knockdown in HUVECs. D39 inhibited dissociation of NMMHC IIA from TNFR2, which subsequently modulated the Akt/GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathways. D39 inhibited tissue factor expression and thrombus formation by modulating the Akt/GSK3β and NF-κB signalling pathways through NMMHC IIA. We identified a new natural product that targeted NMMHC IIA, as a potential treatment for thrombotic disorders and other vasculopathies. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Mutations in the Slow Skeletal Muscle Fiber Myosin Heavy Chain Gene ( MYH7) Cause Laing Early-Onset Distal Myopathy (MPD1)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meredith, Christopher; Herrmann, Ralf; Parry, Cheryl; Liyanage, Khema; Dye, Danielle E; Durling, Hayley J; Duff, Rachael M; Beckman, Kaye; de Visser, Marianne; van der Graaff, Maaike M; Hedera, Peter; Fink, John K; Petty, Elizabeth M; Lamont, Phillipa; Fabian, Vicki; Bridges, Leslie; Voit, Thomas; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laing, Nigel G

    2004-01-01

    .... One candidate gene in the region, MYH7, which is mutated in cardiomyopathy and myosin storage myopathy, codes for the myosin heavy chain of type I skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac ventricles...

  15. Biosynthesis and characterization of a non-repetitive polypeptide derived from silk fibroin heavy chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gaoqiang; Wu, Mingyang; Yi, Honggen; Wang, Jiannan, E-mail: wangjn@suda.edu.cn

    2016-02-01

    Silk fibroin heavy chain is the major protein component of Bombyx mori silk fibroin and is composed of 12 repetitive and 11 non-repetitive regions, with the non-repetitive domain consisting of a hydrophilic polypeptide chain. In order to determine the biomedical function of the non-repetitive domain or potentially use it to modify hydrophobic biomaterials, high-purity isolation is necessary. Previously, we cloned and extended a gene motif (f(1)) encoding the non-repetitive domain. Here, this motif and its multimers are inserted into a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion-protein expression vector. Motif f(1) and multimers f(4) and f(8) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells following isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction, purified by GST-affinity chromatography, and single bands of purified fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8), were visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Target polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8), were cleaved clearly from the GST-fusion tag following thrombin digestion. Mass spectrometry results indicate that the molecular weights associated with fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8) are 31.5, 43.8, and 59.0 kDa, respectively, and with the cleaved polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8) are 4.8, 16.8, and 32.8 kDa, respectively. The F(1), F(4), and F(8) polypeptide chains are negatively charged with isoelectric points (pI) of 3.3, 3.2, and 3.0, respectively. The molecular weight and pI values of the polypeptide chains are consistent with the predicted values and the amino acid compositions similar to predicted sequences. FTIR and CD results show the molecular conformation of F(1) was mainly random coil, and more stable α-helix structure formed in longer molecular chain. - Highlights: • A non-repetitive domain and its multimers of silk fibroin were expressed by E. coli. • The corresponding target polypeptides F(1), F(4) and F(8) were cleaved clearly. • Their

  16. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  17. Phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain is a marker of neurodegeneration in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, John; Shaw, Gerry; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Quiros, Peter; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Carelli, Valerio; Feuer, William J; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2008-01-01

    To determine the profile of neurodegeneration in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We quantitated serum levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) in a Brazilian pedigree of 16 affected patients and 59 carriers with LHON, both molecularly characterized as harboring the G to A mutation at nucleotide 11,778 of the mitochondrial genome. The association of subject characteristics to pNF-H levels was studied with multiple regression; pNF-H data were square-root transformed to effect normality of distribution of residuals. Relationships between the square-root of pNF-H and age and sex were investigated within groups with Pearson correlation and the two-sample t-test. Linear regression was used to assess the difference between groups and to determine if the relationship of age was different between affected individuals and carriers. Results of plotting pNF-H levels by age suggested a nonlinear, quadratic association so age squared was used in the statistical analysis. ANCOVA was used to assess the influence of age and group on pNF-H levels. In the carrier group, there was a significant correlation of square-root pNF-H (mean=0.24 ng/ml(2)) with age (r=0.30, p=0.022) and a stronger correlation with quadratic age (r=0.37, p=0.003). With a higher mean pNF-H (0.33 ng/ml(2)) for the affected group, correlations were of similar magnitude, although they were not statistically significant: age (r=0.22, p=0.42), quadratic age (r=0.22, p=0.45). There was no correlation between age and pNF-H levels (mean=0.34 ng/ml(2)) in the off-pedigree group: age (r=0.03, p=0.87), quadratic age (r=0.04, p=0.84). There was no difference between sexes and pNF-H levels in any of the groups (affected, p=0.65; carriers, p=0.19; off-pedigree, p=0.93). Elevated pNF-H released into the serum of some affected LHON patients may suggest that axonal degeneration occurs at some point after loss of visual function. Increases in pNF-H levels of carriers with increasing age, not seen in

  18. Influence of the Lurcher mutation on myosin heavy chain expression in skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, N; Martrette, J M; Westphal, A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of Lurcher mutation, characterized by degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, granule cells, and inferior olive neurons, on cardiac and skeletal muscles: one respiratory (diaphragm, Dia), three masticatory (anterior temporalis, AT; masseter superficialis, MS and anterior digastric, AD), one hind limb (soleus, S), entire tongue (T), and one cardiac (ventricle, V) muscles. Body and muscle weight, muscle protein content, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms relative expression were then compared in Lurcher mutant mice vs. normal, according to sex. Male body weight was always greater than female one, but there was no specific muscle difference in females, except for T relative weight which was greater in normal females. Muscle protein concentration was greater in normal males except for AD and T in which it was lower. Lurcher mutant mice showed a reduced whole body growth but no specific muscle atrophy (except in male AT), and a global decrease in muscle protein content which made muscles more fragile (except in female Dia and male T, in which it was greater). Lurcher mutation induced a global reduction of muscle protein concentration whereas a general influence of sex could not be disclosed. Concerning MHC relative composition, all the muscles were fast-twitch: Dia, AT, MS, AD, S, and T predominantly expressed the fast type 2 MHC isoforms, except female S, whereas V contained only MHC alpha, also a fast MHC. Female muscles were slower than male ones and classification of muscles in terms of shortening velocity was comparable in normal male and female. In other respects, male Lurcher mutant muscles were slower and consequently more fatigue resistant than normal, except T which became faster and less fatigue resistant. On the contrary, in female mutants, only the Dia was slower than normal one, MS and AD were comparable to normal ones and finally, AT, S, and T were faster than normal ones. It should be noted that a developmental

  19. Post-mortem degradation of myosin heavy chain in intact fish muscle: Effects of pH and enzyme inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, P. A.; Vang, B.; Pedersen, A M; Martínez, Iciar; Olsen, R L

    2011-01-01

    Fish muscle is rapidly degraded during post-mortem storage, due to proteolytic enzymes acting probably both on muscle cells and connective tissue. In this work we have developed a model system which may be used to study the enzymatic degradation occurring in intact post-mortem fish muscle. Degradation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was monitored in muscle with pH adjusted to 6.05, 6.3 and 6.9 and in the presence of the enzyme inhibitors PMSF, EDTA, phenanthroline, pepstatin A, antipain, E-64 and...

  20. Isolation, purification, and characterization of fragment B, the NH2-terminal half of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, M; Lei, D L; N. Sugimoto; Ozutsumi, K; Okabe, T.

    1989-01-01

    Fragment B, the N-terminal half of the heavy chain, an important domain of the tetanus neurotoxin molecule, was isolated for the first time. Tetanus toxin (composed of three domains, A, B, and C) was prepared from culture filtrates. Fragment A-B, derived from the toxin treated mildly with papain, was used for the isolation of fragment B. Fragment A-B obtained was dissociated into fragments A and B by reduction with 100 mM dithiothreitol and treatment with 2 M urea. Fragment B was separated fr...

  1. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con......-chain of MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation.......Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native...... configuration of the MHC class I antigen, since heat denaturation of the HLA antigens reduce the cleavage. The proteolytic fragments following C1 cleavage were characterized by precipitation with Con A-Sepharose, anti-MHC class I and anti-beta 2-microglobulin antibodies. The proteolysis of the alpha...

  2. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  3. Identification of an Arg403Gln beta myosin heavy chain gene mutation in a Portuguese family with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, L M; Vieira, M; Faro, C; Ventura, M; Pires, E; Providência, L A

    2000-04-01

    The etiology of Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is attributed to the mutation of genes that encode sarcomeric proteins in the heart. Until now no gene mutations had been identified in Portuguese families with HCM. The main objective of this study is to describe a Portuguese family with HCM carrying an Arg403Gln mutation in the beta myosin heavy chain gene. With the help of several Molecular Biology tools, 40 families with HCM were studied. In all these families, one member was identified as carrying an Arg403Gln mutation in the beta myosin heavy chain gene. All family members were submitted to a physical exam, EKG and echocardiography. Those carrying a gene mutation were also submitted to Holter monitoring and to magnetic ressonance imaging. Molecular biology techniques are extremely important for the diagnosis of HCM, particularly in healthy carriers. The use of molecular diagnostic tools in HCM is very useful because it allows us to identify the healthy carriers and establish earlier clinical and prevention programs for these individuals.

  4. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  5. Retargeted oncolytic adenovirus displaying a single variable domain of camelid heavy-chain-only antibody in a fiber protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A van Erp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditionally replicative adenoviruses are promising agents for oncolytic virotherapy. Various approaches have been attempted to retarget adenoviruses to tumor-specific antigens to circumvent deficiency of receptor for adenoviral binding and to provide an additional level of tumor specificity. Functional incorporation of highly specific targeting molecules into the viral capsid can potentially retarget adenoviral infection. However, conventional antibodies are not compatible with the cytoplasmic adenovirus capsid synthesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies for retargeting of adenovirus infection. We have combined transcriptional targeting using a tumor-specific promoter with transductional targeting through viral capsid incorporation of antihuman carcinoembryonic antigen single variable domains. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of a single variable domain genetically incorporated into an adenovirus fiber increased specificity of infection and efficacy of replication of single variable domain-targeted oncolytic adenovirus. The double targeting, both transcriptional through the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter and transductional using the single variable domain, is a promising means to improve the therapeutic index for these advanced generation conditionally replicative adenoviruses. A successful strategy to transductional retargeting of oncolytic adenovirus infection has not been shown before and therefore we believe this is the first employment of transductional targeting using single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies to enhance specificity of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

  6. Glucosidase inhibition enhances presentation of de-N-glycosylated hepatitis B virus epitopes by MHC class I in vitro and in woodchucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Pamela A.; Menne, Stephan; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Betesh, Lucy; Cote, Paul J.; Philip, Ramila; Mehta, Anand S.; Tennant, Bud C.; Block, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    In this report, the possibility of pharmacologically altering the hepatitis B virus (HBV) epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I on infected cells is demonstrated. The HBV middle envelope glycoprotein MHBs maturation appears to require calnexin mediated folding. This interaction is dependent upon glucosidases in the endoplasmic reticulum. Prevention of HBV envelope protein maturation in cultured cells with glucosidase inhibitors, such as 6-O-butanoyl castanospermine and N-nonyl deoxynorjirmycin, resulted in MHBs degradation by proteasomes. The de-N-glycosylation associated with polypeptide degradation was predicted to result in conversion of asparagine residues into aspartic acid residues. This prediction was confirmed by showing that peptides corresponding to the N-glycosylation sequons of MHBs, but with aspartic acid replacing asparagine, (a) can prime human CTLs that recognize HBV producing cells and (b) that the presentation of these envelope motifs by MHC class I is enhanced by incubation with glucosidase inhibitors. Moreover, although peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and vaccinated with WHV surface antigen could be induced to recognize the natural MHBs asparagine-containing peptides, only cells isolated from glucosidase inhibitor treated animals recognized the aspartic containing peptides. Conclusion: These data suggest that pharmacological intervention with glucosidase inhibitors can alter the MHBs epitopes presented. This editing of the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide results in a new epitope, or “editope”, with possible medical significance. PMID:20658465

  7. Rational design and synthesis of altered peptide ligands based on human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 epitope: inhibition of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Theodore; Aggelidakis, Mihalis; Tapeinou, Anthi; Tseveleki, Vivian; Kanistras, Ioannis; Gatos, Dimitrios; Matsoukas, John

    2014-11-04

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the etiology of MS remains unclear, there is evidence T-cell recognition of immunodominant epitopes of myelin proteins, such as the 35-55 epitope of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), plays a pathogenic role in the induction of chronic EAE. Cyclization of peptides is of great interest since the limited stability of linear peptides restricts their potential use as therapeutic agents. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a number of linear and cyclic peptides by mutating crucial T cell receptor (TCR) contact residues of the human MOG35-55 epitope. In particular, we have designed and synthesized cyclic altered peptide ligands (APLs) by mutating Arg41 with Ala or Arg41 and Arg46 with Ala. The peptides were synthesized in solid phase on 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl) using the Fmoc/t-Bu methodology. The purity of final products was verified by RP-HPLC and their identification was achieved by ESI-MS. It was found that the substitutions of Arg at positions 41 and 46 with Ala results in peptide analogues that reduce the severity of MOG-induced EAE clinical symptoms in C57BL/6 mice when co-administered with mouse MOG35-55 peptide at the time of immunization.

  8. RNAi targeting embryonic myosin heavy chain isoform inhibited bound thrombin-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Shimada, Seiji; Nakamura, Mariko; Kosugi, Tadayoshi

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of bound thrombin, a complex of alpha-thrombin with fibrin fragments derived from clots, on proliferation and migration of cultured rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells, cell...

  9. TRPM7 regulates myosin IIA filament stability and protein localization by heavy chain phosphorylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, K.; Middelbeek, J.; Lasonder, E.; Dulyaninova, N.G.; Morrice, N.A.; Ryazanov, A.G.; Bresnick, A.R.; Figdor, C.G.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2008-01-01

    Deregulation of myosin II-based contractility contributes to the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as cancer, which underscores the necessity for tight spatial and temporal control of myosin II activity. Recently, we demonstrated that activation of the mammalian alpha-kinase TRPM7 inhibits myosin

  10. [Screening and analysis of the mutations on beta-myosin heavy chain gene in 3 Chinese families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiu-li; Fan, Xin-ping; Yang, Zhong-wei; Yang, Fu-hui

    2011-02-01

    To detect gene mutations on beta-myosin heavy chain gene MYH7 in 3 Chinese families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to analyze the correlation between genotype and phenotype. A denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing mutation screening of the exons (exon3-23) coding for MYH7 gene were performed in 3 Chinese families with HCM. In this study, we identified several mutations in MYH7. A mutation of Thr441Met previously reported in a patient with Laing distal myopathy was first identified in one Chinese pedigree. This study illustrated the high frequency of mutation in MYH7 gene in Chinese HCM families. Different mutations and carriers of the MYH7 gene present phenotypic heterogeneity. Mutation screening and analysis in HCM family could therefore facilitate the early HCM diagnosis and would be helpful for the prediction, prevention and early treatment of HCM linked with MYH7 gene mutation.

  11. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  12. Myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution, fibre-type composition and fibre size in skeletal muscle of patients on haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Eidemak, Inge; Sorensen, Helle Tauby

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Chronic uraemia is associated with abnormalities in skeletal muscles, which can affect their working capacity. It is also well known that the fibre-type composition of skeletal muscles influences endurance, muscle strength and power. In this study we therefore determined the size...... and distribution of muscle fibres and the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform composition in patiens on haemodialysis (HD) in order to establish any differences with values for untrained control subjects. Material and methods. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of 14 non-diabetic patients...... determined fibre-type composition of the vastus lateralis muscle. The mean fibre area of type 1 and 2 fibres was 3283±873 and 3594±1483 µm2, respectively. The MHC composition and the size of the type 1 fibres of the patients on HD were significantly different from those of the control subjects. Conclusions...

  13. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness......, presenile cataracts, and/or progressive nephritis leading to end-stage renal failure. No consistent correlations have been identified between the 27 different MYH9 mutations identified so far and the variable clinical evolution of the disease. We have evaluated 108 consecutive MYH9-RD patients belonging...... or 1841 result in intermediate clinical pictures. These findings are relevant not only to patients' clinical management but also to the elucidation of the pathogenesis of the disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  14. Immunoglobulin Tau Heavy Chain (IgT in Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus: Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Du

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin tau (IgT is a new teleost immunoglobulin isotype, and its potential function in adaptive immunity is not very clear. In the present study, the membrane-bound and secreted IgT (mIgT and sIgT heavy chain genes were cloned for the first time and characterized in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus, and found the nucleic acid sequence were exactly same in the Cτ1–Cτ4 constant domains of mIgT and sIgT, but different in variable regions and the C-terminus. The amino acid sequence of mIgT shared higher similarity with Bovichtus diacanthus (51.2% and Dicentrarchus labrax (45.0%. Amino acid of flounder IgT, IgM, and IgD heavy chain was compared and the highest similarity was found between IgT Cτ1 and IgM Cμ1 (38%. In healthy flounder, the transcript levels of IgT mRNA were the highest in gill, spleen, and liver, and higher in peripheral blood leucocytes, skin, and hindgut. After infection and vaccination with Edwardsiella tarda via intraperitoneal injection and immersion, the qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the IgT mRNA level was significantly upregulated in all tested tissues, with similar dynamic tendency that increased firstly and then decreased, and higher in gill, skin, hindgut, liver, and stomach in immersion than in the injection group, but no significant difference existed in spleen and head kidney between immersion and injection groups. These results revealed that IgT responses could be simultaneously induced in both mucosal and systemic tissues after infection/vaccination via injection and immersion route, but IgT might play a more important role in mucosal immunity than in systemic immunity.

  15. Thrombin Cleavage of Inter-α-inhibitor Heavy Chain 1 Regulates Leukocyte Binding to an Inflammatory Hyaluronan Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrey, Aaron C; de la Motte, Carol A

    2016-11-18

    Dynamic alterations of the extracellular matrix in response to injury directly modulate inflammation and consequently the promotion and resolution of disease. During inflammation, hyaluronan (HA) is increased at sites of inflammation where it may be covalently modified with the heavy chains (HC) of inter-α-trypsin inhibitor. Deposition of this unique, pathological form of HA (HC-HA) leads to the formation of cable-like structures that promote adhesion of leukocytes. Naive mononuclear leukocytes bind specifically to inflammation-associated HA matrices but do not adhere to HA constitutively expressed under homeostatic conditions. In this study, we have directly investigated a role for the blood-coagulation protease thrombin in regulating the adhesion of monocytic cells to smooth muscle cells producing an inflammatory matrix. Our data demonstrate that the proteolytic activity of thrombin negatively regulates the adhesion of monocytes to an inflammatory HC-HA complex. This effect is independent of protease-activated receptor activation but requires proteolytic activity toward a novel substrate. Components of HC-HA complexes were predicted to contain conserved thrombin-susceptible cleavage sites based on sequence analysis, and heavy chain 1 (HC1) was confirmed to be a substrate of thrombin. Thrombin treatment is sufficient to cleave HC1 associated with either cell-surface HA or serum inter-α-trypsin inhibitor. Furthermore, thrombin treatment of the inflammatory matrix leads to dissolution of HC-HA cable structures and abolishes leukocyte adhesion. These data establish a novel mechanism whereby thrombin cleavage of HC1 regulates the adhesive properties of an inflammatory HA matrix. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Ji, Qiuhe; Lin, Ying; Fu, Meng; Gao, Jixin; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Xingbin; Feng, Lei; Liu, Yufeng; Han, Hua; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H)3B4I) and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L)3B4) transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs) via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H)3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H)3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L)3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H)3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  17. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xing

    Full Text Available Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H3B4I and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L3B4 transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  18. Static stretch promotes MEF2A nuclear translocation and expression of neonatal myosin heavy chain in C2C12 myocytes in a calcineurin- and p38-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Cyril; Loughna, Paul T

    2005-03-01

    Although the effects of mechanical stimuli have been studied extensively in fully differentiated skeletal muscle and have been shown to promote changes in phenotype, including altered myosin heavy chain isoform expression, the effects of a change in mechanical environment have been poorly studied at earlier stages of skeletal muscle differentiation. In particular, the early events elicited by mechanical stimuli upon differentiating myocytes have not been investigated. In the present study, the effect of static stretch on the activation of transcriptional factors MEF2A and NFATc1, which have been shown to be involved in the differentiation and phenotype regulation of skeletal muscle, have been examined. Furthermore, putative second messenger signaling pathways that could be involved in the dephosphorylation and hence activation of these factors were also examined. We have demonstrated that static stretch application produces a robust increase in p38 phosphorylation preceding MEF2A, but not NFATc1, nuclear translocation as well as deactivation of GSK-3beta via its phosphorylation. Using SB-203580 and cyclosporine A drugs to inhibit both p38- or/and calcineurin-dependent signals, respectively, we have shown that MEF2A phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation are regulated by p38 and calcineurin in a biphasic, time-dependent manner. Moreover, we also present evidence for another kinase that is involved in the stretch-related signal triggering MEF2A hyperphosphorylation, impairing its nuclear translocation, and that is related to p38. Finally, we have shown that static stretch application overnight promotes neonatal myosin heavy chain expression, which is inhibited by an inactivation of both p38 and calcineurin.

  19. Production of Recombinant Human scFv Against Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain by Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Ehsan; Lakzaei, Mostafa; Rasaee, Mohhamad Javad; Aminian, Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    Tetanus, as a major cause of death in developing countries, is caused by tetanus neurotoxin. Recombinant antibodies against tetanus neurotoxin can be useful in tetanus management. Phage display of antibody fragments from immune human antibody libraries with single chain constructs combining the variable fragments (scFv) has been one of the most prominent technologies in antibody engineering. The aim of this study was the generation of a single chain fragment of variable region (scFv) library and selection of specific antibodies with high affinity against tetanus toxin. Immune human single chain fragment variable (HuscFv) antibody phagemid library was displayed on pIII of filamentous bacteriophage. Selection of scFv clones was performed against tetanus toxin antigens after three rounds of panning. The selected scFv clones were analyzed for inhibition of tetanus toxin binding to ganglioside GT1b. After the third round of panning, over 35 HuscFv phages specific for tetanus toxin were isolated from this library of which 15 clones were found to bind specifically to tetanus toxin. The selected HuscFv phages expressed as a soluble HuscFv peptide and some clones showed positive signals against tetanus toxin. We found that six HuscFv clones inhibit toxin binding to ganglioside GT1b. These selected antibodies can be used in the management of tetanus.

  20. 3D Architecture, dynamics as well as functional implications of genome organization of the Prader-Willi/Angelmann syndrome region & the Immunoglobin Heavy-Chain locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe general 3D architecture of the immunoglobin heavy-chain (Igh) locus was determined by a novel interdisciplinary combination of high-resolution FISH and high-resolution epifluorescence spectral distance microscopy with analytical analysis, computer simulations, as well as

  1. Coexpression of the human HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 heavy chain gene and human beta 2-microglobulin gene in L cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernabeu, C.; Maziarz, R.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J.; Burakoff, S. J.; Terhorst, C.

    1984-01-01

    L cells expressing human HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 class I antigen heavy chains are not recognized by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes directed at HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 antigens. To test whether the absence of human beta 2-m was the cause of the lack of recognition by the human cytotoxic T lymphocytes, coexpression

  2. Production of bifunctional proteins by Aspergillus awamori: Llama variable heavy chain antibody fragment (VHH) R9 coupled to Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Roelofs, M.S.; Dries, N. van den; Goosen, T.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Lokman, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase gene (arp) was genetically fused to either the 5′- or 3′-terminal ends of the gene encoding llama variable heavy chain antibody fragment VHH R9, resulting in the fusion expression cassettes ARP-R9 or R9-ARP. Aspergillus awamori transformants were obtained which

  3. Purification of correctly oxidized MHC class I heavy-chain molecules under denaturing conditions: A novel strategy exploiting disulfide assisted protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Henrik; Ruffet, E.; Blicher, T.

    2003-01-01

    disulfide bonding are formed under non-reducing denaturing conditions and separated from scrambled disulfide bond forms by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. In the second step, rapid refolding of the oxidized heavy chains is afforded by disulfide bond-assisted folding in the presence of beta(2...

  4. Purification of correctly oxidized MHC class I heavy-chain molecules under denaturing conditions: a novel strategy exploiting disulfide assisted protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Henrik; Ruffet, Emmanuel; Blicher, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    with correct disulfide bonding are formed under non-reducing denaturing conditions and separated from scrambled disulfide bond forms by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. In the second step, rapid refolding of the oxidized heavy chains is afforded by disulfide bond-assisted folding in the presence of beta...

  5. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  6. Chronic oral administration of beta-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol affects myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in adult mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiyal, S N; Sharma, S

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of chronic administration of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 30 days) on the major contractile protein (myosin) in the left ventricular muscle of the adult mouse heart. Separation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on 7.5 % glycerol SDS-PAGE and subsequent quantification of the gels by laser densitometry showed a 6.5-fold increase in the beta-isoform of MHC in the clenbuterol-treated group. The alpha : beta ratio of these two isoforms in the control group was 98.16+/-0.14 %: 1.83+/-0.14 %, whereas in the treated group it was 88.05+/-1.15 % : 11.95+/-1.15 %. Actomyosin ATPase activity assay demonstrated a significant (20 %) decline in ATPase activity of the tissue in the beta-agonist-treated group. These results suggest that chronic clenbuterol treatment is capable to induced the transformation of MHC isoforms increasing the slow beta-MHC isoform, which may contribute to the altered contractile mechanics of clenbuterol-treated hearts.

  7. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms mRNA transcripts in the temporalis muscle of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurana, Neus; Artells, Rosa; Muñoz, Carmen; Arias-Martorell, Júlia; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Casado, Aroa; Cuesta, Elisabeth; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Pastor, Juan Francisco; Potau, Josep Maria

    2017-11-01

    The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is the primate that is phylogenetically most closely related to humans (Homo sapiens). In order to shed light on the anatomy and function of the temporalis muscle in the chimpanzee, we have analyzed the expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in different parts of the muscle. We dissected the superficial, deep and sphenomandibularis portions of the temporalis muscle in five adult P. troglodytes and quantified the expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in each portion using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed significant differences in the patterns of expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC-IIM isoform between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior superficial temporalis (33.6% vs 47.0%; P=0.032) and between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior deep temporalis (33.6% vs 43.0; P=0.016). We also observed non-significant differences between the patterns of expression in the anterior and posterior superficial temporalis. The differential expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in the temporalis muscle in P. troglodytes may be related to the functional differences that have been observed in electromyographic studies in other species of primates. Our findings can be applicable to the fields of comparative anatomy, evolutionary anatomy, and anthropology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving the accuracy of the structure prediction of the third hypervariable loop of the heavy chains of antibodies.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2014-06-13

    MOTIVATION: Antibodies are able to recognize a wide range of antigens through their complementary determining regions formed by six hypervariable loops. Predicting the 3D structure of these loops is essential for the analysis and reengineering of novel antibodies with enhanced affinity and specificity. The canonical structure model allows high accuracy prediction for five of the loops. The third loop of the heavy chain, H3, is the hardest to predict because of its diversity in structure, length and sequence composition. RESULTS: We describe a method, based on the Random Forest automatic learning technique, to select structural templates for H3 loops among a dataset of candidates. These can be used to predict the structure of the loop with a higher accuracy than that achieved by any of the presently available methods. The method also has the advantage of being extremely fast and returning a reliable estimate of the model quality. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The source code is freely available at http://www.biocomputing.it/H3Loopred/ .

  9. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Haryadi

    Full Text Available Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig heavy chain (HC and kappa light chain (LC was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells.

  10. SNPs within the beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7 and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PKM2 genes in horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two highly expressed skeletal muscle genes (the MYH7 gene encoding the myosin heavy chain slow/β-cardiac isoform and the PKM2 gene encoding the pyruvate kinase muscle isoforms were investigated with the objective to identify DNA markers in horses. A panel of DNA samples from different horse breeds was analysed using a PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP approach. Four and two alleles were identified for the MYH7 and PKM2 loci, respectively. Mendelian inheritance of alleles of the two investigated genes was confirmed analysing horse families. Sequencing of PCR products obtained from the MYH7 and PKM2 genes made it possible to characterise two SSCP alleles for each gene. The polymorphisms found in the MYH7 and PKM2 genes were further studied in 61 and 68 horses of three (Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Italian Saddler and Murgese and five (Franches-Montagnes, Haflinger, Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Murgese and Standardbred breeds, respectively. Allele frequencies of the two loci varied among the considered breeds. The SNPs discovery in MYH7 and PKM2 genes makes it possible to locate new molecular markers to ECA1. The identified markers could be used in association analysis with performance traits in horses.

  11. The 3D structure of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus: implications for long-range genomic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; van Zelm, Menno C; Peak, Mandy M; Cutchin, Steve; Riblet, Roy; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Grosveld, Frank G; Knoch, Tobias A; Murre, Cornelis

    2008-04-18

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus is organized into distinct regions that contain multiple variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)), joining (J(H)) and constant (C(H)) coding elements. How the Igh locus is structured in 3D space is unknown. To probe the topography of the Igh locus, spatial distance distributions were determined between 12 genomic markers that span the entire Igh locus. Comparison of the distance distributions to computer simulations of alternative chromatin arrangements predicted that the Igh locus is organized into compartments containing clusters of loops separated by linkers. Trilateration and triple-point angle measurements indicated the mean relative 3D positions of the V(H), D(H), J(H), and C(H) elements, showed compartmentalization and striking conformational changes involving V(H) and D(H)-J(H) elements during early B cell development. In pro-B cells, the entire repertoire of V(H) regions (2 Mbp) appeared to have merged and juxtaposed to the D(H) elements, mechanistically permitting long-range genomic interactions to occur with relatively high frequency.

  12. Sulfasalazine Treatment Suppresses the Formation of HLA-B27 Heavy Chain Homodimer in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lu, Ming-Chi; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Su-Qin; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2015-12-29

    Human leukocytic antigen-B27 heavy chain (HLA-B27 HC) has the tendency to fold slowly, in turn gradually forming a homodimer, (B27-HC)₂ via a disulfide linkage to activate killer cells and T-helper 17 cells and inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to trigger the IL-23/IL-17 axis for pro-inflammatory reactions. All these consequences lead to the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Sulfasalazine (SSA) is a common medication used for treatment of patients with AS. However, the effects of SSA treatment on (B27-HC)₂ formation and on suppression of IL-23/IL-17 axis of AS patients remain to be determined. In the current study, we examine the (B27-HC)₂ of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the mean grade of sarcoiliitis and lumbar spine Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index (BASRI) scores of 23 AS patients. The results indicated that AS patients without (B27-HC)₂ on PBMC showed the lower levels of mean grade of sarcoiliitis and the lumbar spine BASRI scores. In addition, after treatment with SSA for four months, the levels of (B27-HC)₂ on PBMCs were significantly reduced. Cytokines mRNA levels, including TNFα, IL-17A, IL-17F and IFNγ, were also significantly down-regulated in PBMCs. However, SSA treatment did not affect the levels of IL-23 and IL-23R mRNAs.

  13. Pattern of myosin heavy chain isoforms in different fibre types of canine trunk and limb skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbenc, M; Smerdu, V; Zupanc, M; Tozon, N; Fazarinc, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expressions within the muscle fibres of functionally diverse trunk and limb dog muscles using monoclonal antibodies that are specific to MHC isoforms. We found that three MHC isoforms are expressed in dog skeletal muscles. The pattern of their expressions determined the existence of 'pure' fibres, i.e. I and IIa, both expressing only one MHC isoform, and 'hybrid' fibres, i.e. I/IIa and IIa/x, that co-expressed two MHC isoforms. While the MHCI, MHCIIa and MHCI/IIa fibres corresponded to the myofibrillar ATPase type fibres I, IIA and IIC, respectively, the hybrid MHCIIa/x fibres mostly behaved like the IIDog fibre type in myofibrillar ATPase reaction as described by Latorre et al. No pure MHCIIx fibres were found. Though MHCIIa/x fibres were quite numerous, their presence varied not only within different muscles but within the same muscle of different animals as well. We suggest that the discrepancies in the classification of fibre types according to their myofibrillar ATPase activity between different studies of dog skeletal muscles are probably a consequence of the variable content of the MHCIIa and MHCIIx isoforms in the MHCIIa/x hybrid fibres. Estimating the histochemical metabolic profile of fibres we found that in all fast fibres oxidative-glycolytic metabolism prevailed, whereas in slow fibres oxidative metabolism was more pronounced. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. MR molecular imaging of tumours using ferritin heavy chain reporter gene expression mediated by the hTERT promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of ChengDu Medical College, Department of Radiology, ChengDu (China); Gong, Ming-fu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Wang, Guang-xian; Su, Tong-sheng; Wen, Li; Zhang, Dong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter and the modified ferritin heavy chain (Fth) reporter gene, reporter gene expression for MRI was examined in telomerase positive and negative tumour cells and xenografts. Activity of the reporter gene expression vector Lenti-hTERT-Fth1-3FLAG-Puro was compared to constitutive CMV-driven expression and to the untransfected parental control in five tumour cell lines: A549, SKOV3, 293T, U2OS and HPDLF. In vitro, transfected cells were evaluated for FLAG-tagged protein expression, iron accumulation and transverse relaxation. In vivo, tumours transduced by lentiviral vector injection were imaged using T2*WI. Changes in tumour signal intensity were validated by histology. Only telomerase positive tumour cells expressed FLAG-tagged Fth and displayed an increase in R2* above the parental control, with a corresponding change in T2*WI. In addition, only telomerase positive tumours, transduced by injection of the reporter gene expression construct, exhibited a change in signal intensity on T2*WI. Tumour histology verified the expression of FLAG-tagged Fth and iron accumulation in telomerase positive tissue. Reporter gene expression for MRI, using the Fth reporter and the hTERT promoter, may be a useful strategy for the non-invasive diagnosis of many types of cancer. (orig.)

  15. Flow cytometric analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain expression in B-cell lymphoma and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, David D; Al-Quran, Samer Z; Cardona, Diana M; Li, Ying; Braylan, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma (BCL) is often dependent on the detection of clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain expression. In some BCLs, the determination of clonality based on Ig light chain restriction may be difficult. The aim of our study was to assess the utility of flow cytometric analysis of surface Ig heavy chain (HC) expression in lymphoid tissues in distinguishing lymphoid hyperplasias from BCLs, and also differentiating various BCL subtypes. HC expression on B-cells varied among different types of hyperplasias. In follicular hyperplasia, IgM and IgD expression was high in mantle cells while germinal center cells showed poor HC expression. In other hyperplasias, B cell compartments were blurred but generally showed high IgD and IgM expression. Compared to hyperplasias, BCLs varied in IgM expression. Small lymphocytic lymphomas had lower IgM expression than mantle cell lymphomas. Of importance, IgD expression was significantly lower in BCLs than in hyperplasias, a finding that can be useful in differentiating lymphoma from reactive processes. PMID:22400070

  16. CED: a conformational epitope database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jian

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen epitopes provide valuable information useful for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Recently, more and more databases focusing on different types of epitopes have become available. Conformational epitopes are an important form of epitope formed by residues that are sequentially discontinuous but close together in three-dimensional space. These epitopes have implicit structural information, making them attractive for both theoretical and applied biomedical research. However, most existing databases focus on linear rather than conformational epitopes. Description We describe CED, a special database of well defined conformational epitopes. CED provides a collection of conformational epitopes and related information including the residue make up and location of the epitope, the immunological property of the epitope, the source antigen and corresponding antibody of the epitope. All entries in this database are manually curated from articles published in peer review journals. The database can be browsed or searched through a user-friendly web interface. Most epitopes in CED can also be viewed interactively in the context of their 3D structures. In addition, the entries are also hyperlinked to various databases such as Swiss-Prot, PDB, KEGG and PubMed, providing wide background information. Conclusion A conformational epitope database called CED has been developed as an information resource for investigators involved in both theoretical and applied immunology research. It complements other existing specialised epitope databases. The database is freely available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~ced

  17. Development of a Bioinformatics Framework for the Detection of Gene Conversion and the Analysis of Combinatorial Diversity in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains in Four Cattle Breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Stefanie; Tietze, Manfred; Czerny, Claus-Peter; König, Sven; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new bioinformatics framework for the analysis of rearranged bovine heavy chain immunoglobulin (Ig) variable regions by combining and refining widely used alignment algorithms. This bioinformatics framework allowed us to investigate alignments of heavy chain framework regions (FRHs) and the separate alignments of FRHs and heavy chain complementarity determining regions (CDRHs) to determine their germline origin in the four cattle breeds Aubrac, German Black Pied, German Simmental, and Holstein Friesian. Now it is also possible to specifically analyze Ig heavy chains possessing exceptionally long CDR3Hs. In order to gain more insight into breed specific differences in Ig combinatorial diversity, somatic hypermutations and putative gene conversions of IgG, we compared the dominantly transcribed variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), and joining (IGHJ) segments and their recombination in the four cattle breeds. The analysis revealed the use of 15 different IGHV segments, 21 IGHD segments, and two IGHJ segments with significant different transcription levels within the breeds. Furthermore, there are preferred rearrangements within the three groups of CDR3H lengths. In the sequences of group 2 (CDR3H lengths (L) of 11-47 amino acid residues (aa)) a higher number of recombination was observed than in sequences of group 1 (L≤10 aa) and 3 (L≥48 aa). The combinatorial diversity of germline IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ-segments revealed 162 rearrangements that were significantly different. The few preferably rearranged gene segments within group 3 CDR3H regions may indicate specialized antibodies because this length is unique in cattle. The most important finding of this study, which was enabled by using the bioinformatics framework, is the discovery of strong evidence for gene conversion as a rare event using pseudogenes fulfilling all definitions for this particular diversification mechanism.

  18. Resistance of Cloned 1F5 Chimeric Anti-CD20 Antibody Heavy-Chain Gene to DNA Polymerase due to a Predicted Hairpin Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Khademi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Formation of secondary structure such as DNA hairpins or loops may influence molecular genetics methods and PCR based approaches necessary for genetic engineering, in addition to gene regulation. Materials and Methods: A polymerase chain reaction with splice overlap extension (SOE-PCR was used to create fully synthetic 1F5 chimeric anti-CD20 heavy- and light-chain genes. The chimeric genes were cloned into the pCR-Blunt II-TOPO vector following by cloning into the pBudCE4.1 expression vector. Prediction of secondary structure was performed with the Vienna RNAfold webserver. PCR and sequencing across the predicted secondary structure of chimeric 1F5 heavy-chain gene was performed with multiple protocols for standard and GC-rich templates. Results: In our attempt to design vectors aimed to generate mouse-human chimeric antibody against CD20 (1F5, we found that the coding sequence of 1F5 chimeric heavy-chain gene constructed by SOE-PCR was resistant to polymerase during both PCR and sequencing reactions. Furthermore, we were also unable to analysis some positive transformants by restriction enzyme digestion. Encountering such difficulties to identify the cloned anti-CD20 chimeric heavy-chain gene, we found that the chimeric heavy-chain sequence is highly GC-rich and predicted to form a stable secondary structure. Conclusion: In conclusion, for the first time, we reported several difficulties with production of therapeutic chimeric 1F5 anti-CD20 antibody due to a predicted hairpin cluster correlates with barriers to PCR, sequencing and possibly restriction analysis. Our findings provide a probable note for researchers experiencing technical difficulties with construction of chimeric anti-CD20 antibody 1F5 gene vectors and also with other genes and molecular biology techniques requiring PCR-based method or restriction enzyme analysis. 

  19. Effects of low-level α-myosin heavy chain expression on contractile kinetics in porcine myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Maria V.; Stelzer, Julian E.; Norman, Holly S.; Moss, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are principal determinants of work capacity in mammalian ventricular myocardium. The ventricles of large mammals including humans normally express ∼10% α-MHC on a predominantly β-MHC background, while in failing human ventricles α-MHC is virtually eliminated, suggesting that low-level α-MHC expression in normal myocardium can accelerate the kinetics of contraction and augment systolic function. To test this hypothesis in a model similar to human myocardium we determined composite rate constants of cross-bridge attachment (fapp) and detachment (gapp) in porcine myocardium expressing either 100% α-MHC or 100% β-MHC in order to predict the MHC isoform-specific effect on twitch kinetics. Right atrial (∼100% α-MHC) and left ventricular (∼100% β-MHC) tissue was used to measure myosin ATPase activity, isometric force, and the rate constant of force redevelopment (ktr) in solutions of varying Ca2+ concentration. The rate of ATP utilization and ktr were approximately ninefold higher in atrial compared with ventricular myocardium, while tension cost was approximately eightfold greater in atrial myocardium. From these values, we calculated fapp to be ∼10-fold higher in α- compared with β-MHC, while gapp was 8-fold higher in α-MHC. Mathematical modeling of an isometric twitch using these rate constants predicts that the expression of 10% α-MHC increases the maximal rate of rise of force (dF/dtmax) by 92% compared with 0% α-MHC. These results suggest that low-level expression of α-MHC significantly accelerates myocardial twitch kinetics, thereby enhancing systolic function in large mammalian myocardium. PMID:21217059

  20. Developing Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Share Fast-Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain and Cardiac Troponin-I Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mary C.; Liu, Li J.; Huard, Johnny; Keller, Bradley B.; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC) and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I) positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13) and 20 (ED20), neonatal day 0 (ND0) and 4 (ND4), postnatal day 10 (PND10), and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:22808244

  1. Size and myosin heavy chain profiles of rat hindlimb extensor muscle fibers after 2 weeks at 2G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R R; Roy, M E; Talmadge, R J; Mendoza, R; Grindeland, R E; Vasques, M

    1996-09-01

    The effects of 14 d of continuous centrifugation at approximately 2G on the hindlimb extensor musculature of male rats were studied. The mean body mass of centrifuged rats was 17% smaller than age-matched controls. In centrifuged rats, the mean absolute masses of the soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were similar to control, while the mean relative masses (expressed as milligram muscle mass/gram of body mass) were larger than control. Based on a battery of monoclonal antibodies for specific myosin heavy chains (MHC), the soleus of centrifuged rats had a lower percentage (68 vs. 74%) of fibers expressing type I MHC only and a higher percentage (15 vs. 10%) that co-expressed type I and IIa MHC's. The MHC composition of fibers from the deep portion of the MG was unaffected by centrifugation. The MHC compositions based on SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis for each muscle were similar in the two groups. Mean fiber size of each fiber type in the soleus was unaffected by centrifugation. In the MG, the fibers, expressing only type IIb MHC were smaller in the centrifuge compared to control rats. Although 2 weeks of chronic centrifugation at 2G resulted in a cessation of body growth, there was essentially no effect on the muscle masses or fiber size in either a slow or fast extensor muscle. These data suggest that periods of centrifugation may be beneficial in maintaining extensor muscle mass in an animal that is not growing at a normal rate e.g., during chronic unloading.

  2. Effects of creatine supplementation during resistance training on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Andreo F; Aguiar, Danilo H; Felisberto, Alan D S; Carani, Fernanda R; Milanezi, Rachel C; Padovani, Carlos R; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a rodent model to test the hypothesis that creatine (Cr) supplementation during resistance training would influence the pattern of slow-twitch muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms expression. Male Wistar rats (2-3 months old, 250-300 g) were divided into 4 groups: Nontrained without creatine supplementation (CO), nontrained with creatine supplementation (CR), trained without creatine supplementation (TR), and trained with creatine supplementation (TRCR). TR and TRCR groups were submitted to a resistance training program for 5 weeks (5 days/week) for morphological and biochemical analysis of the soleus muscle. Weightlifting exercise involved jump sessions into water, carrying progressive overload equivalent to percentage of body weight. CR and TRCR groups were given creatine at 0.5 g/kg(-1)/d(-1). Both Cr supplementation and resistance training alone or associated did not result in significant alterations (p > 0.05) in body weight gain, food intake, and muscle weight in the CR, TR and TRCR groups compared to the CO group. Also compared to the CO group, the CR group showed a significant (p 0.05) changes in MHC content of the TRCR group compared to the CO group. The data show that Cr supplementation provides a potential action to abolish the exercise-induced MHC isoform transitions from slow to fast in slow-twitch muscle. Thus, Cr supplementation might be a suitable strategy to maintaining a slow phenotype in slow muscle during resistance training, which may be favorable to maintenance of muscle oxidative capacity of endurance athletes.

  3. Thyroid hormone partially corrects the effect of diabetes on mysoin heavy chain RNAs in the rat ventricle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1986-05-01

    The relative abundance of the 2 cardiac myosin heavy chains (MHH-..cap alpha.. and MHC-..beta..) and their corresponding RNAs is similarly affected by hypothyroidism and diabetes in the rat ventricle. Since circulating levels of thyroid hormone (T/sub 3/) are significantly decreased in diabetes the decreased RNA-..cap alpha.. and increased RNA-..beta.. associated with diabetes may be related to T/sub 3/ deficiency. Chronically diabetic rats were injected with T/sub 3/, insulin (I), or both and sacrificed between 1 and 12 hrs after injection, MHC RNA was quantified by hybridization of total RNA to a (/sup 32/P)-cDNA MHC-..cap alpha.. probe. Total MHC RNA was measured by retention of S1-resistant label on DE-81 while RNA-..cap alpha.. and RNA-..beta.. were quantified by separation of intact (..cap alpha..) and partially digested (..beta..) probe by gel electrophoresis. Total MHC RNA was not changed by T/sub 3/ or I (.9-1.2 ng/..mu..g of cellular RNA). T/sub 3/ and I elicited a very rapid increase in RNA-..cap alpha.. (18% in untreated to 38% (I) and 47% (T/sub 3/ within 1 hr). I administered either 7 hr before or 1 hr after T/sub 3/ did not modify the RNA-..cap alpha.. increase observed after T/sub 3/ alone. However, the response of diabetic rats to T/sub 3/ was markedly different from that of hypothyroid rats. Conclusions: 1) T/sub 3/ in diabetic rats does not mimick the effect of T/sub 3/ in hypothyroid rats; it may simply impose a hyperthyroid state on the existing diabetes and 2) since neither T/sub 3/ nor I are able to increase RNA-..cap alpha.. to control levels within 12 hrs, neither hormone is sufficient to regulate the expression of MHC RNAs.

  4. Isolation, purification, and characterization of fragment B, the NH2-terminal half of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Lei, D L; Sugimoto, N; Ozutsumi, K; Okabe, T

    1989-11-01

    Fragment B, the N-terminal half of the heavy chain, an important domain of the tetanus neurotoxin molecule, was isolated for the first time. Tetanus toxin (composed of three domains, A, B, and C) was prepared from culture filtrates. Fragment A-B, derived from the toxin treated mildly with papain, was used for the isolation of fragment B. Fragment A-B obtained was dissociated into fragments A and B by reduction with 100 mM dithiothreitol and treatment with 2 M urea. Fragment B was separated from fragment A by ion-exchange column chromatography on a Mono Q column equilibrated with 20 mM Tris hydrochloride buffer (pH 7.6), containing 1 mM dithiothreitol and 2 M urea, in a fast-protein liquid chromatography system by elution with a linear gradient of 0 to 0.5 M NaCl. Fragment B was obtained in two forms having molecular weights of 48,000 +/- 2,000, which were indistinguishable by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis or antigenic specificity, but distinguishable on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis without sodium dodecyl sulfate and on isoelectric focusing (pI 6.7 and 7.3). The recovery of fragment B was 50 to 72% of that of fragment A-B on a molar basis. Purified fragment B was not toxic to mice on intravenous or intramuscular injection at doses of up to 100 micrograms, but was found to form channels (ca. 2.3 pS) in a lipid bilayer membrane by a patch clamp technique. The role of domain B of the tetanus toxin molecule in the mechanism of action of the toxin is discussed.

  5. Reduced expression of androgen receptor and myosin heavy chain mRNA in cremaster muscle of boys with nonsyndromic cryptorchidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthold, Julia Spencer; Wang, Yanping; Reilly, Anita; Robbins, Alan; Figueroa, T Ernesto; Banihani, Ahmad; Hagerty, Jennifer; Akins, Robert E

    2012-10-01

    To better define the developmental mechanisms of nonsyndromic cryptorchidism, we measured the expression of hormone receptor and muscle type specific mRNAs in target tissues of boys with and those without nonsyndromic cryptorchidism. Prospectively collected cremaster muscle and/or hernia sac tissues from boys with congenital (79) or acquired (66) nonsyndromic cryptorchidism and hernia/hydrocele (controls, 84) were analyzed for hormone receptor (RXFP2, AR, ESR1, ESR2) and myosin heavy chain specific (MYH1, MYH2, MYH7) mRNA expression using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Log transformed mRNA, phenotype and feeding history data were statistically analyzed using Pearson's correlation, ANOVA and 2-sample t tests. AR mRNA expression was higher in cremaster muscle than in sac tissue, and significantly lower in congenital and acquired nonsyndromic cryptorchidism cases vs controls (p MYH7 mRNA expression was also significantly reduced in both nonsyndromic cryptorchidism groups (p ≤ 0.002), while a reduction in type 2 (fast) MYH2 expression was more modest and significant only for the congenital cryptorchidism group (p MYH7 and AR levels were strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.751, p MYH7 and ESR1 mRNA levels were higher and lower, respectively, in boys with nonsyndromic cryptorchidism who were fed soy formula. Expression of other genes was not measurable. Our data suggest that boys with congenital and acquired nonsyndromic cryptorchidism differentially express AR and slow twitch specific MYH7 mRNA in the cremaster muscle, and that MYH7 expression is correlated with AR levels and soy formula use. These differences in gene expression may reflect aberrant hormonal signaling and/or innervation during development with the potential for secondary functional effects and failed testicular descent. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Noncompaction of the Ventricular Myocardium Is Associated with a De Novo Mutation in the β-Myosin Heavy Chain Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Birgit S.; Binner, Priska; Waldmüller, Stephan; Höhne, Wolfgang; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Hassfeld, Sabine; Brömsen, Jürgen; Dermintzoglou, Anastassia; Wieczorek, Marcus; May, Erik; Kirst, Elisabeth; Selignow, Carmen; Rackebrandt, Kirsten; Müller, Melanie; Goody, Roger S.; Vosberg, Hans-Peter; Nürnberg, Peter; Scheffold, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM) is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the α- and β-myosin heavy chain, respectively) were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T). In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA) and atrial septal defect (ASD). A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium. PMID:18159245

  7. Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is associated with a de novo mutation in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit S Budde

    Full Text Available Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain, respectively were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T. In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA and atrial septal defect (ASD. A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium.

  8. Contributions of Conventional and Heavy-Chain IgG to Immunity in Fetal, Neonatal, and Adult Alpacas▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Purdy, S. R.; Smith, M. C.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Davis, W. C.; Appleton, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to conventional immunoglobulins, camelids produce antibodies that do not incorporate light chains into their structures. These so-called heavy-chain (HC) antibodies have incited great interest in the biomedical community, as they have considerable potential for biotechnological and therapeutic application. Recently, we have begun to elucidate the immunological functions of HC antibodies, yet little is known about their significance in maternal immunity or about the B lymphocytes that produce them. This study describes the application of isotype-specific reagents toward physiological assessments of camelid IgGs and the B cells that produce them. We document the specificities of monoclonal antibodies that distinguish two conventional IgG1 isotypes and two HC IgG3 variants produced by alpacas. Next, we report that the relative concentrations of five isotypes are similar in serum, milk, and colostrum; however, following passive transfer, the concentrations of HC IgG2 and IgG3 declined more rapidly than the concentration of conventional IgG1 in the sera of neonates. Finally, we assessed the distribution of B cells of distinct isotypes within lymphoid tissues during fetal and adult life. We detected IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 in lymphocytes located in lymph node follicles, suggesting that HC B cells affinity mature and/or class switch. One IgG3 isotype was present in B cells located in ileal Peyer's patches, and one conventional IgG1 isotype was detected in splenic marginal zone B cells. Our findings contribute to the growing body of knowledge pertaining to HC antibodies and are compatible with functional specialization among conventional and HC IgGs in the alpaca. PMID:20926693

  9. Serum Phosphorylated Neurofilament-Heavy Chain, a Potential Biomarker, is Associated With Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiaona; Zhang, Shuo; Zhao, Weiwei; Ye, Hongying; Yang, Yehong; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Miao, Qing; Hu, Renming; Li, Yiming; Lu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Neurofilament (NF), one of the major axonal cytoskeletal proteins, plays a critical role in degenerative diseases in both the central and the peripheral nervous systems. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between serum phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes.Serum pNF-H concentrations were measured by ELISA in hospitalized patients with and without DPN (n = 118). DPN was assessed by clinical symptoms, signs, and electromyography.Compared with the non-DPN group (311.98 [189.59-634.12] pg/mL), the confirmed group (605.99 [281.17-1332.78] pg/mL) patients had the higher serum pNF-H levels (P = 0.007). DPN was significantly correlated with C-peptide (r = -0.269), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.185), and pNF-H (r = 0.258). Serum pNF-H levels were independently associated with DPN (P = 0.004), even after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, TC, C-peptide, urinary albuminto/creatinine ratio, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Compared with pNF-H quartile 1 (referent), patients in quartile 3 (odds ratio [OR], 3.977; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.243-12.728; P = 0.021) and quartile 4 (OR, 10.488; 95% CI, 3.020-34.429; P = 0.000) had the higher risk of DPN after adjusting for the confounders.Serum pNF-H levels might be associated with the DPN, and the correlationship between serum pNF-H and DPN should be further studied.

  10. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  11. Transgenic rabbits with lymphocytic leukemia induced by the c-myc oncogene fused with the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, K L; Spieker-Polet, H; Kazdin, D S; Oi, V T

    1988-01-01

    Transgenic rabbits with the rabbit c-myc oncogene fused with the rabbit immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer region (E mu) DNA were developed by microinjecting pronuclei of single cell zygotes with the gene construct and implanting the microinjected eggs into pseudopregnant females. At age 17-20 days, 3 of 21 offspring born to seven females were found to have peripheral blood leukocyte counts of greater than 100,000 per mm3. Histology analyses showed extensive lymphocytic infiltration in the liver and kidney, indicating that these rabbits had a malignant lymphocytic leukemia. Genomic DNA analyses of thymus and peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that the leukemic rabbits were transgenic and that both immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light chain genes were rearranged in the leukemic cells; thus, the leukemic cells are of B-cell lineage. One to four heavy and light chain gene rearrangements were observed, suggesting that the B-cell tumors were oligoclonal. Stable tissue culture cell lines from the bone marrow and peripheral blood of one of the transgenic rabbits have been developed. The development of B-cell leukemias in rabbits with the E mu-myc transgene contrasts with the development of B-cell lymphomas in mice carrying a similar transgene. The lymphomas in mice develop in adults and are monoclonal in origin. The leukemias in rabbits develop in juveniles, less than 3 weeks after birth, and appear oligoclonal in origin. The leukemias seem to develop in rabbit at a specific stage of development, and we suggest that a normal developmental signal may be involved in the oncogenesis. Images PMID:2834733

  12. Purification of chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody EG2-hFc using hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography: an alternative to protein-A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Spearman, Maureen; Okun, Natalie; Butler, Michael; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Heavy chain monoclonal antibodies are being considered as alternative to whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies for certain niche applications. Protein-A chromatography which is widely used for purifying IgG monoclonal antibodies is also used for purifying heavy chain monoclonal antibodies as these molecules possess fully functional Fc regions. However, the acidic conditions used to elute bound antibody may sometimes also leach protein-A, which is immunotoxic. Low pH conditions also tend to make the mAb molecules unstable and prone to aggregation. Moreover, protein-A affinity chromatography does not remove aggregates already present in the feed. Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (or HIMC) has already been studied as an alternative to protein-A chromatography for purifying whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies. This paper describes the use of HIMC for capturing a humanized chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody (EG2-hFC). Binding and eluting conditions were suitably optimized using pure EG2-hFC. Based on this, an HIMC method was developed for capture of EG2-hFC directly from cell culture supernatant. The EG2-hFc purity obtained in this single-step process was high. The glycan profiles of protein-A and HIMC purified monoclonal antibody samples were similar, clearly demonstrating that both techniques captured similarly glycosylated population of EG2-hFc. Moreover, this technique was able to resolve aggregates from monomeric form of the EG2-hFc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Epitope Mapping Using pEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, K K

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are important tools in molecular and cell biology, allowing protein molecules to be purified (1), identified in immunoblots of gels (2) and sections of biological material (3), and probed for functionally active regions. Studies on the nature of antibody binding sites show that the molecular interaction between an antibody and its antigen is very specific and localized to a small patch on the surface of a molecule (4). For antibodies that inhibit molecular function, it is clearly of value to be able to map their binding site to a physical location on the polypeptide chain. Even antibodies that do not inhibit binding or catalysis of the protein can give useful information since the epitopes of antibodies are located on the surface of an antigen molecule (5-8). Two classes of antibody binding site have been distinguished. In the first-"continuous" epitopes-synthetic peptides are capable of binding to the antibody (9), suggesting that a single loop of the polypeptide chain is predominantly responsible for the antibody binding. In the second-discontinuous epitopes-linear peptides do not bind to the antibody, but the important amino acids can be mapped by mutational analysis (10). These discontinuous epitopes can sometimes be mimicked by peptides that imitate the spacial orientation of the surface residues (11).

  14. Epitope prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a crucial role in adaptive immunity by sampling peptides from self and non-self proteins to be recognised by the immune system. MHC molecules present peptides on cell surfaces for recognition by CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes that can initiate......-MHC prediction methods, and over the last decade several such methods have been successfully developed and used for epitope discovery purposes. My PhD project has been dedicated to improve methods for predicting peptide-MHC interactions by developing new strategies for training prediction algorithms based...... virus. The analysis demonstrated the absence of distinct regions of higher epitope density within the virus polyprotein. Also, the density of epitopes among different proteins was demonstrated to mostly depend on protein length and amino acid composition, underlining the importance of identifying...

  15. Isolation and Epitope Mapping of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Single-Domain Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendrick B. Turner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs, derived from the heavy chain only antibodies found in camelids such as llamas have the potential to provide rugged detection reagents with high affinities, and the ability to refold after denaturation. We have isolated and characterized sdAbs specific to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB which bind to two distinct epitopes and are able to function in a sandwich immunoassay for toxin detection. Characterization of these sdAbs revealed that each exhibited nanomolar binding affinities or better.  Melting temperatures for the sdAbs ranged from approximately 60 °C to over 70 °C, with each demonstrating at least partial refolding after denaturation and several were able to completely refold. A first set of sdAbs was isolated by panning the library using adsorbed antigen, all of which recognized the same epitope on SEB. Epitope mapping suggested that these sdAbs bind to a particular fragment of SEB (VKSIDQFLYFDLIYSI containing position L45 (underlined, which is involved in binding to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. Differences in the binding affinities of the sdAbs to SEB and a less-toxic vaccine immunogen, SEBv (L45R/Y89A/Y94A were also consistent with binding to this epitope. A sandwich panning strategy was utilized to isolate sdAbs which bind a second epitope. This epitope differed from the initial one obtained or from that recognized by previously isolated anti-SEB sdAb A3. Using SEB-toxin spiked milk we demonstrated that these newly isolated sdAbs could be utilized in sandwich-assays with each other, A3, and with various monoclonal antibodies.

  16. Detection of monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement (FR3 in Thai malignant lymphoma by High Resolution Melting curve analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongpruttipan Tawatchai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction followed by heteroduplex has currently become standard whereas fluorescent fragment analysis (GeneScan has been used for confirmation test. In this study, three techniques had been compared: thermocycler polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by heteroduplex and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, GeneScan analysis, and real time PCR with High Resolution Melting curve analysis (HRM. The comparison was carried out with DNA extracted from paraffin embedded tissues diagnosed as B- cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Specific PCR primers sequences for IgH gene variable region 3, including fluorescence labeled IgH primers were used and results were compared with HRM. In conclusion, the detection IgH gene rearrangement by HRM in the LightCycler System showed potential for distinguishing monoclonality from polyclonality in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Introduction Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The incidence rate as reported by Ministry of Public Health is 3.1 per 100,000 population in female whereas the rate in male is 4.5 per 100,000 population 1. At Siriraj Hospital, the new cases diagnosed as malignant lymphoma were 214.6 cases/year 2. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Therefore, detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay has recently become a standard laboratory test for discrimination of reactive from malignant clonal

  17. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  18. Heavy-chain isotype patterns of human antibody-secreting cells induced by Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in relation to age and preimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Juul, Lars; Gyhrs, A

    1994-01-01

    The influence of preexisting immunity on the heavy-chain isotypes of circulating antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) induced by vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and by vaccination with TT or DT...... of natural HibCP antibodies (r = 0.59; P = 0.00002). A possible role of natural exposure for Hib or cross-reactive bacteria on the mucosal surfaces in the shaping of the isotype response to HibCP conjugate vaccines is discussed....

  19. Overexpression of core-binding factor alpha (CBF alpha) reverses cellular transformation by the CBF beta-smooth muscle myosin heavy chain chimeric oncoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Hajra, A; Liu, P P; Speck, N A; Collins, F S

    1995-01-01

    A fusion between the transcription factor core-binding factor beta (CBF beta; also known as PEBP2 beta) and the tail region of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC) is generated by an inversion of chromosome 16 [inv(16) (p13q22)] associated with the M4Eo subtype of acute myeloid leukemia. We have previously shown that this CBF beta-SMMHC chimeric protein can transform NIH 3T3 cells and that this process requires regions of the chimeric protein necessary for association with the CBF alpha s...

  20. Segmental duplication as one of the driving forces underlying the diversity of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Richeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplication and deletion were implicated for a region containing the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV gene segments, 1.9III/hv3005 (possible allelic variants of IGHV3-30 and hv3019b9 (a possible allelic variant of IGHV3-33. However, very little is known about the ranges of the duplication and the polymorphic region. This is mainly because of the difficulty associated with distinguishing between allelic and paralogous sequences in the IGHV region containing extensive repetitive sequences. Inability to separate the two parental haploid genomes in the subjects is another serious barrier. To address these issues, unique DNA sequence tags evenly distributed within and flanking the duplicated region implicated by the previous studies were selected. The selected tags in single sperm from six unrelated healthy donors were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by microarray detection. In this way, individual haplotypes of different parental origins in the sperm donors could be analyzed separately and precisely. The identified polymorphic region was further analyzed at the nucleotide sequence level using sequences from the three human genomic sequence assemblies in the database. Results A large polymorphic region was identified using the selected sequence tags. Four of the 12 haplotypes were shown to contain consecutively undetectable tags spanning in a variable range. Detailed analysis of sequences from the genomic sequence assemblies revealed two large duplicate sequence blocks of 24,696 bp and 24,387 bp, respectively, and an incomplete copy of 961 bp in this region. It contains up to 13 IGHV gene segments depending on haplotypes. A polymorphic region was found to be located within the duplicated blocks. The variants of this polymorphism unusually diverged at the nucleotide sequence level and in IGHV gene segment number, composition and organization, indicating a limited selection pressure in general. However

  1. An Improved Homologous Recombination Method for Rapid Cloning of the Antibody Heavy Chain Gene and Its Comparison with the Homologous Recombination and Traditional Cloning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hajirezaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The homologous recombination (HR is one of the conventional cloning methods for the production of recombinant DNA. It is a quick method for in vivo DNA cloning without using the high cost restriction enzymes. A few modifications in the cloning procedure can increase the efficiency of this method.Materials and Methods: In this study, effect of heating on the rate of the IgG1 heavy chain gene cloning was investigated in the HR method and then it was compared with HR method without heating and traditional cloning method. For doing this comparison, three cloning methods including HR, HR with the heat treatment, and traditional cloning were used to clone the human IgG1 heavy chain into the pcDNA3.1(+ plasmid.Results: The results showed that adding heat in the HR method converts insert and vector from the double strand DNA to the single strand DNA. This allows them to copulate with each other better and faster than the two other methods. The heat addition also helps the cell enzyme system for a faster and easier recombination and moreover it increases the cloning efficiency of the HR method in case of in vitro processing.Conclusion: The results showed that giving heat in the HR method increases cloning rate 7.5% and this increase reaches 10% in comparison with the traditional method. 

  2. Modified human beta 2-microglobulin (desLys(58)) displays decreased affinity for the heavy chain of MHC class I and induces nitric oxide production and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Harhaji, L; Lamberth, K

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) is the light chain of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, and is a prerequisite for the binding of peptides to the heavy chain and their presentation to CD8+ T cells. beta2m can be modified in vivo and in vitro by proteolytic cleavage...... by complement C1 and subsequent carboxypeptidase B-like activity--processes that lead to the generation of desLys(58) beta2m (dbeta2m). This work aims to study the effect of dbeta2m on peptide binding to MHC-I, the influence of dbeta2m on the binding of beta2m to the MHC-I heavy chain and the biological...... activity of dbeta2m. Both beta2m and dbeta2m are able to support the generation of MHC-I/peptide complexes at 18 degrees C, but complexes formed in the presence of dbeta2m destabilize at 37 degrees C. Moreover, a 250 times higher concentration of dbeta2m than of beta2m is needed to displace MHC...

  3. Anion exchange chromatographic distribution of human monoclonal immunoglobulin G is determined by heavy chain subclass and level of sialic acid expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anion exchange chromatography is widely accepted method for purification of immunoglobulins. In this work, we used human monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG with structure and solubility of normal human IgG as a model for studying chromatographic behavior of particular molecular forms of IgG. Human sera with monoclonal IgG were fractionated on strong anion exchanger, Q Sepharose Fast Flow. With 20 mM Tris pH 7.5 as a start buffer, 42% of human monoclonal IgG passed through column, and 58% of them remained adsorbed. Bound monoclonal IgG were eluted from the exchanger by linear increasing of concentration of NaCl from 0 to 0.5 M. Chromatographic distribution of human monoclonal IgG correlated with their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gels, and it was dependent on γ heavy chain isotype. Light chain type, as well as serum concentration of monoclonal IgG did not influence their chromatographic behavior. The level of heavy chain sialic acid expression, but not of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, significantly determined chromatographic distribution of serum monoclonal IgG. Additionally to the information on the chromatographic behavior of human monoclonal IgG, we believe that presented data could provide useful information about the possible use of Q Sepharose Fast Flow matrix for the isolation of specific molecular forms of human IgG.

  4. β-Myosin heavy chain variant Val606Met causes very mild hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice, but exacerbates HCM phenotypes in mice carrying other HCM mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenburg, Robert; Hackert, Katarzyna; Wurster, Sebastian; Deenen, René; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E; Lohse, Martin J; Schmitt, Joachim P

    2014-07-07

    Approximately 40% of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in β-cardiac myosin heavy chain (β-MHC). Associating disease phenotype with mutation is confounded by extensive background genetic and lifestyle/environmental differences between subjects even from the same family. To characterize disease caused by β-cardiac myosin heavy chain Val606Met substitution (VM) that has been identified in several HCM families with wide variation of clinical outcomes, in mice. Unlike 2 mouse lines bearing the malignant myosin mutations Arg453Cys (RC/+) or Arg719Trp (RW/+), VM/+ mice with an identical inbred genetic background lacked hallmarks of HCM such as left ventricular hypertrophy, disarray of myofibers, and interstitial fibrosis. Even homozygous VM/VM mice were indistinguishable from wild-type animals, whereas RC/RC- and RW/RW-mutant mice died within 9 days after birth. However, hypertrophic effects of the VM mutation were observed both in mice treated with cyclosporine, a known stimulator of the HCM response, and compound VM/RC heterozygous mice, which developed a severe HCM phenotype. In contrast to all heterozygous mutants, both systolic and diastolic function of VM/RC hearts was severely impaired already before the onset of cardiac remodeling. The VM mutation per se causes mild HCM-related phenotypes; however, in combination with other HCM activators it exacerbates the HCM phenotype. Double-mutant mice are suitable for assessing the severity of benign mutations. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Mapping of the chicken immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant region gene locus reveals an inverted α gene upstream of a condensed υ gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Rabbani, H; Shimizu, A; Hammarström, L

    2000-01-01

    Chicken antibodies are increasingly being used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. As only the genomic organization of the µ encoding gene was previously known, we analysed the chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY) and IgA (υ and α chain) immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant region (IGHC) genes and the organization of the chicken IGHC locus. The α gene is encoded by four separate exons, whereas, surprisingly, there is no intervening DNA sequence between the CH1 and CH2 domains of the IgY heavy chain, which is thus encoded by three exons separated by two introns. DNA sequence analysis shows that the exon boundaries of the chicken IGHC genes are not consistent with published domain borders. Furthermore, differences in DNA sequence confirm the existence of IgY, IgA and IgM allotypes in chickens. Finally, our results show that the IGHC genes of chicken (IgY, IgA and IgM) are all colocated on chromosome E18C15W15, where the α gene is located upstream of the υ gene in an inverted transcriptional orientation. The distances between the µ and α genes and the α and υ genes are about 18 and 15 kilobases, respectively, and thus, the size of the whole chicken IGHC locus is approximately 67 kilobases. PMID:11106938

  6. Immune epitope database analysis resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Ponomarenko, Julia; Zhu, Zhanyang

    2012-01-01

    The immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR: http://tools.iedb.org) is a collection of tools for prediction and analysis of molecular targets of T- and B-cell immune responses (i.e. epitopes). Since its last publication in the NAR webserver issue in 2008, a new generation of peptide...

  7. Epitope tagging of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzard, B; Chubet, R

    2001-05-01

    Epitope tagging is a method of expressing proteins whereby an epitope for a specific monoclonal antibody is fused to a target protein using recombinant DNA techniques. The fusion gene is cloned into an appropriate expression vector for the experimental cell type and host cells are transfected. The fusion protein can then be detected and/or purified using a monoclonal antibody specific for the epitope tag. This unit presents protocols for detection and purification of proteins tagged with a particular epitope, the FLAG tag, although the same general approach can be applied to other epitope tags. The protocols in this unit employ the anti-FLAG M2 antibody to detect and purify FLAG-tagged proteins. The methods presented are immunoprecipitation of FLAG fusion proteins from cells using an anti-FLAG M2 affinity gel, detection of FLAG fusion proteins by western blotting, and purification of FLAG fusion proteins by anti-FLAG M2 affinity chromatography.

  8. Efficient heterologous expression and secretion in Aspergillus oryzae of a llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragment V(HH) against EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Aoki, Jun-ichi; Tabuchi, Soichiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed a filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae that secretes a llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragment (V(HH)) that binds specifically to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a culture medium. A major improvement in yield was achieved by fusing the V(HH) with a Taka-amylase A signal sequence (sTAA) and a segment of 28 amino acids from the N-terminal region of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (N28). The yields of secreted, immunologically active anti-EGFR V(HH) reached 73.8 mg/1 in a Sakaguchi flask. The V(HH) fragments were released from the sTAA or N28 proteins by an indigenous A. oryzae protease during cultivation. The purified recombinant V(HH) fragment was specifically recognized and could bind to the EGFR with a high affinity.

  9. Mutations in the slow skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) cause laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Christopher; Herrmann, Ralf; Parry, Cheryl; Liyanage, Khema; Dye, Danielle E; Durling, Hayley J; Duff, Rachael M; Beckman, Kaye; de Visser, Marianne; van der Graaff, Maaike M; Hedera, Peter; Fink, John K; Petty, Elizabeth M; Lamont, Phillipa; Fabian, Vicki; Bridges, Leslie; Voit, Thomas; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laing, Nigel G

    2004-10-01

    We previously linked Laing-type early-onset autosomal dominant distal myopathy (MPD1) to a 22-cM region of chromosome 14. One candidate gene in the region, MYH7, which is mutated in cardiomyopathy and myosin storage myopathy, codes for the myosin heavy chain of type I skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac ventricles. We have identified five novel heterozygous mutations--Arg1500Pro, Lys1617del, Ala1663Pro, Leu1706Pro, and Lys1729del in exons 32, 34, 35, and 36 of MYH7--in six families with early-onset distal myopathy. All five mutations are predicted, by in silico analysis, to locally disrupt the ability of the myosin tail to form the coiled coil, which is its normal structure. These findings demonstrate that heterozygous mutations toward the 3' end of MYH7 cause Laing-type early-onset distal myopathy. MYH7 is the fourth distal-myopathy gene to have been identified.

  10. A Secondary Antibody-Detecting Molecular Weight Marker with Mouse and Rabbit IgG Fc Linear Epitopes for Western Blot Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Wei; Chen, I-Ju; Cheng, Ta-Chun; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chu, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Chih-Hung; Hsieh, Yuan-Chin; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Kao, Chien-Han; Roffler, Steve R; Cheng, Tian-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Molecular weight markers that can tolerate denaturing conditions and be auto-detected by secondary antibodies offer great efficacy and convenience for Western Blotting. Here, we describe M&R LE protein markers which contain linear epitopes derived from the heavy chain constant regions of mouse and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG Fc LE). These markers can be directly recognized and stained by a wide range of anti-mouse and anti-rabbit secondary antibodies. We selected three mouse (M1, M2 and M3) linear IgG1 and three rabbit (R1, R2 and R3) linear IgG heavy chain epitope candidates based on their respective crystal structures. Western blot analysis indicated that M2 and R2 linear epitopes are effectively recognized by anti-mouse and anti-rabbit secondary antibodies, respectively. We fused the M2 and R2 epitopes (M&R LE) and incorporated the polypeptide in a range of 15-120 kDa auto-detecting markers (M&R LE protein marker). The M&R LE protein marker can be auto-detected by anti-mouse and anti-rabbit IgG secondary antibodies in standard immunoblots. Linear regression analysis of the M&R LE protein marker plotted as gel mobility versus the log of the marker molecular weights revealed good linearity with a correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.9965, indicating that the M&R LE protein marker displays high accuracy for determining protein molecular weights. This accurate, regular and auto-detected M&R LE protein marker may provide a simple, efficient and economical tool for protein analysis.

  11. Epitope analysis of anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

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    Shen-Ju Gou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Increasing evidences have suggested the pathogenic role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA directing myeloperoxidase (MPO in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. The current study aimed to analyze the association between the linear epitopes of MPO-ANCA and clinicopathological features of patients with AAV. METHODS: Six recombinant linear fragments, covering the whole length amino acid sequence of a single chain of MPO, were produced from E.coli. Sera from 77 patients with AAV were collected at presentation. 13 out of the 77 patients had co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies. Ten patients also had sequential sera during follow up. The epitope specificities were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the recombinant fragments as solid phase ligands. RESULTS: Sera from 45 of the 77 (58.4% patients with AAV showed a positive reaction to one or more linear fragments of the MPO chain. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Scores and the sera creatinine were significantly higher in patients with positive binding to the light chain fragment than that in patients without the binding. The epitopes recognized by MPO-ANCA from patients with co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies were mainly located in the N-terminus of the heavy chain. In 5 out of the 6 patients, whose sera in relapse recognize linear fragments, the reactivity to linear fragments in relapse was similar to that of initial onset. CONCLUSION: The epitope specificities of MPO-ANCA were associated with disease activity and some clinicopathological features in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  12. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

  13. Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by peptide microarray immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereda, Andrea; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Lin, Jing; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Bardina, Luda; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lentils are oftentimes responsible for allergic reactions to legumes in Mediterranean children. Though the primary sequence of the major allergen, Len c 1 is known, the location of the IgE binding epitopes remains undefined. Objective We sought to identify IgE-binding epitopes of Len c 1 and relate epitope binding to clinical characteristics. Methods 135 peptides corresponding to the primary sequence of Len c 1 were probed with sera from 33 lentil-allergic individuals and 15 non-atopic controls by means of microarray immunoassay. Lentil-specific IgE, Skin Prick Tests and clinical reactions to lentil were determined. Epitopes were defined as overlapping signal above inter- and intra-slide cut-offs and confirmed by inhibition assays using a peptide from the respective region. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data was used to correlate binding patterns with clinical findings. Results The lentil-allergic patients specifically recognized IgE-binding epitopes located in the C-terminal region, between peptide 107 and 135. Inhibition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgE binding in this region, identifying different epitopes. Linkage of cluster results with clinical data and lentil specific IgE levels displayed a positive correlation between lentil-specific IgE levels, epitope recognition and respiratory symptoms. Modeling based on the three-dimensional structure of a homologous soy vicilin suggests that the Len c 1 epitopes identified are exposed on the surface of the molecule. Conclusion Several IgE-binding sequential epitopes of Len c 1 have been identified. Epitopes are located in the C-terminal region, and are predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein. Epitope diversity is positively correlated with IgE levels, pointing to a more polyclonal IgE response. PMID:20816193

  14. Spatial distribution of "tissue-specific" antigens in the developing human heart and skeletal muscle. II. An immunohistochemical analysis of myosin heavy chain isoform expression patterns in the embryonic heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, A.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Virágh, S.; Kálmán, F.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHCs) was investigated immunohistochemically in the embryonic human heart between the 4th and the 8th week of development. The development of the overall MHC isoform expression pattern can be outlined as follows: (1) In all

  15. Intact Transition Epitope Mapping (ITEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Danquah, Bright D.; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2017-08-01

    Intact transition epitope mapping (ITEM) enables rapid and accurate determination of protein antigen-derived epitopes by either epitope extraction or epitope excision. Upon formation of the antigen peptide-containing immune complex in solution, the entire mixture is electrosprayed to translate all constituents as protonated ions into the gas phase. There, ions from antibody-peptide complexes are separated from unbound peptide ions according to their masses, charges, and shapes either by ion mobility drift or by quadrupole ion filtering. Subsequently, immune complexes are dissociated by collision induced fragmentation and the ion signals of the "complex-released peptides," which in effect are the epitope peptides, are recorded in the time-of-flight analyzer of the mass spectrometer. Mixing of an antibody solution with a solution in which antigens or antigen-derived peptides are dissolved is, together with antigen proteolysis, the only required in-solution handling step. Simplicity of sample handling and speed of analysis together with very low sample consumption makes ITEM faster and easier to perform than other experimental epitope mapping methods.

  16. Regeneration of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain repertoire after transient B-cell depletion with an anti-CD20 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzière, Anne-Sophie; Kneitz, Christian; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Dörner, Thomas; Tony, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    B-cell depletive therapies have beneficial effects in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of the disease is not clear. In particular, it is not known how the regeneration of the B-cell repertoire takes place. Two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated with rituximab, and the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes (Ig-VH) were analysed to follow the B-cell regeneration. Patient A was treated with two courses of rituximab, and B-cell regeneration was followed over 27 months by analysing more than 680 Ig-VH sequences. Peripheral B-cell depletion lasted 7 months and 10 months, respectively, and each time was accompanied by a clinical improvement. Patient B received one treatment course. B-cell depletion lasted 5 months and was accompanied by a good clinical response. B cells regenerated well in both patients, and the repopulated B-cell repertoire was characterised by a polyclonal and diverse use of Ig-VH genes, as expected in adult individuals. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration we observed the expansion and recirculation of a highly mutated B-cell population. These cells expressed very different Ig-VH genes. They were class-switched and could be detected for a short period only. Patient A was followed long term, whereby some characteristic changes in the VH2 family as well as in specific mini-genes like VH3–23, VH 4–34 or VH 1–69 were observed. In addition, rituximab therapy resulted in the loss of clonal B cells for the whole period. Our data show that therapeutic transient B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibodies results in the regeneration of a diverse and polyclonal heavy-chain repertoire. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration, highly mutated B cells recirculate for a short time period in both the patients analysed. The longitudinal observation of a single patient up to 27 months shows subtle intraindividual changes, which may indicate repertoire

  17. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling and Neurotrophins Control Transformation of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Aerobic Treadmill Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Liu, Gan Chen, Fanling Li, Changfa Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study elucidated the role of CaN-NFAT signaling and neurotrophins on the transformation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber following aerobic exercise training. To do so, we examined the content and distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber, the activity of CaN and expression of NFATc1 in these fibers, and changes in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neutrophin-3 (NT-3 in the soleus and striatum following high-and medium-intensity aerobic treadmill training. Specific pathogen-free 2 month old male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control group (Con, n = 8, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise group (M-Ex, n = 8 and high-intensity aerobic exercise group (H-Ex, n = 8. We used ATPase staining to identify the muscle fiber type I and II, SDS-PAGE to separate and analyze the isoforms MyHCI, MyHCIIA, MyHCIIB and MyHCIIx, and performed western blots to determine the expression of NFATc1, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. CaN activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. In the soleus muscle, 8 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise can induce transformation of MyHC IIA and MyHC IIB to MyHC IIX and MyHC I (p < 0.01, while high-intensity treadmill exercise can induce transform MyHC IIx to MyHC IIB, MyHC IIA and MyHC I (p < 0.01. In comparison to the control group, CaN activity and NFATcl protein level were significantly increased in both the M-Ex and H-Ex groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, with a more pronounced upregulation in the M-Ex group (p < 0.05. Eight weeks of moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise induced the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in the soleus muscle and the striatum (p < 0.01, with the most significant increase in the H-Ex group (p < 0.01. In the rat soleus muscle, (1 CaN–NFATcl signaling contributes to the conversion of MyHC I isoform in response to moderate-intensity exercise; (2

  18. Changed epitopes drive the antigenic drift for influenza A (H3N2 viruses

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    Yang Jinn-Moon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In circulating influenza viruses, gradually accumulated mutations on the glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA, which interacts with infectivity-neutralizing antibodies, lead to the escape of immune system (called antigenic drift. The antibody recognition is highly correlated to the conformation change on the antigenic sites (epitopes, which locate on HA surface. To quantify a changed epitope for escaping from neutralizing antibodies is the basis for the antigenic drift and vaccine development. Results We have developed an epitope-based method to identify the antigenic drift of influenza A utilizing the conformation changes on epitopes. A changed epitope, an antigenic site on HA with an accumulated conformation change to escape from neutralizing antibody, can be considered as a "key feature" for representing the antigenic drift. According to hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays and HA/antibody complex structures, we statistically measured the conformation change of an epitope by considering the number of critical position mutations with high genetic diversity and antigenic scores. Experimental results show that two critical position mutations can induce the conformation change of an epitope to escape from the antibody recognition. Among five epitopes of HA, epitopes A and B, which are near to the receptor binding site, play a key role for neutralizing antibodies. In addition, two changed epitopes often drive the antigenic drift and can explain the selections of 24 WHO vaccine strains. Conclusions Our method is able to quantify the changed epitopes on HA for predicting the antigenic variants and providing biological insights to the vaccine updates. We believe that our method is robust and useful for studying influenza virus evolution and vaccine development.

  19. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) from fast skeletal muscle of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wuying; Fu, Guihong; Bing, Shiyu; Meng, Tao; Zhou, Ruixue; Cheng, Jia; Zhao, Falan; Zhang, Hongfang; Zhang, Jianshe

    2010-03-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) is one of the major structural and contracting proteins of muscle. We have isolated the cDNA clone encoding MyHC of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. The sequence comprises 5 934 bp, including a 5 814 bp open reading frame encoding an amino acid sequence of 1 937 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69% homology to rabbit fast skeletal MyHC and 73%-76% homology to the MyHCs from the mandarin fish, walleye pollack, white croaker, chum salmon, and carp. The putative sequences of subfragment-1 and the light meromyosin region showed 61.4%-80% homology to the corresponding regions of other fish MyHCs. The tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific expressions of the MyHC gene were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The MyHC gene showed the highest expression in the muscles compared with the kidney, spleen and intestine. Developmentally, there was a gradual increase in MyHC mRNA expression from the neural formation stage to the tail bud stage. The highest expression was detected in hatching larva. Our work on the MyHC gene from the grass carp has provided useful information for fish molecular biology and fish genomics.

  20. Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two isopods (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissl, S.; Uber, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two isopods, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00427-008-0216-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18443823

  1. Evaluation of heavy chain C-terminal deletions on productivity and product quality of monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhilan; Tang, Danming; Misaghi, Shahram; Jiang, Guoying; Yu, Christopher; Yim, Mandy; Shaw, David; Snedecor, Brad; Laird, Michael W; Shen, Amy

    2017-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been well established as potent therapeutic agents and are used to treat many different diseases. During cell culture production, antibody charge variants can be generated by cleavage of heavy chain (HC) C-terminal lysine and proline amidation. Differences in levels of charge variants during manufacturing process changes make it challenging to demonstrate process comparability. In order to reduce heterogeneity and achieve consistent product quality, we generated and expressed antibodies with deletion of either HC C-terminal lysine (-K) or lysine and glycine (-GK). Interestingly, clones that express antibodies lacking HC C-terminal lysine (-K) had considerably lower specific productivities compared to clones that expressed either wild type antibodies (WT) or antibodies lacking HC glycine and lysine (-GK). While no measurable differences in antibody HC and LC mRNA levels, glycosylation and secretion were observed, our analysis suggests that the lower specific productivity of clones expressing antibody lacking HC C-terminal lysine was due to slower antibody HC synthesis and faster antibody degradation. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:786-794, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  3. Identification of an altered immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene rearrangement in the central nervous system in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, R; Felix, C A; McKenzie, S E; Shane, S; Lange, B; Finger, L R

    1993-08-01

    In B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the nucleotide sequence of the complementarity determining region III (CDRIII) in the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) has been used as a molecular fingerprint to identify the leukemic cells. In a child with B-precursor ALL without central nervous system (CNS) disease at diagnosis and a subsequent isolated CNS relapse, we examined the stability of the rearranged IgH by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the CDRIII in the leukemic cells from the marrow at diagnosis to the sequences in the leukemic cells from the cerebrospinal fluid at relapse. Whereas two of the three IgH sequences isolated from the leukemic cells at CNS relapse were identical to sequences originally isolated from the marrow lymphoblasts at diagnosis, the third CNS sequence was similar but not identical to the third marrow sequence. The third IgH sequence identified in the CNS differed from the marrow sequence only at the variable gene segment adjoining the CDRIII. Using a detection method based on the polymerase chain reaction, the altered IgH sequence identified in the leukemic cells from the cerebrospinal fluid was noted to be present in the CNS at a higher frequency than the related diagnostic sequence and was not detected in the marrow either at diagnosis or at CNS relapse. These findings indicate that the clonal pattern of leukemia in the CNS may differ from that in the marrow.

  4. Amphipathic variable region heavy chain peptides derived from monoclonal human Wegener's anti-PR3 antibodies stimulate lymphocytes from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peen, E; Malone, C; Myers, C; Williams, R C; Peck, A B; Csernok, E; Gross, W L; Staud, R

    2001-01-01

    Amphipathic variable-region heavy chain 11-mer peptides from monoclonal human IgM antiproteinase-3 antibodies were studied for peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation in 21 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), connective tissue disease controls and normal control subjects. Positive T-cell activation was observed in most experiments with WG patients' lymphocytes using amphipathic VH-region peptides from four different human monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies. Control peptides of the same length but without amphipathic characteristics along with other amphipathic peptides not derived from monoclonal anti-PR3 sequence were employed as controls. No significant lymphocyte stimulation was observed with normal controls, but positive stimulation with amphipathic VH peptides was also recorded in other connective tissue disease controls mainly patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Amphipathic peptides not derived from anti-PR3 sequence did not stimulate WG lymphocytes. Our findings indicate that lymphocyte reactivity as an element of cell-mediated immunity may be activated by amphipathic VH-region amino acid sequences of autoantibodies which are themselves associated with diseases such as WG. PMID:11529926

  5. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3' end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH-DH junction as a "footprint" of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH-DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse.

  6. Unexpectedly Low Mutation Rates in Beta-Myosin Heavy Chain and Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein Genes in Italian Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncarati, Roberta; Latronico, Michael VG; Musumeci, Beatrice; Aurino, Stefania; Torella, Annalaura; Bang, Marie-Louise; Jotti, Gloria Saccani; Puca, Annibale A; Volpe, Massimo; Nigro, Vincenzo; Autore, Camillo; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiac disease. Fourteen sarcomeric and sarcomere-related genes have been implicated in HCM etiology, those encoding β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) reported as the most frequently mutated: in fact, these account for around 50% of all cases related to sarcomeric gene mutations, which are collectively responsible for approximately 70% of all HCM cases. Here, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography followed by bidirectional sequencing to screen the coding regions of MYH7 and MYBPC3 in a cohort (n = 125) of Italian patients presenting with HCM. We found 6 MHY7 mutations in 9/125 patients and 18 MYBPC3 mutations in 19/125 patients. Of the three novel MYH7 mutations found, two were missense, and one was a silent mutation; of the eight novel MYBPC3 mutations, one was a substitution, three were stop codons, and four were missense mutations. Thus, our cohort of Italian HCM patients did not harbor the high frequency of mutations usually found in MYH7 and MYBPC3. This finding, coupled to the clinical diversity of our cohort, emphasizes the complexity of HCM and the need for more inclusive investigative approaches in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of this disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 2894–2900, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21302287

  7. Worse prognosis with gene mutations of beta-myosin heavy chain than myosin-binding protein C in Chinese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxia; Zou, Yubao; Fu, Chunyan; Xu, Xiqi; Wang, Jizheng; Song, Lei; Wang, Hu; Chen, Jingzhou; Wang, Jianwei; Huan, Tujun; Hui, Rutai

    2008-03-01

    No data are available on survival analysis and longitudinal evolution of patients with gene mutations of beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) in Chinese. To prospectively investigate whether different gene mutations confer distinct prognosis. We performed a prospective study in 70 HCM patients and 46 genetically affected family members without HCM-phenotype with direct DNA sequencing of MYH7 and MYBPC3, clinical assessments, and 5.8 +/- 1.8 years follow-up. After follow-up, more surgical intervention (8/52 versus 0/18, p MYH7 mutations than in patients with MYBPC3 mutations (45.1 +/- 14.0 versus 73.5 +/- 7.5 years, p = 0.03). Seven of the 27 mutation carriers of MYH7 had clinical presentations of HCM, but no carriers of MYBPC3 mutations developed to HCM during follow-up. Maximal wall thickness was thicker in the patients carrying mutations in the global region of MYH7 than in those carrying mutations in the rod region of MYH7 (21.5 +/- 6.6 versus 15 +/- 6.1 mm, p MYH7 than in patients with other mutations. MYH7 mutations, especially in the global region, cause malignant clinical phenotypes.

  8. Recovery of the soleus muscle after short- and long-term disuse induced by hindlimb unloading: effects on the electrical properties and myosin heavy chain profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; De Luca, Annamaria; Didonna, M Paola; Frigeri, Antonio; Nicchia, G Paola; Svelto, Maria; Camerino, Claudia; Zallone, Alberta; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2005-03-01

    The hindlimb unloading (HU) rat is a model of muscle disuse characterized by atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition of the postural muscles, such as the soleus. We previously found that the resting sarcolemmal chloride conductance (gCl) that is typically lower in slow-twitch myofibers than in fast ones increased in soleus fibers following 1 to 3 weeks of HU in accord with the slow-to-fast transition of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. Nevertheless, the gCl already raised after a 3-day HU, whereas no change in MHC expression was detected. The present work evaluates the ability of soleus muscle to recover on return to normal load after a short (3 days) or long (2 weeks) disuse period. The changes observed after a 2-week HU were slowly reversible, since 3-4 weeks of reloading were needed to completely recover gCl, fiber diameter, MHC expression pattern, as well as the mechanical threshold Rheobase, an index of calcium homeostasis. After 3-day HU, the gCl increased homogeneously in most of the soleus muscle fibers and gCl recovery was rapidly completed after 4-day reloading. These results suggest different induction mechanisms for gCl augmentation after the short and long HU periods, as well as a possible role for gCl in the slow muscle adaptation to disuse.

  9. Passive Repetitive Stretching for a Short Duration within a Week Increases Myogenic Regulatory Factors and Myosin Heavy Chain mRNA in Rats' Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Kamikawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stretching is a stimulation of muscle growth. Stretching for hours or days has an effect on muscle hypertrophy. However, differences of continuous stretching and repetitive stretching to affect muscle growth are not well known. To clarify the difference of continuous and repetitive stretching within a short duration, we investigated the gene expression of muscle-related genes on stretched skeletal muscles. We used 8-week-old male Wistar rats ( for this study. Animals medial gastrocnemius muscle was stretched continuously or repetitively for 15 min daily and 4 times/week under anesthesia. After stretching, muscles were removed and total RNA was extracted. Then, reverse transcriptional quantitative real-time PCR was done to evaluate the mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Muscles, either stretched continuously or repetitively, increased mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic MyHC more than unstretched muscles. Notably, repetitive stretching resulted in more substantial effects on embryonic MyHC gene expression than continuous stretching. In conclusion, passive stretching for a short duration within a week is effective in increasing myogenic factor expression, and repetitive stretching had more effects than continuous stretching for skeletal muscle on muscle growth. These findings are applicable in clinical muscle-strengthening therapy.

  10. Specific racemization of heavy-chain cysteine-220 in the hinge region of immunoglobulin gamma 1 as a possible cause of degradation during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masato; Hasegawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Naoki; Kishi, Naoyuki; Nakazawa, Takashi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2011-05-15

    Therapeutic antibodies often suffer from degradation due to various modifications during storage. We detected a degradation of immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG1) stored for 6 month at 40 °C, and identified the modification as the racemization of Cys220 in the hinge sequence S(219)CDKTHT(225) of the heavy chain by tryptic peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry. The rate of racemization at Cys220 was enhanced deliberately by incubating the protein at 50 °C and pH 9.0, while all the other cysteine residues were not affected. The racemization of Cys220 was confirmed by mass spectrometry in conjunction with extracted ion chromatography of the tryptic digest of IgG1 forced to degrade in D(2)O and a series of synthetic hinge fragments containing D-amino acid, as well as the detection of D-cysteine in the acid hydrolysate. To rationalize the possible relationship between the racemization of Cys220 and isopeptide formation at the neighboring residue of Asp221, we suggest a new reaction mechanism that assumes a base catalyst to initiate these reactions by activating the amide nitrogen of Lys222. Due to the highly flexible nature of the hinge region, Lys222 can participate in either the formation of a cyclic imidazoline intermediate involving the α-carbonyl carbon of Cys220 to facilitate the racemization of Cys220 or that of a succinimide structure leading to the isomerization of Asp221.

  11. Dominant epitopes and allergic cross-reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ipsen, H

    2000-01-01

    The symptoms characteristic of allergic hypersensitivity are caused by the release of mediators, i.e., histamine, from effector cells such as basophils and mast cells. Allergens with more than one B cell epitope cross-link IgE Abs bound to high affinity FcepsilonRI receptors on mast cell surfaces...... leading to aggregation and subsequent mediator release. Thus, allergen-Ab complexes play a crucial role in the cascade leading to the allergic response. We here report the structure of a 1:1 complex between the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and the Fab fragment from a murine monoclonal IgG1 Ab, BV16......, that has been solved to 2.9 A resolution by x-ray diffraction. The mAb is shown to inhibit the binding of allergic patients' IgE to Bet v 1, and the allergen-IgG complex may therefore serve as a model for the study of allergen-IgE interactions relevant in allergy. The size of the BV16 epitope is 931 A2...

  12. Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This repository contains antibody/B cell and T cell epitope information and epitope prediction and analysis tools for use by the research community worldwide. Immune...

  13. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: Transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaduzzaman, Md. [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kinoshita, Shigeharu, E-mail: akino@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Watabe, Shugo [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); School of Marine Biosciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYH{sub M86-2}, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614 bp 5′-flanking sequences of MYH{sub M86-2} contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. - Highlights: ► MYH{sub M86-2} is highly expressed in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae. ► MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity depends on the hedgehog signaling. ► Sox6 binding elements inhibits MYH{sub M86-2} expression in fast muscle fibers. ► Sox6 elements function as transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity. ► NFAT and MEF2 binding elements play a key role for directing MYH{sub M86-2} expression.

  14. Functional and structural characterization of neutralizing epitopes of measles virus hemagglutinin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Maino; Ito, Yuri; Brindley, Melinda A; Ma, Xuemin; He, Jilan; Xu, Songtao; Fukuhara, Hideo; Sakai, Kouji; Komase, Katsuhiro; Rota, Paul A; Plemper, Richard K; Maenaka, Katsumi; Takeda, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Effective vaccination programs have dramatically reduced the number of measles-related deaths globally. Although all the available data suggest that measles eradication is biologically feasible, a structural and biochemical basis for the single serotype nature of measles virus (MV) remains to be provided. The hemagglutinin (H) protein, which binds to two discrete proteinaceous receptors, is the major neutralizing target. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognizing distinct epitopes on the H protein were characterized using recombinant MVs encoding the H gene from different MV genotypes. The effects of various mutations on neutralization by MAbs and virus fitness were also analyzed, identifying the location of five epitopes on the H protein structure. Our data in the present study demonstrated that the H protein of MV possesses at least two conserved effective neutralizing epitopes. One, which is a previously recognized epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS), and thus MAbs that recognize this epitope blocked the receptor binding of the H protein, whereas the other epitope is located at the position distant from the RBS. Thus, a MAb that recognizes this epitope did not inhibit the receptor binding of the H protein, rather interfered with the hemagglutinin-fusion (H-F) interaction. This epitope was suggested to play a key role for formation of a higher order of an H-F protein oligomeric structure. Our data also identified one nonconserved effective neutralizing epitope. The epitope has been masked by an N-linked sugar modification in some genotype MV strains. These data would contribute to our understanding of the antigenicity of MV and support the global elimination program of measles.

  15. A Supercluster of Neutralizing Epitopes at the Interface of Ricin’s Enzymatic (RTA and Binding (RTB Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Y. Poon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of an effort to engineer ricin antitoxins and immunotherapies, we previously produced and characterized a collection of phage-displayed, heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs from alpacas that had been immunized with ricin antigens. In our initial screens, we identified nine VHHs directed against ricin toxin’s binding subunit (RTB, but only one, JIZ-B7, had toxin-neutralizing activity. Linking JIZ-B7 to different VHHs against ricin’s enzymatic subunit (RTA resulted in several bispecific antibodies with potent toxin-neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. JIZ-B7 may therefore be an integral component of a future VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA for ricin toxin. In this study, we now localize, using competitive ELISA, JIZ-B7’s epitope to a region of RTB’s domain 2 sandwiched between the high-affinity galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc-binding site and the boundary of a neutralizing hotspot on RTA known as cluster II. Analysis of additional RTB (n = 8- and holotoxin (n = 4-specific VHHs from a recent series of screens identified a “supercluster” of neutralizing epitopes at the RTA-RTB interface. Among the VHHs tested, toxin-neutralizing activity was most closely associated with epitope proximity to RTA, and not interference with RTB’s ability to engage Gal/GalNAc receptors. We conclude that JIZ-B7 is representative of a larger group of potent toxin-neutralizing antibodies, possibly including many described in the literature dating back several decades, that recognize tertiary and possibly quaternary epitopes located at the RTA-RTB interface and that target a region of vulnerability on ricin toxin.

  16. Core Binding Factor β (CBFβ) and the Leukemogenic Fusion Protein CBFβ-Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain (SMMHC) Associate with Mitotic Chromosomes to Epigenetically Regulate Ribosomal Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic bookmarking is an epigenetic control mechanism that sustains gene expression in progeny cells; it is often found in genes related to the maintenance of cellular phenotype and growth control. RUNX transcription factors regulate a broad spectrum of RNA Polymerase (Pol II) transcribed genes important for lineage commitment but also regulate RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) driven ribosomal gene expression, thus coordinating control of cellular identity and proliferation. In this study, using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches we show that the principal RUNX co-factor, CBFβ, associates with nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) during mitosis to negatively regulate RUNX-dependent ribosomal gene expression. Of clinical relevance, we establish for the first time that the leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC (smooth muscle myosin heavy chain) also associates with ribosomal genes in interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes to promote and epigenetically sustain regulation of ribosomal genes through RUNX factor interactions. Our results demonstrate that CBFβ contributes to the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal gene expression and provide further understanding of the epigenetic role of CBFβ-SMMHC in proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. Background Runt-related transcription factors (RUNX) bookmark genes important for phenotype, but the mitotic behavior of RUNX cofactor, Core Binding Factor β (CBFβ) is unknown. Results CBFβ and leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC associate with chromosomes during mitosis and regulate ribosomal genes. Conclusion CBFβ and CBFβ-SMMHC contribute to epigenetic control of ribosomal genes. Significance CBFβ-SMMHC alters regulation linking phenotypic control with cell growth, thereby promoting cancer. PMID:25079347

  17. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  18. Differential muscular myosin heavy chain expression of the pectoral and pelvic girdles during early growth in the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbrech, Aude; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Guérin, Nathalie; Groscolas, René; Gilbert, Caroline; Martrette, Jean-Marc

    2011-06-01

    Continuous growth, associated with a steady parental food supply, is a general pattern in offspring development. So that young chicks can acquire their locomotor independence, this period is usually marked by a fast maturation of muscles, during which different myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms are expressed. However, parental food provisioning may fluctuate seasonally, and offspring therefore face a challenge to ensure the necessary maturation of their tissues when energy is limited. To address this trade-off we investigated muscle maturation in both the pectoral and pelvic girdles of king penguin chicks. This species has an exceptionally long rearing period (1 year), which is prolonged when parental food provisioning is drastically reduced during the sub-Antarctic winter. Approximately 1 month post hatching, chicks acquire a functional pedestrian locomotion, which uses pelvic muscles, whereas swimming, which uses the pectoral muscles, only occurs 1 year later. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the MyHC content of the leg muscles reaches a mature state before those of the pectoral muscles. We found that leg muscle MyHC composition changed with the progressive acquisition of pedestrian locomotion, whereas pectoral muscle fibres reached their mature MyHC profile as early as hatching. Contrary to our predictions, the acquisition of the adult profile in pectoral muscles could be related to an early maturation of the contractile muscular proteins, presumably associated with early thermoregulatory capacities of chicks, necessary for survival in their cold environment. This differential maturation appears to reconcile both the locomotor and environmental constraints of king penguin chicks during growth.

  19. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  20. CD98 Heavy Chain Is a Potent Positive Regulator of CD4+ T Cell Proliferation and Interferon-γ Production In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeshi; Arimochi, Hideki; Bhuyan, Zaied Ahmed; Ishifune, Chieko; Tsumura, Hideki; Ito, Morihiro; Ito, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Akiko; Maekawa, Yoichi; Yasutomo, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Upon their recognition of antigens presented by the MHC, T cell proliferation is vital for clonal expansion and the acquisition of effector functions, which are essential for mounting adaptive immune responses. The CD98 heavy chain (CD98hc, Slc3a2) plays a crucial role in the proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, although it is unclear if CD98hc directly regulates the T cell effector functions that are not linked with T cell proliferation in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that CD98hc is required for both CD4+ T cell proliferation and Th1 functional differentiation. T cell-specific deletion of CD98hc did not affect T cell development in the thymus. CD98hc-deficient CD4+ T cells proliferated in vivo more slowly as compared with control T cells. C57BL/6 mice lacking CD98hc in their CD4+ T cells could not control Leishmania major infections due to lowered IFN-γ production, even with massive CD4+ T cell proliferation. CD98hc-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibited lower IFN-γ production compared with wild-type T cells, even when comparing IFN-γ expression in cells that underwent the same number of cell divisions. Therefore, these data indicate that CD98hc is required for CD4+ T cell expansion and functional Th1 differentiation in vivo, and suggest that CD98hc might be a good target for treating Th1-mediated immune disorders.

  1. VDJ-Seq: Deep Sequencing Analysis of Rearranged Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene to Reveal Clonal Evolution Patterns of B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Nie, Kui; Redmond, David; Melnick, Ari M; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-12-28

    Understanding tumor clonality is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis and disease progression. In addition, understanding the clonal composition changes that occur within a tumor in response to certain micro-environment or treatments may lead to the design of more sophisticated and effective approaches to eradicate tumor cells. However, tracking tumor clonal sub-populations has been challenging due to the lack of distinguishable markers. To address this problem, a VDJ-seq protocol was created to trace the clonal evolution patterns of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) relapse by exploiting VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM), two unique features of B cell lymphomas. In this protocol, Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) libraries with indexing potential were constructed from amplified rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) VDJ region from pairs of primary diagnosis and relapse DLBCL samples. On average more than half million VDJ sequences per sample were obtained after sequencing, which contain both VDJ rearrangement and SHM information. In addition, customized bioinformatics pipelines were developed to fully utilize sequence information for the characterization of IgH-VDJ repertoire within these samples. Furthermore, the pipeline allows the reconstruction and comparison of the clonal architecture of individual tumors, which enables the examination of the clonal heterogeneity within the diagnosis tumors and deduction of clonal evolution patterns between diagnosis and relapse tumor pairs. When applying this analysis to several diagnosis-relapse pairs, we uncovered key evidence that multiple distinctive tumor evolutionary patterns could lead to DLBCL relapse. Additionally, this approach can be expanded into other clinical aspects, such as identification of minimal residual disease, monitoring relapse progress and treatment response, and investigation of immune repertoires in non-lymphoma contexts.

  2. Plasma neurofilament heavy chain levels correlate to markers of late stage disease progression and treatment response in SOD1(G93A mice that model ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hua Lu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to death, typically within 3-5 years of symptom onset. The diagnosis of ALS is largely reliant on clinical assessment and electrophysiological findings. Neither specific investigative tools nor reliable biomarkers are currently available to enable an early diagnosis or monitoring of disease progression, hindering the design of treatment trials.In this study, using the well-established SOD1(G93A mouse model of ALS and a new in-house ELISA method, we have validated that plasma neurofilament heavy chain protein (NfH levels correlate with both functional markers of late stage disease progression and treatment response. We detected a significant increase in plasma levels of phosphorylated NfH during disease progression in SOD1(G93A mice from 105 days onwards. Moreover, increased plasma NfH levels correlated with the decline in muscle force, motor unit survival and, more significantly, with the loss of spinal motor neurons in SOD1 mice during this critical period of decline. Importantly, mice treated with the disease modifying compound arimoclomol had lower plasma NfH levels, suggesting plasma NfH levels could be validated as an outcome measure for treatment trials.These results show that plasma NfH levels closely reflect later stages of disease progression and therapeutic response in the SOD1(G93A mouse model of ALS and may potentially be a valuable biomarker of later disease progression in ALS.

  3. Effect of 48-h food deprivation on the expressions of myosin heavy-chain isoforms and fiber type-related factors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Sawano, Shoko; Iwamoto, Yohei; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 48-h food deprivation on rat skeletal muscle fiber type, according to myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform composition and some metabolism-related factors in both slow-type dominant and fast-type dominant muscle tissues. Male Wistar rats (7 wk old) were treated with 48-h food deprivation or ad libitum feeding as control. After the treatment, the soleus muscle (slow-type dominant) and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-type dominant) were excised. We found that 48-h food deprivation did not affect MyHC composition in either the soleus or EDL, compared with fed rats by electrophoretic separation of MyHC isoforms. However, 48-h food deprivation significantly increased the mRNA expression of fast-type MyHC2B in the EDL muscle. Moreover, food deprivation increased fatty acid metabolism, as shown by elevated levels of related serum energy substrates and mRNA expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) 3 and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in both the soleus and EDL. UCP3 and LPL are generally expressed at higher levels in slow-type fibers. Furthermore, we found that food deprivation significantly decreased the protein amounts of PGC1α and phosphorylated FOXO1, which are known as skeletal muscle fiber type regulators. In conclusion, 48-h food deprivation increased mRNA expression of fast-type MyHC isoform and oxidative metabolism-related factors in EDL, whereas MyHC composition at the protein level did not change in either the soleus or EDL.

  4. Recombination between an expressed immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene and a germline variable gene segment in a Ly 1+ B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfield, R; Hardy, R R; Tarlinton, D; Dangl, J; Herzenberg, L A; Weigert, M

    The early stages of murine B-cell differentiation are characterized by a series of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements which are required for the assembly of heavy(H) and light(L)-chain variable regions from germline gene segments. Rearrangement at the heavy-chain locus is initiated first and consists of the joining of a diversity (DH) gene segment to a joining (JH) gene segment. This forms a DJH intermediate to which a variable (VH) gene segment is subsequently added. Light-chain gene rearrangement follows and consists of the joining of a VL gene segment to a JL gene segment: once a productive light-chain gene has been formed the cell initiates synthesis of surface immunoglobulin M (sIgM) receptors (reviewed in ref. 1). These receptors are clonally distributed and may undergo further diversification either by somatic mutation or possibly by continued recombinational events. Such recombinational events have been detected in the Ly 1+ B-cell lymphoma NFS-5, which has been shown to rearrange both lambda and H-chain genes subsequent to the formation of sIgM (mu kappa) molecules. Here we have analysed a rearrangement of the productive allele of NFS-5 and found that it is due to a novel recombination event between VH genes which results in the replacement of most or all of the coding sequence of the initial VHQ52 rearrangement by a germline VH7183 gene. Embedded in the VH coding sequence close to the site of the cross-over is the sequence 5' TACTGTG 3', which is identical to the signal heptamer found 5' of many DH gene segments. This embedded heptamer is conserved in over 70% of known VH genes. We suggest that this heptamer mediates VH gene replacement and may play an important part in the development of the antibody repertoire.

  5. Discovery of a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgT) in rainbow trout: Implications for a distinctive B cell developmental pathway in teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.D.; Landis, E.D.; Phillips, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    During the analysis of Ig superfamily members within the available rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) EST gene index, we identified a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgH) isotype. cDNAs encoding this isotype are composed of a typical IgH leader sequence and a VDJ rearranged segment followed by four Ig superfamily C-1 domains represented as either membrane-bound or secretory versions. Because teleost fish were previously thought to encode and express only two IgH isotypes (IgM and IgD) for their humoral immune repertoire, we isolated all three cDNA isotypes from a single homozygous trout (OSU-142) to confirm that all three are indeed independent isotypes. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this previously undescribed divergent isotype is restricted to bony fish, thus we have named this isotype "IgT" (??) for teleost fish. Genomic sequence analysis of an OSU-142 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone positive for all three IgH isotypes revealed that IgT utilizes the standard rainbow trout VH families, but surprisingly, the IgT isotype possesses its own exclusive set of DH and JH elements for the generation of diversity. The IgT D and J segments and ?? constant (C) region genes are located upstream of the D and J elements for IgM, representing a genomic IgH architecture that has not been observed in any other vertebrate class. All three isotypes are primarily expressed in the spleen and pronephros (bone marrow equivalent), and ontogenically, expression of IgT is present 4 d before hatching in developing embryos. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  6. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus... vaccinated against or infected with EBOV. Using the information obtained along with structural modeling to predict epitope accessibility, we then...constructed two DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant and subdominant epitopes predicted to be accessible on EBOV GP. Although a construct designed to

  7. Generation of epitope-tagged GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Willars, Gary B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of one or more epitope tags to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has facilitated a wide variety of studies on their structure and function. Epitope-tagging is achieved using relatively straightforward molecular techniques but requires careful consideration about the nature of the epitope tag and its location within the receptor. Here, we describe both the strategies and methodologies for the generation of epitope-tagged GPCRs. We highlight a range of possible techniques that depend upon the available starting material, the nature of the epitope to be incorporated, and suggest a strategy to ease the tagging of multiple receptor types.

  8. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Kh. Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15–22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2–5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6–11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7–12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16–30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. PMID:27189949

  9. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-07-08

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15-22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2-5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6-11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7-12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16-30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocnakova, Lenka; Bhide, Mangesh; Pulzova, Lucia Borszekova

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes.

  11. Clustering of conformational IgE epitopes on the major dog allergen Can f 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curin, Mirela; Weber, Milena; Hofer, Gerhard; Apostolovic, Danijela; Keller, Walter; Reininger, Renate; Swoboda, Ines; Spitzauer, Susanne; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; van Hage, Marianne; Valenta, Rudolf

    2017-09-22

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated allergy affects more than 25% of the population. Can f 1 is the major dog allergen associated with respiratory symptoms but the epitopes recognized by allergic patients IgE on Can f 1 are unknown. To characterize IgE epitopes of Can f 1 recognized by dog allergic patients, six overlapping peptides spanning the Can f 1 sequence were synthesized. In direct IgE epitope mapping experiments peptides were analyzed for IgE reactivity by dot blot and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with sera from dog allergic patients. For indirect epitope-mapping, rabbits were immunized with the peptides to generate specific IgG antibodies which were used to inhibit allergic patients' IgE binding to Can f 1. IgE binding sites were visualized on a model of the Can f 1 three-dimensional structure. We found that Can f 1 does not contain any relevant sequential IgE epitopes. However, IgE inhibition experiments with anti-peptide specific IgGs showed that Can f 1 N- and C-terminal portion assembled a major conformational binding site. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify the major IgE epitope-containing area of the dog allergen Can f 1. This finding is important for the development of allergen-specific treatment strategies.

  12. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4: a novel biomarker for environmental exposure to particulate air pollution in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kang-Yun Lee,1–3 Po-Hao Feng,1,2 Shu-Chuan Ho,4 Kai-Jen Chuang,5,6 Tzu-Tao Chen,2,3 Chien-Ling Su,2,4 Wen-Te Liu,2,4 Hsiao-Chi Chuang2,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, 3Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 4School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 5Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 6School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a chronic inflammatory disease that is correlated with environmental stress. Particulate matter ≤10 µm (PM10 is considered to be a risk factor for COPD development; however, the effects of PM10 on the protein levels in COPD remain unclear. Fifty subjects with COPD and 15 healthy controls were recruited. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed proteins identified immune system process and binding as the most important biological process and molecular function, respectively, in the responses of PM10-exposed patients with COPD. Biomarkers for PM10 in COPD were identified and compared with the same in healthy controls and included proteoglycan 4 (PRG4, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4, and apolipoprotein F (APOF. PRG4 and ITIH4 were associated with a past 3-year PM10 exposure level. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that ITIH4 is a sensitive and specific biomarker for PM10 exposure (area under the curve [AUC] =0.690, P=0.015 compared with PRG4 (AUC =0.636, P=0.083, APOF (AUC =0.523, P=0.766, 8-isoprostane (AUC =0.563, P=0.405, and C-reactive protein (CRP; AUC =0.634, P=0.086. ITIH4 levels were correlated with CRP (r=0

  13. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  14. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: low frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) genes among Spanish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castro, Mónica; Reguero, Julián R; Batalla, Alberto; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz; González, Pelayo; Alvarez, Victoria; Cortina, Arturo; Cubero, Gustavo I; Coto, Eliecer

    2003-08-01

    Mutations in the cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) genes are reportedly responsible for up to 40% of familial cases with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Although there are no mutational hotspots, most of the mutations are located in specific exons of the MYH7 and TNNT2 genes. Currently it is not possible to predict the phenotype in carriers of mutations in these genes, although it is widely accepted that mutations in the MYH7 gene predispose to severe HC, whereas TNNT2 mutations are frequently linked to sudden cardiac death (SCD) in spite of minimal hypertrophy. We sequenced exons 8, 9, 13-16, 19, 20, 22-24, and 30 of the MYH7 gene and exons 8, 9, 11, and 14-16 of the TNNT2 gene in 30 HC patients (18-60 years of age) from the region of Asturias (Northern Spain); 25 cases (80%) had a family history of the disease. Genomic DNA was amplified, and fragments were directly sequenced. Each DNA variant found in the patients was also analyzed in 200 healthy controls through single-strand conformation analysis. Four of the probands had nucleotide changes absent in the healthy controls. Two cases had mutations previously described in the MYH7 gene (exon 14, Arg453Cys) or the TNNT2 gene (exon 16, Arg278Cys). Two cases had new mutations (MYH7 exon 22, Met822Val; TNNT2 exon 14, Lys247Arg) not found among the healthy controls. We found MYH7 Met822Val in a woman with a severe form of HC; the mutation was absent in her parents, indicating a de novo mutation. MYH7 R453C was present in a woman with mild HC, mother of a son who died from SCD. TNNT2 R278C was present in a woman with severe HC, but a sister and a daughter were mutation carriers and did not have hypertrophy. A patient with severe HC was carrier of TNNT2 247Arg. Mutations in the MYH7 and TNNT2 genes can be found in patients without a family history of HC. However, compared with other populations MYH7 or TNNT2 mutations were rare among our HC patients. This study illustrates the

  16. IGHV1-69-Encoded Antibodies Expressed in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia React with Malondialdehyde-Acetaldehyde Adduct, an Immunodominant Oxidation-Specific Epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Que, Xuchu; Widhopf Ii, George F; Amir, Shahzada

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulins expressed by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells are highly restricted, suggesting they are selected for binding either self or foreign antigen. Of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) genes expressed in CLL, IGHV1-69 is the most common, and often is expressed...... with little or no somatic mutation, and restricted IGHD and IGHJ gene usage. We found that antibodies encoded by one particular IGHV1-69 subset, designated CLL69C, with the HCDR3 encoded by the IGHD3-3 gene in reading frame 2 and IGHJ6, specifically bound to oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE), which...... are products of enhanced lipid peroxidation and a major target of innate natural antibodies. Specifically, CLL69C bound immunodominant OSE adducts termed MAA (malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-adducts), which are found on apoptotic cells, inflammatory tissues, and atherosclerotic lesions. It also reacted...

  17. A new epitope tag from hepatitis B virus preS1 for immunodetection, localization and affinity purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mee Sook; Kim, Keun Soo; Jang, Young Kug; Maeng, Cheol Young; Min, Soon Hong; Jang, Myeong Hee; Yoon, Sun Ok; Kim, Jung Hee; Hong, Hyo Jeong

    2003-12-01

    Previously, a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) KR127 (IgG2a/kappa) that binds specifically to the preS1 of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was generated and the fine epitope was mapped to amino acids (aa) 37-45 (NSNNPDWDF). In this current study, the epitope in combination with KR127 was tested for protein tagging. Initially, to evaluate the importance of each residue of the KR127 epitope in antibody binding, alanine substitution mutants of the epitope were constructed and characterized for KR127 binding by immunoblot analysis and competition ELISA. The results showed that substitution of Ser(38) by alanine (S38A) increased the affinity to KR127. The mutated epitope (NANNPDWDF), designated S1 tag, was fused to the amino (N)- or carboxyl (C)-terminus of three human recombinant proteins, soluble B lymphocyte stimulator (sBLyS), the N-terminal domain of thrombopoietin (nTPO), and a mitochondrial ribosomal protein (CGI-113) for expression in mammalian cells, while it was fused to the N- or C-terminus of two proteins, a single-chain antibody fragment (ScFv) and the carboxyl-terminal domain (PAc) of the protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis for expression in Escherichia coli. The immunodetection, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification of the expressed S1-tagged proteins by KR127 were successfully demonstrated. In addition, a KR127 mutant (AP2) with higher affinity, K(d) (0.9 nM), for the S1 tag compared to that (20 nM) of KR127 was obtained by mutational analysis of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3) of KR127. The AP2 antibody was 4-fold more sensitive in detecting the S1-tagged protein than KR127. The S1 tag-KR127 or AP2 combination could be universally used for monitoring protein expression, localizing proteins, and protein purification, as well as studying protein interactions.

  18. Linking Single Domain Antibodies that Recognize Different Epitopes on the Same Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Goldman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Single domain antibodies (sdAb are the recombinantly expressed variable regions from the heavy-chain-only antibodies found in camelids and sharks. SdAb are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. Starting with our previously isolated ricin binding sdAb determined to bind to four non-overlapping epitopes, we constructed a series of sdAb pairs, which were genetically linked through peptides of different length. We designed the series so that the sdAb are linked in both orientations with respect to the joining peptide. We confirmed that each of the sdAb in the constructs was able to bind to the ricin target, and have evidence that they are both binding ricin simultaneously. Through this work we determined that the order of genetically linked sdAb seems more important than the linker length. The genetically linked sdAb allowed for improved ricin detection with better limits of detection than the best anti-ricin monoclonal we evaluated, however they were not able to refold as well as unlinked component sdAb.

  19. Presentation of an immunodominant immediate-early CD8+ T cell epitope resists human cytomegalovirus immunoevasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ameres

    Full Text Available Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1, that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy.

  20. Strategies to Query and Display Allergy-Derived Epitope Data from the Immune Epitope Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Larche, Mark; Pomes, Anna; Broide, David; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of specific epitopes on allergens by antibodies and T cells is a key element in allergic processes. Analysis of epitope data may be of interest for basic immunopathology or for potential application in diagnostics or immunotherapy. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a freely available repository of epitope data from infectious disease agents, as well as epitopes defined for allergy, autoimmunity, and transplantation. The IEDB curates the experiments associated with each epitope and thus provides a variety of different ways to search the data. This review aims to demonstrate the utility of the IEDB and its query strategies, including searching by epitope structure (peptidic/nonpeptidic), by assay methodology, by host, by the allergen itself, or by the organism from which the allergen was derived. Links to tools for visualization of 3-D structures, epitope prediction, and analyses of B and T cell reactivity by host response frequency score are also highlighted. PMID:23172234

  1. Strategies to query and display allergy-derived epitope data from the immune epitope database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Larche, Mark; Pomes, Anna; Broide, David; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of specific epitopes on allergens by antibodies and T cells is a key element in allergic processes. Analysis of epitope data may be of interest for basic immunopathology or for potential application in diagnostics or immunotherapy. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a freely available repository of epitope data from infectious disease agents, as well as epitopes defined for allergy, autoimmunity, and transplantation. The IEDB curates the experiments associated with each epitope and thus provides a variety of different ways to search the data. This review aims to demonstrate the utility of the IEDB and its query strategies, including searching by epitope structure (peptidic/nonpeptidic), by assay methodology, by host, by the allergen itself, or by the organism from which the allergen was derived. Links to tools for visualization of 3-D structures, epitope prediction, and analyses of B and T cell reactivity by host response frequency score are also highlighted. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Matching of trastuzumab (Herceptin) epitope mimics onto the surface of Her-2/neu--a new method of epitope definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Angelika B; Kraml, Georg; Scheiner, Otto; Zielinski, Christoph C; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2005-05-01

    As seen with the proto-oncogene Her-2/neu, antibodies targeting different parts of a receptor can have opposing effects. Depending on epitope specificity, in this case, tumor growth can be inhibited--but also enhanced. Therefore, the definition of molecular binding sites is of increasing importance in modern medicine. We here introduce a novel approach for binding site localization, utilizing information obtained by the phage display technique. This is a high throughput screening method for identification of peptide mimics, so called mimotopes, of any binding structure of interest. All target molecules whose structure is available in the RCSB Protein Data Bank can be scanned for mimotope matches on their surface. In this study, we present the matching results of five mimotopes defined for the epitope recognized by trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting tumor growth, on Her-2/neu. The localization thus obtained corresponds to the known trastuzumab epitope. We therefore suggest the algorithm as a novel way of binding site definition, circumventing co-crystallization experiments.

  3. HLA epitope based matching for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, René J

    2014-06-01

    As important risk factors for transplant rejection and failure, HLA antibodies are now recognized as being specific for epitopes which can be defined structurally with amino acid differences between HLA alleles. Donor-recipient compatibility should therefore be assessed at the epitope rather than the antigen level. HLAMatchmaker is a computer algorithm that considers each HLA antigen as a series of small configurations of polymorphic residues referred to as eplets as essential components of HLA epitopes. It includes epitopes on antigens encoded by all HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ and DP loci as well as MICA. HLA epitopes have two characteristics namely antigenicity, i.e. the reactivity with antibody and immunogenicity, i.e. the ability of eliciting an antibody response. This article addresses the relevance of determining epitope-specificities of HLA antibodies, the effect of epitope structure on technique-dependent antibody reactivity and the identification of acceptable mismatches for sensitized patients considered for transplantation. Permissible mismatching for non-sensitized patients aimed to prevent or reduce HLA antibody responses could consider epitope loads of mismatched antigens and the recently developed nonself-self paradigm of epitope immunogenicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epitope Prediction Assays Combined with Validation Assays Strongly Narrows down Putative Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccine design requires prediction and validation of immunogenic MHC class I epitopes expressed by target cells as well as MHC class II epitopes expressed by antigen-presenting cells essential for the induction of optimal immune responses. Epitope prediction methods are based on different

  5. Production, Characterization and Use of Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing IgY Epitopes Shared by Chicken, Turkey, Pheasant, Peafowl and Sparrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Biček

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken antibodies are not only a part of immune defense but are more and more popular commercial products in form of chicken polyclonal, monoclonal or recombinant antibodies. We produced and characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that recognize epitopes located on heavy or light chain of chicken immunoglobulin Y (chIgY shared also by some other Phasianidae birds. The use of mAbs 1F5 and 2F10 that recognize heavy chain on chIgY common epitopes was demonstrated on immunoglobulins of turkey, pheasant and peafowl. Chicken IgY light chain specific mAb 3E10 revealed the presence of common epitopes on immunoglobulins of turkey, pheasant and sparrow. Monoclonal antibody clone 1F5/3G2 was used to prepare horseradish peroxidase (HRP conjugate and immunoadsorbent column. Conjugated mAbs were demonstrated to be excellent secondary antibodies for diagnostics of certain infections in different avian species. Since they do not react with mammalian immunoglobulins using our mAbs as secondary antibodies in human serodiagnostics would minimize background staining that appears when using mouse detection system. In dot immunobinding assay (DIBA and immunoblot assay they recognized specific IgY antibodies against Mycoplasma synoviae, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Newcastle disease virus in sera of infected or vaccinated birds. Immunoadsorption as a method for removal of IgY from samples in which Mycoplasma synoviae specific IgY was predominant immunoglobulin class enabled more exact demonstration of specific IgA and IgM antibodies. Herein we are presenting effective mAbs useful in diagnostics of avian and mammalian infections as well as in final steps of detection and purification of chicken antibodies and their subunits produced in vivo or in vitro as polyclonal, monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  6. IgG subclass and heavy chain domains contribute to binding and protection by mAbs to the poly γ-D-glutamic acid capsular antigen of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hovenden

    Full Text Available Bacterial capsules are common targets for antibody-mediated immunity. The capsule of Bacillus anthracis is unusual among capsules because it is composed of a polymer of poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (γdPGA. We previously generated murine IgG3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to γdPGA that were protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. IgG3 antibodies are characteristic of the murine response to polysaccharide antigens. The goal of the present study was to produce subclass switch variants of the γdPGA mAbs (IgG3 → IgG1 → IgG2b → IgG2a and assess the contribution of subclass to antibody affinity and protection. Subclass switch antibodies had identical variable regions but differed in their heavy chains. The results showed that a switch from the protective IgG3 to IgG1, IgG2b or IgG2a was accompanied by i a loss of protective activity ii a change in mAb binding to the capsular matrix, and iii a loss of affinity. These results identify a role for the heavy chain constant region in mAb binding. Hybrid mAbs were constructed in which the CH1, CH2 or CH3 heavy chain constant domains from a non-protective, low binding IgG2b mAb were swapped into the protective IgG3 mAb. The IgG3 mAb that contained the CH1 domain from IgG2b showed no loss of affinity or protection. In contrast, swapping the CH2 or CH3 domains from IgG2b into IgG3 produced a reduction in affinity and a loss of protection. These studies identify a role for the constant region of IgG heavy chains in affinity and protection against an encapsulated bacterial pathogen.

  7. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  8. Variable epitope library carrying heavily mutated survivin-derived CTL epitope variants as a new class of efficient vaccine immunogen tested in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NoeDominguez-Romero, Allan; Zamora-Alvarado, Rubén; Servín-Blanco, Rodolfo; Pérez-Hernández, Erendira G; Castrillon-Rivera, Laura E; Munguia, Maria Elena; Acero, Gonzalo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The antigenic variability of tumor cells leading to dynamic changes in cancer epitope landscape along with escape from immune surveillance by down-regulating tumor antigen expression/presentation and immune tolerance are major obstacles for the design of effective vaccines. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response as well as HIV-neutralizing antibodies. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested immunogenic properties and anti-tumor effects of the VELs bearing survivin-derived CTL epitope (GWEPDDNPI) variants in an aggressive metastatic mouse 4T1 breast tumor model. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10,500 and 8,000 individual members, generated as combinatorial M13 phage display and synthetic peptide libraries, respectively, with structural composition GWXPXDXPI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Statistically significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in BALB/c mice immunized with the VELs in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Vaccinated mice developed epitope-specific spleen cell and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cell responses that recognize more than 50% of the panel of 87 mutated epitope variants, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of this new class of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against cancer.

  9. Epitope mapping and identification of amino acids critical for mouse IgG-binding to linear epitopes on Gly m Bd 28K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jun; Yan, Huili

    2016-10-01

    Gly m Bd 28K is one of the major allergens in soybeans, but there is limited information on its IgG-binding epitopes. Thirty-four overlapping peptides that covered the entire sequence of Gly m Bd 28K were synthesized, and 3 monoclonal antibodies against Gly m Bd 28K were utilized to identify the IgG-binding regions of Gly m Bd 28K. Three dominant peptides corresponding to (28)GDKKSPKSLFLMSNS(42)(G28-S42), (56)LKSHGGRIFYRHMHI(70)(L56-I70), and (154)ETFQSFYIGGGANSH(168)(E154-H168) were recognized. L56-I70 is the most important epitope, and a competitive ELISA indicated that it could inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibody to Gly m Bd 28K protein. Alanine scanning of L56-I70 documented that F64, Y65, and R66 were the critical amino acids of this epitope. Two bioinformatics tools, ABCpred and BepiPred, were used to predict the epitopes of Gly m Bd 28K, and the predictions were compared with the epitopes that we had located by monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Linear Epitopes in Vaccinia Virus A27 Are Targets of Protective Antibodies Induced by Vaccination against Smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaever, Thomas; Matho, Michael H; Meng, Xiangzhi; Crickard, Lindsay; Schlossman, Andrew; Xiang, Yan; Crotty, Shane; Peters, Bjoern; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2016-05-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) A27 is a target for viral neutralization and part of the Dryvax smallpox vaccine. A27 is one of the three glycosaminoglycan (GAG) adhesion molecules and binds to heparan sulfate. To understand the function of anti-A27 antibodies, especially their protective capacity and their interaction with A27, we generated and subsequently characterized 7 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), which fell into 4 distinct epitope groups (groups I to IV). The MAbs in three groups (groups I, III, and IV) bound to linear peptides, while the MAbs in group II bound only to VACV lysate and recombinant A27, suggesting that they recognized a conformational and discontinuous epitope. Only group I antibodies neutralized the mature virion in a complement-dependent manner and protected against VACV challenge, while a group II MAb partially protected against VACV challenge but did not neutralize the mature virion. The epitope for group I MAbs was mapped to a region adjacent to the GAG binding site, a finding which suggests that group I MAbs could potentially interfere with the cellular adhesion of A27. We further determined the crystal structure of the neutralizing group I MAb 1G6, as well as the nonneutralizing group IV MAb 8E3, bound to the corresponding linear epitope-containing peptides. Both the light and the heavy chains of the antibodies are important in binding to their antigens. For both antibodies, the L1 loop seems to dominate the overall polar interactions with the antigen, while for MAb 8E3, the light chain generally appears to make more contacts with the antigen. Vaccinia virus is a powerful model to study antibody responses upon vaccination, since its use as the smallpox vaccine led to the eradication of one of the world's greatest killers. The immunodominant antigens that elicit the protective antibodies are known, yet for many of these antigens, little information about their precise interaction with antibodies is available. In an attempt to better

  11. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on duck hepatitis A type 1 virus VP1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoying; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qingshan; Wulin, Shaozhou; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Yue; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in ducks; however, B-cell epitopes on the VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A genotype 1 virus (DHAV-1) have not been characterized. To characterize B-cell epitopes on VP1, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2D10 against Escherichia coli-expressed VP1 of DHAV-1. In vitro, mAb 2D10 neutralized DHAV-1 virus. By using an array of overlapping 12-mer peptides, we found that mAb 2D10 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif LPAPTS. Sequence alignment showed that the epitope 173LPAPTS178 is highly conserved among the DHAV-1 genotypes. Moreover, the six amino acid peptide LPAPTS was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with maximal binding activity to mAb 2D10. DHAV-1-positive duck serum reacted with the epitope in dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of the six amino acids of the epitope for antibody-epitope binding. Competitive inhibition assays of mAb 2D10 binding to synthetic LPAPTS peptides and truncated VP1 protein fragments, detected by Western blotting, also verify that LPAPTS was the VP1 epitope. We identified LPAPTS as a VP1-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb 2D10. Our findings have potential applications in the development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against DHAV-1.

  12. Epitope Prediction Assays Combined with Validation Assays Strongly Narrows down Putative Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-03-24

    Tumor vaccine design requires prediction and validation of immunogenic MHC class I epitopes expressed by target cells as well as MHC class II epitopes expressed by antigen-presenting cells essential for the induction of optimal immune responses. Epitope prediction methods are based on different algorithms and are instrumental for a first screening of possible epitopes. However, their results do not reflect a one-to-one correlation with experimental data. We combined several in silico prediction methods to unravel the most promising C57BL/6 mouse-restricted Hepatitis C virus (HCV) MHC class I epitopes and validated these epitopes in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes within the HCV non-structural proteins were identified, and proteasomal cleavage sites and helper T cell (Th) epitopes at close proximity to these CTL epitopes were analyzed using multiple prediction algorithms. This combined in silico analysis enhances the precision of identification of functional HCV-specific CTL epitopes. This approach will be applicable to the design of human vaccines not only for HCV, but also for other antigens in which T-cell responses play a crucial role.

  13. Malondialdehyde epitopes as mediators of sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Clara J; Binder, Christoph J

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced lipid peroxidation occurs during oxidative stress and results in the generation of lipid peroxidation end products such as malondialdehyde (MDA), which can attach to autologous biomolecules, thereby generating neo-self epitopes capable of inducing potentially undesired biological responses. Therefore, the immune system has developed mechanisms to protect from MDA epitopes by binding and neutralizing them through both cellular and soluble effectors. Here, we briefly discuss innate immune responses targeting MDA epitopes and their pro-inflammatory properties, followed by a review of physiological carriers of MDA epitopes that are relevant in homeostasis and disease. Then we discuss in detail the evidence for cellular responses towards MDA epitopes mainly in lung, liver and the circulation as well as signal transduction mechanisms and receptors implicated in the response to MDA epitopes. Last, we hypothesize on the role of MDA epitopes as mediators of inflammation in diseases and speculate on their contribution to disease pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid modification and lipid peroxidation products in innate immunity and inflammation edited by Christoph J. Binder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Epitope discovery with phylogenetic hidden Markov models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lacerda, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Existing methods for the prediction of immunologically active T-cell epitopes are based on the amino acid sequence or structure of pathogen proteins. Additional information regarding the locations of epitopes may be acquired by considering the evolution of viruses in hosts with different immune backgrounds. In particular, immune-dependent evolutionary patterns at sites within or near T-cell epitopes can be used to enhance epitope identification. We have developed a mutation-selection model of T-cell epitope evolution that allows the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype of the host to influence the evolutionary process. This is one of the first examples of the incorporation of environmental parameters into a phylogenetic model and has many other potential applications where the selection pressures exerted on an organism can be related directly to environmental factors. We combine this novel evolutionary model with a hidden Markov model to identify contiguous amino acid positions that appear to evolve under immune pressure in the presence of specific host immune alleles and that therefore represent potential epitopes. This phylogenetic hidden Markov model provides a rigorous probabilistic framework that can be combined with sequence or structural information to improve epitope prediction. As a demonstration, we apply the model to a data set of HIV-1 protein-coding sequences and host HLA genotypes.

  15. Screening for epitope specificity directly on culture supernatants in the early phase of monoclonal antibody production by an ELISA with biotin-labeled antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Gregersen, Annemette

    2004-01-01

    preincubated with biotinylated antigen. When the two antibodies react with the same epitope subsequent binding of the biotin-labeled antigen is abolished (inhibition). In the cases where no inhibition was observed, the two antibodies were considered to react with distinct, independent epitopes. The obvious...... advantages using this assay, are that it can be performed directly on culture supernatants in the early phase of monoclonal antibody production, and also works for antigens with repetitive epitopes. Moreover, the bonus effect, i.e., a signal in excess of the reference signal when sets of monoclonal...

  16. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... Among predicted epitopes, three epitopes were selected including, MVNKDVKQTT, VLLQSTWFL and FHPFDVTKI. Three candidates out of 51catalase antigen epitopes had the highest score for reactivating with MHC II MHC in propred software. The candidate epitopes for vaccine design should be rather a ...

  17. The Use of the Immune Epitope Database to Study Autoimmune Epitope Data Related to Alopecia Areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Alessandro; Paul, Sinu; Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-11-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of published epitope data for infectious diseases, allergy, transplantation and autoimmunity. Herein we provide an introduction to the IEDB search interface, focusing on data related to autoimmune diseases, including alopecia areata (AA). We demonstrate how common questions related can be answered, such as how to search for specific autoantigens, epitope sequences, response types (B- and/or T-cell assays), or host, as well as how to search for epitopes of known major histocompatibility complex restriction and for data related to a specific disease. Our survey of the data found that while as a whole Autoimmunity-specific records represent a significant portion (∼30%); epitopes reported for AA are remarkably few, just 23 epitopes from six antigens. This reveals a significant knowledge gap for AA, and suggests that additional mapping of epitopes and identification of novel AA-associated autoantigens is warranted. Citing recently published examples, we show how bioinformatic, proteomic, and technological advances make it now increasingly feasible to identify epitopes and novel antigens in human disease. The goal herein was to increase awareness of the IEDB as a free resource for the scientific community and to demonstrate its use in finding (existing) and analyzing (prediction) epitope data.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and binding competition experiments. All of these epitopes appeared to be on extracellular domains of the receptor as shown by binding of antibodies to intact cells. In some cases the epitopes were further localized to alpha or beta subunits by immunoblotting. Several antibodies inhibited binding of 125I-insulin to the receptor, some had no effect on binding, and others enhanced the binding of 125I-insulin. It is concluded that these antibodies will be valuable probes of receptor structure and function.

  19. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Vita, R; Zarebski, L

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive...... be unavailable to the public from 129,186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among...... other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009....

  20. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Viral envelope glycoproteins are major targets for antibodies that bind to and inactivate viral particles. The capacity of a viral vaccine to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies is often used as a marker for vaccine efficacy. Yet the number of known neutralization target epitopes is restricted...... variations at glycosylation sites. In conclusion, the viral O-glycosyl peptide epitopes may be of relevance for development of subunit vaccines and for improved serodiagnosis of viral diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  1. DRREP: deep ridge regressed epitope predictor

    OpenAIRE

    Sher, Gene; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Shaojie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The ability to predict epitopes plays an enormous role in vaccine development in terms of our ability to zero in on where to do a more thorough in-vivo analysis of the protein in question. Though for the past decade there have been numerous advancements and improvements in epitope prediction, on average the best benchmark prediction accuracies are still only around 60%. New machine learning algorithms have arisen within the domain of deep learning, text mining, and convolutional ...

  2. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patient with the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Barratt Ross

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from the whole blood of a 43-year-old male with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM who carries the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7. Patient-derived PBMCs were reprogrammed using non-integrative episomal vectors containing reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, KLF4 and L-MYC. iPSCs were shown to express pluripotent markers, have trilineage differentiation potential, carry the pathogenic MYH7 variant p.Val698Ala, have a normal karyotype and no longer carry the episomal reprogramming vector. This line is useful for studying the link between variants in MYH7 and the pathogenesis of HCM.

  3. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patient with the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Samantha Barratt; Fraser, Stuart T; Nowak, Natalie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from the whole blood of a 43-year-old male with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who carries the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7). Patient-derived PBMCs were reprogrammed using non-integrative episomal vectors containing reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, KLF4 and L-MYC. iPSCs were shown to express pluripotent markers, have trilineage differentiation potential, carry the pathogenic MYH7 variant p.Val698Ala, have a normal karyotype and no longer carry the episomal reprogramming vector. This line is useful for studying the link between variants in MYH7 and the pathogenesis of HCM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    ) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed...... at baseline and after 12 wk. The final GH dose was 1.77 +/- 0.18 IU x d(-1) (approximately 7.2 +/- 0.8 microg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). GH alone had no effect on isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength, power, CSA, or fiber size. However, a substantial increase in MHC 2X isoform was observed with GH administration...... alone, and this may be regarded as a change into a more youthful MHC composition, possibly induced by the rejuvenating of systemic IGF-I levels. RT + placebo caused substantial increases in quadriceps isokinetic strength, power, and CSA; but these RT induced improvements were not further augmented...

  5. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3......-5 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM)/session] + placebo (n = 8), RT + GH (n = 8), GH (n = 8), or placebo (n = 7) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded (RT + placebo and RT + GH) or single-blinded (GH or placebo) design. Measurements of: 1) isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength; 2......) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed...

  6. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to a de novo mutation Arg719Trp of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene and cardiac arrest in childhood. A case report and family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhlemann, C; Hebe, J; Meitinger, T; Vosberg, H P

    2000-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a myocardial disease with variable phenotpye and genotype. To demonstrate that the mutation Arg719Trp in the cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain (beta MHC) gene is a high risk factor for sudden death and can be associated with an unusual apical non-obstructive HCM, we report the case of a 6 1/2 year old boy, who suffered cardiac arrest. The proband had a de novo mutation of the beta MHC gene (Arg719Trp) on the paternal beta MHC allele and a second maternally transmitted mutation (Met349Thr), as was shown previously (Jeschke et al. 1998 (11)). Here we report the clinical phenotype of the proband and of his relatives in detail. The proband had a marked apical and midventricular hypertrophy of the left and right ventricle without obstruction. There was an abnormal relaxation of both ventricles. Holter monitoring detected no arrhythmia. Ventricular fibrillation was inducible only by aggressive programmed stimulation. The boy died 3 1/2 years later after another cardiac arrest due to arrhythmia. Five carriers of the Met349Thr mutation in the family were asymptomatic and had no echocardiographic changes in the heart, suggesting a neutral inherited polymorphism or a recessive mutation. It is concluded that there is an association of the mutation Arg719Trp in the beta-myosin heavy chain with sudden cardiac death in a young child. Disease history in conjunction with the genetic analysis suggests that the implantation of a defibrillator converter would have been a beneficial and probably life saving measure.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy using a DNA vaccine encoding a single-chain trimer of MHC class I linked to an HPV-16 E6 immunodominant CTL epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-H; Peng, S; He, L; Tsai, Y-C; Boyd, D A K; Hansen, T H; Wu, T-C; Hung, C-F

    2005-08-01

    The potency of DNA vaccines may be affected by the efficiency of intracellular processing and MHC class I presentation of encoded antigens. Since a single-chain trimer (SCT) composed of peptide, beta2-microglobulin (beta2m), and MHC class I heavy chain has been shown to bypass antigen processing and lead to stable presentation of peptides, we investigated the efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding a SCT composed of an immunodominant CTL epitope of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 antigen, beta2m, and H-2Kb MHC class I heavy chain (pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb). Transfection of 293 cells with pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb can bypass antigen processing and lead to stable presentation of E6 peptide. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb exhibited significantly increased E6 peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses compared to mice vaccinated with DNA encoding wild-type E6. Most importantly, 100% of mice vaccinated with pIRES-E6-beta2m-Kb DNA were protected against a lethal challenge of E6-expressing TC-1 tumor cells. In contrast, all mice vaccinated with wild-type E6 DNA or control plasmid DNA grew tumors. Our data indicate that a DNA vaccine encoding a SCT can lead to stable enhanced MHC class I presentation of encoded antigenic peptide and may be useful for improving DNA vaccine potency to control tumors or infectious diseases.

  8. Epitope Structure of the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of Asialoglycoprotein Receptor to a Monoclonal Antibody Revealed by High-Resolution Proteolytic Excision Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Raluca; Born, Rita; Moise, Adrian; Ernst, Beat; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the H1 subunit of the carbohydrate recognition domain (H1CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor is used as an entry site into hepatocytes by hepatitis A and B viruses and Marburg virus. Thus, molecules binding specifically to the CRD might exert inhibition towards these diseases by blocking the virus entry site. We report here the identification of the epitope structure of H1CRD to a monoclonal antibody by proteolytic epitope excision of the immune complex and high-resolution MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry. As a prerequisite of the epitope determination, the primary structure of the H1CRD antigen was characterised by ESI-FTICR-MS of the intact protein and by LC-MS/MS of tryptic digest mixtures. Molecular mass determination and proteolytic fragments provided the identification of two intramolecular disulfide bridges (seven Cys residues), and a Cys-mercaptoethanol adduct formed by treatment with β-mercaptoethanol during protein extraction. The H1CRD antigen binds to the monoclonal antibody in both native and Cys-alkylated form. For identification of the epitope, the antibody was immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose. Epitope excision and epitope extraction with trypsin and FTICR-MS of affinity-bound peptides provided the identification of two specific epitope peptides (5-16) and (17-23) that showed high affinity to the antibody. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope peptides revealed independent binding of each peptide to the antibody.

  9. A novel approach in potential anticoagulants from peptides epitope 558-565 of A2 subunit of factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, C; Sarigiannis, Y; Stavropoulos, G

    2013-04-01

    Factor VIII, a human blood plasma protein, plays an important role during the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation cascade after its activation by thrombin. The activated form of FVIII acts as cofactor to the serine protease Factor IXa, in the conversion of the zymogen Factor X to the active enzyme Factor Xa. The Ser558-Gln565 region of the A2 subunit of Factor VIII has been shown to be crucial for FVIIIa-FIXa interaction. Based on this, a series of linear peptides, analogs of the 558-565 loop of the A2 subunit of the heavy chain of Factor VIII were synthesized using the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin and biologically evaluated in vitro by measuring the chronic delay of activated partial thromboplastin time and the inhibition of Factor VIII activity, as potential anticoagulants.

  10. Galactosylated Fucose Epitopes in Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shi; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Plaza, David Fernando; Künzler, Markus; Aebi, Markus; Joachim, Anja; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Jantsch, Verena; Geyer, Rudolf; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Paschinger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The modification of α1,6-linked fucose residues attached to the proximal (reducing-terminal) core N-acetylglucosamine residue of N-glycans by β1,4-linked galactose (“GalFuc” epitope) is a feature of a number of invertebrate species including the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A pre-requisite for both core α1,6-fucosylation and β1,4-galactosylation is the presence of a nonreducing terminal N-acetylglucosamine; however, this residue is normally absent from the final glycan structure in invertebrates due to the action of specific hexosaminidases. Previously, we have identified two hexosaminidases (HEX-2 and HEX-3) in C. elegans, which process N-glycans. In the present study, we have prepared a hex-2;hex-3 double mutant, which possesses a radically altered N-glycomic profile. Whereas in the double mutant core α1,3-fucosylation of the proximal N-acetylglucosamine was abolished, the degree of galactosylation of core α1,6-fucose increased, and a novel Galα1,2Fucα1,3 moiety attached to the distal core N-acetylglucosamine residue was detected. Both galactosylated fucose moieties were also found in two parasitic nematodes, Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum dentatum. As core modifications of N-glycans are known targets for fungal nematotoxic lectins, the sensitivity of the C. elegans double hexosaminidase mutant was assessed. Although this mutant displayed hypersensitivity to the GalFuc-binding lectin CGL2 and the N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectin XCL, the mutant was resistant to CCL2, which binds core α1,3-fucose. Thus, the use of C. elegans mutants aids the identification of novel N-glycan modifications and the definition of in vivo specificities of nematotoxic lectins with potential as anthelmintic agents. PMID:22733825

  11. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Wiens

    Full Text Available The HLA (human leukocyte antigen molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure.We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines.We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes.Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  12. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  13. Epitope tagging of chromosomal genes in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzau, S; Figueroa-Bossi, N; Rubino, S; Bossi, L

    2001-12-18

    We have developed a simple and efficient procedure for adding an epitope-encoding tail to one or more genes of interest in the bacterial chromosome. The procedure is a modification of the gene replacement method of Datsenko and Wanner [Datsenko, K. A. & Wanner, B. L. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 6640-6645]. A DNA module that begins with the epitope-encoding sequence and includes a selectable marker is amplified by PCR with primers that carry extensions (as short as 36 nt) homologous to the last portion of the targeted gene and to a region downstream from it. Transformation of a strain expressing bacteriophage lambda red functions yields recombinants carrying the targeted gene fused to the epitope-encoding sequence. The resulting C-terminal-tagged protein can be identified by standard immuno-detection techniques. In an initial application of the method, we have added the sequences encoding the FLAG and 3xFLAG and influenza virus hemagglutinin epitopes to various genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, including putative and established pathogenic determinants present in prophage genomes. Epitope fusion proteins were detected in bacteria growing in vitro, tissue culture cells, and infected mouse tissues. This work identified a prophage locus specifically expressed in bacteria growing intracellularly. The procedure described here should be applicable to a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria and is particularly suited for the study of intracellular pathogens.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing a Core Epitope on Mucin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Devine

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibody TH1 (IgM was prepared by immunizing mice with deglycosylated (TFMSA-treated cystic fibrosis mucin. TH1 reacted strongly with TFMSA treated cystic fibrosis mucin but not with the fully glycosylated mucin, indicating reactivity with a core mucin epitope. TH1 showed no reactivity with ovine mucin (98% of glycans as sialyl-Tn but reacted strongly with desialylated ovine mucin, indicating the epitope for this mab was the Tn-antigen (O-linked GalNAc. However, TH1 showed no reactivity with Tn-positive red blood cells, and the binding of TH1 was not inhibited by GalNAc at 2.5 mg/ml, illustrating the importance of the peptide sequence to which the GalNAc is attached. TH1 stained the majority of cancers of the colon, lung, stomach, ovary, breast, and cervix, and the cellular distribution of this antigen in normal tissue suggested reactivity with immature mucin. This antibody appears to be a useful reagent for the detection of immature mucin.

  15. First report on the antibody verification of MICA epitopes recorded in the HLA epitope registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Mostecki, J; Marrari, M; da Silva, A S; da Mata Sousa, L C D; do Monte, S J H

    2014-10-01

    The International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand antibody responses to HLA mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modelling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. A major goal was to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. This report addresses the identification of MICA epitopes. Our analysis included published information about MICA antibody reactivity in sera from sensitized patients as well as data from our own laboratories. This report describes twenty-one MICA epitopes verified with antibodies which have primarily been tested in Luminex assays with single alleles. The epitopes correspond to distinct eplets that are often defined by single residues. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cytomegalovirus vectors violate CD8+ T cell epitope recognition paradigms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B; Hughes, Colette M; Ford, Julia C; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Scholz, Isabel; Gilbride, Roxanne M; Lewis, Matthew S; Gilliam, Awbrey N; Ventura, Abigail B; Malouli, Daniel; Xu, Guangwu; Richards, Rebecca; Whizin, Nathan; Reed, Jason S; Hammond, Katherine B; Fischer, Miranda; Turner, John M; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Edlefsen, Paul T; Nelson, Jay A; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Früh, Klaus; Picker, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    ...) vectors elicit SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells that recognize unusual, diverse, and highly promiscuous epitopes, including dominant responses to epitopes restricted by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules...

  17. DRREP: deep ridge regressed epitope predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Gene; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Shaojie

    2017-10-03

    The ability to predict epitopes plays an enormous role in vaccine development in terms of our ability to zero in on where to do a more thorough in-vivo analysis of the protein in question. Though for the past decade there have been numerous advancements and improvements in epitope prediction, on average the best benchmark prediction accuracies are still only around 60%. New machine learning algorithms have arisen within the domain of deep learning, text mining, and convolutional networks. This paper presents a novel analytically trained and string kernel using deep neural network, which is tailored for continuous epitope prediction, called: Deep Ridge Regressed Epitope Predictor (DRREP). DRREP was tested on long protein sequences from the following datasets: SARS, Pellequer, HIV, AntiJen, and SEQ194. DRREP was compared to numerous state of the art epitope predictors, including the most recently published predictors called LBtope and DMNLBE. Using area under ROC curve (AUC), DRREP achieved a performance improvement over the best performing predictors on SARS (13.7%), HIV (8.9%), Pellequer (1.5%), and SEQ194 (3.1%), with its performance being matched only on the AntiJen dataset, by the LBtope predictor, where both DRREP and LBtope achieved an AUC of 0.702. DRREP is an analytically trained deep neural network, thus capable of learning in a single step through regression. By combining the features of deep learning, string kernels, and convolutional networks, the system is able to perform residue-by-residue prediction of continues epitopes with higher accuracy than the current state of the art predictors.

  18. Epitope tagging: general method for tracking recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, C E; Anderson, T R

    2000-01-01

    Epitope tagging has provided a useful experimental strategy with widespread applicability. The ample variety of epitope tag systems that have been put to use to date provide a collection of attributes relevant to virtually any experimental system. As a consequence, epitope tagging will continue to be a valuable tool for molecular biologists long into the future.

  19. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies.

  20. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-09-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Relationship Between B-Cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  2. An analysis of B-cell epitope discontinuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Ganesh N; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2012-07-01

    Although it is widely acknowledged that most B-cell epitopes are discontinuous, the degree of discontinuity is poorly understood. For example, given that an antigen having a single epitope that has been chopped into peptides of a specific length, what is the likelihood that one of the peptides will span all the residues belonging to that epitope? Or, alternatively, what is the largest proportion of the epitope's residues that any peptide is likely to contain? These and similar questions are of direct relevance both to computational methods that aim to predict the location of epitopes from sequence (linear B-cell epitope prediction methods) and window-based experimental methods that aim to locate epitopes by assessing the strength of antibody binding to synthetic peptides on a chip. In this paper we present an analysis of the degree of B-cell epitope discontinuity, both in terms of the structural epitopes defined by a set of antigen-antibody complexes in the Protein Data Bank, and with respect to the distribution of key residues that form functional epitopes. We show that, taking a strict definition of discontinuity, all the epitopes in our data set are discontinuous. More significantly, we provide explicit guidance about the choice of peptide length when using window-based B-cell epitope prediction and mapping techniques based on a detailed analysis of the likely effectiveness of different lengths. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    associated with root cap cells in a range of angiosperm species. In embryogenic carrot suspension cell cultures the epitope is abundant at the surface of cell walls of loosely attached cells in both induced and non-induced cultures. The LM8 epitope is the first cell wall epitope to be identified...

  4. Localization of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outer membrane protein U (OmpU), an adhesion protein of Vibrio mimicus, is a good antigen, but its epitopes are still unclear. In order to locate the epitopes of OmpU protein, epitope prediction was performed using the amino acid sequence of OmpU protein of V. mimicus HX4 strain that was isolated from the diseased ...

  5. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori : A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three candidates out of 51catalase antigen epitopes had the highest score for reactivating with MHC II MHC in propred software. The candidate epitopes for vaccine design should be rather a composition of considering epitopes: MVNKDVKQTTKKVLLQSTWFLKKFHPFDVTKI. In this manner, 39 of 51 alleles of MHC class ІІ ...

  6. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibodies directed against L-tryptophan epitope (WE - W for tryptophan, E for epitope), a constant epitope borne by variant surface glycoproteins (VSG), have been detected in sera of all 152 Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT) patients from Angola. The WE is present in VSG hydrophobic regions of the C terminal ...

  7. Estrogen-Induced Maldevelopment of the Penis Involves Down-Regulation of Myosin Heavy Chain 11 (MYH11) Expression, a Biomarker for Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, L.A.; Bruinton, Sequoia; Braden, Tim D.; Simon, Liz; Goyal, Hari O.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cavernous smooth muscle cells are essential components in penile erection. In this study, we investigated effects of estrogen exposure on biomarkers for smooth muscle cell differentiation in the penis. Neonatal rats received diethylstilbestrol (DES), with or without the estrogen receptor (ESR) antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) or the androgen receptor (AR) agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT), from Postnatal Days 1 to 6. Tissues were collected at 7, 10, or 21 days of age. The smooth muscle cell biomarker MYH11 was studied in depth because microarray data showed it was significantly down-regulated, along with other biomarkers, in DES treatment. Quantitative real time-PCR and Western blot analyses showed 50%–80% reduction (P ≤ 0.05) in Myh11 expression in DES-treated rats compared to that in controls; and ICI and DHT coadministration mitigated the decrease. Temporally, from 7 to 21 days of age, Myh11 expression was onefold increased (P ≥ 0.05) in DES-treated rats versus threefold increased (P ≤ 0.001) in controls, implying the long-lasting inhibitory effect of DES on smooth muscle cell differentiation. Immunohistochemical localization of smooth muscle alpha actin, another biomarker for smooth muscle cell differentiation, showed fewer cavernous smooth muscle cells in DES-treated animals than in controls. Additionally, DES treatment significantly up-regulated Esr1 mRNA expression and suppressed the neonatal testosterone surge by 90%, which was mitigated by ICI coadministration but not by DHT coadministration. Collectively, results provided evidence that DES treatment in neonatal rats inhibited cavernous smooth muscle cell differentiation, as shown by down-regulation of MYH11 expression at the mRNA and protein levels and by reduced immunohistochemical staining of smooth muscle alpha actin. Both the ESR and the AR pathways probably mediate this effect. PMID:22976277

  8. Streptococcus sanguis expresses a 150-kilodalton two-domain adhesin: characterization of several independent adhesin epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, K; Herzberg, M C

    1997-09-01

    Streptococcus sanguis binds to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite (sHA), an in vitro model of the enamel pellicle. To learn if more than one adhesin functions during adhesion, 12 reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were isolated by screening against both adhesive and nonadhesive strains. Two of these MAbs, 1.1 and 1.2, inhibited adhesion in a dose-dependent fashion, although maximum inhibition with either was only 37%. When these two MAbs plus a polyclonal antibody to P1-like adhesin were combined, the inhibition was additive to about 82%. These data indicated that there were at least three distinct, functional adhesion epitopes on the surface of S. sanguis. Western blot analyses of S. sanguis surface macromolecules showed antigens at 36 and 56 (with MAb 1.2), 87 and 150 (with both MAb 1.1 and MAb 1.2), and 100, 130, and 170 kDa (with anti-P1 antibody). The antigens were eluted from gels. Isolated antigens and corresponding antibodies inhibited adhesion similarly. Additivity experiments suggested the distinct epitopes were in three groups: (i) 36/56 kDa, (ii) 87/150 kDa, and (iii) 100/130/170 kDa. The 150-kDa antigen reacting with both MAbs was isolated from gels and digested with trypsin. The digestion revealed a series of tryptic bands. A band at 38 kDa reacted with MAb 1.1 whereas a band at 54 kDa reacted with MAb 1.2 in Western blot analysis, indicating two distinct adhesive epitopes on the 150-kDa antigen. These data strongly suggest that S. sanguis adhesion to sHA is maximized when several adhesin epitopes are coexpressed on surface antigens of different sizes.

  9. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH(M86-2) promoter in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Md; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM86-2, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYHM86-2 promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614bp 5'-flanking sequences of MYHM86-2 contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYHM86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYHM86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYHM86-2 expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYHM86-2 expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilization of Ig heavy chain variable, diversity, and joining gene segments in children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: implications for the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aihong; Rue, Montse; Zhou, Jianbiao; Wang, Hongjun; Goldwasser, Meredith A; Neuberg, Donna; Dalton, Virginia; Zuckerman, David; Lyons, Cheryl; Silverman, Lewis B; Sallan, Stephen E; Gribben, John G

    2004-06-15

    Sequence analysis of the immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgH) has demonstrated preferential usage of specific variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) genes at different stages of B-cell development and in B-cell malignancies, and this has provided insight into B-cell maturation and selection. Knowledge of the association between rearrangement patterns based on updated databases and clinical characteristics of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. We analyzed 381 IgH sequences identified at presentation in 317 children with B-lineage ALL and assessed the V(H)D(H)J(H) gene utilization profiles. The D(H)J(H)-proximal V(H) segments and the D(H)2 gene family were significantly overrepresented. Only 21% of V(H)-J(H) joinings were potentially productive, a finding associated with a trend toward an increased risk of relapse. These results suggest that physical location at the V(H) locus is involved in preferential usage of D(H)J(H)-proximal V(H) segments whereas D(H) and J(H) segment usage is governed by position-independent molecular mechanisms. Molecular pathophysiology appears relevant to clinical outcome in patients who have only productive rearrangements, and specific rearrangement patterns are associated with differences in the tumor biology of childhood ALL.

  11. Lack of Phenotypic Differences by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MYH7 (β-Myosin Heavy Chain)- Versus MYBPC3 (Myosin-Binding Protein C)-Related Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Hindieh, Waseem; Gruner, Christiane; Fourey, Dana; Appelbaum, Evan; Rowin, Ethan; Care, Melanie; Lesser, John R; Haas, Tammy S; Udelson, James E; Manning, Warren J; Olivotto, Iacopo; Tomberli, Benedetta; Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S; Crean, Andrew M; Rakowski, Harry; Chan, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    The 2 most commonly affected genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are MYH7 (β-myosin heavy chain) and MYBPC3 (β-myosin-binding protein C). Phenotypic differences between patients with mutations in these 2 genes have been inconsistent. Scarce data exist on the genotype-phenotype association as assessed by tomographic imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 358 consecutive genotyped hypertrophic cardiomyopathy probands at 5 tertiary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy centers. Genetic testing revealed a pathogenic mutation in 159 patients (44.4%). The most common genes identified were MYH7 (n=53) and MYBPC3 (n=75); 33.1% and 47% of genopositive patients, respectively. Phenotypic characteristics by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of these 2 groups were similar, including left ventricular volumes, mass, maximal wall thickness, morphology, left atrial volume, and mitral valve leaflet lengths (all P=non-significant). The presence of late gadolinium enhancement (65% versus 64%; P=0.99) and the proportion of total left ventricular mass (%late gadolinium enhancement; 10.4±13.2% versus 8.5±8.5%; P=0.44) were also similar. This multicenter multinational study shows lack of phenotypic differences between MYH7- and MYBPC3-associated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Postmutational mechanisms appear more relevant to thick-filament disease expression and outcome than the disease-causing variant per se. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A PCR-based integrated protocol for the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7): development of a diagnostic tool for HCM disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Zapheiropoulos, Athanassios Z; Voutsinas, Gerassimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2008-06-01

    Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) constitutes a genetic disease of the sarcomere characterized by a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. A variety of different mutations affecting the at least eight sarcomeric gene products has been identified and the majority of them appear to function through a dominant negative mechanism. Family history analysis and genetic counseling have been widely adopted as integral tools for the evaluation and management of individuals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Genetic testing of the disease has been progressively released into the clinical mainstream, thus rendering the development of novel and potent molecular diagnostic protocols an inevitable task. To this direction, we have evolved an integrated PCR-based molecular protocol, which through the utilization of novel "exonic" primers allows, among others, the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene locus (MYH7) mainly characterized by the critical for HCM Arginine residue 403 (R(403)). Interestingly, through a DNA sequencing approach, a single nucleotide substitution from "G" to "T" was detected in the adjacent 13th intron, thus divulging the versatile potential of the present molecular protocol to clinical practice.

  13. Urine of patients with early prostate cancer contains lower levels of light chain fragments of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor and saposin B but increased expression of an inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapalan, Jaime J; Ng, Keng L; Shuib, Adawiyah S; Razack, Azad H A; Hashim, Onn H

    2013-06-01

    The present study was aimed at the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in the urine of patients with prostate cancer (PCa), those with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and age-matched healthy male control subjects. Using a combination of 2DE and MS/MS, significantly lower expression of urinary saposin B and two different fragments of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor light chain (ITIL) was demonstrated in the PCa patients compared to the controls. However, only one of the ITIL fragments was significantly different between the PCa and BPH patients. When image analysis was performed on urinary proteins that were transferred onto NC membranes and detected using a lectin that binds to O-glycans, a truncated fragment of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 was the sole protein found to be significantly enhanced in the PCa patients compared to the controls. Together, these urinary peptide fragments might be useful complementary biomarkers to indicate PCa as well as to distinguish it from BPH, although further epidemiological evidence on the specificity and sensitivity of the protein candidates is required. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Efficient epitope mapping by bacteriophage {lambda} surface display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, I.; Maruyama, H.; Zuberi, R.I. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage {lambda} surface expression system, {lambda}foo, was used for epitope mapping of human galectin-3. We constructed random epitope and peptide libraries and compared their efficiencies in the mapping. The galectin-3 cDNA was randomly digested by DNase I to make random epitope libraries. The libraries were screened by affinity selection using a microtiter plate coated with monoclonal antibodies. Direct DNA sequencing of the selected clones defined two distinct epitope sites consisting of nine and 11 amino-acid residues. Affinity selection of random peptide libraries recovered a number of sequences that were similar to each other but distinct from the galectin-3 sequence. These results demonstrate that a single affinity selection of epitope libraries with antibodies is able to define an epitope determinant as small as nine residues long and is more efficient in epitope mapping than random peptide libraries. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A broadly applicable approach to T cell epitope identification: application to improving tumor associated epitopes and identifying epitopes in complex pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Michael D; Abdul-Alim, C Siddiq; Maben, Zachary J; Skrombolas, Denise; Hensley, Lucinda L; Kawula, Thomas H; Dziejman, Michelle; Lord, Edith M; Frelinger, Jeffrey A; Frelinger, John G

    2011-10-28

    Epitopes are a hallmark of the antigen specific immune response. The identification and characterization of epitopes is essential for modern immunologic studies, from investigating cellular responses against tumors to understanding host/pathogen interactions especially in the case of bacteria with intracellular residence. Here, we have utilized a novel approach to identify T cell epitopes exploiting the exquisite ability of particulate antigens, in the form of beads, to deliver exogenous antigen to both MHC class I and class II pathways for presentation to T cell hybridomas. In the current study, we coupled this functional assay with two distinct protein expression libraries to develop a methodology for the characterization of T cell epitopes. One set of expression libraries containing single amino acid substitutions in a defined epitope sequence was interrogated to identify epitopes with enhanced T cell stimulation for a MHC class I epitope. The second expression library is comprised of the majority of open reading frames from the intracellular pathogen and potential biowarfare agent, Francisella tularensis. By automating aspects of this technology, we have been able to functionally screen and identify novel T cell epitopes within F. tularensis. We have also expanded upon these studies to generate a novel expression vector that enables immunization of recombinant protein into mice, which has been utilized to facilitate T cell epitope discovery for proteins that are critically linked to Francisella pathogenicity. This methodology should be applicable to a variety of systems and other pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies have become an indispensable tool for many biotechnological and clinical applications. They bind their molecular target (antigen) by recognizing a portion of its structure (epitope) in a highly specific manner. The ability to predict epitopes from antigen sequences alone is a complex...... task. Despite substantial effort, limited advancement has been achieved over the last decade in the accuracy of epitope prediction methods, especially for those that rely on the sequence of the antigen only. Here, we present BepiPred-2.0 (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/BepiPred/), a web server...... for predicting B-cell epitopes from antigen sequences. BepiPred-2.0 is based on a random forest algorithm trained on epitopes annotated from antibody-antigen protein structures. This new method was found to outperform other available tools for sequence-based epitope prediction both on epitope data derived from...

  17. The protective antibodies induced by a novel epitope of human TNF-alpha could suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Gao, Yaping; Liu, Yu; Shi, Jinxia; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Zhanguo; Pan, Heping; Xue, Yanning; Liu, Chuan; Shen, Beifen; Shao, Ningsheng; Yang, Guang

    2010-01-27

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a major inflammatory mediator that exhibits actions leading to tissue destruction and hampering recovery from damage. At present, two antibodies against human TNF-alpha (hTNF-alpha) are available, which are widely used for the clinic treatment of certain inflammatory diseases. This work was undertaken to identify a novel functional epitope of hTNF-alpha. We performed screening peptide library against anti-hTNF-alpha antibodies, ELISA and competitive ELISA to obtain the epitope of hTNF-alpha. The key residues of the epitope were identified by means of combinatorial alanine scanning and site-specific mutagenesis. The N terminus (80-91 aa) of hTNF-alpha proved to be a novel epitope (YG1). The two amino acids of YG1, proline and valine, were identified as the key residues, which were important for hTNF-alpha biological function. Furthermore, the function of the epitope was addressed on an animal model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA could be suppressed in an animal model by prevaccination with the derivative peptides of YG1. The antibodies of YG1 could also inhibit the cytotoxicity of hTNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that YG1 is a novel epitope associated with the biological function of hTNF-alpha and the antibodies against YG1 can inhibit the development of CIA in animal model, so it would be a potential target of new therapeutic antibodies.

  18. Epitope diversity of hepatitis B virus capsids: quasi-equivalent variations in spike epitopes and binding of different antibodies to the same epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A; Belnap, D M; Watts, N R; Conway, J F; Cheng, N; Stahl, S J; Vethanayagam, J G; Wingfield, P T; Steven, A C

    2006-01-20

    To investigate the range of antigenic variation of HBV capsids, we have characterized the epitopes for two anti-capsid antibodies by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of Fab-labeled capsids to approximately 10A resolution followed by molecular modeling. Both antibodies engage residues on the protruding spikes but their epitopes and binding orientations differ. Steric interference effects limit maximum binding to approximately 50% average occupancy in each case. However, the occupancies of the two copies of a given epitope that are present on a single spike differ, reflecting subtle distinctions in structure and hence, binding affinity, arising from quasi-equivalence. The epitope for mAb88 is conformational but continuous, consisting of a loop-helix motif (residues 77-87) on one of the two polypeptide chains in the spike. In contrast, the epitope for mAb842, like most conformational epitopes, is discontinuous, consisting of a loop on one polypeptide chain (residues 74-78) combined with a loop-helix element (residues 78-83) on the other. The epitope of mAb842 is essentially identical with that previously mapped for mAb F11A4, although the binding orientations of the two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) differ, as do their affinities measured by surface plasmon resonance. From the number of monoclonals (six) whose binding had to be characterized to give the first duplicate epitope, we estimate the total number of core antigen (cAg) epitopes to be of the order of 20. Given that different antibodies may share the same epitope, the potential number of distinct anti-cAg clones should be considerably higher. The observation that the large majority of cAg epitopes are conformational reflects the relative dimensions of a Fab (large) and the small size and close packing of the motifs that are exposed and accessible on the capsid surface.

  19. Multiple HLA Epitopes Contribute to Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Christina L.; Anderson, Kirsten M.; Simon, Lucas J.; Schuyler, Ronald P.; Aubrey, Michael T.; Freed, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Disease susceptibility for type 1 diabetes is strongly associated with the inheritance of specific HLA alleles. However, conventional allele frequency analysis can miss HLA associations because many alleles are rare. In addition, disparate alleles that have similar peptide-binding sites, or shared epitopes, can be missed. To identify the HLA shared epitopes associated with diabetes, we analyzed high-resolution genotyping for class I and class II loci. The HLA epitopes most strongly associated with susceptibility for disease were DQB1 A57, DQA1 V76, DRB1 H13, and DRB1 K71, whereas DPB1 YD9,57, HLA-B C67, and HLA-C YY9,116 were more weakly associated. The HLA epitopes strongly associated with resistance were DQB1 D57, DQA1 Y80, DRB1 R13, and DRB1 A71. A dominant resistance phenotype was observed for individuals bearing a protective HLA epitope, even in the presence of a susceptibility epitope. In addition, an earlier age of disease onset correlated with significantly greater numbers of susceptibility epitopes and fewer resistance epitopes (P epitopes was higher in patients than in control subjects and was not exclusively a result of linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that multiple HLA epitopes may work together to increase the risk of developing diabetes. PMID:24357703

  20. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy, Alexander M.; Healey, John F.; Deng, Wei; Spiegel, P. Clint; Meeks, Shannon L.; Li, Renhao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The development of anti-factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of anti-fVIII monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to different epitopes on fVIII, we recently have shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics, and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting response to fVIII and the combination of fVIII and recombinant factor VIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high dose fVIII, which would not be predicted based on their inhibitor titer alone. Thus the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma using a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. Objectives To map the epitopes of anti-fVIII MAbs, of which 3 are classical inhibitors and one non-classical, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Methods Binding epitopes of 4 MAbs targeting fVIII C2 domain were mapped using HDX-MS. Results The epitopes determined by HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition classical and non-classical inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished using a limited subset of C2-derived peptic fragments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of fVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24152306

  1. A semisynthetic epitope for kinase substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jasmina J; Li, Manqing; Brinkworth, Craig S; Paulson, Jennifer L; Wang, Dan; Hübner, Anette; Chou, Wen-Hai; Davis, Roger J; Burlingame, Alma L; Messing, Robert O; Katayama, Carol D; Hedrick, Stephen M; Shokat, Kevan M

    2007-06-01

    The ubiquitous nature of protein phosphorylation makes it challenging to map kinase-substrate relationships, which is a necessary step toward defining signaling network architecture. To trace the activity of individual kinases, we developed a semisynthetic reaction scheme, which results in the affinity tagging of substrates of the kinase in question. First, a kinase, engineered to use a bio-orthogonal ATPgammaS analog, catalyzes thiophosphorylation of its direct substrates. Second, alkylation of thiophosphorylated serine, threonine or tyrosine residues creates an epitope for thiophosphate ester-specific antibodies. We demonstrated the generality of semisynthetic epitope construction with 13 diverse kinases: JNK1, p38alpha MAPK, Erk1, Erk2, Akt1, PKCdelta, PKCepsilon, Cdk1/cyclinB, CK1, Cdc5, GSK3beta, Src and Abl. Application of this approach, in cells isolated from a mouse that expressed endogenous levels of an analog-specific (AS) kinase (Erk2), allowed purification of a direct Erk2 substrate.

  2. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Variable Region of Llama Heavy Chain-Only Antibody JM4 Efficiently Blocks both Cell-Free and T Cell-T Cell Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Weiming; Matz, Julie; Ye, Chaobaihui; Bracq, Lucie; Delon, Jerome; Kimata, Jason T; Chen, Zhiwei; Benichou, Serge; Zhou, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The variable regions (VHHs) of two heavy chain-only antibodies, JM2 and JM4, from llamas that have been immunized with a trimeric gp140 bound to a CD4 mimic have been recently isolated (here referred to as VHH JM2 and VHH JM4, respectively). JM2 binds the CD4-binding site of gp120 and neutralizes HIV-1 strains from subtypes B, C, and G. JM4 binds gp120 and neutralizes HIV-1 strains from subtypes A, B, C, A/E, and G in a CD4-dependent manner. In the present study, we constructed glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored VHH JM2 and JM4 along with an E4 control and transduced them into human CD4+ cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. We report that by genetically linking the VHHs with a GPI attachment signal, VHHs are targeted to the lipid rafts of the plasma membranes. Expression of GPI-VHH JM4, but not GPI-VHH E4 and JM2, on the surface of transduced TZM.bl cells potently neutralizes multiple subtypes of HIV-1 isolates, including tier 2 or 3 strains, transmitted founders, quasispecies, and soluble single domain antibody (sdAb) JM4-resistant viruses. Moreover, transduction of CEMss-CCR5 cells with GPI-VHH JM4, but not with GPI-VHH E4, confers resistance to both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission of HIV-1 and HIV-1 envelope-mediated fusion. Finally, GPI-VHH JM4-transduced human primary CD4 T cells efficiently resist both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission of HIV-1. Thus, we conclude that VHH JM4, when targeted to the lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, efficiently neutralizes HIV-1 infection via both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission. Our findings should have important implications for GPI-anchored antibody-based therapy against HIV-1. Lipid rafts are specialized dynamic microdomains of the plasma membrane and have been shown to be gateways for HIV-1 budding as well as entry into T cells and macrophages. In nature, many glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins localize in the lipid rafts. In the present study, we developed GPI

  3. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1 Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Augière

    Full Text Available A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects, conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5.A set of 399 poly(AC markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1 among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys and p.(Met125Val which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser,p.(Asp313His and p.(Arg314His which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface.Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin.

  4. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  5. Functional Epitopes for Anti-Aquaporin 5 Antibodies in Sjögren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, J; Koh, J H; Kwok, S-K; Park, S-H; Park, K; Choi, Y

    2017-11-01

    We recently reported the presence of anti-aquaporin 5 (AQP5) immunoglobulin G (IgG) in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (SS) with a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.68. The aim of this study was to identify functional epitopes for the anti-AQP5 autoantibodies detected in control subjects and patients with SS. Recognition of epitopes by anti-AQP5 autoantibodies in sera ( n = 13 for control and n = 24 for SS) or purified IgG ( n = 1 for control and n = 3 for SS) was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay performed in the presence or absence of peptides corresponding to the second transmembrane helix and extracellular loops A, C, and E of AQP5. Functional epitopes were determined by measuring the effects of purified IgG and neutralizing peptides on transepithelial osmotic permeability (PfT) of MDCK cells expressing AQP5. In the IIF assay, 89% of SS samples were inhibited by at least 1 peptide, while only half of control samples were inhibited by any peptide. Overall, SS samples were inhibited by peptides corresponding to extracellular loops A, C, and E by 40% to 50%, whereas control samples were inhibited only by peptides corresponding to loop E by <20%. A cyclized peptide (E1) mimicking loop E was most frequently recognized and best differentiated between the SS and control samples. Incubation of MDCK-AQP5 cells with SS but not with control IgG, significantly decreased PfT, which was reversed by neutralization of IgG binding to any of the extracellular loops. In conclusion, the anti-AQP5 autoantibodies detected in control and SS groups showed differences in fine specificity to the functional epitopes of AQP5. The prevalent recognition of functional epitopes by anti-AQP5 autoantibodies from SS patients suggests that anti-AQP5 autoantibodies act as mediators of glandular hypofunction and are a potential therapeutic target in SS.

  6. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  7. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Leonard; Zhang, Karen; Bonawitz, Tristan; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Waring, Richard; Balciunas, Darius

    2016-11-28

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type function.

  8. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard Burg; Karen Zhang; Tristan Bonawitz; Viktorija Grajevskaja; Gianfranco Bellipanni; Richard Waring; Darius Balciunas

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type ...

  9. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2017-11-09

    As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents.

  10. Spying the neutralizing epitopes on E2 N-terminal by candidate epitope-vaccines against classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Nan; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2006-05-08

    Our previous study proved that the N-terminal (aa693-711) of glycoprotein E2 contained sequential neutralizing epitopes. In this study, four candidate epitope-vaccines (EVs) were separately prepared and evaluated. Among them, epitope-vaccine EV-BC1a (BC1a: aa693-699) induced high level of epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies and exhibited similar protective capability with that induced by Chinese vaccine strain (C-strain). These results confirmed CKEDYRY (aa693-699) as a principal sequential neutralizing epitope on E2 N-terminal. Moreover, these findings also indicate that epitope-vaccine is a potent candidate strategy for marker vaccine against classical swine fever virus (CSFV).

  11. Defining the immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, C S M; Roelen, D L; Heidt, S; Claas, F H J

    2017-07-01

    Transplantation of an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched graft can lead to the development of donor-specific antibodies (DSA), which can result in antibody mediated rejection and graft loss as well as complicate repeat transplantation. These DSA are induced by foreign epitopes present on the mismatched HLA antigens of the donor. However, not all epitopes appear to be equally effective in their ability to induce DSA. Understanding the characteristics of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical transplantation. In this review, the latest insights on HLA epitopes are described with a special focus on the definition of immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes. Furthermore, the use of this knowledge to prevent HLA antibody formation and to select the optimal donor for sensitised transplant candidates will be discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Using patient serum to epitope map soybean glycinins reveals common epitopes shared with many legumes and tree nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Hanaa; Gagnon, Christine; Cober, Elroy; Gleddie, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Soybean consumption is increasing in many Western diets; however, recent reviews suggest that the prevalence of soy allergy can be as high as 0.5% for the general population and up to 13% for children. The immunoglobulin-E (IgE) binding of sera from six soy-sensitive adult human subjects to soybean proteins separated by 2D gel electrophoresis was studied. Synthetic peptide sets spanning the mature glycinin subunit A2 and A3 primary sequences were used to map the IgE-binding regions. Putative epitopes identified in this study were also localized on glycinin hexamer models using bioinformatics software. We identified linear IgE-binding epitopes of the major storage protein Gly m 6 by screening individual soy-sensitive patient sera. These epitopes were then further analysed by 3D in silico model localization and compared to other plant storage protein epitopes. Web-based software applications were also used to study the ability to accurately predict epitopes with mixed results. A total of nine putative IgE-binding epitopes were identified in the glycinin A3 (A3.1-A3.3) and A2 (A2.1-A2.6) subunits. Most patients' sera IgE bound to only one or two epitopes, except for one patient's serum which bound to four different A2 epitopes. Two epitopes (A3.2 and A2.4) overlapped with a previously identified epitope hot spot of 11S globulins from other plant species. Most epitopes were predicted to be exposed on the surface of the 3D model of the glycinin hexamer. Amino acid sequence alignments of soybean acidic glycinins and other plant globulins revealed one dominant epitope hot spot among the four reported hot spots. This study may be helpful for future development of soy allergy immunotherapy and diagnosis. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of T-cell epitopes by a novel mRNA PCR-based epitope chase technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Jean-Daniel; Gauchat, Dominique; Lapointe, Réjean

    2011-03-01

    The identification of specific viral and tumor antigen T-cell epitopes remains a challenge. Indeed, epitope mapping methods are generally costly and time-consuming. Thus, few techniques allow for efficient CD4+ T-lymphocyte epitope identification. Here, we introduce a novel polymerase chain reaction-based mRNA epitope identification method, called mPEC, to rapidly and precisely identify relevant T-cell epitopes recognized by CD8+ or CD4+ T lymphocytes. This method is based on the use of mRNA fragments synthesized from polymerase chain reaction-amplified cDNA with a choice of 3'end deletions. mRNA fragments are electroporated into autologous antigen-presenting cells to deduce an epitope's localization in a given protein antigen. Considering mRNA's sensitivity to degradation, we also inserted a defined epitope at the mRNA's 3'end to control for electroporated mRNA's integrity and its capacity to be translated. Using this method, we rapidly and successfully identified the specific epitope of 2 CD8+ and 1 CD4+ T-lymphocyte clones derived from influenza model antigens. Hence, mPEC could be used to identify new, in vivo-relevant T-cell epitopes for cancer immunotherapy and vaccination in general.

  14. Resistance-associated epitopes of HIV-1C-highly probable candidates for a multi-epitope vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Earlier studies have identified a large number of immunogenic epitopes in HIV-1. Efforts are required to prioritize these epitopes in order to identify the best candidates for formulating an effective multi-epitope vaccine for HIV. We modeled 155 known cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes of HIV-1 subtype C on the 3D structure of HLA-A*0201, HLA-B*2705, and HLA-B*5101 using MODPROPEP, as these alleles are known to be associated with resistance to HIV/slow progression to AIDS. Thirty-six epitopes were identified to bind to all the three HLA alleles with better binding affinity than the control peptides complexed with each HLA allele but not to any of the HLA alleles reported to be associated with susceptibility to HIV infection/rapid progression to disease. As increase in stability of the epitope-HLA complex results in increased immunogenicity, the short-listed epitopes could be suitable candidates for vaccine development. Twenty of the 36 epitopes were polyfunctional in nature adding to their immunological relevance for vaccine design. Further, 9 of the 20 polyfunctional epitopes were found to bind to all three resistance-associated HLA alleles using an additional method, adding worth to their potential as candidates for a vaccine formulation for HIV-1C.

  15. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel A J; Dupuy, Lesley C; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo; Back, Jaap W; Shimanovskaya, Katya; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Ripoll, Daniel R; Wallqvist, Anders; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-07-12

    We performed epitope mapping studies on the major surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) using Chemically Linked Peptides on Scaffolds (CLIPS), which form linear and potential conformational epitopes. This method identified monoclonal antibody epitopes and predicted additional epitopes recognized by antibodies in polyclonal sera from animals experimentally vaccinated against or infected with EBOV. Using the information obtained along with structural modeling to predict epitope accessibility, we then constructed two DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant and subdominant epitopes predicted to be accessible on EBOV GP. Although a construct designed to produce a membrane-bound oligopeptide was poorly immunogenic, a construct generating a secreted oligopeptide elicited strong antibody responses in mice. When this construct was administered as a boost to a DNA vaccine expressing the complete EBOV GP gene, the resultant antibody response was focused largely toward the less immunodominant epitopes in the oligopeptide. Taken together, the results of this work suggest a utility for this method for immune focusing of antibody responses elicited by vaccination.

  16. Neutralization epitope patterns of poliovirus strains isolated from paralytic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crainic, R; Blondel, B; Aubert-Combiescu, A; Beytout, D; Couillin, P; Candrea, A; Boué, A; Horaud, F

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used in previous work to define neutralization epitopes (NE) of poliovirus during its natural variation upon interhuman passages. Two kind of NE were found: constant (K) epitopes, present on practically all poliovirus strains of the same serotype, and variable (V) epitopes, which were strain-specific either for wild-laboratory strains (Mahoney, MEF1, and Saukett) (VW epitopes), or for attenuated Sabin strains (VS epitopes), or for attenuated Sabin strains (VS epitopes). In the present paper we analyzed the NE formulae of poliovirus strains of each of the three serotypes isolated from paralytic cases that have occurred after mass vaccination with oral poliovaccine (Sabin). Type 1 isolates from both the central nervous system and stools showed the existence of the four VW epitopes characteristic for Mahoney virus. However, in some cases, variation of the K epitope formula was noticed. As concerns the paralytic cases where type 2 poliovirus was isolated, the situation was more complex due to the existence of three different VS epitopes. Various patterns of VS epitopes were encountered, making difficult the definition of the strains origin. Most of the type 3 strains isolated from paralytic cases contained one or both VS epitopes, some of them having an identical NE formula to the Sabin type 3 vaccine virus. These data showed that the use of strain-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for the characterization of strain origin is more complex than generally agreed. The multitude of NE coexisting on the same virus particle and their variation during viral replication in the human intestine call for cautious interpretation of the results obtained in poliovirus intratypic differentiation by neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

  17. Multiplex epitope mapping using bacterial surface display reveals both linear and conformational epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Elton P; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2012-01-01

    As antibody-based diagnosis and therapy grow at an increased pace, there is a need for methods which rapidly and accurately determine antibody-antigen interactions. Here, we report a method for the multiplex determination of antibody epitopes using bacterial cell-surface display. A protein-fragment library with 10(7) cell clones, covering 60 clinically-relevant protein targets, was created and characterized with massively parallel sequencing. Using this multi-target fragment library we determined simultaneously epitopes of commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies targeting PSMA, EGFR, and VEGF. Off-target binding was observed for one of the antibodies, which demonstrates the methods ability to reveal cross-reactivity. We exemplify the detection of structural epitopes by mapping the therapeutic antibody Avastin. Based on our findings we suggest this method to be suitable for mapping linear and structural epitopes of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in a multiplex fashion and could find applicability in serum profiling as well as other protein-protein interaction studies.

  18. Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody against human thrombin by H/D-exchange mass spectrometry reveals selection of a diverse sequence in a highly conserved protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerga-Ortiz, Abel; Hughes, Carrie A; Mandell, Jeffrey G; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2002-06-01

    The epitope of a monoclonal antibody raised against human thrombin has been determined by hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled to MALDI mass spectrometry. The antibody epitope was identified as the surface of thrombin that retained deuterium in the presence of the monoclonal antibody compared to control experiments in its absence. Covalent attachment of the antibody to protein G beads and efficient elution of the antigen after deuterium exchange afforded the analysis of all possible epitopes in a single MALDI mass spectrum. The epitope, which was discontinuous, consisting of two peptides close to anion-binding exosite I, was readily identified. The epitope overlapped with, but was not identical to, the thrombomodulin binding site, consistent with inhibition studies. The antibody bound specifically to human thrombin and not to murine or bovine thrombin, although these proteins share 86% identity with the human protein. Interestingly, the epitope turned out to be the more structured of two surface regions in which higher sequence variation between the three species is seen.

  19. Clustering of GLUT4, TUG, and RUVBL2 protein levels correlate with myosin heavy chain isoform pattern in skeletal muscles, but AS160 and TBC1D1 levels do not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorena, Carlos M; Mackrell, James G; Bogan, Jonathan S; Kanzaki, Makoto; Cartee, Gregory D

    2011-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue. To further elucidate this heterogeneity, we probed relationships between myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition and abundance of GLUT4 and four other proteins that are established or putative GLUT4 regulators [Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc 16-domain member 1 (TBC1D1), Tethering protein containing an UBX-domain for GLUT4 (TUG), and RuvB-like protein two (RUVBL2)] in 12 skeletal muscles or muscle regions from Wistar rats [adductor longus, extensor digitorum longus, epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius (mixed, red, and white), plantaris, soleus, tibialis anterior (red and white), tensor fasciae latae, and white vastus lateralis]. Key results were 1) significant differences found among the muscles (range of muscle expression values) for GLUT4 (2.5-fold), TUG (1.7-fold), RUVBL2 (2.0-fold), and TBC1D1 (2.7-fold), but not AS160; 2) significant positive correlations for pairs of proteins: GLUT4 vs. TUG (R = 0.699), GLUT4 vs. RUVBL2 (R = 0.613), TUG vs. RUVBL2 (R = 0.564), AS160 vs. TBC1D1 (R = 0.293), and AS160 vs. TUG (R = 0.246); 3) significant positive correlations for %MHC-I: GLUT4 (R = 0.460), TUG (R = 0.538), and RUVBL2 (R = 0.511); 4) significant positive correlations for %MHC-IIa: GLUT4 (R = 0.293) and RUVBL2 (R = 0.204); 5) significant negative correlations for %MHC-IIb vs. GLUT4 (R = -0.642), TUG (R = -0.626), and RUVBL2 (R = -0.692); and 6) neither AS160 nor TBC1D1 significantly correlated with MHC isoforms. In 12 rat muscles, GLUT4 abundance tracked with TUG and RUVBL2 and correlated with MHC isoform expression, but was unrelated to AS160 or TBC1D1. Our working hypothesis is that some of the mechanisms that regulate GLUT4 abundance in rat skeletal muscle also influence TUG and RUVBL2 abundance.

  20. Dystrophin deficiency in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ alters myosin heavy chain expression profiles in the diaphragm more markedly than in the tibialis cranialis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijikata Takao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous collections of muscle fiber types, the arrangement of which contributes to a variety of functional capabilities in many muscle types. Furthermore, skeletal muscles can adapt individual myofibers under various circumstances, such as disease and exercise, by changing fiber types. This study was performed to examine the influence of dystrophin deficiency on fiber type composition of skeletal muscles in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ, a large animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods We used tibialis cranialis (TC muscles and diaphragms of normal dogs and those with CXMDJ at various ages from 1 month to 3 years old. For classification of fiber types, muscle sections were immunostained with antibodies against fast, slow, or developmental myosin heavy chain (MHC, and the number and size of these fibers were analyzed. In addition, MHC isoforms were detected by gel electrophoresis. Results In comparison with TC muscles of CXMDJ, the number of fibers expressing slow MHC increased markedly and the number of fibers expressing fast MHC decreased with growth in the affected diaphragm. In populations of muscle fibers expressing fast and/or slow MHC(s but not developmental MHC of CXMDJ muscles, slow MHC fibers were predominant in number and showed selective enlargement. Especially, in CXMDJ diaphragms, the proportions of slow MHC fibers were significantly larger in populations of myofibers with non-expression of developmental MHC. Analyses of MHC isoforms also indicated a marked increase of type I and decrease of type IIA isoforms in the affected diaphragm at ages over 6 months. In addition, expression of developmental (embryonic and/or neonatal MHC decreased in the CXMDJ diaphragm in adults, in contrast to continuous high-level expression in affected TC muscle. Conclusion The CXMDJ diaphragm showed marked changes in fiber type composition unlike TC muscles

  1. Myosin heavy chain expression pattern as a marker for anabolic potency: desoxymethyltestosterone (madol), norandrostenedione and testosterone repress MHC-IIb expression and stimulate MHC-IId/x expression in orchiectomized rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, S; Velders, M; Schleipen, B; Schänzer, W; Bloch, W; Diel, P

    2011-06-01

    Both 19-norandrostenedione (estr-4-ene-3,17-dione, NOR) and desoxymethyltestosterone (17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol, DMT or "madol") are 'designer steroids' misused for doping purposes in the bodybuilding scene. We have previously characterized the pharmacological profile of madol and identified potential adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anabolic potency of NOR, madol and the reference substance testosterone propionate (TP). Besides wet weight of the M.levator ani (LA), we examined the effects on muscle fiber type composition and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the M.gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle as additional markers for anabolic potency. A Hershberger assay was performed, where orchiectomized (orchi) male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with NOR, madol, TP or vehicle control (all 1 mg/kg BW/day) for 12 days. Wet weights of the Gas, LA, prostate and seminal vesicle were examined to determine anabolic and androgenic effects. Fiber type composition of the Gas muscle was analyzed using ATPase staining, and MHC protein profiles were determined by silver stain and Western blot analysis. NOR and madol exhibited strong anabolic and weak androgenic potency by stimulating growth of the LA but not the prostate and seminal vesicle. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition characterized by ATPase staining was not significantly altered between the treatment groups, although there was a tendency toward lower levels of type IIB and increased type IIA fibers in all treatment groups relative to orchi. MHC protein expression determined by Western blot and silver stain analysis revealed that MHC IId/x was significantly up-regulated, while MHC IIb was significantly down-regulated in NOR, madol and TP groups relative to orchi. There were no significant differences for MHC IIa and MHC I expression between groups. Results suggest that the observed MHC expression shift could serve as a molecular marker to determine anabolic

  2. Pectic homogalacturonan masks abundant sets of xyloglucan epitopes in plant cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Henriette L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular probes are required to detect cell wall polymers in-situ to aid understanding of their cell biology and several studies have shown that cell wall epitopes have restricted occurrences across sections of plant organs indicating that cell wall structure is highly developmentally regulated. Xyloglucan is the major hemicellulose or cross-linking glycan of the primary cell walls of dicotyledons although little is known of its occurrence or functions in relation to cell development and cell wall microstructure. Results Using a neoglycoprotein approach, in which a XXXG heptasaccharide of tamarind seed xyloglucan was coupled to BSA to produce an immunogen, we have generated a rat monoclonal antibody (designated LM15 to the XXXG structural motif of xyloglucans. The specificity of LM15 has been confirmed by the analysis of LM15 binding using glycan microarrays and oligosaccharide hapten inhibition of binding studies. The use of LM15 for the analysis of xyloglucan in the cell walls of tamarind and nasturtium seeds, in which xyloglucan occurs as a storage polysaccharide, indicated that the LM15 xyloglucan epitope occurs throughout the thickened cell walls of the tamarind seed and in the outer regions, adjacent to middle lamellae, of the thickened cell walls of the nasturtium seed. Immunofluorescence analysis of LM15 binding to sections of tobacco and pea stem internodes indicated that the xyloglucan epitope was restricted to a few cell types in these organs. Enzymatic removal of pectic homogalacturonan from equivalent sections resulted in the abundant detection of distinct patterns of the LM15 xyloglucan epitope across these organs and a diversity of occurrences in relation to the cell wall microstructure of a range of cell types. Conclusion These observations support ideas that xyloglucan is associated with pectin in plant cell walls. They also indicate that documented patterns of cell wall epitopes in relation to cell

  3. Study of the epitope structure of purified Dac G I and Lol p I, the major allergens of Dactylis glomerata and Lolium perenne pollens, using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, W; Mécheri, S; Peltre, G; David, B; Hébert, J

    1988-11-15

    The use of mAb allowed us to further analyze the cross-reactivity between purified Dac g I and Lol p I, the major allergens of Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot) and Lolium perenne (Rye grass), respectively. It was first shown, using IEF, followed by immunoprinting, that serum IgE antibodies from most grass-sensitive patients recognize both Dac g I and Lol p I. Second, three different anti-Lol p I mAb, 290A-167, 348A-6, and 539A-6, and one anti-Dac g I mAb, P3B2 were all shown to react with Dac g I and Lol p I, indicating that the two molecules share common epitopes. Epitope specificity of the mAb was determined by competitive binding inhibition of a given labeled mAb to solid phase fixed Dac g I or Lol p I by the mAb. The results indicated that the four mAb are directed against four different and non-overlapping epitopes present on both allergens. Using double-binding RIA, our data strongly suggest that the common epitopes are not repetitive on both molecules. In addition to their similar physicochemical characteristics, such as isolectric points and m.w., Dac g I and Lol p I share four identical epitopes. Binding inhibition of human IgE to Lol p I and Dac g I by the mAb was also assessed. The results indicated that each mAb was able to inhibit such reactions to variable degree but no additive inhibition was observed when two mAb of different specificities were used in combination, suggesting that the human IgE binding site is partially shared by each epitope recognized by the four mAb.

  4. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willats, W.G.T.; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.; Marcus, S.E.; Mort, A.J.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Goff, le A.; Bonnin, E.; Thibault, J.F.; Knox, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitope

  5. Versatile epitope tagging vector for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosfield, T; Lu, Q

    1998-08-01

    We have constructed an epitope-tagging vector, pCMV-Tag1, for gene expression in mammalian cells. This vector, which allows for N-terminal, C-terminal and internal tagging of the gene product of interest with the FLAG and/or c-myc epitopes, enables researchers to rapidly and efficiently characterize gene products in vivo.

  6. A novel linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zi-Min; Tang, Ming; Zhao, Min; Wen, Gui-Ping; Yang, Fan; Cai, Wei; Wang, Si-Ling; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-07-09

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health problem that causes acute hepatitis in humans and is primarily transmitted through fecal and oral routes. The major anti-HEV antibody responses are against conformational epitopes located in a.a. 459-606 of HEV pORF2. All reported neutralization epitopes are present on the dimer domain constructed by this peptide. While looking for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-recognized linear epitope, we found a novel neutralizing linear epitope (L2) located in a.a. 423-437 of pORF2. Moreover, epitope L2 is proved non-immunodominant in the HEV-infection process. Using the hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier to display this novel linear epitope, we show herein that this epitope could induce a neutralizing antibody response against HEV in mice and could protect rhesus monkeys from HEV infection. Collectively, our results showed a novel non-immunodominant linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus, which provided additional insight of HEV vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High epitope expression levels increase competition between T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almut Scherer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Both theoretical predictions and experimental findings suggest that T cell populations can compete with each other. There is some debate on whether T cells compete for aspecific stimuli, such as access to the surface on antigen-presenting cells (APCs or for specific stimuli, such as their cognate epitope ligand. We have developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study T cell competition. Our model shows that the expression level of foreign epitopes per APC determines whether T cell competition is mainly for specific or aspecific stimuli. Under low epitope expression, competition is mainly for the specific epitope stimuli, and, hence, different epitope-specific T cell populations coexist readily. However, if epitope expression levels are high, aspecific competition becomes more important. Such between-specificity competition can lead to competitive exclusion between different epitope-specific T cell populations. Our model allows us to delineate the circumstances that facilitate coexistence of T cells of different epitope specificity. Understanding mechanisms of T cell coexistence has important practical implications for immune therapies that require a broad immune response.

  8. Immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Peng; Kim, Yohan

    2008-01-01

    We present a new release of the immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR, http://tools.immuneepitope.org), a repository of web-based tools for the prediction and analysis of immune epitopes. New functionalities have been added to most of the previously implemented tools, and a total of ...

  9. A novel strategy of epitope design in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, Debmalya; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Kumar, Anil; Vasco, Azevedo

    2010-07-06

    In spite of genome sequences of both human and N. gonorrhoeae in hand, vaccine for gonorrhea is yet not available. Due to availability of several host and pathogen genomes and numerous tools for in silico prediction of effective B-cell and T-cell epitopes; recent trend of vaccine designing has been shifted to peptide or epitope based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In order to design and develop such a peptide vaccine against the pathogen, we adopted a novel computational approache based on sequence, structure, QSAR, and simulation methods along with fold level analysis to predict potential antigenic B-cell epitope derived T-cell epitopes from four vaccine targets of N. gonorrhoeae previously identified by us [Barh and Kumar (2009) In Silico Biology 9, 1-7]. Four epitopes, one from each protein, have been designed in such a way that each epitope is highly likely to bind maximum number of HLA molecules (comprising of both the MHC-I and II) and interacts with most frequent HLA alleles (A*0201, A*0204, B*2705, DRB1*0101, and DRB1*0401) in human population. Therefore our selected epitopes are highly potential to induce both the B-cell and T-cell mediated immune responses. Of course, these selected epitopes require further experimental validation.

  10. Mapping of Lol p I allergenic epitopes by using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, W; Bernier, D; Jobin, M; Hébert, J

    1989-11-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three non-overlapping epitopes of Lol p I allergen were previously produced and subsequently used for purification of the allergen. In the present study, these MAbs were further characterized, and the biological activity of the purified allergen assessed. The three MAbs were of the IgG isotype and carried a kappa light chain. Their affinity constants were in the range of 7.4-15.1 x 10(-9) mol/l. Purified Lol p I kept its biological activity, as shown by its ability to induce histamine release by basophils of Lol p I-sensitive patients. The profiles of histamine release induced by either Lol p I or crude Lolium perenne extracts were comparable. This observation suggests that human IgE bound to basophils are polyspecific which has been confirmed by immunoblot and inhibition assay. Our data indicated also that Lol p I possesses a major allergenic epitope recognized by all human serum IgE tested. This epitope seems to be partially shared by those recognized by the three MAbs. Finally, preincubation of Lol p I with either one of the Mabs did not affect significantly the basophil-histamine release induced by the purified allergen. This suggests that Lol p I possesses allergenic sites other than the one shared by MAbs and IgE Abs.

  11. Epitope-Specific Vaccination Limits Clonal Expansion of Heterologous Naive T Cells during Viral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexus R. Johnson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite robust secondary T cell expansion primed by vaccination, the impact on primary immune responses to heterotypic antigens remains undefined. Here we show that secondary expansion of epitope-specific memory CD8+ T cells primed by prior infection with recombinant pathogens limits the primary expansion of naive CD8+ T cells with specificity to new heterologous antigens, dampening protective immunity against subsequent pathogen challenge. The degree of naive T cell repression directly paralleled the magnitude of the recall response. Suppressed primary T cell priming reflects competition for antigen accessibility, since clonal expansion was not inhibited if the primary and secondary epitopes were expressed on different dendritic cells. Interestingly, robust recall responses did not impact antigen-specific NK cells, suggesting that adaptive and innate lymphocyte responses possess different activation requirements or occur in distinct anatomical locations. These findings have important implications in pathogen vaccination strategies that depend on the targeting of multiple T cell epitopes.

  12. Identification of an Endogenously Generated Cryptic Collagen Epitope (XL313) That May Selectively Regulate Angiogenesis by an Integrin Yes-associated Protein (YAP) Mechano-transduction Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Jacquelyn J.; Contois, Liangru; Caron, Jennifer M.; Tweedie, Eric; Yang, Xuehui; Friesel, Robert; Vary, Calvin; Brooks, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling regulates angiogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms by which structural changes in ECM proteins contribute to angiogenesis are not fully understood. Integrins are molecules with the ability to detect compositional and structural changes within the ECM and integrate this information into a network of signaling circuits that coordinate context-dependent cell behavior. The role of integrin αvβ3 in angiogenesis is complex, as evidence exists for both positive and negative functions. The precise downstream signaling events initiated by αvβ3 may depend on the molecular characteristics of its ligands. Here, we identified an RGD-containing cryptic collagen epitope that is generated in vivo. Surprisingly, rather than inhibiting αvβ3 signaling, this collagen epitope promoted αvβ3 activation and stimulated angiogenesis and inflammation. An antibody directed to this RGDKGE epitope but not other RGD collagen epitopes inhibited angiogenesis and inflammation in vivo. The selective ability of this RGD epitope to promote angiogenesis and inflammation depends in part on its flanking KGE motif. Interestingly, a subset of macrophages may represent a physiologically relevant source of this collagen epitope. Here, we define an endothelial cell mechano-signaling pathway in which a cryptic collagen epitope activates αvβ3 leading to an Src and p38 MAPK-dependent cascade that leads to nuclear accumulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) and stimulation of endothelial cell growth. Collectively, our findings not only provide evidence for a novel mechano-signaling pathway, but also define a possible therapeutic strategy to control αvβ3 signaling by targeting a pro-angiogenic and inflammatory ligand of αvβ3 rather than the receptor itself. PMID:26668310

  13. Trichinella spiralis shares epitopes with human autoantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Radovic

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like other helminths, Trichinella spiralis has evolved strategies to allow it to survive in the host organism, including the expression of epitopes similar to those present in either expressed or hidden host antigens. To identify T. spiralis-derived antigens that are evolutionarily conserved in the parasite and its host and that could be responsible for its evasion of the host immune response, we examined the reactivity of six different types of autoantibodies to T. spiralis larvae from muscle. T. spiralis antigens that share epitopes with human autoantigens were identified by assessing the cross-reactivity of autoantibody-containing serum samples with T. spiralis antigens in the absence of specific anti-parasite antibodies. Of the 55 autoantibody-containing human serum samples that we analysed by immunohistological screening, 24 (43.6% recognised T. spiralis muscle larvae structures such as the subcuticular region, the genital primordium or the midgut. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that the same sera reacted with 24 protein components of T. spiralis muscle larvae excretory-secretory L1 antigens. We found that the human autoantibodies predominantly bound antigens belonging to the TSL1 group; more specifically, the autoantibody-containing sera reacted most frequently with the 53-kDa component. Thus, this protein is a good candidate for further studies of the mechanisms of T. spiralis-mediated immunomodulation.

  14. Epitope location for two monoclonal antibodies against human cystatin C, representing opposite aggregation inhibitory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Izabela; Prądzińska, Martyna; Spodzieja, Marta; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksandra S; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Szymańska, Aneta; Czaplewska, Paulina

    2016-07-01

    Human cystatin C (hCC), like many other amyloidogenic proteins, dimerizes and possibly makes aggregates by subdomain swapping. Inhibition of the process should suppress the fibrillogenesis leading to a specific amyloidosis (hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy, HCCAA). It has been reported that exogenous agents like monoclonal antibodies against cystatin C are able to suppress formation of cystatin C dimers and presumably control the neurodegenerative disease. We have studied in detail two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) representing very different aggregation inhibitory potency, Cyst10 and Cyst28, to find binding sites in hCC sequence responsible for the immunocomplex formation and pave the way for possible immunotherapy of HCCAA. We used the epitope extraction/excision mass spectrometry approach with the use of different enzymes complemented by affinity studies with synthetic hCC fragments as a basic technique for epitope identification. The results were analyzed in the context of hCC structure allowing us to discuss the binding sites for both antibodies. Epitopic sequences for clone Cyst28 which is a highly potent dimerization inhibitor were found in N-terminus, loop 1 and 2 (L1, L2) and fragments of β2 and β3 strands. The crucial difference between conformational epitope sequences found for both mAbs seems to be the lack of interactions with hCC via N-terminus and the loop 1 in the case of mAb Cyst10. Presumably the interactions of mAbs with hCC via L1 and β sheet fragments make the hCC structure rigid and unable to undergo the swapping process.

  15. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2017-05-02

    Antibodies have become an indispensable tool for many biotechnological and clinical applications. They bind their molecular target (antigen) by recognizing a portion of its structure (epitope) in a highly specific manner. The ability to predict epitopes from antigen sequences alone is a complex task. Despite substantial effort, limited advancement has been achieved over the last decade in the accuracy of epitope prediction methods, especially for those that rely on the sequence of the antigen only. Here, we present BepiPred-2.0 (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/BepiPred/), a web server for predicting B-cell epitopes from antigen sequences. BepiPred-2.0 is based on a random forest algorithm trained on epitopes annotated from antibody-antigen protein structures. This new method was found to outperform other available tools for sequence-based epitope prediction both on epitope data derived from solved 3D structures, and on a large collection of linear epitopes downloaded from the IEDB database. The method displays results in a user-friendly and informative way, both for computer-savvy and non-expert users. We believe that BepiPred-2.0 will be a valuable tool for the bioinformatics and immunology community. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Identification and characterization of the antigenic site (epitope) on bovine β-lactoglobulin: common residues in linear and conformational epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yuan, Shuilin; He, Shengfa; Gao, Jinyan; Chen, Hongbing

    2015-11-01

    β-Lactoglobulin is recognised as one of major allergens in milk and its epitopes include linear and conformational epitopes contributed to milk allergy. In our work, two types of epitopes have been identified. Linear epitopes identified by using SPOT™ peptide arrays approach and three common peptide sequences AA77-82 (KIPAVF), AA126-131 (PEVDNE) and AA142-147 (ALPMHI) were obtained by reacting with specific sera from two rabbits. At the same time, mimotopes were screened by the panning of a phage display peptide library and the corresponding conformational epitopes were calculated by the web tool of Peptiope server with Mapitope algorithm. Three conformational epitopes against two specific sera were identified, in which there were 15 common residues as well and located in the different position and appeared mainly as an α-helix. Common residues on the linear and conformational epitopes were identified in the first time, respectively, which could be regarded as informative epitopes for detection of allergen in dairy products. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies have become an indispensable tool for many biotechnological and clinical applications. They bind their molecular target (antigen) by recognizing a portion of its structure (epitope) in a highly specific manner. The ability to predict epitopes from antigen sequences alone is a complex...

  18. B epitope multiplicity and B/T epitope orientation influence immunogenicity of foot-and-mouth disease peptide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Esther; Cubillos, Carolina; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154) linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35) of FMD virus (FMDV) elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T) or four (B4T) copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype) were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFN γ . Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines.

  19. B Epitope Multiplicity and B/T Epitope Orientation Influence Immunogenicity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154 linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35 of FMD virus (FMDV elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T or four (B4T copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFNγ. Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines.

  20. Fine-mapping of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes of the Staphylococcus aureus SEB antigen using short overlapping peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zhao

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is one of the most potent Staphylococcus aureus exotoxins (SEs. Due to its conserved sequence and stable structure, SEB might be a good candidate antigen for MRSA vaccines. Although cellular immune responses to SEB are well-characterized, much less is known regarding SEB-specific humoral immune responses, particularly regarding detailed epitope mapping. In this study, we utilized a recombinant nontoxic mutant of SEB (rSEB and an AlPO4 adjuvant to immunize BALB/c mice and confirmed that rSEB can induce a high antibody level and effective immune protection against MRSA infection. Next, the antisera of immunized mice were collected, and linear B cell epitopes within SEB were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Three immunodominant B cell epitopes of SEB were screened by ELISA, including a novel epitope, SEB205-222, and two known epitopes, SEB97-114 and SEB247-261. Using truncated peptides, an ELISA was performed with peptide-KLH antisera, and the core sequence of the three immunodominant B cell epitopes were verified as SEB97-112, SEB207-222, and SEB247-257. In vitro, all of the immunodominant epitope-specific antisera (anti-SEB97-112, anti-SEB207-222 and anti-SEB247-257 were observed to inhibit SEB-induced T cell mitogenesis and cytokine production from splenic lymphocytes of BALB/c mice. The homology analysis indicated that SEB97-112 and SEB207-222 were well-conserved among different Staphylococcus aureus strains. The 3D crystal structure of SEB indicated that SEB97-112 was in the loop region inside SEB, whereas SEB207-222 and SEB247-257 were in the β-slice region outside SEB. In summary, the fine-mapping of linear B-cell epitopes of the SEB antigen in this study will be useful to understand anti-SEB immunity against MRSA infection further and will be helpful to optimize MRSA vaccine designs that are based on the SEB antigen.

  1. Fine-mapping of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes of the Staphylococcus aureus SEB antigen using short overlapping peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuo; Li, Bin; Sun, He-Qiang; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wang, Yi-Lin; Chen, Li; Hu, Jian; He, Ya-Fei; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming; Wu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the most potent Staphylococcus aureus exotoxins (SEs). Due to its conserved sequence and stable structure, SEB might be a good candidate antigen for MRSA vaccines. Although cellular immune responses to SEB are well-characterized, much less is known regarding SEB-specific humoral immune responses, particularly regarding detailed epitope mapping. In this study, we utilized a recombinant nontoxic mutant of SEB (rSEB) and an AlPO4 adjuvant to immunize BALB/c mice and confirmed that rSEB can induce a high antibody level and effective immune protection against MRSA infection. Next, the antisera of immunized mice were collected, and linear B cell epitopes within SEB were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Three immunodominant B cell epitopes of SEB were screened by ELISA, including a novel epitope, SEB205-222, and two known epitopes, SEB97-114 and SEB247-261. Using truncated peptides, an ELISA was performed with peptide-KLH antisera, and the core sequence of the three immunodominant B cell epitopes were verified as SEB97-112, SEB207-222, and SEB247-257. In vitro, all of the immunodominant epitope-specific antisera (anti-SEB97-112, anti-SEB207-222 and anti-SEB247-257) were observed to inhibit SEB-induced T cell mitogenesis and cytokine production from splenic lymphocytes of BALB/c mice. The homology analysis indicated that SEB97-112 and SEB207-222 were well-conserved among different Staphylococcus aureus strains. The 3D crystal structure of SEB indicated that SEB97-112 was in the loop region inside SEB, whereas SEB207-222 and SEB247-257 were in the β-slice region outside SEB. In summary, the fine-mapping of linear B-cell epitopes of the SEB antigen in this study will be useful to understand anti-SEB immunity against MRSA infection further and will be helpful to optimize MRSA vaccine designs that are based on the SEB antigen.

  2. Benchmarking B-cell epitope prediction with quantitative dose-response data on antipeptide antibodies: towards novel pharmaceutical product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction can enable novel pharmaceutical product development. However, a mechanistically framed consensus has yet to emerge on benchmarking such prediction, thus presenting an opportunity to establish standards of practice that circumvent epistemic inconsistencies of casting the epitope prediction task as a binary-classification problem. As an alternative to conventional dichotomous qualitative benchmark data, quantitative dose-response data on antibody-mediated biological effects are more meaningful from an information-theoretic perspective in the sense that such effects may be expressed as probabilities (e.g., of functional inhibition by antibody) for which the Shannon information entropy (SIE) can be evaluated as a measure of informativeness. Accordingly, half-maximal biological effects (e.g., at median inhibitory concentrations of antibody) correspond to maximally informative data while undetectable and maximal biological effects correspond to minimally informative data. This applies to benchmarking B-cell epitope prediction for the design of peptide-based immunogens that elicit antipeptide antibodies with functionally relevant cross-reactivity. Presently, the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) contains relatively few quantitative dose-response data on such cross-reactivity. Only a small fraction of these IEDB data is maximally informative, and many more of them are minimally informative (i.e., with zero SIE). Nevertheless, the numerous qualitative data in IEDB suggest how to overcome the paucity of informative benchmark data.

  3. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: conservation of carbohydrate epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4...... for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  4. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: Conservation of carbohydrate Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4...... for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  5. Characterizing affinity epitopes between prion protein and β-amyloid using an epitope mapping immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mino; Kim, Su Yeon; An, Seong Soo A; Ju, Young Ran

    2013-08-02

    Cellular prion protein, a membrane protein, is expressed in all mammals. Prion protein is also found in human blood as an anchorless protein, and this protein form is one of the many potential sources of misfolded prion protein replication during transmission. Many studies have suggested that β-amyloid1-42 oligomer causes neurotoxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease, which is mediated by the prion protein that acts as a receptor and regulates the hippocampal potentiation. The prevention of the binding of these proteins has been proposed as a possible preventative treatment for Alzheimer's disease; therefore, a greater understanding of the binding hot-spots between the two molecules is necessary. In this study, the epitope mapping immunoassay was employed to characterize binding epitopes within the prion protein and complementary epitopes in β-amyloid. Residues 23-39 and 93-119 in the prion protein were involved in binding to β-amyloid1-40 and 1-42, and monomers of this protein interacted with prion protein residues 93-113 and 123-166. Furthermore, β-amyloid antibodies against the C-terminus detected bound β-amyloid1-42 at residues 23-40, 104-122 and 159-175. β-Amyloid epitopes necessary for the interaction with prion protein were not determined. In conclusion, charged clusters and hydrophobic regions of the prion protein were involved in binding to β-amyloid1-40 and 1-42. The 3D structure appears to be necessary for β-amyloid to interact with prion protein. In the future, these binding sites may be utilized for 3D structure modeling, as well as for the pharmaceutical intervention of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Dissecting Antibodies with Regards to Linear and Conformational Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsström, Björn; Bisławska Axnäs, Barbara; Rockberg, Johan; Danielsson, Hanna; Bohlin, Anna; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    An important issue for the performance and specificity of an antibody is the nature of the binding to its protein target, including if the recognition involves linear or conformational epitopes. Here, we dissect polyclonal sera by creating epitope-specific antibody fractions using a combination of epitope mapping and an affinity capture approach involving both synthesized peptides and recombinant protein fragments. This allowed us to study the relative amounts of antibodies to linear and conformational epitopes in the polyclonal sera as well as the ability of each antibody-fraction to detect its target protein in Western blot assays. The majority of the analyzed polyclonal sera were found to have most of the target-specific antibodies directed towards linear epitopes and these were in many cases giving Western blot bands of correct molecular weight. In contrast, many of the antibodies towards conformational epitopes did not bind their target proteins in the Western blot assays. The results from this work have given us insights regarding the nature of the antibody response generated by immunization with recombinant protein fragments and has demonstrated the advantage of using antibodies recognizing linear epitopes for immunoassay involving wholly or partially denatured protein targets. PMID:25816293

  7. Prediction of antigenic epitopes on protein surfaces by consensus scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of antigenic epitopes on protein surfaces is important for vaccine design. Most existing epitope prediction methods focus on protein sequences to predict continuous epitopes linear in sequence. Only a few structure-based epitope prediction algorithms are available and they have not yet shown satisfying performance. Results We present a new antigen Epitope Prediction method, which uses ConsEnsus Scoring (EPCES from six different scoring functions - residue epitope propensity, conservation score, side-chain energy score, contact number, surface planarity score, and secondary structure composition. Applied to unbounded antigen structures from an independent test set, EPCES was able to predict antigenic eptitopes with 47.8% sensitivity, 69.5% specificity and an AUC value of 0.632. The performance of the method is statistically similar to other published methods. The AUC value of EPCES is slightly higher compared to the best results of existing algorithms by about 0.034. Conclusion Our work shows consensus scoring of multiple features has a better performance than any single term. The successful prediction is also due to the new score of residue epitope propensity based on atomic solvent accessibility.

  8. Common and specific epitopes of Campylobacter flagellin recognized by monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Nachamkin, I; Hart, A M

    1986-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies to Campylobacter jejuni recognized a flagellin epitope common to most Campylobacter species and an epitope restricted to C. jejuni and C. coli. These epitopes are distinct from the serotype-specific epitope recently detected on the flagellin and have not been described previously.

  9. A Novel Multi-Epitope Vaccine Based on Urate Transporter 1 Alleviates Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes by Producing Anti-URAT1 Antibody and an Immunomodulatory Effect in C57BL/6J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyperuricemia (HUA is related to diabetes. Uric acid-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are risk factors for diabetes and its complications. Human urate transporter 1 (URAT1 regulates the renal tubular reabsorption of uric acid. IA-2(5-P2-1, a potent immunogenic carrier designed by our laboratory, can induce high-titer specific antibodies when it carries a B cell epitope, such as B cell epitopes of DPP4 (Dipeptidyl peptidase-4, xanthine oxidase. In this report, we describe a novel multi-epitope vaccine composing a peptide of URAT1, an anti-diabetic B epitope of insulinoma antigen-2(IA-2 and a Th2 epitope (P2:IPALDSLTPANED of P277 peptide in human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60. Immunization with the multi-epitope vaccine in streptozotocin-induced diabetes C57BL/6J mice successfully induced specific anti-URAT1 antibody, which inhibited URAT1 action and uric acid reabsorption, and increased pancreatic insulin level with a lower insulitis incidence. Vaccination with U-IA-2(5-P2-1 (UIP-1 significantly reduced blood glucose and uric acid level, increased Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL-10 and IL-4, and regulated immune reactions through a balanced Th1/Th2 ratio. These results demonstrate that the URAT1-based multi-epitope peptide vaccine may be a suitable therapeutic approach for diabetes and its complications.

  10. Analysis of cytotoxic T cell epitopes in relation to cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas

    kill the infected cells. The focus of my PhD project has been on improving a method for CTL epitope pathway prediction, on analyzing the epitope density in the alternative cancer exome, and on a study investigating minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) associated with leukemia. Part I...... is an introduction to the fields covered in the thesis. Part II describes a pan-specific, integrative approach for the prediction of CTL epitopes. The presented method, NetCTLpan, an improved and extended version of NetCTL, performs predictions for all MHC class I molecules with known protein sequence and allows...

  11. PCR-mediated epitope tagging of genes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Radhika; Kaiser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Epitope tagging of genes is a powerful technique facilitating assays for gene function, determination of subcellular distribution of proteins, affinity purification, study of protein interaction with other proteins, DNA or RNA, and any other antibody-based approach in the absence of protein-specific antibodies. Here, we describe a one-step PCR-based strategy for insertion of epitope tags at the chromosomal locus. This method takes advantage of efficient homologous recombination in yeast. PCR amplified tags are directed to desired chromosomal loci with the help of primer-encoded flanking homologous sequences enabling selective epitope tagging of genes of interest.

  12. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES.

  13. Generation of potent mouse monoclonal antibodies to self-proteins using T-cell epitope "tags".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer L; England, Elizabeth; Kemp, Benjamin; Rapley, Laura; Davis, Nicola H E; McCarthy, Grant R; Majithiya, Jayesh B; Corkill, Dominic J; Welsted, Sarah; Minton, Kevin; Cohen, E Suzanne; Robinson, Matthew J; Dobson, Claire; Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Vaughan, Tristan J; Groves, Maria A T; Tigue, Natalie J

    2015-01-01

    Immunization of mice or rats with a "non-self" protein is a commonly used method to obtain monoclonal antibodies, and relies on the immune system's ability to recognize the immunogen as foreign. Immunization of an antigen with 100% identity to the endogenous protein, however, will not elicit a robust immune response. To develop antibodies to mouse proteins, we focused on the potential for breaking such immune tolerance by genetically fusing two independent T-cell epitope-containing sequences (from tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA)) to a mouse protein, mouse ST2 (mST2). Wild-type CD1 mice were immunized with three mST2 tagged proteins (Fc, TT and DTA) and the specific serum response was determined. Only in mice immunized with the T-cell epitope-containing antigens were specific mST2 serum responses detected; hybridomas generated from these mice secreted highly sequence-diverse IgGs that were capable of binding mST2 and inhibiting the interaction of mST2 with its ligand, mouse interleukin (IL)-33 (mIL-33). Of the hundreds of antibodies profiled, we identified five potent antibodies that were able to inhibit IL-33 induced IL-6 release in a mast cell assay; notably one such antibody was sufficiently potent to suppress IL-5 release and eosinophilia infiltration in an Alternaria alternata challenge mouse model of asthma. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that T-cell epitope-containing tags have the ability to break tolerance in wild-type mice to 100% conserved proteins, and it provides a compelling argument for the broader use of this approach to generate antibodies against any mouse protein or conserved ortholog.

  14. Nanobodies targeting norovirus capsid reveal functional epitopes and potential mechanisms of neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koromyslova, Anna D; Hansman, Grant S

    2017-11-01

    Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite recent developments in norovirus propagation in cell culture, these viruses are still challenging to grow routinely. Moreover, little is known on how norovirus infects the host cells, except that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are important binding factors for infection and cell entry. Antibodies that bind at the HBGA pocket and block attachment to HBGAs are believed to neutralize the virus. However, additional neutralization epitopes elsewhere on the capsid likely exist and impeding the intrinsic structural dynamics of the capsid could be equally important. In the current study, we investigated a panel of Nanobodies in order to probe functional epitopes that could trigger capsid rearrangement and/ or interfere with HBGA binding interactions. The precise binding sites of six Nanobodies (Nano-4, Nano-14, Nano-26, Nano-27, Nano-32, and Nano-42) were identified using X-ray crystallography. We showed that these Nanobodies bound on the top, side, and bottom of the norovirus protruding domain. The impact of Nanobody binding on norovirus capsid morphology was analyzed using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We discovered that distinct Nanobody epitopes were associated with varied changes in particle structural integrity and assembly. Interestingly, certain Nanobody-induced capsid morphological changes lead to the capsid protein degradation and viral RNA exposure. Moreover, Nanobodies employed multiple inhibition mechanisms to prevent norovirus attachment to HBGAs, which included steric obstruction (Nano-14), allosteric interference (Nano-32), and violation of normal capsid morphology (Nano-26 and Nano-85). Finally, we showed that two Nanobodies (Nano-26 and Nano-85) not only compromised capsid integrity and inhibited VLPs attachment to HBGAs, but also recognized a broad panel of norovirus genotypes with high affinities. Consequently, Nano-26 and Nano-85 have a great potential to

  15. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH)

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  16. Characterization of epitope specificities of reference antibodies used for the quantification of the birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, S; Le Mignon, M; Jain, K; Lebrun, C; Peurois, F; Kellenberger, C; Bordas-Le Floch, V; Mascarell, L; Nony, E; Moingeon, P

    2017-11-24

    Accurate allergen quantification is needed to document the consistency of allergen extracts used for immunotherapy. Herein, we characterize the epitope specificities of two monoclonal antibodies used in an ELISA for the quantification of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, established as a reference by the BSP090 European project. The ability of mAbs 5B4 and 6H4 to recognize Bet v 1 isoforms was addressed by immunochromatography. The capacity of each mAb to compete with patients' IgE for binding to Bet v 1 was measured by ELISA inhibition. Epitope mapping was performed by pepscan analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry. The 5B4 epitope corresponds to a peptide sequence (I56-K68) overlapping with the binding sites of patients' serum IgEs. Mutation of residues P59, E60, and K65 abolishes 5B4 binding to Bet v 1 and reduces the level of IgE recognition. In contrast, 6H4 recognizes a conformational epitope lying opposite to the 5B4 binding site, involving residues located in segments I44-K55 and R70-F79. Substitution of E45 reduces the binding capacity of 6H4, confirming that it is critical for the interaction. Both mAbs interact with >90% of Bet v 1 content present in the birch pollen extract, while displaying a weak cross-reactivity with other allergens of the PR-10 family. MAbs 5B4 and 6H4 recognize structurally distinct epitopes present in the vast majority of Bet v 1 isoforms. These results support the relevance as a reference method of the Bet v 1-specific quantitative ELISA adopted by the European Pharmacopoeia. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  17. An assessment on epitope prediction methods for protozoa genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Daniela M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epitope prediction using computational methods represents one of the most promising approaches to vaccine development. Reduction of time, cost, and the availability of completely sequenced genomes are key points and highly motivating regarding the use of reverse vaccinology. Parasites of genus Leishmania are widely spread and they are the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis. Currently, there is no efficient vaccine against this pathogen and the drug treatment is highly toxic. The lack of sufficiently large datasets of experimentally validated parasites epitopes represents a serious limitation, especially for trypanomatids genomes. In this work we highlight the predictive performances of several algorithms that were evaluated through the development of a MySQL database built with the purpose of: a evaluating individual algorithms prediction performances and their combination for CD8+ T cell epitopes, B-cell epitopes and subcellular localization by means of AUC (Area Under Curve performance and a threshold dependent method that employs a confusion matrix; b integrating data from experimentally validated and in silico predicted epitopes; and c integrating the subcellular localization predictions and experimental data. NetCTL, NetMHC, BepiPred, BCPred12, and AAP12 algorithms were used for in silico epitope prediction and WoLF PSORT, Sigcleave and TargetP for in silico subcellular localization prediction against trypanosomatid genomes. Results A database-driven epitope prediction method was developed with built-in functions that were capable of: a removing experimental data redundancy; b parsing algorithms predictions and storage experimental validated and predict data; and c evaluating algorithm performances. Results show that a better performance is achieved when the combined prediction is considered. This is particularly true for B cell epitope predictors, where the combined prediction of AAP12 and BCPred12 reached an AUC value

  18. PCR-mediated epitope tagging of genes in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Mathur; P. Kaiser

    2014-01-01

    Epitope tagging of genes is a powerful technique facilitating assays for gene function, determination of subcellular distribution of proteins, affinity purification, study of protein interaction with other proteins, DNA or RNA, and any other antibody-based approach in the absence of protein-specific antibodies. Here, we describe a one-step PCR-based strategy for insertion of epitope tags at the chromosomal locus. This method takes advantage of efficient homologous recombination in yeast. PCR ...

  19. Improving Multi-Epitope Long Peptide Vaccine Potency by Using a Strategy that Enhances CD4+ T Help in BALB/c Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniyeh Ghaffari-Nazari

    Full Text Available Peptide-based vaccines are attractive approaches for cancer immunotherapy; but the success of these vaccines in clinical trials have been limited. Our goal is to improve immune responses and anti-tumor effects against a synthetic, multi-epitope, long peptide from rat Her2/neu (rHer2/neu using the help of CD4+ T cells and appropriate adjuvant in a mouse tumor model. Female BALB/c mice were vaccinated with P5+435 multi-epitope long peptide that presents epitopes for cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL in combination with a universal Pan DR epitope (PADRE or CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODNs as a Toll-like receptor agonist adjuvant. The results show that vaccination with the multi-epitope long peptide in combination with the PADRE peptide and CpG-ODN induced expansion of subpopulations of CD4+ and CD8+ cells producing IFN-γ, the average tumor size in the vaccinated mice was less than that of the other groups, and tumor growth was inhibited in 40% of the mice in the vaccinated group. The mean survival time was 82.6 ± 1.25 days in mice vaccinated with P5+435 + CpG+ PADRE. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of PADRE and CpG with the peptide vaccine enhanced significant tumor specific-immune responses in vaccinated mice.

  20. Dominating IgE-binding epitope of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen, characterized by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangfort, Michael D; Mirza, Osman; Ipsen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    approach to the engineering of allergen molecules with reduced IgE binding. In this study, we describe the identification and modification of a human IgE-binding epitope based on the crystal structure of Bet v 1 in complex with the BV16 Fab' fragment. The epitope occupies approximately 10% of the molecular...... surface area of Bet v 1 and is clearly conformational. A synthetic peptide representing a sequential motif in the epitope (11 of 16 residues) did not inhibit the binding of mAb BV16 to Bet v 1, illustrating limitations in the use of peptides for B cell epitope characterization. The single amino acid...... substitution, Glu(45)-Ser, was introduced in the epitope and completely abolished the binding of mAb BV16 to the Bet v 1 mutant within a concentration range 1000-fold higher than wild type. The mutant also showed up to 50% reduction in the binding of human polyclonal IgE, demonstrating that glutamic acid 45...

  1. Epitope Mapping of Rhi o 1 and Generation of a Hypoallergenic Variant: A CANDIDATE MOLECULE FOR FUNGAL ALLERGY VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Gaurab; Jana, Kuladip; Dasgupta, Angira; Saha, Sudipto; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2016-08-19

    Efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy is often severely impaired by detrimental IgE-mediated side effects of native allergen during vaccination. Here, we present the molecular determinants for IgE recognition of Rhi o 1 and eventually converting the allergen into a hypoallergenic immunogen to restrain health hazards during desensitization. Rhi o 1 is a respiratory fungal allergen. Despite having cross-reactivity with cockroach allergen, we observed that non-cross-reactive epitope predominantly determined IgE binding to Rhi o 1. Denaturation and refolding behavior of the allergen confirmed that its IgE reactivity was not essentially conformation-dependent. A combinatorial approach consisting of computational prediction and a peptide-based immunoassay identified two peptides ((44)TGEYLTQKYFNSQRNN and (311)GAEKNWAGQYVVDCNK) of Rhi o 1 that frequently reacted with IgE antibodies of sensitized patients. Interestingly, these peptides did not represent purely linear IgE epitopes but were presented in a conformational manner by forming a spatially clustered surface-exposed epitope conferring optimal IgE-binding capacity to the folded allergen. Site-directed alanine substitution identified four residues of the IgE epitope that were crucial for antibody binding. A multiple mutant (T49A/Y52A/K314A/W316A) showing 100-fold lower IgE binding and reduced allergenic activity was generated. The TYKW mutant retained T-cell epitopes, as evident from its lymphoproliferative capacity but down-regulated pro-allergic IL-5 secretion. The TYKW mutant induced enhanced focusing of blocking IgG antibodies specifically toward the IgE epitope of the allergen. Anti-TYKW mutant polyclonal IgG antibodies competitively inhibited binding of IgE antibodies to Rhi o 1 up to 70% and suppressed allergen-mediated histamine release by 10-fold. In conclusion, this is a simple yet rational strategy based on epitope mapping data to develop a genetically modified hypoallergenic variant showing

  2. Frequent associations between CTL and T-Helper epitopes in HIV-1 genomes and implications for multi-epitope vaccine designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sinu; Piontkivska, Helen

    2010-08-09

    Epitope vaccines have been suggested as a strategy to counteract viral escape and development of drug resistance. Multiple studies have shown that Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte (CTL) and T-Helper (Th) epitopes can generate strong immune responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1). However, not much is known about the relationship among different types of HIV epitopes, particularly those epitopes that can be considered potential candidates for inclusion in the multi-epitope vaccines. In this study we used association rule mining to examine relationship between different types of epitopes (CTL, Th and antibody epitopes) from nine protein-coding HIV-1 genes to identify strong associations as potent multi-epitope vaccine candidates. Our results revealed 137 association rules that were consistently present in the majority of reference and non-reference HIV-1 genomes and included epitopes of two different types (CTL and Th) from three different genes (Gag, Pol and Nef). These rules involved 14 non-overlapping epitope regions that frequently co-occurred despite high mutation and recombination rates, including in genomes of circulating recombinant forms. These epitope regions were also highly conserved at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicating strong purifying selection driven by functional and/or structural constraints and hence, the diminished likelihood of successful escape mutations. Our results provide a comprehensive systematic survey of CTL, Th and Ab epitopes that are both highly conserved and co-occur together among all subtypes of HIV-1, including circulating recombinant forms. Several co-occurring epitope combinations were identified as potent candidates for inclusion in multi-epitope vaccines, including epitopes that are immuno-responsive to different arms of the host immune machinery and can enable stronger and more efficient immune responses, similar to responses achieved with adjuvant therapies. Signature of strong purifying selection acting at

  3. Kinetics of Antigen Expression and Epitope Presentation during Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Nathan P.; Smith, Stewart A.; Wong, Yik Chun; Tan, Chor Teck; Dudek, Nadine L.; Flesch, Inge E. A.; Lin, Leon C. W.; Tscharke, David C.; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about the dynamics of antigen presentation to T cells during viral infection is very poor despite being of fundamental importance to our understanding of anti-viral immunity. Here we use an advanced mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify the presentation of eight vaccinia virus peptide-MHC complexes (epitopes) on infected cells and the amounts of their source antigens at multiple times after infection. The results show a startling 1000-fold range in abundance as well as strikingly different kinetics across the epitopes monitored. The tight correlation between onset of protein expression and epitope display for most antigens provides the strongest support to date that antigen presentation is largely linked to translation and not later degradation of antigens. Finally, we show a complete disconnect between the epitope abundance and immunodominance hierarchy of these eight epitopes. This study highlights the complexity of viral antigen presentation by the host and demonstrates the weakness of simple models that assume total protein levels are directly linked to epitope presentation and immunogenicity. PMID:23382674

  4. 16th IHIW: a website for antibody-defined HLA epitope Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Marrari, M; da M Sousa, L C D; de M Barroso, J R P; de S U Aita, K M; da Silva, A S; do Monte, S J H

    2013-02-01

    The concept that HLA antibodies are specific for epitopes rather than HLA antigens is important not only for the determination of mismatch acceptability for sensitized patients but also for a better understanding of the antibody response to an HLA mismatch. Numerous publications describe epitope-specific antibodies, but there is no standardized information about the repertoire of clinically relevant HLA epitopes. Under auspices of the 16th IHIW, we have developed a website-based registry of antibody-verified HLA epitopes. Epitope notations are based on HLA molecular modelling of amino acid residues in polymorphic sequence positions. Informative epitope-specific antibodies had been induced by a transplant, transfusion or pregnancy and were monoclonal antibodies or eluates of sera absorbed with single HLA alleles. Antibody reactivity was determined in binding assays with single-allele panels. Antibody producer/immunizer HLA types enhanced the characterization of specific epitopes. The Registry also includes epitopes described in original research publications. Based on the extent of antibody reactivity information, we assigned epitope status as confirmed (well documented) or provisional (more data are needed). At present, the Registry has 69 HLA-ABC, 53 DRB1/3/4/5, 17 DQ, 8 DP and 22 MICA antibody-verified epitopes and will be updated on a quarterly basis. Laboratories worldwide continue to submit data about previously unreported antibody-specific epitopes. For each epitope, the website shows its amino acid composition and HLA alleles that share the epitope. Links show antibody reactivity patterns, sensitization information and references. Other links show molecular modelling of corresponding structural epitopes and polymorphic residue information for epitope-carrying alleles. The website will also have a link to epitope frequency information in different populations. Search functions will list mismatched epitopes on mismatched alleles for selected HLA types. The HLA

  5. Epitope Mapping of Avian Influenza M2e Protein: Different Species Recognise Various Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Noor Haliza; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Tarigan, Simson; Peaston, Anne; Hemmatzadeh, Farhid

    2016-01-01

    A common approach for developing diagnostic tests for influenza virus detection is the use of mouse or rabbit monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies against a target antigen of the virus. However, comparative mapping of the target antigen using antibodies from different animal sources has not been evaluated before. This is important because identification of antigenic determinants of the target antigen in different species plays a central role to ensure the efficiency of a diagnostic test, such as competitive ELISA or immunohistochemistry-based tests. Interest in the matrix 2 ectodomain (M2e) protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) as a candidate for a universal vaccine and also as a marker for detection of virus infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA) is the rationale for the selection of this protein for comparative mapping evaluation. This study aimed to map the epitopes of the M2e protein of avian influenza virus H5N1 using chicken, mouse and rabbit monoclonal or monospecific antibodies. Our findings revealed that rabbit antibodies (rAbs) recognized epitope 6EVETPTRN13 of the M2e, located at the N-terminal of the protein, while mouse (mAb) and chicken antibodies (cAbs) recognized epitope 10PTRNEWECK18, located at the centre region of the protein. The findings highlighted the difference between the M2e antigenic determinants recognized by different species that emphasized the importance of comparative mapping of antibody reactivity from different animals to the same antigen, especially in the case of multi-host infectious agents such as influenza. The findings are of importance for antigenic mapping, as well as diagnostic test and vaccine development.

  6. Effects of a traditional Chinese medicine formula and its extraction on muscle fiber characteristics in finishing pigs, porcine cell proliferation and isoforms of myosin heavy chain gene expression in myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine formula (TCMF on muscle fiber characteristics in finishing pigs and the effects of the formula’s extract (distilled water, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether extraction on porcine cell proliferation and isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC gene expression in myocytes. Methods In a completely randomized design, ninety pigs were assigned to three diets with five replications per treatment and six pigs per pen. The diets included the basal diet (control group, TCMF1 (basal diet+2.5 g/kg TCMF and TCMF2 (basal diet+5 g/kg TCMF. The psoas major muscle was obtained from pigs at the end of the experiment. Muscle fiber characteristics in the psoas major muscle were analyzed using myosin ATPase staining. Cell proliferation was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT dye and cytometry. Isoforms of MyHC gene expression were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The final body weight and carcass weight of finishing pigs were increased by TCMF1 (p<0.05, while the psoas major muscle cross-sectional area was increased by TCMF (p<0.05. The cross-sectional area and diameter of psoas major muscle fiber I, IIA, and IIB were increased by TCMF2 (p<0.05. The cross-sectional area and fiber diameter of psoas major muscle fiber IIA and IIB were increased by diet supplementation with TCMF1 (p<0.05. Psoas major muscle fiber IIA and IIB fiber density from the pigs fed the TCMF1 diet and the type IIB fiber density from the pigs fed the TCMF2 diet were lower compared to pigs fed the control diet (p<0.05. Pigs fed TCMF2 had a higher composition of type I fiber and a lower percentage of type IIB fiber in the psoas major muscle (p<0.05. The expression levels of MyHC I, MyHC IIa, and MyHC IIx mRNA increased and the amount of MyHC IIb mRNA decreased in the psoas major muscle from TCMF2, whereas MyHC I and MyHC IIx mRNA increased

  7. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-ABC epitopes recorded in the website-based HLA Epitope Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Marrari, M; Mulder, A; Sousa, L C D da Mata; da Silva, A S; do Monte, S J H

    2014-06-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes ( http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. So-called eplets represent essential components of HLA epitopes and they are defined by polymorphic residues. A major goal is to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. Our analysis has also included data in many publications. As of 1 November 2013, 95 HLA-ABC antibody-verified epitopes have been recorded, 62 correspond to eplets and 33 are defined by eplets paired with other residue configurations. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. IgE and allergen-specific immunotherapy-induced IgG4 recognize similar epitopes of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, N; von Loetzen, C S; Subbarayal, B; Möbs, C; Vogel, L; Hoffmann, A; Fötisch, K; Koutsouridou, A; Randow, S; Völker, E; Seutter von Loetzen, A; Rösch, P; Vieths, S; Pfützner, W; Bohle, B; Schiller, D

    2017-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) with birch pollen generates Bet v 1-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G4 which blocks IgE-mediated hypersensitivity mechanisms. Whether IgG4 specific for Bet v 1a competes with IgE for identical epitopes or whether novel epitope specificities of IgG4 antibodies are developed is under debate. We sought to analyze the epitope specificities of IgE and IgG4 antibodies from sera of patients who received AIT. 15 sera of patients (13/15 received AIT) with Bet v 1a-specific IgE and IgG4 were analyzed. The structural arrangements of recombinant (r)Bet v 1a and rBet v 1a_11x , modified in five potential epitopes, were analyzed by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. IgE binding to Bet v 1 was assessed by ELISA and mediator release assays. Competitive binding of monoclonal antibodies specific for Bet v 1a and serum IgE/IgG4 to rBet v 1a and serum antibody binding to a non-allergenic Bet v 1-type model protein presenting an individual epitope for IgE was analyzed in ELISA and western blot. rBet v 1a_11x had a Bet v 1a - similar secondary and tertiary structure. Monomeric dispersion of rBet v 1a_11x was concentration and buffer-dependent. Up to 1500-fold increase in the EC50 for IgE-mediated mediator release induced by rBet v 1a_11x was determined. The reduction of IgE and IgG4 binding to rBet v 1a_11x was comparable in 67% (10/15) of sera. Bet v 1a-specific monoclonal antibodies inhibited binding of serum IgE and IgG4 to 66.1% and 64.9%, respectively. Serum IgE and IgG4 bound specifically to an individual epitope presented by our model protein in 33% (5/15) of sera. Patients receiving AIT develop Bet v 1a-specific IgG4 which competes with IgE for partly identical or largely overlapping epitopes. The similarities of epitopes for IgE and IgG4 might stimulate the development of epitope-specific diagnostics and therapeutics. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A new rotavirus VP6-based foreign epitope presenting vector and immunoreactivity of VP4 epitope chimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yumei; Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2014-04-01

    The VP6, the group antigenic rotavirus (RV), is highly conserved and the most abundant, constituting about 39% of the viral structure proteins by weight. The high degree of identity (>87%-99%) in the primary amino acid sequences suggests VP6-based vaccines could potentially provide heterotypic protection. Although some efforts have been made toward producing recombinant rotavirus VP6 vaccines, the native VP6 is still unsatisfactory as an optimal vaccine. The major neutralizing antigenic epitopes that exist on VP4 or VP7 are not on the native VP6, and as a vector the native VP6 lacks insertion sites that can be used for insertion of foreign epitopes. In this study, a new foreign epitope presenting system using VP6 as a vector (VP6F) was constructed on the outer surface of the vector six sites that could be used for insertion of the foreign epitopes created. Using this system, three VP6-based VP4 epitope chimeric proteins were constructed. Results showed that these chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and -VP4 antibodies, and elicited antibodies against VP6 and VP4 in guinea pigs. Antibodies against VP6F or antibodies against the chimeric proteins neutralized RV Wa and SA11 infection in vitro. It is optimistic that the limitation for using the native VP6 as a vaccine candidate or vector will be solved with our proposed approach. It is expected that this VP6-based epitope presenting system and the VP6-based VP4 epitope chimeric proteins will be valuable for and contribute to the development of novel RV vaccines and vaccine vectors.

  10. Accurate prediction of immunogenic T-cell epitopes from epitope sequences using the genetic algorithm-based ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Niu, Yanqing; Zou, Hua; Luo, Longqiang; Liu, Qianchao; Wu, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    T-cell epitopes play the important role in T-cell immune response, and they are critical components in the epitope-based vaccine design. Immunogenicity is the ability to trigger an immune response. The accurate prediction of immunogenic T-cell epitopes is significant for designing useful vaccines and understanding the immune system. In this paper, we attempt to differentiate immunogenic epitopes from non-immunogenic epitopes based on their primary structures. First of all, we explore a variety of sequence-derived features, and analyze their relationship with epitope immunogenicity. To effectively utilize various features, a genetic algorithm (GA)-based ensemble method is proposed to determine the optimal feature subset and develop the high-accuracy ensemble model. In the GA optimization, a chromosome is to represent a feature subset in the search space. For each feature subset, the selected features are utilized to construct the base predictors, and an ensemble model is developed by taking the average of outputs from base predictors. The objective of GA is to search for the optimal feature subset, which leads to the ensemble model with the best cross validation AUC (area under ROC curve) on the training set. Two datasets named 'IMMA2' and 'PAAQD' are adopted as the benchmark datasets. Compared with the state-of-the-art methods POPI, POPISK, PAAQD and our previous method, the GA-based ensemble method produces much better performances, achieving the AUC score of 0.846 on IMMA2 dataset and the AUC score of 0.829 on PAAQD dataset. The statistical analysis demonstrates the performance improvements of GA-based ensemble method are statistically significant. The proposed method is a promising tool for predicting the immunogenic epitopes. The source codes and datasets are available in S1 File.

  11. Epitope determination of immunogenic proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Daniel O; Danckert, Lena; Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative organism of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted disease that globally accounts for an estimated 80 to 100 million new infections per year. Increasing resistances to all common antibiotics used for N. gonorrhoeae treatment pose the risk of an untreatable disease. Further knowledge of ways of infection and host immune response are needed to understand the pathogen-host interaction and to discover new treatment alternatives against this disease. Therefore, detailed information about immunogenic proteins and their properties like epitope sites could advance further research in this area. In this work, we investigated immunogenic proteins of N. gonorrhoeae for linear epitopes by microarrays. Dominant linear epitopes were identified for eleven of the nineteen investigated proteins with three polyclonal rabbit antibodies from different immunisations. Identified linear epitopes were further examined for non-specific binding with antibodies to Escherichia coli and the closely related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis. On top of that, amino acids crucial for the antibody epitope binding were detected by microarray based alanine scans.

  12. A nanobody directed to a functional epitope on VEGF, as a novel strategy for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farajpour, Zahra [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh, E-mail: rahbarif@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, Bahram [Cellular and Molecular Biology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadvand, Davoud [School of Allied Medical Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A novel nanobody directed to antigenic regions on VEGF was identified. • Our nanobody was successfully purified. • Our nanobody significantly inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation of HUVECs in a dose dependent manner. - Abstract: Compelling evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), due to its essential role in angiogenesis, is a critical target for cancer treatment. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against VEGF are important class of drugs used in cancer therapy. However, the cost of production, large size, and immunogenicity are main drawbacks of conventional monoclonal therapy. Nanobodies are the smallest antigen-binding antibody fragments, which occur naturally in camelidae. Because of their remarkable features, we decided to use an immune library of nanobody to direct phage display to recognition of novel functional epitopes on VEGF. Four rounds of selection were performed and six phage-displayed nanobodies were obtained from an immune phage library. The most reactive clone in whole-cell ELISA experiments, was purified and assessed in proliferation inhibition assay. Purified ZFR-5 not only blocked interaction of VEGF with its receptor in cell ELISA experiments, but also was able to significantly inhibit proliferation response of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to VEGF in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, our study demonstrates that by using whole-cell ELISA experiments, nanobodies against antigenic regions included in interaction of VEGF with its receptors can be directed. Because of unique and intrinsic properties of a nanobody and the ability of selected nanobody for blocking the epitope that is important for biological function of VEGF, it represents novel potential drug candidate.

  13. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Koksunan, Sarawut [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Prachasupap, Apichai [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Ken-ichiro [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Yasuha [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  14. Epitope mapping by random peptide phage display reveals essential residues for vaccinia extracellular enveloped virion spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A33 is a type II integral membrane protein expressed on the extracellular enveloped form of vaccinia virus (VACV. Passive transfer of A33-directed monoclonal antibodies or vaccination with an A33 subunit vaccine confers protection against lethal poxvirus challenge in animal models. Homologs of A33 are highly conserved among members of the Orthopoxvirus genus and are potential candidates for inclusion in vaccines or assays targeting extracellular enveloped virus activity. One monoclonal antibody directed against VACV A33, MAb-1G10, has been shown to target a conformation-dependent epitope. Interestingly, while it recognizes VACV A33 as well as the corresponding variola homolog, it does not bind to the monkeypox homolog. In this study, we utilized a random phage display library to investigate the epitope recognized by MAb-1G10 that is critical for facilitating cell-to-cell spread of the vaccinia virus. Results By screening with linear or conformational random phage libraries, we found that phages binding to MAb-1G10 display the consensus motif CEPLC, with a disulfide bond formed between two cysteine residues required for MAb-1G10 binding. Although the phage motif contained no linear sequences homologous to VACV A33, structure modeling and analysis suggested that residue D115 is important to form the minimal epitope core. A panel of point mutants expressing the ectodomain of A33 protein was generated and analyzed by either binding assays such as ELISA and immunoprecipitation or a functional assessment by blocking MAb-1G10 mediated comet inhibition in cell culture. Conclusions These results confirm L118 as a component of the MAb-1G10 binding epitope, and further identify D115 as an essential residue. By defining the minimum conformational structure, as well as the conformational arrangement of a short peptide sequence recognized by MAb-1G10, these results introduce the possibility of designing small molecule mimetics that may

  15. Prediction of residues in discontinuous B-cell epitopes using protein 3D structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.H.; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    .5% of residues located in discontinuous epitopes with a specificity of 95%. At this level of specificity, the conventional Parker hydrophilicity scale for predicting linear B-cell epitopes identifies only 11.0% of residues located in discontinuous epitopes. Predictions by the DiscoTope method can guide......Discovery of discontinuous B-cell epitopes is a major challenge in vaccine design. Previous epitope prediction methods have mostly been based on protein sequences and are not very effective. Here, we present DiscoTope, a novel method for discontinuous epitope prediction that uses protein three....... We show that the new structure-based method has a better performance for predicting residues of discontinuous epitopes than methods based solely on sequence information, and that it can successfully predict epitope residues that have been identified by different techniques. DiscoTope detects 15...

  16. Antibody specific epitope prediction-emergence of a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Ofran, Yanay; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    The development of accurate tools for predicting B-cell epitopes is important but difficult. Traditional methods have examined which regions in an antigen are likely binding sites of an antibody. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that most antigen surface residues will be able to bind one or more of the myriad of possible antibodies. In recent years, new approaches have emerged for predicting an epitope for a specific antibody, utilizing information encoded in antibody sequence or structure. Applying such antibody-specific predictions to groups of antibodies in combination with easily obtainable experimental data improves the performance of epitope predictions. We expect that further advances of such tools will be possible with the integration of immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibody specific epitope prediction – emergence of a new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Ofran, Yanay; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    The development of accurate tools for predicting B-cell epitopes is important but difficult. Traditional methods have examined which regions in an antigen are likely binding sites of an antibody. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that most antigen surface residues will be able to bind one or more of the myriad of possible antibodies. In recent years, new approaches have emerged for predicting an epitope for a specific antibody, utilizing information encoded in antibody sequence or structure. Applying such antibody-specific predictions to groups of antibodies in combination with easily obtainable experimental data improves the performance of epitope predictions. We expect that further advances of such tools will be possible with the integration of immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing data. PMID:25837466

  18. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-38 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-11-21

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is extensively expressed by normal lymphatic endothelial cells, renal podocytes, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells. Nevertheless, increased expression of PDPN in malignant tumors not only associates with poor prognosis but also facilitates hematogenous metastasis through interaction with C-type lectin-like receptor-2 presented on platelets, followed by PDPN-mediated platelet activation. We previously reported a novel PMab-38 antibody, an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody, which specifically recognizes PDPN in squamous cell carcinomas melanomas and cancer-associated fibroblasts in canine cancer tissues. However, the specific binding with the epitope of PMab-38 remains undefined. In this study, flow cytometry was utilized to investigate the epitope of PMab-38, which was determined using a series of deletion or point mutants of dPDPN. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-38 is Tyr67 and Glu68 of dPDPN.

  19. A Linear Epitope in the N-Terminal Domain of CCR5 and Its Interaction with Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Chain

    Full Text Available The CCR5 receptor plays a role in several key physiological and pathological processes and is an important therapeutic target. Inhibition of the CCR5 axis by passive or active immunisation offers one very selective strategy for intervention. In this study we define a new linear epitope within the extracellular domain of CCR5 recognised by two independently produced monoclonal antibodies. A short peptide encoding the linear epitope can induce antibodies which recognise the intact receptor when administered colinear with a tetanus toxoid helper T cell epitope. The monoclonal antibody RoAb 13 is shown to bind to both cells and peptide with moderate to high affinity (6x10^8 and 1.2x107 M-1 respectively, and binding to the peptide is enhanced by sulfation of tyrosines at positions 10 and 14. RoAb13, which has previously been shown to block HIV infection, also blocks migration of monocytes in response to CCR5 binding chemokines and to inflammatory macrophage conditioned medium. A Fab fragment of RoAb13 has been crystallised and a structure of the antibody is reported to 2.1 angstrom resolution.

  20. A novel strategy of epitope design in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    OpenAIRE

    Barh, Debmalya; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Kumar, Anil; Vasco, Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    In spite of genome sequences of both human and N. gonorrhoeae in hand, vaccine for gonorrhea is yet not available. Due to availability of several host and pathogen genomes and numerous tools for in silico prediction of effective B-cell and T-cell epitopes; recent trend of vaccine designing has been shifted to peptide or epitope based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In order to design and develop such a peptide vaccine against the pathogen, we adopted a novel comput...

  1. High-throughput epitope identification for snakebite antivenom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; De Masi, Federico; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    Insight into the epitopic recognition pattern for polyclonal antivenoms is a strong tool for accurate prediction of antivenom cross-reactivity and provides a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a high-throughput approach was applied to characterize linear epitopes in 966 individual...... toxins from pit vipers (Crotalidae) using the ICP Crotalidae antivenom. Due to an abundance of snake venom metalloproteinases and phospholipase A2s in the venoms used for production of the investigated antivenom, this study focuses on these toxin families....

  2. File list: Oth.Utr.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Others SRX228677,SR...X228676,SRX228679,SRX228678 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Oth.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX204898,SR...X204899 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153153,SRX...153151,SRX153152 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.YSt.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.YSt.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Yeast strain SR...3939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.YSt.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX1470542,...SRX1470544 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...995,SRX275809,SRX275811 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.EmF.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryonic fibroblas...RX255459,SRX255462,SRX255460,SRX204643,SRX204642 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.CDV.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX344965,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Kid.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Kid.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Kidney SRX065541,S...RX644719,SRX527876,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Kid.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.EmF.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryonic fibroblas...RX255459,SRX204642,SRX204643,SRX255462,SRX255460 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX...644715,SRX555489,SRX644719,SRX527876,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX039346,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX485264,SR...SRX663358,SRX967653 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types ...211370,SRX211371,SRX493939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified SRX88...9798 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Brs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Breast SRX667411,S...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Brs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Liv.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Liv.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Liver SRX1165103,S...RX1165095,SRX1165100,SRX1165101,SRX1165104,SRX1165102,SRX1165090,SRX1165091,SRX1165096 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Liv.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...802,SRX204643,SRX204642 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified SRX88...9798 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Emb.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX815533,SR...X066244,SRX066245,SRX815531,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX...096360,SRX096362 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Dig.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Digestive tract SRX...365692 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX039346,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Dig.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Digestive tract SRX...365692 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem ce...708,ERX320411,SRX647912,SRX204802,SRX352995 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX022865,SR...SRX759284,SRX706573,SRX691797,SRX691798,SRX691799,SRX691796,SRX275809,SRX275811,SRX691795 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Utr.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Uterus SRX188854,S...,SRX735139,SRX095385,SRX095386,SRX210702,SRX968127,SRX210703 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Pan.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pancreas SRX747491,...SRX747492 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Pan.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pancreas SRX747491,...SRX747492 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Lng.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Lng.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Lung SRX119639,SRX...119641,SRX119640,SRX119642,SRX119638,SRX119637 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Lng.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...462,SRX255460,SRX204802 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem c...ell SRX555489 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Utr.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Uterus SRX188854,S...,SRX210703,SRX968127,SRX610673,SRX610674,SRX610672,SRX095386 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153152,SRX...153153,SRX153151 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX...527878,SRX644719,SRX170375,SRX322539,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags No description ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Dig.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Digestive tract SRX...365692 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Brs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Breast SRX667411,S...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Prs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084527...,SRX084528,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Prs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084528...,SRX084527,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types ...493939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Liv.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Liv.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Liver SRX1165103,S...RX1165095,SRX1165100,SRX1165101,SRX1165090,SRX1165104,SRX1165102,SRX1165096,SRX1165091 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Liv.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX...096360,SRX096362 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX71842...0,SRX512368,SRX512366,SRX807621,SRX512367,SRX512372,SRX512373,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX1470542,...SRX1470544 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Utr.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Uterus SRX248763,S...,SRX735140,SRX735139,SRX210703,SRX210702,SRX095386,SRX968127 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX344965,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags No description htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX066244,SR...X815533,SRX066247,SRX066245,SRX815531 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX275807,SR...SRX759284,SRX691794,SRX759286,SRX691798,SRX691797,SRX691795,SRX022866,SRX275809,SRX275811 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Adl.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Adult SRX181427,SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX663359,SR...SRX967653,SRX139878 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags No description htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Gon.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153153,SRX...153152,SRX153151 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Brs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Breast SRX667411,S...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Brs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Bon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Bone SRX065557,SRX...096356,SRX096358,SRX316960,SRX065556 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX71842...0,SRX512368,SRX512366,SRX807621,SRX512367,SRX512372,SRX512373,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Kid.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Kid.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Kidney SRX065541,S...RX644719,SRX170375,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Kid.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem c...ell SRX555489 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Prs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084528...,SRX084527,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX066244,SR...X815533,SRX066245,SRX815531,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX...096360,SRX096362 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags No description ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags No description htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryonic fibroblas...RX542102,SRX204644,SRX204643,SRX255462,SRX255460 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.NoD.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags No description htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.NoD.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX099638...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. Characterization of a linear epitope on Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 DnaK-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozkokmen, D; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    technique, the epitope was limited to 14 amino acids. With synthetic peptides, the epitope was further limited to eight amino acids. Six of these amino acids are conserved in bovine HSP70, which has a known three-dimensional structure. The amino acid sequence homologous to the epitope is located in a linear...

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class I binding predictions as a tool in epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2010-01-01

    , highlighting the most useful and historically important. Selected case stories, where these 'reverse immunology' systems have been used in actual epitope discovery, are briefly reviewed. We conclude that this new generation of epitope discovery systems has become a highly efficient tool for epitope discovery...

  12. File list: Oth.EmF.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryonic fibroblas...RX255460,SRX204644,SRX542102,SRX204643,SRX204642 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags No description ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Liv.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Liv.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Liver SRX1165095,S...RX1165103,SRX1165096,SRX1165104,SRX1165100,SRX1165101,SRX1165102,SRX1165090,SRX1165091 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Liv.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX51236...8,SRX512367,SRX718420,SRX512372,SRX512366,SRX512373,SRX807621,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX099638...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Prs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084527...,SRX084528,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Adl.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Adult SRX181427,SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX275807,SR...SRX691799,SRX691794,SRX759286,SRX691798,SRX691797,SRX275809,SRX275811,SRX691795,SRX022866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...460,ERX320411,SRX695808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem ce...822,SRX266828,SRX352996,ERX320411,SRX204802 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX204898,SR...X204899 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. High frequency of T cells specific for cryptic epitopes in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Hjortsø, Mads Duus

    2013-01-01

    epitopes by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes isolated from melanoma patients. Here, we show that such cryptic epitopes are more frequently recognized than antigens of the same class encoded by canonical reading frames. Furthermore, we report the presence of T cells specific for three cryptic epitopes encoded...

  7. In silico-accelerated identification of conserved and immunogenic variola/vaccinia T-cell epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moise, Leonard; McMurry, Julie A; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Epitopes shared by the vaccinia and variola viruses underlie the protective effect of vaccinia immunization against variola infection. We set out to identify a subset of cross-reactive epitopes using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Putative T-cell epitopes were computationally predicted...

  8. Structural analysis of B-cell epitopes in antibody:protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Nielsen, Morten; Padkjær, Søren Berg

    2013-01-01

    (B-cell epitopes) is essential. However experimental epitope mapping is highly cost-intensive and computer-aided methods do in general have moderate performance. One major reason for this moderate performance is an incomplete understanding of what characterizes an epitope. To fill this gap, we here...

  9. Putative phage-display epitopes of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus S1 protein and their anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liyan; Ge, Xuying; Gao, Yu; Zarlenga, Dante S; Wang, Kexiong; Li, Xunliang; Qin, Zhaoheng; Yin, Xiangping; Liu, Jisheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxin

    2015-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a pathogen of swine that causes severe diarrhea and dehydration resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality in newborn piglets. Phage display is a technique with wide application, in particular, the identification of key antigen epitopes for the development of therapeutic and diagnostic reagents and vaccines. To identify antigen epitopes with specificity for PEDV, a monoclonal antibody (MAb-5E12) against the immunodominant region of the PEDV Spike protein (S1) was used as the target for biopanning a 12-mer phage display, random peptide library. After multiple rounds of biopanning and stringent washing, three phage-displayed peptides, designated L, W and H, were identified that recognize MAb-5E12. Sequence analysis showed that the one or more of the peptides exhibited partial sequence similarity to the native S1 sequence 'MQYVYTPTYYML' (designated peptide M) at position 201-212. In combination with software analysis for the prediction of B cell epitopes, aa 201-212 exhibited characteristics of a linear epitope on the PEDV S1 protein. In contrast to peptide M, a consensus motif 'PxxY' was identified on both peptides L and W, and on the S1 protein, but not on peptide H. Peptide M and the MAb-5E12-recognizing peptides L and W significantly inhibited the adsorption of PEDV on the cell surface as monitored through plaque-reduction assays. Furthermore, data from real-time PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays were consistent with the ability of peptides M, L and W to block viral protein expression and thereby function as antiviral agents for PEDV.

  10. Determination of the mimic epitope of the M-like protein adhesin in swine Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Fuyu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The M-like protein, also known as SzP, is expressed on the surface of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus. Previous studies demonstrated that SzP is similar to M protein of group A Streptococcus in the structure and characteristics of antiphagocytosis. The M protein is an adhesin that can bind to the host cells, however it is not known whether the SzP of S. zooepidemicus also functions as an adhesin. We conducted an investigation to determine SzP as an adhesin, and one SzP epitope was identified to be responsible for mediating binding to HEp-2 cells. Methods The gene encoding SzP was expressed in E. coli, and the purified recombinant SzP (rSzP was recognized by rabbit anti-S. zooepidemicus antibodies using immunoblot. Furthermore, the adherence of S. zooepidemicus to HEp-2 cells was inhibited by anti-rSzP antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. We employed a random 12-peptide phage display library for screening of immunodominant mimics of the SzP, which were recognized by an anti-SzP specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2C8. Initial positive phage clones were identified by ELISA, followed by assays to determine the adherence-inhibiting ability of the peptide. Results Ten out of fourteen selected positive clones showed high reactivity that effectively inhibited the binding of mAb 2C8 to rSzP. The motif XSLSRX was highly conserved among six of the ten clones. Conclusion Collectively, our findings suggest that the motif XSLSRX may represent an immunodominant mimic epitope of the SzP of S. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246, and that the same epitope may be used to mediate SzP binding to HEp-2 cells.

  11. The avidity of cross-reactive virus-specific T cells for their viral and allogeneic epitopes is variable and depends on epitope expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Heleen; Heutinck, Kirstin M; van der Meer-Prins, Ellen M W; Franke-van Dijk, Marry E I; van Miert, Paula P M C; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Claas, Frans H J

    2018-01-01

    Virus-specific T cells can recognize allogeneic HLA (allo-HLA) through cross-reactivity of their T-cell receptor (TCR). In a transplantation setting, such allo-HLA cross-reactivity may contribute to harmful immune responses towards the allograft, provided that the cross-reactive T cells get sufficiently activated upon recognition of the allo-HLA. An important determinant of T-cell activation is TCR avidity, which to date, has remained largely unexplored for allo-HLA-cross-reactive virus-specific T cells. For this purpose, cold target inhibition assays were performed using allo-HLA-cross-reactive virus-specific memory CD8+ T-cell clones as responders, and syngeneic cells loaded with viral peptide and allogeneic cells as hot (radioactively-labeled) and cold (non-radioactively-labeled) targets. CD8 dependency of the T-cell responses was assessed using interferon γ (IFNγ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the presence and absence of CD8-blocking antibodies. At high viral-peptide loading concentrations, T-cell clones consistently demonstrated lower avidity for allogeneic versus viral epitopes, but at suboptimal concentrations the opposite was observed. In line, anti-viral reactivity was CD8 independent at high, but not at suboptimal viral-peptide-loading concentrations. The avidity of allo-HLA-cross-reactive virus-specific memory CD8+ T cells is therefore highly dependent on epitope expression, and as a consequence, can be both higher and lower for allogeneic versus viral targets under different (patho)physiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunolocalization of cell wall carbohydrate epitopes in seaweeds: presence of land plant epitopes in Fucus vesiculosus L. (Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Sandra Cristina; Avci, Utku; Hopper, Christina; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Popper, Zoë A

    2016-02-01

    Land plant cell wall glycan epitopes are present in Fucus vesiculosus. RG-I/AG mAbs recognize distinct glycan epitopes in structurally different galactans, and 3-linked glucans are also present in the cell walls. Cell wall-directed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have given increased knowledge of fundamental land plant processes but are not extensively used to study seaweeds. We profiled the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus glycome employing 155 mAbs that recognize predominantly vascular plant cell wall glycan components. The resulting profile was used to inform in situ labeling studies. Several of the mAbs recognized and bound to epitopes present in different thallus parts of Fucus vesiculosus. Antibodies recognizing arabinogalactan epitopes were divided into four groups based on their immunolocalization patterns. Group 1 bound to the stipe, blade, and receptacles. Group 2 bound to the antheridia, oogonia and paraphyses. Group 3 recognized antheridia cell walls and Group 4 localized on the antheridia inner wall and oogonia mesochite. This study reveals that epitopes present in vascular plant cell walls are also present in brown seaweeds. Furthermore, the diverse in situ localization patterns of the RG-I/AG clade mAbs suggest that these mAbs likely detect distinct epitopes present in structurally different galactans. In addition, 3-linked glucans were also detected throughout the cell walls of the algal tissues, using the β-glucan-directed LAMP mAb. Our results give insights into cell wall evolution, and diversify the available tools for the study of brown seaweed cell walls.

  13. Improved method for linear B-cell epitope prediction using antigen's primary sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Singh

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in designing a peptide-based vaccine is the identification of antigenic regions in an antigen that can stimulate B-cell's response, also called B-cell epitopes. In the past, several methods have been developed for the prediction of conformational and linear (or continuous B-cell epitopes. However, the existing methods for predicting linear B-cell epitopes are far from perfection. In this study, an attempt has been made to develop an improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. We have retrieved experimentally validated B-cell epitopes as well as non B-cell epitopes from Immune Epitope Database and derived two types of datasets called Lbtope_Variable and Lbtope_Fixed length datasets. The Lbtope_Variable dataset contains 14876 B-cell epitope and 23321 non-epitopes of variable length where as Lbtope_Fixed length dataset contains 12063 B-cell epitopes and 20589 non-epitopes of fixed length. We also evaluated the performance of models on above datasets after removing highly identical peptides from the datasets. In addition, we have derived third dataset Lbtope_Confirm having 1042 epitopes and 1795 non-epitopes where each epitope or non-epitope has been experimentally validated in at least two studies. A number of models have been developed to discriminate epitopes and non-epitopes using different machine-learning techniques like Support Vector Machine, and K-Nearest Neighbor. We achieved accuracy from ∼54% to 86% using diverse s features like binary profile, dipeptide composition, AAP (amino acid pair profile. In this study, for the first time experimentally validated non B-cell epitopes have been used for developing method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. In previous studies, random peptides have been used as non B-cell epitopes. In order to provide service to scientific community, a web server LBtope has been developed for predicting and designing B-cell epitopes (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lbtope/.

  14. Identification of an HLA-A*0201 restricted Bcl2-derived epitope expressed on tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Johansen, Britta; Nissen, Mogens H

    2006-01-01

    A large number of human tumor-associated antigen-derived peptides have been identified that are recognized by CTLs in a MHC-I restricted fashion. The apoptosis inhibitory protein Bcl2 is overexpressed in many human cancers as part of their neoplastic phenotype. Since inhibition or loss of Bcl2...... expression might impair tumor growth and survival, this protein may serve as a rational target for vaccine-induced CTL responses. By Western blot technique, we screened a panel of established human tumor cell lines for proteins involved in the apoptotic process. Two of eight tumor cell lines, a B lymphoma...... (Loukes) and a colon carcinoma (CCL220) cell line showed increased Bcl2 protein expression whereas the majority of tumor cell lines expressed proapoptotic proteins. Neither fibroblasts nor peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed Bcl2 expression. An HLA-A*0201 restricted CTL epitope was deduced in silica...

  15. Characterization of an enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) epitope recognized by anti-ECA-tetanus toxoid conjugate serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugowski, C; Romanowska, E

    1991-01-15

    The antigenic reactivity of both native and chemically modified enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) with anti-ECA-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate serum was investigated. The results obtained suggest that reduction of the carboxyl group of the mannosaminuronic acid component of ECA diminishes, but does not destroy its antigenic reactivity. Each of the sugar components were found to contribute to its reactivity with anti-ECA-TT conjugate serum, indicating that the trisaccharide repeating unit represents the ECA epitope. A nonasaccharide (trimer of the ECA repeating unit) inhibited antibody binding better than the hexasaccharide dimer, a finding which suggests that oligosaccharide conformation also makes a contribution to its inhibitory activity.

  16. Carbohydrate epitopes as a cause of cross-reactivity in patients allergic to Hymenoptera venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzen, Renato; Korosec, Peter; Silar, Mira; Music, Ema; Kosnik, Mitja

    2009-01-01

    Among patients with allergy to insect stings, double positivity in tests for IgE antibodies specific to honey bee and wasp venoms is a frequent diagnostic problem. True double sensitization and possible cross-reactivity of venom hyaluronidases and with carbohydrate determinants must be considered in such patients. We studied the frequency of sensitization to carbohydrate determinants and the role of these in double positivity in tests for specific IgE antibodies. A group of 66 patients (41 men, 25 women; 16-66 years) with double positivity for wasp and bee venoms were tested in the FEIA inhibition test in order to distinguish true double sensitization from cross-reactivity. Patients were tested for the presence of IgE antibodies specific to oilseed rape (OSR) pollen and MUXF3 allergens, both of which are rich in cross-reacting carbohydrate epitopes. Inhibition tests revealed true double sensitization in 37 patients (56.1%) and cross-reactivity in 29. Among those showing cross-reactivity, five were sensitized to honey bee venom and 24 to wasp venom. The median value of IgE specific for OSR pollen in patients sensitized to honey bee venom was 4.350 IU/ml, in patients sensitized to wasp venom 0.61 IU/ml, and in patients with double sensitization 0.25 IU/ml (P = 0.028, Kruskal-Wallis test). Findings for IgE specific for MUXF3 were similar. Discordance between OSR pollen positivity and MUXF3 positivity was found in 11.1% of the patients. The values of IgE specific for OSR pollen and MUXF3 in patients with primary sensitization to either honey bee venom or wasp venom were significantly higher than in patients with double sensitization. These results confirm that IgE antibodies against carbohydrates epitopes are a frequent cause of double positivity in tests for anti-venom IgE antibodies.

  17. Characterization of a dodecapeptide containing a dominant epitope of Par j 1 and Par o 1, the major allergens of P. judaica and P. officinalis pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, T; Cassese, G; Di Modugno, F; Chersi, A; Buono, C; Ruffilli, A

    1999-10-01

    The pollen of Parietaria, a weed of the Urticaceae family, is a major cause of respiratory allergy in Europe, where the most common species are P. judaica and P. officinalis. Previously, we reported that a beta-galactosidase fusion protein (6a-BG) expressing a 26-bp cDNA fragment (6a cDNA) contained a dominant IgE-binding epitope (6a epitope) of the major allergens Par o 1 and Par j 1. The present study aimed to define the amino-acid sequence containing the 6a epitope. We analyzed the reactivity of anti-Par o 1 antibodies affinity purified from allergic patient sera with: 1) a panel of synthetic peptides deduced from the 6a nucleotide sequence using different reading frames 2) glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins containing selected peptides. The peptide NSARARADSCRI (p102) specifically bound anti-Par o 1 antibodies affinity purified from allergic patient sera or from rabbit anti-Par o 1 antiserum (ELISA). The related peptide NSARAGTSSCRI (p101) reacted to human but not to rabbit, anti-Par o 1 antibodies. GST fusion proteins containing p101 (GST 3.5) or p102 (GST 3.2) extensively inhibited the binding between Par o 1 and IgE or IgG antibodies from an allergic patient serum pool according to a dose-response curve. Percent inhibition of IgE antibodies binding obtained by absorbing a solution (50 microl) of affinity-purified antibodies with 5 microg of GST 3.2 or with 1.2 mg of GST 3.5 was 69% and 66%, respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that the amino-acid sequences NSARARADSCRI (p102) and NSARAGTSSCRI (p101) contain the dominant epitope of Par o 1 and Par j 1 for human IgE and IgG antibodies indicated as 6a epitope. Moreover, the study shows that the epitope is conserved in recombinant molecules containing these peptides, irrespective of the fused polypeptide (beta-galactosidase or GST). The knowledge of the amino-acid sequence of this dominant epitope is important in therapeutic approaches to the development of allergen

  18. Transient expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 L2 epitope ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient expression of foreign genes based on plant viral vectors is a suitable system for the production of relevant immunogens that can be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study the epitope derived from HPV-16 L2 minor capsid protein ...

  19. Indirect recognition of HLA epitopes in solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, C.C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Alloreactivity due to HLA mismatches between donor and recipient remains the major limiting factor in successful graft outcome after solid organ transplantation. However, the immunogenicity of individual HLA mismatches is highly variable. Therefore, epitope-based HLA matching may be a sophisticated

  20. Epitope tagging of endogenous genes in diverse human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Bonifant, Challice; Bunz, Fred; Lane, William S; Waldman, Todd

    2008-11-01

    Epitope tagging is a powerful and commonly used approach for studying the physical properties of proteins and their functions and localization in eukaryotic cells. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been possible to exploit the high efficiency of homologous recombination to tag proteins by modifying their endogenous genes, making it possible to tag virtually every endogenous gene and perform genome-wide proteomics experiments. However, due to the relative inefficiency of homologous recombination in cultured human cells, epitope-tagging approaches have been limited to ectopically expressed transgenes, with the attendant limitations of their nonphysiological transcriptional regulation and levels of expression. To overcome this limitation, a modification and extension of adeno-associated virus-mediated human somatic cell gene targeting technology is described that makes it possible to simply and easily create an endogenous epitope tag in the same way that it is possible to knock out a gene. Using this approach, we have created and validated human cell lines with epitope-tagged alleles of two cancer-related genes in a variety of untransformed and transformed human cell lines. This straightforward approach makes it possible to study the physical and biological properties of endogenous proteins in human cells without the need for specialized antibodies for individual proteins of interest.