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Sample records for heavy subunit mrnas

  1. Selective increases of AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex but not in prefrontal cortex of human alcoholics

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    Zhe eJin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the main excitatory transmitter in the human brain. Drugs that affect the glutamatergic signaling will alter neuronal excitability. Ethanol inhibits glutamate receptors. We examined the expression level of glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in human post-mortem samples from alcoholics and compared the results to brain samples from control subjects. RNA from hippocampal dentate gyrus (HP-DG, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC samples from 21 controls and 19 individuals with chronic alcohol dependence were included in the study. Total RNA was assayed using quantitative RT-PCR. Out of the 16 glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA (2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-ylpropanoic acid receptor subunits GluA2 and GluA3; three kainate receptor subunits GluK2, GluK3 and GluK5 and five NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2C, GluN2D and GluN3A were significantly increased in the HP-DG region in alcoholics. In the OFC, mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN3A was increased, whereas in the DL-PFC, no differences in mRNA levels were observed. Our laboratory has previously shown that the expression of genes encoding inhibitory GABA-A receptors is altered in the HP-DG and OFC of alcoholics (Jin et al., 2011. Whether the changes in one neurotransmitter system drives changes in the other or if they change independently is currently not known. The results demonstrate that excessive long-term alcohol consumption is associated with altered expression of genes encoding glutamate receptors in a brain region-specific manner. It is an intriguing possibility that genetic predisposition to alcoholism may contribute to these gene expression changes.

  2. The light subunit of system bo,+ is fully functional in the absence of the heavy subunit

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    Reig, Núria; Chillarón, Josep; Bartoccioni, Paola; Fernández, Esperanza; Bendahan, Annie; Zorzano, Antonio; Kanner, Baruch; Palacín, Manuel; Bertran, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of a type II glycoprotein and a non-glycosylated polytopic membrane protein. System bo,+ exchanges dibasic for neutral amino acids. It is composed of rBAT and bo,+AT, the latter being the polytopic membrane subunit. Mutations in either of them cause malfunction of the system, leading to cystinuria. bo,+AT-reconstituted systems from HeLa or MDCK cells catalysed transport of arginine that was totally dependent on the presence of one of the bo...

  3. Oxaliplatin-induced loss of phosphorylated heavy neurofilament subunit neuronal immunoreactivity in rat DRG tissue

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    Connor Bronwen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxaliplatin and related chemotherapeutic drugs cause painful chronic peripheral neuropathies in cancer patients. We investigated changes in neuronal size profiles and neurofilament immunoreactivity in L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG tissue of adult female Wistar rats after multiple-dose treatment with oxaliplatin, cisplatin, carboplatin or paclitaxel. Results After treatment with oxaliplatin, phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit (pNF-H immunoreactivity was reduced in neuronal cell bodies, but unchanged in nerve fibres, of the L5 DRG. Morphometric analysis confirmed significant changes in the number (-75%; P P P = 0.82, NF-M (-1%, P = 0.96 or NF-H (0%; P = 0.93 after oxaliplatin treatment, although the sizes of parvalbumin (-29%, P = 0.047, NF-M (-11%, P = 0.038 and NF-H (-28%; P = 0.0033 immunoreactive neurons were reduced. In an independent comparison of different chemotherapeutic agents, the number of pNF-H-immunoreactive neurons was significantly altered by oxaliplatin (-77.2%; P P = 0.03 but not by carboplatin or paclitaxel, and their mean cell body area was significantly changed by oxaliplatin (-31.1%; P = 0.008 but not by cisplatin, carboplatin or paclitaxel. Conclusion This study has demonstrated a specific pattern of loss of pNF-H immunoreactivity in rat DRG tissue that corresponds with the relative neurotoxicity of oxaliplatin, cisplatin and carboplatin. Loss of pNF-H may be mechanistically linked to oxaliplatin-induced neuronal atrophy, and serves as a readily measureable endpoint of its neurotoxicity in the rat model.

  4. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats.

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    Soukup, T; Diallo, M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have established that slow soleus (SOL) and fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of euthyroid (EU) Lewis rats posses the same proportions between their four myosin heavy chain (MyHC) mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types as determined by real time RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and 2-D stereological fiber type analysis, respectively. In the present paper we investigated if these proportions are maintained in adult Lewis rats with hyperthyroid (HT) and hypothyroid (HY) status. Although HT and HY states change MyHC isoform expression, results from all three methods showed that proportion between MyHC mRNA-1, 2a, -2x/d, -2b, protein isoforms MyHC-1, -2a, -2x/d, -2b and to lesser extent also fiber types 1, 2A, 2X/D, 2B were preserved in both SOL and EDL muscles. Furthermore, in the SOL muscle mRNA expression of slow MyHC-1 remained up to three orders higher compared to fast MyHC transcripts, which explains the predominance of MyHC-1 isoform and fiber type 1 even in HT rats. Although HT status led in the SOL to increased expression of MyHC-2a mRNA, MyHC-2a isoform and 2A fibers, it preserved extremely low expression of MyHC-2x and -2b mRNA and protein isoforms, which explains the absence of pure 2X/D and 2B fibers. HY status, on the other hand, almost completely abolished expression of all three fast MyHC mRNAs, MyHC protein isoforms and fast fiber types in the SOL muscle. Our data present evidence that a correlation between mRNA, protein content and fiber type composition found in EU status is also preserved in HT and HY rats.

  5. Comparison of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber type proportions in the rat slow and fast muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žurmanová, J.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 4 (2013), s. 445-453 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/1228; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA MŠk(CZ) LH12058 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat * soleus * extensor digitorum longus * myosin heavy chain isoforms * muscle gene expression * quantitative Real Time RT-PCR * SDS - PAGE * fiber type analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  6. Real Time RT-PCR with a Newly Designed Set of Promers Confirmed the Presence of 2b and 2x/d Myosim Heavy Chain mRNAs in the Rat Slow Soleus Muscle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žurmanová, Jitka; Půta, F.; Stopková, R.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2008), s. 973-978 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1115; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat slow soleus muscle * myosin heavy chain isoforms * real time RT-PCR Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  7. Multiple Export Mechanisms for mRNAs

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    Delaleau, Mildred; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear mRNA export plays an important role in gene expression. We describe the mechanisms of mRNA export including the importance of mRNP assembly, docking with the nuclear basket of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), transit through the central channel of the NPC and cytoplasmic release. We describe multiple mechanisms of mRNA export including NXF1 and CRM1 mediated pathways. Selective groups of mRNAs can be preferentially transported in order to respond to cellular stimuli. RNAs can be selected based on the presence of specific cis-acting RNA elements and binding of specific adaptor proteins. The role that dysregulation of this process plays in human disease is also discussed. PMID:26343730

  8. Heavy subunit of cell surface Gal/GalNAc lectin (Hgl) undergoes degradation via endo-lysosomal compartments in Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Verma, Kuldeep; Datta, Sunando

    2017-06-14

    The human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica uses a multifunctional virulence factor, Hgl, a cell surface transmembrane receptor subunit of Gal/GalNAc lectin that contributes to adhesion, invasion, cytotoxicity and immune response in the host. At present, the physiologic importance of Hgl receptor is mostly known for pathogenicity of E. histolytica. However, the molecular mechanisms of Hgl trafficking events and their association with the intracellular membrane transport machinery are largely unknown. We used biochemical and microscopy-based assays to understand the Hgl trafficking in the amoebic trophozoites. Our results suggest that the Hgl is constitutively degraded through delivery into amoebic lysosome-like compartments. Further, we also observed that the Hgl was significantly colocalized with amoebic Rab GTPases such as EhRab5, EhRab7A, and EhRab11B. While, we detected association of Hgl with all these Rab GTPases in early vacuolar compartments, only EhRab7A remains associated with Hgl till its transport to amoebic lysosome-like compartments.

  9. Phasing and structure of bestrophin-1: a case study in the use of heavy-atom cluster compounds with multi-subunit transmembrane proteins

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    Dickson, Veronica Kane (Cambridge)

    2016-03-01

    The purification and three-dimensional crystallization of membrane proteins are commonly affected by a cumulation of pathologies that are less prevalent in their soluble counterparts. This may include severe anisotropy, poor spot shape, poor to moderate-resolution diffraction, crystal twinning, translational pseudo-symmetry and poor uptake of heavy atoms for derivatization. Such challenges must be circumvented by adaptations in the approach to crystallization and/or phasing. Here, an example of a protein that exhibited all of the above-mentioned complications is presented. Bestrophin-1 is a eukaryotic calcium-activated chloride channel, the structure of which was recently determined in complex with monoclonal antibody fragments using SAD phasing with tantalum bromide clusters (Ta6Br12·Br2). Some of the obstacles to obtaining improved diffraction and phasing for this particular channel are discussed, as well as the approach and adaptations that were key to determining the structure.

  10. Increases of heat shock proteins and their mRNAs at high hydrostatic pressure in a deep-sea piezophilic bacterium, Shewanella violacea.

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    Sato, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Kaoru; Yoshida, Takao; Kato, Chiaki; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    When non-extremophiles encounter extreme environmental conditions, which are natural for the extremophiles, stress reactions, e.g., expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), are thought to be induced for survival. To understand how the extremophiles live in such extreme environments, we studied the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on cellular contents of HSPs and their mRNAs during growth in a piezophilic bacterium, Shewanella violacea. HSPs increased at high hydrostatic pressures even when optimal for growth. The mRNAs and proteins of these HSPs significantly increased at higher hydrostatic pressure in S. violacea. In the non-piezophilic Escherichia coli, however, their mRNAs decreased, while their proteins did not change. Several transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for HSP genes were determined by the primer extension method and some of them showed hydrostatic pressure-dependent increase of the mRNAs. A major refolding target of one of the HSPs, chaperonin, at high hydrostatic pressure was shown to be RplB, a subunit of the 50S ribosome. These results suggested that in S. violacea, HSPs play essential roles, e.g., maintaining protein complex machinery including ribosomes, in the growth and viability at high hydrostatic pressure, and that, in their expression, the transcription is under the control of σ(32).

  11. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

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    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  12. The cytochrome oxidase subunit I and subunit III genes in Oenothera mitochondria are transcribed from identical promoter sequences

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    Hiesel, Rudolf; Schobel, Werner; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1987-01-01

    Two loci encoding subunit III of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) in Oenothera mitochondria have been identified from a cDNA library of mitochondrial transcripts. A 657-bp sequence block upstream from the open reading frame is also present in the two copies of the COX subunit I gene and is presumably involved in homologous sequence rearrangement. The proximal points of sequence rearrangements are located 3 bp upstream from the COX I and 1139 bp upstream from the COX III initiation codons. The 5'-termini of both COX I and COX III mRNAs have been mapped in this common sequence confining the promoter region for the Oenothera mitochondrial COX I and COX III genes to the homologous sequence block. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:15981332

  13. Schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and functional channel formation in the course of in vitro-induced neurogenesis.

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    Varju, P; Schlett, K; Eisel, U; Madarász, E

    2001-06-01

    NE-7C2 neuroectodermal cells derived from forebrain vesicles of p53-deficient mouse embryos (E9) produce neurons and astrocytes in vitro if induced by all-trans retinoic acid. The reproducible morphological stages of neurogenesis were correlated with the expression of various NMDA receptor subunits. RT-PCR studies revealed that GluRepsilon1 and GluRepsilon4 subunit mRNAs were transcribed by both non-induced and neuronally differentiated cells. GluRepsilon3 subunit mRNAs were not synthesized by NE-7C2 cells and increased numbers of messages from the GluRepsilon2 gene were detected only after neural network formation. The presence of the GluRzeta1 protein was detected throughout neural induction, whereas retinoic acid-induced neuron formation elevated the amount of exon 21 (C1)- and exon 22 (C2)-containing GluRzeta1 mRNAs and resulted in the appearance of exon 5 (N1)-containing transcripts. NMDA-elicited Ca(2+)-signals were detected only in cells displaying neuronal morphology, but preceding the appearance of synapsin-I immunoreactivity. Our findings demonstrated that, in spite of the presence of subunits necessary for channel formation, functional channels were formed by NE-7C2 cells no sooner than the time of neurite maturation. The data show that the cell line provides a suitable model to analyse the mechanisms involved in NMDA receptor gene expression before the appearance of synaptic communication.

  14. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

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    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  15. Thyroid hormone coordinately regulates Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase. alpha. - and. beta. -subunit mRNA levels in kidney

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    McDonough, A.A.; Brown, T.A.; Horowitz, B.; Chiu, R.; Schlotterbeck, J.; Bowen, J.; Schmitt, C.A. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1988-02-01

    Synthesis of the sodium pump, Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase, is regulated by thyroid hormone in responsive tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine if triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) regulates the concentration of the mRNAs coding for the two enzyme subunits, {alpha} and {beta}, and the time course of the response. A single dose of T{sub 3} was administered to hypothyroid rats that were killed at various times after injection. In the kidney cortexes of the T{sub 3}-injected animals, as well as hypothyroid and euthyroid rats, {alpha}- and {beta}-mRNA concentrations were measured by dot blot using cDNAs corresponding to the two mRNAs; {alpha}-subunit abundance was measured by Western blot using antibodies to the enzyme, and Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity was measured enzymatically. {alpha}- and {beta}-mRNAs increased coordinately to 1.6-fold over hypothyroid levels by 12 h after T{sub 3}. The authors conclude that T{sub 3} regulates Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase synthesis and activity by coordinately increasing the mRNAs of both the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits of the enzyme.

  16. Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial mRNAs: A Powerful Force in Axonal Growth and Development.

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    Gale, Jenna R; Aschrafi, Armaz; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2018-04-01

    Axons, their growth cones, and synaptic nerve terminals are neuronal subcompartments that have high energetic needs. As such, they are enriched in mitochondria, which supply the ATP necessary to meet these demands. To date, a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs has been identified in distal axons and growth cones. Accumulating evidence suggests that the local translation of these mRNAs is required for mitochondrial maintenance and axonal viability. Here, we review evidence that suggests a critical role for axonal translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs in axonal growth and development. Additionally, we explore the role that site-specific translation at the mitochondria itself may play in this process. Finally, we briefly review the clinical implications of dysregulation of local translation of mitochondrial-related mRNAs in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  17. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

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    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  18. Characterization of mTOR-Responsive Truncated mRNAs in Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    These findings identify a previously uncharacterized role for mTOR in modulating 3’- UTR length of mRNAs by alternative polyadenylation ( APA ). Another...outcome of APA in the mTOR-activated transcriptome is an early termination of mRNA transcription to produce truncated mRNAs with polyadenylation in...for exhaustive analysis of Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation ( APA ) events (Figure 1). In IntMAP, first the position of multiple

  19. Expression Levels of Myostatin and Matrix Metalloproteinase 14 mRNAs in Uterine Leiomyoma are Correlated With Dysmenorrhea.

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    Tsigkou, Anastasia; Reis, Fernando M; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Lee, Meng H; Jiang, Bingjie; Tosti, Claudia; Shen, Fang-Rong; Shi, Zhendan; Chen, You-Guo; Petraglia, Felice

    2015-12-01

    Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign neoplasm of female reproductive system, found in about 50% of women in reproductive age. The mechanisms of leiomyoma growth include cell proliferation, which is modulated by growth factors, and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). Activin A and myostatin are growth factors that play a role in proliferation of leiomyoma cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known for their ability to remodel the ECM in different biological systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of activin βA-subunit, myostatin, and MMP14 messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in uterine leiomyomas and the possible correlation of these factors with clinical features of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinase 14 was highly expressed in uterine leiomyoma and correlated with myostatin and activin A mRNA expression. Moreover, MMP14 and myostatin mRNA expression correlated significantly and directly with the intensity of dysmenorrhea. Overall, the present findings showed that MMP14 mRNA is highly expressed in uterine leiomyoma, where it correlates with the molecular expression of growth factors and is further increased in cases of intense dysmenorrhea. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Co-ordinate expression of activin A and its type I receptor mRNAs during phorbol ester-induced differentiation of human K562 erythroleukemia cells.

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    Hildén, K; Tuuri, T; Erämaa, M; Ritvos, O

    1999-07-20

    Activins were originally isolated based on their ability to stimulate follicle-stimulating hormone secretion but later they have been shown to regulate a number of different cellular functions such as nerve cell survival, mesoderm induction during early embryogenesis as well as hematopoiesis. We studied the regulation of activin A, a homodimer of betaA-subunits, mRNA and protein in K562 erythroleukemia cells, which are known to be induced toward the erythroid lineage in response to activin or TGF-beta or toward the megakaryocytic lineage by the phorbol ester protein kinase C activator 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Here we show by Northern blot analysis as well as by Western and ligand blotting that TPA strongly promotes activin betaA-subunit mRNA and activin A protein expression in K562 cells in time- and concentration dependent manner. In contrast, neither activin A nor TGF-beta induced betaA-subunit mRNA expression during erythroid differentiation in K562 cells. Interestingly, whereas activin type II receptors are not regulated during K562 cell differentiation (Hilden et al. (1994) Blood 83, 2163-2170), we now show that the activin type I and IB receptor mRNAs are clearly induced by TPA but not by activin or TGF-beta. We also show that the inducing effect of TPA on expression of activin betaA-subunit mRNA is potentiated by the protein kinase A activator 8-bromo-cAMP. We conclude that activin A and its type I receptors appear to be co-ordinately up-regulated during megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 cells.

  1. Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors.

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    Kwon Tae You

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Frameshift and nonsense mutations are common in tumors with microsatellite instability, and mRNAs from these mutated genes have premature termination codons (PTCs. Abnormal mRNAs containing PTCs are normally degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system. However, PTCs located within 50-55 nucleotides of the last exon-exon junction are not recognized by NMD (NMD-irrelevant, and some PTC-containing mRNAs can escape from the NMD system (NMD-escape. We investigated protein expression from NMD-irrelevant and NMD-escape PTC-containing mRNAs by Western blotting and transfection assays. We demonstrated that transfection of NMD-irrelevant PTC-containing genomic DNA of MARCKS generates truncated protein. In contrast, NMD-escape PTC-containing versions of hMSH3 and TGFBR2 generate normal levels of mRNA, but do not generate detectable levels of protein. Transfection of NMD-escape mutant TGFBR2 genomic DNA failed to generate expression of truncated proteins, whereas transfection of wild-type TGFBR2 genomic DNA or mutant PTC-containing TGFBR2 cDNA generated expression of wild-type protein and truncated protein, respectively. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of gene expression regulation for PTC-containing mRNAs in which the deleterious transcripts are regulated either by NMD or translational repression.

  2. Cadherin complexes recruit mRNAs and RISC to regulate epithelial cell signaling.

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    Kourtidis, Antonis; Necela, Brian; Lin, Wan-Hsin; Lu, Ruifeng; Feathers, Ryan W; Asmann, Yan W; Thompson, E Aubrey; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2017-10-02

    Cumulative evidence demonstrates that most RNAs exhibit specific subcellular distribution. However, the mechanisms regulating this phenomenon and its functional consequences are still under investigation. Here, we reveal that cadherin complexes at the apical zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial adherens junctions recruit the core components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) Ago2, GW182, and PABPC1, as well as a set of 522 messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and 28 mature microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs), via PLEKHA7. Top canonical pathways represented by these mRNAs include Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, and stem cell signaling. We specifically demonstrate the presence and silencing of MYC, JUN, and SOX2 mRNAs by miR-24 and miR-200c at the ZA. PLEKHA7 knockdown dissociates RISC from the ZA, decreases loading of the ZA-associated mRNAs and miRNAs to Ago2, and results in a corresponding increase of MYC, JUN, and SOX2 protein expression. The present work reveals a mechanism that directly links junction integrity to the silencing of a set of mRNAs that critically affect epithelial homeostasis. © 2017 Kourtidis et al.

  3. IRAK2 directs stimulus-dependent nuclear export of inflammatory mRNAs.

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    Zhou, Hao; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiao; Herjan, Tomasz; Yu, Minjia; Qian, Wen; Wang, Han; Zhou, Gao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Hui; Hong, Lingzi; Zhao, Junjie; Qin, Luke; Fukuda, Koichi; Flotho, Annette; Gao, Ji; Dongre, Ashok; Carman, Julie A; Kang, Zizhen; Su, Bing; Kern, Timothy S; Smith, Jonathan D; Hamilton, Thomas A; Melchior, Frauke; Fox, Paul L; Li, Xiaoxia

    2017-10-09

    Expression of inflammatory genes is determined in part by post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA metabolism but how stimulus- and transcript-dependent nuclear export influence is poorly understood. Here, we report a novel pathway in which LPS/TLR4 engagement promotes nuclear localization of IRAK2 to facilitate nuclear export of a specific subset of inflammation-related mRNAs for translation in murine macrophages. IRAK2 kinase activity is required for LPS-induced RanBP2-mediated IRAK2 sumoylation and subsequent nuclear translocation. Array analysis showed that an SRSF1-binding motif is enriched in mRNAs dependent on IRAK2 for nuclear export. Nuclear IRAK2 phosphorylates SRSF1 to reduce its binding to target mRNAs, which promotes the RNA binding of the nuclear export adaptor ALYREF and nuclear export receptor Nxf1 loading for the export of the mRNAs. In summary, LPS activates a nuclear function of IRAK2 that facilitates the assembly of nuclear export machinery to export selected inflammatory mRNAs to the cytoplasm for translation.

  4. Heavy leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility that a new lepton may exist is discussed under the headings; theoretical reasons for the introduction of heavy leptons, classification of heavy leptons (ortho and paraleptons), discrimination between different types of lepton, decays of charged heavy leptons, production of charged heavy leptons (in e + e - storage rings, neutrino production, photoproduction, and hadroproduction), neutral heavy leptons, and hadroleptons. (U.K.)

  5. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs. PMID:22925561

  6. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  7. Dis3- and exosome subunit-responsive 3′ mRNA instability elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Daniel L.; Hou, Dezhi; Gross, Robert H.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Successful use of a novel RNA-specific bioinformatic tool, RNA SCOPE. ► Identified novel 3′ UTR cis-acting element that destabilizes a reporter mRNA. ► Show exosome subunits are required for cis-acting element-mediated mRNA instability. ► Define precise sequence requirements of novel cis-acting element. ► Show that microarray-defined exosome subunit-regulated mRNAs have novel element. -- Abstract: Eukaryotic RNA turnover is regulated in part by the exosome, a nuclear and cytoplasmic complex of ribonucleases (RNases) and RNA-binding proteins. The major RNase of the complex is thought to be Dis3, a multi-functional 3′–5′ exoribonuclease and endoribonuclease. Although it is known that Dis3 and core exosome subunits are recruited to transcriptionally active genes and to messenger RNA (mRNA) substrates, this recruitment is thought to occur indirectly. We sought to discover cis-acting elements that recruit Dis3 or other exosome subunits. Using a bioinformatic tool called RNA SCOPE to screen the 3′ untranslated regions of up-regulated transcripts from our published Dis3 depletion-derived transcriptomic data set, we identified several motifs as candidate instability elements. Secondary screening using a luciferase reporter system revealed that one cassette—harboring four elements—destabilized the reporter transcript. RNAi-based depletion of Dis3, Rrp6, Rrp4, Rrp40, or Rrp46 diminished the efficacy of cassette-mediated destabilization. Truncation analysis of the cassette showed that two exosome subunit-sensitive elements (ESSEs) destabilized the reporter. Point-directed mutagenesis of ESSE abrogated the destabilization effect. An examination of the transcriptomic data from exosome subunit depletion-based microarrays revealed that mRNAs with ESSEs are found in every up-regulated mRNA data set but are underrepresented or missing from the down-regulated data sets. Taken together, our findings imply a potentially novel mechanism of m

  8. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy regulates the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaalani, R., E-mail: rita.machaalani@sydney.edu.au [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Ghazavi, E. [Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology), The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hinton, T. [School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology), The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Waters, K.A. [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Hennessy, A. [School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, NSW 2751 (Australia); Heart Research Institute, 7 Eliza St Newtown, NSW 2042 (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, premature delivery, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Nicotine, a major pathogenic compound of cigarette smoke, binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A total of 16 nAChR subunits have been identified in mammals (9 α, 4 β, and 1 δ, γ and ε subunits). The effect of cigarette smoking on the expression of these subunits in the placenta has not yet been determined, thus constituting the aim of this study. Using RT-qPCR and western blotting, this study investigated all 16 mammalian nAChR subunits in the normal healthy human placenta, and compared mRNA and protein expressions in the placentas from smokers (n = 8) to controls (n = 8). Our data show that all 16 subunit mRNAs are expressed in the normal, non-diseased human placenta and that the expression of α2, α3, α4, α9, β2 and β4 subunits is greater than the other subunits. For mRNA, cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased expression of the α9 subunit, and decreased expression of the δ subunit. At the protein level, expression of both α9 and δ was increased. Thus, cigarette smoking in pregnancy is sufficient to regulate nAChR subunits in the placenta, specifically α9 and δ subunits, and could contribute to the adverse effects of vasoconstriction and decreased re-epithelialisation (α9), and increased calcification and apoptosis (δ), seen in the placentas of smoking women. - Highlights: • All 16 mammalian nAChR subunits are expressed in the human placenta. • Cigarette smoking increases α9 mRNA and protein in the placenta. • Cigarette smoking decreases δ mRNA but increases δ protein in the placenta.

  9. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy regulates the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaalani, R.; Ghazavi, E.; Hinton, T.; Waters, K.A.; Hennessy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, premature delivery, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Nicotine, a major pathogenic compound of cigarette smoke, binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A total of 16 nAChR subunits have been identified in mammals (9 α, 4 β, and 1 δ, γ and ε subunits). The effect of cigarette smoking on the expression of these subunits in the placenta has not yet been determined, thus constituting the aim of this study. Using RT-qPCR and western blotting, this study investigated all 16 mammalian nAChR subunits in the normal healthy human placenta, and compared mRNA and protein expressions in the placentas from smokers (n = 8) to controls (n = 8). Our data show that all 16 subunit mRNAs are expressed in the normal, non-diseased human placenta and that the expression of α2, α3, α4, α9, β2 and β4 subunits is greater than the other subunits. For mRNA, cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased expression of the α9 subunit, and decreased expression of the δ subunit. At the protein level, expression of both α9 and δ was increased. Thus, cigarette smoking in pregnancy is sufficient to regulate nAChR subunits in the placenta, specifically α9 and δ subunits, and could contribute to the adverse effects of vasoconstriction and decreased re-epithelialisation (α9), and increased calcification and apoptosis (δ), seen in the placentas of smoking women. - Highlights: • All 16 mammalian nAChR subunits are expressed in the human placenta. • Cigarette smoking increases α9 mRNA and protein in the placenta. • Cigarette smoking decreases δ mRNA but increases δ protein in the placenta

  10. The race to decipher the top secrets of TOP mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyuhas, Oded; Kahan, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Cells encountering hostile growth conditions, like those residing in the middle of a newly developing solid tumor, conserve resources and energy by downregulating protein synthesis. One mechanism in this response is the translational repression of multiple mRNAs that encode components of the translational apparatus. This coordinated translational control is carried through a common cis-regulatory element, the 5' Terminal OligoPyrimidine motif (5'TOP), after which these mRNAs are referred to as TOP mRNAs. Subsequent to the initial structural and functional characterization of members of this family, the research of TOP mRNAs has progressed in three major directions: a) delineating the landscape of the family; b) establishing the pathways that transduce stress cues into selective translational repression; and c) attempting to decipher the most proximal trans-acting factor(s) and defining its mode of action--a repressor or activator. The present chapter critically reviews the development in these three avenues of research with a special emphasis on the two "top secrets" of the TOP mRNA family: the scope of its members and the identity of the proximal cellular regulator(s). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Opposite responses of rabbit and human globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakin, S.H.; Liebhaber, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The translational efficiency of an mRNA may be determined at the step of translational initiation by the efficiency of its interaction with the cap binding protein complex. To further investigate the role of these interactions in translational control, the authors compare in vitro the relative sensitivities of rabbit and human α- and β-globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues. They find that rabbit β-globin mRNA is more resistant to translational inhibition by cap analogues than rabbit α-globin mRNA, while in contrast, human β-globin mRNA is more sensitive to cap analogue inhibition than human α- and β-globin mRNAs is unexpected as direct in vivo and in vitro comparisons of polysome profiles reveal parallel translational handling of the α- and β-globin mRNAs from these two species. This discordance between the relative translational sensitivities of these mRNAs to cap analogues and their relative ribosome loading activities suggests that cap-dependent events may not be rate limiting in steady-state globin translation

  12. Stage-related expression of mRNAs during pollen development in lily and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, J A; de Groot, P F; van Herpen, M M; van der Lee, T; Reynen, W H; Weterings, K A; Wullems, G J

    1990-09-01

    Homogeneous populations of developing microspores and pollen from anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) show a continuous production of biomass, reaching a maximum in young pollen. The rate of RNA synthesis was 460 fg · h(-1) in young binucleate cells, 138 fg · h(-1) in late binucleate cells and 56 fg · h(-1) in microspores. The mRNA population in developing pollen can be separated into three groups. In the first group, certain types of mRNAs are present at a constant level during all stages of development. A second group is characteristic of young pollen and increases quantitatively until anthesis. A third group is seen transiently; to this belong mRNAs present only before mitosis or at a distinct cell stage after mitosis. Some of the translation products of this latter group of mRNAs showed similarities between lily and tobacco on two-dimensional gels in respect of molecular weight and isolectric point, indicating that those mRNAs and proteins play a role in the regulation of pollen development.

  13. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; Boulay, Jocelyne

    2003-01-01

    site of transcription, and known S. cerevisiae nuclear structures such as the nucleolus and the nucleolar body. Our results show that retained SSA4 RNA localizes to an area in close proximity to the SSA4 locus. On deletion of Rrp6p and release from the genomic locus, heat shock mRNAs produced...

  14. Translational coregulation of 5′TOP mRNAs by TIA-1 and TIAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The response of cells to changes in their environment often requires coregulation of gene networks, but little is known about how this can occur at the post-transcriptional level. An important example of post-transcriptional coregulation is the selective translational regulation in response to growth conditions of mammalian mRNAs that encode protein biosynthesis factors and contain hallmark 5′-terminal oligopyrimidine tracts (5′TOP). However, the responsible trans-factors and the mechanism by which they coregulate 5′TOP mRNAs have remained elusive. Here we identify stress granule-associated TIA-1 and TIAR proteins as key factors in human 5′TOP mRNA regulation, which upon amino acid starvation assemble onto the 5′ end of 5′TOP mRNAs and arrest translation at the initiation step, as evidenced by TIA-1/TIAR-dependent 5′TOP mRNA translation repression, polysome release, and accumulation in stress granules. This requires starvation-mediated activation of the GCN2 (general control nonderepressible 2) kinase and inactivation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation to the long-standing question of how the network of 5′TOP mRNAs are coregulated according to amino acid availability, thereby allowing redirection of limited resources to mount a nutrient deprivation response. This presents a fundamental example of how a group of mRNAs can be translationally coregulated in response to changes in the cellular environment. PMID:21979918

  15. Characterization of fimbrial subunits from Bordetella species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, F.R.; Heide, H.G.J. van der; Avest, A.R. ter; Welinder, K.G.; Livey, I.; Zeijst, B.A.M. van der; Gaastra, W.

    Using antisera raised against serotype 2 and 3 fimbrial subunits from Bordetella pertussis, serologically related polypeptides were detected in Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella avium strains. The two B. pertussis fimbrial subunits, and three of the serologically

  16. Localization of mRNAs coding for mitochondrial proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Gadir, Noga; Haim-Vilmovsky, Liora; Kraut-Cohen, Judith; Gerst, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted mRNA localization is a likely determinant of localized protein synthesis. To investigate whether mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins (mMPs) localize to mitochondria and, thus, might confer localized protein synthesis and import, we visualized endogenously expressed mMPs in vivo for the first time. We determined the localization of 24 yeast mMPs encoding proteins of the mitochondrial matrix, outer and inner membrane, and intermembrane space and found that many mMPs colocalize with m...

  17. In situ localization of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic mRNAs and proteins in Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinold, S.; Hahlbrock, K.

    1997-01-01

    Using in situ RNA/RNA hybridization, enzyme immunolocalization, and histochemical techniques, several phenylpropanoid biosynthetic activities and products were localized in tissue sections from various aerial parts of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) plants at different developmental stages. The enzymes and corresponding mRNAs analyzed included two representatives of general phenylpropanoid metabolism: phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL), and one representative each from two distinct branch pathways: chalcone synthase (CHS; flavonoids) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine: bergaptol O-methyltransferase (BMT; furanocoumarins). In almost all cases, the relative timing of accumulation differed greatly for mRNA and protein and indicated short expression periods and short half-lives for all mRNAs as compared to the proteins. PAL and 4CL occurred almost ubiquitously in cell type-specific patterns, and their mRNAs and proteins were always coordinately expressed, whereas the cell type-specific localization of flavonoid and furanocoumarin biosynthetic activities was to a large extent mutually exclusive. However, the distribution patterns of CHS and BMT, when superimposed, closely matched those of PAL and 4CL in nearly all tissues analysed, suggesting that the flavonoid and furanocoumarin pathways together constituted a large majority of the total phenylpropanoid biosynthetic activity. Differential sites of synthesis and accumulation indicating intercellular translocation were observed both for flavonoids and for furanocoumarins in oil ducts and the surrounding tissue. The widespread occurrence of both classes of compounds, as well as selected, pathway-specific mRNAs and enzymes, in many cell types of all parsley organs including various flower parts suggests additional functions beyond the previously established roles of flavonoids in UV protection and furanocoumarins in pathogen defence. (author)

  18. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  19. Death of a dogma: eukaryotic mRNAs can code for more than one protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouilleron, Hélène; Delcourt, Vivian; Roucou, Xavier

    2016-01-08

    mRNAs carry the genetic information that is translated by ribosomes. The traditional view of a mature eukaryotic mRNA is a molecule with three main regions, the 5' UTR, the protein coding open reading frame (ORF) or coding sequence (CDS), and the 3' UTR. This concept assumes that ribosomes translate one ORF only, generally the longest one, and produce one protein. As a result, in the early days of genomics and bioinformatics, one CDS was associated with each protein-coding gene. This fundamental concept of a single CDS is being challenged by increasing experimental evidence indicating that annotated proteins are not the only proteins translated from mRNAs. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics and ribosome profiling have detected productive translation of alternative open reading frames. In several cases, the alternative and annotated proteins interact. Thus, the expression of two or more proteins translated from the same mRNA may offer a mechanism to ensure the co-expression of proteins which have functional interactions. Translational mechanisms already described in eukaryotic cells indicate that the cellular machinery is able to translate different CDSs from a single viral or cellular mRNA. In addition to summarizing data showing that the protein coding potential of eukaryotic mRNAs has been underestimated, this review aims to challenge the single translated CDS dogma. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Alternative Splicing of AMPA subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen eAcosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA subunit variant and kainate (GRIK subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted.

  1. Heavy baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    We review the experimental and theoretical status of baryons containing one heavy quark. The charm and bottom baryon states are classified and their mass spectra are listed. The appropriate theoretical framework for the description of heavy baryons is the Heavy Quark Effective Theory, whose general ideas and methods are introduced and illustrated in specific examples. We present simple covariant expressions for the spin wave functions of heavy baryons including p-wave baryons. The covariant spin wave functions are used to determine the Heavy Quark Symmetry structure of flavour-changing current-induced transitions between heavy baryons as well as one-pion and one-photon transitions between heavy baryons of the same flavour. We discuss 1/m Q corrections to the current-induced transitions as well as the structure of heavy to light baryon transitions. Whenever possible we attempt to present numbers to compare with experiment by making use of further model-dependent assumptions as e.g. the constituent picture for light quarks. We highlight recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the inclusive decays of hadrons containing one heavy quark including polarization. For exclusive semileptonic decays we discuss rates, angular decay distributions and polarization effects. We provide an update of the experimental and theoretical status of lifetimes of heavy baryons and of exclusive nonleptonic two body decays of charm baryons. (orig.)

  2. Subunit Stoichiometry of Human Muscle Chloride Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlke, Christoph; Knittle, Timothy; Gurnett, Christina A.; Campbell, Kevin P.; George, Alfred L.

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cl? channels belonging to the ClC family appear to function as homomultimers, but the number of subunits needed to form a functional channel is controversial. To determine subunit stoichiometry, we constructed dimeric human skeletal muscle Cl? channels in which one subunit was tagged by a mutation (D136G) that causes profound changes in voltage-dependent gating. Sucrose-density gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that both monomeric and dimeric hClC-1 channels in their ...

  3. Heavy flavors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.; Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    A range of issues pertaining to heavy flavors at the SSC is examined including heavy flavor production by gluon-gluon fusion and by shower evolution of gluon jets, flavor tagging, reconstruction of Higgs and W bosons, and the study of rare decays and CP violation in the B meson system. A specific detector for doing heavy flavor physics and tuned to this latter study at the SSC, the TASTER, is described. 36 refs., 10 figs

  4. Pluripotent State Induction in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Using mRNAs of Reprogramming Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kamel El-Sayed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of somatic cells has great potential to provide therapeutic treatments for a number of diseases as well as provide insight into mechanisms underlying early embryonic development. Improvement of induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs generation through mRNA-based methods is currently an area of intense research. This approach provides a number of advantages over previously used methods such as DNA integration and insertional mutagenesis. Using transfection of specifically synthesized mRNAs of various pluripotency factors, we generated iPSCs from mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells. The genetic, epigenetic and functional properties of the iPSCs were evaluated at different times during the reprogramming process. We successfully introduced synthesized mRNAs, which localized correctly inside the cells and exhibited efficient and stable translation into proteins. Our work demonstrated a robust up-regulation and a gradual promoter de-methylation of the pluripotency markers, including non-transfected factors such as Nanog, SSEA-1 (stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 and Rex-1 (ZFP-42, zinc finger protein 42. Using embryonic stem cells (ESCs conditions to culture the iPS cells resulted in formation of ES-like colonies after approximately 12 days with only five daily repeated transfections. The colonies were positive for alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency-specific markers associated with ESCs. This study revealed the ability of pluripotency induction and generation of mouse mRNA induced pluripotent stem cells (mRNA iPSCs using transfection of specifically synthesized mRNAs of various pluripotency factors into mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells. These generated iPSCs exhibited molecular and functional properties similar to ESCs, which indicate that this method is an efficient and viable alternative to ESCs and can be used for further biological, developmental and therapeutic investigations.

  5. Regional localization of suspensor mRNAs during early embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, K; Apuya, N R; Bi, Y; Fischer, R L; Harada, J J; Goldberg, R B

    2001-11-01

    We investigated gene activity within the giant embryos of the scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) to gain understanding of the processes by which the apical and basal cells become specified to follow different developmental pathways after division of the zygote. We identified two mRNAs, designated G564 and C541, that accumulate specifically within the suspensor of globular-stage embryos. G564 mRNA accumulates uniformly throughout the suspensor, whereas C541 mRNA accumulates to a higher level within the large basal cells of the suspensor that anchor the embryo to the surrounding seed tissue. Both G564 and C541 mRNAs begin to accumulate shortly after fertilization and are present within the two basal cells of embryos at the four-cell stage. In contrast, at the same stage, these mRNAs are not detectable within the two descendants of the apical cell. Nor are they detectable within cells of the embryo sac before fertilization, including the egg cell. We used a G564/beta-glucuronidase reporter gene to show that the G564 promoter is activated specifically within the basal region and suspensor of preglobular tobacco embryos. Analysis of the G564 promoter identified a sequence domain required for transcription within the suspensor that contains several copies of a conserved motif. These results show that derivatives of the apical and basal cells transcribe different genes as early as the four-cell stage of embryo development and suggest that the apical and basal cells are specified at the molecular level after division of the zygote.

  6. Regional Localization of Suspensor mRNAs during Early Embryo Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Koen; Apuya, Nestor R.; Bi, Yuping; Fischer, Robert L.; Harada, John J.; Goldberg, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated gene activity within the giant embryos of the scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) to gain understanding of the processes by which the apical and basal cells become specified to follow different developmental pathways after division of the zygote. We identified two mRNAs, designated G564 and C541, that accumulate specifically within the suspensor of globular-stage embryos. G564 mRNA accumulates uniformly throughout the suspensor, whereas C541 mRNA accumulates to a higher level within the large basal cells of the suspensor that anchor the embryo to the surrounding seed tissue. Both G564 and C541 mRNAs begin to accumulate shortly after fertilization and are present within the two basal cells of embryos at the four-cell stage. In contrast, at the same stage, these mRNAs are not detectable within the two descendants of the apical cell. Nor are they detectable within cells of the embryo sac before fertilization, including the egg cell. We used a G564/β-glucuronidase reporter gene to show that the G564 promoter is activated specifically within the basal region and suspensor of preglobular tobacco embryos. Analysis of the G564 promoter identified a sequence domain required for transcription within the suspensor that contains several copies of a conserved motif. These results show that derivatives of the apical and basal cells transcribe different genes as early as the four-cell stage of embryo development and suggest that the apical and basal cells are specified at the molecular level after division of the zygote. PMID:11701878

  7. Intracellular distribution of histone mRNAs in human fibroblasts studied by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.B.; Singer, R.H.; Villnave, C.A.; Stein, J.L.; Stein, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    We have used in situ hybridization to study the intracellular distribution of mRNAs for cell cycle-dependent core and H1 histone proteins in human WI-38 fibroblasts. Because histones are abundant nuclear proteins and histone mRNA expression is tightly coupled to DNA synthesis, it was of interest to determine whether histone mRNAs are localized near the nucleus. Cells were hybridized with tritiated DNA probes specific for either histone H1, histone H4, actin, or poly(A)+ mRNA and were processed for autoradiography. In exponentially growing cultures, the fraction of histone mRNA-positive cells correlated well with the fraction of cells in S phase and was eliminated by hydroxyurea inhibition of DNA synthesis. Within individual cells the label for histone mRNA was widely distributed throughout the cytoplasm and did not appear to be more heavily concentrated near the nucleus. However, histone mRNA appeared to exhibit patchy, nonhomogeneous localization, and a quantitative evaluation confirmed that grain distributions were not as uniform as they were after hybridizations to poly(A)+ mRNA. Actin mRNA in WI-38 cells was also widely distributed throughout the cytoplasm but differed from histone mRNA in that label for actin mRNA was frequently most dense at the outermost region of narrow cell extensions. The localization of actin mRNA was less pronounced but qualitatively very similar to that previously described for chicken embryonic myoblasts and fibroblasts. We conclude that localization of histones in WI-38 cells is not facilitated by localization of histone protein synthesis near the nucleus and that there are subtle but discrete and potentially functional differences in the distributions of histone, actin, and poly(A)+ mRNAs

  8. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  9. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  10. Interplay of noncoding RNAs, mRNAs, and proteins during the growth of eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous biological functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in eukaryotic cells are based primarily on their ability to pair with target mRNAs and then either to prevent translation or to result in rapid degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Using a general model describing this scenario, we show that ncRNAs may help to maintain constant mRNA and protein concentrations during the growth of cells. The possibility of observation of this effect on the global scale is briefly discussed.

  11. Multiple-targeted graphene-based nanocarrier for intracellular imaging of mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Liu, Misha; Xu, Jinjin; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Yuehe; Li, Jinghong

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous detection and imaging of multiple intracellular messenger RNA (mRNAs) hold great significant for early cancer diagnostics and preventive medicine development. Herein, we propose a multiple-targeted graphene oxide (GO) nanocarrier that can simultaneously detect and image different type mRNAs in living cells. First of all, in vitro detection of multiple targets have been realized successfully based on the multiple-targeted GO nanocarrier with linear relationship ranging from 3 nM to 200 nM, as well as sensitive detection limit of 1.84 nM for manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) mRNA and 2.45 nM for β-actin mRNA. Additionally, this nanosensing platform composed of fluorescent labelled single strand DNA probes and GO nanocarrier can identify Mn-SOD mRNA and endogenous mRNA of β-actin in living cancer cells, showing rapid response, high specificity, nuclease stability, and good biocompatibility during the cell imaging. Thirdly, changes of the expression levels of mRNA in living cells before or after the drug treatment can be monitored successfully. By using multiple ssDNA as probes and GO nanocarrier as the cellular delivery cargo, the proposed simultaneous multiple-targeted sensing platform will be of great potential as a powerful tool for intracellular trafficking process from basic research to clinical diagnosis. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of simultaneously multiple mRNAs monitoring inside single living breast cancer cell based on GO nanocarrier. In particular, the fluorescent signals could be monitored when Mn-SOD probe (red) and β-actin probe (green) hybridizes with their mRNA targets inside the living cells. Random probe (orange) was regarded as control probe for the sensing strategy. - Highlights: • A multiple-targeted GO nanocarrier was used for mRNAs imaging and expression changes after drug treatment can be monitored successfully. • Sensitive detection limit of 1.84 nM for manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) m

  12. Sequestration of highly expressed mRNAs in cytoplasmic granules, P-bodies, and stress granules enhances cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lavut

    Full Text Available Transcriptome analyses indicate that a core 10%-15% of the yeast genome is modulated by a variety of different stresses. However, not all the induced genes undergo translation, and null mutants of many induced genes do not show elevated sensitivity to the particular stress. Elucidation of the RNA lifecycle reveals accumulation of non-translating mRNAs in cytoplasmic granules, P-bodies, and stress granules for future regulation. P-bodies contain enzymes for mRNA degradation; under stress conditions mRNAs may be transferred to stress granules for storage and return to translation. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is elevated by stress; and here we analyzed the steady state levels, decay, and subcellular localization of the mRNA of the gene encoding the F-box protein, UFO1, that is induced by stress. Using the MS2L mRNA reporter system UFO1 mRNA was observed in granules that colocalized with P-bodies and stress granules. These P-bodies stored diverse mRNAs. Granules of two mRNAs transported prior to translation, ASH1-MS2L and OXA1-MS2L, docked with P-bodies. HSP12 mRNA that gave rise to highly elevated protein levels was not observed in granules under these stress conditions. ecd3, pat1 double mutants that are defective in P-body formation were sensitive to mRNAs expressed ectopically from strong promoters. These highly expressed mRNAs showed elevated translation compared with wild-type cells, and the viability of the mutants was strongly reduced. ecd3, pat1 mutants also exhibited increased sensitivity to different stresses. Our interpretation is that sequestration of highly expressed mRNAs in P-bodies is essential for viability. Storage of mRNAs for future regulation may contribute to the discrepancy between the steady state levels of many stress-induced mRNAs and their proteins. Sorting of mRNAs for future translation or decay by individual cells could generate potentially different phenotypes in a genetically identical

  13. Testosterone regulation of sex steroid-related mRNAs and dopamine-related mRNAs in adolescent male rat substantia nigra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purves-Tyson Tertia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased risk of schizophrenia in adolescent males indicates that a link between the development of dopamine-related psychopathology and testosterone-driven brain changes may exist. However, contradictions as to whether testosterone increases or decreases dopamine neurotransmission are found and most studies address this in adult animals. Testosterone-dependent actions in neurons are direct via activation of androgen receptors (AR or indirect by conversion to 17β-estradiol and activation of estrogen receptors (ER. How midbrain dopamine neurons respond to sex steroids depends on the presence of sex steroid receptor(s and the level of steroid conversion enzymes (aromatase and 5α-reductase. We investigated whether gonadectomy and sex steroid replacement could influence dopamine levels by changing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH protein and mRNA and/or dopamine breakdown enzyme mRNA levels [catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT and monoamine oxygenase (MAO A and B] in the adolescent male rat substantia nigra. We hypothesized that adolescent testosterone would regulate sex steroid signaling through regulation of ER and AR mRNAs and through modulation of aromatase and 5α-reductase mRNA levels. Results We find ERα and AR in midbrain dopamine neurons in adolescent male rats, indicating that dopamine neurons are poised to respond to circulating sex steroids. We report that androgens (T and DHT increase TH protein and increase COMT, MAOA and MAOB mRNAs in the adolescent male rat substantia nigra. We report that all three sex steroids increase AR mRNA. Differential action on ER pathways, with ERα mRNA down-regulation and ERβ mRNA up-regulation by testosterone was found. 5α reductase-1 mRNA was increased by AR activation, and aromatase mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy. Conclusions We conclude that increased testosterone at adolescence can shift the balance of sex steroid signaling to favor androgenic responses through promoting

  14. Complex mutual regulation of facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) subunits on both mRNA and protein levels in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, Alfiya; Garcia, Henry; Commane, Mairead; Guryanova, Olga; Degan, Seamus; Kolesnikova, Kateryna; Gurova, Katerina V

    2013-08-01

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) is a chromatin remodeling complex with two subunits: SSRP1 and SPT16. Mechanisms controlling FACT levels are of interest, since the complex is not expressed in most differentiated cells, but is frequently upregulated in cancer, particularly in poorly differentiated, aggressive tumors. Moreover, inhibition of FACT expression or function in tumor cells interferes with their survival. Here we demonstrate that SSRP1 and SPT16 protein levels decline upon induction of cellular differentiation or senescence in vitro and that similar declines in protein levels for both SSRP1 and SPT16 occur upon RNAi-mediated knockdown of either SSRP1 or SPT16. The interdependence of SSRP1 and SPT16 protein levels was found to be due to their association with SSRP1 and SPT16 mRNAs, which stabilizes the proteins. In particular, presence of SSRP1 mRNA is critical for SPT16 protein stability. In addition, binding of SSRP1 and SPT16 mRNAs to the FACT complex increases the stability and efficiency of translation of the mRNAs. These data support a model in which the FACT complex is stable when SSRP1 mRNA is present, but quickly degrades when SSRP1 mRNA levels drop. In the absence of FACT complex, SSRP1 and SPT16 mRNAs are unstable and inefficiently translated, making reactivation of FACT function unlikely in normal cells. Thus, we have described a complex and unusual mode of regulation controlling cellular FACT levels that results in amplified and stringent control of FACT activity. The FACT dependence of tumor cells suggests that mechanisms controlling FACT levels could be targeted for anticancer therapy.

  15. The beta subunit of casein kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Piontek, K; Schmidt-Spaniol, I

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the beta subunit of pig and mouse CKII were isolated. The porcine cDNA was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used for the production of anti-CKII-beta subunit specific antibodies....

  16. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All political...

  17. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Mature dry seeds contain translatable mRNAs called long-lived mRNAs. Early studies have shown that protein synthesis during the initial phase of seed germination occurs from long-lived mRNAs, without de novo transcription. However, the gene expression systems that generate long-lived mRNAs in seeds are not well understood. To examine the accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos, germination tests using the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (Act D) were performed with the Japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Although over 70% of embryos at 10 days after flowering (DAF) germinated in the absence of the inhibitor, germination was remarkably impaired in embryos treated with Act D. In contrast, more than 70% of embryos at 20, 25, 30 and 40 DAF germinated in the presence of Act D. The same results were obtained when another cultivar, Koshihikari, was used, indicating that the long-lived mRNAs required for germination predominantly accumulate in embryos between 10 and 20 DAF during seed development. RNA-Seq identified 529 long-lived mRNA candidates, encoding proteins such as ABA, calcium ion and phospholipid signalling-related proteins, and HSP DNA J, increased from 10 to 20 DAF and were highly abundant in 40 DAF embryos of Nipponbare and Koshihikari. We also revealed that these long-lived mRNA candidates are clearly up-regulated in 10 DAF germinating embryos after imbibition, suggesting that the accumulation of these mRNAs in embryos is indispensable for the induction of germination. The findings presented here may facilitate in overcoming irregular seed germination or producing more vigorous seedlings. PMID:25941326

  18. Acute and chronic glucocorticoid treatments regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in multiple brain regions in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S. Carter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have primarily interpreted gene expression regulation by glucocorticoids in the brain in terms of impact on neurons; however, less is known about the corresponding impact of glucocorticoids on glia and specifically astrocytes in vivo. Recent microarray experiments have identified glucocorticoid-sensitive mRNAs in primary astrocyte cell culture, including a number of mRNAs that have reported astrocyte-enriched expression patterns relative to other brain cell types. Here, we have tested whether elevations of glucocorticoids regulate a subset of these mRNAs in vivo following acute and chronic corticosterone exposure in adult mice. Acute corticosterone exposure was achieved by a single injection of 10 mg/kg corticosterone, and tissue samples were harvested two hours post-injection. Chronic corticosterone exposure was achieved by administering 10 mg/mL corticosterone via drinking water for two weeks. Gene expression was then assessed in two brain regions associated with glucocorticoid action (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus by qPCR and by in situ hybridization. The majority of measured mRNAs regulated by glucocorticoids in astrocytes in vitro were similarly regulated by acute and/or chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vivo. In addition, the expression levels for mRNAs regulated in at least one corticosterone exposure condition (acute/chronic demonstrated moderate positive correlation between the two conditions by brain region. In situ hybridization analyses suggest that select mRNAs are regulated by chronic corticosterone exposure specifically in astroctyes based on (1 similar general expression patterns between corticosterone-treated and vehicle-treated animals and (2 similar expression patterns to the pan-astrocyte marker Aldh1l1. Our findings demonstrate that glucocorticoids regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in vivo and suggest that glucocorticoids regulate gene expression in the brain in a cell type-dependent fashion.

  19. Expression of the somatostatin receptor family mRNAs in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Wang Liangang; Deng Jinglan; Wu Shengxi

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of expression and distribution of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-5) in lung cancer, in situ hybridization was used to examine the expression patterns of SSTR mRNAs in 21 cases of different pathologic types of lung cancer tissues with [α- 35 S]dATP labelled oligonucleotides of the 5 SSTR subtypes as probes. Additionally, Leica Q-500 image analysis processing system was employed for the semi-quantitatively analysis of the hybridization signals. Patterns of SSTR1-5 expression in lung cancer tissues were found as follows. SSTR2 was prominent in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), whereas in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) including the adenous cancer (Ad) and the squamous cancer (Sq), the expression of SSTR1 mRNA was stronger than that of the other 4 types. the expression density of SSTR1-5 in the NSCLC was higher that the SCLC (p < 0.01). The expression patterns and densities of the SSTR subtypes showed heterogeneity in different pathologic types of lung cancer. The expressions of the SSTR mRNAs in both SCLC and NSCLC indicated the positive prospects for somatostatin analog (SSA)-oriented agents in the treatment of both types of the lung cancer

  20. Multiple-Targeted Graphene-based Nanocarrier for Intracellular Imaging of mRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Liu, Misha; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Yuehe; Li, Jinghong

    2017-08-29

    Simultaneous detection and imaging of multiple intracellular messenger RNA (mRNAs) hold great significant for early cancer diagnostics and preventive medicine development. Herein, we propose a multiple-targeted graphene oxide (GO) nanocarrier that can simultaneously detect and image different type mRNAs in living cells. First of all, in vitro detection of multiple targets have been realized successfully based on the multiple-targeted GO nanocarrier with linear relationship ranging from 3 nM to 200 nM, as well as sensitive detection limit of 1.84 nM for manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) mRNA and 2.45 nM for β-actin mRNA. Additionally, this nanosensing platform composed of fluorescent labeled single strand DNA probes and GO nanocarrier can identify Mn-SOD mRNA and endogenous mRNA of β-actin in living cancer cells, showing rapid response, high specificity, nuclease stability, and good biocompatibility during the cell imaging. Thirdly, changes of the expression levels of mRNA in living cells before or after the drug treatment can be monitored successfully. By using multiple ssDNA as probes and GO nanocarrier as the cellular delivery cargo, the proposed simultaneous multiple-targeted sensing platform will be of great potential as a powerful tool for intracellular trafficking process from basic research to clinical diagnosis.

  1. Aberrant Expression of miRNA and mRNAs in Lesioned Tissues of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Qin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Abnormal microRNA (miRNA expression is found in many diseases including autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the role of miRNA regulation in Graves' disease (GD. Here, we simultaneously detected different expressions of miRNA and mRNAs in thyroid tissues via a high-throughput transcriptomics approach, known as microarray, in order to reveal the relationship between aberrant expression of miRNAs and mRNAs spectrum and GD. Methods: Totally 7 specimens of thyroid tissue from 4 GD patients and 3 controls were obtained by surgery for microarray analysis. Then, 30 thyroid specimens (18 GD and 12 controls were also collected for further validation by quantitative real-time PCR ( qRT-PCR . Results: Statistical analysis showed that the expressions of 5 specific miRNA were increased significantly while those of other 18 miRNA were decreased in thyroid tissue of GD patients (FC≥1.3 or≤0.77 and pConclusion: Our study highlights the possibility that miRNA-target gene network may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD and could provide new insights into understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of GD.

  2. The fragile X protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; La Fata, Giorgio; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  3. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  4. The Fragile X Protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Fata, Giorgio La; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  5. Heterogeneous Ribosomes Preferentially Translate Distinct Subpools of mRNAs Genome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Fujii, Kotaro; Kovary, Kyle M; Genuth, Naomi R; Röst, Hannes L; Teruel, Mary N; Barna, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emerging studies have linked the ribosome to more selective control of gene regulation. However, an outstanding question is whether ribosome heterogeneity at the level of core ribosomal proteins (RPs) exists and enables ribosomes to preferentially translate specific mRNAs genome-wide. Here, we measured the absolute abundance of RPs in translating ribosomes and profiled transcripts that are enriched or depleted from select subsets of ribosomes within embryonic stem cells. We find that heterogeneity in RP composition endows ribosomes with differential selectivity for translating subpools of transcripts, including those controlling metabolism, cell cycle, and development. As an example, mRNAs enriched in binding to RPL10A/uL1-containing ribosomes are shown to require RPL10A/uL1 for their efficient translation. Within several of these transcripts, this level of regulation is mediated, at least in part, by internal ribosome entry sites. Together, these results reveal a critical functional link between ribosome heterogeneity and the post-transcriptional circuitry of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequence features of E. coli mRNAs affect their degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Lenz

    Full Text Available Degradation of mRNA in bacteria is a regulatory mechanism, providing an efficient way to fine-tune protein abundance in response to environmental changes. While the mechanisms responsible for initiation and subsequent propagation of mRNA degradation are well studied, the mRNA features that affect its stability are yet to be elucidated. We calculated three properties for each mRNA in the E. coli transcriptome: G+C content, tRNA adaptation index (tAI and folding energy. Each of these properties were then correlated with the experimental transcript half life measured for each transcript and detected significant correlations. A sliding window analysis identified the regions that displayed the maximal signal. The correlation between transcript half life and both G+C content and folding energy was strongest at the 5' termini of the mRNAs. Partial correlations showed that each of the parameters contributes separately to mRNA half life. Notably, mRNAs of recently-acquired genes in the E. coli genome, which have a distinct nucleotide composition, tend to be highly stable. This high stability may aid the evolutionary fixation of horizontally acquired genes.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of uncapped mRNAs under heat stress in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Gutierrez-Beltran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we have showed that Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease (TSN or Tudor-SN proteins (TSN1 and TSN2 are localized in cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes called stress granules (SG and processing bodies (PB under heat stress in Arabidopsis. One of the primary functions of these mRNP complexes is mRNA decay, which generates uncapped mRNAs by the action of endonucleases and decapping enzymes (Thomas et al., 2011 [1]. In order to figure out whether TSN proteins could be implicated in mRNA decay, we isolated uncapped and total mRNAs of Wild type (WT; Col and Ler and TSN double knock-out (tsn1tsn2 seedlings grown under heat stress (39 °C for 40 min and control (23 °C conditions. Here, we provide the experimental procedure to reproduce the results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE63522 published by Gutierrez-Beltran et al. (2015 in The Plant Cell [2].

  8. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yukako

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit. Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas. The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98 ; L: 98–100%. The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed.

  9. Axonal and dendritic localization of mRNAs for glycogen-metabolizing enzymes in cultured rodent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer-Guglielmi, Brigitte; Dombert, Benjamin; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hausherr, Vanessa; van Thriel, Christoph; Schöbel, Nicole; Jansen, Ralf-Peter

    2014-06-04

    Localization of mRNAs encoding cytoskeletal or signaling proteins to neuronal processes is known to contribute to axon growth, synaptic differentiation and plasticity. In addition, a still increasing spectrum of mRNAs has been demonstrated to be localized under different conditions and developing stages thus reflecting a highly regulated mechanism and a role of mRNA localization in a broad range of cellular processes. Applying fluorescence in-situ-hybridization with specific riboprobes on cultured neurons and nervous tissue sections, we investigated whether the mRNAs for two metabolic enzymes, namely glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP), the key enzymes of glycogen metabolism, may also be targeted to neuronal processes. If it were so, this might contribute to clarify the so far enigmatic role of neuronal glycogen. We found that the mRNAs for both enzymes are localized to axonal and dendritic processes in cultured lumbar spinal motoneurons, but not in cultured trigeminal neurons. In cultured cortical neurons which do not store glycogen but nevertheless express glycogen synthase, the GS mRNA is also subject to axonal and dendritic localization. In spinal motoneurons and trigeminal neurons in situ, however, the mRNAs could only be demonstrated in the neuronal somata but not in the nerves. We could demonstrate that the mRNAs for major enzymes of neural energy metabolism can be localized to neuronal processes. The heterogeneous pattern of mRNA localization in different culture types and developmental stages stresses that mRNA localization is a versatile mechanism for the fine-tuning of cellular events. Our findings suggest that mRNA localization for enzymes of glycogen metabolism could allow adaptation to spatial and temporal energy demands in neuronal events like growth, repair and synaptic transmission.

  10. Improving Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol production and tolerance via RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zilong; Jiang, Rongrong

    2017-01-01

    Classical strain engineering methods often have limitations in altering multigenetic cellular phenotypes. Here we try to improve Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol tolerance and productivity by reprogramming its transcription profile through rewiring its key transcription component RNA polymerase II (RNAP II), which plays a central role in synthesizing mRNAs. This is the first report on using directed evolution method to engineer RNAP II to alter S. cerevisiae strain phenotypes. Error-prone PCR was employed to engineer the subunit Rpb7 of RNAP II to improve yeast ethanol tolerance and production. Based on previous studies and the presumption that improved ethanol resistance would lead to enhanced ethanol production, we first isolated variant M1 with much improved resistance towards 8 and 10% ethanol. The ethanol titers of M1 was ~122 g/L (96.58% of the theoretical yield) under laboratory very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, 40% increase as compared to the control. DNA microarray assay showed that 369 genes had differential expression in M1 after 12 h VHG fermentation, which are involved in glycolysis, alcoholic fermentation, oxidative stress response, etc. This is the first study to demonstrate the possibility of engineering eukaryotic RNAP to alter global transcription profile and improve strain phenotypes. Targeting subunit Rpb7 of RNAP II was able to bring differential expression in hundreds of genes in S. cerevisiae , which finally led to improvement in yeast ethanol tolerance and production.

  11. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  12. Heavy flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    1998-01-01

    This volume is a collection of review articles on the most outstanding topics in heavy flavour physics. All the authors have made significant contributions to this field. The book reviews in detail the theoretical structure of heavy flavour physics and confronts the Standard Model and some of its extensions with existing experimental data.This new edition covers new trends and ideas and includes the latest experimental information. Compared to the previous edition interesting new activities are included and some of the key contributions are updated. Particular attention is paid to the discover

  13. Genome-wide RIP-Chip analysis of translational repressor-bound mRNAs in the Plasmodium gametocyte

    KAUST Repository

    Guerreiro, Ana; Deligianni, Elena; Santos, Jorge M; Silva, Patricia AGC; Louis, Christos; Pain, Arnab; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Carret, Celine K; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Mair, Gunnar R

    2014-01-01

    of RNA polymerase II transcription. Using GFP-tagging, we validate the repression phenotype of selected genes and identify mRNAs relying on the 5′ untranslated region for translational control. Gene deletion reveals a novel protein located in the ookinete

  14. No evidence that mRNAs have lower folding free energies than random sequences with the same dinucleotide distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Christopher; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1999-01-01

    This work investigates whether mRNA has a lower estimated folding free energy than random sequences. The free energy estimates are calculated by the mfold program for prediction of RNA secondary structures. For a set of 46 mRNAs it is shown that the predicted free energy is not significantly diff...

  15. Single-molecule imaging of {beta}-actin mRNAs in the cytoplasm of a living cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Mai; Ishihama, Yo [Laboratory of Bio-Analytical Chemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Shirasaki, Yoshitaka [Laboratory of Genome Technology, Department of Human Genome Research, Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818 (Japan); Kurama, Hideki [Major in Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Funatsu, Takashi, E-mail: funatsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Bio-Analytical Chemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Center for NanoBio Integration, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    {beta}-Actin mRNA labeled with an MS2-EGFP fusion protein was expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts and its localization and movement were analyzed by single-molecule imaging. Most {beta}-Actin mRNAs localized to the leading edge, while some others were observed in the perinuclear region. Singe-molecule tracking of individual mRNAs revealed that the majority of mRNAs were in unrestricted Brownian motion at the leading edge and in restricted Brownian motion in the perinuclear region. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient of mRNA (D{sub MACRO}) at the leading edge was 0.3 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. On the other hand, D{sub MACRO} in the perinuclear region was 0.02 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. The destruction of microfilaments with cytochalasin D, which is known to delocalize {beta}-actin mRNAs, led to an increase in D{sub MACRO} to 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that the microstructure, composed of microfilaments, serves as a barrier for the movement of {beta}-actin mRNA.

  16. Shine-dalgarno sequences play an essential role in the translation of plastid mRNAs in tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, Lars; Ehrnthaler, Miriam; Janowski, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    SD]). Although many chloroplast mRNAs harbor putative SDs in their 5' untranslated regions and the aSD displays strong conservation, the functional relevance of SD-aSD interactions in plastid translation is unclear. Here, by generating transplastomic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutants with point mutations...

  17. Granules Harboring Translationally Active mRNAs Provide a Platform for P-Body Formation following Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The localization of mRNA to defined cytoplasmic sites in eukaryotic cells not only allows localized protein production but also determines the fate of mRNAs. For instance, translationally repressed mRNAs localize to P-bodies and stress granules where their decay and storage, respectively, are directed. Here, we find that several mRNAs are localized to granules in unstressed, actively growing cells. These granules play a key role in the stress-dependent formation of P-bodies. Specific glycolytic mRNAs are colocalized in multiple granules per cell, which aggregate during P-body formation. Such aggregation is still observed under conditions or in mutants where P-bodies do not form. In unstressed cells, the mRNA granules appear associated with active translation; this might enable a coregulation of protein expression from the same pathways or complexes. Parallels can be drawn between this coregulation and the advantage of operons in prokaryotic systems.

  18. Heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoze, V.A.

    1983-10-01

    We discuss the results accumulated during the last five years in heavy quark physics and try to draw a simple general picture of the present situation. The survey is based on a unified point of view resulting from quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  19. The Subunit Principle in Scar Face Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahat, Ahmed; Lashin, Riham

    2017-06-01

    Facial scaring is considered one of the most difficult cosmetic problems for any plastic surgeon to solve. The condition is more difficult if the direction of the scar is not parallel to relaxed skin tension lines. Attempts to manage this difficult situation included revisions using geometric designs, Z plasties or W plasties to camouflage the straight line visible scaring. The use of long-lasting resorbable sutures was tried too. Recently, the use of botulinum toxin during revision improved the results. Fractional CO2 lasers, microfat grafts, and platelet-rich plasma were added to the armamentarium. The scar is least visible if placed in the junction between the facial subunits. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the subunit principle to improve the results of scar revision. Four patients were included in this study. Tissue expansion of the intact part of the subunit allowed shifting the scar to the junction between the affected subunit and the adjacent one. Tissue expansion, delivery of the expanders, and advancement of the flaps were successful in all patients. The fact that this is a 2-stage procedure and sacrifices some of the intact skin from the affected facial subunit, makes this technique reserved to patients with ugly facial scars who are ambitious to improve their appearance.

  20. Nuclear Export of Pre-Ribosomal Subunits Requires Dbp5, but Not as an RNA-Helicase as for mRNA Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Bettina; Wu, Haijia; Hackmann, Alexandra; Krebber, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA-helicase Dbp5/Rat8 is known for its function in nuclear mRNA export, where it displaces the export receptor Mex67 from the mRNA at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here we show that Dbp5 is also required for the nuclear export of both pre-ribosomal subunits. Yeast temperature-sensitive dbp5 mutants accumulate both ribosomal particles in their nuclei. Furthermore, Dbp5 genetically and physically interacts with known ribosomal transport factors such as Nmd3. Similar to mRNA export we show that also for ribosomal transport Dbp5 is required at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. However, unlike its role in mRNA export, Dbp5 does not seem to undergo its ATPase cycle for this function, as ATPase-deficient dbp5 mutants that selectively inhibit mRNA export do not affect ribosomal transport. Furthermore, mutants of GLE1, the ATPase stimulating factor of Dbp5, show no major ribosomal export defects. Consequently, while Dbp5 uses its ATPase cycle to displace the export receptor Mex67 from the translocated mRNAs, Mex67 remains bound to ribosomal subunits upon transit to the cytoplasm, where it is detectable on translating ribosomes. Therefore, we propose a model, in which Dbp5 supports ribosomal transport by capturing ribosomal subunits upon their cytoplasmic appearance at the NPC, possibly by binding export factors such as Mex67. Thus, our findings reveal that although different ribonucleoparticles, mRNAs and pre-ribosomal subunits, use shared export factors, they utilize different transport mechanisms.

  1. Heavy flavours: theory summary

    OpenAIRE

    Corcella, Gennaro

    2005-01-01

    I summarize the theory talks given in the Heavy Flavours Working Group. In particular, I discuss heavy-flavour parton distribution functions, threshold resummation for heavy-quark production, progress in fragmentation functions, quarkonium production, heavy-meson hadroproduction.

  2. Reassessment of the role of TSC, mTORC1 and microRNAs in amino acids-meditated translational control of TOP mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Patursky-Polischuk

    Full Text Available TOP mRNAs encode components of the translational apparatus, and repression of their translation comprises one mechanism, by which cells encountering amino acid deprivation downregulate the biosynthesis of the protein synthesis machinery. This mode of regulation involves TSC as knockout of TSC1 or TSC2 rescued TOP mRNAs translation in amino acid-starved cells. The involvement of mTOR in translational control of TOP mRNAs is demonstrated by the ability of constitutively active mTOR to relieve the translational repression of TOP mRNA upon amino acid deprivation. Consistently, knockdown of this kinase as well as its inhibition by pharmacological means blocked amino acid-induced translational activation of these mRNAs. The signaling of amino acids to TOP mRNAs involves RagB, as overexpression of active RagB derepressed the translation of these mRNAs in amino acid-starved cells. Nonetheless, knockdown of raptor or rictor failed to suppress translational activation of TOP mRNAs by amino acids, suggesting that mTORC1 or mTORC2 plays a minor, if any, role in this mode of regulation. Finally, miR10a has previously been suggested to positively regulate the translation of TOP mRNAs. However, we show here that titration of this microRNA failed to downregulate the basal translation efficiency of TOP mRNAs. Moreover, Drosha knockdown or Dicer knockout, which carries out the first and second processing steps in microRNAs biosynthesis, respectively, failed to block the translational activation of TOP mRNAs by amino acid or serum stimulation. Evidently, these results are questioning the positive role of microRNAs in this mode of regulation.

  3. The Not5 subunit of the ccr4-not complex connects transcription and translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Villanyi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that a sub-complex of RNA polymerase II composed of Rpb4 and Rpb7 couples the nuclear and cytoplasmic stages of gene expression by associating with newly made mRNAs in the nucleus, and contributing to their translation and degradation in the cytoplasm. Here we show by yeast two hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, followed by ribosome fractionation and fluorescent microscopy, that a subunit of the Ccr4-Not complex, Not5, is essential in the nucleus for the cytoplasmic functions of Rpb4. Not5 interacts with Rpb4; it is required for the presence of Rpb4 in polysomes, for interaction of Rpb4 with the translation initiation factor eIF3 and for association of Rpb4 with mRNAs. We find that Rpb7 presence in the cytoplasm and polysomes is much less significant than that of Rpb4, and that it does not depend upon Not5. Hence Not5-dependence unlinks the cytoplasmic functions of Rpb4 and Rpb7. We additionally determine with RNA immunoprecipitation and native gel analysis that Not5 is needed in the cytoplasm for the co-translational assembly of RNA polymerase II. This stems from the importance of Not5 for the association of the R2TP Hsp90 co-chaperone with polysomes translating RPB1 mRNA to protect newly synthesized Rpb1 from aggregation. Hence taken together our results show that Not5 interconnects translation and transcription.

  4. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, M Josés; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a "stemness and metastatic" signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients.

  5. Accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs in response to fungal elicitor and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, A M; Bell, J N; Cramer, C L; Bailey, J A; Varner, J E; Lamb, C J

    1985-10-01

    Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) are important structural components of plant cell walls and also accumulate in response to infection as an apparent defense mechanism. Accumulation of HRGP mRNA in biologically stressed bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cells was monitored by blot hybridization with (32)P-labeled tomato genomic HRGP sequences. Elicitor treatment of suspension-cultured cells caused a marked increase in hybridizable HRGP mRNA. The response was less rapid but more prolonged than that observed for mRNAs encoding enzymes of phytoalexin biosynthesis. HRGP mRNA also accumulated during race:cultivar-specific interactions between bean hypocotyls and the partially biotrophic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose. In an incompatible interaction (host resistant) there was an early increase in HRGP mRNA correlated with expression of hypersensitive resistance; whereas, in a compatible interaction (host susceptible), marked accumulation of HRGP mRNA occurred as a delayed response at the onset of lesion formation. In both interactions, mRNA accumulation was observed in uninfected cells distant from the site of fungal inoculation, indicating intercellular transmission of an elicitation signal.

  6. Expression analysis of miRNA and target mRNAs in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X.R. [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Lu, P. [Gastrointestinal Surgery Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou (China); Mei, J.Z.; Liu, G.J. [Medical Oncology Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou (China); Fan, Q.X. [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to investigate miRNAs and related mRNAs through a network-based approach in order to learn the crucial role that they play in the biological processes of esophageal cancer. Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (EAC)-related miRNA and gene expression data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and differentially expressed miRNAs and genes were selected. Target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted and their regulatory networks were constructed. Differentially expressed miRNA analysis selected four miRNAs associated with EAC and ESCC, among which hsa-miR-21 and hsa-miR-202 were shared by both diseases. hsa-miR-202 was reported for the first time to be associated with esophageal cancer in the present study. Differentially expressed miRNA target genes were mainly involved in cancer-related and signal-transduction pathways. Functional categories of these target genes were related to transcriptional regulation. The results may indicate potential target miRNAs and genes for future investigations of esophageal cancer.

  7. Deadenylase depletion protects inherited mRNAs in primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, S Zachary; Reich, Adrian M; Oulhen, Nathalie; Raz, Tal; Milos, Patrice M; Campanale, Joseph P; Hamdoun, Amro; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    A crucial event in animal development is the specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs), which become the stem cells that create sperm and eggs. How PGCs are created provides a valuable paradigm for understanding stem cells in general. We find that the PGCs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus exhibit broad transcriptional repression, yet enrichment for a set of inherited mRNAs. Enrichment of several germline determinants in the PGCs requires the RNA-binding protein Nanos to target the transcript that encodes CNOT6, a deadenylase, for degradation in the PGCs, thereby creating a stable environment for RNA. Misexpression of CNOT6 in the PGCs results in their failure to retain Seawi transcripts and Vasa protein. Conversely, broad knockdown of CNOT6 expands the domain of Seawi RNA as well as exogenous reporters. Thus, Nanos-dependent spatially restricted CNOT6 differential expression is used to selectively localize germline RNAs to the PGCs. Our findings support a 'time capsule' model of germline determination, whereby the PGCs are insulated from differentiation by retaining the molecular characteristics of the totipotent egg and early embryo. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Heavy weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The paper mentions the important thing that it was for the country, exporting the first shipping of crude de Castilla to a company of asphalts in United States. It was not a common sale, as those that it carries out the company with the crude of Cusiana or Cano Limon. The new of this shipping is that it was the first successful test of marketing the Colombian heavy crude in the exterior, since previously it was almost considered a curse to find heavy crude by the difficulties of its transport. Today it can be taken to any refinery of the world and the best test is that, after almost a year of efforts to overcome the barriers of the transport, the company achieved its conduction from the Castilla Field, in proximities to Villavicencio, until the Covenas Port, in the Caribbean Colombian coast

  9. Differential transcription and message stability of two genes encoding soybean ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, B.W.; Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Grandbastien, M.A.; Zurfluh, L.L.; Shah, D.M.; Meagher, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The expression of two closely related soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (Rubisco ss) genes, SRS1 and SRS4, has been compared. These genes account for approximately 2-4% of the total transcription in light grown leaves, SRS4 being twice as transcriptionally active as SRS1. The transcription of these genes is reduced more than 30 fold after a pulse of far-red light or extended periods of darkness. When etiolated seedlings are shifted to the light the transcription of both genes increases 30-50 fold. Despite this 30-fold range in transcriptional expression the steady state mRNA levels in light and dark grown tissue differ by less than 8 fold. This suggests that the mRNAs are less stable in light grown tissue. 38 refs., 5 figs

  10. Human liver phosphatase 2A: cDNA and amino acid sequence of two catalytic subunit isotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino, J.; Woon, Chee Wai; Brautigan, D.L.; Miller, T.B. Jr.; Johnson, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver library that encode two phosphatase 2A catalytic subunits. The two cDNAs differed in eight amino acids (97% identity) with three nonconservative substitutions. All of the amino acid substitutions were clustered in the amino-terminal domain of the protein. Amino acid sequence of one human liver clone (HL-14) was identical to the rabbit skeletal muscle phosphatase 2A cDNA (with 97% nucleotide identity). The second human liver clone (HL-1) is encoded by a separate gene, and RNA gel blot analysis indicates that both mRNAs are expressed similarly in several human clonal cell lines. Sequence comparison with phosphatase 1 and 2A indicates highly divergent amino acid sequences at the amino and carboxyl termini of the proteins and identifies six highly conserved regions between the two proteins that are predicted to be important for phosphatase enzymatic activity

  11. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Antinori, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  12. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  13. 7-ketocholesterol inhibits Na,K-ATPase activity by decreasing expression of its α1-subunit and membrane fluidity in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, M J; Pierre, S V; Lesnik, P; Pieroni, G; Bourdeaux, M; Dignat-Georges, F; Sampol, J; Maixent, J M

    2010-11-09

    As cholesterol, oxysterols, can insert the cell membrane and thereby modify the functions of membrane-bound proteins. The Na,K-ATPase is very sensitive to its lipid environment, seems to be involved in important endothelial functions as the regulation of nitric oxide (NO) release. The effects of 7-ketocholesterol , an oxysterol present in oxidized LDL, was investigated on Na,K-ATPase in isolated human endothelial cells. Cells were incubated 24h with lecithin-, cholesterol- or 7-ketocholesterol liposomes (6 μg/ml). K+-stimulated paranitrophenyl phosphatase activity, reflecting Na,K-ATPase activity, was evaluated as well as cell viability and lipoperoxidation. The expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits mRNAs and membrane fluidity were also investigated. As Na,K-ATPase and nitric oxide seem to be related, we determined the production of NO and the expression of endothelial NO synthase mRNAs. Na,K-ATPase activity was strongly decreased by 7-ketocholesterol. This decrease, not related to lipoperoxidation, was correlated with a decreased expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit messengers and with rigidity of plasma membranes. Cholesterol induced similar effects but was less potent than 7-ketocholesterol. Basal NO production and expression of endothelial NO synthase mRNAs were not modified by 7-ketocholesterol. Our new findings demonstrate that 7-ketocholesterol, used at non toxic doses, was very potent to disrupt the transport of ions by Na,K-ATPase and perturb membrane structure. These data demonstrate that 7-ketocholesterol induces endothelial dysfunction without cell death that may contribute to early events in atherosclerosis.

  14. Immunochemical aspects of crotoxim and its subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazone, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Crotamine and crotoxin with the subunits - phospholipase A and crotapotin - were obtained by purification from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom. Interaction studies of the subunits using crotalic antiserum, indicated that: crotoxin is formed of crotapotin and phospholipase A with the molar ratio of 1 to 1; using crotapotin 125 I the presence of a soluble complex was shown with the same antiserum. Immunological precipitation reactions demonstrated that crotapotin is antigenic: crotapotin and phospholipase A presented similar antigenic determinants; crotoxin antiserum reacted with each one of the submits; when the subunits are mixed to form synthetic crotoxin some antigenic determinants are masked in the process of interaction. Crotamine, interacted with crotapotin 1:1, without hidden antigenic determinants crotapotin antigenic site seems to be formed by, at least, one lysine. Enzimatical activity of phospholipase A apreared to be dependent on some reaction conditions when its arginine residues are blocked. Tyrosines of phospholipase A are more susceptible to labelling with 131 I than crotapotin. Gama irradiation of aqueous solutions of the subunits produced modifications in the ultraviolet spectra. A decrease of the enzymatic activity occured as a function of radiation dosis. Immunological activities of crotapotin and phospholipase A were not altered [pt

  15. Isolation of amino acid activating subunit-pantetheine protein complexes: Their role in chain elongation in tyrocidine synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung G.; Lipmann, Fritz

    1977-01-01

    Dissociation of the multienzymes of tyrocidine synthesis by prolonged incubation of crude extracts of Bacillus brevis (Dubos strain, ATCC 8185) has yielded, on Sephadex G-100 chromatography, two fractions of amino acid activating subunits, a larger one of 70,000 daltons and a smaller one of 90,000 daltons; the latter was a complex consisting of the 70,000 dalton subunit and the pantetheine-carrying protein of about 20,000 daltons. When it dissociated, the intermediate enzyme, which activates three amino acids, contained two-thirds of the subunits in the 70,000 dalton and one-third in the 90,000 dalton fraction; the heavy enzyme, which activates six amino acids, contained five-sixths of the subunits in the former fraction and one-sixth in the latter. Both fractions showed ATP-PPi exchange with all amino acids that are activated by the respective polyenzymes. With proline as an example, the 70,000 dalton subunit exhibited a single low-affinity binding site, which should correspond to the peripheral thiol acceptor site, whereas the 90,000 dalton subunit showed both a low-affinity binding site and an additional high-affinity site for proline; the high-affinity site is attributed to the pantetheine present on the pantetheine-carrying protein, and suggests that amino acids are translocated from the peripheral SH to the pantetheine-carrying moiety during chain elongation. This was confirmed by the observation that the 90,000 dalton complex, when incubated with the light enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine and proline, produced DPhe-Pro dipeptide that cyclized into DPhe-Pro diketopiperazine, but the 70,000 dalton activating subunit, when similarly incubated, did not. After subunit dissociation, however, no further elongation occurred after the transfer from phenylalanine to proline. Images PMID:196286

  16. Human trabecular meshwork cells express BMP antagonist mRNAs and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Vidales, Tara; Fitzgerald, Ashley M; Clark, Abbot F

    2016-06-01

    Glaucoma patients have elevated aqueous humor and trabecular meshwork (TM) levels of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2). TGF-β2 has been associated with increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition (i.e. fibronectin), which is attributed to the increased resistance of aqueous humor outflow through the TM. We have previously demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 selectively counteracts the profibrotic effect of TGF-β2 with respect to ECM synthesis in the TM, and this action is reversed by the BMP antagonist gremlin. Thus, the BMP and TGF-β signaling pathways antagonize each other's antifibrotic and profibrotic roles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cultured human TM cells: (a) express other BMP antagonists including noggin, chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, Smurf1 and 2, and (b) whether expression of these proteins is regulated by exogenous TGF-β2 treatment. Primary human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells were grown to confluency and treated with TGF-β2 (5 ng/ml) for 24 or 48 h in serum-free medium. Untreated cell served as controls. qPCR and Western immunoblots (WB) determined that human TM cells expressed mRNAs and proteins for the BMP antagonist proteins: noggin, chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, and Smurf1/2. Exogenous TGF-β2 decreased chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, and Smurf1 mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, TGF-β2 increased secreted noggin and Smurf2 mRNA and protein levels. BMP antagonist members are expressed in the human TM. These molecules may be involved in the normal function of the TM as well as TM pathogenesis. Altered expression of BMP antagonist members may lead to functional changes in the human TM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TH and DCX mRNAs in peripheral blood and bone marrow predict outcome in metastatic neuroblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Yania; Hervás, David; Grau, Elena; Oltra, Silvestre; Pérez, Gema; Palanca, Sarai; Bermúdez, Mar; Márquez, Catalina; Cañete, Adela; Castel, Victoria

    2016-03-01

    In metastatic neuroblastoma (NB) patients, accurate risk stratification and disease monitoring would reduce relapse probabilities. This study aims to evaluate the independent prognostic significance of detecting tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and doublecortin (DCX) mRNAs by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples from metastatic NB patients. RT-qPCR was performed on PB and BM samples from metastatic NB patients at diagnosis, post-induction therapy and at the end of treatment for TH and DCX mRNAs detection. High levels of TH and DCX mRNAs when detected in PB and BM at diagnosis independently predicted worse outcome in a cohort of 162 metastatic NB. In the subgroup of high-risk metastatic NB, TH mRNA detected in PB remained as independent predictor of EFS and OS at diagnosis. After the induction therapy, high levels of TH mRNA in PB and DCX mRNA in BM independently predicted poor EFS and OS. Furthermore TH mRNA when detected in BM predicted worse EFS. TH mRNA in PB samples at the end of treatment is an independent predictor of worse outcome. TH and DCX mRNAs levels in PB and BM assessed by RT-qPCR should be considered in new pre-treatment risk stratification strategies to reliable estimate outcome differences in metastatic NB patients. In those high-risk metastatic NB, TH and DCX mRNA quantification could be used for the assessment of response to treatment and for early detection of progressive disease or relapses.

  18. Genome-wide RIP-Chip analysis of translational repressor-bound mRNAs in the Plasmodium gametocyte

    KAUST Repository

    Guerreiro, Ana

    2014-11-03

    Background Following fertilization, the early proteomes of metazoans are defined by the translation of stored but repressed transcripts; further embryonic development relies on de novo transcription of the zygotic genome. During sexual development of Plasmodium berghei, a rodent model for human malaria species including P. falciparum, the stability of repressed mRNAs requires the translational repressors DOZI and CITH. When these repressors are absent, Plasmodium zygote development and transmission to the mosquito vector is halted, as hundreds of transcripts become destabilized. However, which mRNAs are direct targets of these RNA binding proteins, and thus subject to translational repression, is unknown. Results We identify the maternal mRNA contribution to post-fertilization development of P. berghei using RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray analysis. We find that 731 mRNAs, approximately 50% of the transcriptome, are associated with DOZI and CITH, allowing zygote development to proceed in the absence of RNA polymerase II transcription. Using GFP-tagging, we validate the repression phenotype of selected genes and identify mRNAs relying on the 5′ untranslated region for translational control. Gene deletion reveals a novel protein located in the ookinete crystalloid with an essential function for sporozoite development. Conclusions Our study details for the first time the P. berghei maternal repressome. This mRNA population provides the developing ookinete with coding potential for key molecules required for life-cycle progression, and that are likely to be critical for the transmission of the malaria parasite from the rodent and the human host to the mosquito vector.

  19. Heavy quark effective theory and heavy baryon transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.

    1992-01-01

    The heavy quark effective theory (HQET) is applied to study the weak decay of heavy mesons and heavy baryons and to predict the form factors for heavy to heavy and heavy to light transitions. 28 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  20. The NS1 Protein from Influenza Virus Stimulates Translation Initiation by Enhancing Ribosome Recruitment to mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthu, Baptiste; Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; Traversier, Aurélien; Corbin, Antoine; Balvay, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2017-10-27

    The non-structural protein NS1 of influenza A viruses exerts pleiotropic functions during infection. Among these functions, NS1 was shown to be involved in the control of both viral and cellular translation; however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be determined. Thus, we have revisited the role of NS1 in translation by using a combination of influenza infection, mRNA reporter transfection, and in vitro functional and biochemical assays. Our data show that the NS1 protein is able to enhance the translation of virtually all tested mRNAs with the exception of constructs bearing the Dicistroviruses Internal ribosome entry segment (IRESes) (DCV and CrPV), suggesting a role at the level of translation initiation. The domain of NS1 required for translation stimulation was mapped to the RNA binding amino-terminal motif of the protein with residues R38 and K41 being critical for activity. Although we show that NS1 can bind directly to mRNAs, it does not correlate with its ability to stimulate translation. This activity rather relies on the property of NS1 to associate with ribosomes and to recruit them to target mRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimized Mitochondrial Targeting of Proteins Encoded by Modified mRNAs Rescues Cells Harboring Mutations in mtATP6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall Marcelo Chin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Mitochondrial disease may be caused by mutations in the protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial genome. A promising strategy for treating such diseases is allotopic expression—the translation of wild-type copies of these proteins in the cytosol, with subsequent translocation into the mitochondria, resulting in rescue of mitochondrial function. In this paper, we develop an automated, quantitative, and unbiased screening platform to evaluate protein localization and mitochondrial morphology. This platform was used to compare 31 mitochondrial targeting sequences and 15 3′ UTRs in their ability to localize up to 9 allotopically expressed proteins to the mitochondria and their subsequent impact on mitochondrial morphology. Taking these two factors together, we synthesized chemically modified mRNAs that encode for an optimized allotopic expression construct for mtATP6. These mRNAs were able to functionally rescue a cell line harboring the 8993T > G point mutation in the mtATP6 gene. : Allotopic expression of proteins normally encoded by mtDNA is a promising therapy for mitochondrial disease. Chin et al. use an unbiased and high-content imaging-based screening platform to optimize allotopic expression. Modified mRNAs encoding for the optimized allotopic expression constructs rescued the respiration and growth of mtATP6-deficient cells. Keywords: mitochondria, mitochondrial disease, mRNA, modified mRNA, ATP6, allotopic expression, rare disease, gene therapy, screening, high content imaging

  2. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  3. Roles of viral and cellular proteins in the expression of alternatively spliced HTLV-1 pX mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Princler, Gerald L.; Julias, John G.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Derse, David

    2003-01-01

    The human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) genome contains a cluster of at least five open reading frames (ORFs) near the 3' terminus within the pX region. The pX ORFs are encoded by mono- or bicistronic mRNAs that are generated by alternative splicing. The various pX mRNAs result from skipping of the internal exon (2-exon versus 3-exon isofoms) or from the utilization of alternative splice acceptor sites in the terminal exon. The Rex and Tax proteins, encoded by ORFs X-III and X-IV, have been studied intensively and are encoded by the most abundant of the alternative 3-exon mRNAs. The protein products of the other pX ORFs have not been detected in HTLV-1-infected cell lines and the levels of the corresponding mRNAs have not been accurately established. We have used real-time RT-PCR with splice-site specific primers to accurately measure the levels of individual pX mRNA species in chronically infected T cell lines. We have asked whether virus regulatory proteins or ectopic expression of cellular factors influence pX mRNA splicing in cells that were transfected with HTLV-1 provirus clones. In chronically infected cell lines, the pX-tax/rex mRNA was present at 500- to 2500-fold higher levels than the pX-tax-orfII mRNA and at approximately 1000-fold higher levels than pX-rex-orfI mRNA. Chronically infected cell lines that contain numerous defective proviruses expressed 2-exon forms of pX mRNAs at significantly higher levels compared to cell lines that contain a single full-length provirus. Cells transfected with provirus expression plasmids expressed similar relative amounts of 3-exon pX mRNAs but lower levels of 2-exon mRNA forms compared to cells containing a single, full-length provirus. The pX mRNA expression patterns were nearly identical in cells transfected with wild-type, Tax-minus, or Rex-minus proviruses. Cotransfection of cells with HTLV-1 provirus in combination with SF2/ASF expression plasmid resulted in a relative increase in pX-tax/rex m

  4. Selective expression of KCNS3 potassium channel α-subunit in parvalbumin-containing GABA neurons in the human prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Georgiev

    Full Text Available The cognitive deficits of schizophrenia appear to be associated with altered cortical GABA neurotransmission in the subsets of inhibitory neurons that express either parvalbumin (PV or somatostatin (SST. Identification of molecular mechanisms that operate selectively in these neurons is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies that do not influence other cell types. Consequently, we sought to identify, in the human cortex, gene products that are expressed selectively by PV and/or SST neurons, and that might contribute to their distinctive functional properties. Based on previously reported expression patterns in the cortex of mice and humans, we selected four genes: KCNS3, LHX6, KCNAB1, and PPP1R2, encoding K(+ channel Kv9.3 modulatory α-subunit, LIM homeobox protein 6, K(+ channel Kvβ1 subunit, and protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 2, respectively, and examined their colocalization with PV or SST mRNAs in the human prefrontal cortex using dual-label in situ hybridization with (35S- and digoxigenin-labeled antisense riboprobes. KCNS3 mRNA was detected in almost all PV neurons, but not in SST neurons, and PV mRNA was detected in >90% of KCNS3 mRNA-expressing neurons. LHX6 mRNA was detected in almost all PV and >90% of SST neurons, while among all LHX6 mRNA-expressing neurons 50% expressed PV mRNA and >44% expressed SST mRNA. KCNAB1 and PPP1R2 mRNAs were detected in much larger populations of cortical neurons than PV or SST neurons. These findings indicate that KCNS3 is a selective marker of PV neurons, whereas LHX6 is expressed by both PV and SST neurons. KCNS3 and LHX6 might be useful for characterizing cell-type specific molecular alterations of cortical GABA neurotransmission and for the development of novel treatments targeting PV and/or SST neurons in schizophrenia.

  5. Distinct α subunit variations of the hypothalamic GABAA receptor triplets (αβγ are linked to hibernating state in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alò Raffaella

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural arrangement of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR is known to be crucial for the maintenance of cerebral-dependent homeostatic mechanisms during the promotion of highly adaptive neurophysiological events of the permissive hibernating rodent, i.e the Syrian golden hamster. In this study, in vitro quantitative autoradiography and in situ hybridization were assessed in major hypothalamic nuclei. Reverse Transcription Reaction-Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR tests were performed for specific GABAAR receptor subunit gene primers synthases of non-hibernating (NHIB and hibernating (HIB hamsters. Attempts were made to identify the type of αβγ subunit combinations operating during the switching ON/OFF of neuronal activities in some hypothalamic nuclei of hibernators. Results Both autoradiography and molecular analysis supplied distinct expression patterns of all α subunits considered as shown by a strong (p 1 ratio (over total α subunits considered in the present study in the medial preoptic area (MPOA and arcuate nucleus (Arc of NHIBs with respect to HIBs. At the same time α2 subunit levels proved to be typical of periventricular nucleus (Pe and Arc of HIB, while strong α4 expression levels were detected during awakening state in the key circadian hypothalamic station, i.e. the suprachiasmatic nucleus (Sch; 60%. Regarding the other two subunits (β and γ, elevated β3 and γ3 mRNAs levels mostly characterized MPOA of HIBs, while prevalently elevated expression concentrations of the same subunits were also typical of Sch, even though this time during the awakening state. In the case of Arc, notably elevated levels were obtained for β3 and γ2 during hibernating conditions. Conclusion We conclude that different αβγ subunits are operating as major elements either at the onset of torpor or during induction of the arousal state in the Syrian golden hamster. The identification of a brain regional

  6. Muscular subunits transplantation for facial reanimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazan André Salo Buslik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present an alternative technique for reconstruction of musculocutaneous damages in the face transferring innervated subsegments(subunits of the latissimus dorsi flap for replacement of various facial mimetic muscles. METHODS: One clinical case of trauma with skin and mimetic muscles damage is described as an example of the technique. The treatment was performed with microsurgical transfer of latissimus dorsi muscle subunits. Each subunit present shape and dimensions of the respective mimetic muscles replaced. The origin, insertions and force vectors for the mimicmuscle lost were considered. Each subsegment has its own arterial and venous supply with a motor nerve component for the muscular unit. RESULTS: Pre and one year postoperative photos registration of static and dynamic mimic aspects, as well as digital electromyography digital data of the patients were compared. The transplanted muscular units presented myoeletric activity, fulfilling both the functional and cosmetic aspect. CONCLUSION: This technique seems to be a promising way to deal with the complex musculocutaneous losses of the face as well as facial palsy.

  7. Influvac, a trivalent inactivated subunit influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Fabiano, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Influenza represents a major sanitary and socio-economic burden and vaccination is universally considered the most effective strategy for preventing the disease and its complications. Traditional influenza vaccines have been on the market since the late 1940s, with million of doses administered annually worldwide, and demonstrated a substantial efficacy and safety. The trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine has been available for more than 25 years and has been studied in healthy children, adults and the elderly and in people affected by underlying chronic medical conditions. We describe vaccine technology focusing on subunit vaccine production procedures and mode of action and provide updated information on efficacy and safety available data. A review of efficacy and safety data in healthy subjects and in high risk populations from major sponsor- and investigator-driven studies. The vaccine showed a good immunogenicity and a favorable safety profile in all target groups. In the panorama of actually available influenza vaccines, trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine represents a well-established tool for preventing flu and the associated complications.

  8. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... It can also be bleeding that is very heavy. How do you know if you have heavy ...

  9. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Debora Lika; Conti, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented

  10. Anchoring a Defined Sequence to the 55' Ends of mRNAs : The Bolt to Clone Rare Full Length mRNAs and Generate cDNA Libraries porn a Few Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, J; Milne Edwards, D; Delort, J; Mallet, J

    1993-01-01

    Among numerous applications, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (1,2) provides a convenient means to clone 5' ends of rare mRNAs and to generate cDNA libraries from tissue available in amounts too low to be processed by conventional methods. Basically, the amplification of cDNAs by the PCR requires the availability of the sequences of two stretches of the molecule to be amplified. A sequence can easily be imposed at the 5' end of the first-strand cDNAs (corresponding to the 3' end of the mRNAs) by priming the reverse transcription with a specific primer (for cloning the 5' end of rare messenger) or with an oligonucleotide tailored with a poly (dT) stretch (for cDNA library construction), taking advantage of the poly (A) sequence that is located at the 3' end of mRNAs. Several strategies have been devised to tag the 3' end of the ss-cDNAs (corresponding to the 55' end of the mRNAs). We (3) and others have described strategies based on the addition of a homopolymeric dG (4,5) or dA (6,7) tail using terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase (TdT) ("anchor-PCR" [4]). However, this strategy has important limitations. The TdT reaction is difficult to control and has a low efficiency (unpublished observations). But most importantly, the return primers containing a homopolymeric (dC or dT) tail generate nonspecific amplifications, a phenomenon that prevents the isolation of low abundance mRNA species and/or interferes with the relative abundance of primary clones in the library. To circumvent these drawbacks, we have used two approaches. First, we devised a strategy based on a cRNA enrichment procedure, which has been useful to eliminate nonspecific-PCR products and to allow detection and cloning of cDNAs of low abundance (3). More recently, to avoid the nonspecific amplification resulting from the annealing of the homopolymeric tail oligonucleotide, we have developed a novel anchoring strategy that is based on the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 35' end of ss

  11. Soybean glycinin subunits: Characterization of physicochemical and adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaoqun; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Sun, Xiuzhi

    2006-10-04

    Soybean proteins have shown great potential for applications as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives. The objective of this work was to study physicochemical and adhesion properties of soy glycinin subunits. Soybean glycinin was extracted from soybean flour and then fractionated into acidic and basic subunits with an estimated purity of 90 and 85%, respectively. Amino acid composition of glycinin subunits was determined. The high hydrophobic amino acid content is a major contributor to the solubility behavior and water resistance of the basic subunits. Acidic subunits and glycinin had similar solubility profiles, showing more than 80% solubility at pH 2.0-4.0 or 6.5-12.0, whereas basic subunits had considerably lower solubility with the minimum at pH 4.5-8.0. Thermal analysis using a differential scanning calorimeter suggested that basic subunits form new oligomeric structures with higher thermal stability than glycinin but no highly ordered structures present in isolated acidic subunits. The wet strength of basic subunits was 160% more than that of acidic subunits prepared at their respective isoelectric points (pI) and cured at 130 degrees C. Both pH and the curing temperature significantly affected adhesive performance. High-adhesion water resistance was usually observed for adhesives from protein prepared at their pI values and cured at elevated temperatures. Basic subunits are responsible for the water resistance of glycinin and are a good starting material for the development of water-resistant adhesives.

  12. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  13. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The First Clinical Hospital, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Song, Wenzhi [Department of Stomatology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The First Clinical Hospital, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2013-06-12

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer.

  14. Activity-dependent expression of ELAV/Hu RBPs and neuronal mRNAs in seizure and cocaine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruchinapalli, Dhanrajan M; Caron, Marc G; Keene, Jack D

    2008-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both seizure (glutamate) and cocaine (dopamine) treatment modulate synaptic plasticity within the mesolimbic region of the CNS. Activation of glutamatergic neurons depends on the localized translation of neuronal mRNA products involved in modulating synaptic plasticity. In this study, we demonstrate the dendritic localization of HuR and HuD RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and their association with neuronal mRNAs following these two paradigms of seizure and cocaine treatment. Both the ubiquitously expressed HuR and neuronal HuD RBPs were detected in different regions as well as within dendrites of the brain and in dissociated neurons. Quantitative analysis revealed an increase in HuR, HuD and p-glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) protein levels as well as neuronal mRNAs encoding Homer, CaMKIIalpha, vascular early response gene, GAP-43, neuritin, and neuroligin protein products following either seizure or cocaine treatment. Inhibition of the Akt/GSK3beta signaling pathway by acute or chronic LiCl treatment revealed changes in HuR, HuD, pGSK3beta, p-Akt, and beta-catenin protein levels. In addition, a genetically engineered hyperdopaminergic mouse model (dopamine transporter knockout) revealed decreased expression of HuR protein levels, but no significant change was observed in HuD or fragile-X mental retardation protein RBPs. Finally, our data suggest that HuR and HuD RBPs potentially interact directly with neuronal mRNAs important for differentiation and synaptic plasticity.

  15. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Song, Wenzhi; Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer

  16. Stress and Withdrawal from Chronic Ethanol Induce Selective Changes in Neuroimmune mRNAs in Differing Brain Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin J. Knapp

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a strong risk factor in alcoholic relapse and may exert effects that mimic aspects of chronic alcohol exposure on neurobiological systems. With the neuroimmune system becoming a prominent focus in the study of the neurobiological consequences of stress, as well as chronic alcohol exposure proving to be a valuable focus in this regard, the present study sought to compare the effects of stress and chronic ethanol exposure on induction of components of the neuroimmune system. Rats were exposed to either 1 h exposure to a mild stressor (restraint or exposure to withdrawal from 15 days of chronic alcohol exposure (i.e., withdrawal from chronic ethanol, WCE and assessed for neuroimmune mRNAs in brain. Restraint stress alone elevated chemokine (C–C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 mRNAs in the cerebral cortex within 4 h with a return to a control level by 24 h. These increases were not accompanied by an increase in corresponding proteins. Withdrawal from WCE also elevated cytokines, but did so to varying degrees across different cytokines and brain regions. In the cortex, stress and WCE induced CCL2, TNFα, IL-1β, and TLR4 mRNAs. In the hypothalamus, only WCE induced cytokines (CCL2 and IL-1β while in the hippocampus, WCE strongly induced CCL2 while stress and WCE induced IL-1β. In the amygdala, only WCE induced CCL2. Finally—based on the previously demonstrated role of corticotropin-releasing factor 1 (CRF1 receptor inhibition in blocking WCE-induced cytokine mRNAs—the CRF1 receptor antagonist CP154,526 was administered to a subgroup of stressed rats and found to be inactive against induction of CCL2, TNFα, or IL-1β mRNAs. These differential results suggest that stress and WCE manifest broad neuroimmune effects in brain depending on the cytokine and brain region, and that CRF inhibition may not be a relevant mechanism in non-alcohol exposed animals

  17. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study 32 P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A + ) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A + ) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded

  18. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heavy metal jako subkultura

    OpenAIRE

    KOUTNÁ, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with heavy metal subculture. Its aim is to introduce the most important branches and to show broadness of heavy metal. This bachelor thesis describes development and history, briefly shows Czech heavy metal history alongside with the biggest and most popular Czech heavy metal festivals. It shows the most dressing concerns of society against this style.

  20. Highly efficient gene knockout by injection of TALEN mRNAs into oocytes and host transfer in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nakajima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins system are potentially powerful tools for producing tailor-made knockout animals. However, their mutagenic activity is not high enough to induce mutations at all loci of a target gene throughout an entire tadpole. In this study, we present a highly efficient method for introducing gene modifications at almost all target sequences in randomly selected embryos. The gene modification activity of TALEN is enhanced by adopting the host-transfer technique. In our method, the efficiency is further improved by injecting TALEN mRNAs fused to the 3′UTR of the Xenopus DEADSouth gene into oocytes, which are then transferred into a host female frog, where they are ovulated and fertilized. The addition of the 3′UTR of the DEADSouth gene promotes mRNA translation in the oocytes and increases the expression of TALEN proteins to near-maximal levels three hours post fertilization (hpf. In contrast, TALEN mRNAs without this 3′UTR are translated infrequently in oocytes. Our data suggest that genomic DNA is more sensitive to TALEN proteins from fertilization to the midblastula (MBT stage. Our method works by increasing the levels of TALEN proteins during the pre-MBT stages.

  1. A 3'-coterminal nested set of independently transcribed mRNAs is generated during Berne virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snijder, E.J.; Horzinek, M.C.; Spaan, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    By using poly(A)-selected RNA from Berne virus (BEV)-infected embryonic mule skin cells as a template, cDNA was prepared and cloned in plasmid pUC9. Recombinants covering a contiguous sequence of about 10 kilobases were identified. Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations with various restriction fragments from these clones showed that the five BEV mRNAs formed a 3'-coterminal nested set. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of four complete open reading frames of 4743, 699, 426, and 480 nucleotides, with initiation codons coinciding with the 5' ends of BEV RNAs 2 through 5, respectively. By using primer extension analysis and oligonucleotide hybridizations, RNA 5 was found to be contiguous on the consensus sequence. The transcription of BEV mRNAs was studied by means of UV mapping. BEV RNAs 1, 2, and 3 were shown to be transcribed independently, which is also likely--although not rigorously proven--for RNAs 4 and 5. Upstream of the AUG codon of each open reading frame a conserved sequence pattern was observed which is postulated to function as a core promoter sequence in subgenomic RNA transcription. In the area surrounding the core promoter region of the two most abundant subgenomic BEV RNAs, a number of homologous sequence motifs were identified

  2. Differential stability of host mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayman, B.A.; Nishioka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on cellular macromolecules were investigated in Friend erythroleukemia cells. The patterns of protein synthesis, examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, demonstrated that by 4 h postinfection the synthesis of many host proteins, with the exception of histones, was inhibited. Examination of the steady-state level of histone H3 mRNA by molecular hybridization of total RNA to a cloned mouse histone H3 complementary DNA probe demonstrated that the ratio of histone H3 mRNA to total RNA remained unchanged for the first 4 h postinfection. In contrast, the steady-state levels of globin and actin mRNAs decreased progressively at early intervals postinfection. Studies on RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the transcription of the histone H3 gene was inhibited to approximately the same extent as that of actin gene. It was concluded that the stabilization of preexisting histone H3 mRNA was responsible for the persistence of H3 mRNA and histone protein synthesis in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected Friend erythroleukemia cells. The possible mechanisms influencing the differential stability of host mRNAs during the course of productive infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 are discussed

  3. Drosophila Pumilio protein contains multiple autonomous repression domains that regulate mRNAs independently of Nanos and brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Pumilio is an RNA-binding protein that potently represses specific mRNAs. In developing embryos, Pumilio regulates a key morphogen, Hunchback, in collaboration with the cofactor Nanos. To investigate repression by Pumilio and Nanos, we created cell-based assays and found that Pumilio inhibits translation and enhances mRNA decay independent of Nanos. Nanos robustly stimulates repression through interactions with the Pumilio RNA-binding domain. We programmed Pumilio to recognize a new binding site, which garners repression of new target mRNAs. We show that cofactors Brain Tumor and eIF4E Homologous Protein are not obligatory for Pumilio and Nanos activity. The conserved RNA-binding domain of Pumilio was thought to be sufficient for its function. Instead, we demonstrate that three unique domains in the N terminus of Pumilio possess the major repressive activity and can function autonomously. The N termini of insect and vertebrate Pumilio and Fem-3 binding factors (PUFs) are related, and we show that corresponding regions of human PUM1 and PUM2 have repressive activity. Other PUF proteins lack these repression domains. Our findings suggest that PUF proteins have evolved new regulatory functions through protein sequences appended to their conserved PUF repeat RNA-binding domains.

  4. Human aldolase B subunit-specific radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, M.; Alpert, E.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the direct quantification of aldolase B in human serum and tissues. The method is a double-antibody radioimmunoassay technique using radioiodinated aldolase B homopolymer as ligand, chicken antibodies to aldolase B and rabbit antibodies to chicken IgG. This radioimmunoassay was shown to be specific for the aldolase B subunit, with no cross-reactivity with either human aldolase A subunit or homopolymeric human aldolase C (C 4 ). The lowest measurable amount by this method was 2 ng/ml. Aldolase B is predominantly found in normal liver tissue, with relatively-high aldolase B levels also observed in kidney. Aldolase B levels in the serum obtained from 11 normal subjects ranged from 23 to 38 ng/ml, with a mean of 28.5 +- 9.2 (S.D.) ng/ml. Almost all of patients with hepatitis had serum aldolase B levels greater than 30 ng/ml. In cancer patients, serum aldolase B was slightly elevated in patients with metastatic liver cancer and primary lever cell carcinoma, whereas no elevation of serum aldolase B was shown in patients without liver metastasis. (Auth.)

  5. Deuterium and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasaru, G.; Ursu, D.; Mihaila, A.; Szentgyorgyi, P.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography on deuterium and heavy water contains 3763 references (1932-1974) from 43 sources of information. An author index and a subject index are given. The latter contains a list of 136 subjects, arranged in 13 main topics: abundance of deuterium , catalysts, catalytic exchange, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, deuterium and heavy water analysis, deuterium and heavy water properties, deuterium and heavy water separation, exchange reactions, general review, heavy water as moderator, isotope effects, synthesis of deuterium compounds

  6. Subunit stoichiometry of the chloroplast photosystem I complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, B.D.; Malkin, R.

    1988-01-01

    A native photosystem I (PS I) complex and a PS I core complex depleted of antenna subunits has been isolated from the uniformly 14 C-labeled aquatic higher plant, Lemna. These complexes have been analyzed for their subunit stoichiometry by quantitative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results for both preparations indicate that one copy of each high molecular mass subunit is present per PS I complex and that a single copy of most low molecular mass subunits is also present. These results suggest that iron-sulfur center X, an early PS I electron acceptor proposed to bind to the high molecular mass subunits, contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster which is bound to a dimeric structure of high molecular mass subunits, each providing 2 cysteine residues to coordinate this cluster

  7. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqin eLi; Sigrid A Langhans

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during developme...

  8. LARP1 functions as a molecular switch for mTORC1-mediated translation of an essential class of mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungki; Freeberg, Mallory A; Han, Ting; Kamath, Avani; Yao, Yao; Fukuda, Tomoko; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kim, John K; Inoki, Ken

    2017-06-26

    The RNA binding protein, LARP1, has been proposed to function downstream of mTORC1 to regulate the translation of 5'TOP mRNAs such as those encoding ribosome proteins (RP). However, the roles of LARP1 in the translation of 5'TOP mRNAs are controversial and its regulatory roles in mTORC1-mediated translation remain unclear. Here we show that LARP1 is a direct substrate of mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1. Deep sequencing of LARP1-bound mRNAs reveal that non-phosphorylated LARP1 interacts with both 5' and 3'UTRs of RP mRNAs and inhibits their translation. Importantly, phosphorylation of LARP1 by mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1 dissociates it from 5'UTRs and relieves its inhibitory activity on RP mRNA translation. Concomitantly, phosphorylated LARP1 scaffolds mTORC1 on the 3'UTRs of translationally-competent RP mRNAs to facilitate mTORC1-dependent induction of translation initiation. Thus, in response to cellular mTOR activity, LARP1 serves as a phosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch for turning off or on RP mRNA translation and subsequent ribosome biogenesis.

  9. Regulation of RNA-binding proteins affinity to export receptors enables the nuclear basket proteins to distinguish and retain aberrant mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilypour, M; Mofrad, M R K

    2016-11-02

    Export of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) into the cytoplasm is a fundamental step in gene regulation processes, which is meticulously quality controlled by highly efficient mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Yet, it remains unclear how the aberrant mRNAs are recognized and retained inside the nucleus. Using a new modelling approach for complex systems, namely the agent-based modelling (ABM) approach, we develop a minimal model of the mRNA quality control (QC) mechanism. Our results demonstrate that regulation of the affinity of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) to export receptors along with the weak interaction between the nuclear basket protein (Mlp1 or Tpr) and RBPs are the minimum requirements to distinguish and retain aberrant mRNAs. Our results show that the affinity between Tpr and RBPs is optimized to maximize the retention of aberrant mRNAs. In addition, we demonstrate how the length of mRNA affects the QC process. Since longer mRNAs spend more time in the nuclear basket to form a compact conformation and initiate their export, nuclear basket proteins could more easily capture and retain them inside the nucleus.

  10. Characterization and distribution of GHRH, PACAP, TRH, SST and IGF1 mRNAs in the green iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Urban-Sosa, Valeria; Carranza, Martha; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The somatotropic axis (SA) regulates numerous aspects of vertebrate physiology such as development, growth, and metabolism and has influence on several tissues including neural, immune, reproductive and gastric tract. Growth hormone (GH) is a key component of SA, it is synthesized and released mainly by pituitary somatotrophs, although now it is known that virtually all tissues can express GH, which, in addition to its well-described endocrine roles, also has autocrine/paracrine/intracrine actions. In the pituitary, GH expression is regulated by several hypothalamic neuropeptides including GHRH, PACAP, TRH and SST. GH, in turn, regulates IGF1 synthesis in several target tissues, adding complexity to the system since GH effects can be exerted either directly or mediated by IGF1. In reptiles, little is known about the SA components and their functional interactions. The aim of this work was to characterize the mRNAs of the principal SA components in the green iguana and to develop the tools that allow the study of the structural and functional evolution of this system in reptiles. By employing RT-PCR and RACE, the cDNAs encoding for GHRH, PACAP, TRH, SST and IGF1 were amplified and sequenced. Results showed that these cDNAs coded for the corresponding protein precursors of 154, 170, 243, 113, and 131 amino acids, respectively. Of these, GHRH, PACAP, SST and IGF1 precursors exhibited a high structural conservation with respect to its counterparts in other vertebrates. On the other hand, iguana's TRH precursor showed 7 functional copies of mature TRH (pyr-QHP-NH 2 ), as compared to 4 and 6 copies of TRH in avian and mammalian proTRH sequences, respectively. It was found that in addition to its primary production site (brain for GHRH, PACAP, TRH and SST, and liver for IGF1), they were also expressed in other peripheral tissues, i.e. testes and ovaries expressed all the studied mRNAs, whereas TRH and IGF1 mRNAs were observed ubiquitously in all tissues considered. These

  11. Neuroblastoma mRNAs predict outcome in children with stage 4 neuroblastoma: a European HR-NBL1/SIOPEN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viprey, Virginie F; Gregory, Walter M; Corrias, Maria V; Tchirkov, Andrei; Swerts, Katrien; Vicha, Ales; Dallorso, Sandro; Brock, Penelope; Luksch, Roberto; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Papadakis, Vassilios; Laureys, Genevieve; Pearson, Andrew D; Ladenstein, Ruth; Burchill, Susan A

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that detection of neuroblastoma mRNAs by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTqPCR) in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow aspirates (BM) from children with stage 4 neuroblastoma are clinically useful biomarkers of risk. RTqPCR for paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and doublecortin (DCX) mRNA in PB and BM of children enrolled onto the High-Risk Neuroblastoma Trial-1 of the European Society of Pediatric Oncology Neuroblastoma Group (HR-NBL1/SIOPEN) was performed at diagnosis and after induction therapy. High levels of TH, PHOX2B, or DCX mRNA in PB or BM at diagnosis strongly predicted for worse event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) in a cohort of 290 children. After induction therapy, high levels of these mRNAs predicted worse EFS and OS in BM but not in PB. Combinations of mRNAs in BM did not add to the predictive power of any single mRNA. However, in the original (n = 182) and validation (n = 137) PB cohorts, high TH (log10TH > 0.8) or high PHOX2B (log10PHOX2B > 0.28) identify 19% of children as ultrahigh risk, with 5-year EFS and OS rates of 0%; OS rate was 25% (95% CI, 16% to 36%) and EFS rate was 38% (95% CI, 28% to 49%) in the remaining children. The magnitude of reduction in mRNA level between diagnosis and postinduction therapy in BM or PB was not of additional predictive value. High levels of TH and PHOX2B mRNA in PB at diagnosis objectively identify children with ultrahigh-risk disease who may benefit from novel treatment approaches. The level of TH, PHOX2B, and DCX mRNA in BM and/or PB at diagnosis might contribute to an algorithm to improve stratification of children for treatment.

  12. Development of an in situ hybridization assay for the detection of ostreid herpesvirus type 1 mRNAs in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, Serge; Faury, Nicole; Segarra, Amélie; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    An in situ hybridization protocol for detecting mRNAs of ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1) which infects Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, was developed. Three RNA probes were synthesized by cloning three partial OsHV-1 genes into plasmids using three specific primer pairs, and performing a transcription in the presence of digoxigenin dUTP. The RNA probes were able to detect the virus mRNAs in paraffin sections of experimentally infected oysters 26 h post-injection. The in situ hybridization showed that the OsHV-1 mRNAs were mainly present in connective tissues in gills, mantle, adductor muscle, digestive gland and gonads. DNA detection by in situ hybridization using a DNA probe and viral DNA quantitation by real-time PCR were also performed and results were compared with those obtained using RNA probes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 5'-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather J Beck

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence upstream of the gene's start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA's 5'- terminus (5'-uAUG. Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5'-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5'-terminal upstream open reading frames (5'-uORFs tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5'-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5'-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5'-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5'-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5'-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5'-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs.

  14. Microarray profiling and co-expression network analysis of circulating lncRNAs and mRNAs associated with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifen Liu

    Full Text Available LncRNAs, which represent one of the most highly expressed classes of ncRNAs in the brain, are becoming increasingly interesting with regard to brain functions and disorders. However, changes in the expression of regulatory lncRNAs in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD have not yet been reported. Using microarrays, we profiled the expression of 34834 lncRNAs and 39224 mRNAs in peripheral blood sampled from MDD patients as well as demographically-matched controls. Among these, we found that 2007 lncRNAs and 1667 mRNAs were differentially expressed, 17 of which were documented as depression-related gene in previous studies. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway analyses indicated that the biological functions of differentially expressed mRNAs were related to fundamental metabolic processes and neurodevelopment diseases. To investigate the potential regulatory roles of the differentially expressed lncRNAs on the mRNAs, we also constructed co-expression networks composed of the lncRNAs and mRNAs, which shows significant correlated patterns of expression. In the MDD-derived network, there were a greater number of nodes and connections than that in the control-derived network. The lncRNAs located at chr10:874695-874794, chr10:75873456-75873642, and chr3:47048304-47048512 may be important factors regulating the expression of mRNAs as they have previously been reported associations with MDD. This study is the first to explore genome-wide lncRNA expression and co-expression with mRNA patterns in MDD using microarray technology. We identified circulating lncRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in MDD and the results suggest that lncRNAs may contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of MDD.

  15. Comparative study of the distribution of the alpha-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels in normal and axotomized rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Obata, Koichi; Dai, Yi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2008-09-10

    We compared the distribution of the alpha-subunit mRNAs of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.1-1.3 and Nav1.6-1.9 and a related channel, Nax, in histochemically identified neuronal subpopulations of the rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In the naïve DRG, the expression of Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 was restricted to A-fiber neurons, and they were preferentially expressed by TrkC neurons, suggesting that proprioceptive neurons possess these channels. Nav1.7, -1.8, and -1.9 mRNAs were more abundant in C-fiber neurons compared with A-fiber ones. Nax was evenly expressed in both populations. Although Nav1.8 and -1.9 were preferentially expressed by TrkA neurons, other alpha-subunits were expressed independently of TrkA expression. Actually, all IB4(+) neurons expressed both Nav1.8 and -1.9, and relatively limited subpopulations of IB4(+) neurons (3% and 12%, respectively) expressed Nav1.1 and/or Nav1.6. These findings provide useful information in interpreting the electrophysiological characteristics of some neuronal subpopulations of naïve DRG. After L5 spinal nerve ligation, Nav1.3 mRNA was up-regulated mainly in A-fiber neurons in the ipsilateral L5 DRG. Although previous studies demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reversed this up-regulation, the Nav1.3 induction was independent of either TrkA or GFRalpha1 expression, suggesting that the induction of Nav1.3 may be one of the common responses of axotomized DRG neurons without a direct relationship to NGF/GDNF supply. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode......The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR expression profile of the target APCs. Here, we review state-of-the-art formulation approaches employed for the inclusion of immunostimulators and subunit...

  17. A heavy load for heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 25 September, the two large coils for the dipole magnet of ALICE, the LHC experiment dedicated to heavy ions, arrived at Point 2 on two heavy load trucks after a 1200 km journey from their assembly in Vannes, France.

  18. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  19. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  20. Development of a Subunit Vaccine for Contagious Bovine ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Their work has set the stage for commercial development of a sub-unit vaccine. ... The sub-unit vaccine will be cost-effective, easy to produce, and safe. How it will make a ... IDRC invites applications for the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards.

  1. Chronic Stress Triggers Expression of Immediate Early Genes and Differentially Affects the Expression of AMPA and NMDA Subunits in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Pacheco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in rats have demonstrated that chronic restraint stress triggers anhedonia, depressive-like behaviors, anxiety and a reduction in dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons. In this study, we compared the effect of repeated stress on the expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor subunits in dorsal and ventral hippocampus (VH. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and stressed groups, and were daily restrained in their motion (2.5 h/day during 14 days. We found that chronic stress promotes an increase in c-Fos mRNA levels in both hippocampal areas, although it was observed a reduction in the immunoreactivity at pyramidal cell layer. Furthermore, Arc mRNAs levels were increased in both dorsal and VH, accompanied by an increase in Arc immunoreactivity in dendritic hippocampal layers. Furthermore, stress triggered a reduction in PSD-95 and NR1 protein levels in whole extract of dorsal and VH. Moreover, a reduction in NR2A/NR2B ratio was observed only in dorsal pole. In synaptosomal fractions, we detected a rise in NR1 in dorsal hippocampus (DH. By indirect immunofluorescence we found that NR1 subunits rise, especially in neuropil areas of dorsal, but not VH. In relation to AMPA receptor (AMPAR subunits, chronic stress did not trigger any change, either in dorsal or ventral hippocampal areas. These data suggest that DH is more sensitive than VH to chronic stress exposure, mainly altering the expression of NMDA receptor (NMDAR subunits, and probably favors changes in the configuration of this receptor that may influence the function of this area.

  2. Studies on the subunits of human glycoprotein hormones in relation to reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, C.

    1977-01-01

    In this review summarising present knowledge of the biological and immunological activity of the subunits of human glycoprotein hormones, the specificity of the α-subunit and β-subunit radioimmunoassays are discussed. The crossreaction studies performed with the α-subunit radioimmunoassays are aummarised in one table while those with the β-subunit radioimmunoassays are presented in a second table. (JIW)

  3. INTRINSIC REGULATION OF HEMOGLOBIN EXPRESSION BY VARIABLE SUBUNIT INTERFACE STRENGTHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, James M.; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Manning, Lois R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expression of the six types of human hemoglobin subunits over time is currently considered to be regulated mainly by transcription factors that bind to upstream control regions of the gene (the “extrinsic” component of regulation). Here we describe how subunit pairing and further assembly to tetramers in the liganded state is influenced by the affinity of subunits for one another (the “intrinsic” component of regulation). The adult hemoglobin dimers have the strongest subunit interfaces and the embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest with fetal hemoglobins of intermediate strength, corresponding to the temporal order of their expression. These variable subunit binding strengths and the attenuating effects of acetylation contribute to the differences with which these hemoglobin types form functional O2-binding tetramers consistent with gene switching. PMID:22129306

  4. Positive selection at codon 38 of the human KCNE1 (= minK gene and sporadic absence of 38Ser-coding mRNAs in Gly38Ser heterozygotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeufer Arne

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KCNE1 represents the regulatory beta-subunit of the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKs. Variants of KCNE1 have repeatedly been linked to the long-QT syndrome (LQTS, a disorder which predisposes to deafness, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, syncope, and sudden cardiac death. Results We here analyze the evolution of the common Gly38Ser variant (rs1805127, using genomic DNAs, complementary DNAs, and HEK293-expressed variants of altogether 19 mammalian species. The between species comparison reveals that the human-specific Gly38Ser polymorphism evolved under strong positive Darwinian selection, probably in adaptation to specific challenges in the fine-tuning of IKs channels. The involved amino acid exchanges (Asp > Gly, Gly > Ser are moderately radical and do not induce apparent changes in posttranslational modification. According to population genetic analyses (HapMap phase II a heterozygote advantage accounts for the maintenance of the Gly38Ser polymorphism in humans. On the other hand, the expression of the 38Ser allele seems to be disadvantageous under certain conditions, as suggested by the sporadic deficiency of 38Ser-coding mRNAs in heterozygote Central Europeans and the depletion of homozygotes 38Ser in the Yoruban sample. Conclusion We speculate that individual differences in genomic imprinting or genomic recoding might have contributed to conflicting results of recent association studies between Gly38Ser polymorphism and QT phenotype. The findings thus highlight the relevance of mRNA data in future association studies of genotypes and clinical disorders. To the best of our knowledge, they moreover provide first time evidence for a unique pattern; i.e. coincidence of positive Darwinian selection and polymorphism with a sporadically suppressed expression of one allele.

  5. Complementary DNA and derived amino acid sequence of the β subunit of human complement protein C8: identification of a close structural and ancestral relationship to the α subunit and C9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, O.M.Z.; Rao, A.G.; Sodetz, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the β subunit (M/sub r/ 64,000) of the eighth component of complement (C8) has been isolated from a human liver cDNA library. This clone has a cDNA insert of 1.95 kilobases (kb) and contains the entire β sequence [1608 base pairs (bp)]. Analysis of total cellular RNA isolated from the hepatoma cell line HepG2 revealed the mRNA for β to be ∼ 2.5 kb. This is similar to the message size for the α subunit of C8 and confirms the existence of different mRNAs for α and β. This finding supports genetic evidence that α and β are encoded at different loci. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed several membrane surface seeking segments that may facilitate β interaction with target membranes during complement-mediated cytolysis. Determined of the carbohydrate composition indicated 1 or 2 asparagine-linked but no O-linked oligosaccharide chains. Comparison of the β sequence to that reported earlier and to that of human C9 revealed a striking homology between all three proteins. For β and α, the overall homology is 33% on the basis of identity and 53% when conserved substitutions are allowed. For β and C9, the values are 26% and 47 5 , respectively. All three have a large internal domain that is nearly cysteine free and N- and C-termini that are cysteine-rich and homologous to the low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat and epidermal growth factor type sequences, respectively. The overall homology and similarities in size and structural organization are indicative of a close ancestral relationship. It is concluded that α, β and C9 are members of a family of structurally related proteins that are capable of interacting to produce a hydrophilic to amphiphilic transition and membrane association

  6. Genome-Wide Maps of m6A circRNAs Identify Widespread and Cell-Type-Specific Methylation Patterns that Are Distinct from mRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available N6-methyladenosine (m6A is the most abundant internal modification of mRNAs and is implicated in all aspects of post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. However, little is known about m6A modifications to circular (circ RNAs. We developed a computational pipeline (AutoCirc that, together with depletion of ribosomal RNA and m6A immunoprecipitation, defined thousands of m6A circRNAs with cell-type-specific expression. The presence of m6A circRNAs is corroborated by interaction between circRNAs and YTHDF1/YTHDF2, proteins that read m6A sites in mRNAs, and by reduced m6A levels upon depletion of METTL3, the m6A writer. Despite sharing m6A readers and writers, m6A circRNAs are frequently derived from exons that are not methylated in mRNAs, whereas mRNAs that are methylated on the same exons that compose m6A circRNAs exhibit less stability in a process regulated by YTHDF2. These results expand our understanding of the breadth of m6A modifications and uncover regulation of circRNAs through m6A modification.

  7. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups.

  8. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, K Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  9. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kevin Pfister

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  10. Soil heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherameti, Irena [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Pflanzenphysiologie; Varma, Ajit (eds.) [Amity Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India). Amity Inst. of Microbial Technology; Amity Science, Technology and Innovation Foundation, Noida, UP (India)

    2010-07-01

    Human activities have dramatically changed the composition and organisation of soils. Industrial and urban wastes, agricultural application and also mining activities resulted in an increased concentration of heavy metals in soils. How plants and soil microorganisms cope with this situation and the sophisticated techniques developed for survival in contaminated soils is discussed in this volume. The topics presented include: the general role of heavy metals in biological soil systems; the relation of inorganic and organic pollutions; heavy metal, salt tolerance and combined effects with salinity; effects on abuscular mycorrhizal and on saprophytic soil fungi; heavy metal resistance by streptomycetes; trace element determination of environmental samples; the use of microbiological communities as indicators; phytostabilization of lead polluted sites by native plants; effects of soil earthworms on removal of heavy metals and the remediation of heavy metal contaminated tropical land. (orig.)

  11. Unusually effective microRNA targeting within repeat-rich coding regions of mammalian mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall-Levin, Michael; Rissland, Olivia S.; Johnston, Wendy K.; Perrimon, Norbert; Bartel, David P.; Berger, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate numerous biological processes by base-pairing with target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), primarily through sites in 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), to direct the repression of these targets. Although miRNAs have sometimes been observed to target genes through sites in open reading frames (ORFs), large-scale studies have shown such targeting to be generally less effective than 3′ UTR targeting. Here, we show that several miRNAs each target significant groups of genes through multiple sites within their coding regions. This ORF targeting, which mediates both predictable and effective repression, arises from highly repeated sequences containing miRNA target sites. We show that such sequence repeats largely arise through evolutionary duplications and occur particularly frequently within families of paralogous C2H2 zinc-finger genes, suggesting the potential for their coordinated regulation. Examples of ORFs targeted by miR-181 include both the well-known tumor suppressor RB1 and RBAK, encoding a C2H2 zinc-finger protein and transcriptional binding partner of RB1. Our results indicate a function for repeat-rich coding sequences in mediating post-transcriptional regulation and reveal circumstances in which miRNA-mediated repression through ORF sites can be reliably predicted. PMID:21685129

  12. Circulating mRNAs and miRNAs as candidate markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, Marilesia Ferreira de; Kuasne, Hellen; Barros-Filho, Mateus de Camargo

    2017-01-01

    Circulating nucleic acids are found in free form in body fluids and may serve as minimally invasive tools for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Only a few studies have investigated the potential application of circulating mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) in prostate cancer (PCa). The Cancer Genome Atlas......RNA expression revealed eleven genes and eight miRNAs which were validated by RT-qPCR in plasma samples from 102 untreated PCa patients and 50 cancer-free individuals. Two genes, OR51E2 and SIM2, and two miRNAs, miR-200c and miR-200b, showed significant association with PCa. Expression levels...... of these transcripts distinguished PCa patients from controls (67% sensitivity and 75% specificity). PCa patients and controls with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 4.0 ng/mL were discriminated based on OR51E2 and SIM2 expression levels. The miR-200c expression showed association with Gleason score and miR-200b...

  13. Time-Dependent Expression Profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs in Rat Milk Whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hirohisa; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Takashi; Sekine, Kazunori; Ochiya, Takahiro; Takase, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    Functional RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, are present in milk, but their roles are unknown. To clarify the roles of milk RNAs, further studies using experimental animals such as rats are needed. However, it is unclear whether rat milk also contains functional RNAs and what their time dependent expression profiles are. Thus, we prepared total RNA from whey isolated from rat milk collected on days 2, 9, and 16 postpartum and analyzed using microarrays and quantitative PCR. The concentration of RNA in colostrum whey (day 2) was markedly higher than that in mature milk whey (days 9 and 16). Microarray analysis detected 161 miRNAs and 10,948 mRNA transcripts. Most of the miRNAs and mRNA transcripts were common to all tested milks. Finally, we selected some immune- and development-related miRNAs and mRNAs, and analysed them by quantitative PCR (in equal sample volumes) to determine their time-dependent changes in expression in detail. Some were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum whey than in mature milk whey, but some were expressed equally. And mRNA expression levels of some cytokines and hormones did not reflect the protein levels. It is still unknown whether RNAs in milk play biological roles in neonates. However, our data will help guide future in vivo studies using experimental animals such as rats. PMID:24533154

  14. Expression Pattern of Myogenic Regulatory Transcription Factor mRNAs in the Embryo and Adult Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archya Sengupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of skeletal muscle development is important to meet the increasing demand of Indian major carp Labeo rohita. Myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs along with myocyte specific enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 play the pivotal role in the determination and differentiation of skeletal muscle. The majority of skeletal muscle genes require both MRFs and MEF2 family members to activate their transcription. In this study, the expression pattern of MyoD, myf-5, myogenin, and MEF2A was observed from 6 h after fertilization to 12 months of age using semiquantitative RT-PCR as well as real-time PCR method. MyoD and myf-5 mRNAs were expressed at high level at the early embryonic stages. Myogenin and MEF2A were expressed after MyoD and myf-5 and remained active up to adult stage. Expression of MyoD was lower than that of Myf-5 after the 5th month. Partial sequencing of MyoD, myf-5, and MEF2A was done to draw phylogeny. In phylogenetic study, Labeo MyoD, MEF2A and myf-5 were found to be closely related to those of common carp. The present investigation suggests that the four transcription factors play pivotal role in the regulation of muscle growth of Labeo rohita in an overlapping and interconnected way.

  15. Extreme heterogeneity of polyadenylation sites in mRNAs encoding chloroplast RNA-binding proteins in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahre, U; Hemmings-Mieszczak, M; Filipowicz, W

    1995-06-01

    We have previously characterized nuclear cDNA clones encoding two RNA binding proteins, CP-RBP30 and CP-RBP-31, which are targeted to chloroplasts in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. In this report we describe the analysis of the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) in 22 CP-RBP30 and 8 CP-RBP31 clones which reveals that mRNAs encoding both proteins have a very complex polyadenylation pattern. Fourteen distinct poly(A) sites were identified among CP-RBP30 clones and four sites among the CP-RBP31 clones. The authenticity of the sites was confirmed by RNase A/T1 mapping of N. plumbaginifolia RNA. CP-RBP30 provides an extreme example of the heterogeneity known to be a feature of mRNA polyadenylation in higher plants. Using PCR we have demonstrated that CP-RBP genes in N. plumbaginifolia and N. sylvestris, in addition to the previously described introns interrupting the coding region, contain an intron located in the 3' non-coding part of the gene. In the case of the CP-RBP31, we have identified one polyadenylation event occurring in this intron.

  16. Analysis of transcription factor mRNAs in identified oxytocin and vasopressin magnocellular neurons isolated by laser capture microdissection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Humerick

    Full Text Available The oxytocin (Oxt and vasopressin (Avp magnocellular neurons (MCNs in the hypothalamus are the only neuronal phenotypes that are present in the supraoptic nucleus (SON, and are characterized by their robust and selective expression of either the Oxt or Avp genes. In this paper, we take advantage of the differential expression of these neuropeptide genes to identify and isolate these two individual phenotypes from the rat SON by laser capture microdissection (LCM, and to analyze the differential expression of several of their transcription factor mRNAs by qRT-PCR. We identify these neuronal phenotypes by stereotaxically injecting recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral (rAAV vectors which contain cell-type specific Oxt or Avp promoters that drive expression of EGFP selectively in either the Oxt or Avp MCNs into the SON. The fluorescent MCNs are then dissected by LCM using a novel Cap Road Map protocol described in this paper, and the purified MCNs are extracted for their RNAs. qRT-PCR of these RNAs show that some transcription factors (RORA and c-jun are differentially expressed in the Oxt and Avp MCNs.

  17. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile; Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen; Cosson, Bertrand; Paillard, Luc; Poncet, Didier; Osborne, H. Beverley

    2009-01-01

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  18. The Binding Sites of miR-619-5p in the mRNAs of Human and Orthologous Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atambayeva, Shara; Niyazova, Raigul; Ivashchenko, Anatoliy; Pyrkova, Anna; Pinsky, Ilya; Akimniyazova, Aigul; Labeit, Siegfried

    2017-06-01

    Normally, one miRNA interacts with the mRNA of one gene. However, there are miRNAs that can bind to many mRNAs, and one mRNA can be the target of many miRNAs. This significantly complicates the study of the properties of miRNAs and their diagnostic and medical applications. The search of 2,750 human microRNAs (miRNAs) binding sites in 12,175 mRNAs of human genes using the MirTarget program has been completed. For the binding sites of the miR-619-5p the hybridization free energy of the bonds was equal to 100% of the maximum potential free energy. The mRNAs of 201 human genes have complete complementary binding sites of miR-619-5p in the 3'UTR (214 sites), CDS (3 sites), and 5'UTR (4 sites). The mRNAs of CATAD1, ICA1L, GK5, POLH, and PRR11 genes have six miR-619-5p binding sites, and the mRNAs of OPA3 and CYP20A1 genes have eight and ten binding sites, respectively. All of these miR-619-5p binding sites are located in the 3'UTRs. The miR-619-5p binding site in the 5'UTR of mRNA of human USP29 gene is found in the mRNAs of orthologous genes of primates. Binding sites of miR-619-5p in the coding regions of mRNAs of C8H8orf44, C8orf44, and ISY1 genes encode the WLMPVIP oligopeptide, which is present in the orthologous proteins. Binding sites of miR-619-5p in the mRNAs of transcription factor genes ZNF429 and ZNF429 encode the AHACNP oligopeptide in another reading frame. Binding sites of miR-619-5p in the 3'UTRs of all human target genes are also present in the 3'UTRs of orthologous genes of mammals. The completely complementary binding sites for miR-619-5p are conservative in the orthologous mammalian genes. The majority of miR-619-5p binding sites are located in the 3'UTRs but some genes have miRNA binding sites in the 5'UTRs of mRNAs. Several genes have binding sites for miRNAs in the CDSs that are read in different open reading frames. Identical nucleotide sequences of binding sites encode different amino acids in different proteins. The binding sites of miR-619-5p

  19. Heavy-ion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter examines the characteristics of targets required in heavy-ion accelerator physics experiments. The effects of target parameters on heavy-ion experimental results are reviewed. The target fabrication and characterization techniques used to minimize experimental problems during heavy-ion bombardment are described. Topics considered include target thickness and uniformity, target lifetime, target purity, substrate materials, Doppler shift effects, metal preparations, and target preparation methods

  20. Heavy quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  1. Heavy quark effective theory and study of heavy hadron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yubing

    1995-01-01

    By employing the heavy quark effective theory, the spectra of heavy hadrons, such as heavy mesons (Q-barq), heavy baryons (QQq and Qqq) and heavy multiquark systems (Q-barQ-barqq) are studied systemically. The results are compared with the predictions for Q-barQ-barqq in potential model

  2. Heavy baryon transitions and the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy baryon decays are studied in the context of the Bethe-Salpeter approach to the heavy quark effective theory. A drastic reduction, in the number of independent form factors, is found. Results are presented both for heavy to heavy and heavy to light baryon decays. (orig.)

  3. Heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpakchieva, R.; Cherepanov, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The international school-seminar on heavy ion physics had been organized in Dubna in may of 1993. The scientific program of reports covers the following main topics: synthesis and properties of heavy nuclei; synthesis and investigation of properties of exotic nuclei; experiments with radioactive nuclear beams; interaction between complex nuclei at low and intermediate energies. It also includes reports on laser spectroscopy and exotic nuclear beams, on some application of heavy ion beams for the problems of solid state physics, on construction of multidetector facilities and on developing of heavy ion accelerator complexes. Short communication

  4. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.; Woodruff, K.H.; MacFarland, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    High energy, heavy-ion beams offer superior discrimination of tissue electron densities at very low radiation doses. This characteristic has potential for diagnostic medical imaging of neoplasms arising in the soft tissues and organs because it can detect smaller inhomogeneities than x rays. Heavy-ion imaging may also increase the accuracy of cancer radiotherapy planning involving use of accelerated charged particles. In the current physics research program of passive heavy-ion imaging, critical modulation transfer function tests are being carried out in heavy-ion projection radiography and heavy-ion computerized tomography. The research goal is to improve the heavy-ion imaging method until it reaches the limits of its theoretical resolution defined by range straggling, multiple scattering, and other factors involved in the beam quality characteristics. Clinical uses of the imaging method include the application of heavy-ion computerized tomography to heavy-ion radiotherapy planning, to the study of brain tumors and other structures of the head, and to low-dose heavy-ion projection mammography, particularly for women with dense breasts where other methods of diagnosis fail. The ions used are primarily 300 to 570 MeV/amu carbon and neon ions accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac

  5. Production of heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Larry S.; Brown, Sam W.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2017-06-06

    Disclosed are methods and apparatuses for producing heavy water. In one embodiment, a catalyst is treated with high purity air or a mixture of gaseous nitrogen and oxygen with gaseous deuterium all together flowing over the catalyst to produce the heavy water. In an alternate embodiment, the deuterium is combusted to form the heavy water. In an alternate embodiment, gaseous deuterium and gaseous oxygen is flowed into a fuel cell to produce the heavy water. In various embodiments, the deuterium may be produced by a thermal decomposition and distillation process that involves heating solid lithium deuteride to form liquid lithium deuteride and then extracting the gaseous deuterium from the liquid lithium deuteride.

  6. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  7. Expression patterns of mRNAs for methanotrophy and thiotrophy in symbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendeberg, Annelie; Zielinski, Frank U; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis (Mytilidae) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hosts symbiotic sulfur- and methane-oxidizing bacteria in its gills. In this study, we investigated the activity and distribution of these two symbionts in juvenile mussels from the Logatchev hydrothermal vent field (14°45′N Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Expression patterns of two key genes for chemosynthesis were examined: pmoA (encoding subunit A of the particulate methane monooxygenase) as an indicator for methanotrophy, and aprA (encoding the subunit A of the dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase) as an indicator for thiotrophy. Using simultaneous fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of rRNA and mRNA we observed highest mRNA FISH signals toward the ciliated epithelium where seawater enters the gills. The levels of mRNA expression differed between individual specimens collected in a single grab from the same sampling site, whereas no obvious differences in symbiont abundance or distribution were observed. We propose that the symbionts respond to the steep temporal and spatial gradients in methane, reduced sulfur compounds and oxygen by modifying gene transcription, whereas changes in symbiont abundance and distribution take much longer than regulation of mRNA expression and may only occur in response to long-term changes in vent fluid geochemistry. PMID:21734728

  8. Heavy-Quark Production

    CERN Document Server

    Frixione, Stefano; Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1997-01-01

    We review the present theoretical and experimental status of heavy quark production in high-energy collisions. In particular, we cover hadro- and photoproduction at fixed target experiments, at HERA and at the hadron colliders, as well as aspects of heavy quark production in e+e- collisions at the Z0 peak.

  9. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-05-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of our research and development program on heavy water processes

  10. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    This report on the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion held May 27-29, 1986 summarizes the problems and achievements in the areas of targets, accelerators, focussing, reactor studies, and system studies. The symposium participants recognize that there are large uncertainties in Heavy Ion Fusion but many of them are also optimistic that HIF may ultimately be the best approach to fusion

  11. Pituitary glycoprotein hormone a-subunit secretion by cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of the a-subunit of pituitary glycoprotein hormones usually follows the secretion of intact gonadotropins and is increased in gonadal failure and decreased in isolated gonadotropin deficiency. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of the a-subunit in the serum of patients with cirrhosis of the liver and to compare the results obtained for eugonadal cirrhotic patients with those obtained for cirrhotic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Forty-seven of 63 patients with cirrhosis (74.6% presented hypogonadism (which was central in 45 cases and primary in 2, 7 were eugonadal, and 9 women were in normal menopause. The serum a-subunit was measured by the fluorimetric method using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity with LH, TSH, FSH and hCG was 6.5, 1.2, 4.3 and 1.1%, respectively, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of less than 5% and an interassay CV of 5%, and sensitivity limit of 4 ng/l. The serum a-subunit concentration ranged from 36 to 6253 ng/l, with a median of 273 ng/l. The median was 251 ng/l for patients with central hypogonadism and 198 ng/l for eugonadal patients. The correlation between the a-subunit and basal LH levels was significant both in the total sample (r = 0.48, P<0.01 and in the cirrhotic patients with central hypogonadism (r = 0.33, P = 0.02. Among men with central hypogonadism there was a negative correlation between a-subunit levels and total testosterone levels (r = 0.54, P<0.01 as well as free testosterone levels (r = -0.53, P<0.01. In conclusion, although the a-subunit levels are correlated with LH levels, at present they cannot be used as markers for hypogonadism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  12. Heavy water and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.M.

    1980-05-01

    This report begins with a historical sketch of heavy water. The report next assesses the nonproliferation implications of the use of heavy water-moderated power reactors; several different reactor types are discussed, but the focus is on the natural uranium, on-power fueled, pressure tube reactor CANDU. The need for and development of on-power fueling safeguards is discussed. Also considered is the use of heavy water in plutonium production reactors as well as the broader issue of the relative nuclear leverage that suppliers can bring to bear on countries with natural uranium-fueled reactors as compared to those using enriched designs. The final chapter reviews heavy water production methods and analyzes the difficulties involved in implementing these on both a large and a small scale. It concludes with an overview of proprietary and nonproliferation constraints on heavy water technology transfer

  13. HNRNPLL stabilizes mRNAs for DNA replication proteins and promotes cell cycle progression in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Eiichi; Kimura, Kenya; Komori, Koji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yatabe, Yasushi; Aoki, Masahiro

    2018-06-05

    HNRNPLL (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like), an RNA-binding protein that regulates alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs, has been shown to regulate differentiation of lymphocytes, as well as metastasis of colorectal cancer cells. Here we show that HNRNPLL promotes cell cycle progression and hence proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. Functional annotation analysis of those genes whose expression levels were changed by three-fold or more in RNA sequencing analysis between SW480 cells overexpressing HNRNPLL and those knocked down for HNRNPLL revealed enrichment of DNA replication-related genes by HNRNPLL overexpression. Among 13 genes detected in the DNA replication pathway, PCNA, RFC3, and FEN1 showed reproducible upregulation by HNRNPLL overexpression both at mRNA and protein levels in SW480 and HT29 cells. Importantly, knockdown of any of these genes alone suppressed the proliferation promoting effect induced by HNRNPLL overexpression. RNA-immunoprecipitation assay presented a binding of FLAG-tagged HNRNPLL to mRNA of these genes, and HNRNPLL overexpression significantly suppressed the downregulation of these genes during 12 hours of actinomycin D treatment, suggesting a role of HNRNPLL in mRNA stability. Finally, analysis of a public RNA sequencing dataset of clinical samples suggested a link between overexpression of HNRNPLL and that of PCNA, RFC3, and FEN1. This link was further supported by immunohistochemistry of colorectal cancer clinical samples, whereas expression of CDKN1A, which is known to inhibit the cooperative function of PCNA, RFC3, and FEN1, was negatively associated with HNRNPLL expression. These results indicate that HNRNPLL stabilizes mRNAs encoding regulators of DNA replication and promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Analyzing the interactions of mRNAs, miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs to predict competing endogenous RNA networks in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Jiaoming, Li; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Shu, Jiang; Maling, Gou; Qing, Mao

    2018-05-01

    Cross-talk between competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) may play a critical role in revealing potential mechanisms of tumor development and physiology. Glioblastoma is the most common type of malignant primary brain tumor, and the mechanisms of tumor genesis and development in glioblastoma are unclear. Here, to investigate the role of non-coding RNAs and the ceRNA network in glioblastoma, we performed paired-end RNA sequencing and microarray analyses to obtain the expression profiles of mRNAs, lncRNAs, circRNAs and miRNAs. We identified that the expression of 501 lncRNAs, 1999 mRNAs, 2038 circRNAs and 143 miRNAs were often altered between glioblastoma and matched normal brain tissue. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses were performed on these differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNA-mediated target genes of lncRNAs and circRNAs. Furthermore, we used a multi-step computational framework and several bioinformatics methods to construct a ceRNA network combining mRNAs, miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNA, based on co-expression analysis between the differentially expressed RNAs. We identified that plenty of lncRNAs, CircRNAs and their downstream target genes in the ceRNA network are related to glutamatergic synapse, suggesting that glutamate metabolism is involved in glioma biological functions. Our results will accelerate the understanding of tumorigenesis, cancer progression and even therapeutic targeting in glioblastoma.

  15. Microarray-based identification and RT-PCR test screening for epithelial-specific mRNAs in peripheral blood of patients with colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppola Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of screening for colorectal cancer using a simple blood-based assay for the detection of tumor cells disseminated in the circulation at an early stage of the disease is gaining positive feedback from several lines of research. This method seems able to reduce colorectal cancer mortality and may replace colonoscopy as the most effective means of detecting colonic lesions. Methods In this work, we present a new microarray-based high-throughput screening method to identifying candidate marker mRNAs for the early detection of epithelial cells diluted in peripheral blood cells. This method includes 1. direct comparison of different samples of colonic mucosa and of blood cells to identify consistent epithelial-specific mRNAs from among 20,000 cDNA assayed by microarray slides; 2. identification of candidate marker mRNAs by data analysis, which allowed selection of only 10 putative differentially expressed genes; 3. Selection of some of the most suitable mRNAs (TMEM69, RANBP3 and PRSS22 that were assayed in blood samples from normal subjects and patients with colon cancer as possible markers for the presence of epithelial cells in the blood, using reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Our present results seem to provide an indication, for the first time obtained by genome-scale screening, that a suitable and consistent colon epithelium mRNA marker may be difficult to identify. Conclusion The design of new approaches to identify such markers is warranted.

  16. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  17. Phenol emulsion-enhanced DNA-driven subtractive cDNA cloning: isolation of low-abundance monkey cortex-specific mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, G.H.; Sutcliffe, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    To isolate cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs expressed in monkey cerebral cortex but absent from cerebellum, the authors developed an improved subtractive cDNA cloning procedure that requires only modest quantities of mRNA. Plasmid DNA from a monkey cerebellum cDNA library was hybridized in large excess to radiolabeled monkey cortex cDNA in a phenol emulsion-enhanced reaction. The unhybridized cortex cDNA was isolated by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and used to probe colonies from a monkey cortex cDNA library. Of 60,000 colonies screened, 163 clones were isolated and confirmed by colony hybridization or RNA blotting to represent mRNAs, ranging from 0.001% to 0.1% abundance, specific to or highly enriched in cerebral cortex relative to cerebellum. Clones of one medium-abundance mRNA were recovered almost quantitatively. Two of the lower-abundance mRNAs were expressed at levels reduced by a factor of 10 in Alzheimer disease relative to normal human cortex. One of these was identified as the monkey preprosomatostatin I mRNA

  18. Probing the functional subunits of the tonoplast H+-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, S.K.; Lai, S.; Sze, H.

    1986-01-01

    The tonoplast ATPase of oat roots is composed of at least three polypeptides of 72, 60, and 16 kDa. The 16 kDA polypeptide covalently binds N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and is postulated to be a component of the proton channel. Initial studies to identify other subunits indicate that both the 72 and 60 kDa subunits covalently bind 14 C]-7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole and [ 14 C]N-ethylamleimide, inhibitors of the tonoplast ATPase. ATP prevents binding of these inhibitors suggesting that both the 72 and 60 kDa subunits are involved in substrate binding. Polyclonal antibody has been made to the 72 kDa subunit. Western blot analysis of tonoplast vesicles reveals single reactive polypeptide (72 kDa). The antibody shows no cross-reactivity towards either the mitochondrial F 1 -ATPase or the plasma membrane ATPase. This antibody specifically inhibits ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent H + pumping in native tonoplast vesicles. The authors conclude that the 72 kDa subunit is intimately associated with the catalytic (or ATP-binding) site

  19. Role of regulatory subunits and protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) in determining nuclear localization and activity of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J C; Wailes, L A; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1999-03-05

    Regulation of protein kinase A by subcellular localization may be critical to target catalytic subunits to specific substrates. We employed epitope-tagged catalytic subunit to correlate subcellular localization and gene-inducing activity in the presence of regulatory subunit or protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). Transiently expressed catalytic subunit distributed throughout the cell and induced gene expression. Co-expression of regulatory subunit or PKI blocked gene induction and prevented nuclear accumulation. A mutant PKI lacking the nuclear export signal blocked gene induction but not nuclear accumulation, demonstrating that nuclear export is not essential to inhibit gene induction. When the catalytic subunit was targeted to the nucleus with a nuclear localization signal, it was not sequestered in the cytoplasm by regulatory subunit, although its activity was completely inhibited. PKI redistributed the nuclear catalytic subunit to the cytoplasm and blocked gene induction, demonstrating that the nuclear export signal of PKI can override a strong nuclear localization signal. With increasing PKI, the export process appeared to saturate, resulting in the return of catalytic subunit to the nucleus. These results demonstrate that both the regulatory subunit and PKI are able to completely inhibit the gene-inducing activity of the catalytic subunit even when the catalytic subunit is forced to concentrate in the nuclear compartment.

  20. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained

  1. Novel subunit structure observed for noncooperative hemoglobin from Urechis caupo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolatkar, P R; Meador, W E; Stanfield, R L; Hackert, M L

    1988-03-05

    Tetrameric hemoglobin from the "fat innkeeper" worm Urechis caupo possesses a novel subunit arrangement having an "inside out" quaternary structure in that the G/H helices are located on the outer surface of the tetramer. A 5-A resolution crystal structure reveals that although the individual subunits are beta-like, having a distinct D helix and the general myoglobin fold, the subunit contacts are very different from those previously observed for hemoglobins. Furthermore, the hemoglobin from U. caupo is also quite different from the unusual hemoglobin tetramer from clam which also has its G/H helices on the outer surface but with the hemes in close proximity through E-F helical contacts (Royer, W. E., Jr., Love, W. E., and Fenderson, F. F. (1985) Nature 316, 277-280).

  2. Dynamic properties of motor proteins with two subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; III, Hubert Phillips

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of motor protein molecules consisting of two subunits is investigated using simple discrete stochastic models. Exact steady-state analytical expressions are obtained for velocities and dispersions for any number of intermediate states and conformations between the corresponding binding states of proteins. These models enable us to provide a detailed description and comparison of two different mechanisms of the motion of motor proteins along the linear tracks: the hand-over-hand mechanism, when the motion of subunits alternate; and the inchworm mechanism, when one subunit is always trailing another one. It is shown that the proteins in the hand-over-hand mechanism move faster and fluctuate more than the molecules in the inchworm mechanism. The effect of external forces on dynamic properties of motor proteins is also discussed. Finally, a quantitative method, based on experimental observations for single motor proteins, is proposed for distinguishing between two mechanisms of motion

  3. CSNAP Is a Stoichiometric Subunit of the COP9 Signalosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Rozen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly conserved COP9 signalosome (CSN complex is a key regulator of all cullin-RING-ubiquitin ligases (CRLs, the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Until now, it was accepted that the CSN is composed of eight canonical components. Here, we report the discovery of an additional integral and stoichiometric subunit that had thus far evaded detection, and we named it CSNAP (CSN acidic protein. We show that CSNAP binds CSN3, CSN5, and CSN6, and its incorporation into the CSN complex is mediated through the C-terminal region involving conserved aromatic residues. Moreover, depletion of this small protein leads to reduced proliferation and a flattened and enlarged morphology. Finally, on the basis of sequence and structural properties shared by both CSNAP and DSS1, a component of the related 19S lid proteasome complex, we propose that CSNAP, the ninth CSN subunit, is the missing paralogous subunit of DSS1.

  4. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan J. Baldauf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT, which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA and the B subunit (CTB. CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction.

  5. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    , such as influenza, tuberculosis, and Ebola, for which no good universal vaccines exist. At least two pharmaceutical improvements are expected to help filling this gap: i) The development of thermostable vaccine dosage forms, and ii) the full exploitation of the adjuvant technology for subunit vaccines to potentiate...... strong immune responses. This review highlights the status and recent advances in formulation and pulmonary delivery of thermostable human subunit vaccines. Such vaccines are very appealing from compliance, distribution and immunological point of view: Being non-invasive, inhalable vaccines are self...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  6. Phenomenology of heavy leptons and heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1978-11-01

    The review of the quark and lepton family includes properties of the tau, SU(2) x U(1) classification of the tau and its decays, heavier leptons, the spectroscopy of heavy hadrons composed of quarks, their strong and electromagnetic decays, the weak interaction properties of the c, b, and t quarks, and the decays of hadrons containing them expected within the context of the standard SU(2) x U(1) model. 76 references

  7. Heavy Flavour Production

    CERN Document Server

    Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1995-01-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour production in QCD. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results for top and bottom production are given. Selected topics in charm production are also discussed.

  8. Heavy element research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Heavy element research activities in metallurgy and ceramics during 1976 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are reviewed. Topics include: microstructure, properties and alloy design; ceramic alloy program; high resolution and high voltage electron microscopy; and powder metallurgy

  9. Heavy rain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge of the effect of heavy rain on airplane performance. Although the effects of heavy rain on airplane systems and engines are generally known, only recently has the potential aerodynamic effect of heavy rain been recognized. In 1977 the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) conducted a study of 25 aircraft accidents and incidents which occurred between 1964 and 1976 in which low-altitude wind shear could have been a contributing factor. Of the 25 cases (23 approach or landing and 2 take-off) in the study, ten cases had occurred in a rain environment, and in five cases these were classified as intense or heavy rain encounters. These results led to the reconsideration of high-intensity, short-duration rainfall as a potential weather-related aircraft safety hazard, particularly in the take-off and/or approach phases of flight.

  10. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-07

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27(kip1)and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27(kip1)mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford

  11. Heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, C.

    1974-01-01

    This review of the present state of work on heavy-ion accelerators pays particular attention to the requirements for nuclear research. It is divided into the following sections: single-particle versus collective acceleration, heavy-ion accelerators, beam quality, and a status report on the UNILAC facility. Among the topics considered are the recycling cyclotron, linacs with superconducting resonators, and acceleration to the GeV/nucleon range. (8 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  12. Heavy oils clean up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collitt, R.

    1997-01-01

    High production, transport and refining costs have long led oil companies to shun heavy crude oils. Advances in the technology of upgrading heavy oils, however, are likely to reduce transport costs and improve the refinery output. Research and development by Venezuela's state oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), has resulted in a process called Aquaconversion which permits the upgrading of heavy crude oils using a catalyst and the hydrogen from steam. This may be carried out at the wellhead in small low-pressure and relatively inexpensive units. In addition, higher distillate yields of higher value could be produced by revamping the thermal cracking units of refineries to incorporate the new technology. This has generated considerable interest in Venezuela's large extra-heavy crude oil reserves and has led multinational oil companies along with PDVSA to pledge $17 billion to their development. Even at a $2 to $3 per barrel upgrading cost, Venezuela's extra heavy crudes are competitive with lighter oils from other countries. Other major markets for the new technology are likely to be China and Russia, given their own large heavy crude reserves. (UK)

  13. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  14. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Anna; Teichert, Ines; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-06-21

    The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. The striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex is highly conserved from yeasts to humans and is an important regulator of numerous eukaryotic developmental processes, such as cellular signaling and cell development. Although functional insights into the STRIPAK complex are accumulating, the detailed molecular mechanisms of single subunits are only partially understood

  15. Potato spindle tuber viroid infection triggers degradation of chloride channel protein CLC-b-like and Ribosomal protein S3a-like mRNAs in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Iyer, Pavithran Sridharan; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2017-08-21

    It is well established that viroid derived small RNA (vd-sRNA) induces RNA silencing of endogenous mRNA. However, it remains not clear how exactly viroid infections can lead to severe symptom induction given the fact that fewer vd-sRNAs binding the specific target mRNAs were recovered from the infected plants. To answer this question, the two least expressed (+) and (-) strand vd-sRNAs of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) binding to both the 3' UTR and the coding region of tomato mRNAs were analyzed by infecting tomato plants with two variants of PSTVd. As products of these putative target mRNAs are involved in plant phenotype, the effect of this viroid on these genes were analyzed by infecting tomato plants with two variants of PSTVd. The direct interaction between the vd-sRNAs and putative mRNAs was validated by artificial microRNA experiments in a transient expression system and by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Parallel analysis of RNA ends of viroid infected plants revealed the widespread cleavage of the target mRNAs in locations other than the vd-sRNA binding site during the viroid infection implying the viroid-infection induced vd-sRNA independent degradation of endogenous mRNAs during viroid infection.

  16. Evaluation of subunit vaccines against feline immunodeficiency virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Verschoor, E.J.; Willemse, M.J.; Stam, J.G.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Pouwels, H.; Chalmers, S.K.; Sondermeijer, P.J.; Hesselink, W.; Ronde, A. de

    1996-01-01

    Subunit vaccines prepared against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection were evaluated in two trials. First, cats were immunized with bacterial expression products of an envelope fragment that contained the V3 neutralization domain of the FIV surface protein fused to either galactokinase

  17. Partial agonists and subunit selectivity at NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Rune; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2010-01-01

    Subunit-selective ligands for glutamate receptors remains an area of interest as glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and involved in a number of diseased states in the central nervous system (CNS). Few subtype-selective ligands are known, especially among the N...

  18. Therapeutic potential of Mediator complex subunits in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amol; Ansari, Suraiya A

    2018-01-01

    The multisubunit Mediator is an evolutionary conserved transcriptional coregulatory complex in eukaryotes. It is needed for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression in general as well as in a gene specific manner. Mediator complex subunits interact with different transcription factors as well as components of RNA Pol II transcription initiation complex and in doing so act as a bridge between gene specific transcription factors and general Pol II transcription machinery. Specific interaction of various Mediator subunits with nuclear receptors (NRs) and other transcription factors involved in metabolism has been reported in different studies. Evidences indicate that ligand-activated NRs recruit Mediator complex for RNA Pol II-dependent gene transcription. These NRs have been explored as therapeutic targets in different metabolic diseases; however, they show side-effects as targets due to their overlapping involvement in different signaling pathways. Here we discuss the interaction of various Mediator subunits with transcription factors involved in metabolism and whether specific interaction of these transcription factors with Mediator subunits could be potentially utilized as therapeutic strategy in a variety of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  19. α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphisms exhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Nicotine is the major addictive substance in cigarettes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are thought to play an important role in nicotine addiction of smokers. One of the genes, α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...

  20. Structural interaction of novel dendrimer and subunits with water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    interaction study with solvents are essential [4-6] and several subunits are used for .... slowed down the viscous flow with higher excess limiting viscosities of the 2,4,6- ..... Practical Organic Chemistry, 5th ed.; Wiley: New York; 1989; p 300. 14.

  1. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  2. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of hemoglobin and its isolated subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, G.R.; Cook, D.C.; Berger, R.L.; Friedman, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of 90% enriched 57Fe hemoglobin and its isolated subunits have been prepared. Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements have been made on three such samples. Sample one contained contributions of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and carbonmonoxyhemoglobin. This sample was studied from a temperature of 90 K down to 230 mK. Measurements were also made at 4.2 K using a small applied magnetic field of 1.0 T. In general, the measured quadrupole splittings and isomer shifts for each component agreed with previous measurements on single component samples in the literature, and thus demonstrated that chemically enriched hemoglobin has not been altered. The second and third samples were isolated alpha and beta subunits, respectively. We have found measurable Moessbauer spectral differences between the HbO 2 sites in the alpha subunit sample and the beta subunit sample. The measured Moessbauer spectral areas indicate that the iron ion has the largest mean-square displacement at the deoxy Hb sites as compared to that at the oxy- and carbonmonoxy Hb sites. The mean-square displacement at the HbO 2 sites is the smallest

  3. Profiling and Co-expression Network Analysis of Learned Helplessness Regulated mRNAs and lncRNAs in the Mouse Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although studies provide insights into the neurobiology of stress and depression, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their pathologies remain largely unknown. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA has been implicated in brain functions and behavior. A potential link between lncRNA and psychiatric disorders has been proposed. However, it remains undetermined whether IncRNA regulation, in the brain, contributes to stress or depression pathologies. In this study, we used a valid animal model of depression-like symptoms; namely learned helplessness, RNA-seq, Gene Ontology and co-expression network analyses to profile the expression pattern of lncRNA and mRNA in the hippocampus of mice. We identified 6346 differentially expressed transcripts. Among them, 340 lncRNAs and 3559 protein coding mRNAs were differentially expressed in helpless mice in comparison with control and/or non-helpless mice (inescapable stress resilient mice. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses indicated that induction of helplessness altered expression of mRNAs enriched in fundamental biological functions implicated in stress/depression neurobiology such as synaptic, metabolic, cell survival and proliferation, developmental and chromatin modification functions. To explore the possible regulatory roles of the altered lncRNAs, we constructed co-expression networks composed of the lncRNAs and mRNAs. Among our differentially expressed lncRNAs, 17% showed significant correlation with genes. Functional co-expression analysis linked the identified lncRNAs to several cellular mechanisms implicated in stress/depression neurobiology. Importantly, 57% of the identified regulatory lncRNAs significantly correlated with 18 different synapse-related functions. Thus, the current study identifies for the first time distinct groups of lncRNAs regulated by induction of learned helplessness in the mouse brain. Our results suggest that lncRNA-directed regulatory mechanisms might contribute to

  4. Profiling and Co-expression Network Analysis of Learned Helplessness Regulated mRNAs and lncRNAs in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoqun; Cao, Feifei; Li, Shengli; Huang, Shenglin; Li, Wei; Abumaria, Nashat

    2017-01-01

    Although studies provide insights into the neurobiology of stress and depression, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their pathologies remain largely unknown. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has been implicated in brain functions and behavior. A potential link between lncRNA and psychiatric disorders has been proposed. However, it remains undetermined whether IncRNA regulation, in the brain, contributes to stress or depression pathologies. In this study, we used a valid animal model of depression-like symptoms; namely learned helplessness, RNA-seq, Gene Ontology and co-expression network analyses to profile the expression pattern of lncRNA and mRNA in the hippocampus of mice. We identified 6346 differentially expressed transcripts. Among them, 340 lncRNAs and 3559 protein coding mRNAs were differentially expressed in helpless mice in comparison with control and/or non-helpless mice (inescapable stress resilient mice). Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses indicated that induction of helplessness altered expression of mRNAs enriched in fundamental biological functions implicated in stress/depression neurobiology such as synaptic, metabolic, cell survival and proliferation, developmental and chromatin modification functions. To explore the possible regulatory roles of the altered lncRNAs, we constructed co-expression networks composed of the lncRNAs and mRNAs. Among our differentially expressed lncRNAs, 17% showed significant correlation with genes. Functional co-expression analysis linked the identified lncRNAs to several cellular mechanisms implicated in stress/depression neurobiology. Importantly, 57% of the identified regulatory lncRNAs significantly correlated with 18 different synapse-related functions. Thus, the current study identifies for the first time distinct groups of lncRNAs regulated by induction of learned helplessness in the mouse brain. Our results suggest that lncRNA-directed regulatory mechanisms might contribute to stress

  5. An "up, no change, or down" system: Time-dependent expression of mRNAs in contused skeletal muscle of rats used for wound age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Hong; Zhu, Xi-Yan; Dong, Ta-Na; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Qi-Qing; Li, San-Qiang; Du, Qiu-Xiang

    2017-03-01

    The combined use of multiple markers is considered a promising strategy in estimating the age of wounds. We sought to develop an "up, no change, or down" system and to explore how to combine and use various parameters. In total, 78 Sprague Dawley rats were divided randomly into a control group and contusion groups of 4-, 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, 24-, 28-, 32-, 36-, 40-, 44-, and 48-h post-injury (n=6 per group). A contusion was produced in the right limb of the rats under diethyl ether anesthesia by a drop-ball technique; the animals were sacrificed at certain time points thereafter, using a lethal dose of pentobarbital. Levels of PUM2, TAB2, GJC1, and CHRNA1 mRNAs were detected in contused muscle using real-time PCR. An up, no change, or down system was developed with the relative quantities of the four mRNAs recorded as black, dark gray, or light gray boxes, representing up-, no change, or down-regulation of the gene of interest during wound repair. The four transcripts were combined and used as a marker cluster for color model analysis of each contusion group. Levels of PUM2, TAB2, and GJC1 mRNAs decreased, whereas that of CHRNA1 increased in wound repair (Psystem was adequate to distinguish most time groups with the color model. Thus, the proposed up, no change, or down system provide the means to determine the minimal periods of early wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of mRNAs that move over long distances using an RNA-Seq analysis of Arabidopsis/Nicotiana benthamiana heterografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaguchi, Michitaka; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2015-02-01

    Phloem is a conductive tissue that allocates nutrients from mature source leaves to sinks such as young developing tissues. Phloem also delivers proteins and RNA species, such as small RNAs and mRNAs. Intensive studies on plant systemic signaling revealed the essential roles of proteins and RNA species. However, many of their functions are still largely unknown, with the roles of transported mRNAs being particularly poorly understood. A major difficulty is the absence of an accurate and comprehensive list of mobile transcripts. In this study, we used a hetero-graft system with Nicotiana benthamiana as the recipient scion and Arabidopsis as the donor stock, to identify transcripts that moved long distances across the graft union. We identified 138 Arabidopsis transcripts as mobile mRNAs, which we collectively termed the mRNA mobilome. Reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR and droplet digital PCR analyses confirmed the mobility. The transcripts included potential signaling factors and, unexpectedly, more general factors. In our investigations, we found no preferred transcript length, no previously known sequence motifs in promoter or transcript sequences and no similarities between the level of the transcripts and that in the source leaves. Grafting experiments regarding the function of ERECTA, an identified transcript, showed that no function of the transcript mobilized. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying transcripts that move over long distances using a hetero-graft system between different plant taxa. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effect of high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and subunits of gliadin on physicochemical parameters of different wheat genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of functional properties of wheat flour by specific tests allows genotypes with appropriate characteristics to be selected for specific industrial uses. The objective of wheat breeding programs is to improve the quality of germplasm bank in order to be able to develop wheat with suitable gluten strength and extensibility for bread making. The aim of this study was to evaluate 16 wheat genotypes by correlating both glutenin subunits of high and low molecular weight and gliadin subunits with the physicochemical characteristics of the grain. Protein content, sedimentation volume, sedimentation index, and falling number values were analyzed after the grains were milled. Hectoliter weight and mass of 1000 seeds were also determined. The glutenin and gliadin subunits were separated using polyacrylamide gel in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The data were evaluated using variance analysis, Pearson's correlation, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis. The IPR 85, IPR Catuara TM, T 091015, and T 091069 genotypes stood out from the others, which indicate their possibly superior grain quality with higher sedimentation volume, higher sedimentation index, and higher mass of 1000 seeds; these genotypes possessed the subunits 1 (Glu-A1, 5 + 10 (Glu-D1, c (Glu-A3, and b (Glu-B3, with exception of T 091069 genotype that possessed the g allele instead of b in the Glu-B3.

  8. The RNA binding protein HuR differentially regulates unique subsets of mRNAs in estrogen receptor negative and estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jing

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discordance between steady-state levels of mRNAs and protein has been attributed to posttranscriptional control mechanisms affecting mRNA stability and translation. Traditional methods of genome wide microarray analysis, profiling steady-state levels of mRNA, may miss important mRNA targets owing to significant posttranscriptional gene regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs. Methods The ribonomic approach, utilizing RNA immunoprecipitation hybridized to microarray (RIP-Chip, provides global identification of putative endogenous mRNA targets of different RBPs. HuR is an RBP that binds to the AU-rich elements (ARE of labile mRNAs, such as proto-oncogenes, facilitating their translation into protein. HuR has been shown to play a role in cancer progression and elevated levels of cytoplasmic HuR directly correlate with increased invasiveness and poor prognosis for many cancers, including those of the breast. HuR has been described to control genes in several of the acquired capabilities of cancer and has been hypothesized to be a tumor-maintenance gene, allowing for cancers to proliferate once they are established. Results We used HuR RIP-Chip as a comprehensive and systematic method to survey breast cancer target genes in both MCF-7 (estrogen receptor positive, ER+ and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor negative, ER- breast cancer cell lines. We identified unique subsets of HuR-associated mRNAs found individually or in both cell types. Two novel HuR targets, CD9 and CALM2 mRNAs, were identified and validated by quantitative RT-PCR and biotin pull-down analysis. Conclusion This is the first report of a side-by-side genome-wide comparison of HuR-associated targets in wild type ER+ and ER- breast cancer. We found distinct, differentially expressed subsets of cancer related genes in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines, and noted that the differential regulation of two cancer-related genes by HuR was contingent upon the cellular

  9. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy-particle radiography has clinical potential as a newly developed noninvasive low-dose imaging procedure that provides increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high-energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program for medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low-dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures, brain and spinal neoplasms, and the heart. The potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, is now proving to be an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, and for the early detection of small soft-tissue tumors at low radiation dose

  10. Very heavy dark Skyrmions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    A dark sector with a solitonic component provides a means to circumvent the problem of generically low annihilation cross sections of very heavy dark matter particles. At the same time, enhanced annihilation cross sections are necessary for indirect detection of very heavy dark matter components beyond 100 TeV. Non-thermally produced dark matter in this mass range could therefore contribute to the cosmic γ-ray and neutrino flux above 100 TeV, and massive Skyrmions provide an interesting framework for the discussion of these scenarios. Therefore a Higgs portal and a neutrino portal for very heavy Skyrmion dark matter are discussed. The Higgs portal model demonstrates a dark mediator bottleneck, where limitations on particle annihilation cross sections will prevent a signal from the potentially large soliton annihilation cross sections. This problem can be avoided in models where the dark mediator decays. This is illustrated by the neutrino portal for Skyrmion dark matter. (orig.)

  11. Heavy-Load Lifting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, Kira; Oturai, Peter; Steele, Megan L

    2018-01-01

    of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal....... repetition maximum (RM), two sets of 15-20 repetitions) and heavy-load (85-90% 1RM, three sets of 5-8 repetition) upper-extremity resistance exercise separated by a one-week wash-out period. Swelling was determined by bioimpedance spectroscopy and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, with breast cancer......-related lymphedema symptoms (heaviness, swelling, pain, tightness) reported using a numeric rating scale (0-10). Order of low- versus heavy-load was randomized. All outcomes were assessed pre-, immediately post-, and 24- and 72-hours post-exercise. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate changes over...

  12. Very heavy dark Skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Rainer [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    A dark sector with a solitonic component provides a means to circumvent the problem of generically low annihilation cross sections of very heavy dark matter particles. At the same time, enhanced annihilation cross sections are necessary for indirect detection of very heavy dark matter components beyond 100 TeV. Non-thermally produced dark matter in this mass range could therefore contribute to the cosmic γ-ray and neutrino flux above 100 TeV, and massive Skyrmions provide an interesting framework for the discussion of these scenarios. Therefore a Higgs portal and a neutrino portal for very heavy Skyrmion dark matter are discussed. The Higgs portal model demonstrates a dark mediator bottleneck, where limitations on particle annihilation cross sections will prevent a signal from the potentially large soliton annihilation cross sections. This problem can be avoided in models where the dark mediator decays. This is illustrated by the neutrino portal for Skyrmion dark matter. (orig.)

  13. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Beier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general.

  14. Heavy fermion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Cooke, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The heavy-fermion ground state occurs in a few select metallic compounds as a result of interactions between f-electron and conduction-electron spins. A characteristically large electronic heat capacity at low temperature indicates that the effective electron mass of these materials is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that expected for a free-electron metal. This heavy-fermion ground state can become superconducting or antiferromagnetic, exhibiting very unusual properties. These materials and the role of muon spin rotation in their study are briefly discussed

  15. [Relativistic heavy ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, participation in the E802 Experiment, which is the first major heavy-ion experiment at the BNL-AGS, was the main focus of the group during the past four years. The emphases of the E802 experiment were on (a) accurate particle identification and measurements of spectra over a wide kinematical domain (5 degree LAB < 55 degree, p < 20 GeV/c); and (b) measurements of small-angle two-particle correlations, with event characterization tools: multiplicity array, forward and large-angle calorimeters. This experiment and other heavy ion collision experiments are discussed in this report

  16. Search for heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1977-03-01

    Direct and indirect evidence for the existence of a new heavy quark b and of new heavy neutral leptons N/sub e/ and N/sub μ/ can be sought in neutrino and e + e - scattering. These particles are expected to have right-handed currents. Discussion is given on the characteristics, production and decay of hadrons such as bb, ub and db, and of the massive neutral leptons. Muon number violation with and without N/sub e/ and N/sub μ/ is considered

  17. Heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacak, B.V.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy ion collisions at very high energies provide an opportunity to recreate in the laboratory the conditions which existed very early in the universe, just after the big bang. We prepare matter at very high energy density and search for evidence that the quarks and gluons are deconfined. I describe the kinds of observables that are experimentally accessible to characterize the system and to search for evidence of new physics. A wealth of information is now available from CERN and BNL heavy ion experiments. I discuss recent results on two particle correlations, strangeness production, and dilepton and direct photon distributions

  18. Electrophysiology and Beyond: Multiple roles of Na+ channel β subunits in development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Gustavo A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) β subunits are not “auxiliary.” These multifunctional molecules not only modulate Na+ current (INa), but also function as cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) – playing roles in aggregation, migration, invasion, neurite outgrowth, and axonal fasciculation. β subunits are integral members of VGSC signaling complexes at nodes of Ranvier, axon initial segments, and cardiac intercalated disks, regulating action potential propagation through critical intermolecular and cell-cell communication events. At least in vitro, many β subunit cell adhesive functions occur both in the presence and absence of pore-forming VGSC α subunits, and in vivo β subunits are expressed in excitable as well as non-excitable cells, thus β subunits may play important functional roles on their own, in the absence of α subunits. VGSC β1 subunits are essential for life and appear to be especially important during brain development. Mutations in β subunit genes result in a variety of human neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, some cancer cells exhibit alterations in β subunit expression during metastasis. In short, these proteins, originally thought of as merely accessory to α subunits, are critical players in their own right in human health and disease. Here we discuss the role of VGSC β subunits in the nervous system. PMID:20600605

  19. Heavy baryons in the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, J.G.; Thompson, G.

    1991-10-01

    We give a mini-review of recent results on current-induced transitions between heavy baryons (and between heavy and light baryons) in the light of the new spin and flavour symmetries of the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET). We discuss the structure of the 1/m corrections to the heavy mass limit and outline a diagrammatic proof that there are no 0(1/m) correction to the Voloshin-Shifman normalization condition at zero recoil. (orig.)

  20. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  1. Gibberellin-induced changes in the populations of translatable mRNAs and accumulated polypeptides in dwarfs of maize and pea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chory, J.; Voytas, D.F.; Olszewski, N.E.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the molecular mechanism of gibberellin-induced stem elongation in maize and pea. Dwarf mutants of maize and pea lack endogenous gibberellin (GA 1 ) but become phenotypically normal with exogenous applications of this hormone. Sections from either etiolated maize or green pea seedlings were incubated in the presence of [ 35 S] methionine for 3 hours with or without gibberellin. Labeled proteins from soluble and particulate fractions were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and specific changes in the patterns of protein synthesis were observed upon treatment with gibberellin. Polyadenylated mRNAs from etiolated or green maize shoots and green pea epicotyls treated or not with gibberellin (a 0.5 to 16 hour time course) were assayed by translation in a rabbit reticulocyte extract and separation of products by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both increases and decreases in the levels of specific polypeptides were seen for pea and corn, and these changes were observed within 30 minutes of treatment with gibberellin. Together, these data indicate that gibberellin induces changes in the expression of a subset of gene products within elongating dwarfs. This may be due to changes in transcription rate, mRNA stability, or increased efficiency of translation of certain mRNAs

  2. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchao9@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zhang, Hui [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  3. Architecture of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Leitner, Alexander; Bieri, Philipp; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Erzberger, Jan P; Leibundgut, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-01-23

    Mitochondrial ribosomes synthesize a number of highly hydrophobic proteins encoded on the genome of mitochondria, the organelles in eukaryotic cells that are responsible for energy conversion by oxidative phosphorylation. The ribosomes in mammalian mitochondria have undergone massive structural changes throughout their evolution, including ribosomal RNA shortening and acquisition of mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of the 39S large subunit of the porcine mitochondrial ribosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 4.9 Å resolution. The structure, combined with data from chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry experiments, reveals the unique features of the 39S subunit at near-atomic resolution and provides detailed insight into the architecture of the polypeptide exit site. This region of the mitochondrial ribosome has been considerably remodelled compared to its bacterial counterpart, providing a specialized platform for the synthesis and membrane insertion of the highly hydrophobic protein components of the respiratory chain.

  4. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Denaro, Luca; Redaelli, Marco; D'Avella, Domenico; Caretta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  5. Testing experimental subunit furunculosis vaccines for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika H.; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) is the etiological agent of typical furunculosis in salmonid fish. The disease causes bacterial septicemia and is a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide, inducing high morbidity and mortality. In this study we vaccinated rainbow...... trout with subunit vaccines containing protein antigens that were selected based on an in silico antigen discovery approach. Thus, the proteome of AS strain A449 was analyzed by an antigen discovery platform and its proteins consequently ranked by their predicted ability to evoke protective immune...... response against AS. Fourteen proteins were prepared in 3 different experimental subunit vaccine combinations and used to vaccinate rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. We tested the proteins for their ability to elicit antibody production and protection. Thus, fish were exposed to virulent...

  6. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  7. Heavy ion accelerator GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    This article presents GANIL, a large national heavy ion accelerator. The broad problems of nuclear physics, atomic physics, astrophysics and physics of condensed media which can be approached and studied with this machine are discussed first, after which the final construction project is described. The project comprises a circular injector, a separated sector cyclotron up beam stripper, and a second separated cyclotron downstream [fr

  8. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  9. Heavy quarks photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.

    1996-08-01

    The state of the art of the theoretical calculations for heavy quarks photoproduction is reviewed. The full next-to-leading order calculation and two possible resummations, the high energy one for total cross sections and the large p T one for differential cross sections, are described. (orig.)

  10. Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    acute toxicity and sublethal chronic action the devastating effects that the accumulation - including ... the laboratory and kept in holding glass (a) Copper as CuSO,.5H,0 ... from 2 psu to 21 psu) depending on time of The choice of heavy metals for this s year. ... serving as substrate and food source for Salinity of test media.

  11. Heavy-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Yang, T.C.H.; Richards, T.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter briefly describes the techniques of optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, soft x-ray microscopy and compares these latter techniques with heavy-ion microscopy. The resolution obtained with these various types of microscopy are compared and the influence of the etching procedure on total resolution is discussed. Several micrographs of mammalian cells are included

  12. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  13. Relativisitic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Some of the objectives and observables of Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics are presented. The first experimental results from oxygen interactions at CERN, 200 GeV/c per nucleon, and BNL, 14.5 GeV/c per nucleon are shown. The data indicate more energy emission than was originally predicted. 25 refs., 19 figs

  14. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis

  15. ASIC subunit ratio and differential surface trafficking in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jiangping; Hu, Youjia; Zha, Xiang-ming

    2016-01-08

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are key mediators of acidosis-induced responses in neurons. However, little is known about the relative abundance of different ASIC subunits in the brain. Such data are fundamental for interpreting the relative contribution of ASIC1a homomers and 1a/2 heteromers to acid signaling, and essential for designing therapeutic interventions to target these channels. We used a simple biochemical approach and semi-quantitatively determined the molar ratio of ASIC1a and 2 subunits in mouse brain. Further, we investigated differential surface trafficking of ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC2b. ASIC1a subunits outnumber the sum of ASIC2a and ASIC2b. There is a region-specific variation in ASIC2a and 2b expression, with cerebellum and striatum expressing predominantly 2b and 2a, respectively. Further, we performed surface biotinylation and found that surface ASIC1a and ASIC2a ratio correlates with their total expression. In contrast, ASIC2b exhibits little surface presence in the brain. This result is consistent with increased co-localization of ASIC2b with an ER marker in 3T3 cells. Our data are the first semi-quantitative determination of relative subunit ratio of various ASICs in the brain. The differential surface trafficking of ASICs suggests that the main functional ASICs in the brain are ASIC1a homomers and 1a/2a heteromers. This finding provides important insights into the relative contribution of various ASIC complexes to acid signaling in neurons.

  16. Heavy quarks - experimental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebeek, R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures, given at the 1989 SLAC Summer School, was to discuss the experimental aspects of heavy quark production. A companion set of lectures on the theoretical point of view were to be given by Keith Ellis. An experimentalist should gather together the measurements which have been made by various groups, compare, contrast and tabulate them, and if possible point out the ways in which these measurements confirm or contradict current theories. Here the authors has tried to do this, although the reader who expects to find here the latest of all experimental measurements should probably be forewarned that the field is moving extremely rapidly. In some cases, he has added and updated materials where crucial new information became available after or during the summer of 1989, but not in all cases. He has concentrated on trying to select those measurements which are at the moment most crucial in refining our understanding of heavy quarks as opposed to those which merely measure things which are perhaps too complicated to be enlightening at the moment. While theorists worry primarily about production mechanisms, cross sections, QCD corrections, and to some extent about signatures, the experimentalist must determine which measurements he is interested in making, and which signatures for heavy quark production are realistic and likely to produce results which will shed some new light on the underlying production model without undo theoretical complications. Experimentalists also need to evaluate the available experimental equipment, both machines and detectors to find the best way to investigate the properties of heavy quarks. In many cases, the things which we would like to measure are severely restricted by what we can measure. Nevertheless, many properties of heavy quark production and decay can be measured, and the results have already taught us much about the weak interactions and QCD

  17. Heavy water at Aswan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    A fertilizer factory is being built by Egyptian Chemical Industries (Kima) at Aswan on the upper Nile; it will produce a mixture of ammonium nitrate and calcium carbonate adjusted to contain 20.5% nitrogen. It is also proposed to construct a heavy water plant to be located at and integrated with the fertilizer factory. At the request of the Government of the United Arab Republic, the International Atomic Energy Agency sent an expert to carry out investigation of the technical, economic and other related aspects of the proposed production of heavy water. A report was submitted to the IAEA Director General. Its main conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) Production of heavy water as a by-product of fertilizer manufacture at Aswan is technically feasible. Separation of deuterium from industrial hydrogen for this purpose could be done either by catalytic exchange or by liquefaction and distillation; the choice should depend on economic considerations. (2) The heavy water produced at Aswan should be competitive in cost with that produced elsewhere; this, however, would depend on whether firm contracts are obtained for the delivery of equipment at guaranteed prices and with guaranteed performance, and whether such prices are in reasonable agreement with preliminary estimates. (3) The future market for heavy water is difficult to predict. For one thing, there is a very large production capacity in the USA, most of which is idle due to lack of demand. Secondly, there is a relatively small production outside the USA that is sold at prices higher than that charged by the US Government. The future of the market is necessarily contingent upon the possibility of future free sale by the US Government. At the end of his report, the expert has also given his comments on possible further assistance to the project by IAEA

  18. Global Proteome Analysis Identifies Active Immunoproteasome Subunits in Human Platelets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M.; Brown, Lyda M.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. PMID:25146974

  19. Global proteome analysis identifies active immunoproteasome subunits in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenbusch, Cordula; Walsh, Geraldine M; Brown, Lyda M; Hoffman, Michael D; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Kast, Juergen

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new functions for platelets, particularly in inflammation and immunity, has expanded the role of these anucleate cell fragments beyond their primary hemostatic function. Here, four in-depth human platelet proteomic data sets were generated to explore potential new functions for platelets based on their protein content and this led to the identification of 2559 high confidence proteins. During a more detailed analysis, consistently high expression of the proteasome was discovered, and the composition and function of this complex, whose role in platelets has not been thoroughly investigated, was examined. Data set mining resulted in identification of nearly all members of the 26S proteasome in one or more data sets, except the β5 subunit. However, β5i, a component of the immunoproteasome, was identified. Biochemical analyses confirmed the presence of all catalytically active subunits of the standard 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome in human platelets, including β5, which was predominantly found in its precursor form. It was demonstrated that these components were assembled into the proteasome complex and that standard proteasome as well as immunoproteasome subunits were constitutively active in platelets. These findings suggest potential new roles for platelets in the immune system. For example, the immunoproteasome may be involved in major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptide generation, as the MHC I machinery was also identified in our data sets. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Radioimmunoassay of TSH subunits in thyroid diseases and endocrine opthalmopahty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, W.

    1982-01-01

    Highly sensitive radioimmunoassays of hTSH sub-units were developed. The hormone preparations were labelled with 125-iodine according to a modified chloramine -T method, and purified by chromatography using biogel P6 and P60. Rabbit antisera were used as antibodies. Separation of the antibody-bound and of the free antigens was carried out via the double antibody method. The antiserum required for this purpose was obtained from a goat. The sensitivity of the assay was influenced by changing the protein content of the buffer, the incubation volume, the tracer amounts, the incubation time and the incubation temperature. For hTSH-α, the lowest detectable limit was found to be 50 pg/ml, for hTSH-#betta# 20 pg/ml. Thus, the sub-units could be determined for 98% of the patients under review. The #betta#-TSH radioimmunoassay is largely specific, TSH cross-reacts to a degree of 5%. The computerized evoluation was carried out by means of Spline approximation using the Siemens 4004 computer. Precision and accurateness are in compliance with generally accpted criteria. The serum levels of α and #betta# sub-units showed no discordancy with regard to TSH. In all groups of patients examined, the levels of the hormone-specific #betta#-chain were found to be exclusively dependent upon the actual thyroid activity. (orig.) [de

  1. Heavy Flavour Production at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.

    2001-01-01

    ZEUS and H1 results on heavy quark production using the HERA data from 1995 to 2000 are summarised with emphasis on unresolved problems. The HERA upgrade and its impact on future heavy flavour measurements is briefly discussed

  2. (17) ACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adeyinka Odunsi

    Spectrophotometer (AAS) 2ID using their respective lamp and wavelengths. Calculation ... (Table 2). Concentration of heavy metals in the cassava. Lead and chromium were not significantly ..... Market basket survey for some heavy metals in ...

  3. The Mediator subunit MDT-15 confers metabolic adaptation to ingested material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Taubert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II (Pol(II dependent gene expression requires accessory factors termed transcriptional coregulators. One coregulator that universally contributes to Pol(II-dependent transcription is the Mediator, a multisubunit complex that is targeted by many transcriptional regulatory factors. For example, the Caenorhabditis elegans Mediator subunit MDT-15 confers the regulatory actions of the sterol response element binding protein SBP-1 and the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 on fatty acid metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that MDT-15 displays a broader spectrum of activities, and that it integrates metabolic responses to materials ingested by C. elegans. Depletion of MDT-15 protein or mutation of the mdt-15 gene abrogated induction of specific detoxification genes in response to certain xenobiotics or heavy metals, rendering these animals hypersensitive to toxin exposure. Intriguingly, MDT-15 appeared to selectively affect stress responses related to ingestion, as MDT-15 functional defects did not abrogate other stress responses, e.g., thermotolerance. Together with our previous finding that MDT-15:NHR-49 regulatory complexes coordinate a sector of the fasting response, we propose a model whereby MDT-15 integrates several transcriptional regulatory pathways to monitor both the availability and quality of ingested materials, including nutrients and xenobiotic compounds.

  4. Heavy water upgrader of 'Fugen'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Sasaki, Shigeo

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear power station of the advanced thermal prototype reactor ''Fugen'' has continued the smooth operation since it started the fullscale operation in March, 1979. Fugen is the first heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled reactor in Japan, and its outstanding feature is the use of heavy water as the moderator. The quantity of heavy water retained in Fugen is about 140 m 3 , and the concentration is 99.8 wt.%. This heavy water had been made is USA, and was imported from F.R. of Germany where it had been used. Heavy water is an internationally regulated material, and it is very expensive and hard to purchase. Therefore in order to prevent the deterioration of heavy water and to avoid its loss as far as possible, the management of the quantity and the control of the water quality have been carried out carefully and strictly. The generation of deteriorated heavy water occurs from the exchange of ion exchange resin for poison removal and purification. The heavy water upgrader reconcentrates the deteriorated heavy water of high concentration and returns to the heavy water system, and it was installed for the purpose of reducing the purchase of supplementary heavy water. The outline of the heavy water upgrader, its construction, the performance test and the operation are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Heavy metals in our foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-11-01

    The special group ''chemistry of food and forensic chemistry'' of the Association of German Analytical Chemists in Munich in 1983 issued a statement on that subject. The publication points out how heavy metals (examples: lead, cadmium and mercury) make their way into the foodstuffs, how many heavy metals are contained in our foodstuffs, which heavy metals are indispensable minerals and which aren't, and which heavy metals are ingested with food. It concludes by discussing how heavy metal contamination of our food can be prevented.

  6. Detecting heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 . Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system

  7. Ablation of the auditory cortex results in changes in the expression of neurotransmission-related mRNAs in the cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Verónica; Juiz, José M; Merchán, Miguel A

    2017-03-01

    The auditory cortex (AC) dynamically regulates responses of the Organ of Corti to sound through descending connections to both the medial (MOC) and lateral (LOC) olivocochlear efferent systems. We have recently provided evidence that AC has a reinforcement role in the responses to sound of the auditory brainstem nuclei. In a molecular level, we have shown that descending inputs from AC are needed to regulate the expression of molecules involved in outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility control, such as prestin and the α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR). In this report, we show that descending connections from AC to olivocochlear neurons are necessary to regulate the expression of molecules involved in cochlear afferent signaling. RT-qPCR was performed in rats at 1, 7 and 15 days after unilateral ablation of the AC, and analyzed the time course changes in gene transcripts involved in neurotransmission at the first auditory synapse. This included the glutamate metabolism enzyme glutamate decarboxylase 1 (glud1) and AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluA2-4. In addition, gene transcripts involved in efferent regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) excitability mediated by LOC, such as the α7 nAchR, the D2 dopamine receptor, and the α1, and γ2 GABAA receptor subunits, were also investigated. Unilateral AC ablation induced up-regulation of GluA3 receptor subunit transcripts, whereas both GluA2 and GluA4 mRNA receptors were down-regulated already at 1 day after the ablation. Unilateral removal of the AC also resulted in up-regulation of the transcripts for α7 nAchR subunit, D2 dopamine receptor, and α1 GABAA receptor subunit at 1 day after the ablation. Fifteen days after the injury, AC ablations induced an up-regulation of glud1 transcripts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heavy ion fusion III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.; Max, C.; Perkins, F.; Rosenbluth, M.

    1987-03-01

    This report updates Heavy Ion Fusion, JSR-82-302, dated January, 1983. During the last four years, program management and direction has been changed and the overall Inertial Confinement Program has been reviewed. This report therefore concentrates on accelerator physics issues, how the program has addressed those issues during the last four years, and how it will be addressing them in the future. 8 refs., 3 figs

  9. Experimental heavy quarkonium physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugge, L.

    1986-08-01

    Following some brief arguments on why heavy quarkonium spectroscopy is an important field of particle physics, some points on experimental techniques are discussed. Parts of the basic quarkonium phenomenology, including discussions of various items related to potensial models, are then presented. An up-to-date presentation is given of the state-of-the-art of experimental charmonium and bottomonium spectroscopy below open flavour threshold, including the confrontation of experimental results to representative theoretical predictions

  10. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, D M

    1989-08-01

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs.

  11. Carburetor for heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautreau, L

    1905-03-06

    This invention relates to a carburetor for heavy oils in which the combustion liquid circulates successively in two annular spaces at the top and bottom of the vaporizer heated by the gas from the outlet and returning from there, after having been conveniently heated, to the constant level by an appropriate tube; the constant level can be surrounded by an annular chamber in which circulates a part of the gas from the outlet.

  12. Relativistic heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1985-01-01

    In the fall of 1986 beams of heavy ions up to A ∼ 40 at total energies up to E ∼ 225 GeV/-nucleon will become available for experiments at CERN (60 and 225 GeV/nucleon) and at Brookhaven (15.5 GeV/nucleon). Are these energies interesting in relation to the ideas of creating quark deconfinement? An energy consideration of the planned experiments is presented, as well as a description of the experimental arrangement. (Auth.)

  13. Neutrinos: Heavy water detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The proponents of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) received a welcome Christmas present when William Winegard, Canadian Minister for Science and Technology announced the final details of the funding for this project, totalling 48 million Canadian dollars and including contributions from the US and the UK. The SNO experiment will extend significantly the study of solar neutrinos, using some 1,000 tonnes of heavy water to be installed more than two kilometres below ground in a nickel mine at Sudbury, Ontario

  14. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of the Canadian R and D programme on heavy water processes. Six Canadian heavy water plants with a total design capacity of 4000Mg/a are in operation or under construction. All use the Girdler-Sulphide (GS) process, which is based on deuterium exchange between water and hydrogen sulphide. Early operating problems have been overcome and the plants have demonstrated annual capacity factors in excess of 70%, with short-term production rates equal to design rates. Areas for further improvement are: to increase production rates by optimizing the control of foaming to give both higher sieve tray efficiency and higher flow rates, to reduce the incapacity due to deposition of pyrite (FeS 2 ) and sulphur (between 5% and 10%), and to improve process control and optimization of operating conditions by the application of mathematical simulations of the detailed deuterium profile throughout each plant. Other processes being studied, which look potentially attractive are the hydrogen-water exchange and the hydrogen-amine exchange. Even if they become successful competitors to the GS process, the latter is likely to remain the dominant production method for the next 10-20 years. This programme, when related to the long-term electricity demand, indicates that heavy water supply and demand are in reasonable balance and that the Candu programme will not be inhibited because of shortages of this commodity. (author)

  15. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs

  16. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  17. Outlook for Saskatchewan heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youzwa, P.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the heavy oil industry in Saskatchewan are discussed from a government perspective. By the end of September 1993, 220 heavy oil wells were drilled in the province, and 26% of the land sales in 1993 were in heavy oil areas. About 41% of the wells drilled in heavy oil areas were horizontal oil wells. Of the total horizontal wells drilled in Saskatchewan, 48% are for heavy oil, and horizontal well production averages 85 bbl/d. Initial trends suggest that horizontal wells both accelerate production and contribute to ultimate recovery. Total heavy oil production in 1992 reached 28.9 million bbl and recoverable reserves in 1991 were 262.3 million bbl, or 1.5% of total oil in place. The low recovery is not only due to technical factors such as high viscosity but also to low investment in the heavy oil sector due to poor economics. It is hoped that lower interest and exchange rates, the success of horizontal wells and the provincial royalty structure will maintain the recent increase in heavy oil activity. The provincial government recently launched a comprehensive energy strategy in which development of a heavy oil strategy is an important component. Total heavy oil reserves exceed those of light and medium oil and have significant development potential. The Saskatchewan government wishes to adopt a cooperative and partnership approach in its dealings with the heavy oil industry to help realize this potential. 9 figs

  18. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  19. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    With controlled thermonuclear fusion holding out the possibility of a prolific and clean new source of energy, the goal remains elusive after many years of continual effort. While the conventional Tokamak route with magnetic confinement continues to hit the headlines, other alternatives are now becoming competitive. One possible solution is to confine the thermonuclear fuel pellet by high power beams. Current research and perspectives for future work in such inertial confinement was the subject of the 'Prospects for Heavy Ion Fusion' European Research Conference held in Aghia Pelaghia, Crete, last year. Its main focus was on the potential of heavy ion accelerators as well as recent advances in target physics with high power lasers and light ion beams. Carlo Rubbia declared that high energy accelerators, with their high efficiency, are the most promising approach to economical fusion energy production. However the need for cost saving in the driver accelerator requires new ideas in target design tailored to the particularities of heavy ion beams, which need to be pushed to the limits of high current and phase space density at the same time

  20. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-09-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. Interest in this field may be provisionally divided into two general classes: Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states; open flavor states: The D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; and charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note we emphasize that there are many missing states in both categories -- states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to us would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular states. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner bar B decay remains to be seen. We suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  1. Searching for heavy leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1979-11-01

    This frankly speculative paper discusses ways in which leptons heavier than the tau (if they exist) might be found. The status of the tau is briefly reviewed, and methods for searching for sequential charged leptons beyond the tau and other charged leptons at PEP, PETRA, and CESR are sketched. Charged leptons with mass greater than 20 GeV/c 2 might be found at proton accelerators in hadron-hadron, photon-hadron, or ν-hadron collisions. Unstable, neutral heavy leptons might have unique, conserved lepton number or nonunique lepton number. The most difficult leptons to detect are stable neutral heavy leptons; nevertheless, a possible detection method is suggested. The obvious solution to seeking the postulated leptons is an e + e - colliding beam storage ring with c.m. energy = several hundred GeV. Until such a machine is built, one can employ Z 0 → L + + L - ; the use of R/sub Z 0 / and GAMMA/sub Z 0 / in this connection is discussed. If heavier Z 0 's exist, the heavy lepton search can be extended to higher energies. Another solution for producing these leptons involves the use of clashing e + e - linear accelerators. Characteristics of storage rings are compared with those of clashing linacs; a general description is given of the proposed SLAC Linac-Collider, along with the physics that could be done at such a machine. 6 figures

  2. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-01-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. (I) Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states. (II) Open flavor states (a) the D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; (b) Charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note the authors emphasize that there are many missing (undiscovered) states in both categories - states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to the authors would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular status. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner B decay remains to be seen. The authors suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undetermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  3. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Friedman, A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the research status in the following areas of research in the field of heavy ion inertial fusion: (1) RF accelerators, storage rings, and synchrotrons; (2) induction linacs; (3) recirculation induction accelerator approach; (4) a new accelerator concept, the ''Mirrortron''; (5) general issues of transport, including beam merging, production of short, fat quadrupoles with nearly linear focusing, calculations of beam behaviour in image fields; 3-D electrostatic codes on drift compression with misalignments and transport around bends; (6) injectors, ion sources and RFQs, a.o., on the development of a 27 MHz RFQ to be used for the low energy portion of a new injector for all ions up to Uranium, and the development of a 2 MV carbon ion injector to provide 16 C + beams of 0.5 A each for ILSE; (7) beam transport from accelerator to target, reporting, a.o., the feasibility to suppress third-order aberrations; while Particle-in-Cell simulations on the propagation of a non-neutral ion beam in a low density gas identified photo-ionization by thermal X-rays from the target as an important source of defocusing; (9) heavy ion target studies; (10) reviewing experience with laser drivers; (11) ion cluster stopping and muon catalyzed fusion; (12) heavy ion systems, including the option of a fusion-fission burner. 1 tab

  4. eIF4A inhibition allows translational regulation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bottley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia in our increasingly aging population. The debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms characteristic of AD make it an extremely distressing illness for patients and carers. Although drugs have been developed to treat AD symptoms and to slow disease progression, there is currently no cure. The incidence of AD is predicted to increase to over one hundred million by 2050, placing a heavy burden on communities and economies, and making the development of effective therapies an urgent priority. Two proteins are thought to have major contributory roles in AD: the microtubule associated protein tau, also known as MAPT; and the amyloid-beta peptide (A-beta, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Oxidative stress is also implicated in AD pathology from an early stage. By targeting eIF4A, an RNA helicase involved in translation initiation, the synthesis of APP and tau, but not neuroprotective proteins, can be simultaneously and specifically reduced, representing a novel avenue for AD intervention. We also show that protection from oxidative stress is increased upon eIF4A inhibition. We demonstrate that the reduction of these proteins is not due to changes in mRNA levels or increased protein degradation, but is a consequence of translational repression conferred by inhibition of the helicase activity of eIF4A. Inhibition of eIF4A selectively and simultaneously modulates the synthesis of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease: reducing A-beta and tau synthesis, while increasing proteins predicted to be neuroprotective.

  5. Antisense sequences and antagomiR 155 in therapy for B lymphomas over expressing miR-155: preclinical models and identification of target mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marziali, G.; Peschle, C.

    2009-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are a conserved class of small noncoding RNAs (22-25 nucleotides), which modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level by base pairing to the 3'UTR of the target mRNAs, thus causing messenger degradation or inhibiting its translation. Experimental evidence indicate that several miRNAs are deregulated in human tumors. MIRN155 has been shown to be highly expressed in a variety of human B cell lymphomas, especially diffuse large B cells, Hodgkin, and a subset of Burkitt lymphomas. Its expression is physiologically increased in activated B and T cells and it plays a key role in regulating the homeostasis and function of the immune system

  6. Exosomes released in vitro from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Venturi, Giulietta; Borghi, Martina; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with a number of malignancies. Both lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), and EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells have been demonstrated to release exosomes containing the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and mature micro-RNAs (EBV-miRNAs). Here we analyze the EBV protein and nucleic acid content of exosomes from different EBV-infected cells (LCL, 721 and Daudi) and we show for the first time that exosomes released from LCLs and 721 also contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs. This confirms and strengthens exosomes pathogenetic potential, and might provide insights for development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-Ma2 antibody related paraneoplastic limbic/brain stem encephalitis associated with breast cancer expressing Ma1, Ma2, and Ma3 mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, K; Sakai, K; Mano, K; Hirose, G

    2003-09-01

    A 69 year old woman presented with cognitive impairment and supranuclear gaze palsy caused by paraneoplastic limbic/brain stem encephalitis associated with atypical medullary breast carcinoma. The cerebrospinal fluid from the patient harboured an anti-neuronal cell antibody against Ma2 antigen, but not against Ma1 or Ma3 antigen. Despite the antibody being restricted to the Ma2 antigen, the patient's cancer tissue expressed Ma1, Ma2, and Ma3 mRNAs. These results, and the expression of Ma2 mRNA in an atypical medullar breast carcinoma in another patient without paraneoplastic encephalitis, indicate that the induction of anti-Ma2 antibody depends on host immunoreponsiveness and not on the presence of the antigen itself in the cancer.

  8. Sink limitation induces the expression of multiple soybean vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs while the endogenous jasmonic acid level remains low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, T W; Koetje, D S; Stephenson, L C; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Grimes, H D

    1995-08-01

    The response of individual members of the lipoxygenase multigene family in soybeans to sink deprivation was analyzed. RNase protection assays indicated that a novel vegetative lipoxygenase gene, vlxC, and three other vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs accumulated in mature leaves in response to a variety of sink limitations. These data suggest that several members of the lipoxygenase multigene family are involved in assimilate partitioning. The possible involvement of jasmonic acid as a signaling molecule regulating assimilate partitioning into the vegetative storage proteins and lipoxygenases was directly assessed by determining the endogenous level of jasmonic acid in leaves from plants with their pods removed. There was no rise in the level of endogenous jasmonic acid coincident with the strong increase in both vlxC and vegetative storage protein VspB transcripts in response to sink limitation. Thus, expression of the vegetative lipoxygenases and vegetative storage proteins is not regulated by jasmonic acid in sink-limited leaves.

  9. Organ-Specific and Age-Dependent Expression of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) mRNA Variants: IGF-IA and IB mRNAs in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Otsuki, Mariko; Murakami, Yousuke; Maekawa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Takashi; Akasaka, Koji; Takeuchi, Sakae; Takahashi, Sumio

    2005-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene generates several IGF-I mRNA variants by alternative splicing. Two promoters are present in mouse IGF-I gene. Each promoter encodes two IGF-I mRNA variants (IGF-IA and IGF-IB mRNAs). Variants differ by the presence (IGF-IB) or absence (IGF-IA) of a 52-bp insert in the E domain-coding region. Functional differences among IGF-I mRNAs, and regulatory mechanisms for alternative splicing of IGF-I mRNA are not yet known. We analyzed the expression of mouse ...

  10. Molecular cloning of the human casein kinase II α subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, H.; Heller-Harrison, R.; Buxton, J.; Czech, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding the α subunit of casein kinase II and a partial cDNA encoding the rat homologue were isolated by using a Drosophila casein kinase II cDNA probe. The 2.2-kb human cDNA contains a 1.2-kb open reading frame, 150 nucleotides of 5' leader, and 850 nucleotides of 3' noncoding region. Except for the first 7 deduced amino acids that are missing in the rat cDNA, the 328 amino acids beginning with the amino terminus are identical between human and rat. The Drosophila enzyme sequence is 90% identical with the human casein kinase II sequence, and there is only a single amino acid difference between the published partial bovine sequence and the human sequence. In addition, the C-terminus of the human cDNA has an extra 53 amino acids not present in Drosophila. Northern analysis of rat and human RNA showed predominant bands of 5.5, 3.1, and 1.8 kb. In rat tissues, brain and spleen had the highest levels of casein kinase II α subunit specific RNA, while skeletal muscle showed the lowest. Southern analysis of human cultured cell and tissue genomic DNA using the full-length cDNA probe revealed two bands with restriction enzymes that have no recognition sites within the cDNA and three to six bands with enzymes having single internal sites. These results are consistent with the possibility that two genes encode the α subunits

  11. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, R.M.B. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia]|[Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal). Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of {sup 35}S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author).

  12. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.M.B.; Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35 S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author)

  13. Flexible Connectors between Capsomer Subunits that Regulate Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasek, Mary L; Maurer, Joshua B; Hendrix, Roger W; Duda, Robert L

    2017-08-04

    Viruses build icosahedral capsids of specific size and shape by regulating the spatial arrangement of the hexameric and pentameric protein capsomers in the growing shell during assembly. In the T=7 capsids of Escherichia coli bacteriophage HK97 and other phages, 60 capsomers are hexons, while the rest are pentons that are correctly positioned during assembly. Assembly of the HK97 capsid to the correct size and shape has been shown to depend on specific ionic contacts between capsomers. We now describe additional ionic interactions within capsomers that also regulate assembly. Each is between the long hairpin, the "E-loop," that extends from one subunit to the adjacent subunit within the same capsomer. Glutamate E153 on the E-loop and arginine R210 on the adjacent subunit's backbone alpha-helix form salt bridges in hexamers and pentamers. Mutations that disrupt these salt bridges were lethal for virus production, because the mutant proteins assembled into tubes or sheets instead of capsids. X-ray structures show that the E153-R210 links are flexible and maintained during maturation despite radical changes in capsomer shape. The E153-R210 links appear to form early in assembly to enable capsomers to make programmed changes in their shape during assembly. The links also prevent flattening of capsomers and premature maturation. Mutant phenotypes and modeling support an assembly model in which flexible E153-R210 links mediate capsomer shape changes that control where pentons are placed to create normal-sized capsids. The E-loop may be conserved in other systems in order to play similar roles in regulating assembly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human thyroid peroxidase: complete cDNA and protein sequence, chromosome mapping, and identification of two alternately spliced mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, S.; Kotani, T.; McBride, O.W.; Umeki, K.; Hirai, K.; Nakayama, T.; Ohtaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Two forms of human thyroid peroxidase cDNAs were isolated from a λgt11 cDNA library, prepared from Graves disease thyroid tissue mRNA, by use of oligonucleotides. The longest complete cDNA, designated phTPO-1, has 3048 nucleotides and an open reading frame consisting of 933 amino acids, which would encode a protein with a molecular weight of 103,026. Five potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are found in the deduced amino acid sequence. The second peroxidase cDNA, designated phTPO-2, is almost identical to phTPO-1 beginning 605 base pairs downstream except that it contains 1-base-pair difference and lacks 171 base pairs in the middle of the sequence. This results in a loss of 57 amino acids corresponding to a molecular weight of 6282. Interestingly, this 171-nucleotide sequence has GT and AG at its 5' and 3' boundaries, respectively, that are in good agreement with donor and acceptor splice site consensus sequences. Using specific oligonucleotide probes for the mRNAs derived from the cDNA sequences hTOP-1 and hTOP-2, the authors show that both are expressed in all thyroid tissues examined and the relative level of two mRNAs is different in each sample. The results suggest that two thyroid peroxidase proteins might be generated through alternate splicing of the same gene. By using somatic cell hybrid lines, the thyroid peroxidase gene was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 2

  15. Testosterone stimulates progesterone production and STAR, P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage and LH receptor mRNAs expression in hen (Gallus domesticus) granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, P L; Rodríguez, A; Rojas, S; Sharp, P J; Gutierrez, C G

    2009-12-01

    The chicken ovary is organized into a hierarchy of yellow yolky follicles that ovulate on successive days. Active or passive immunization of laying hens against testosterone blocks ovulation without affecting follicle development. Testosterone may play a role in pre-ovulatory follicle maturation by stimulating granulosa progesterone production. We assessed whether this stimulus is dose-related and depends on the maturity of the donor follicle, and if it does so by stimulating granulosa cell STAR, P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and LH receptor (LHCGR) mRNAs expression. Progesterone production by granulosa cells from F1, F3, and F4 follicles, cultured for 3 h without testosterone was greater in cells collected 11-14 h than 1-4 h after ovulation. These differences in progesterone production were less pronounced after granulosa cells had been cultured for 24 h. Culture of granulosa cells for 3 or 24 h with testosterone (1-100 ng/ml) stimulated progesterone production in cells collected from F4, F3, or F1 follicles 1-4, or 11-14 h after ovulation. Testosterone (0-4000 ng/ml) alone or in combination with LH (0-100 ng/ml) increased progesterone production by F1 granulosa cells, collected 1-4 and 11-14 h after ovulation and cultured for 3 h. Finally, testosterone (10 or 100 ng/ml) increased STAR, P450scc, and LHCGR mRNAs, when added to 3 h cultures of F1 granulosa cells. In conclusion, testosterone stimulates granulosa cell progesterone production in hen pre-ovulatory hierarchical follicles irrespective of maturational state, acting alone or additively with LH. We propose that testosterone promotes granulosa cell maturation to facilitate the pre-ovulatory release of LH.

  16. Maternal mRNAs of PEM and macho 1, the ascidian muscle determinant, associate and move with a rough endoplasmic reticulum network in the egg cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardet, Christian; Nishida, Hiroki; Prodon, Francois; Sawada, Kaichiro

    2003-12-01

    Localization of maternal mRNAs in the egg cortex is an essential feature of polarity in embryos of Drosophila, Xenopus and ascidians. In ascidians, maternal mRNAs such as macho 1, a determinant of primary muscle-cell fate, belong to a class of postplasmic RNAs that are located along the animal-vegetal gradient in the egg cortex. Between fertilization and cleavage, these postplasmic RNAs relocate in two main phases. They further concentrate and segregate in small posterior blastomeres into a cortical structure, the centrosome-attracting body (CAB), which is responsible for unequal cleavages. By using high-resolution, fluorescent, in situ hybridization in eggs, zygotes and embryos of Halocynthia roretzi, we showed that macho 1 and HrPEM are localized on a reticulated structure situated within 2 mum of the surface of the unfertilized egg, and within 8 mum of the surface the vegetal region and then posterior region of the zygote. By isolating cortices from eggs and zygotes we demonstrated that this reticulated structure is a network of cortical rough endoplasmic reticulum (cER) that is tethered to the plasma membrane. The postplasmic RNAs macho 1 and HrPEM were located on the cER network and could be detached from it. We also show that macho 1 and HrPEM accumulated in the CAB and the cER network. We propose that these postplasmic RNAs relocalized after fertilization by following the microfilament- and microtubule-driven translocations of the cER network to the poles of the zygote. We also suggest that the RNAs segregate and concentrate in posterior blastomeres through compaction of the cER to form the CAB. A multimedia BioClip 'Polarity inside the egg cortex' tells the story and can be downloaded at www.bioclips.com/bioclip.html

  17. Uncoupling of the hnRNP Npl3p from mRNAs during the stress-induced block in mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebber, H; Taura, T; Lee, M S; Silver, P A

    1999-08-01

    Npl3p, the major mRNA-binding protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. A single amino acid change in the carboxyl terminus of Npl3p (E409 --> K) renders the mutant protein largely cytoplasmic because of a delay in its import into the nucleus. This import defect can be reversed by increasing the intracellular concentration of Mtr10p, the nuclear import receptor for Npl3p. Conversely, using this mutant, we show that Npl3p and mRNA export out of the nucleus is significantly slowed in cells bearing mutations in XPO1/CRM1, which encodes the export receptor for NES-containing proteins and in RAT7, which encodes an essential nucleoporin. Interestingly, following induction of stress by heat shock, high salt, or ethanol, conditions under which most mRNA export is blocked, Npl3p is still exported from the nucleus. The stress-induced export of Npl3p is independent of both the activity of Xpo1p and the continued selective export of heat-shock mRNAs that occurs following stress. UV-cross-linking experiments show that Npl3p is bound to mRNA under normal conditions, but is no longer RNA associated in stressed cells. Taken together, we suggest that the uncoupling of Npl3p and possibly other mRNA-binding proteins from mRNAs in the nucleus provides a general switch that regulates mRNA export. By this model, under normal conditions Npl3p is a major component of an export-competent RNP complex. However, under conditions of stress, Npl3p no longer associates with the export complex, rendering it export incompetent and thus nuclear.

  18. Profiling of Long Non-coding RNAs and mRNAs by RNA-Sequencing in the Hippocampi of Adult Mice Following Propofol Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Zhou, Quan; Li, Yan; Song, Xiuling; Hu, Jijie; Qin, Zaisheng; Tang, Jing; Tao, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Propofol is a frequently used intravenous anesthetic agent. The impairment caused by propofol on the neural system, especially the hippocampus, has been widely reported. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of propofol on learning and memory functions in the hippocampus is still unclear. In the present study we performed lncRNA and mRNA analysis in the hippocampi of adult mice, after propofol sedation, through RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq). A total of 146 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 1103 mRNAs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis, including gene ontology (GO) analysis, pathway analysis and network analysis, were done for the identified dysregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that the FoxO signaling pathway played an important role in the effects of propofol on the hippocampus. Finally, four lncRNAs and three proteins were selected from the FoxO-related network for further validation. The up-regulation of lncE230001N04Rik and the down-regulation of lncRP23-430H21.1 and lncB230206L02Rik showed the same fold change tendencies but changes in Gm26532 were not statistically significant in the RNA-Seq results, following propofol sedation. The FoxO pathway-related proteins, PI3K and AKT, are up-regulated in propofol-exposed group. FoxO3a is down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels. Our study reveals that propofol sedation can influence the expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in the hippocampus, and bioinformatics analysis have identified key biological processes and pathways associated with propofol sedation. Cumulatively, our results provide a framework for further study on the role of lncRNAs in propofol-induced or -related neurotoxicity, particularly with regards to hippocampus-related dysfunction.

  19. Profiling of Long Non-coding RNAs and mRNAs by RNA-Sequencing in the Hippocampi of Adult Mice Following Propofol Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is a frequently used intravenous anesthetic agent. The impairment caused by propofol on the neural system, especially the hippocampus, has been widely reported. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of propofol on learning and memory functions in the hippocampus is still unclear. In the present study we performed lncRNA and mRNA analysis in the hippocampi of adult mice, after propofol sedation, through RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq. A total of 146 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 1103 mRNAs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis, including gene ontology (GO analysis, pathway analysis and network analysis, were done for the identified dysregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that the FoxO signaling pathway played an important role in the effects of propofol on the hippocampus. Finally, four lncRNAs and three proteins were selected from the FoxO-related network for further validation. The up-regulation of lncE230001N04Rik and the down-regulation of lncRP23-430H21.1 and lncB230206L02Rik showed the same fold change tendencies but changes in Gm26532 were not statistically significant in the RNA-Seq results, following propofol sedation. The FoxO pathway-related proteins, PI3K and AKT, are up-regulated in propofol-exposed group. FoxO3a is down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels. Our study reveals that propofol sedation can influence the expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in the hippocampus, and bioinformatics analysis have identified key biological processes and pathways associated with propofol sedation. Cumulatively, our results provide a framework for further study on the role of lncRNAs in propofol-induced or -related neurotoxicity, particularly with regards to hippocampus-related dysfunction.

  20. Expression of beta-keratin mRNAs and proline uptake in epidermal cells of growing scales and pad lamellae of gecko lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Toni, Mattia; Valle, Luisa Dalla

    2007-01-01

    Beta-keratins form a large part of the proteins contained in the hard beta layer of reptilian scales. The expression of genes encoding glycine–proline-rich beta-keratins in normal and regenerating epidermis of two species of gecko lizards has been studied by in situ hybridization. The probes localize mRNAs in differentiating oberhautchen and beta cells of growing scales and in modified scales, termed pad lamellae, on the digits of gecko lizards. In situ localization at the ultrastructural level shows clusters of gold particles in the cytoplasm among beta-keratin filaments of oberhautchen and beta cells. They are also present in the differentiating elongation or setae of oberhautchen cells present in pad lamellae. Setae allow geckos to adhere and climb vertical surfaces. Oberhautchen and beta cells also incorporate tritiated proline. The fine localization of the beta-keratin mRNAs and the uptake of proline confirms the biomolecular data that identified glycine–proline-rich beta-keratin in differentiating beta cells of gecko epidermis. The present study also shows the presence of differentiating and metabolically active cells in both inner and outer oberhautchen/beta cells at the base of the outer setae localized at the tip of pad lamellae. The addition of new beta and alpha cells to the corneous layer near the tip of the outer setae explains the anterior movement of the setae along the apical free-margin of pad lamellae. The rapid replacement of setae ensures the continuous usage of the gecko's adhesive devices, the pad lamellae, during most of their active life. PMID:17553098

  1. pp32 (ANP32A expression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and induces gemcitabine resistance by disrupting HuR binding to mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy K Williams

    Full Text Available The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1, a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C, but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK, causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR, while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients' tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy.

  2. Heavy-heavy and heavy-light quarks interactions generated by QCD vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musakhanov Mirzayusuf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The QCD vacuum is populated by instantons that correspond to the tunneling processes in the vacuum. This mechanism creates the strong vacuum gluon fields. As result, the QCD vacuum instantons induce very strong interactions between light quarks, initially almost massless. Such a strong interactions bring a large dynamical mass M of the light quarks and bound them to produce almost massless pions in accordance with the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry (SBCS. On the other hand, the QCD vacuum instantons also interact with heavy quarks and responsible for the generation of the heavy-heavy and heavy-light quarks interactions, with a traces of the SBCS. If we take the average instanton size ρ¯=0.33$\\bar \\rho = 0.33$ fm, and the average inter-instanton distance R¯=1$\\bar R = 1$ fm we obtain the dynamical light quark mass to be M = 365 MeV and the instanton media contribution to the heavy quark mass ΔM=70 MeV. These factors define the coupling between heavy-light and heavy-heavy quarks induced by the QCD vacuum instantons. We consider first the instanton effects on the heavy-heavy quarks potential, including its spin-dependent part. We also discuss those effects on the masses of the charmonia and their hyperfine mass splittings. At the second part we discuss the interaction between a heavy and light quarks generated by instantons and it’s effects.

  3. Sex Hormone Receptor Expression in the Human Vocal Fold Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirgezen, Tolga; Sunter, Ahmet Volkan; Yigit, Ozgur; Huq, Gulben Erdem

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the existence of sex hormone receptors in the subunits of vocal fold. This is a cadaver study. The androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors were examined in the epithelium (EP), superficial layer of the lamina propria (SLP), vocal ligament (VL), and macula flava (MF) of the vocal folds from 42 human cadavers (21 male, 21 female) by immunohistochemical methods. Their staining ratios were scored and statistically compared. The androgen receptor score was significantly higher for the MF than for the EP and SLP (P vocal fold, mostly in the MF and VLs. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Motor Skills Training Enhances α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid Receptor Subunit mRNA Expression in the Ipsilateral Sensorimotor Cortex and Striatum of Rats Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamakoshi, Keigo; Ishida, Kazuto; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Takamatsu, Yasuyuki; Tamaki, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the effects of acrobatic training (AT) on expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunits in the sensorimotor cortex and striatum after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: ICH without AT (ICH), ICH with AT (ICH + AT), sham operation without AT (SHAM), and sham operation with AT (SHAM + AT). ICH was induced by collagenase injection into the left striatum. The ICH + AT group performed 5 acrobatic tasks daily on days 4-28 post ICH. Forelimb sensorimotor function was evaluated using the forelimb placing test. On days 14 and 29, mRNA expression levels of AMPAR subunits GluR1-4 were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Forelimb placing test scores were significantly higher in the ICH + AT group than in the ICH group. Expression levels of all AMPAR subunit mRNAs were significantly higher in the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex of rats in the ICH + AT group than in that of rats in the ICH group on day 29. GluR3 and GluR4 expression levels were reduced in the ipsilateral striatum of rats in the ICH group compared with that of rats in the SHAM group on day 14. These changes may play a critical role in motor skills training-induced recovery after ICH. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. N-linked glycans are required on epithelial Na+ channel subunits for maturation and surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlan, Ossama B; Kinlough, Carol L; Myerburg, Michael M; Shi, Shujie; Chen, Jingxin; Blobner, Brandon M; Buck, Teresa M; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Hughey, Rebecca P; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) subunits undergo N-linked glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum where they assemble into an αβγ complex. Six, 13, and 5 consensus sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) for N-glycosylation reside in the extracellular domains of the mouse α-, β-, and γ-subunits, respectively. Because the importance of ENaC N-linked glycans has not been fully addressed, we examined the effect of preventing N-glycosylation of specific subunits on channel function, expression, maturation, and folding. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes or Fischer rat thyroid cells with αβγ-ENaC lacking N-linked glycans on a single subunit reduced ENaC activity as well as the inhibitory response to extracellular Na + . The lack of N-linked glycans on the β-subunit also precluded channel activation by trypsin. However, channel activation by shear stress was N-linked glycan independent, regardless of which subunit was modified. We also discovered that the lack of N-linked glycans on any one subunit reduced the total and surface levels of cognate subunits. The lack of N-linked glycans on the β-subunit had the largest effect on total levels, with the lack of N-linked glycans on the γ- and α-subunits having intermediate and modest effects, respectively. Finally, channels with wild-type β-subunits were more sensitive to limited trypsin proteolysis than channels lacking N-linked glycans on the β-subunit. Our results indicate that N-linked glycans on each subunit are required for proper folding, maturation, surface expression, and function of the channel.

  6. Determination of heavy water in heavy water - light water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza M, A.

    1986-01-01

    A description about experimental methodology to determine isotopic composition of heavy water - light water mixtures is presented. The employed methods are Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, for measuring heavy water concentrations from 0 to 100% with intervals of 10% approx., and mass Spectrometry, for measuring heavy water concentrations from 0.1 to 1% with intervals of 0.15% approx., by means of an indirect method of Dilution. (Author)

  7. Heavy water upgrading system in the Fugen heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Susaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    The heavy water upgrading system, which is installed in the Fugen heavy water reactor (HWR) was designed to reuse degraded heavy water generated from the deuteration-dedeuteration of resin in the ion exchange column of the moderator purification system. The electrolysis method has been applied in this system on the basis of the predicted generation rate and concentration of degraded heavy water. The structural feature of the electrolytic cell is that it consists of dual cylindrical electrodes, instead of a diaphragm as in the case of conventional water electrolysis. 2 refs

  8. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient

  9. Heavy fragment radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silisteanu, I.

    1991-06-01

    The effect of collective mode excitation in heavy fragment radioactivity (HFR) is explored and discussed in the light of current experimental data. It is found that the coupling and resonance effects in fragment interaction and also the proper angular momentum effects may lead to an important enhancing of the emission process. New useful procedures are proposed for the study of nuclear decay properties. The relations between different decay processes are investigated in detail. We are also trying to understand and explain in a unified way the reaction mechanisms in decay phenomena. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Fission of heavy hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1993-01-01

    The results on delayed and prompt fission of heavy hypernuclei obtained by the LEAR PS177 collaboration are recalled and discussed. It is shown that the hypernuclei life-times can be explained in term of a weak strangeness violating lambda-nucleon interaction with a cross section close to 6.0 10 -15 barns. The lambda attachment function is shown to be sensitive to the scission configuration, just before fission, and to the neck dynamics. This function provides a new way to study the nuclear scission process. (author)

  11. Heavy gas valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, L [Vereinigte Armaturen Gesellschaft m.b.H., Mannheim (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-01-01

    Heavy gas valves must comply with special requirements. Apart from absolute safety in operation there are stringent requirements for material, sealing and ease of operation even in the most difficult conditions. Ball valves and single plate pipe gate valves lateral sealing rings have a dual, double sided sealing effect according to the GROVE sealing system. Single plate gate valves with lateral protective plates are suitable preferably for highly contaminated media. Soft sealing gate valves made of cast iron are used for low pressure applications.

  12. Relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.W.; Kaempfer, B.; Schulz, H.

    1984-12-01

    An elementary introduction is given into the scenario of relativistic heavy ion collisions. It deals with relativistic kinematics and estimates of energy densities, extrapolations of the present knowledge of hadron-hadron and hadron-nuleus to nucleus-nucleus collisions, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma and the formation of the plasma and possible experimental signatures. Comments are made on a cosmic ray experiment which could be interpreted as a first indication of the quark-gluon phase of the matter. (author)

  13. Heavy Quarkonium Physics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Krämer, Michael; Mussa, Roberto; Vairo, Antonio; Bali, G S; Bodwin, G T; Braaten, E; Eichten, E; Eidelman, S; Godfrey, S; Hoang, A; Jamin, M; Kharzeev, Dima E; Lombardo, M P; Lourenço, C; Meyer, A B; Papadimitriou, V; Patrignani, C; Rosati, M; Sanchis-Lozano, M A; Satz, Helmut; Soto, J; Besson, D Z; Bettoni, D; Böhrer, A; Boogert, S; Chang, C H; Cooper, P; Crochet, Philippe; Datta, S; Davies, C; Deandrea, A; Faustov, R; Ferguson, T; Galik, R; Harris, F; Iouchtchenko, O; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, Frithjof; Kienzle, M; Kiselev, V V; Klein, S R; Kroll, P; Kronfeld, A S; Kuang Yu Ping; Laporta, V; Lee, J; Leibovich, A K; Ma, J P; MacKenzie, P; Maiani, Luciano; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Meyer, A; Mo, X H; Morningstar, C; Nairz, A; Napolitano, J; Olsen, S; Penin, A A; Petreczky, P; Piccinini, F; Pineda, A; Polosa, Antonio; Ramello, L; Rapp, R; Richard, J M; Riquer, V; Ricciardi, S; Robutti, E; Schneider, O; Scomparin, E; Simone, J; Skwarnicki, T; Stancari, G; Stewart, I W; Sumino, Y; Teubner, T; Tseng, J; Vogt, R; Wang, P; Yabsley, B D; Yuan, C Z; Zantow, F; Zhao, Z G; Zieminski, A

    2005-01-01

    This report is the result of the collaboration and research effort of the Quarkonium Working Group over the last three years. It provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in heavy-quarkonium theory and experiment, covering quarkonium spectroscopy, decay, and production, the determination of QCD parameters from quarkonium observables, quarkonia in media, and the effects on quarkonia of physics beyond the Standard Model. An introduction to common theoretical and experimental tools is included. Future opportunities for research in quarkonium physics are also discussed.

  14. Heavy transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.F.

    1975-01-01

    Assuming that very often a long transport route from the factory of the manufacturer to the provided site has to be reckoned with, in general only transport with a ship is possible. As each site is only called by a certain steamship line, at a very early stage of planning the nuclear power plant the possibilities and capacities of the lines and means of transportation under discussion should be investigated. In planning the unloading equipment at the site, due consideration should be given to the fact that at a later time this equipment should also be suitable for the transport of heavy components and spent fuel assemblies. (orig.) [de

  15. Heavy Quark Effective Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, A. V.

    2003-02-01

    These lecture notes present some of the basic ideas of heavy quark effective theory. The topics covered include the classification of states, the derivation of the HQET Lagrangian at tree level, hadron masses, meson form factors, Luke's theorem, reparameterization invariance and inclusive decays. Radiative corrections are discussed in some detail, including an explicit computation of a matching correction for HQET. Borel summability, renormalons, and their connection with the QCD perturbation series is covered, as well as the use of the upsilon expansion to improve the convergence of the perturbation series.

  16. Heavy ion storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented. 35 refs

  17. [Relativistic heavy ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The present document describes our second-year application for a continuation grant on relativistic heavy-ion research at Nevis Laboratories, Columbia University, over the two-year period starting from November 15, 1990. The progress during the current budget year is presented. This year, construction of RHIC officially began. As a result, the entire Nevis nuclear physics group has made a coherent effort to create new proposal for an Open Axially Symmetric Ion Spectrometer (OASIS) proposal. Future perspectives and our plans for this proposal are described

  18. Activation of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α Subunit Pathway in Steatotic Liver Contributes to Formation of Cholesterol Gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yoichiro; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsukita, Sohei; Takahashi, Kei; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Honma, Midori; Ikeda, Masanori; Murakami, Keigo; Munakata, Yuichiro; Shirai, Yuta; Kodama, Shinjiro; Sugisawa, Takashi; Chiba, Yumiko; Kondo, Yasuteru; Kaneko, Keizo; Uno, Kenji; Sawada, Shojiro; Imai, Junta; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Kozo; Sasano, Hironobu; Mano, Nariyasu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Katagiri, Hideki

    2017-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α subunit (HIF1A) is a transcription factor that controls the cellular response to hypoxia and is activated in hepatocytes of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD increases the risk for cholesterol gallstone disease by unclear mechanisms. We studied the relationship between HIF1A and gallstone formation associated with liver steatosis. We performed studies with mice with inducible disruption of Hif1a in hepatocytes via a Cre adenoviral vector (inducible hepatocyte-selective HIF1A knockout [iH-HIFKO] mice), and mice without disruption of Hif1a (control mice). Mice were fed a diet rich in cholesterol and cholate for 1 or 2 weeks; gallbladders were collected and the number of gallstones was determined. Livers and biliary tissues were analyzed by histology, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblots. We measured concentrations of bile acid, cholesterol, and phospholipid in bile and rates of bile flow. Primary hepatocytes and cholangiocytes were isolated and analyzed. HIF1A was knocked down in Hepa1-6 cells with small interfering RNAs. Liver biopsy samples from patients with NAFLD, with or without gallstones, were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Control mice fed a diet rich in cholesterol and cholate developed liver steatosis with hypoxia; levels of HIF1A protein were increased in hepatocytes around central veins and 90% of mice developed cholesterol gallstones. Only 20% of the iH-HIFKO mice developed cholesterol gallstones. In iH-HIFKO mice, the biliary lipid concentration was reduced by 36%, compared with control mice, and bile flow was increased by 35%. We observed increased water secretion from hepatocytes into bile canaliculi to mediate these effects, resulting in suppression of cholelithogenesis. Hepatic expression of aquaporin 8 (AQP8) protein was 1.5-fold higher in iH-HIFKO mice than in control mice. Under hypoxic

  19. A charged residue at the subunit interface of PCNA promotes trimer formation by destabilizing alternate subunit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential accessory factor in DNA replication and repair, is a ring-shaped homotrimer. A novel nontrimeric structure of E113G-mutant PCNA protein is reported, which shows that this protein forms alternate subunit interactions. It is concluded that the charged side chain of Glu113 promotes normal trimer formation by destabilizing these alternate subunit interactions. Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential replication accessory factor that interacts with a variety of proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. Each monomer of PCNA has an N-terminal domain A and a C-terminal domain B. In the structure of the wild-type PCNA protein, domain A of one monomer interacts with domain B of a neighboring monomer to form a ring-shaped trimer. Glu113 is a conserved residue at the subunit interface in domain A. Two distinct X-ray crystal structures have been determined of a mutant form of PCNA with a substitution at this position (E113G) that has previously been studied because of its effect on translesion synthesis. The first structure was the expected ring-shaped trimer. The second structure was an unanticipated nontrimeric form of the protein. In this nontrimeric form, domain A of one PCNA monomer interacts with domain A of a neighboring monomer, while domain B of this monomer interacts with domain B of a different neighboring monomer. The B–B interface is stabilized by an antiparallel β-sheet and appears to be structurally similar to the A–B interface observed in the trimeric form of PCNA. The A–A interface, in contrast, is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Because the E113G substitution is located on this hydrophobic surface, the A–A interface should be less favorable in the case of the wild-type protein. This suggests that the side chain of Glu113 promotes trimer formation by destabilizing these possible alternate subunit interactions

  20. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta ...

  1. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits are located on rat liver endosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyke Rebecca W

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat liver endosomes contain activated insulin receptors and downstream signal transduction molecules. We undertook these studies to determine whether endosomes also contain heterotrimeric G proteins that may be involved in signal transduction from G protein-coupled receptors. Results By Western blotting Gsα, Giα1,2, Giα3 and Gβ were enriched in both canalicular (CM and basolateral (BLM membranes but also readily detectable on three types of purified rat liver endosomes in the order recycling receptor compartment (RRC > compartment for uncoupling of receptor and ligand (CURL > multivesicular bodies (MVB >> purified secondary lysosomes. Western blotting with antibodies to Na, K-ATPase and to other proteins associated with plasma membranes and intracellular organelles indicated this was not due to contamination of endosome preparations by CM or BLM. Adenylate cyclase (AC was also identified on purified CM, BLM, RRC, CURL and MVB. Percoll gradient fractionation of liver postnuclear supernatants demonstrated co-occurrence of endosomes and heterotrimeric G protein subunits in fractions with little plasma membrane markers. By confocal microscopy, punctate staining for Gsα, Giα3 and Gβ corresponded to punctate areas of endocytosed Texas red-dextran in hepatocytes from control and cholera toxin-treated livers. Conclusion We conclude that heterotrimeric G protein subunits as well as AC likely traffic into hepatocytes on endosome membranes, possibly generating downstream signals spatially separate from signalling generated at the plasma membrane, analogous to the role(s of internalized insulin receptors.

  2. Fungal mediator tail subunits contain classical transcriptional activation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2015-04-01

    Classical activation domains within DNA-bound eukaryotic transcription factors make weak interactions with coactivator complexes, such as Mediator, to stimulate transcription. How these interactions stimulate transcription, however, is unknown. The activation of reporter genes by artificial fusion of Mediator subunits to DNA binding domains that bind to their promoters has been cited as evidence that the primary role of activators is simply to recruit Mediator. We have identified potent classical transcriptional activation domains in the C termini of several tail module subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis Mediator, while their N-terminal domains are necessary and sufficient for their incorporation into Mediator but do not possess the ability to activate transcription when fused to a DNA binding domain. This suggests that Mediator fusion proteins actually are functioning in a manner similar to that of a classical DNA-bound activator rather than just recruiting Mediator. Our finding that deletion of the activation domains of S. cerevisiae Med2 and Med3, as well as C. dubliniensis Tlo1 (a Med2 ortholog), impairs the induction of certain genes shows these domains function at native promoters. Activation domains within coactivators are likely an important feature of these complexes and one that may have been uniquely leveraged by a common fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of [ 3 H]ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site

  5. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  6. Role of the beta subunit of casein kinase-2 on the stability and specificity of the recombinant reconstituted holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human alpha subunit from casein kinase-2 (CK-2) was subjected, either alone or in combination with recombinant human beta subunit, to high temperature, tryptic digestion and urea treatment. In all three cases, it was shown that the presence of the beta subunit could drastically reduce...... the autophosphorylation site. It is suggested that the acidic domain of the beta subunit, encompassing residues 55-71, plays a role in the interactions between the beta and alpha subunits....

  7. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered

  8. Spectroscopy of doubly heavy baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, S.S.; Kiselev, V.V.; Likhoded, A.K.; Onishchenko, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Within a nonrelativistic quark model featuring a QCD-motivated Buchmueller-Tye potential, the mass spectra for the families of doubly heavy baryons are calculated by assuming the quark-diquark structure of the baryon wave functions and by taking into account spin-dependent splitting. Physically motivated evidence that, in the case where heavy quarks have identical flavors, quasistationary excited states may be formed in the heavy-diquark subsystem is analyzed

  9. Relativistic heavy-ion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera Corral, G

    2010-01-01

    The study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is an important part of the LHC research programme at CERN. This emerging field of research focuses on the study of matter under extreme conditions of temperature, density, and pressure. Here we present an introduction to the general aspects of relativistic heavy-ion physics. Afterwards we give an overview of the accelerator facility at CERN and then a quick look at the ALICE project as a dedicated experiment for heavy-ion collisions.

  10. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation

  11. Regulation of human gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase: co-ordinate induction of the catalytic and regulatory subunits in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D C; Blake, D G; Shepherd, A G; McLellan, L I

    1997-11-15

    We have shown that in HepG2 cells treatment with 75 microM t-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) results in a 2.5-fold increase in glutathione concentration, as part of an adaptive response to chemical stress. In these cells the elevation in intracellular glutathione level was found to be accompanied by an increase of between 2-fold and 3-fold in the level of the 73 kDa catalytic subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (heavy subunit, GCSh) and the 31 kDa regulatory subunit (light subunit, GCSl). Levels of GCSh and GCSl mRNA were increased by up to 5-fold in HepG2 cells in response to tBHQ. To study the transcriptional regulation of GCSl, we subcloned 6.7 kb of the upstream region of the human GCSl gene (GLCLR) from a genomic clone isolated from a P1 lymphoblastoid cell line genomic library. HepG2 cells were transfected with GLCLR promoter reporter constructs and treated with tBHQ. This resulted in an induction of between 1.5-fold and 3.5-fold in reporter activity, indicating that transcriptional regulation of GLCLR is likely to contribute to the induction of GCSl by tBHQ in HepG2 cells. Sequence analysis of the promoter region demonstrated the presence of putative enhancer elements including AP-1 sites and an antioxidant-responsive element, which might be involved in the observed induction of the GLCLR promoter.

  12. Heavy quark spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    New experimental and theoretical developments in heavy quark spectroscopy are reviewed. From studies of J/psi decays, the eta' is found to have some ''glue'' or other inert component, while the iota (a glueball candidate) probably contains some quarks as well. The xi(2.2) persists in new Mark III data, but is not seen by the DM2 collaboration. The production of charmonium states by anti pp reactions is reviewed. First evidence for a P- wave charmed meson, D(2420), has been presented by the ARGUS group. Radiative UPSILON decay studies fail to confirm the zeta(8.3) and begin to place useful limits on Higgs bosons. First results from an experiment at Fermilab on low-background hadronic production of UPSILON states are shown. Accurate measurements of chi/sub b/(1P) masses by the ARGUS collaboration are noted, and interpreted as favoring scalar quark confinement. Studies of t and other heavy quarks will probe the q anti q interaction below 0.05 fm, are likely to be strongly affected by t anti t-Z interference, and can provide varied information on Higgs bosons. 144 refs., 21 figs

  13. Relativistic heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992 a proposal by the Iowa State University experimental nuclear physics group entitled ''Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics'' was funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, for a three-year period beginning November 15, 1991. This is a progress report for the first six months of that period but, in order to give a wider perspective, we report here on progress made since the beginning of calendar year 1991. In the first section, entitled ''Purpose and Trends,'' we give some background on the recent trends in our research program and its evolution from an emphasis on nuclear structure physics to its present emphasis on relativistic heavy ion and RHIC physics. The next section, entitled, ''Physics Research Programs,'' is divided into three parts. First, we discuss our participation in the program to develop a large detector named PHENIX for the RHIC accelerator. Second, we outline progress made in the study of electromagnetic dissociation (ED). A highlight of this endeavor is experiments carried out with the 197 Au beam from the AGS accelerator in April 1991. Third, we discuss progress in completion of our nuclear structure studies. In the final section a list of publications, invited talks and contributed talks starting in 1991 is given

  14. Actinides and heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    The actinide series of elements begins with f-shell electrons forming energy bands, contributing to the bonding, and possessing no magnetic moments. At americium the series switches over to localized f electrons with magnetic moments. In metallic compounds this crossover of behavior can be modified and studied. In this continuum of behavior a few compounds on the very edge of localized f-electron behavior exhibit enormous electronic heat capacities at low temperatures. This is associated with an enhanced thermal mass of the conduction electrons, which is well over a hundred times the free electron mass, and is what led to the label heavy fermion for such compounds. A few of these become superconducting at even lower temperatures. The excitement in this field comes from attempting to understand how this heaviness arises and from the likelihood that the superconductivity is different from that of previously known superconductors. The effects of thorium impurities in UBe 13 were studied as a representative system for studying the nature of the superconductivity

  15. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two accelerator scenarios for heavy ion fusion are considered as driver candidates for an ICF power plant: the RF linac with storage rings and the induction linac. The necessary beam intensity and beam quality requirements are already believed to be achievable in the long run; repetition rate and accelerator efficiency are not critical issues. Conceptual design studies have indicated that the technical problems of the ICF concept with a heavy ion driver can be solved and that the economical aspects are not prohibitive as compared to other ICF concepts. Nevertheless, many open problems still exist, and some new ones have exhibited themselves, and it has become evident that most of them cannot be investigated with existing facilities and at the present level of effort. The first section of this paper deals with current conceptual design studies and focuses on the interface between the accelerator and the reactor. The second section summarizes the present research programs and recommends that their scope should be expanded and intensified in the areas of accelerator physics and beam-target interaction and target physics. In the third section the author calls for a dedicated facility and reports on the plans and ideas for such a facility. Schematics of two proposed accelerator driver systems--the driver for HIBALL (5 MJ/pulse) and a single-pass four-beam induction linac (3 MJ/pulse)--are provided

  16. Heavy ion accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottier, Jacques.

    1977-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerating structure concerned in this invention is of the kind that have a resonance cavity inside which are located at least two longitudinal conducting supports electrically connected to the cavity by one of their ends in such a way that they are in quarter-wavelength resonance and in phase opposition. Slide tubes are electrically connected alternatively to one or the other of the two supports, they being electrically connected respectively to one or the other end of the side wall of the cavity. The feature of the structure is that it includes two pairs of supports symmetrically placed with respect to the centre line of the cavity, the supports of one pair fitted overhanging being placed symmetrically with respect to the centre line of the cavity, each slide tube being connected to the two supports of one pair. These support are connected to the slide wall of the cavity by an insulator located at their electrically free end. The accelerator structure composed of several structures placed end to end, the last one of which is fed by a high frequency field of adjustable amplitude and phase, enables a heavy ion linear accelerator to be built [fr

  17. Ultrarelativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    Studies with ultrarelativistic heavy ions combine aspects of cosmic ray physics, particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmogenesis. The leading theoretical concerns are the behavior of matter at very high-energy density and flux, the general behavior of space time in collisions, relativistic nuclear theory, and quantum chromodynamics. The field has developed over a period of more than thirty years, since the first observation of heavy nuclei in cosmic rays and the major developments of understanding of high-energy collisions made by Fermi and Landau in the early fifties. In the late sixties the discovery of the parton content of nucleons was rapidly followed by a great extension of high-energy collision phenomenology at the CERN ISR and subsequent confirmation of the QCD theory. In parallel the study of p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at very high energies, especially at the CERN PS, Fermilab and the Bevalac, and in cosmic rays demonstrated that studies involving the nucleus opened up a new dimension in studies of the hadronic interaction. It is now at a high level of interest on an international scale, with major new accelerators being proposed to dedicate to this kind of study

  18. Efficient expression of functional (α6β22β3 AChRs in Xenopus oocytes from free subunits using slightly modified α6 subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Kai-Kwong Ley

    Full Text Available Human (α6β2(α4β2β3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs are essential for addiction to nicotine and a target for drug development for smoking cessation. Expressing this complex AChR is difficult, but has been achieved using subunit concatamers. In order to determine what limits expression of α6* AChRs and to efficiently express α6* AChRs using free subunits, we investigated expression of the simpler (α6β22β3 AChR. The concatameric form of this AChR assembles well, but is transported to the cell surface inefficiently. Various chimeras of α6 with the closely related α3 subunit increased expression efficiency with free subunits and produced pharmacologically equivalent functional AChRs. A chimera in which the large cytoplasmic domain of α6 was replaced with that of α3 increased assembly with β2 subunits and transport of AChRs to the oocyte surface. Another chimera replacing the unique methionine 211 of α6 with leucine found at this position in transmembrane domain 1 of α3 and other α subunits increased assembly of mature subunits containing β3 subunits within oocytes. Combining both α3 sequences in an α6 chimera increased expression of functional (α6β22β3 AChRs to 12-fold more than with concatamers. This is pragmatically useful, and provides insights on features of α6 subunit structure that limit its expression in transfected cells.

  19. Characterisation by nuclear magnetic resonance of the β catalytic subunit of the chloroplastic coupling factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Francois

    1986-09-01

    This academic work addressed the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the structural and dynamic study of the catalytic sub-unit of the extrinsic section of a membrane complex, the chloroplastic H+-ATPase. This work included the development of a protocol of preparation and quantitative purification of β subunits isolated from the CF1 for the elaboration of a concentrated sample for NMR, and then the study of the β subunit by using proton NMR

  20. Antibodies to the α-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.; Yu, J.; Bai, D.H.; Hester, P.Y.; Kim, K.

    1985-01-01

    Simple methods for the generation, purification, and assay of antibodies to the α-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hen have been described. Chicken antibodies against the α-subunit inhibit insulin binding to the receptor and stimulate glucose oxidation as well as autophosphorylation of the β-subunit. Thus the properties of chicken antibodies are very similar to those of antibodies found in human autoimmune diseases and different from rabbit antibodies obtained against the same antigen

  1. Cloning and sequencing of the casein kinase 2 alpha subunit from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobrowolska, G; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA coding for the alpha subunit of casein kinase 2 of Zea mays has been determined. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame of 996 nucleotides encoding a polypeptide comprising 332 amino acids. The primary amino acid sequence exhibits 75% identity to the alpha...... subunit and 71% identity to the alpha' subunit of human casein kinase 2....

  2. Compensatory expression of human -Acetylglucosaminyl-1-phosphotransferase subunits in mucolipidosis type III gamma

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl , Sandra; Tiede , Stephan; Castrichini , Monica; Cantz , Michael; Gieselmann , Volkmar; Braulke , Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The N-Acetylglucosaminyl-1-phosphotransferase plays a key role in the generation of mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) recognition markers essential for efficient transport of lysosomal hydrolases to lysosomes. The phosphotransferase is composed of six subunits (?2, ?2, ?2). The ?- and ?-subunits are catalytically active and encoded by a single gene, GNPTAB, whereas the ?-subunit encoded by GNPTG is proposed to recognize conformational structures common to lysosomal enzymes. Defects in GN...

  3. Subunits of the Snf1 kinase heterotrimer show interdependence for association and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Karin; Rubenstein, Eric M; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2006-09-08

    The Snf1 kinase and its mammalian orthologue, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), function as heterotrimers composed of a catalytic alpha-subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma. The beta-subunit is thought to hold the complex together and control subcellular localization whereas the gamma-subunit plays a regulatory role by binding to and blocking the function of an auto-inhibitory domain (AID) present in the alpha-subunit. In addition, catalytic activity requires phosphorylation by a distinct upstream kinase. In yeast, any one of three Snf1-activating kinases, Sak1, Tos3, or Elm1, can fulfill this role. We have previously shown that Sak1 is the only Snf1-activating kinase that forms a stable complex with Snf1. Here we show that the formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex requires the beta- and gamma-subunits in vivo. However, formation of the Sak1.Snf1 complex is not necessary for glucose-regulated phosphorylation of the Snf1 activation loop. Snf1 kinase purified from cells lacking the beta-subunits do not contain any gamma-subunit, indicating that the Snf1 kinase does not form a stable alphagamma dimer in vivo. In vitro kinase assays using purified full-length and truncated Snf1 proteins demonstrate that the kinase domain, which lacks the AID, is significantly more active than the full-length Snf1 protein. Addition of purified beta- and gamma-subunits could stimulate the kinase activity of the full-length alpha-subunit but only when all three subunits were present, suggesting an interdependence of all three subunits for assembly of a functional complex.

  4. Monocistronic mRNAs containing defective hepatitis C virus-like picornavirus internal ribosome entry site elements in their 5 ' untranslated regions are efficiently translated in cells by a cap-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Nielsen, Inge; Normann, Preben

    2008-01-01

    The initiation of protein synthesis on mRNAs within eukaryotic cells is achieved either by a 5' cap-dependent mechanism or through internal initiation directed by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Picornavirus IRES elements, located in the 59 untranslated region (5'UTR), contain extensive s...

  5. The testis-specific Cα2 subunit of PKA is kinetically indistinguishable from the common Cα1 subunit of PKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herberg Friedrich W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two variants of the α-form of the catalytic (C subunit of protein kinase A (PKA, designated Cα1 and Cα2, are encoded by the PRKACA gene. Whereas Cα1 is ubiquitous, Cα2 expression is restricted to the sperm cell. Cα1 and Cα2 are encoded with different N-terminal domains. In Cα1 but not Cα2 the N-terminal end introduces three sites for posttranslational modifications which include myristylation at Gly1, Asp-specific deamidation at Asn2 and autophosphorylation at Ser10. Previous reports have implicated specific biological features correlating with these modifications on Cα1. Since Cα2 is not modified in the same way as Cα1 we tested if they have distinct biochemical activities that may be reflected in different biological properties. Results We show that Cα2 interacts with the two major forms of the regulatory subunit (R of PKA, RI and RII, to form cAMP-sensitive PKAI and PKAII holoenzymes both in vitro and in vivo as is also the case with Cα1. Moreover, using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, we show that the interaction patterns of the physiological inhibitors RI, RII and PKI were comparable for Cα2 and Cα1. This is also the case for their potency to inhibit catalytic activities of Cα2 and Cα1. Conclusion We conclude that the regulatory complexes formed with either Cα1 or Cα2, respectively, are indistinguishable.

  6. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-05

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  7. Distinct forms of the β subunit of GTP-binding regulatory proteins identified by molecular cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, H.K.W.; Amatruda, T.T. III; Birren, B.W.; Simon, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    Two distinct β subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins have been identified by cDNA cloning and are referred to as β 1 and β 1 subunits. The bovine transducin β subunit (β 1 ) has been cloned previously. The author now isolated and analyzed cDNA clones that encode the β 2 subunit from bovine adrenal, bovine brain, and a human myeloid leukemia cell line, HL-60. The 340-residue M/sub r/ 37,329 Β 2 protein is 90% identical with β 1 in predicted amino acid sequence, and it is also organized as a series of repetitive homologous segments. The major mRNA that encodes the bovine β 2 subunit is 1.7 kilobases in length. It is expressed at lower levels than β 1 subunit mRNA in all tissues examined. The β 1 and β 2 messages are expressed in cloned human cell lines. Hybridization of cDNA probes to bovine DNA showed that β 1 and β 2 are encoded by separate genes. The amino acid sequences for the bovine and human β 2 subunit are identical, as are the amino acid sequences for the bovine and human β 1 subunit. This evolutionary conservation suggests that the two β subunits have different roles in the signal transduction process

  8. Translation activity of chimeric ribosomes composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome composition, consisting of rRNA and ribosomal proteins, is highly conserved among a broad range of organisms. However, biochemical studies focusing on ribosomal subunit exchangeability between organisms remain limited. In this study, we show that chimeric ribosomes, composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or E. coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits, are active for β-galactosidase translation in a highly purified E. coli translation system. Activities of the chimeric ribosomes showed only a modest decrease when using E. coli 30 S subunits, indicating functional conservation of the 50 S subunit between these bacterial species.

  9. Specific radioimmunoassay of HCG and its α and β subunits: methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, A.M.; Schoonbrood, J.; Franchimont, P.

    1976-01-01

    To create antisera that are specific for the radioimmunoassay of HCG and its subunits, the antisera are neutralized by incubation with LH or HCG. For each RIA system the inhibition curves of HCG and its subunits LH, FSH, TSH and STH are obtained. The 125 I labelled hormones HCG, α and β subunits and LH were chromatographed over a Sephadex G 100 column. Serum of menopausal and pregnant women were chromatographed in the same way and the fractions subjected to RIA. HCG and its subunits were determined by RIA in the sera of patients with different kinds of cancer

  10. Immunochemical analysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus (luteus) F1-ATPase and its subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, C; Salton, M R

    1983-08-31

    The F1-ATPase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus has been purified to 95% protein homogeneity in this laboratory and as all other bacterial F1S, possesses five distinct subunits with molecular weights ranging from 60 000 to 10 000 (Huberman, M. and Salton, M.R.J. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 547, 230-240). In this communication, we demonstrate the immunochemical reactivities of antibodies to native and SDS-dissociated subunits with the native and dissociated F1-ATPase and show that: (1) the antibodies generated to the native or SDS-dissociated subunits react with the native molecule; (2) all of the subunits comprising the F1 are antigenically unique as determined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis and the Ouchterlony double-diffusion techniques; (3) antibodies to the SDS-denatured individual delta- and epsilon-subunits can be used to destabilize the interaction of these specific subunits with the rest of the native F1; and (4) all subunit antibodies as well as anti-native F1 were found to inhibit ATPase activity to varying degrees, the strongest inhibition being seen with antibodies to the total F1 and anti-alpha- and anti-beta-subunit antibodies. The interaction of specific subunit antibodies may provide a new and novel way to study further and characterize the catalytic portions of F1-ATPases and in general may offer an additional method for the examination of multimeric proteins.

  11. Effect of HMM Glutenin Subunits on Wheat Quality Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Horvat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutenin is a group of polymeric gluten proteins. Glutenin molecules consist of glutenin subunits linked together with disulphide bonds and having higher (HMM-GS and lower (LMM-GS molecular mass. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the influence of HMM-GS on flour processing properties. Seven bread wheat genotypes with contrasting quality attributes and different HMM-GS composition were analyzed during three years. The composition and quantity of HMM-GS were determined by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. The quality diversity among genotypes was estimated by the analysis of wheat grain, and flour and bread quality parameters. The presence of HMM glutenin subunits 1 and 2* at Glu-A1 and the subunits 5+10 at Glu-D1 loci, as well as a higher proportion of total HMM-GS, had a positive effect on wheat quality. Cluster analysis of the three groups of data (genotype and HMM-GS, flour and bread quality, and dough rheology yielded the same hierarchical structure for the first top three levels, and similarity of the corresponding dendrograms was proved by the principal eigenvalues of the corresponding Euclidian distance matrices. The obtained similarity in classification based on essentially different types of measurements reflects strong natural association between genetic data, product quality and physical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to effectively reduce large data set into lower dimensions of latent variables amenable for the analysis. PCA analysis of the total set of data (15 variables revealed a very strong interrelationship between the variables. The first three PCA components accounted for 96 % of the total variance, which was significant to the level of 0.05 and was considered as the level of experimental error. These data imply that the quality of wheat cultivars can be contributed to HMM-GS data and should be taken into account in breeding programs assisted by computer models with the aim to

  12. Heavy flavours in ultra-relativistic heavy ions collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosnet, Ph.

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-relativistic collisions of heavy ions are the today's only means to tackle in laboratory conditions the phase diagram in quantum chromodynamics and the strong interaction. The most recent theoretical studies predict a phase transition between the cold nuclear matter (a hadronic gas) and a plasma of quarks and gluons. Heavy flavour can characterize the nuclear matter produced in a heavy ion collision as well as its spatial-temporal evolution. Their study can be made through their decay into muons. The first part of this work presents the issue of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions and the role of heavy flavours. In the second part the author reviews the results of experiments performed at RHIC and particularly presents the analysis of the mass spectrum of dimuons in the Phenix experiment. The third part describes the muon trigger system of the Alice experiment at CERN and the expected performances for the study of di-muons

  13. Determination of hCG-alpha subunit in threatened pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talas, M.; Pohanka, J.; Fingerova, H.; Janouskova, M.; Krikal, Z.; Prasilova, J.; Zupkova, H.

    1987-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of the hCG-alpha subunit was made using an antibody anti hCG-alpha serum, highly purified hCG-alpha for 125 I-labelling and the standard hCG-alpha. Sera of healthy pregnant women sampled throughout the whole pregnancies were used to determine x-bar±S.D. of hCG-alpha for 14-day intervals. Included in the study were groups of women with high risk of premature labor, late toxemia of pregnancy, twins and fetal hypotrophy. It was shown that increased hCG-alpha is found in pregnant women in whom signs of late toxemia of pregnancy are combined with high risk of premature labor, or with twin pregnancies, while in those with fetal hypotrophy hCG-alpha is within normal limits. (author). 3 figs., 7 refs

  14. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  15. Glycine Receptor α2 Subunit Activation Promotes Cortical Interneuron Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Avila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycine receptors (GlyRs are detected in the developing CNS before synaptogenesis, but their function remains elusive. This study demonstrates that functional GlyRs are expressed by embryonic cortical interneurons in vivo. Furthermore, genetic disruption of these receptors leads to interneuron migration defects. We discovered that extrasynaptic activation of GlyRs containing the α2 subunit in cortical interneurons by endogenous glycine activates voltage-gated calcium channels and promotes calcium influx, which further modulates actomyosin contractility to fine-tune nuclear translocation during migration. Taken together, our data highlight the molecular events triggered by GlyR α2 activation that control cortical tangential migration during embryogenesis.

  16. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion-source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at. (Auth.)

  17. Relativistic heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    This is a progress report for the period May 1992 through April 1993. The first section, entitled ''Purpose and Trends, gives background on the recent trends in the research program and its evolution from an emphasis on nuclear structure physics to its present emphasis on relativistic heavy ion and RHIC physics. The next section, entitled ''Physics Research Progress'', is divided into four parts: participation in the program to develop a large detector named PHENIX for the RHIC accelerator; joining E864 at the AGS accelerator and the role in that experiment; progress made in the study of electromagnetic dissociation highlight of this endeavor is an experiment carried out with the 197 Au beam from the AGS accelerator in April 1992; progress in completion of the nuclear structure studies. In the final section a list of publications, invited talks, and contributed talks is given

  18. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  19. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at

  20. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  1. Heavy-ion superconducting linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the superconducting heavy-ion accelerators. Most of them are linacs used as boosters for tandem electrostatic accelerators, although the technology is being extended to very low velocity to eliminate the need for an injector. The characteristics and features of the various superconducting heavy-ion accelerators are discussed. 45 refs

  2. Heavy-ion superconducting linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the superconducting heavy-ion accelerators. Most of them are linacs used as boosters for tandem electrostatic accelerators, although the technology is being extended to very low velocity to eliminate the need for an injector. The characteristics and features of the various superconducting heavy-ion accelerators are discussed. 45 refs.

  3. Heavy fermion and actinide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    During this period, 1/N expansions have been systematically applied to the calculation of the properties of highly correlated electron systems. These studies include examinations of (a) the class of materials known as heavy fermion semi-conductors, (b) the high energy spectra of heavy fermion systems, and (c) the doped oxide superconductors

  4. Heavy metals and soil microbes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giller, K.E.; Witter, E.; McGrath, S.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery in the early 1980s that soil microorganisms, and in particular the symbiotic bacteria Rhizobium, were highly sensitive to heavy metals initiated a new line of research. This has given us important insights into a range of topics: ecotoxicology, bioavailability of heavy metals, the role

  5. The subunit structure of the extracellular hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, Marcio H.L.; Naves, Cristiani F.; Xavier, Luciana P.; Santoro, Marcelo M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata was purified to homogeneity by a two step purification protocol using a gel filtration column (Superose 6 HR/Pharmacia ) followed by an anion exchange chromatography (MONO-Q Sepharose/Pharmacia). The dissociation products were analysed by a 5 - 15 % Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-PAGE) giving a band of 270 K Daltons and a band of 180 K Daltons after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol. The same profile was obtained in a 3.5 % Agarose gel electrophoresis containing SDS (SDS-AGE) showing additional bands of higher molecular weight. These bands were proposed to be monomers, dimers and trimers and, after reduction in a Bidimensional SDS-AGE, the proposed monomers and dimers were decomposed in two and four bands that were interpreted as 1 - 4 chains. The hemoglobin was digested by four different proteases ( Thrombin, Trypsin, Chymotrypsin and Subtilisin ) showing several equivalent fragments with molecular weights multiples of its minimum molecular weight ( 17.7 K Daltons). The circular dichroism spectrum of the protein showed a characteristic high α-helix content. We proposed that this hemoglobin is a pentamer of approx. 360 K Daltons subunits each formed by two 180 K Daltons chains linked in pairs by disulfide bridges and each of these chains comprises ten Heme binding domains. These data were compared to other Planorbidae extracellular hemoglobins. Up to now, the quaternary structure of this hemoglobin (shape and disposition of the subunits) is unknown. It is intended to elucidate its structure by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering in Brazilian National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS). (author)

  6. Heavy charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoe, Jun-etsu

    1995-01-01

    A pilot study of heavy charged particles with heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for advanced H and N cancer has been carried out from June 1994 at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). As of the beginning of August 1994, three patients were treated by 290 MeV carbon ions. The patients had adenocarcinoma of the cheek mucosa, squamous cell carcinoma of the ethmoid sinus and adenoid cystic carcinoma of the sublingual gland. Patients were immobilized by individual head coach and thermosplint facial shell. Individual collimators and bolus were also prepared for each ports. Dose fractionation for the initial pilot study group was 16.2 GyE/18 fractions/6 weeks, which would be equivalent to standard fractionation of 60.0 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks with photons. This dose fractionation was considered to be 20% lesser than 75 GyE/37.5 fractions/7.5 weeks, which is estimated to be maximum tolerance dose for advanced H and N cancers. HIMAC worked well and there was no major trouble causing any treatment delay. Acute skin reactions of 3 patients were 2 cases of bright erythema with patchy moist desquamation and one of dull erythema, which were evaluated as equivalent reaction with irradiated dose. Acute mucosa reactions appeared to have lesser reaction than predicted mucositis. Tumor reactions of three patients were partial reaction (PR) at the end of treatment and nearly complete remission (CR) after 6 months of treatment. From October 1994, we started to treat patients with advanced H and N cancer with 10% high dose than previous dose. And new candidates of pilot study with non small cell lung cancer, brain tumor and carcinoma of the tongue were entered into pilot study. At the end of February 1995, a total of 21 patients were treated by carbon ions. (J.P.N.)

  7. Differential regulation of thyrotropin subunit apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.; Weintraub, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of TSH apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone was studied by incubating pituitaries from normal and hypothyroid (3 weeks post-thyroidectomy) rats in medium containing [ 14 C]alanine and [ 3 H] glucosamine. After 6 h, samples were sequentially treated with anti-TSH beta to precipitate TSH and free TSH beta, anti-LH beta to clear the sample of LH and free LH beta, then anti-LH alpha to precipitate free alpha-subunit. Total proteins were acid precipitated. All precipitates were subjected to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, which were then sliced and assayed by scintillation spectrometry. In hypothyroid pituitaries plus medium, [ 14 C]alanine incorporation in combined and free beta-subunits was 26 times normal and considerably greater than the 3.4-fold increase seen in total protein; combined and free alpha-subunits showed no specific increase in apoprotein synthesis. [ 3 H]Glucosamine incorporation in combined alpha- and beta-subunits in hypothyroid samples was 13 and 21 times normal, respectively, and was greater than the 1.9-fold increase in total protein; free alpha-subunit showed no specific increase in carbohydrate synthesis. The glucosamine to alanine ratio, reflecting relative glycosylation of newly synthesized molecules, was increased in hypothyroidism for combined alpha-subunits, but not for combined beta-subunits, free alpha-subunits, or total proteins. In summary, short term hypothyroidism selectively stimulated TSH beta apoprotein synthesis and carbohydrate synthesis of combined alpha- and beta-subunits. Hypothyroidism also increased the relative glycosylation of combined alpha-subunit. Thus, thyroid hormone deficiency appears to alter the rate-limiting step in TSH assembly (i.e. beta-subunit synthesis) as well as the carbohydrate structure of TSH, which may play important roles in its biological function

  8. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists

  9. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandau, E.; Sandau, P.; Pulz, O.

    1996-01-01

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  10. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  11. Roles of the β subunit hinge domain in ATP synthase F1 sector: Hydrophobic network formed by introduced βPhe174 inhibits subunit rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Kashiwagi, Sachiko; Kojima, Masaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Futai, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    The ATP synthase β subunit hinge domain (βPhe148 ∼ βGly186, P-loop/α-helixB/loop/β-sheet4, Escherichia coli residue numbering) dramatically changes in conformation upon nucleotide binding. We previously reported that F 1 with the βSer174 to Phe mutation in the domain lowered the γ subunit rotation speed, and thus decreased the ATPase activity [M. Nakanishi-Matsui, S. Kashiwagi, T. Ubukata, A. Iwamoto-Kihara, Y. Wada, M. Futai, Rotational catalysis of Escherichia coli ATP synthase F 1 sector. Stochastic fluctuation and a key domain of the β subunit, J. Biol. Chem. 282 (2007) 20698-20704.]. Homology modeling indicates that the amino acid replacement induces a hydrophobic network, in which the βMet159, βIle163, and βAla167 residues of the β subunit are involved together with the mutant βPhe174. The network is expected to stabilize the conformation of β DP (nucleotide-bound form of the β subunit), resulting in increased activation energy for transition to β E (empty β subunit). The modeling further predicts that replacement of βMet159 with Ala or Ile weakens the hydrophobic network. As expected, these two mutations experimentally suppressed the ATPase activities as well as subunit rotation of βS174F. Furthermore, the rotation rate decreased with the increase of the strength in the hydrophobic network. These results indicate that the smooth conformational change of the β subunit hinge domain is pertinent for the rotational catalysis.

  12. Baryons in the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannel, T.; Roberts, W.; Ryzak, Z.

    1990-08-01

    We show how to incorporate baryons in the heavy quark effective theory. A convenient formalism is exhibited and applied to semileptonic weak decays of heavy baryons and to exclusive production of heavy baryons in e + e - annihilation. (orig.)

  13. A Supercluster of Neutralizing Epitopes at the Interface of Ricin’s Enzymatic (RTA and Binding (RTB Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Y. Poon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of an effort to engineer ricin antitoxins and immunotherapies, we previously produced and characterized a collection of phage-displayed, heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs from alpacas that had been immunized with ricin antigens. In our initial screens, we identified nine VHHs directed against ricin toxin’s binding subunit (RTB, but only one, JIZ-B7, had toxin-neutralizing activity. Linking JIZ-B7 to different VHHs against ricin’s enzymatic subunit (RTA resulted in several bispecific antibodies with potent toxin-neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. JIZ-B7 may therefore be an integral component of a future VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA for ricin toxin. In this study, we now localize, using competitive ELISA, JIZ-B7’s epitope to a region of RTB’s domain 2 sandwiched between the high-affinity galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc-binding site and the boundary of a neutralizing hotspot on RTA known as cluster II. Analysis of additional RTB (n = 8- and holotoxin (n = 4-specific VHHs from a recent series of screens identified a “supercluster” of neutralizing epitopes at the RTA-RTB interface. Among the VHHs tested, toxin-neutralizing activity was most closely associated with epitope proximity to RTA, and not interference with RTB’s ability to engage Gal/GalNAc receptors. We conclude that JIZ-B7 is representative of a larger group of potent toxin-neutralizing antibodies, possibly including many described in the literature dating back several decades, that recognize tertiary and possibly quaternary epitopes located at the RTA-RTB interface and that target a region of vulnerability on ricin toxin.

  14. Regulated appearance of NMDA receptor subunits and channel functions during in vitro neuronal differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelitai, Márta; Schlett, Katalin; Varju, Patrícia; Eisel, Ulrich; Madarász, Emília

    The schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and the appearance of functional NMDA-gated ion channels were investigated during the retinoic acid (RA) induced neuronal differentiation of NE-4C, a p53-deficient mouse neuroectodermal progenitor cell line. NR2A. NR2B, and NR2D subunit transcripts

  15. Differential expression of BK channel isoforms and beta-subunits in rat neuro-vascular tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Wulf, Helle; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the expression of splice variants and beta-subunits of the BK channel (big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel, Slo1, MaxiK, K(Ca)1.1) in rat cerebral blood vessels, meninges, trigeminal ganglion among other tissues. An alpha-subunit splice variant X1(+24) was found expresse...

  16. Differential antibiotic sensitivity determined by the large ribosomal subunit in thermophilic archaea.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggero, D; Londei, P

    1996-01-01

    Hybrid ribosomes obtained by mixing the ribosomal subunits of the extremely thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Desulfurococcus mobilis were tested for their sensitivity to selected antibiotics. It is shown that structural differences in the large ribosomal subunits determine qualitatively and quantitatively the patterns of response to alpha-sarcin and paromomycin in these species.

  17. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...

  18. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  19. A-Raf kinase is a new interacting partner of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1997-01-01

    In a search for protein kinase CK2 beta subunit binding proteins using the two-hybrid system, more than 1000 positive clones were isolated. Beside clones for the alpha' and beta subunit of CK2, there were clones coding for a so far unknown protein, whose partial cDNA sequence was already deposited...

  20. Purification of the alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotiroudis, T.G.; Heilmeyer, L.M.G. Jr.; Crabb, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Structural analysis of the alpha (Mr, 132,000) and beta (Mr, 113,000) subunits of phosphorylase kinase may provide clues to their yet unknown functions however purification remains problematic. Preparative RP-HPLC procedures yield inconveniently large, dilute solutions and concentration steps are required prior to subunit modification and fragmentation. Concentration of the β subunit usually results in significant losses due to insolubility. Using preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, they have purified the α, 7 , and β subunits from rabbit muscle phosphorylase kinase in a soluble and concentrated form suitable for structural studies. Phosphorylase kinase labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate in the α and α' subunits and fully 14 C-S-carboxymethylated was fractionated on a 5% acrylamide Laemmli slab gel. The subunit bands were visualized by fluorescence and by SDS precipitation then excised and electroeluted in the presence of SDS using an ELUTRAP device. From 4.5 mg of enzyme applied to a 4.5 mm thick gel about 70% of the α subunit and about 90% of the β subunit were typically recovered in less than 1 ml with overnight elution

  1. ME31B globally represses maternal mRNAs by two distinct mechanisms during the Drosophila maternal-to-zygotic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miranda; Ly, Michael; Lugowski, Andrew; Laver, John D; Lipshitz, Howard D; Smibert, Craig A; Rissland, Olivia S

    2017-09-06

    In animal embryos, control of development is passed from exclusively maternal gene products to those encoded by the embryonic genome in a process referred to as the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). We show that the RNA-binding protein, ME31B, binds to and represses the expression of thousands of maternal mRNAs during the Drosophila MZT. However, ME31B carries out repression in different ways during different phases of the MZT. Early, it represses translation while, later, its binding leads to mRNA destruction, most likely as a consequence of translational repression in the context of robust mRNA decay. In a process dependent on the PNG kinase, levels of ME31B and its partners, Cup and Trailer Hitch (TRAL), decrease by over 10-fold during the MZT, leading to a change in the composition of mRNA-protein complexes. We propose that ME31B is a global repressor whose regulatory impact changes based on its biological context.

  2. Transcriptome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytidine RNA modifications in bacteria, archaea, and yeast reveals m5C within archaeal mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Edelheit

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of 5-methylcytidine (m(5C in tRNA and rRNA molecules of a wide variety of organisms was first observed more than 40 years ago. However, detection of this modification was limited to specific, abundant, RNA species, due to the usage of low-throughput methods. To obtain a high resolution, systematic, and comprehensive transcriptome-wide overview of m(5C across the three domains of life, we used bisulfite treatment on total RNA from both gram positive (B. subtilis and gram negative (E. coli bacteria, an archaeon (S. solfataricus and a eukaryote (S. cerevisiae, followed by massively parallel sequencing. We were able to recover most previously documented m(5C sites on rRNA in the four organisms, and identified several novel sites in yeast and archaeal rRNAs. Our analyses also allowed quantification of methylated m(5C positions in 64 tRNAs in yeast and archaea, revealing stoichiometric differences between the methylation patterns of these organisms. Molecules of tRNAs in which m(5C was absent were also discovered. Intriguingly, we detected m(5C sites within archaeal mRNAs, and identified a consensus motif of AUCGANGU that directs methylation in S. solfataricus. Our results, which were validated using m(5C-specific RNA immunoprecipitation, provide the first evidence for mRNA modifications in archaea, suggesting that this mode of post-transcriptional regulation extends beyond the eukaryotic domain.

  3. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Francisco Esteban; Moxon, Simon; de Haro, Juan P.; Calo, Silvia; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M.; Dalmay, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi. PMID:20427422

  4. Regnase-1 Maintains Iron Homeostasis via the Degradation of Transferrin Receptor 1 and Prolyl-Hydroxylase-Domain-Containing Protein 3 mRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yoshinaga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron metabolism is regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The mRNA of the iron-controlling gene, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, has long been believed to be negatively regulated by a yet-unidentified endonuclease. Here, we show that the endonuclease Regnase-1 is critical for the degradation of mRNAs involved in iron metabolism in vivo. First, we demonstrate that Regnase-1 promotes TfR1 mRNA decay. Next, we show that Regnase-1−/− mice suffer from severe iron deficiency anemia, although hepcidin expression is downregulated. The iron deficiency anemia is induced by a defect in duodenal iron uptake. We reveal that duodenal Regnase-1 controls the expression of PHD3, which impairs duodenal iron uptake via HIF2α suppression. Finally, we show that Regnase-1 is a HIF2α-inducible gene and thus provides a positive feedback loop for HIF2α activation via PHD3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Regnase-1-mediated regulation of iron-related transcripts is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  5. Regnase-1 Maintains Iron Homeostasis via the Degradation of Transferrin Receptor 1 and Prolyl-Hydroxylase-Domain-Containing Protein 3 mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Masanori; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Ori, Daisuke; Uehata, Takuya; Tsujimura, Tohru; Suzuki, Yutaka; Mino, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2017-05-23

    Iron metabolism is regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The mRNA of the iron-controlling gene, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), has long been believed to be negatively regulated by a yet-unidentified endonuclease. Here, we show that the endonuclease Regnase-1 is critical for the degradation of mRNAs involved in iron metabolism in vivo. First, we demonstrate that Regnase-1 promotes TfR1 mRNA decay. Next, we show that Regnase-1 -/- mice suffer from severe iron deficiency anemia, although hepcidin expression is downregulated. The iron deficiency anemia is induced by a defect in duodenal iron uptake. We reveal that duodenal Regnase-1 controls the expression of PHD3, which impairs duodenal iron uptake via HIF2α suppression. Finally, we show that Regnase-1 is a HIF2α-inducible gene and thus provides a positive feedback loop for HIF2α activation via PHD3. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Regnase-1-mediated regulation of iron-related transcripts is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor; Nicolas, Francisco; Moxon, Simon; Haro, Juan de; Calo, Silvia; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi

  7. Toxicity of heavy metals in the environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oehme, F.W

    1978-01-01

    ... as the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity resulting from heavy metal chemicals. The more common toxic heavy metals, along with their biochemistry and associated clinical syndromes, are then described...

  8. Multichromophoric hybrid species made of perylene bisimide derivatives and Ru(ii) and Os(ii) polypyridine subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Francesco; La Ganga, Giuseppina; Campagna, Sebastiano; Syrgiannis, Zois; Rigodanza, Francesco; Vitale, Stefania; Licciardello, Antonino; Prato, Maurizio

    2017-05-31

    Herein, the synthesis and the photophysical and redox properties of a new perylene bisimide (PBI) species (L), bearing two 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) ligands at the two imide positions of the PBI, and its dinuclear Ru(ii) and Os(ii) complexes, [(bpy) 2 Ru(μ-L)Ru(bpy) 2 ](PF 6 ) 4 (Ru2; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [(Me 2 -bpy) 2 Os(μ-L)Os(Me 2 -bpy) 2 ](PF 6 ) 4 (Os2; Me 2 -bpy = (4,4'-dimethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine), are reported. The absorption spectra of the compounds are dominated by the structured bands of the PBI subunit due to the lowest-energy spin-allowed π-π* transition. The spin-allowed MLCT transitions in Ru2 and Os2 are inferred by the absorption at 350-470 nm, where the PBI absorption is negligible. The absorption band extends towards the red region for Os2 due to the spin-forbidden MLCT transitions, intensified by the heavy osmium center. The reduction processes of the compounds are dominated by two successive mono-electronic PBI-based processes, which in the metal complexes are slightly shifted compared to the free ligand. On oxidation, both metal complexes undergo an apparent bi-electronic process (at 1.31 V vs. SCE for Ru2 and 0.77 V for Os2), attributed to the simultaneous one-electron oxidation of the two weakly-interacting metal centers. In Ru2 and Os2, the intense fluorescence of L subunit (λ max , 535 nm; τ, 4.3 ns; Φ, 0.91) is fully quenched, mainly by photoinduced electron transfer from the metal centers, on the ps timescale (time constant, 11 ps in Ru2 and 3 ps in Os2). Such photoinduced electron transfer leads to the formation of a charge-separated state, which directly decays to the ground state in about 70 ps in Os2, but produces the triplet π-π* state of the PBI subunit in 35 ps in Ru2. The results provide information on the excited-state processes of the hybrid species combining two dominant classes of chromophore/luminophore species, the PBI and the metal polypyridine complexes, and can be used for future design on new hybrid

  9. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  10. Submitochondrial distributions and stabilities of subunits 4, 5, and 6 of yeast cytochrome oxidase in assembly defective mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, D M; Tzagoloff, A

    1997-08-04

    The concentration and submitochondrial distribution of the subunit polypeptides of cytochrome oxidase have been studied in wild type yeast and in different mutants impaired in assembly of this respiratory complex. All the subunit polypeptides of the enzyme are associated with mitochondrial membranes of wild type cells, except for a small fraction of subunits 4 and 6 that is recovered in the soluble protein fraction of mitochondria. Cytochrome oxidase mutants consistently display a severe reduction in the steady-state concentration of subunit 1 due to its increased turnover. As a consequence, most of subunit 4, which normally is associated with subunit 1, is found in the soluble fraction. A similar shift from membrane-bound to soluble subunit 6 is seen in mutants blocked in expression of subunit 5a. In contrast, null mutations in COX6 coding for subunit 6 promote loss of subunit 5a. The absence of subunit 5a in the cox6 mutant is the result of proteolytic degradation rather than regulation of its expression by subunit 6. The possible role of the ATP-dependent proteases Rca1p and Afg3p in proteolysis of subunits 1 and 5a has been assessed in strains with combined mutations in COX6, RCA1, and/or AFG3. Immunochemical assays indicate that another protease(s) must be responsible for most of the proteolytic loss of these proteins.

  11. Persistence of the mitochondrial permeability transition in the absence of subunit c of human ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuya; Ford, Holly C; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2017-03-28

    The permeability transition in human mitochondria refers to the opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membrane. Opening can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane, and ATP synthesis, followed by cell death. Recent proposals suggest that the pore is associated with the ATP synthase complex and specifically with the ring of c-subunits that constitute the membrane domain of the enzyme's rotor. The c-subunit is produced from three nuclear genes, ATP5G1 , ATP5G2 , and ATP5G3 , encoding identical copies of the mature protein with different mitochondrial-targeting sequences that are removed during their import into the organelle. To investigate the involvement of the c-subunit in the PTP, we generated a clonal cell, HAP1-A12, from near-haploid human cells, in which ATP5G1 , ATP5G2 , and ATP5G3 were disrupted. The HAP1-A12 cells are incapable of producing the c-subunit, but they preserve the characteristic properties of the PTP. Therefore, the c-subunit does not provide the PTP. The mitochondria in HAP1-A12 cells assemble a vestigial ATP synthase, with intact F 1 -catalytic and peripheral stalk domains and the supernumerary subunits e, f, and g, but lacking membrane subunits ATP6 and ATP8. The same vestigial complex plus associated c-subunits was characterized from human 143B ρ 0 cells, which cannot make the subunits ATP6 and ATP8, but retain the PTP. Therefore, none of the membrane subunits of the ATP synthase that are involved directly in transmembrane proton translocation is involved in forming the PTP.

  12. Mining Protein Evolution for Insights into Mechanisms of Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Auxiliary Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinarolo, Steven; Granata, Daniele; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Ahern, Christopher A

    2018-02-21

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) beta (β) subunits have been called the "overachieving" auxiliary ion channel subunit. Indeed, these subunits regulate the trafficking of the sodium channel complex at the plasma membrane and simultaneously tune the voltage-dependent properties of the pore-forming alpha-subunit. It is now known that VGSC β-subunits are capable of similar modulation of multiple isoforms of related voltage-gated potassium channels, suggesting that their abilities extend into the broader voltage-gated channels. The gene family for these single transmembrane immunoglobulin beta-fold proteins extends well beyond the traditional VGSC β1-β4 subunit designation, with deep roots into the cell adhesion protein family and myelin-related proteins - where inherited mutations result in a myriad of electrical signaling disorders. Yet, very little is known about how VGSC β-subunits support protein trafficking pathways, the basis for their modulation of voltage-dependent gating, and, ultimately, their role in shaping neuronal excitability. An evolutionary approach can be useful in yielding new clues to such functions as it provides an unbiased assessment of protein residues, folds, and functions. An approach is described here which indicates the greater emergence of the modern β-subunits roughly 400 million years ago in the early neurons of Bilateria and bony fish, and the unexpected presence of distant homologues in bacteriophages. Recent structural breakthroughs containing α and β eukaryotic sodium channels containing subunits suggest a novel role for a highly conserved polar contact that occurs within the transmembrane segments. Overall, a mixture of approaches will ultimately advance our understanding of the mechanism for β-subunit interactions with voltage-sensor containing ion channels and membrane proteins.

  13. Topographic antigenic determinants recognized by monoclonal antibodies on human choriogonadotropin beta-subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidart, J.M.; Troalen, F.; Salesse, R.; Bousfield, G.R.; Bohuon, C.J.; Bellet, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a first attempt to study the antibody-combining sites recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the beta-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). Two groups of antibodies were first defined by their ability to recognize only the free beta-subunit or the free and combined subunit. Antibodies FBT-11 and FBT-11-L bind only to hCG beta-subunit but not to hCG, whereas antibodies FBT-10 and D1E8 bind to both the beta-subunit and the hormone. In both cases, the antigenic determinants were localized to the core of the protein (residues 1-112), indicating the weak immunogenicity of the specific carboxyl-terminal extension of hCG-beta. Nine synthetic peptides spanning different regions of hCG-beta and lutropin-beta were assessed for their capacity to inhibit antibody binding. A synthetic peptide inclusive of the NH2-terminal region (residues 1-7) of the hCG beta-subunit was found to inhibit binding to the radiolabeled subunit of a monoclonal antibody specific for free hCG-beta (FBT-11). Further delineation of the antigenic site recognized by this antibody provided evidence for the involvement of fragment 82-92. Moreover, monoclonal antibody FBT-11 inhibited the recombination of hCG-beta to hCG-alpha, indicating that its antigenic determinant might be located nearby or in the hCG-beta portion interacting with the alpha-subunit. Binding of monoclonal antibody FBT-10, corresponding to the second antigenic determinant, was weakly inhibited by fragment 82-105 and did not impair the recombination of the hCG beta-subunit to the hCG alpha-subunit. Its combining site appeared to be located in a region of the intact native choriogonadotropin present at the surface of the hormone-receptor complex

  14. Heavy Water - Industrial Separation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculea, M.

    1984-01-01

    This monograph devoted to the heavy water production mainly presents the Romanian experience in the field which started in early sixties from the laboratory scale production and reached now the level of large scale industrial production at ROMAG-Drobeta, Romania. The book is structured in eleven chapters entitled: Overview, The main physical properties, Sources, Uses, Separation factor and equilibrium constant, Mathematical modelling of the separation process, Thermodynamical considerations on the isotope separation, Selection criteria for heavy water separation processes, Industrial installations for heavy water production, Prospects, Acknowledgements. 200 Figs., 90 Tabs., 135 Refs

  15. Heavy quark fragmentation functions in the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmentation of b-bar-antiquark into polarized B c * -mesons and b-quark into P-wave (c-bar b) states in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory. The heavy quark fragmentation functions in longitudinally and transversely polarized S-wave b-bar c-states and P-wave mesons containing b-, c-quarks also, with the exact account of corrections of first order in 1/m b . 20 refs., 2 figs

  16. Heavy-element nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    New measurements and theoretical studies of nuclear properties, together with new astronomical data on the growth of heavy-element abundances during the early history of the Galaxy, now provide a clearer picture of where in nature the elements heavier than iron are produced by rapid (r-process) and show (s-process) neutron capture reactions. The nuclear data suggest that the r-process involves a high-neutron-density beta-flow equilibrium environment and that the s-process may have occurred at a temperature and neutron density consistent with a 13 C(α,n) 16 0 neutron source. The astronomical data, when compared with simple galactic chemical evolution modes, suggests that the r-process is associated with type II supernovae and that the neutron source must be manufactured by the star. Low-mass type II supernovae are proposed as the most important contributors to the r-process. A 13 C neutron source in intermediate-mass stars is proposed for the s-process. 64 refs., 7 figs

  17. Heavy ion fusion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D.P.; Kwan, J.; Westenskow, G.

    2003-01-01

    In Heavy-Fusion and in other applications, there is a need for high brightness sources with both high current and low emittance. The traditional design with a single monolithic source, while very successful, has significant constraints on it when going to higher currents. With the Child-Langmuir current-density limit, geometric aberration limits, and voltage breakdown limits, the area of the source becomes a high power of the current, A ∼ I 8/3 . We are examining a multi-beamlet source, avoiding the constraints by having many beamlets each with low current and small area. The beamlets are created and initially accelerated separately and then merged to form a single beam. This design offers a number of potential advantages over a monolithic source, such as a smaller transverse footprint, more control over the shaping and aiming of the beam, and more flexibility in the choice of ion sources. A potential drawback, however, is the emittance that results from the merging of the beamlets. We have designed injectors using simulation that have acceptably low emittance and are beginning to examine them experimentally

  18. Heavy fields and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goon, Garrett [Institute of Physics, Universiteit van Amsterdam,Science Park 904, Amsterdam, 1090 GL (Netherlands)

    2017-01-11

    We study the effects of heavy fields on 4D spacetimes with flat, de Sitter and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. At low energies, matter generates specific, calculable higher derivative corrections to the GR action which perturbatively alter the Schwarzschild-(A)dS family of solutions. The effects of massive scalars, Dirac spinors and gauge fields are each considered. The six-derivative operators they produce, such as ∼R{sup 3} terms, generate the leading corrections. The induced changes to horizon radii, Hawking temperatures and entropies are found. Modifications to the energy of large AdS black holes are derived by imposing the first law. An explicit demonstration of the replica trick is provided, as it is used to derive black hole and cosmological horizon entropies. Considering entropy bounds, it’s found that scalars and fermions increase the entropy one can store inside a region bounded by a sphere of fixed size, but vectors lead to a decrease, oddly. We also demonstrate, however, that many of the corrections fall below the resolving power of the effective field theory and are therefore untrustworthy. Defining properties of black holes, such as the horizon area and Hawking temperature, prove to be remarkably robust against higher derivative gravitational corrections.

  19. Heavy ion elastic scatterings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Diffraction and refraction play an important role in particle elastic scattering. The optical model treats correctly and simultaneously both phenomena but without disentangling them. Semi-classical discussions in terms of trajectories emphasize the refractive aspect due to the real part of the optical potential. The separation due to to R.C. Fuller of the quantal cross section into two components coming from opposite side of the target nucleus allows to understand better the refractive phenomenon and the origin of the observed oscillations in the elastic scattering angular distributions. We shall see that the real part of the potential is responsible of a Coulomb and a nuclear rainbow which allows to determine better the nuclear potential in the interior region near the nuclear surface since the volume absorption eliminates any effect of the real part of the potential for the internal partial scattering waves. Resonance phenomena seen in heavy ion scattering will be discussed in terms of optical model potential and Regge pole analysis. Compound nucleus resonances or quasi-molecular states can be indeed the more correct and fundamental alternative

  20. Relativistic heavy ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Experimental work is reported on the following topics: transverse energy production in 10.7-GeV/c/u Au on Au collisions; first results on delta ray production and charged particle multiplicities with the Au beam at 10.7 GeV/c/A; preliminary studies on the feasibility of flow measurement with the E814 participant calorimeter; preliminary results from the E877 telescope; and low-p t baryon distribution in Si+Al, Pb collisions at the AGS. Then the status of the Hadronic Calorimeter project of AGS Experiment E864 (ECOS--Exotic Composite Object Spectrometer) is reviewed. Next, the same is done for work of the STAR RHIC collaboration (Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) project evolution and development in FY92, SVT software results from 1992, SVT instrumentation, FY93 SVT pion test beam). The instrumentation section deals with the design and installation of a target rapidity telescope for BNL experiment 814/877 and a repair scheme for the E814/E877 participant calorimeter. Finally, the theory part addresses bosonic kinetics: thermalization of mesons and the pion p perpendicular spectrum in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions and non-equilibrium properties of hadronic mixtures

  1. Heavy quarks and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimov, Ya.I.; Khoze, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results which proved the reality of quarks are reviewed along with further experiments broadening the representation of quarks and leptons and providing the basis to develop the theory of elementary particles. The discovery of the J/psi particle is noted to give rise to the discovery of c-quark, the existance of which is confirmed by the discovery of charmed hadrons. The main aspects of quantum chromodynamics explaining the mechanism of strong interaction of quarks are considered along with those of the Weinberg-Salam theory proposed to describe weak and electromagnetic interactions of quarks and leptons. Experimental data testifying to the existance of heavy tausup(+-) leptons are presented. The history of discovery of γ mesons and of a new heavier b-quark is described. Perspectives for studying elementary particles are discussed. Further studies of γ mesons, discovery and investigation of charmed particles are noted to be immediate tasks along with the search for manifestation of t-quark considered to be a partner of b-quark from the viewpoint of the Weinberg-Salam model

  2. Heavy particle effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.P.

    1981-01-01

    There are two problems discussed, both of which have to do with dissimilar magnitudes in mass. Theoretically, we can devise the large difference in mass as observed by decreeing some vev, v/sub i/ to be much bigger than the other; or, we can assume that some couplings g/sub i/ are much stronger. These two different assumptions give rise to entirely different patterns of interaction in the resulting theory. The first way to generate a mass hierarchy can be called the soft way, because in the zeroth order, the large mass scale leaves its foot print merely in a few effective parameters of the residual theory. The effective theory is renormalizable, sans anomaly. In this limit, the heavy particles decouple. The second assumption (g/sub j/ much greater than g/sub j'/) to create mass hierarchy does a lot of violence to a theory. Effects of the large mass scale will be felt by the system left behind in many ways. An infinite number of parameters are needed to summarize the effects in this limit. This is called the hard limit. It follows that the resulting effective Lagrangian, if in fact it makes sense to construct one at all, will be non-polynomial and apparently non-renormalizable

  3. Characterization of the interaction between the heavy and light chains of bovine factor Va.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, F J

    1992-10-05

    Bovine factor Va has been previously been shown to consist of heavy (M(r) = 94,000) and light chains (M(r) = 81,000), that interact in a manner dependent upon the presence of either calcium or manganese ions. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of subunit interaction we have studied the effects of temperature and ions on factor Va stability. The rates of formation of factor Va from isolated chains and dissociation were temperature-dependent with an energy of activation of 6.2 and 1.3 kcal mol-1, respectively. The yield of factor Va from isolated chains was inversely related to the amount of time the chains were incubated at 4 degrees C. Incubation of individual chains revealed that the heavy chain is cold-labile, an effect that is reversible. Manganese ion was observed to prevent the conversion to the inactive form. High salt tends to stabilize the two-chain structure of factor Va, but is inhibitory to its formation from isolated chains. High concentrations of either manganese or calcium ions also inhibited reconstitution of activity. The light chain, in particular, was sensitive to the presence of manganese or calcium ion. Heavy chain that had been cleaved by activated protein C had a weakened interaction with the light chain, and the resulting complex had no procoagulant activity. Cooling of the heavy chain to 4 degrees C enhanced its intrinsic fluorescence. Manganese ion prevented some of this enhancement. The heavy chain fluorescence returned to the room temperature value with a half-life of approximately 10 min. In the presence of manganese ion relaxation was accelerated. The intrinsic fluorescence of activated protein C-cleaved heavy chain was not increased when the temperature was decreased. These data suggest that the heavy chain can exist in two forms. Elevated temperature converts it to a form that can bind ions and have a productive interaction with the light chain. However, conditions that prevent the heavy chain from combining with the light

  4. Heavy Flavor Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Heavy flavor production are of great interest in heavy ion collisions. In the produced medium, the binding potential between a quark and antiquark in quarkonium is screened by surrounding light quarks and antiquarks. Thus, the various quarkonium states are expected to be melt at different temperatures depending on their binding energies, which allows us to characterize the QCD phase transition. In addition, open heavy flavor production are relevant for flavor-dependence of the in-medium parton energy loss. In QCD, gluons are expected to lose more energy compared to quarks when passing through the QGP due to the larger color charge. Compared to light quarks, heavy quarks are expected to lose less radiative energy because gluon radiation is suppressed at angles smaller than the ratio of the quark mass to its energy. This dead cone effect (and its disappearance at high transverse momentum) can be studied using open heavy flavor mesons and heavy flavor tagged jets. With CMS detector, quarkonia, open he...

  5. SAD1, an RNA polymerase I subunit A34.5 of rice, interacts with Mediator and controls various aspects of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiqiang; Yoshida, Akiko; Takahashi, Megumu; Maekawa, Masahiko; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kyozuka, Junko

    2015-01-01

    The DWARF14 (D14) gene of rice functions within the signaling pathway of strigolactones, a group of plant hormones that inhibits shoot branching. We isolated a recessive mutant named super apical dormant (sad1-1) from a suppressor screen of d14-1. The growth of tillers (vegetative shoot branches) is suppressed in both the d14-1 sad1-1 double mutant and the sad1-1 single mutant. In addition, the sad1-1 mutant shows pleiotropic defects throughout development. SAD1 encodes an ortholog of RPA34.5, a subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Consequently, the level of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is severely reduced in the sad1-1 mutant. These results indicate that proper ribosome function is a prerequisite for normal development in plants. The Arabidopsis ortholog of SAD1 was previously isolated as a Mediator-interacting protein. Here we show that SAD1 interacts physically with the Mediator complex through direct binding with OsMED4, a component of the middle module of the Mediator complex in rice. It is known that Mediator interacts with Pol II, which transcribes mRNAs and functions as a central regulator of transcription. This study indicates a novel aspect of Mediator function in Pol I-controlled rRNA transcription. TFIIF2 and RPC53 are the counterparts of RPA34.5 in Pol II and Pol III, respectively. We demonstrate that the rice orthologs of these proteins also interact with OsMED4. Our results suggest that interaction with MED4 in the Mediator complex is a common feature of the three types of RNA polymerases. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Tomáš; Diallo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK123; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : thyroid hormones * muscle gene expression * MyHC isoforms and muscle fiber types * quantitative real time RT-PCR * SDS-PAGE and 2-D Stereological analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  7. Heavy quark and magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, Ahmad; Jallu, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic moments and transition moments of heavy hadrons including the conventional particles are obtained under the SU(5) truth symmetry scheme. To this end state vectors are defined and the quark additivity principle is taken into account. (author)

  8. Heavy flavour production at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Barsuk, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The present write-up reports recent LHCb results on production of quarkonium and open flavour states, as well as selected results on associated production, central exclusive production and pro- duction in heavy ion collisions.

  9. Principles of heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szasz, S.E.; Thomas, G.W.

    1965-10-01

    Rising exploration costs have prompted greater interest in the large known deposits of heavy oil in North America. Because of high oil viscosities in such reservoirs, recoveries are poor, fluid drives are inefficient and production rates are uneconomical. Viscosity reduction can best be accomplished by heating the reservoir. The basic aspects of reservoir heating are reviewed and those processes which are of practical importance in heavy oil reservoirs are discussed. Wellbore heating frequently can be applied to heavy oil reservoirs to increase production rates. In hot waterflooding, the water requirements are much higher than an ordinary waterflood. Steam floods are more attractive, but operating costs are generally high. Conduction heating processes appear most promising. Among these is included the cyclic steam-soak process. A simple method is presented for estimating the performance from the first cycle of steam injection into the formation, assuming gravity as the only driving energy. An example calculation for a typical heavy oil reservoir is given. (26 refs.)

  10. The Canadian heavy water situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.

    The Canadian heavy water industry is analyzed. Supply and demand are predicted through 1985. Pricing is broken down into components. Backup R and D contributes greatly to process improvements. (E.C.B.)

  11. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs

  12. Heavy Metal Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  13. Subunit association as the stabilizing determinant for archaeal methionine adenosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Francisco; Alfonso, Carlos; Taylor, John C; Markham, George D; Pajares, María A

    2009-07-01

    Archaea contain a class of methionine adenosyltransferases (MATs) that exhibit substantially higher stability than their mesophilic counterparts. Their sequences are highly divergent, but preserve the essential active site motifs of the family. We have investigated the origin of this increased stability using chemical denaturation experiments on Methanococcus jannaschii MAT (Mj-MAT) and mutants containing single tryptophans in place of tyrosine residues. The results from fluorescence, circular dichroism, hydrodynamic, and enzyme activity measurements showed that the higher stability of Mj-MAT derives largely from a tighter association of its subunits in the dimer. Local fluorescence changes, interpreted using secondary structure predictions, further identify the least stable structural elements as the C-terminal ends of beta-strands E2 and E6, and the N-terminus of E3. Dimer dissociation however requires a wider perturbation of the molecule. Additional analysis was initially hindered by the lack of crystal structures for archaeal MATs, a limitation that we overcame by construction of a 3D-homology model of Mj-MAT. This model predicts preservation of the chain topology and three-domain organization typical of this family, locates the least stable structural elements at the flat contact surface between monomers, and shows that alterations in all three domains are required for dimer dissociation.

  14. The Regulation of NF-κB Subunits by Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Christian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The NF-κB transcription factor is the master regulator of the inflammatory response and is essential for the homeostasis of the immune system. NF-κB regulates the transcription of genes that control inflammation, immune cell development, cell cycle, proliferation, and cell death. The fundamental role that NF-κB plays in key physiological processes makes it an important factor in determining health and disease. The importance of NF-κB in tissue homeostasis and immunity has frustrated therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting NF-κB activation. However, significant research efforts have revealed the crucial contribution of NF-κB phosphorylation to controlling NF-κB directed transactivation. Importantly, NF-κB phosphorylation controls transcription in a gene-specific manner, offering new opportunities to selectively target NF-κB for therapeutic benefit. This review will focus on the phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits and the impact on NF-κB function.

  15. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  16. Editing modifies the GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlson, Johan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Haussler, David

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) pre-mRNA editing by the ADAR enzyme family has the potential to increase the variety of the proteome. This editing by adenosine deamination is essential in mammals for a functional brain. To detect novel substrates for A-to-I editing we have used an experimental method...... to find selectively edited sites and combined it with bioinformatic techniques that find stem-loop structures suitable for editing. We present here the first verified editing candidate detected by this screening procedure. We show that Gabra-3, which codes for the alpha3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor......, is a substrate for editing by both ADAR1 and ADAR2. Editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA recodes an isoleucine to a methionine. The extent of editing is low at birth but increases with age, reaching close to 100% in the adult brain. We therefore propose that editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA is important for normal brain...

  17. Vaccine profile of herpes zoster (HZ/su) subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Heineman, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) causes an often severe and painful rash in older people and may be complicated by prolonged pain (postherpetic neuralgia; PHN) and by dissemination in immune-compromised patients. HZ results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, often associated with age-related or other causes of decreased T cell immunity. A live attenuated vaccine boosts this immunity and provides partial protection against HZ, but this decreases with age and declines over 8 years. Areas covered: A new HZ subunit (HZ/su) vaccine combines a key surface VZV glycoprotein (E) with a T cell-boosting adjuvant system (AS01 B ) and is administered by two intramuscular injections two months apart. Expert commentary: HZ/su showed excellent efficacy of ~90% in immunocompetent adults ≥50 and ≥70 years of age, respectively, in the ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 phase III controlled trials. Efficacy was unaffected by advancing age and persisted for >3 years. Approximately 9.5% of subjects had severe, but transient (1-2 days) injection site pain, swelling or redness. Compliance with both vaccine doses was high (95%). The vaccine will have a major impact on HZ management. Phase I-II trials showed safety and immunogenicity in severely immunocompromised patients. Phase III trial results are expected soon.

  18. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  19. Fc receptor gamma subunit polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansari, Aliya; Ollier, W.E.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Gul, Ahmet; Inanac, Murat; Ordi, Jose; Teh, Lee-Suan; Hajeer, Ali H.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible association between Fc receptor gamma polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have investigated the full FcR gamma gene for polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand confirmational polymorphisms and DNA sequencing .The polymorphisms identified were genotype using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Systemic lupus erythematosus cases and controls were available from 3 ethnic groups: Turkish, Spanish and Caucasian. The study was conducted in the year 2001 at the Arthritis Research Campaign, Epidemiology Unit, Manchester University Medical School, Manchester, United Kingdom. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, 2 in the promoter, one in intron 4 and, 2 in the 3'UTR. Four of the 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were relatively common and investigated in the 3 populations. Allele and genotype frequencies of all 4 investigated SNPs were not statistically different cases and controls. fc receptor gamma gene does not appear to contribute to SLE susceptibility. The identified polymorphisms may be useful in investigating other diseases where receptors containing the FcR gamma subunit contribute to the pathology. (author)

  20. Exotic heavy baryons at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.S.; Zimanyi, J.

    1993-06-01

    A heavy bottom-charm six-quark baryon is considered. A semiclassical and a Gaussian estimate show that the octet-octet bbb-ccc configuration can be favoured energetically rather than the singlet-singlet one. This result suggests that a confined bbb-ccc six-quark state may exist. Such objects may be produced in suitable amounts by heavy-ion collisions at Large Hadronic Collider energies. (R.P.) 8 refs. 1 fig

  1. Heavy leptons at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnemus, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The recent advent of high energy hadron colliders capable of producing weak bosons has opened new vistas for particle physics research, including the search for a possible fourth generation heavy charged lepton, which is the primary topic of the thesis. Signals for identifying a new heavy lepton have been calculated and compared to Standard Model backgrounds. Results are presented for signals at the CERN collider, the Fermilab collider, and the proposed Superconducting Supercollider

  2. Heavy Ion Physics at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, G.

    2002-01-01

    The study of heavy ion interactions constitutes an important part of the experimental program outlined for the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN and expected to be operational by 2006. ALICE 1 is the single detector having the capabilities to explore at the same time most of the characteristics of high energy heavy ion interactions. Specific studies of jet quenching and quarkonia production, essentially related to µ detection are also planned by CMS 2 .

  3. BNL heavy ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschke, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    A principal attraction of heavy ion fusion is that existing accelerator technology and theory are sufficiently advanced to allow one to commence the design of a machine capable of igniting thermonuclear explosions. There are, however, a number of features which are not found in existing accelerators built for other purposes. The main thrust of the BNL Heavy Ion Fusion program has been to explore these features. Longitudinal beam bunching, very low velocity acceleration, and space charge neutralization are briefly discussed

  4. The Canadian heavy water situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.

    1975-08-01

    Existing heavy water plants in Canada are producing at a satisfactory rate and currently planned capacity is in balance with projected needs. By 1980, we shall have Girdler-Sulphide plants installed with a design capacity of almost 600 kg/h. Effort is required to minimize production costs for heavy water and to ensure that costs do not increase faster than the current inflationary trend. (Author)

  5. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model

  6. Heavy ion medical accelerator, HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Satoru

    1993-01-01

    The heavy ion beam is undoutedly suitable for the cancer treatment. The supriority of the heavy ions over the conventional radiations including protons and neutrons comes mainly from physical characteristics of a heavy particle with multiple charges. A straggling angle due to a multiple Coulomb scattering process in a human body is small for heavy ions, and the small scattering angle results in a good dose localization in a transverse direction. An ionization ratio of the heavy ion beam makes a very sharp peak at the ends of their range. The height of the peak is higher for the heavier ions and shows excellent biomedical effects around Ne ions. In order to apply heavy ion beams to cancer treatment, Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has been constructed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The accelerator complex consists of two ion sources, two successive linac tanks, a pair of synchrotron rings, a beam transport system and an irradiation system. An operation frequency is 100 MHz for two linacs, and the ion energy is 6.0 MeV/u at the output end of the linac. The other four experimental rooms are prepared for basic experiments. The synchrotron accelerates ions up to 800 MeV/u for a charge to mass ratio of 1/2. The long beam transport line provides two vertical beams in addition with two horizontal beams for the treatment. The three treatment rooms are prepared one of which is equipped with both horizontal and vertical beam lines. The whole facility will be open for all scientists who have interests in the heavy ion science as well as the biophysics. The conceptual design study of HIMAC started in 1984, and the construction of the accelerator complex was begun in March 1988. The beam acceleration tests of the injector system was successfully completed in March of this year, and tests of the whole system will be finished throughout this fyscal year. (author)

  7. Status of Heavy Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wynne, Benjamin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations raises the possibility that there exist additional, undiscovered high-mass neutrinos, giving mass to Standard Model neutrinos via the seesaw mechanism. By pushing the collider energy frontier at the LHC, the possibility arises that these heavy neutrinos may be produced and identified. We summarise the latest LHC results of searches for heavy neutrinos in a variety of final states.

  8. Identification and tissue distribution of mRNAs encoding salmon-type calcitonins-IV and -V in the rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Yoshie; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2004-06-01

    Four types of calcitonin are produced in salmonid fish, although their functional diversity is almost unknown. To explore the significance of these isoforms, we have characterized salmon-type calcitonin (sCT) mRNAs in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and examined their tissue distribution. In addition to the previously isolated sCT-I cDNAs, two new forms of sCT cDNA were cloned from the ultimobranchial gland, and one of them (sCT-IV cDNA) was predicted to encode an N-terminal peptide of 80 amino acid residues, a putative cleavage site Lys-Arg, sCT-IV, a cleavage and amidation sequence Gly-Lys-Lys-Arg, and a C-terminal peptide of 18 amino acids. The sCT-IV precursor was 78% identical with the rainbow trout sCT-I precursors. The other cloned cDNA encoded a precursor for a novel CT, sCT-V. The sCT-V peptide was different from sCT-IV by only one amino acid residue: Val at position 8 in the latter was replaced by Met. The sCT-V precursor had 80 and 90% identity with the sCT-I and -IV precursors respectively. No cDNA clones were obtained for sCTs-II or -III.Tissue distribution of sCT-I, -IV and -V mRNAs was examined by RT-PCR and specific cleavage with restriction enzymes. An amplified fragment from sCT-I mRNA was detected not only in the ultimobranchial gland, but also in the gills, testis and ovary. RT-PCR analysis coupled to restriction digestion further revealed that sCT-IV mRNA was expressed in both the testis and the ultimobranchial gland. The expression sites of sCT-IV mRNA were localized to the Leydig cells of the testis and to the parenchymal cells of the ultimobranchial gland, by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Although the amino acid sequence of sCT-V peptide was nearly the same as that of sCT-IV, the sCT-V gene showed a much wider pattern of expression: the band amplified by RT-PCR was detected in all the tissues examined except the kidney, gills and blood cells. The sCT-V mRNA was shown to be localized in the parenchymal cells of the

  9. RsmV a small non-coding regulatory RNA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that sequesters RsmA and RsmF from target mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Kayley H; Diaz, Manisha R; Gode, Cindy J; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Yahr, Timothy L

    2018-06-04

    The Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has distinct genetic programs that favor either acute or chronic virulence gene expression. Acute virulence is associated with twitching and swimming motility, expression of a type III secretion system (T3SS), and the absence of alginate, Psl, or Pel polysaccharide production. Traits associated with chronic infection include growth as a biofilm, reduced motility, and expression of a type VI secretion system (T6SS). The Rsm post-transcriptional regulatory system plays important roles in the inverse control of phenotypes associated with acute and chronic virulence. RsmA and RsmF are RNA-binding proteins that interact with target mRNAs to control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous work found that RsmA activity is controlled by at least three small, non-coding regulatory RNAs (RsmW, RsmY, and RsmZ). In this study, we took an in-silico approach to identify additional sRNAs that might function in the sequestration of RsmA and/or RsmF and identified RsmV, a 192 nt transcript with four predicted RsmA/RsmF consensus binding sites. RsmV is capable of sequestering RsmA and RsmF in vivo to activate translation of tssA1 , a component of the T6SS, and to inhibit T3SS gene expression. Each of the predicted RsmA/RsmF consensus binding sites contribute to RsmV activity. Electrophoretic mobility shifts assays show that RsmF binds RsmV with >10-fold higher affinity than RsmY and RsmZ. Gene expression studies revealed that the temporal expression pattern of RsmV differs from RsmW, RsmY, and RsmZ. These findings suggest that each sRNA may play distinct roles in controlling RsmA and RsmF activity. IMPORTANCE The CsrA/RsmA family of RNA-binding proteins play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. The activity of CsrA/RsmA proteins is controlled by small non-coding RNAs that function as decoys to sequester CsrA/RsmA from target mRNAs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has two Csr

  10. Crystal structure of the P pilus rod subunit PapA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Verger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available P pili are important adhesive fibres involved in kidney infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. P pili are assembled by the conserved chaperone-usher pathway, which involves the PapD chaperone and the PapC usher. During pilus assembly, subunits are incorporated into the growing fiber via the donor-strand exchange (DSE mechanism, whereby the chaperone's G1 beta-strand that complements the incomplete immunoglobulin-fold of each subunit is displaced by the N-terminal extension (Nte of an incoming subunit. P pili comprise a helical rod, a tip fibrillum, and an adhesin at the distal end. PapA is the rod subunit and is assembled into a superhelical right-handed structure. Here, we have solved the structure of a ternary complex of PapD bound to PapA through donor-strand complementation, itself bound to another PapA subunit through DSE. This structure provides insight into the structural basis of the DSE reaction involving this important pilus subunit. Using gel filtration chromatography and electron microscopy on a number of PapA Nte mutants, we establish that PapA differs in its mode of assembly compared with other Pap subunits, involving a much larger Nte that encompasses not only the DSE region of the Nte but also the region N-terminal to it.

  11. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S.; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The two recombinant apo subunits H1 and H2 from H. americanus have been structurally characterized. Reconstitution studies with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85–95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits. Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H 1 and H 2 from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H 1 and H 2 with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85–95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype–phenotype linkage

  12. Self-subunit swapping occurs in another gene type of cobalt nitrile hydratase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Self-subunit swapping is one of the post-translational maturation of the cobalt-containing nitrile hydratase (Co-NHase family of enzymes. All of these NHases possess a gene organization of , which allows the activator protein to easily form a mediatory complex with the α-subunit of the NHase after translation. Here, we discovered that the incorporation of cobalt into another type of Co-NHase, with a gene organization of , was also dependent on self-subunit swapping. We successfully isolated a recombinant NHase activator protein (P14K of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 by adding a Strep-tag N-terminal to the P14K gene. P14K was found to form a complex [α(StrepP14K(2] with the α-subunit of the NHase. The incorporation of cobalt into the NHase of P. putida was confirmed to be dependent on the α-subunit substitution between the cobalt-containing α(StrepP14K(2 and the cobalt-free NHase. Cobalt was inserted into cobalt-free α(StrepP14K(2 but not into cobalt-free NHase, suggesting that P14K functions not only as a self-subunit swapping chaperone but also as a metallochaperone. In addition, NHase from P. putida was also expressed by a mutant gene that was designed with a order. Our findings expand the general features of self-subunit swapping maturation.

  13. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel β1/β1B Subunits Regulate Cardiac Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi Edokobi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myocyte contraction is initiated by a set of intricately orchestrated electrical impulses, collectively known as action potentials (APs. Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs are responsible for the upstroke and propagation of APs in excitable cells, including cardiomyocytes. NaVs consist of a single, pore-forming α subunit and two different β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional cell adhesion molecules and channel modulators that have cell type and subcellular domain specific functional effects. Variants in SCN1B, the gene encoding the Nav-β1 and -β1B subunits, are linked to atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, e.g., Brugada syndrome, as well as to the early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Dravet syndrome, all of which put patients at risk for sudden death. Evidence over the past two decades has demonstrated that Nav-β1/β1B subunits play critical roles in cardiac myocyte physiology, in which they regulate tetrodotoxin-resistant and -sensitive sodium currents, potassium currents, and calcium handling, and that Nav-β1/β1B subunit dysfunction generates substrates for arrhythmias. This review will highlight the role of Nav-β1/β1B subunits in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology.

  14. Transcriptome-wide analysis of the Trypanosoma cruzi proliferative cycle identifies the periodically expressed mRNAs and their multiple levels of control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Chávez

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan parasite causing American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease, a neglected parasitosis with important human health impact in Latin America. The efficacy of current therapy is limited, and its toxicity is high. Since parasite proliferation is a fundamental target for rational drug design, we sought to progress into its understanding by applying a genome-wide approach. Treating a TcI linage strain with hydroxyurea, we isolated epimastigotes in late G1, S and G2/M cell cycle stages at 70% purity. The sequencing of each phase identified 305 stage-specific transcripts (1.5-fold change, p≤0.01, coding for conserved cell cycle regulated proteins and numerous proteins whose cell cycle dependence has not been recognized before. Comparisons with the parasite T. brucei and the human host reveal important differences. The meta-analysis of T. cruzi transcriptomic and ribonomic data indicates that cell cycle regulated mRNAs are subject to sub-cellular compartmentalization. Compositional and structural biases of these genes- including CAI, GC content, UTR length, and polycistron position- may contribute to their regulation. To discover nucleotide motifs responsible for the co-regulation of cell cycle regulated genes, we looked for overrepresented motifs at their UTRs and found a variant of the cell cycle sequence motif at the 3' UTR of most of the S and G2 stage genes. We additionally identified hairpin structures at the 5' UTRs of a high proportion of the transcripts, suggesting that periodic gene expression might also rely on translation initiation in T. cruzi. In summary, we report a comprehensive list of T. cruzi cell cycle regulated genes, including many previously unstudied proteins, we show evidence favoring a multi-step control of their expression, and we identify mRNA motifs that may mediate their regulation. Our results provide novel information of the T. cruzi proliferative proteins and the integrated levels of

  15. Capture of microRNA-bound mRNAs identifies the tumor suppressor miR-34a as a regulator of growth factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Lal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple biochemical method to isolate mRNAs pulled down with a transfected, biotinylated microRNA was used to identify direct target genes of miR-34a, a tumor suppressor gene. The method reidentified most of the known miR-34a regulated genes expressed in K562 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Transcripts for 982 genes were enriched in the pull-down with miR-34a in both cell lines. Despite this large number, validation experiments suggested that ~90% of the genes identified in both cell lines can be directly regulated by miR-34a. Thus miR-34a is capable of regulating hundreds of genes. The transcripts pulled down with miR-34a were highly enriched for their roles in growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. These genes form a dense network of interacting gene products that regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that orchestrate the proliferative response to external growth stimuli. Multiple candidate miR-34a-regulated genes participate in RAS-RAF-MAPK signaling. Ectopic miR-34a expression reduced basal ERK and AKT phosphorylation and enhanced sensitivity to serum growth factor withdrawal, while cells genetically deficient in miR-34a were less sensitive. Fourteen new direct targets of miR-34a were experimentally validated, including genes that participate in growth factor signaling (ARAF and PIK3R2 as well as genes that regulate cell cycle progression at various phases of the cell cycle (cyclins D3 and G2, MCM2 and MCM5, PLK1 and SMAD4. Thus miR-34a tempers the proliferative and pro-survival effect of growth factor stimulation by interfering with growth factor signal transduction and downstream pathways required for cell division.

  16. Capture of microRNA-bound mRNAs identifies the tumor suppressor miR-34a as a regulator of growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Thomas, Marshall P; Altschuler, Gabriel; Navarro, Francisco; O'Day, Elizabeth; Li, Xiao Ling; Concepcion, Carla; Han, Yoon-Chi; Thiery, Jerome; Rajani, Danielle K; Deutsch, Aaron; Hofmann, Oliver; Ventura, Andrea; Hide, Winston; Lieberman, Judy

    2011-11-01

    A simple biochemical method to isolate mRNAs pulled down with a transfected, biotinylated microRNA was used to identify direct target genes of miR-34a, a tumor suppressor gene. The method reidentified most of the known miR-34a regulated genes expressed in K562 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Transcripts for 982 genes were enriched in the pull-down with miR-34a in both cell lines. Despite this large number, validation experiments suggested that ~90% of the genes identified in both cell lines can be directly regulated by miR-34a. Thus miR-34a is capable of regulating hundreds of genes. The transcripts pulled down with miR-34a were highly enriched for their roles in growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. These genes form a dense network of interacting gene products that regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that orchestrate the proliferative response to external growth stimuli. Multiple candidate miR-34a-regulated genes participate in RAS-RAF-MAPK signaling. Ectopic miR-34a expression reduced basal ERK and AKT phosphorylation and enhanced sensitivity to serum growth factor withdrawal, while cells genetically deficient in miR-34a were less sensitive. Fourteen new direct targets of miR-34a were experimentally validated, including genes that participate in growth factor signaling (ARAF and PIK3R2) as well as genes that regulate cell cycle progression at various phases of the cell cycle (cyclins D3 and G2, MCM2 and MCM5, PLK1 and SMAD4). Thus miR-34a tempers the proliferative and pro-survival effect of growth factor stimulation by interfering with growth factor signal transduction and downstream pathways required for cell division.

  17. Identification of reference genes for quantitative expression analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in barley under various stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Ferdous

    Full Text Available For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR, the selection of appropriate reference genes as an internal control for normalization is crucial. We hypothesized that non-coding, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAswould be stably expressed in different barley varieties and under different experimental treatments,in different tissues and at different developmental stages of plant growth and therefore might prove to be suitable reference genes for expression analysis of both microRNAs (miRNAsand mRNAs. In this study, we examined the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in six barley genotypes under five experimental stresses, drought, fungal infection,boron toxicity, nutrient deficiency and salinity. We compared four commonly used housekeeping genes; Actin (ACT, alpha-Tubulin (α-TUB, Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH, ADP-ribosylation factor 1-like protein (ADP, four snoRNAs; (U18,U61, snoR14 and snoR23 and two microRNAs (miR168, miR159 as candidate reference genes. We found that ADP, snoR14 and snoR23 were ranked as the best of these candidates across diverse samples. Additionally, we found that miR168 was a suitable reference gene for expression analysis in barley. Finally, we validated the performance of our stable and unstable candidate reference genes for both mRNA and miRNA qPCR data normalization under different stress conditions and demonstrated the superiority of the stable candidates. Our data demonstrate the suitability of barley snoRNAs and miRNAs as potential reference genes form iRNA and mRNA qPCR data normalization under different stress treatments [corrected].

  18. An integrative analysis of cellular contexts, miRNAs and mRNAs reveals network clusters associated with antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Seungyoon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major goal of the field of systems biology is to translate genome-wide profiling data (e.g., mRNAs, miRNAs into interpretable functional networks. However, employing a systems biology approach to better understand the complexities underlying drug resistance phenotypes in cancer continues to represent a significant challenge to the field. Previously, we derived two drug-resistant breast cancer sublines (tamoxifen- and fulvestrant-resistant cell lines from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and performed genome-wide mRNA and microRNA profiling to identify differential molecular pathways underlying acquired resistance to these important antiestrogens. In the current study, to further define molecular characteristics of acquired antiestrogen resistance we constructed an “integrative network”. We combined joint miRNA-mRNA expression profiles, cancer contexts, miRNA-target mRNA relationships, and miRNA upstream regulators. In particular, to reduce the probability of false positive connections in the network, experimentally validated, rather than prediction-oriented, databases were utilized to obtain connectivity. Also, to improve biological interpretation, cancer contexts were incorporated into the network connectivity. Results Based on the integrative network, we extracted “substructures” (network clusters representing the drug resistant states (tamoxifen- or fulvestrant-resistance cells compared to drug sensitive state (parental MCF7 cells. We identified un-described network clusters that contribute to antiestrogen resistance consisting of miR-146a, -27a, -145, -21, -155, -15a, -125b, and let-7s, in addition to the previously described miR-221/222. Conclusions By integrating miRNA-related network, gene/miRNA expression and text-mining, the current study provides a computational-based systems biology approach for further investigating the molecular mechanism underlying antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer cells. In

  19. Capture of MicroRNA–Bound mRNAs Identifies the Tumor Suppressor miR-34a as a Regulator of Growth Factor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Elizabeth; Li, Xiao Ling; Concepcion, Carla; Han, Yoon-Chi; Thiery, Jerome; Rajani, Danielle K.; Deutsch, Aaron; Hofmann, Oliver; Ventura, Andrea; Hide, Winston; Lieberman, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A simple biochemical method to isolate mRNAs pulled down with a transfected, biotinylated microRNA was used to identify direct target genes of miR-34a, a tumor suppressor gene. The method reidentified most of the known miR-34a regulated genes expressed in K562 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Transcripts for 982 genes were enriched in the pull-down with miR-34a in both cell lines. Despite this large number, validation experiments suggested that ∼90% of the genes identified in both cell lines can be directly regulated by miR-34a. Thus miR-34a is capable of regulating hundreds of genes. The transcripts pulled down with miR-34a were highly enriched for their roles in growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. These genes form a dense network of interacting gene products that regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that orchestrate the proliferative response to external growth stimuli. Multiple candidate miR-34a–regulated genes participate in RAS-RAF-MAPK signaling. Ectopic miR-34a expression reduced basal ERK and AKT phosphorylation and enhanced sensitivity to serum growth factor withdrawal, while cells genetically deficient in miR-34a were less sensitive. Fourteen new direct targets of miR-34a were experimentally validated, including genes that participate in growth factor signaling (ARAF and PIK3R2) as well as genes that regulate cell cycle progression at various phases of the cell cycle (cyclins D3 and G2, MCM2 and MCM5, PLK1 and SMAD4). Thus miR-34a tempers the proliferative and pro-survival effect of growth factor stimulation by interfering with growth factor signal transduction and downstream pathways required for cell division. PMID:22102825

  20. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs

  1. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, A.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1997-06-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Three human alcohol dehydrogenase subunits: cDNA structure and molecular and evolutionary divergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, T.; Szeto, S.; Yoshida, A.

    1986-01-01

    Class I human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD + oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) consists of several homo- and heterodimers of α, β, and γ subunits that are governed by the ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 loci. The authors previously cloned a full length of cDNA for the β subunit, and the complete sequence of 374 amino acid residues was established. cDNAs for the α and γ subunits were cloned and characterized. A human liver cDNA library, constructed in phage λgt11, was screened by using a synthetic oligonucleotide probe that was matched to the γ but not to the β sequence. Clone pUCADHγ21 and clone pUCADHα15L differed from β cDNA with respect to restriction sites and hybridization with the nucleotide probe. Clone pUCADHγ21 contained an insertion of 1.5 kilobase pairs (kbp) and encodes 374 amino acid residues compatible with the reported amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. Clone pUCADHα15L contained an insertion of 2.4 kbp and included nucleotide sequences that encode 374 amino acid residues for another subunit, the γ subunit. In addition, this clone contained the sequences that encode the COOH-terminal part of the β subunit at its extended 5' region. The amino acid sequences and coding regions of the cDNAs of the three subunits are very similar. A high degree of resemblance is observed also in their 3' noncoding regions. However, distinctive differences exist in the vicinity of the Zn-binding cysteine residue at position 46. Based on the cDNA sequences and the deduced amino acid sequences of the three subunits, their structural and evolutionary relationships are discussed

  3. Regulated appearance of NMDA receptor subunits and channel functions during in vitro neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelitai, Márta; Schlett, Katalin; Varju, Patrícia; Eisel, Ulrich; Madarász, Emília

    2002-04-01

    The schedule of NMDA receptor subunit expression and the appearance of functional NMDA-gated ion channels were investigated during the retinoic acid (RA) induced neuronal differentiation of NE-4C, a p53-deficient mouse neuroectodermal progenitor cell line. NR2A, NR2B, and NR2D subunit transcripts were present in both nondifferentiated and neuronally differentiated cultures, while NR2C subunits were expressed only transiently, during the early period of neural differentiation. Several splice variants of NR1 were detected in noninduced progenitors and in RA-induced cells, except the N1 exon containing transcripts that appeared after the fourth day of induction, when neuronal processes were already formed. NR1 and NR2A subunit proteins were detected both in nondifferentiated progenitor cells and in neurons, while the mature form of NR2B subunit protein appeared only at the time of neuronal process elongation. Despite the early presence of NR1 and NR2A subunits, NMDA-evoked responses could be detected in NE-4C neurons only after the sixth day of induction, coinciding in time with the expression of the mature NR2B subunit. The formation of functional NMDA receptors also coincided with the appearance of synapsin I and synaptophysin. The lag period between the production of the subunits and the onset of channel function suggests that subunits capable of channel formation cannot form functional NMDA receptors until a certain stage of neuronal commitment. Thus, the in vitro neurogenesis by NE-4C cells provides a suitable tool to investigate some inherent regulatory processes involved in the initial maturation of NMDA receptor complexes. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding the 80-kDa subunit protein of the human autoantigen Ku (p70/p80) recognized by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimori, Tsuneyo; Ohosone, Yasuo; Hama, Nobuaki; Suwa, Akira; Akizuki, Masashi; Homma, Mitsuo; Griffith, A.J.; Hardin, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Anti-Ku (p70/p80) autoantibodies in patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome recognize a 70-kDa/80-kDa protein heterodimer which binds to terminal regions of double-stranded DNA. In the present study, the authors isolated full-length cDNAs that encode the 80-kDa Ku subunit. Initial screening of a human spleen cDNA library with anti-Ku antibodies yielded a cDNA of 1.0 kilobase (kb) (termed K71) encoding a portion of the 80-kDa Ku polypeptide (identification based on immunological criteria). In RNA blots, this cDNA hybridized with two mRNAs of 3.4 and 2.6 kb. In vitro transcription and translation experiments produced an immunoprecipitable polypeptide which comigrated with the 80-kDa Ku subunit. The Ku80-6 cDNA proved to be 3304 nucleotides in length, with an additional poly(A) tail, closely approximating the size of the larger mRNA. It contains a single long open reading frame encoding 732 amino acids. The putative polypeptide has a high content of acidic amino acids and a region with periodic repeat of leucine in every seventh position which may form the leucine zipper structure. In genomic DNA blots, probes derived from the opposite ends of cDNA Ku80-6 hybridized with several nonoverlapping restriction fragments from human leukocyte DNA, indicating that the gene encoding the 80-kDa Ku polypeptide is divided into several exons by intervening sequences

  5. Expression of mRNAs for PPT, CGRP, NF-200, and MAP-2 in cocultures of dissociated DRG neurons and skeletal muscle cells in administration of NGF or NT-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Both neurotrophins (NTs and target skeletal muscle (SKM cells are essential for the maintenance of the function of neurons and nerve-muscle communication. However, much less is known about the association of target SKM cells with distinct NTs on the expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin (PPT, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP, neurofilament 200 (NF-200, and microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neurons. In the present study, a neuromuscular coculture model of dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and SKM cells was established. The morphology of DRG neurons and SKM cells in coculture was observed with an inverted phase contrast microscope. The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 on the expression of mRNAs for PPT, CGRP, NF-200, and MAP-2 was analyzed by real time-PCR assay. The morphology of DRG neuronal cell bodies and SKM cells in neuromuscular coculture at different conditions was similar. The neurons presented evidence of dense neurite outgrowth in the presence of distinct NTs in neuromuscular cocultures. NGF and NT-3 increased mRNA levels of PPT, CGRP, and NF-200, but not MAP-2, in neuromuscular cocultures. These results offer new clues towards a better understanding of the association of target SKM cells with distinct NTs on the expression of mRNAs for PPT, CGRP, NF-200 and MAP-2, and implicate the association of target SKM cells and NTs with DRG sensory neuronal phenotypes.

  6. Effect of glutenin subunits on the baking quality of Brazilian wheat genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Mariana Souza; Scholz, Maria Brígida dos Santos; Miranda, Martha Zavariz; Franco, Célia Maria Landi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits on the grain traits of sixteen Brazilian wheat genotypes. Grain hardness index, milling traits, physicochemical and rheological properties of the flour, and specific volume and firmness of the bread were evaluated. Physicochemical properties of the flour were not influenced by glutenin subunits. Genotypes with subunits at the Glu-B1 (17+18 or 7+8), Glu-D1 (5+10), and Glu-A3 (b) were associa...

  7. Inhibition of herpesvirus and influenza virus replication by blocking polymerase subunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palù, Giorgio; Loregian, Arianna

    2013-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a key role in many biological processes, including virus replication in the host cell. Since most of the PPIs are functionally essential, a possible strategy to inhibit virus replication is based on the disruption of viral protein complexes by peptides or small molecules that interfere with subunit interactions. In particular, an attractive target for antiviral drugs is the binding between the subunits of essential viral enzymes. This review describes the development of new antiviral compounds that inhibit herpesvirus and influenza virus replication by blocking interactions between subunit proteins of their polymerase complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heavy Flavor Physics in Heavy-Ion Collisions with STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yifei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Heavy quarks are a unique tool to probe the strongly interacting matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. Due to their large mass, energetic heavy quarks are predicted to lose less energy than light quarks by gluon radiation when they traverse a Quark-Gluon Plasma. In contrast, recent measurements of non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays at high transverse momentum (p T ) show a jet quenching level similar to that of the light hadrons. Heavy quark are produced mainly at early stage in heavy-ion collisions, thus they are proposed to probe the QCD medium and to be sensitive to bulk medium properties. Ultimately, their flow behavior may help establish whether light quarks thermalize. But due to the absence of the measurement of B-mesons and precise measurement of D-mesons, it is difficult to separate bottom and charm contributions experimentally in current non-photonic electron measurements for both spectra and elliptic flow v 2 . Therefore, topological reconstruction of D-mesons and identification of electrons from charm and bottom decays are crucial to understand the heavy flavor production and their in medium properties. The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) is a micro-vertex detector utilizing active pixel sensors and silicon strip technology. The HFT will significantly extend the physics reach of the STAR experiment for precise measurement of charmed and bottom hadrons. We present a study on the open charm nuclear modification factor, elliptic flow v 2 and λ c measurement as well as the measurement of bottom mesons via a semi-leptonic decay. (author)

  9. Suppression and Two-Particle Correlations of Heavy Mesons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Shanshan [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Qin, Guang-You [Institute of Particle Physics and Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Central China Normal University, Wuhan, 430079 (China); Bass, Steffen A. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We study the medium modification of heavy quarks produced in heavy-ion collisions. The evolution of heavy quarks inside the QGP is described using a modified Langevin framework that simultaneously incorporates their collisional and radiative energy loss. Within this framework, we provide good descriptions of the heavy meson suppression and predictions for the two-particle correlation functions of heavy meson pairs.

  10. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent chronic stress-induced increases in L-type calcium channel mRNAs in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maigaard, Katrine; Pedersen, Ida Hageman; Jørgensen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Although affective disorders have high prevalence, morbidity and mortality, we do not fully understand disease etiopathology, nor have we determined the exact mechanisms by which treatment works. Recent research indicates that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction might be involved. Here we use...... the chronic restraint stress model of affective disorder (6 h restraint per day for 21 days) in combination with electroconvulsive stimulations to examine the effects of stress and an effective antidepressive treatment modality on L-type voltage gated calcium channel subunit mRNA expression patterns...... in the brain. We find that stress tended to upregulate Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 channels in a brain region specific manner, while ECS tended to normalise this effect. This was more pronounced for Ca(v)1.2 channels, where stress clearly increased expression in both the basolateral amygdala, dentate gyrus and CA3...

  11. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunits in Human Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Bondioni, Sara; Alberti, Luisella; Gilardini, Luisa; Invitti, Cecilia; Corbetta, Sabrina; Zappa, Marco A.; Ferrero, Stefano; Lania, Andrea G.; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—In human adipocytes, the cAMP-dependent pathway mediates signals originating from β-adrenergic activation, thus playing a key role in the regulation of important metabolic processes, i.e., lipolysis and thermogenesis. Cyclic AMP effects are mainly mediated by protein kinase A (PKA), whose R2B regulatory isoform is the most expressed in mouse adipose tissue, where it protects against diet-induced obesity and fatty liver development. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in R2B expression, PKA activity, and lipolysis in adipose tissues from obese and nonobese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The expression of the different PKA regulatory subunits was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples from 20 nonobese and 67 obese patients. PKA activity and glycerol release were evaluated in total protein extract and adipocytes isolated from fresh tissue samples, respectively. RESULTS—Expression techniques showed that R2B was the most abundant regulatory protein, both at mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, R2B mRNA levels were significantly lower in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues from obese than nonobese patients and negatively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Moreover, both basal and stimulated PKA activity and glycerol release were significantly lower in visceral adipose tissue from obese patients then nonobese subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Our results first indicate that, in human adipose tissue, there are important BMI-related differences in R2B expression and PKA activation, which might be included among the multiple determinants involved in the different lipolytic response to β-adrenergic activation in obesity. PMID:19095761

  12. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Religa

    Full Text Available Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA, though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further

  13. Molecular cloning of the α subunit of human and guinea pig leukocyte adhesion glycoprotein Mo1: Chromosomal localization and homology to the α subunits of integrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaout, M.A.; Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Pierce, M.W.; Harris, P.; Tenen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface-glycoprotein Mo1 is a member of the family of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (Leu-CAMs) that includes lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and p150,95. Each Leu-CAM is a heterodimer with a distinct α subunit noncovalently associated with a common β subunit. The authors describe the isolation and analysis of two partial cDNA clones encoding the α subunit of the Leu-CAM Mo1 in humans and guinea pigs. A monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the guinea pig α chain was used for immunoscreening a λgt11 expression library. The sequence of a 378-base-pair insert from one immunoreactive clone revealed a single continuous open reading frame encoding 126 amino acids including a 26-amino acid tryptic peptide isolated from the purified guinea pig α subunit. A cDNA clone of identical size was isolated from a human monocyte/lymphocyte cDNA library by using the guinea pig clone as a probe. The human clone also encoded a 126-amino acid peptide including the sequence of an additional tryptic peptide present in purified human Mo1α chain. Southern analysis of DNA from hamster-human hybrids localized the human Mo1α chain to chromosome 16, which has been shown to contain the gene for the α chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. These data suggest that the α subunits of Leu-CAMs evolved by gene duplication from a common ancestral gene and strengthen the hypothesis that the α subunits of these heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules on myeloid and lymphoid cells, platelets, and fibroblasts are evolutionary related

  14. The C-terminal domains of NF-H and NF-M subunits maintain axonal neurofilament content by blocking turnover of the stationary neurofilament network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala V Rao

    Full Text Available Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M(tailΔ] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3-6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M(tailΔ mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M(tailΔ axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons.

  15. Heavy quark photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim; Vogt, Ramona

    2002-01-01

    Heavy quarks are copiously produced in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions. In the strong electromagnetic fields, cc-bar and bb-bar are produced by photonuclear and two-photon interactions. Hadroproduction can also occur in grazing interactions. We calculate the total cross sections and the quark transverse momentum and rapidity distributions, as well as the QQ-bar invariant mass spectra from the three production channels. We consider AA and pA collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider. We discuss techniques for separating the three processes and describe how the AA to pA production ratios might be measured accurately enough to study nuclear shadowing

  16. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  17. Novel synthesis and applications of Thiomer solidification for heavy metals immobilization in hazardous ASR/ISW thermal residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Woong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Park, Hung Suck

    2016-03-01

    The present paper reports the novel synthesis and application of Thiomer solidification for heavy metal immobilization in hazardous automobile shredder residues and industrial solid waste (ASR/ISW) thermal residues. The word Thiomer is a combination of the prefix of a sulfur-containing compound "Thio" and the suffix of "Polymer" meaning a large molecule compound of many repeated subunits. To immobilize heavy metals, either ASR/ISW thermal residues (including bottom and fly ash) was mixed well with Thiomer and heated at 140°C. After Thiomer solidification, approximately 91-100% heavy metal immobilization was achieved. The morphology and mineral phases of the Thiomer-solidified ASR/ISW thermal residue were characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that the amounts of heavy metals detectable on the ASR/ISW thermal residue surface decreased and the sulfur mass percent increased. XRD indicated that the main fraction of the enclosed/bound materials on the ASR/ISW residue contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. The Thiomer solidified process could convert the heavy metal compounds into highly insoluble metal sulfides and simultaneously encapsulate the ASR/ISW thermal residue. These results show that the proposed method can be applied to the immobilization of ASR/ISW hazardous ash involving heavy metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of the alpha and beta subunits of casein kinase 2 by far-UV CD spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Brockel, C; Boldyreff, B

    1992-01-01

    Although Chou-Fasman calculations of the secondary structure of recombinant casein kinase 2 subunits alpha and beta suggest they have a similar overall conformation, circular dichroism (CD) studies show that substantial differences in the conformation of the two subunits exist. In addition......, no changes in the far-UV CD spectrum of the alpha subunit are observed in the presence of casein or the synthetic decapeptide substrate RRRDDDSDDD. Furthermore, the alpha-helical structure of the alpha subunit (but not the beta subunit) can be increased in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of heparin...

  19. Heavy ion fusion- Using heavy ions to make electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of using nuclear fusion as a source of commercial electrical power has been pursued worldwide since the 1950s. Two approaches, using magnetic and inertial confinement of the reactants, are under study. This paper describes the difference between the two approaches, and discusses in more detail the heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion concept. A multibeam induction linear accelerator would be used to bring ∼100 heavy ion beams to a few GeV. The beams would then heat and compress a target of solid D-T. This approach is unique among fusion concepts in its ability to protect the reaction chamber wall from neutrons and debris

  20. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) Subunit of the Iejimalides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendlik, Matthew T.; Cottard, Muriel; Rein, Tobias

    1997-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) subunit of the iejimalides has been accomplished through a combination of an asymmetric Homer-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation and a chiral pool approach. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  1. Identification of a conserved archaeal RNA polymerase subunit contacted by the basal transcription factor TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, C P; Jackson, S P; Bell, S D

    2001-12-14

    Archaea possess two general transcription factors that are required to recruit RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoters in vitro. These are TBP, the TATA-box-binding protein and TFB, the archaeal homologue of TFIIB. Thus, the archaeal and eucaryal transcription machineries are fundamentally related. In both RNAP II and archaeal transcription systems, direct contacts between TFB/TFIIB and the RNAP have been demonstrated to mediate recruitment of the polymerase to the promoter. However the subunit(s) directly contacted by these factors has not been identified. Using systematic yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analyses we have identified an interaction between the N-terminal domain of TFB and an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoK. Intriguingly, homologues of RpoK are found in all three nuclear RNA polymerases (Rpb6) and also in the bacterial RNA polymerase (omega-subunit).

  2. Subunit architecture and functional modular rearrangements of the transcriptional mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Sato, Shigeo; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2014-06-05

    The multisubunit Mediator, comprising ∼30 distinct proteins, plays an essential role in gene expression regulation by acting as a bridge between DNA-binding transcription factors and the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription machinery. Efforts to uncover the Mediator mechanism have been hindered by a poor understanding of its structure, subunit organization, and conformational rearrangements. By overcoming biochemical and image analysis hurdles, we obtained accurate EM structures of yeast and human Mediators. Subunit localization experiments, docking of partial X-ray structures, and biochemical analyses resulted in comprehensive mapping of yeast Mediator subunits and a complete reinterpretation of our previous Mediator organization model. Large-scale Mediator rearrangements depend on changes at the interfaces between previously described Mediator modules, which appear to be facilitated by factors conducive to transcription initiation. Conservation across eukaryotes of Mediator structure, subunit organization, and RNA polymerase II interaction suggest conservation of fundamental aspects of the Mediator mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  4. Two subunits of human ORC are dispensable for DNA replication and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Etsuko; Kiran, Manjari; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Singh, Samarendra; Kiran, Shashi; Dutta, Anindya

    2016-12-01

    The six-subunit Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) is believed to be an essential eukaryotic ATPase that binds to origins of replication as a ring-shaped heterohexamer to load MCM2-7 and initiate DNA replication. We have discovered that human cell lines in culture proliferate with intact chromosomal origins of replication after disruption of both alleles of ORC2 or of the ATPase subunit, ORC1 . The ORC1 or ORC2 -depleted cells replicate with decreased chromatin loading of MCM2-7 and become critically dependent on another ATPase, CDC6, for survival and DNA replication. Thus, either the ORC ring lacking a subunit, even its ATPase subunit, can load enough MCM2-7 in partnership with CDC6 to initiate DNA replication, or cells have an ORC-independent, CDC6-dependent mechanism to load MCM2-7 on origins of replication.

  5. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  7. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Yolima P.; Granados, Sara T.; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above. PMID:25346693

  8. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolima P. Torres

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca+2-activated K+ channel (BK is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains, where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3 & β4 and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca+2 sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above.

  9. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Yolima P; Granados, Sara T; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K(+) channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K(+) channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K(+) conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca(2+)-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca(2+) sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above.

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: subunit structure, functional binding sites, and ion transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.A.; Dunn, S.M.J.; Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Middlemas, D.S.; Crawford, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been highly conserved during animal evolution, and in all the species and tissues studied so far, including mammals, it is a pseudosymmetric, pentameric complex of related subunits with very similar physical properties. All subunits of these nicotinic receptors were derived from a common ancestral gene, probably by way of gene duplications occurring very early in animal evolution. 45 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160

    OpenAIRE

    Perrin, Arnaud; Rousseau, Jo?l; Tremblay, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adul...

  12. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures

  13. Distribution of AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the chick visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Several glutamate receptor (GluR subunits have been characterized during the past few years. In the present study, subunit-specific antisera were used to determine the distribution of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits GluR1-4 in retinorecipient areas of the chick brain. Six white leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus, 7-15 days old, unknown sex were deeply anesthetized and perfused with 4% buffered paraformaldehyde and brain sections were stained using immunoperoxidase techniques. The AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits GluR1, GluR2/3 and GluR4 were present in several retinorecipient areas, with varying degrees of colocalization. For example, perikarya in layers 2, 3, and 5 of the optic tectum contained GluR1, whereas GluR2/3 subunits appeared mainly in neurons of layer 13. The GluR4 subunit was only detected in a few cells of the tectal layer 13. GluR1 and GluR2/3 were observed in neurons of the nucleus geniculatus lateralis ventralis, whereas GluR4 was only present in its neuropil. Somata in the accessory optic nucleus appeared to contain GluR2/3 and GluR4, whereas GluR1 was the dominant subunit in the neuropil of this nucleus. These results suggest that different subpopulations of visual neurons might express different combinations of AMPA-type GluR subunits, which in turn might generate different synaptic responses to glutamate derived from retinal ganglion cell axons

  14. Crystal structure of Agaricus bisporus mushroom tyrosinase: identity of the tetramer subunits and interaction with tropolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaya, Wangsa T; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Weijn, Amrah; Mes, Jurriaan J; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Wichers, Harry J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2011-06-21

    Tyrosinase catalyzes the conversion of phenolic compounds into their quinone derivatives, which are precursors for the formation of melanin, a ubiquitous pigment in living organisms. Because of its importance for browning reactions in the food industry, the tyrosinase from the mushroom Agaricus bisporus has been investigated in depth. In previous studies the tyrosinase enzyme complex was shown to be a H(2)L(2) tetramer, but no clues were obtained of the identities of the subunits, their mode of association, and the 3D structure of the complex. Here we unravel this tetramer at the molecular level. Its 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure is the first structure of the full fungal tyrosinase complex. The complex comprises two H subunits of ∼392 residues and two L subunits of ∼150 residues. The H subunit originates from the ppo3 gene and has a fold similar to other tyrosinases, but it is ∼100 residues larger. The L subunit appeared to be the product of orf239342 and has a lectin-like fold. The H subunit contains a binuclear copper-binding site in the deoxy-state, in which three histidine residues coordinate each copper ion. The side chains of these histidines have their orientation fixed by hydrogen bonds or, in the case of His85, by a thioether bridge with the side chain of Cys83. The specific tyrosinase inhibitor tropolone forms a pre-Michaelis complex with the enzyme. It binds near the binuclear copper site without directly coordinating the copper ions. The function of the ORF239342 subunits is not known. Carbohydrate binding sites identified in other lectins are not conserved in ORF239342, and the subunits are over 25 Å away from the active site, making a role in activity unlikely. The structures explain how calcium ions stabilize the tetrameric state of the enzyme.

  15. Heavy ion collisions and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2016-12-15

    There are interesting parallels between the physics of heavy ion collisions and cosmology. Both systems are out-of-equilibrium and relativistic fluid dynamics plays an important role for their theoretical description. From a comparison one can draw interesting conclusions for both sides. For heavy ion physics it could be rewarding to attempt a theoretical description of fluid perturbations similar to cosmological perturbation theory. In the context of late time cosmology, it could be interesting to study dissipative properties such as shear and bulk viscosity and corresponding relaxation times in more detail. Knowledge and experience from heavy ion physics could help to constrain the microscopic properties of dark matter from observational knowledge of the cosmological fluid properties.

  16. Heavy resistance training and lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, Kira; Karlsmark, Tonny; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge regarding progressive resistance training during adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of developing breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Furthermore, no studies have investigated the safety of resistance training with heavy loads (> 80% 1 repetition maximum......) in this population. 'Body and Cancer' is a six-week, nine-hour weekly, supervised, multimodal exercise intervention utilizing progressive resistance training with heavy loads for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of BCRL in former participants......, and identify associations between progressive resistance training with heavy loads, and the development of BCRL. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study. POPULATION: Women treated for breast cancer (n = 149), who had participated in the 'Body and Cancer' exercise intervention between 1 January 2010...

  17. Swift Heavy Ions in Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothard, Hermann; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-12-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter (SHIM). This conference was held in Darmstadt, from 18 to 21 May 2015. SHIM is a triennial series, which started about 25 years ago by a joint initiative of CIRIL - Caen and GSI - Darmstadt, with the aim of promoting fundamental and applied interdisciplinary research in the field of high-energy, heavy-ion interaction processes with matter. SHIM was successively organized in Caen (1989), Bensheim (1992), Caen (1995), Berlin (1998), Catania (2002), Aschaffenburg (2005), Lyon (2008), and Kyoto (2012). The conference attracts scientists from many different fields using high-energy heavy ions delivered by large accelerator facilities and characterized by strong and short electronic excitations.

  18. Proteasome (Prosome Subunit Variations during the Differentiation of Myeloid U937 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Henry

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 20S proteasomes (prosomes/multicatalytic proteinase are protein particles built of 28 subunits in variable composition. We studied the changes in proteasome subunit composition during the differentiation of U937 cells induced by phorbol‐myristate‐acetate or retinoic acid plus 1,25‐dihydroxy‐cholecalciferol by western blot, flow cytometry and immuno‐fluorescence. p25K (C3, p27K (IOTA and p30/33K (C2 subunits were detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of undifferentiated cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated a biphasic decrease in proteasome subunits detection during differentiation induced by RA+VD. PMA caused an early transient decrease in these subunits followed by a return to their control level, except for p30/33K, which remained low. Immuno‐fluorescence also showed differences in the cytolocalization of the subunits, with a particular decrease in antigen labeling in the nucleus of RA+VD‐induced cells, and a scattering in the cytoplasm and a reorganization in the nucleus of PMA‐induced cells. Small amounts of proteasomal proteins were seen on the outer membrane of non‐induced cells; these membrane proteins disappeared when treated with RA+VD, whereas some increased on PMA‐induced cells. The differential changes in the distribution and type of proteasomes in RA+VD and PMA‐induced cells indicate that, possibly, 20S proteasomes may play a role in relation to the mechanisms of differentiation and the inducer used.

  19. Characterization and application of a radioimmunoassay for reduced, carboxymethylated human luteinizing hormone α-subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutmann, H.T.; Beitins, I.Z.; Johnson, L.; McArthur, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have established a double antibody RIA using a rabbit antiserum prepared against reduced, carboxymethylated (RCXM) human LH α-subunit, with RCXM-α as tracer and standard. This antiserum did not cross-react with any native gonadotropins or subunit, and reacted only weakly with RCXM-α. A tryptic digest of RCXM α-subunit was completely reactive, while chymotryptic digestion abolished all immunoreactivity. By testing with separate tryptic fragments, the recognition site could be localized to a segment close to the amino-terminus of the peptide chain. When applied to measurement of serum and urine, an immunoreactive species, parallel to RCXM α-subunit by serial dilution, was found in concentrations of 1-2 ng/ml in serum and 3-4 ng/ml in urine. Similar levels of the immunoreactive component were found in conditions of elevated gonadotropins (e.g. pregnancy) as well as gonadotropin deficiency (panhypopituitarism and Kallmann's syndrome). After stimulation with LHRH, no rise was noted at times up to 6 h despite the fact that both LH and LH-α were elevated. The data indicate that the sequence-specific antiserum may be detecting an immunoreactive form of α-subunit of LH whose kinetics of appearance and disappearance differs from those of the native subunit

  20. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Maulik, P.R.; Reed, R.A.; Shipley, G. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). School of Medicine; Westbrook, E.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Scott, D.L.; Otwinowski, Z. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.

  1. Effect of glutenin subunits on the baking quality of Brazilian wheat genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the high and low molecular weight glutenin subunits on the grain traits of sixteen Brazilian wheat genotypes. Grain hardness index, milling traits, physicochemical and rheological properties of the flour, and specific volume and firmness of the bread were evaluated. Physicochemical properties of the flour were not influenced by glutenin subunits. Genotypes with subunits at the Glu-B1 (17+18 or 7+8, Glu-D1 (5+10, and Glu-A3 (b were associated with strong flours and bread with high specific volume and low firmness. The subunits at the Glu-A1 and Glu-B3 had no effect on the rheological properties of the dough and bread quality, while the subunit 2+12 at Glu-D1 negatively affected the resistance to extension, and specific volume and firmness of the bread. Specific volume and firmness of the bread were influenced by the rheological properties of the dough, while the flour protein content was not important to define wheat quality. The identification of glutenin subunits at different loci along with the rheological tests of the flour are fundamental in estimating the potential use of different materials developed in wheat breeding.

  2. A molecular breadboard: Removal and replacement of subunits in a hepatitis B virus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lye Siang; Brunk, Nicholas; Haywood, Daniel G; Keifer, David; Pierson, Elizabeth; Kondylis, Panagiotis; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Jacobson, Stephen C; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is a model system for studying assembly and disassembly of icosahedral structures. Controlling disassembly will allow re-engineering the 120 subunit HBV capsid, making it a molecular breadboard. We examined removal of subunits from partially crosslinked capsids to form stable incomplete particles. To characterize incomplete capsids, we used two single molecule techniques, resistive-pulse sensing and charge detection mass spectrometry. We expected to find a binomial distribution of capsid fragments. Instead, we found a preponderance of 3 MDa complexes (90 subunits) and no fragments smaller than 3 MDa. We also found 90-mers in the disassembly of uncrosslinked HBV capsids. 90-mers seem to be a common pause point in disassembly reactions. Partly explaining this result, graph theory simulations have showed a threshold for capsid stability between 80 and 90 subunits. To test a molecular breadboard concept, we showed that missing subunits could be refilled resulting in chimeric, 120 subunit particles. This result may be a means of assembling unique capsids with functional decorations. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Ovarian steroid regulation of monoamine oxidase-A and -B mRNAs in the macaque dorsal raphe and hypothalamic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlah, Chrisana; Lu, Nick Z; Bethea, Cynthia L

    2002-03-01

    The serotonin neural system plays a pivotal role in mood, affective regulation and integrative cognition, as well as numerous autonomic functions. We have shown that ovarian steroids alter the expression of several genes in the dorsal raphe of macaques, which may increase serotonin synthesis and decrease serotonin autoinhibition. Another control point in aminergic neurotransmission involves degradation by MAO. This enzyme occurs in two isoforms, A and B, which have different substrate preferences. We questioned the effect of ovarian steroid hormones on MAO-A and MAO-B mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus and hypothalamus using in situ hybridization in non-human primates. Rhesus monkeys ( Macaca mulatta; n=5/group) were spayed and either placebo treated (controls), estrogen (E) treated (28 days), progesterone (P) treated (14 days placebo+14 days P), or E+P treated (14 days E+14 days E+P). Perfusion-fixed sections (25 microm) were hybridized with a 233 bp MAO-A, or a 373 bp MAO-B, radiolabeled-antisense monkey specific probes. Autoradiographic films were analyzed by densitometry, which was performed with NIH Image Software. MAO-A and -B mRNAs were detected in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), preoptic area (POA), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON), lateral hypothalamus (LH) and ventromedial nucleus (VMN). MAO-A mRNA optical density was significantly decreased by E, P, and E+P in the DRN and in the hypothalamic PVN, LH and VMN. Ovarian hormones had no effect on MAO-B mRNA expression in the DRN. However, there was a significant decrease in MAO-B optical density in the hypothalamic POA, LH and VMN with E, P or E+P treatment. Pixel area generally reflected optical density. Ovarian steroids decreased MAO-A, but not B, in the raphe nucleus. However, both MAO-A and B were decreased in discrete hypothalamic nuclei by hormone replacement. These data suggest that the transcriptional regulation of

  4. Gene expression profiling of upregulated mRNAs in granulosa cells of bovine ovulatory follicles following stimulation with hCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques G. Lussier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovulation and luteinization of follicles are complex biological processes initiated by the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. The objective of this study was to identify genes that are differentially expressed in bovine granulosa cells (GC of ovulatory follicles. Methods Granulosa cells were collected during the first follicular wave of the bovine estrous cycle from dominant follicles (DF and from ovulatory follicles (OF obtained 24 h following injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. A granulosa cell subtracted cDNA library (OF-DF was generated using suppression subtractive hybridization and screened. Results Detection of genes known to be upregulated in bovine GC during ovulation, such as ADAMTS1, CAV1, EGR1, MMP1, PLAT, PLA2G4A, PTGES, PTGS2, RGS2, TIMP1, TNFAIP6 and VNN2 validated the physiological model and analytical techniques used. For a subset of genes that were identified for the first time, gene expression profiles were further compared by semiquantitative RT-PCR in follicles obtained at different developmental stages. Results confirmed an induction or upregulation of the respective mRNAs in GC of OF 24 h after hCG-injection compared with those of DF for the following genes: ADAMTS9, ARAF, CAPN2, CRISPLD2, FKBP5, GFPT2, KIT, KITLG, L3MBLT3, MRO, NUDT10, NUDT11, P4HA3, POSTN, PSAP, RBP1, SAT1, SDC4, TIMP2, TNC and USP53. In bovine GC, CRISPLD2 and POSTN mRNA were found as full-length transcript whereas L3MBLT3 mRNA was alternatively spliced resulting in a truncated protein missing the carboxy-terminal end amino acids, 774KNSHNEL780. Conversely, L3MBLT3 is expressed as a full-length mRNA in a bovine endometrial cell line. The 774KNSHNEL780 sequence is well conserved in all mammalian species and follows a SAM domain known to confer protein/protein interactions, which suggest a key function for these amino acids in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Conclusions We conclude that we have identified

  5. TFPI alpha and beta regulate mRNAs and microRNAs involved in cancer biology and in the immune system in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicte Stavik

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence indicate a new role of TFPI in cancer biology. We recently reported that both isoforms of TFPI induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of cancer cells. The signaling pathway(s mediating the effects of TFPI is, however, presently still unclear. Our goal was to further investigate the cellular processes affected by TFPI and to get insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of TFPI, using a global gene expression study approach. TFPIα or TFPIβ cDNA were transfected into SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells for stable overexpression. Global mRNA and microRNA (miRNA expressions were measured and functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs according to gene ontology terms was conducted. Selected results were validated using qRT-PCR and Western blot. A total of 242 and 801 mRNA transcripts and 120 and 46 miRNAs were differentially expressed in cells overexpressing TFPIα or TFPIβ, respectively. Overexpression of either isoform significantly affected the expression of genes involved in cell development (apoptosis, cell movement, migration, invasion, colony formation, growth, and adhesion and immune response. Network analyses revealed biological interactions between these genes and implied that several of the genes may be involved in both processes. The expression profiles also correlated significantly with clinical phenotype and outcome. Functional cluster analyses indicated altered activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor, small GTPases, and the NF-κB and JAK/STAT cascades when TFPI was overexpressed, and increased activity of the transcription factors NF-κB and Elk-1 and phospho-Akt levels was observed. Integrated mRNA-miRNA analyses showed that 19% and 32% of the differentially expressed genes in cells overexpressing TFPIα or TFPIβ, respectively, may have been regulated by miRNAs. Overexpression of TFPI in breast cancer cells affected the expression of mRNAs and mi

  6. TFPI alpha and beta regulate mRNAs and microRNAs involved in cancer biology and in the immune system in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavik, Benedicte; Skretting, Grethe; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Sletten, Marit; Dehli Vigeland, Magnus; Sandset, Per Morten; Iversen, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicate a new role of TFPI in cancer biology. We recently reported that both isoforms of TFPI induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of cancer cells. The signaling pathway(s) mediating the effects of TFPI is, however, presently still unclear. Our goal was to further investigate the cellular processes affected by TFPI and to get insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of TFPI, using a global gene expression study approach. TFPIα or TFPIβ cDNA were transfected into SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells for stable overexpression. Global mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expressions were measured and functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs according to gene ontology terms was conducted. Selected results were validated using qRT-PCR and Western blot. A total of 242 and 801 mRNA transcripts and 120 and 46 miRNAs were differentially expressed in cells overexpressing TFPIα or TFPIβ, respectively. Overexpression of either isoform significantly affected the expression of genes involved in cell development (apoptosis, cell movement, migration, invasion, colony formation, growth, and adhesion) and immune response. Network analyses revealed biological interactions between these genes and implied that several of the genes may be involved in both processes. The expression profiles also correlated significantly with clinical phenotype and outcome. Functional cluster analyses indicated altered activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor, small GTPases, and the NF-κB and JAK/STAT cascades when TFPI was overexpressed, and increased activity of the transcription factors NF-κB and Elk-1 and phospho-Akt levels was observed. Integrated mRNA-miRNA analyses showed that 19% and 32% of the differentially expressed genes in cells overexpressing TFPIα or TFPIβ, respectively, may have been regulated by miRNAs. Overexpression of TFPI in breast cancer cells affected the expression of mRNAs and miRNAs involved in processes

  7. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985

  8. Weak decays of heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1978-08-01

    The properties that may help to identify the two additional quark flavors that are expected to be discovered. These properties are lifetime, branching ratios, selection rules, and lepton decay spectra. It is also noted that CP violation may manifest itself more strongly in heavy particle decays than elsewhere providing a new probe of its origin. The theoretical progress in the understanding of nonleptonic transitions among lighter quarks, nonleptonic K and hyperon decay amplitudes, omega minus and charmed particle decay predictions, and lastly the Kobayashi--Maskawa model for the weak coupling of heavy quarks together with the details of its implications for topology and bottomology are treated. 48 references

  9. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Heavy consumption and drink driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Lars

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of an ongoing mixed methods project about untreated heavy alcohol consumption amongst adult Danes. It is based upon 21 in-depth qualitative interviews with convicted drink drivers. All interviewees were contacted while attending mandatory courses in “Alcohol and Traffic safety...... on the interviewee’s risk behaviour, especially in relation to driving. The interviewees are first divided into 1) a group of young “edgeworkers” with pronounced general risk behaviour, 2) a group of middle-aged “post-edgeworkers”, most with criminal records, and 3) a group of middle-aged and older heavy consumers...

  11. Heavy flavor production in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper a brief survey is given of the status of heavy quark hadroproduction in QCD. The next-to-leading order calculation allows an estimate of the theoretical uncertainties to be made. They are manageable for top, but considerable for charm. The data on charm continues to show an excess of events at large x F , compared to QCD expectations. This may be linked to the measured anomalous A-dependence of the cross section on nuclear targets, also present at large x F . QCD models for the diffractive production of heavy quarks remain to be tested experimentally

  12. Central collisions of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R ampersand D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals

  13. Heavy flavour production at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocenti Gian Michele

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this proceedings, I present selected experimental results on heavy-flavour production at RHIC and at the LHC, which were presented at the Strangeness in Quark Matter 2017 conference. I will present a brief introduction to the heavy-flavour physics in heavy ion collisions and I will focus on recents measurements of in-medium energy loss and and collective properties of heavy-flavour particles, which provided important information on the mechanisms of heavy flavour interaction with the hot and dense medium created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  14. Reactivation of the chloroplast CF1-ATPase beta subunit by trace amounts of the CF1 alpha subunit suggests a chaperonin-like activity for CF1 alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, A; Avital, S; Gromet-Elhanan, Z

    1991-04-25

    Incubation of tobacco and lettuce thylakoids with 2 M LiCl in the presence of MgATP removes the beta subunit from their CF1-ATPase (CF1 beta) together with varying amounts of the CF1 alpha subunit (CF1 alpha). These 2 M LiCl extracts, as with the one obtained from spinach thylakoids (Avital, S., and Gromet-Elhanan, Z. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7067-7072), could form active hybrid ATPases when reconstituted into inactive beta-less Rhodospirillum rubrum chromatophores. Pure CF1 beta fractions that have been isolated from these extracts could not form such active hybrids by themselves, but could do so when supplemented with trace amounts (less than 5%) of CF1 alpha. A mitochondrial F1-ATPase alpha subunit was recently reported to be a heat-shock protein, having two amino acid sequences that show a highly conserved identity with sequences found in molecular chaperones (Luis, A. M., Alconada, A., and Cuezva, J. M. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 7713-7716). These sequences are also conserved in CF1 alpha isolated from various plants, but not in F1 beta subunits. The above described reactivation of CF1 beta by trace amounts of CF1 alpha could thus be due to a chaperonin-like function of CF1 alpha, which involves the correct, active folding of isolated pure CF1 beta.

  15. General analysis of weak decay form factors in heavy to heavy and heavy to light baryon transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.; Liu Dongsheng; Kraemer, M.; Koerner, J.G.; Tawfiq, S.

    1992-01-01

    We present a complete analysis of the heavy to heavy and heavy to light baryon semi-leptonic decays in the heavy quark effective theory within the framework of a Bethe-Salpeter (BS) approach and demonstrate the equivalence of this approach to other work in the field. We present in a compact form the baryon BS amplitudes which incorporate the symmetries manifest in the heavy quark limit and which also show clearly the light quark dynamics. A similar form of the BS amplitude is presented for light baryons. Using the BS amplitudes, the heavy to heavy and heavy to light semi-leptonic baryon decays are considered. As expected there is a dramatic reduction in the number of form factors. An advantage of our BS approach is demonstrated where the form factors are written as loop integrals which in principle can be calculated. (orig.)

  16. Dithiothreitol activation of the insulin receptor/kinase does not involve subunit dissociation of the native α2β2 insulin receptor subunit complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, L.J.; Wilden, P.A.; Pessin, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The subunit composition of the dithiothreitol- (DTT) activated insulin receptor/kinase was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography under denaturing or nondenaturing conditions. Pretreatment of 32 P-labeled insulin receptors with 50 mM DTT followed by gel filtration chromatography in 0.1% SDS demonstrated the dissociation of the α 2 β 2 insulin receptor complex (M/sub r/ 400,000) into the monomeric 95,000 β subunit. In contrast, pretreatment of the insulin receptors with 1-50 mM DTT followed by gel filtration chromatography in 0.1% Triton X-100 resulted in no apparent alteration in mobility compared to the untreated insulin receptors. Resolution of this complex by nonreducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography demonstrated the existence of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric complex with essentially no αβ heterodimeric or free monomeric β subunit species present. This suggests that the insulin receptor can reoxidize into the M/sub r/ 400,000 complex after the removal of DTT by gel filtration chromatography. To prevent reoxidation, the insulin receptors were pretreated with 50 mM DTT. Under the conditions the insulin receptors migrated as the M/sub r/ 400,000 α 2 β 2 complex. These results demonstrate that treatment of the insulin receptors with high concentrations of DTT, followed by removal of DTT by gel filtration, results in reoxidation of the reduced α 2 β 2 insulin receptor complex. Further, these results document that although the DTT stimulation of the insulin receptor/kinase does involve reduction of the insulin receptor subunits, it does not result in dissociation of the native α 2 β 2 insulin receptor subunit complex

  17. The influence of religious affiliation on heavy drinking, heavy smoking and heavy betel nut chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The results of a national survey of determinants of drinking, smoking and betel-nut chewing behaviors are analyzed. The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate whether drinking, smoking and betel-nut chewing are influenced by a variety of religions based on Taiwan data. Our results suggest that Buddhism, Taoism and practitioners of Chinese folk region are positively associated with heavy betel nut chewing while the religion effects on heavy smoking and drinking are statistically insignificant. Our findings on religion effects in Taiwan can be a valuable reference for comparison in Christian and western countries. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Shock Mounting for Heavy Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    Elastomeric bearings eliminate extraneous forces. Rocket thrust transmitted from motor to load cells via support that absorbs extraneous forces so they do not affect accuracy of thrust measurements. Adapter spoked cone fits over forward end of rocket motor. Shock mounting developed for rocket engines under test used as support for heavy machines, bridges, or towers.

  19. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dornan, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses

  20. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  1. Future relativistic heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    Equations of state for nuclear matter and ongoing experimental studies are discussed. Relativistic heavy ion physics is the only opportunity to study in the laboratory the properties of extended multiquark systems under conditions such that quarks might run together into new arrangements previously unobserved. Several lines of further study are mentioned

  2. Summary of heavy ion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, S.

    1994-09-01

    Can we study hot QCD using nuclear collisions? Can we learn about metallic hydrogen from the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter? The answer to both questions may surprise you exclamation point I summarize progress in relativistic heavy ion theory reported at DPF '94 in the parallel sessions

  3. Heavy neutral leptons at FASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Felix; Trojanowski, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    We study the prospects for discovering heavy neutral leptons at Forward Search Experiment (FASER), the newly proposed detector at the LHC. Previous studies showed that a relatively small detector with ˜10 m length and ≲1 m2 cross sectional area can probe large unconstrained parts of parameter space for dark photons and dark Higgs bosons. In this work, we show that FASER will also be sensitive to heavy neutral leptons that have mixing angles with the active neutrinos that are up to an order of magnitude lower than current bounds. In particular, this is true for heavy neutral leptons produced dominantly in B -meson decays, in which case FASER's discovery potential is comparable to the proposed SHiP detector. We also illustrate how the search for heavy neutral leptons at FASER will be complementary to ongoing searches in high-pT experiments at the LHC and can shed light on the nature of dark matter and the process of baryogenesis in the early Universe.

  4. Fast and Slow Inhibition in the Visual Thalamus Is Influenced by Allocating GABAA Receptors with Different γ Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Ye

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell-type specific differences in the kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic conductance changes (IPSCs are believed to impact upon network dynamics throughout the brain. Much attention has focused on how GABAA receptor (GABAAR α and β subunit diversity will influence IPSC kinetics, but less is known about the influence of the γ subunit. We have examined whether GABAAR γ subunit heterogeneity influences IPSC properties in the thalamus. The γ2 subunit gene was deleted from GABAARs selectively in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN. The removal of the γ2 subunit from the dLGN reduced the overall spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC frequency across all relay cells and produced an absence of IPSCs in a subset of relay neurons. The remaining slower IPSCs were both insensitive to diazepam and zinc indicating the absence of the γ2 subunit. Because these slower IPSCs were potentiated by methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM, we propose these IPSCs involve γ1 subunit-containing GABAAR activation. Therefore, γ subunit heterogeneity appears to influence the kinetics of GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission in the visual thalamus in a cell-selective manner. We suggest that activation of γ1 subunit-containing GABAARs give rise to slower IPSCs in general, while faster IPSCs tend to be mediated by γ2 subunit-containing GABAARs.

  5. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both Cα and Cβ are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism

  6. The biosynthesis and processing of high molecular weight precursors of soybean glycinin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, K A; Thompson, J F; Madison, J T; Rosenthal, R; Jarvis, N P; Beachy, R N

    1982-06-10

    The predominant storage protein of soybean seed, glycinin, is composed of two heterogeneous classes of related subunits, the acidics (Mr approximately 38,000) and the basics (Mr approximately 22,000). Immunoreaction of polypeptides translated in vitro from isolated seed mRNA using antibodies prepared against either purified acidic or basic subunit groups precipitated precursor polypeptides of Mr = 60,000 to Mr = 63,000. High pressure liquid chromatography fingerprinting of trypsin-generated fragments from in vitro synthesized precursors showed fragments specific to both acidic and basic subunits. No mature acidic or basic subunits were detected in vitro translation reactions by either immunoprecipitation or high pressure liquid chromatography fingerprinting. Pulse-labeling of cotyledons growing in culture with [3H]glycine showed rapid accumulation of label in glycinin precursors of Mr = 59,000 to Mr = 62,000. Although in vivo synthesized precursors had slightly greater electrophoretic mobility than in vitro synthesized precursors, little label initially appeared in mature glycinin subunits. After several hours of continued cotyledon growth in absence of label, precursors were processed and label accumulated in both acidic and basic subunit groups. Recombinant plasmids were prepared by reverse transcription of soybean seed mRNA, and clones which encode glycinin precursors were identified by heteroduplex-hybridization of translatable messages. Northern blot analysis of seed mRNA shows the mRNA-encoding glycinin precursors to migrate at Mr = 0.71 X 10(6) on agarose gels, corresponding to approximately 2050 nucleotides. This is sufficiently large to encode a polypeptide consisting of both a glycinin acidic and basic subunit.

  7. Permeability transition in human mitochondria persists in the absence of peripheral stalk subunits of ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuya; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2017-08-22

    The opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membranes of mitochondria can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane and ATP synthesis, and cell death. Pore opening can be inhibited by cyclosporin A mediated via cyclophilin D. It has been proposed that the pore is associated with the dimeric ATP synthase and the oligomycin sensitivity conferral protein (OSCP), a component of the enzyme's peripheral stalk, provides the site at which cyclophilin D interacts. Subunit b contributes a central α-helical structure to the peripheral stalk, extending from near the top of the enzyme's catalytic domain and crossing the membrane domain of the enzyme via two α-helices. We investigated the possible involvement of the subunit b and the OSCP in the PTP by generating clonal cells, HAP1-Δb and HAP1-ΔOSCP, lacking the membrane domain of subunit b or the OSCP, respectively, in which the corresponding genes, ATP5F1 and ATP5O , had been disrupted. Both cell lines preserve the characteristic properties of the PTP; therefore, the membrane domain of subunit b does not contribute to the PTP, and the OSCP does not provide the site of interaction with cyclophilin D. The membrane subunits ATP6, ATP8, and subunit c have been eliminated previously from possible participation in the PTP; thus, the only subunits of ATP synthase that could participate in pore formation are e, f, g, diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues (DAPIT), and the 6.8-kDa proteolipid.

  8. Immunodominant role of CCHA subunit of Concholepas hemocyanin is associated with unique biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, María Inés; Fuentes, Alejandra; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto; Nova, Esteban; Oliva, Harold; Faunes, Fernando; Valenzuela, María Antonieta; Campos-Vallette, Marcelo; Aliaga, Alvaro; Ferreira, Jorge; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno

    2009-03-01

    Hemocyanin, the oxygen transporter metallo-glycoprotein from mollusks, shows strong relationship between its notable structural features and intrinsic immunomodulatory effects. Here we investigated the individual contribution of CCHA and CCHB subunits from Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) to in vivo humoral immune response and their pre-clinical evaluation as immunotherapeutic agent in a mice bladder cancer model, in relation to their biochemical properties. To this end, subunits were purified and well characterized. Homogeneous subunits were obtained by anionic exchange chromatography, and its purity assessed by electrophoretic and immunochemical methods. While each CCH subunit contains eight functional units showing partial cross reaction, the vibrational spectral analysis showed several spectral differences, suggesting structural differences between them. In addition, we demonstrated differences in the carbohydrate content: CCHA had a 3.6% w/w sugar with both N- and O-linked moieties. In turn, CCHB had a 2.5% w/w sugar with N-linked, while O-linked moieties were nearly absent. Considering these differences, it was not possible to predict a priori whether the immunogenic and immunotherapeutic properties of subunits might be similar. Surprisingly, both subunits by itself induced a humoral response, and showed an antitumor effect in the bladder carcinoma cell line MBT-2. However, when immunologic parameters were analyzed, CCHA showed better efficiency than CCHB. No allergic reactions or any toxic effects were observed in mice treated with CCHA, sustaining its potential therapeutic use. Our study supports that CCHA subunit accounts for the most important features involved in the immunogenicity of CCH, such as better hydrophilicity and higher content of carbohydrates.

  9. Heavy metals in Mindhola river estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Rokade, M.A; Mandalia, A

    The heavy metal concentrations are studied along the Mindhola river estuary. Surface and bottom water samples were collected using Niskin Sampler. The sediment samples were collected using a Van Veen grab. The heavy metal concentration is estimated...

  10. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  11. Heavy water. A production alternative for Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of heavy water production methods is made. Main facts about isotopic and distillation methods, reforming and coupling to a Hydrogen distillation plant are presented. A feasibility study on heavy water production in Venezuela is suggested

  12. Study of the heavy water regeneration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavcic, E.

    1965-11-01

    Experience derived from heavy water reactor operation showed degradation and dilution of heavy water to be inevitable and depends on the type of reactor. Dilution of heavy water during operation of the RA and the RB reactors is shown in this report. Principles and procedures of heavy water regeneration by electrolysis, fractional distillation, cleaning, prevention of tritium contamination are described as well as separation columns

  13. Nuclear physics with heavy ions. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, R.; Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some results obtained in nuclear physics with heavy ions in the energy range up to 10 MeV/nucleon are summarized. A short review of the tendencies in the development of heavy ion accelerators is followed by a classification of the mechanisms observed in heavy ion interactions. The characteristics of the various types of reactions are presented. Applications of heavy ion beams in other branches of sciences are discussed. (author)

  14. Peptide-based subunit vaccine against hookworm infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Skwarczynski

    Full Text Available Hookworms infect more people than HIV and malaria combined, predominantly in third world countries. Treatment of infection with chemotherapy can have limited efficacy and re-infections after treatment are common. Heavy infection often leads to debilitating diseases. All these factors suggest an urgent need for development of vaccine. In an attempt to develop a vaccine targeting the major human hookworm, Necator americanus, a B-cell peptide epitope was chosen from the apical enzyme in the hemoglobin digestion cascade, the aspartic protease Na-APR-1. The A(291Y alpha helical epitope is known to induce neutralizing antibodies that inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1, thus reducing the capacity for hookworms to digest hemoglobin and obtain nutrients. A(291Y was engineered such that it was flanked on both termini by a coil-promoting sequence to maintain native conformation, and subsequently incorporated into a Lipid Core Peptide (LCP self-adjuvanting system. While A(291Y alone or the chimeric epitope with or without Freund's adjuvants induced negligible IgG responses, the LCP construct incorporating the chimeric peptide induced a strong IgG response in mice. Antibodies produced were able to bind to and completely inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1. The results presented show that the new chimeric LCP construct can induce effective enzyme-neutralising antibodies in mice, without the help of any additional toxic adjuvants. This approach offers promise for the development of vaccines against helminth parasites of humans and their livestock and companion animals.

  15. New theoretical results in heavy quark hadroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nason, P.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the status of the heavy quark hadroproduction theory. In particular, we discuss recent developments on production of heavy quarks in the high energy limit, and the results of a new calculation to next-to-leading accuracy of the fully exclusive parton cross section for heavy quark production. (orig.)

  16. BROOKHAVEN: Looking towards heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    July 11-22 were busy days at Brookhaven with a two-week Summer Institute on Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics. After an intensive first week designed to introduce young physicists to high energy heavy ion research, the second week was a workshop on detector technology for Brookhaven's proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), attended by some 150 physicists

  17. Therapy tumor with the heavy ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Li Wenjian

    2002-01-01

    As physical characteristic of heavy ions Bragg peak, therapy tumor with heavy ions is becoming advanced technology. So, many countries have developed the technology and used to treat tumor, the societal and economic effects are beneficial to people. The authors show the development, present situation and information of research in world of advanced radiotherapy with heavy ions

  18. Spectroscopy of heavy few-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we ask first, why is it interesting to investigate heavy-few electron ions. Then the various accelerator-based methods to produce heavy few-electron ions are discussed. In the main part an overview on available heavy few-electron ion data and current experiments is given. The summary will end up with future aspects in this field. (orig.)

  19. Polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, K.; Ishihara, M.; Takahashi, N.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents a few key experiments which provide direct evidence of the polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions. The theory of polarization observables and measurements is given with the necessary formulae. The polarization phenomena is described and studies of product nuclear polarization in heavy-ion reactions are discussed. Studies of heavy-ion reactions induced by polarized beams are examined

  20. Formation of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.M.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1992-02-01

    We investigate the production of heavy quarks in continuum and bound states in nuclear collisions. Creation for free banti b and tanti t quark pairs and for bottomonium and toponium in the ground state are computed at RHIC, LHC and SSC energies. Central and peripheral heavy-ion collisions are discussed. For top quark creation we assumed a mass range of 90 GeV ≤ m t ≤ 250 GeV. The creation rate for top quarks on peripheral collisions is estimated to be by a factor 40 to 130 smaller compared with corresponding central collisions. For m t = 130 GeV we calculated a creation rate of about 4760 top quark pairs per day at the LHC (3.5 TeV/u) for Pb-Pb collisions. (orig.)