WorldWideScience

Sample records for heavy petroleum oil

  1. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  2. Will Venezuelan extra-heavy oil be a significant source of petroleum in the next decades?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, Marcelo Fonseca Monteiro de; Rosa, Luiz Pinguelli; Szklo, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional oil resources are needed to complement petroleum supply in the next decades. However, given the restrictions that pertain to the production of these resources, this article evaluates the availability of Venezuelan unconventional oil for helping meet the future worldwide petroleum demand. Venezuela has the world's second-largest oil reserves, but the majority of it is unconventional extra-heavy oil from the Orinoco Oil Belt. The perspective of Venezuelan production, the ways in which PDVSA, the state oil company, will raise funds for planned investments and the future oil price predictions are used to assess Venezuela's ability to serve as a source of unconventional oil in the coming years. Findings indicate that Venezuelan crude oil will be increasingly able to provide part of the marginal petroleum supply at a level predicted in global scenarios but short of that predicted by the country's government. Operational difficulties and the effort to raise financial resources for the oil production in the Belt require urgency in overcoming difficulties. As conventional production in Venezuela will stabilise in the coming years and the country is dependent on oil production, Venezuela will rely on extra-heavy oil extraction to ensure increased oil production and the stabilisation of internal accounts. - Highlights: • We analyse the future unconventional oil production capacity of Venezuela. • The study is based on operational capacity, investments capacity and future prices. • The study indicates a production shorter than that predicted by the Venezuelan government. • Venezuela can provide part of the marginal petroleum supply in the coming years

  3. Treatment of heavy hydrocarbons, such as petroleum, shale oil, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercurio, M

    1939-02-04

    A process is described for treating heavy hydrocarbons in two operations: The first (operation) consisting of distilling in contact with neutral metals such as iron, copper, nickel, etc., or even stones, according to a known method, without pressure or with only a slight pressure or also by conducting the vapors into a receiver containing the materials mentioned, without pressure or with only a slight pressure, and causing condensation in one or the other ways for cooling by means of a submerged spiral; the second operation consisting in submitting the hydrocarbons recovered from the first operation, or otherwise, to the action of oxygen or ozone for recovering them from the carbon, purifying, desulfurizing, and rendering them inodorous, all these matters constituting the novelty of the invention.

  4. Analysis of heavy oils: Method development and application to Cerro Negro heavy petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-12-01

    On March 6, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ministry of Energy and Mines of Venezuela (MEMV) entered into a joint agreement which included analysis of heavy crude oils from the Venezuelan Orinoco oil belt. The purpose of this report is to present compositional data and describe new analytical methods obtained from work on the Cerro Negro Orinoco belt crude oil since 1980. Most of the chapters focus on the methods rather than the resulting data on Cerro Negro oil, and results from other oils obtained during the verification of the method are included. In addition, published work on analysis of heavy oils, tar sand bitumens, and like materials is reviewed, and the overall state of the art in analytical methodology for heavy fossil liquids is assessed. The various phases of the work included: distillation and determination of routine'' physical/chemical properties (Chapter 1); preliminary separation of >200{degrees} C distillates and the residue into acid, base, neutral, saturated hydrocarbon and neutral-aromatic concentrates (Chapter 2); further separation of acid, base, and neutral concentrates into subtypes (Chapters 3--5); and determination of the distribution of metal-containing compounds in all fractions (Chapter 6).

  5. Analysis of heavy oils: Method development and application to Cerro Negro heavy petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbognani, L.; Hazos, M.; Sanchez, V. (INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)); Green, J.A.; Green, J.B.; Grigsby, R.D.; Pearson, C.D.; Reynolds, J.W.; Shay, J.Y.; Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Thomson, J.S.; Vogh, J.W.; Vrana, R.P.; Yu, S.K.T.; Diehl, B.H.; Grizzle, P.L.; Hirsch, D.E; Hornung, K.W.; Tang, S.Y.

    1989-12-01

    On March 6, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ministry of Energy and Mines of Venezuela (MEMV) entered into a joint agreement which included analysis of heavy crude oils from the Venezuelan Orinoco oil belt.The purpose of this report is to present compositional data and describe new analytical methods obtained from work on the Cerro Negro Orinoco belt crude oil since 1980. Most of the chapters focus on the methods rather than the resulting data on Cerro Negro oil, and results from other oils obtained during the verification of the method are included. In addition, published work on analysis of heavy oils, tar sand bitumens, and like materials is reviewed, and the overall state of the art in analytical methodology for heavy fossil liquids is assessed. The various phases of the work included: distillation and determination of routine'' physical/chemical properties (Chapter 1); preliminary separation of >200{degree}C distillates and the residue into acid, base, neutral, saturated hydrocarbon and neutral-aromatic concentrates (Chapter 2); further separation of acid, base, and neutral concentrates into subtypes (Chapters 3-5); and determination of the distribution of metal-containing compounds in all fractions (Chapter 6).

  6. Petroleum Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Different types of crude oil and refined product, of all different chemical compositions, have distinct physical properties. These properties affect the way oil spreads and breaks down, its hazard to marine and human life, and the likelihood of threat.

  7. Methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in subsurface environments remediation, heavy oil formation, and energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Hubert, C; Dolfing, J; Head, I M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are common constituents of surface, shallow, and deep-subsurface environments. Under anaerobic conditions, hydrocarbons can be degraded to methane by methanogenic microbial consortia. This degradation process is widespread in the geosphere. In comparison with other anaerobic processes, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is more sustainable over geological time scales because replenishment of an exogenous electron acceptor is not required. As a consequence, this process has been responsible for the formation of the world's vast deposits of heavy oil, which far exceed conventional oil assets such as those found in the Middle East. Methanogenic degradation is also a potentially important component of attenuation in hydrocarbon contamination plumes. Studies of the organisms, syntrophic partnerships, mechanisms, and geochemical signatures associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation have identified common themes and diagnostic markers for this process in the subsurface. These studies have also identified the potential to engineer methanogenic processes to enhance the recovery of energy assets as biogenic methane from residual oils stranded in petroleum systems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Proceedings of the 2002 Petroleum Society of CIM/SPE/CHOA International Thermal Operations and Heavy Oil Symposium, International Conference on Horizontal Well Technology, and Canadian Heavy Oil Association Business Conference : Resources 2 Reserves 2 Results. CD ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This three day conference combined the Petroleum Society's International Horizontal Well and Technology Conference, the Society of Petroleum Engineer's (SPE) International Thermal Operations and Heavy Oil Symposium, and the Canadian Heavy Oil Association's (CHOA) Annual Business Meeting. The 87 presentations covered all aspects of heavy oil, thermal, and horizontal well technology from geosciences and drilling to economics and environment. The themes included financing, turning projects into results, eliminating the downstream barriers to oil sand development in North America and the world, and emerging technologies for horizontal or heavy oil applications. The conference included the following 20 sessions: (1) thermal operations/engineering, (2) well testing/productivity of horizontal wells, (3) heavy oil operations, (4) environmental aspects of heavy oil projects, (5) upgrading/pipelines, (6) economics and project appraisal, (7) simulation studies of thermal projects, (8) multilaterals, (9) horizontal wells in conventional reservoirs, (10) cold production of heavy oil, (11) horizontal drilling in thermal projects, (12) simulation studies of horizontal wells, (13) horizontal drilling technology, (14) thermal field studies and horizontal wells in heavy oil, (15) completion/production technology of horizontal and thermal wells, (16) physics and PVT of heavy oil recovery processes, (17) reservoir characterization/geosciences, (18) horizontal injectors/produced water technology, (19) emerging technologies, and (20) reservoir geomechanics/fracturing. Tutorials were also organized to provide opportunity to review areas that have undergone major changes. A total of 73 papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Non-Petroleum Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    These include synthetics such as silicone fluids and tung oils, wood-derivative oils such as resin/rosin, animal fats/oil, and seed oils. Many have similar physical properties to petroleum-based, such as water insolubility and formation of slicks.

  10. Deodorizing petroleum oils, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, A

    1906-06-14

    A process of purifying and deodorizing petroleum oils, gasolines, ethers, benzines, shale oils, resins, and similar products, consisting essentially in passing the vapors of the liquids with a current of hydrogen or of gases high in hydrogen over divided metals, such as nickel, copper, cobalt, iron, platinum, etc., heated to a temperature between 100/sup 0/C and 350/sup 0/C, the vapors passing before entering the apparatus through a column of copper heated to above 350/sup 0/C.

  11. Production of petroleum bitumen by oxidation of heavy oil residue with sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tileuberdi, Ye.; Akkazyn, Ye. A.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper production of bitumen adding elemental sulfur at oxidation of oil residue are investigated. The objects of research were distilled residue of Karazhanbas crude oil and elemental sulfur. These oil residue characterized by a low output of easy fractions and the high content of tar-asphaltene substances, therefore is the most comprehensible feedstock for producing bitumen. The sulfur is one of the oil product collected in oil extraction regions. Oxidation process of hydrocarbons carried out at temperatures from 180 up to 210 °С without addition of sulfur and with the addition of sulfur (5-10 wt. %) for 4 hours. At 200 °С oxidation of hydrocarbons with 5, 7 and 10 wt.% sulfur within 3-4 h allows receiving paving bitumen on the mark BND 200/300, BND 130/200, BN 90/130 and BN 70/30. Physical and mechanical characteristics of oxidation products with the addition of 5-7 wt. % sulfur corresponds to grade of paving bitumen BND 40/60. At the given temperature oxidized for 2.5-3 h, addition of 10 wt. % sulfur gave the products of oxidation describing on parameters of construction grades of bitumen (BN 90/10).

  12. A tiered analytical protocol for the characterization of heavy oil residues at petroleum-contaminated hazardous waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, S.J.T.; Kenefick, S.L.; Hrudey, S.E.; Fuhr, B.J.; Holloway, L.R.; Rawluk, M.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from abandoned refinery sites in Alberta, Canada is used to illustrate a tiered analytical approach to the characterization of complex hydrocarbon wastes. Soil extracts isolated from heavy oil- and creosote-contaminated sites were characterized by thin layer chromatography with flame ionization detection (TLC-FID), ultraviolet fluorescence, simulated distillation (GC-SIMDIS) and chemical ionization GC-MS analysis. The combined screening and detailed analytical methods provided information essential to remedial technology selection including the extent of contamination, the class composition of soil extracts, the distillation profile of component classes and the distribution of individual class components within various waste fractions. Residual contamination was characteristic of heavy, degraded oils, consistent with documented site operations and length of hydrocarbon exposure at the soil surface

  13. Proceedings of the 3. NCUT meeting on upgrading and refining of heavy oil, bitumen and synthetic crude oil and the 2. symposium on stability and compatibility during the production, transportation and refining of petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This conference highlights new developments in refining processes for heavy oil, bitumen, and synthetic crudes. The oil sands/heavy oil industry in Canada has grown significantly in the last decade and could triple by 2012 to reach 2.6 million barrels per day. Experts from the petroleum industry, government organizations and technology providers attended this conference which identified technology gaps and areas where improvements are needed. The presentations demonstrated that many new technologies associated with heavy oil bitumen upgrading and refining have posed compatibility and stability challenges for pipeliners, upgraders and refiners. One of the issues addressed at the conference was the effect of upgrading technologies on market price due to the expected increase in production. Another important issue is how production of bitumen can be increased without significantly increasing greenhouse gas emissions from the refineries and upgrading facilities. The sessions of the conference were entitled: new technology developments in bitumen upgrading; secondary upgrading developments and expanded product opportunities; environmental issues and expanded oil sands development; and, stability and compatibility during the production, transportation and refining of petroleum. Twenty six presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  14. Improvements in petroleum oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohle, S

    1909-10-12

    A process for treating oils of the kind described is disclosed, which consists in adding to the oil an alkaline solution containing salines, and a vegetable saponaceous substance with or without iodides and with or without sulfuric acid. The salines and iodides are added in the form of a mucilage prepared from seaweed.

  15. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

  16. Heavy oils clean up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collitt, R.

    1997-01-01

    High production, transport and refining costs have long led oil companies to shun heavy crude oils. Advances in the technology of upgrading heavy oils, however, are likely to reduce transport costs and improve the refinery output. Research and development by Venezuela's state oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), has resulted in a process called Aquaconversion which permits the upgrading of heavy crude oils using a catalyst and the hydrogen from steam. This may be carried out at the wellhead in small low-pressure and relatively inexpensive units. In addition, higher distillate yields of higher value could be produced by revamping the thermal cracking units of refineries to incorporate the new technology. This has generated considerable interest in Venezuela's large extra-heavy crude oil reserves and has led multinational oil companies along with PDVSA to pledge $17 billion to their development. Even at a $2 to $3 per barrel upgrading cost, Venezuela's extra heavy crudes are competitive with lighter oils from other countries. Other major markets for the new technology are likely to be China and Russia, given their own large heavy crude reserves. (UK)

  17. Crude oil derived petroleum products in the aquatic environment: priorities for control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimwood, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    The available data on the environmental fate, behaviour and toxicity of five groups of petroleum products is reviewed and the information used to identify the priority of oil products for pollution control to protect the aquatic environment. The oil product groups comprise gasolines, kerosenes, other light fuel oil distillates, residual heavy fuel oils and lubricating oils. (author)

  18. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  19. Process to hydroform heavy petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinfelt, J.H.; Barnett, A.E.

    1977-02-17

    The invention concerns the hydroforming of heavy petrol. A particularly high degree of conversion of paraffins into aromatic substances is achieved. This leads to a a considerable increase of the octane number above 100. The hydroforming takes place by contacting the initial product with a catalyst in the presence of hydrogen. The temperature here is 427/sup 0/ to 566/sup 0/C. A mixture of 0.05-2 wt.% iridium, 0.5-2 wt.% gold, silver and copper serves as catalyst. It is coated on an oxidic carrier with a large surface, e.g. aluminium oxide with a surface of 50-300 m/sup 2//g. The larger the surface, the greater the reaction rate. The iridium acts as active catalyst, gold reduces the cracking activity of the catalyst and improves the product yield in the boiling range of benzine.

  20. The petroleum challenge. Present day questions about oil and gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussena, S.; Locatelli, C.; Pauwels, J.P.; Swartenbroekx, C.

    2006-04-01

    Will the 21. century be the petroleum challenge century? The petroleum problem is no longer the affair of experts and journalists, it challenges also governments and consumers in pressing terms. If there is today a petroleum problem, there is no oil or gas shortage for the moment. The cumulated oil and gas reserves would allow to face the demand of the century, with the condition that investments in exploration, field development, production, and back-end of oil and gas industries will be done in time. This book, written by specialists of energy economics and geopolitics shows up some of the key questions of our energy future. In particular, it invites us to never forget the basic heavy trends of the hydrocarbons sector in order to never be trapped by superficial extrapolations of short term phenomena. Content: heavy trend of oil prices at the 2020 prospects, natural gas take over?; oil and gas geopolitics: enough of hydrocarbons for the 21. century; Russia and Caspian sea oil and gas weight; China: a new strategic actor of the energy scene; influence of 'futures' market, of speculation, and of stocks on hydrocarbon prices; which future for LNG?; natural gas in the USA: towards a new foreign dependence. (J.S.)

  1. Outlook for Saskatchewan heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youzwa, P.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the heavy oil industry in Saskatchewan are discussed from a government perspective. By the end of September 1993, 220 heavy oil wells were drilled in the province, and 26% of the land sales in 1993 were in heavy oil areas. About 41% of the wells drilled in heavy oil areas were horizontal oil wells. Of the total horizontal wells drilled in Saskatchewan, 48% are for heavy oil, and horizontal well production averages 85 bbl/d. Initial trends suggest that horizontal wells both accelerate production and contribute to ultimate recovery. Total heavy oil production in 1992 reached 28.9 million bbl and recoverable reserves in 1991 were 262.3 million bbl, or 1.5% of total oil in place. The low recovery is not only due to technical factors such as high viscosity but also to low investment in the heavy oil sector due to poor economics. It is hoped that lower interest and exchange rates, the success of horizontal wells and the provincial royalty structure will maintain the recent increase in heavy oil activity. The provincial government recently launched a comprehensive energy strategy in which development of a heavy oil strategy is an important component. Total heavy oil reserves exceed those of light and medium oil and have significant development potential. The Saskatchewan government wishes to adopt a cooperative and partnership approach in its dealings with the heavy oil industry to help realize this potential. 9 figs

  2. Study of sulfur and vanadium in heavy petroleum products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    Sulfur compounds in heavy oil fractions (>450/sup 0/C) are studied in the first part of this work. After chemical oxidation by metachloroperbenzoic acid to obtain sulfones, sulfur compounds are analyzed by infrared spectroscopy for their qualitative and quantitative repartition. The method can be applied for the study of sulfur containing molecules before and after structural modifications of petroleum fractions by any chemical refining processes. In a second part vanadium is characterized in asphalt by physicochemical and chemical methods. 80% of the vanadium in a Boscan asphalt is under the form of porphyrins. Different associations are evidenced in petroleum fractions and metalloporphyrins, but the liaison between the vanadyl group and heterocondensate from asphalts is the more frequent.

  3. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10 degrees to 20 degrees API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources

  4. Petroleum biodegradation and oil spill bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlas, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in the marine environment following oil spills. These microorganisms naturally biodegrade numerous contaminating petroleum hydrocarbons, thereby cleansing the oceans of oil pullutants. Bioremediation, which is accomplished by adding exogenous microbial populations or stimulating indigenous ones, attempts to raise the rates of degradation found naturally to significantly higher rates. Seeding with oil degraders has not been demonstrated to be effective, but addition of nitrogenous fertilizers has been shown to increase rates of petroleum biodegradation. In the case of the Exxon Valdez spill, the largest and most thoroughly studied application of bioremediation, the application of fertilizer (slow release or oleophilic) increased rates of biodegradation 3-5 times. Because of the patchiness of oil, an internally conserved compound, hopane, was critical for demonstrating the efficacy of bioremediation. Multiple regression models showed that the effectiveness of bioremediation depended upon the amount of nitrogen delivered, the concentration of oil, and time. (author)

  5. Characterization of CRUDE OILS and petroleum products: (i) elution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of CRUDE OILS and petroleum products: (i) elution liquid chromatographic separation and gas chromatographic analysis of crude oils and petroleum products. E.O. Odebunmi, E.A. Ogunsakin, P.E.P. Ilukhor ...

  6. Carburetor for heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautreau, L

    1905-03-06

    This invention relates to a carburetor for heavy oils in which the combustion liquid circulates successively in two annular spaces at the top and bottom of the vaporizer heated by the gas from the outlet and returning from there, after having been conveniently heated, to the constant level by an appropriate tube; the constant level can be surrounded by an annular chamber in which circulates a part of the gas from the outlet.

  7. The oil and petroleum industry. 20. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This financial survey is a compilation of financial and marketing data on oil and petroleum industry companies in the United Kingdom. It includes quoted companies in the production and distribution industry, unquoted companies in the exploration and production industry, unquoted companies in the refining and distribution industry, a geographical index and an alphabetical index. (UK)

  8. Converting heavy oils into light oils, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mony, H

    1915-12-22

    A process is described for transforming heavy oils obtained by the carbonization of lignites, peats, coals, shales into light oils, and also the heavy oils of mineral and vegetable origin, consisting of heating the heavy oils or tars in the presence of one or more solid substances or liquids suitably chosen to cause the distillation of the oils under atmospheric pressure at an appropriate temperature; solid and liquid substances which favor the production of light products under the influence of heat being added preferably to the oil to be treated before putting it in the retort and before heating, so that light oils are obtained by treatment of the heavy oils in a single operation.

  9. Field reconnaissance and estimation of petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metal contents of soils affected by the Ebocha-8 oil spillage in Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuji, Leo C; Onojake, Chukunedum M

    2006-04-01

    Field reconnaissance of the Ebocha-8 oil spill-affected site at Obiobi/Obrikom in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria was carried out to assess the extent of damage to the terrestrial ecosystem and delimit the epicenter of oil spillage. Following three successive reconnaissance surveys, the area to be sampled was delimited (200 x 200 m2), and soil samples were collected using the grid method from three replicate quadrats at two depths, surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm). A geographically similar area located 50 m adjacent to the oil-polluted area was used as a reference (control) site. Total hydrocarbon content (THC) and heavy metal concentrations were later determined in the laboratory by extraction and spetrophotemetric techniques. Generally, the THC of soils at surface and subsurface depths of the oil-polluted plots was 2.06 x 10(4) +/- 4.97 x 10(3) mg/kg and 1.67 x 10(3) +/- 3.61 x 10(2) mg/kg soil, respectively, (no overlap in standard errors at 95% confidence limit) while concentrations of heavy metals(Pb, Cd, V, Cu and Ni) were enhanced, especially at the surface. The high levels of THC and heavy metals may predispose the site, which hitherto served as arable agricultural land, to impaired fertility and possible conflagration. When concentrations of heavy metals reach the levels obtained in this study, they may become toxic to plants or possibly bio-accumulate, thus leading to toxic reactions along the food chain. While the spilled-oil may have contributed to the enhanced levels of the metals in the affected soils, physico-chemical properties of the soils, mobility of metals, and the intense rainfall and flooding that preceded the period of study may have also contributed in part to their enhanced concentrations. The presence of high hydrocarbon content may cause oxygen deprivation, which may result in the death of soil fauna by asphyxiation. There is, therefore, an urgent need to clear the affected site of these excess hydrocarbon deposits so as to

  10. Petroleum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, T. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review of petroleum covers: crude oil; fuels, gaseous and liquid; lubricants, oils, and greases; asphalts, bitumens, tars, and pitches; hydrocarbons; physical properties; metals in oil; nonmetallic elements and heterocompounds; and analytical methods and apparatus. (MVL)

  11. Technological alternatives for the handling of high viscosity heavy crude oil and of petroleum residuals; Alternativas tecnologicas para el manejo de crudos pesados de alta viscosidad y residuales de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, Ramon; Peralta M, Maria Vita; Gonzalez Santalo, Jose M; Herrera V, J Ramon; Arriola M, Alejandro M; Manzanares P, Emilio; Romo M, Cesar A; Palacios L, Elvia M [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This work presents the technological capacity that, through the years, has been developed in emulsions of heavy oil in water preparations, as well as the potential application that this technology has in the electrical sector and the problem reduction during the extraction and handling of high viscosity heavy oils. Within this technological development it first appears the process for the formation of emulsions of residual petroleum within lots, followed by the preparation of emulsions in a continuous way within a laboratory model, and finally the production in greater scale in a pilot plant, including more and more adequate tense-actives for the formation of emulsions. Also experimental systems are presented to execute static stability and dynamic tests in different conditions, pumping tests for the handling of these emulsions and burning tests for their combustion. All of this with the purpose of consolidating the technology of residual petroleum emulsions as a profitable alternative that replaces the heavy fuel oil and to solve specific problems of the oil industry, among other benefits. [Spanish] Este trabajo exhibe la capacidad tecnologica que, a traves de los anos, se ha desarrollado en la preparacion de emulsiones de aceites pesados en agua; asi como el potencial de aplicacion que tiene dicha tecnologia en el sector electrico y la reduccion de problemas durante la extraccion y manejo de aceites pesados de alta viscosidad. Dentro de este desarrollo tecnologico figura primero el proceso para la formacion de emulsiones de residuales de petroleo dentro de lotes, seguido por la preparacion de emulsiones en continuo dentro de un laboratorio modelo, y finalmente la produccion a mayor escala en una planta piloto, incluyendo cada vez mas adecuados tenso-activos para la formacion de las emulsiones. Tambien se presentan sistemas experimentales para ejecutar pruebas de estabilidad estatica y dinamica en diferentes condiciones, pruebas de bombeo para el manejo de estas

  12. RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

    1999-06-01

    The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

  13. The PTRC : a world leader in enhanced heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristoff, B.; Knudsen, R.; Asghari, K. [Petroleum Technology Research Centre, Regina, SK (Canada); Pappas, E.S. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC) fosters knowledge and progressive technologies to enhance the recovery of petroleum. This paper discussed the PTRC's leadership in enhanced heavy oil recovery, with particular reference to core research program such as heavy oil (post) cold flow; enhanced waterflooding; miscible/immiscible solvent injection; and near-wellbore conformance control. Other projects that were presented included a joint implementation of vapour extraction project (JIVE); and the IEA greenhouse gas (GHG) Weyburn-Midale carbon dioxide monitoring and storage project. The JIVE project will develop, demonstrate and evaluate solvent vapour extraction processes for enhanced oil recovery in heavy oil reservoirs. The GHG Weyburn-Midale project, launched in 2000, studies carbon dioxide injection and storage in partially depleted oil reservoirs. It was concluded that the PTRC continues to develop technologies to meet the world's energy requirements while mitigating both immediate and long-term environmental impacts. 4 figs.

  14. Characteristics of bicyclic sesquiterpanes in crude oils and petroleum products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Zhendi; Hollebone, Bruce P; Brown, Carl E; Landriault, Mike

    2009-05-15

    This study presents a quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of bicyclic sesquiterpanes (BSs) in numerous crude oils and refined petroleum products including light and mid-range distillate fuels, residual fuels, and lubricating oils collected from various sources. Ten commonly recognized bicyclic sesquiterpanes were determined in all the studied crude oils and diesel range fuels with principal dominance of BS3 (C(15)H(28)), BS5 (C(15)H(28)) and BS10 (C(16)H(30)), while they were generally not detected or in trace in light fuel oils like gasoline and kerosene and most lubricating oils. Laboratory distillation of crude oils demonstrated that sesquiterpanes were highly enriched in the medium distillation fractions of approximately 180 to 481 degrees C and were generally absent or very low in the light distillation fraction (boiling point to approximately 180 degrees C) and the heavy residual fraction (>481 degrees C). The effect of evaporative weathering on a series of diagnostic ratios of sesquiterpanes, n-alkanes, and biomarkers was evaluated with two suites of weathered oil samples. The change of abundance of sesquiterpanes was used to determine the extent of weathering of artificially evaporated crude oils and diesel. In addition to the pentacyclic biomarker C(29) and C(30) alphabeta-hopane, C(15) and C(16) sesquiterpanes might be alternative internal marker compounds to provide a direct way to estimate the depletion of oils, particularly diesels, in oil spill investigations. These findings may offer potential applications for both oil identification and oil-source correlation in cases where the tri- to pentacyclic biomarkers are absent due to refining or environmental weathering of oils.

  15. Microbial dynamics in petroleum oilfields and their relationship with physiological properties of petroleum oil reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjani, Sunita J; Gnansounou, Edgard

    2017-12-01

    Petroleum is produced by thermal decay of buried organic material over millions of years. Petroleum oilfield ecosystems represent resource of reduced carbon which favours microbial growth. Therefore, it is obvious that many microorganisms have adapted to harsh environmental conditions of these ecosystems specifically temperature, oxygen availability and pressure. Knowledge of microorganisms present in ecosystems of petroleum oil reservoirs; their physiological and biological properties help in successful exploration of petroleum. Understanding microbiology of petroleum oilfield(s) can be used to enhance oil recovery, as microorganisms in oil reservoirs produce various metabolites viz. gases, acids, solvents, biopolymers and biosurfactants. The aim of this review is to discuss characteristics of petroleum oil reservoirs. This review also provides an updated literature on microbial ecology of these extreme ecosystems including microbial origin as well as various types of microorganisms such as methanogens; iron, nitrate and sulphate reducing bacteria, and fermentative microbes present in petroleum oilfield ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Technology management for heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.

    1994-01-01

    The framework for investment in research and development (R ampersand D) at a medium-sized Canadian petroleum company is described. The importance of R ampersand D is illustrated by a graph showing the strong positive correlation between R ampersand D intensity and sales for companies in the mainstream oil and gas sector in the USA. Strong R ampersand D efforts also help to maintain market share and enhance corporate ability to transfer technology into its operations. Three ways of structuring, developing, and transferring technology are outlined: using in-house R ampersand D facilities, which is too costly for medium-sized firms; having a central group responsible for funding third-party R ampersand D, transferring technology into the company, and being aware of technology activities within and outside the company; and complete decentralizing of R ampersand D, in which operations decides how, when, and what to spend on R ampersand D. For the medium-sized company, the second option is considered the best choice. Essential R ampersand D administration practices for such a company are reviewed, including corporate support, an updated technology strategy, central funding with a separate budget from operations, a portfolio of R ampersand D projects and ideas, collaboration with other organizations, and effective communication of R ampersand D activity and results to the company. At the company studied, Wascana Energy, R ampersand D is being focused on three priority areas: production technology, enhanced recovery, and heavy oil upgrading. It is estimated that the monetary benefits of R ampersand D in these three areas could be as much as $100 million. The evaluation of R ampersand D performance is then discussed and critical factors for R ampersand D success are listed. 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Principles of heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szasz, S.E.; Thomas, G.W.

    1965-10-01

    Rising exploration costs have prompted greater interest in the large known deposits of heavy oil in North America. Because of high oil viscosities in such reservoirs, recoveries are poor, fluid drives are inefficient and production rates are uneconomical. Viscosity reduction can best be accomplished by heating the reservoir. The basic aspects of reservoir heating are reviewed and those processes which are of practical importance in heavy oil reservoirs are discussed. Wellbore heating frequently can be applied to heavy oil reservoirs to increase production rates. In hot waterflooding, the water requirements are much higher than an ordinary waterflood. Steam floods are more attractive, but operating costs are generally high. Conduction heating processes appear most promising. Among these is included the cyclic steam-soak process. A simple method is presented for estimating the performance from the first cycle of steam injection into the formation, assuming gravity as the only driving energy. An example calculation for a typical heavy oil reservoir is given. (26 refs.)

  18. Pipeline capacity and heavy oil markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    Aspects of transporting heavy crude to markets from Canadian sources are discussed, with reference to pipeline expansion, western Canadian crude supply, and exports to various Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) in the USA. Pipeline expansions have been proposed by Interprovincial Pipeline, Trans Mountain Pipeline, Rangeland, and Wascana, and some of these proposals are in the review stage. Western Canadian crude supply is expected to peak at 1.9 million bbl/d in 1996. An increase in heavy crude supply is expected but this increase will not be sufficient to offset a decline in light crude supply. Adequate pipeline capacity should exist with the Interprovincial expansion volume of 170,000 bbl/d and the Trans Mountain expansion of 38,000 bbl/d forecast to be in place by 1995. Canadian crude exports to the USA have steadily increased since 1989, and heavy crude exports have grown an average of 20,000 bbl/d each year. In PADD Region IV, oil production is declining and ca 20,000 bbl/d of heavy crude will be needed by the year 2000; additional pipeline capacity will be required. In PADD Region II, Canadian heavy crude imports are ca 390,000 bbl/d and further market opportunities exist, after the Interprovincial expansion is complete. When the various combinations of possible pipeline expansions or reversals are considered, a range of heavy crude near-term growth potentials is obtained in which Canadian heavy oil would displace offshore heavy oil supplied to USA refineries. This potential is seen to range from 35,000 bbl/d to 200,000 bbl/d. 7 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here are gathered the results of the year 1999 concerning the petroleum industry in France ('UFIP' data), the market quotations of crude oil, the prices of fuels in France and in Portugal and some news about the petroleum industry in Algeria (privatization, exploration-offshore, repurchase), in Iraq (exports, contracts with foreign companies), in Russian Federation (petroleum pipelines and oil ports constructions) and in Chad (production sharing, offshore sites discoveries). (O.M.)

  20. The evaporation of crude oil and petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    The physics of oil and petroleum evaporation was studied by means of an experimental apparatus. The evaporation was determined by weight loss and recorded on a computer. Examination of the data showed that most oil and petroleum products (those with seven to ten components) evaporate at a logarithmic rate with respect to time, while other petroleum products (those with fewer chemical components) evaporate at a rate which is square root with respect to time. Evaporation of oil and petroleum was not strictly boundary-layer regulated because the typical oil evaporation rate rates do not exceed that of molecular diffusion and thus turbulent diffusion does not increase the evaporation rates. Overall, boundary layer regulation can be ignored in the prediction of oil and petroleum evaporation. The simple equation relating only the logarithm of time (or the square root of time in the case of narrow-cut products) and temperature are sufficient to accurately describe oil evaporation. refs., figs

  1. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  2. Chinese refining capacity for Canadian heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discussed China's refining capacity in relation to exports of Canadian heavy oil. Demand for oil is increasing throughout the world, and China is expected to consume 25 per cent of the projected yearly oil supplies. Alberta currently has an estimated 174 billion barrels of recoverable bitumen, and produces 1.06 million barrels per day. Production is expected to increase to 4.5 million barrels per day by the year 2020. Currently bitumen blends are refined and diluted with naphtha and sweet synthetic crude oil. Bitumen is a challenging feedstock for refineries, and requires thermal production methods or gasification processes. Primary conversion into sour synthetic crude is typically followed by hydrocracking and further refining into finished petroleum products. There are currently 50 refineries in China with a 7.4 million barrel per day capacity. Coastal refineries using imported crude oil have a 4 million barrel per day capacity. New facilities are being constructed and existing plants are being upgraded in order to process heavier and more sour crude oils. However, current refining capabilities in Chinese refineries have a limited ability for resid conversion. It was concluded that while China has a refining infrastructure, only refineries on the coast will use oil sands-derived feedstocks. However, there are currently opportunities to design refineries to match future feedstocks. tabs., figs

  3. Proceedings of ITOHOS 2008 : The 2008 SPE/PS/CHOA International Thermal Operations and Heavy Oil Symposium : Heavy Oil : Integrating the Pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    This multi-disciplinary conference and exhibition combined the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) and the Petroleum Society's (PS) international thermal operations and heavy oil symposium, and the Canadian Heavy Oil Association's (CHOA) annual business meeting. The conference provided a forum to examine emerging technologies and other critical issues affecting the global heavy oil and bitumen industry. The most current technologies from around the world that enhance the recovery of heavy oil and bitumen from oil sand deposits were also showcased. The technical program encompassed the economic, technical, and environmental challenges that the petroleum industry is currently facing. The sessions of the conference were entitled: artificial lift; mining, extraction and cold production; simulation; solvent processes; reservoir characterization; steam generation and water treatment; and, in-situ combustion in Canada. The conference also featured a series of short courses and tutorials on heavy oil wellbore completions and design; drilling horizontal heavy oil wells and steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) wells; geomechanical based reservoir monitoring; thermal well design; fiber optic thermal monitoring; heavy oil thermal recovery and economics; wellbore slotting; advanced geomechanics; and, an overview of cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS). All 91 presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  4. Proceedings of ITOHOS 2008 : The 2008 SPE/PS/CHOA International Thermal Operations and Heavy Oil Symposium : Heavy Oil : Integrating the Pieces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-10-15

    This multi-disciplinary conference and exhibition combined the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) and the Petroleum Society's (PS) international thermal operations and heavy oil symposium, and the Canadian Heavy Oil Association's (CHOA) annual business meeting. The conference provided a forum to examine emerging technologies and other critical issues affecting the global heavy oil and bitumen industry. The most current technologies from around the world that enhance the recovery of heavy oil and bitumen from oil sand deposits were also showcased. The technical program encompassed the economic, technical, and environmental challenges that the petroleum industry is currently facing. The sessions of the conference were entitled: artificial lift; mining, extraction and cold production; simulation; solvent processes; reservoir characterization; steam generation and water treatment; and, in-situ combustion in Canada. The conference also featured a series of short courses and tutorials on heavy oil wellbore completions and design; drilling horizontal heavy oil wells and steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) wells; geomechanical based reservoir monitoring; thermal well design; fiber optic thermal monitoring; heavy oil thermal recovery and economics; wellbore slotting; advanced geomechanics; and, an overview of cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS). All 91 presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  5. HFRR investigation of biobased and petroleum based oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biobased oils come in a wide range of chemical structures as do petroleum based oils. In addition, a distinct structural difference exists between these two broad categories of oils. Previous work has shown that, in spite of the structural differences, these two categories of oils display similar pr...

  6. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  7. Shale oil. I. Genesis of oil shales and its relation to petroleum and other fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R H; Manning, P D.V.

    1927-01-01

    Oil-shale kerogen originated from resinous vegetation residues of past eras, whereas well petroleum was formed from oil shales by pressure and mild heat. Petroleum migrated to its present reservoir from neighboring oil-shale deposits, leaving a residue of black bituminous shales. The high carbon dioxide content of gases present in petroleum wells originated from kerogen, as it gives off carbon dioxide gas before producing soluble oil or bitumen.

  8. Preliminary fingerprinting analysis of Alberta oil sands and related petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.; Wang, Z.D.; Hollebone, B.; Brown, C.E.; Yang, Z.Y.; Landriault, M.; Fieldhouse, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reported on a study that presented a preliminary quantitative chemical characterization of Alberta oil sands and many other related Alberta oils such as oil sand bitumen, Cold Lake bitumen, Albian heavy synthetic crude, and Alberta Mixed sweet blend. The rapid increase in production of the Alberta oil sands has resulted in unprecedented environmental concern. The mining, extraction and production of oil sands such resulted in huge consumption of water resources, huge emission of greenhouse gas and large number of tailings ponds. In addition, accidental spills in the transportation and usage of oil sands will potentially cause considerable impact on the environment. It is therefore essential to have the ability to characterize Alberta oil sands and their oil products. The specific chemical properties of the oil sands bitumen must be known. Therefore, this study collected quantitative data on the concentration and distribution profiles of target compounds in Alberta oil sands and its petroleum products. The chemical fingerprints of 5 Alberta oil sands and their related petroleum products were studied using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The characterized hydrocarbons were n-alkanes; target alkylated PAHs and other EPA priority PAHs; biomarker terpanes and steranes; and bicyclic sesquiterpanes. The information acquired during this study will provide the basis for oil-oil correlation and differentiation in future environmental applications relevant to oil sands. 24 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Increasing oil recovery from heavy oil waterfloods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, B.W. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[BP Exploration, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    In an effort to optimize waterflood strategies in Alaska, the authors examined the results of up to 50 years of waterflooding on 166 western Canadian waterfloods recovering oil of less than 30 degrees API. The study determined the best operating practices for heavy oil waterflooding by investigating the difference between waterflooding of heavy oil and lighter oil counterparts. Operators of light oil waterflooding are advised to begin waterflooding early and maintain the voidage replacement ratio (VRR) at 1. However, this study showed that it is beneficial to delay the start of waterflooding until a certain fraction of the original oil in place was recovered. Varying the VRR was also shown to correlate with increased ultimate recovery. This statistical study of 166 western Canadian waterfloods also examined the effect of injection strategy and the effect of primary production before waterflooding. Some pre-waterflood production and under injection time is advantageous for ultimate recovery by waterfloods. Specific recommendations were presented for waterfloods in reservoirs with both high and low API gravity ranges. Each range showed a narrow sweet spot window where improved recovery occurred. 27 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Applying CFD in the Analysis of Heavy Oil/Water Separation Process via Hydrocyclone

    OpenAIRE

    K Angelim; A De Lima; J Souza; S Neto; V Oliveira; G Moreira

    2017-01-01

    In recent years most of the oil reserves discovered has been related to heavy oil reservoirs whose reserves are abundant but still show operational difficulties. This fact provoked great interest of the petroleum companies in developing new technologies for increasing the heavy oil production. Produced water generation, effluent recovered from the production wells together with oil and natural gas, is among the greatest potential factors for environmental degradation. Thus, a new scenario of ...

  11. Characterization of crude oils and petroleum products: (I Elution liquid chromatographic separation and gas chromatographic analysis of crude oils and petroleum products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Odebunmi

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Some physical and chemical properties of samples of light, medium and heavy Nigerian crude oils and petroleum products including gasoline, kerosene and engine oil have been measured and are reported in this paper. The crude oils and petroleum products have also been characterized by fractional distillation and elution liquid chromatography. The fractions obtained from elution liquid chromatography were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC. The GC fractions were identified by comparing the retention time of peaks in the unknown samples with those of components of calibration standard mixtures. The importance of the physico-chemical properties and the significance of the fractional distillation and chromatographic separation methods to industrial process operations have been discussed.

  12. Characterization of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Post-Burn Crude Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Niger delta, crude oil spilled soils are burned as a means of decontaminating the impacted soils. Gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GCFID) analyses were performed on oil residues extracted from burnt spilled oil soil samples to facilitate detailed chemical composition and characterization of petroleum ...

  13. Microbial ecology of methanogenic crude oil biodegradation; from microbial consortia to heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Head, Ian M.; Maguire, Michael J.; Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell; Gray, Neil D.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Martin Jones, D.; Oldenburg, Thomas B.P.; Larter, Stephen R. [Petroleum Research Group, Geosciences, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the microbial ecology of methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. Biodegraded petroleum reservoirs are one of the most dramatic indications of the deep biosphere. It is estimated that heavy oil and oil sands will account for a considerable amount of energy production in the future. Carbon, a major resource for deep subsurface microorganisms, and energy are contained in large quantities in petroleum reservoirs. The aerobic to anaerobic paradigm shift is explained. A key process for in-situ oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs is methanogenesis. New paradigms for in-reservoir crude oil biodegradation are discussed. Variations in anaerobic degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons are also discussed. A graph shows the different patterns of crude oil biodegradation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Alternative anaerobic alkane activation mechanisms are also shown. From the study, it can be concluded that methanogenic crude oil degradation is of global importance and led to the establishment of the world's enormous heavy oil deposits.

  14. SOVENT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY FOR IN-SITU UPGRADING OF HEAVY OIL SANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, Norman

    2009-01-30

    With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO2. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO2 density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the

  15. New guidelines for oil spill identification of waterborne petroleum and petroleum products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faksness, L.G.; Daling, P.S. [SINTEF Energy Research, Trondheim (Norway); Hansen, A.B. [National Environmental Research Inst., Roskilde (Denmark); Kienhuis, P. [RIZA, (Netherlands); Duus, R. [Norwegian Standard Association (Norway)

    2005-07-01

    Advances in interpretive and analytical methods have opened the possibility to improve the existing Nordtest methodology for oil spill identification which was developed in 1991 under the Nordic Council of Ministers. In 2002, the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) established 2 working groups to revise the Nordtest Methodology into the following 2 CEN guidelines: (1) oil spill identification which includes waterborne and petroleum products, and (2) oil spill identification which in addition to including waterborne petroleum and petroleum products, includes analytical methodology and interpretation of results. The revised methodology includes a protocol/decision chart that has 3 tiered levels of analyses and data treatment. The methodology relies on the characterization of diagnostic ratios. The CEN working group intends to use the guidelines as a basis for a national oil spill identification protocol in each European country and for further international use. The methodology can be applied to oil samples of petrogenic origin with boiling points above 200 degrees C, such as crude oils, diesel fuel oils, residual bunker oils, lubricants, and mixtures of oily bilge and sludge samples. It is not intended for automotive gasolines or other light petroleum products. The method has been implemented in most forensic laboratories in Europe and has successfully differentiated between oils from a spill and possible pollution sources. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  16. New guidelines for oil spill identification of waterborne petroleum and petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faksness, L.G.; Daling, P.S.; Hansen, A.B.; Kienhuis, P.; Duus, R.

    2005-01-01

    Advances in interpretive and analytical methods have opened the possibility to improve the existing Nordtest methodology for oil spill identification which was developed in 1991 under the Nordic Council of Ministers. In 2002, the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) established 2 working groups to revise the Nordtest Methodology into the following 2 CEN guidelines: (1) oil spill identification which includes waterborne and petroleum products, and (2) oil spill identification which in addition to including waterborne petroleum and petroleum products, includes analytical methodology and interpretation of results. The revised methodology includes a protocol/decision chart that has 3 tiered levels of analyses and data treatment. The methodology relies on the characterization of diagnostic ratios. The CEN working group intends to use the guidelines as a basis for a national oil spill identification protocol in each European country and for further international use. The methodology can be applied to oil samples of petrogenic origin with boiling points above 200 degrees C, such as crude oils, diesel fuel oils, residual bunker oils, lubricants, and mixtures of oily bilge and sludge samples. It is not intended for automotive gasolines or other light petroleum products. The method has been implemented in most forensic laboratories in Europe and has successfully differentiated between oils from a spill and possible pollution sources. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  17. An Estimate of Recoverable Heavy Oil Resources of the Orinoco Oil Belt, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.

    2009-01-01

    The Orinoco Oil Belt Assessment Unit of the La Luna-Quercual Total Petroleum System encompasses approximately 50,000 km2 of the East Venezuela Basin Province that is underlain by more than 1 trillion barrels of heavy oil-in-place. As part of a program directed at estimating the technically recoverable oil and gas resources of priority petroleum basins worldwide, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Orinoco Oil Belt Assessment Unit. This estimate relied mainly on published geologic and engineering data for reservoirs (net oil-saturated sandstone thickness and extent), petrophysical properties (porosity, water saturation, and formation volume factors), recovery factors determined by pilot projects, and estimates of volumes of oil-in-place. The U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean volume of 513 billion barrels of technically recoverable heavy oil in the Orinoco Oil Belt Assessment Unit of the East Venezuela Basin Province; the range is 380 to 652 billion barrels. The Orinoco Oil Belt Assessment Unit thus contains one of the largest recoverable oil accumulations in the world.

  18. Phase behaviour of heavy petroleum fractions in pure propane and n-butane and with methanol as co-solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canziani, D.; Ndiaye, P.M.; Franceschi, Elton; Corazza, Marcos L.; Vladimir Oliveira, J.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports phase equilibrium experimental results for heavy petroleum fractions in pure propane and n-butane as primary solvents and using methanol as co-solvent. Three kinds of oils were investigated from Marlim petroleum: a relatively light fraction coming from the first distillation of crude petroleum at atmospheric pressure (GOP - heavy gas oil of petroleum), the residue of such distillation (RAT) and the crude petroleum sample. Phase equilibrium measurements were performed in a high-pressure, variable-volume view cell, following the static synthetic method, over the temperature range of 323 K to 393 K, pressures up to 10 MPa and overall compositions of heavy component varying from 1 wt% to 40 wt%. Transition pressures for low methanol and oil concentrations were very close for GOP, RAT, and crude Marlim when using propane as the primary solvent. Close to propane critical temperature, two and three-phase transitions were observed for GOP and Marlim when methanol was increased. When n-butane was used as primary solvent, all transitions observed were of (vapour + liquid) type with transition pressure values smaller than those obtained for propane.

  19. Toxicology of oil field wastes. Hazards to livestock associated with the petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, W C

    1989-07-01

    In oil-producing states, the proximity of livestock to drilling operations and production sites often results in poisoning of animals from ingestion of crude oil, condensate, salt water, heavy metals, and caustic chemicals. The heavy metals encountered most frequently are lead from pipe joint compound and arsenicals and chromates used as corrosion inhibitors. Numerous toxic and caustic chemicals are used in drilling muds and fluids. Crude oil and salt water spills are common occurrences around production sites. Pipeline breaks may result in exposure of livestock to crude oil or refined petroleum hydrocarbons. Ingestion of petroleum hydrocarbons may result in sudden death from peracute bloat. The most common cause of illness or death following exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons is aspiration pneumonia, which may cause a chronic progressive deterioration of health, with death after several days or weeks. Cases in which livestock are exposed to oil, salt water, or caustic chemicals, but do not die acutely or from aspiration pneumonia are more frustrating to diagnose. In these cases, parasitism, poor nutrition, and other debilitating diseases must be considered. Anorexia, weight loss, and decreased rumen motility may be caused by a disruption of normal rumen function. Petroleum hydrocarbons, salt water, and caustic chemicals have the potential of altering rumen flora and enzymatic processes as well as damaging the ruminal and gastrointestinal epithelium. The toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbons appears to be related more closely to the volatility and viscosity of the product than to other factors. The more volatile straight chain and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons have a greater potential for aspiration pneumonia and may produce an anesthetic-like action if absorbed systemically. The more volatile petroleum hydrocarbons also are more irritating to skin and mucous membranes and appear to be more damaging to rumen flora. Treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon ingestion is

  20. HEAVY-OIL PRODUCTION USING EMULSION FLOODING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ... American Petroleum Institute, EOR = Enhanced Oil Recovery, GOR = Gas Oil Ratio ... concentration, 166.003 is the constant (molar mass of ... (molar mass of CaCO3),1M is the constant value. ... volume of prepared oil-in-water emulsion, that.

  1. Microbial enhanced separation of oil from a petroleum refinery sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, P J; Joseph, Ammini

    2009-01-15

    Petroleum refineries around the world have adopted different technological options to manage the solid wastes generated during the refining process and stocking of crude oil. These include physical, chemical and biological treatment methods. In this investigation bacterial mediated oil separation is effected. Two strains of Bacillus were isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils, and inoculated into slurry of sludge, and sludge-sand combinations. The bacteria could effect the separation of oil so as to form a floating scum within 48h with an efficiency of 97% at < or =5% level of sludge in the sludge-sand mixture. The activity was traced to the production of biosurfactants by bacteria.

  2. Evaluation of phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals with using Catharanthus roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Askary Mehrabadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil pollution is an inevitable worldwide phenomenon in oil producing and consuming areas that stems from human error, accidental discharge and other sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phytoremediation potential of vinca in petroleum-polluted soil. The experiment was laid out as a completely randomized design in 3 replications with different concentrations of crude oil (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 % V/W in pot planting stage. At the end of the 70-day period, soil samples were analyzed for total hydrocarbons removal. Contents of pb, zn and Ni were measured by atomic absorption from the soils and the leaves. Statistical analysis of data were performed on the basis of duncan’s test and by using of SPSS16 software. In concentrations higher than 3 % no growth was observed. The growth parameters such as stem length, stem fresh and dry matter decreased progressively from 0.5-3 % crude oil in soil. The results showed heavy metal accumulation in plant leaves and reduction of them in the soil. Heavy metals containing zinc, lead and nickel in plant increased in different concentration of crude oil. Total hydrocarbons and heavy metals containing zinc, lead and nickel reduced were in planted contaminated soil. This study showed that Periwinkle was able to grow and survive in low concentrations of oil and reduced pollutants in the soil. Based upon these results, Catharanthus roseus can be used as phytoremediator of petroleum-contaminated soil in low concentrations.

  3. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  4. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  5. Heavy oil in Saskatchewan: Building on strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Saskatchewan has reserves of 17.6 billion bbl of heavy oil located in the west-central part of the province. The first oil well was drilled in 1945 and production of heavy oil has increased gradually, reaching 79,000 bbl/d in 1992. In recent years, the production pattern has not matched trends in investment; since 1982/83, the relative proportion of heavy oil drilling has declined significantly. A study is presented which analyzes trends in heavy oil investment, production, economics, and markets, with a focus on determining the causes for lack of investment in the heavy oil sector and evaluating the opportunities and constraints for long-term sustainability of this industry. Industry background is provided, with presentation of the key resource characteristics, reserve potential, and production and investment trends. Markets both in Canada and the USA are analyzed in detail, possible future trends are suggested. The effect of development of refinery capacity on heavy oil developments is examined. The logistics of shipping heavy oil to markets are detailed. The economics of Saskatchewan heavy oil production are established, taking into account all relevant cost components including taxes, royalties, and netbacks to producers. Issues of relevance affecting the heavy oil industry are discussed, including the need for environmental safeguards. 25 figs., 24 tabs

  6. Petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, S.

    2008-01-01

    While petroleum has become an indispensable product in our everyday life, it is more and more question of an oil shortage. This book makes a status of the real situation. Starting from the industrial revolution and the history of oil exploitation, it explains the main present day stakes: the depletion of reserves, the environmental aspects and the search for alternative energy solutions. (J.S.)

  7. Tolerance of Four Tropical Tree Species to Heavy Petroleum Contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Hernandez, I.; Ochoa-Gaona, S.; Schroeder, R.H.A.; Rivera-Cruz, M.C.; Geissen, V.

    2013-01-01

    Four species of trees were selected to evaluate the tolerance to heavy crude oil contamination by means of a tolerance index integrating germination, height, biomass and survival as variables. Fresh seeds to Cedrela odorata (tropical cedar), Haematoxylum campechianum (tinto bush), Swietenia

  8. Oil Spill Related Heavy Metal: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Dasuki Mustafa; Hafizan Juahir; Kamaruzzaman Yunus; Mohammad Azizi Amran; Che Noraini Che Hasnam; Fazureen Azaman; Ismail Zainal Abidin; Syahril Hirman Azmee; Nur Hishaam Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Oil spill occurs every day worldwide and oil contamination is a significant contributor for the higher levels of heavy metals in the environment. This study is purposely to summarize the heavy metals which significant to major oil spill incidents around the world and effects of toxic metals to human health. The study performed a comprehensive review of relevant scientific journal articles and government documents concerning heavy metals contamination and oil spills. Overall, the heavy metals most frequently been detected in oil spill related study where Pb>Ni>V>Zn>Cd and caused many effects to human health especially cancer. In conclusion, the comparison of heavy metal level between the post - spill and baseline levels must be done, and implementation of continuous monitoring of heavy metal. In addition, the result based on the strategies must be transparent to public in order to maintaining human health. (author)

  9. The future for heavy crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsnell, P.

    1995-01-01

    The expectation, still held in 1993, that the light oil-heavy crude oil differential would go on increasing in favour of light oil has not been fulfilled. Current perceptions are that heavy oil will continue to be relatively strong and there is no inevitable upward trend in light-heavy crude differentials. Non-OPEC production has grown significantly lighter overall in recent years and is likely to continue so for several more years. This is due to expanded light oil production in the North Sea, Latin America and the Far East, and contractions in heavy oil production in Russia and the USA. OPEC production has also become lighter with, in particular, an expansion in light oil and contraction in heavy grades from Saudi Arabia. At the same time, the nature of the demand from refineries has changed with the introduction of new units designed to process the residium from heavy oil distillation. Thus the supply of light oil has expanded while demand for it has contracted with the reverse being true for heavy oil. (2 figures, 1 table) (UK)

  10. Treatment of petroleum industry oil sludge by Rhodotorula sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shailubhai, K.; Rao, N.N.; Modi, V.V.

    1984-06-01

    A Rhodotorula sp., isolated from soil, which showed a versatile capacity to degrade various aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, was used to treat oil sludge. As a result of treatment, there was significant decrease in BOD, COD and contents of various petroleum fractions. The susceptibility to degradation was in the following order: saturate fraction >aromatic fraction> asphaltic fraction.

  11. Radioactivity concentration and heavy metal content in fuel oil and oil-ashes in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Abril, J.M.; Greaves, E.D.

    2004-01-01

    During the last years an intensive national program was developed to determine the environmental radioactivity levels in Venezuela. Gamma dose and the radon concentrations indoors, in drinking water, in caves and in artificial cavities including the effect of radon transported to the surface with the earth gas have been studied. To continue this project the oil and other natural energy resource should be considered. It is expected that the environmental radiation level is modified in regions where the oil industrial activity is more aggressive such as in the Zulia State and the Faja Petrolifera del Orinoco, (Central Region). In these regions Venezuela is producing 1.750 thousand barrels of oil from the near-to-the- surface or deep oil drilling. Petroleum constitutes an important source of energy and as the majority of natural source contains radionuclides and their disintegration products, being U, Ra, Pb, Bi, Po and K the most often encountered. The combustion of petroleum concentrate in the ashes those radioelements, and later enter the environment by different ways producing adverse effects on the quality of man life. The concentration of radioelements varies greatly between oil fields, then we still requiring local survey studies in this area. Moreover due to the recent national interest in recycling processes, it becomes important to take precaution in the selection of materials that may contain by-products of industrial origin, including oil. In fact the oil ashes, oil slurry and other mining by-products are thought to be employable in the building industry. The concentration of radioactivity in the ash from thermoelectric power plants that use petroleum as a primary energy source was determined. The analysis include the two major thermoelectric power plants in Venezuela, Ricardo Zuluaga on the northern sea side of Caracas and Planta Centro on the littoral of Carabobo State. The study cover different samples: fuel oil No 6, ashes, heavy and medium petroleum

  12. Heavy Oil Recovery Ohmsett Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    U.S. The first phase of separation is to refloat the oil for physical collection using a conveyor belt or rope mop oil skimmer. The open discharge is...inverted cone-shroud installed in the Frac tank for physical collection using a conveyor belt or rope mop oil skimmer. Heavy Oil Recovery Ohmsett Test...develop and test viable designs for systems which can detect and recover oil from subsurface environments. This is the second major report within this

  13. Global market trade policy analysis for petroleum oils and oils obtained from bituminous minerals, crude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri, F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on surveying the custom tariffs imposed on the world export market of Petroleum Oils and Oils Obtained from Bituminous Minerals, Crude. We obtained the data according to the most updated available data provided online by UNCTAD and World Bank. The results indicate that none of the 142 countries in the world market of this product have imposed non-tariff trade barriers on the import of Petroleum Oils and Oils Obtained from Bituminous Minerals, Crude. The developed countries and the countries with transition economies are the main world import partners. European Union, United States, China, Japan, South Korea, Canada, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, South Africa, Australia, Turkey, Brazil, Sweden and Belarus are the examples and have imposed low custom tariffs on Petroleum Oils and Oils Obtained from Bituminous Minerals, Crude.

  14. Assessment of soil pollution based on total petroleum hydrocarbons and individual oil substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, J; Ibáñez, R; Lijzen, J P A; Irabien, Á

    2013-11-30

    Different oil products like gasoline, diesel or heavy oils can cause soil contamination. The assessment of soils exposed to oil products can be conducted through the comparison between a measured concentration and an intervention value (IV). Several national policies include the IV based on the so called total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) measure. However, the TPH assessment does not indicate the individual substances that may produce contamination. The soil quality assessment can be improved by including common hazardous compounds as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aromatic volatile hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). This study, focused on 62 samples collected from different sites throughout The Netherlands, evaluates TPH, PAH and BTEX concentrations in soils. Several indices of pollution are defined for the assessment of individual variables (TPH, PAH, B, T, E, and X) and multivariables (MV, BTEX), allowing us to group the pollutants and simplify the methodology. TPH and PAH concentrations above the IV are mainly found in medium and heavy oil products such as diesel and heavy oil. On the other hand, unacceptable BTEX concentrations are reached in soils contaminated with gasoline and kerosene. The TPH assessment suggests the need for further action to include lighter products. The application of multivariable indices allows us to include these products in the soil quality assessment without changing the IV for TPH. This work provides useful information about the soil quality assessment methodology of oil products in soils, focussing the analysis into the substances that mainly cause the risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Horizontal well impact on heavy oil supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, B.; Bielecki, J.; Hu, J.; Wall, B.; Drummond, K.

    1993-01-01

    Horizontal wells can take advantage of gravity drainage mechanisms, which can be important in conventional heavy oil and bitumen recovery. Horizontal drilling will impact on the development of established conventional heavy oil pools by infill drilling and application of enhanced recovery techniques. There will also be an impact on the development of extensions to established and newly discovered heavy oil pools, as well as a major impact on development of bitumen resources. To assess the impact of horizontal drilling on heavy oil supply, high-impact and low-impact scenarios were evaluated under specified oil-price assumptions for four heavy oil areas in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Horizontal well potential for infill drilling, waterflood projects, and thermal projects was assessed and estimates were made of such developments as reserves additions and heavy oil development wells under the two scenarios. In the low case, projected supply of conventional heavy oil and bitumen stabilizes at a level in the 90,000-94,000 m 3 /d after 1994. In the high case, overall supply continuously grows from 80,000 m 3 /d in 1992 to 140,000 m 3 /d in 2002. Through application of horizontal drilling, reserves additions in western Canada could be improved by ca 100 million m 3 by 2002. 14 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Petroleum Diesel Fuel and Linseed Oil Mixtures as Engine Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, V. A.; Kamaltdinov, V. G.; Savastenko, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The actual problem is the use of alternative biofuels in automotive diesel engines. Insufficiently studied are the indicators of toxicity of exhaust gases of these engines operating on biofuel. The aim of the study is to identify indicators of the toxicity of exhaust gases when using of petroleum diesel fuel and linseed oil mixtures as a fuel for automotive diesel engines. Physical and chemical properties of linseed oil and its mixtures with petroleum diesel fuel are considered. Experimental researches of D-245.12C diesel are carried out on mixtures of diesel fuel and corn oil with a different composition. An opportunity of exhaust toxicity indexes improvement using these mixtures as a fuel for automobiles engine is shown.

  17. Toxicity of oils and petroleum hydrocarbons to estuarine crustaceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatem, H.E. (Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS); Cox, B.A.; Anderson, J.W.

    1978-04-01

    Bioassay experiments with various life stages of three estuarine shrimp and soluble petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) revealed residual Bunker C oil and refined No. 2 fuel oil to be more toxic than two crude oils tested. Larvae of Palaemonetes pugio were slightly more sensitive to the PH than adults, while young penaeid shrimp were shown to be more resistant than older, larger individuals. Shrimp exposed to PH in conjunction with temperature and salinity changes were more susceptible to the PH. Some common aromatic and diaromatic PH, including three naphthalene compounds, were utilized in bioassays. Naphthalenes were highly toxic. The toxicity of petroleum products is closely related to aromatic hydrocarbon content, especially the naphthalenes and related hydrocarbons.

  18. How equity markets view heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janisch, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    A review of heavy oil economics was presented in this power point presentation with particular focus on investor motivation, the importance of heavy oil, and an outlook on commodity price for oil and natural gas. Heavy oil from oil sands is playing a major role on the Canadian domestic production front as well as globally. Almost all senior Canadian producers have a major heavy oil project in the works. Oil prices are forecasted to remain strong, but a more bullish outlook is expected for natural gas prices for both the short and long term. Natural gas drilling has increased, but the number of natural gas wells as a percentage of total wells has decreased. Recent Canadian drilling activity has placed more emphasis on crude oil production which has contributed to the lower overall natural gas drilling success rate. It was shown that infrastructure issues regarding tankers, refining capacity (at or near capacity) will be the major factor affecting the availability of crude products to market. It was also shown that heavy oil differentials have increased substantially, which could be a potential issue if oil prices begin to weaken. 1 tab., 12 figs

  19. Maximizing heavy oil value while minimizing environmental impact with HTL upgrading of heavy to light oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshka, E. [Ivanhoe Energy Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described Ivanhoe Energy Inc.'s proprietary HTL upgrading technology which was designed to process heavy oil in the field to cost effectively produce an upgraded synthetic oil that meets pipeline requirements. Steam and electricity are generated from the energy produced during the process. HTL improves the economics of heavy oil production by reducing the need for natural gas and diluent, and by capturing most of the heavy to light oil price differential. Integrated HTL heavy oil production also provides many environmental benefits regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The HTL upgrading process is ready for full scale application. tabs., figs.

  20. Modular-block complex on preparation and processing of oil slurry, spilled and raw petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The use of non-serial small petroleum equipment for development of remote and low output petroleum deposit, collection and processing of spilled petroleum is urgent issue. Joint-stock company Montazhengineering developed and mastered production of small modular-block complexes for preparation and processing of petroleum. The complex can include the following modules: preparation of raw petroleum for getting commodity petroleum; petroleum processing installation for getting gas, diesel fuel and black oil; installation for refining of nafta; installation for cleaning petroleum products from mercaptans; installation for getting basic oil; installation for getting bitumen and mastic; installation for processing of spilled petroleum and oil slurry. Each of modules can work separately and in various combinations depending on input and necessary assortment of commodity petroleum. One of urgent ecological problem in Kazakhstan petroleum-processing regions is large number barns with spilled petroleum and oil slurry. Their processing will allow to solve the ecological and economical problems. Processing of spilled petroleum and oil slurry in developed installations it's possible to get commodity petroleum and petroleum products

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum oil by certain bacterial strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, A.E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Balaeam base oil was chosen as a model oil in the present study through which some abiotic treatments were implemented aiming at attenuating its naphthenic and aromatic contents; such as the adsorptive technique and the gamma-irradiation technique . In an attempt to apply the biodegrading bacteria as oil pollutant bio indicators upon coastal water samples, a correlation between hydrocarbon concentration and the relative enumeration of the bacterial oil degraders was detected for some litter locations along the mediterranean Sea shore west and east Delta, Suez canal. and suez gulf. 24 petroleum utilizing bacterial isolates were isolated from El-Zayteia port (suez) and identified by morphological, physiological and environmental examination . the biodegradation capacity of the isolates towards the chosen model oil and its separate components was studied in comparison with the standard isolate pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further, the role of the bacterial plasmids taking part in the biodegradation process was investigated as well

  2. Petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugg, W G

    1967-07-01

    This discussion of the Canadian petroleum industry for the year 1966 includes production statistics and operating procedures, reserve estimates, exploration and development, transportation, refining, and marketing. Most sectors of the Canadian industry had an excellent year in 1966, featured by continued exploration and development successes in the Rainbow Lake-Zama Lake region of northwestern Alberta and a record value of production that exceeded $900 million for all liquid hydrocarbons. Production of crude oil and natural gas liquids exceeded one million bopd. Crude oil producers supplied 58% of the total crude oil requirements for Canadian refineries. Oil reserves increased due primarily to the application of secondary recovery and the discovery of new reserves. Total pipeline construction decreased, and there was a small increase in refinery capacity.

  3. New lube oil for stationary heavy fuel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    An extensively field-tested diesel engine lubricating oil for medium speed, heavy fuel stationary engine applications has been introduced by Caltex Petroleum, in Dallas, Texas. The new oil is similar to a product developed and marketed for marine medium speed heavy fuel propulsion and auxillary engine applications by one of its two parent companies, Chevron. Detailed are results of two field evaluations in Caterpillar 3600 series engines installed at Kimberly Clark (KCPI) and Sime Darby (SDPI), both in the Philippines. Both were one year, 7000-plus hour field evaluations of a new, 40 BN trunk piston engine oil (TPEO), identified as Caltex Delo 3400, SAE 40 engine lube oil. The oil uses the new Phenalate additive technology developed by Chevron Chemical Company`s Oronite Additives Division. This technology is designed to improve engine cleanliness in regard to soft black sludge and piston deposits. The focus of the field evaluations was the performance of the lubricating oil. During controlled tests at Sime Darby, the most noticeable improvement over another technology was in the control of sludge deposits. This improvement was seen in all areas where black sludge forms, such as the rocker cover, crankcase cover and valve assemblies. 4 figs.

  4. 15 CFR 754.3 - Petroleum products not including crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Petroleum products not including crude... SUPPLY CONTROLS § 754.3 Petroleum products not including crude oil. (a) License requirement. As indicated... required to all destinations, including Canada, for the export of petroleum products, excluding crude oil...

  5. Stabilization of Bio-Oil Fractions for Insertion into Petroleum Refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Wright, Mark [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Resasco, Daniel [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Crossley, Steven [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-28

    This project is part of a collaboration effort between Iowa State University (ISU), University of Oklahoma (OK) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The purpose of this project is to stabilize bio-oil fractions and improve their suitability for insertion into petroleum refineries. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass is a complex mixture of unstable organic compounds. These organic compounds react under standard room conditions resulting in increases in bio-oil viscosity and water content – both detrimental for bio-oil storage and transportation. This study employed fractionation and upgrading systems to improve the stability of bio-oil. The fractionation system consists of a series of condensers, and electrostatic precipitators designed to separate bio-oil into five fractions: soluble carbohydrates (SF1&2), clean phenolic oligomers (CPO) and middle fraction (SF3&4), light oxygenates (SF5). A two-stage upgrading process was designed to process bio-oil stage fractions into stable products that can be inserted into a refinery. In the upgrading system, heavy and middle bio-oil fractions were upgraded into stable oil via cracking and subsequent hydrodeoxygenation. The light oxygenate fraction was steam reformed to provide a portion of requisite hydrogen for hydroprocessing. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking employed hydrogen from natural gas, fuel gas and light oxygenates reforming. The finished products from this study consist of gasoline- and diesel-blend stock fuels.

  6. Heavy metal extraction from produced water in the petroleum industry utilizing vegetal oil derivatives as the extractant; Extracao de metais pesados a partir de aguas produzidas na industria do petroleo utilizando derivados de oleo vegetal como extratante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Dulcineia de Castro [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Goias (CEFET/GO), Goiania (Brazil). Coordenacao de Mineracao], e-mail: dcs@cefetgo.br, e-mail: dcs@eq.ufrn.br; Paulo, Joao Bosco de Araujo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica], e-mail: jbosco@eq.ufrn.br; Lima, Raquel Franco de Souza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Geologia], e-mail: raquel@geologia.ufrn.br; Brandao, Paulo Roberto Gomes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia], e-mail: pbrandao@demin.ufmg.br; Fernandes Junior, Wilaci Eutropio [PETROBRAS, RN/CE (Brazil). Unidade de Negocio de Exploracao e Producao do Rio Grande do Norte e Ceara. Gerencia de Desenvolvimento da Producao], e-mail: wilaci@petrobras.com.br

    2007-12-15

    It is well known today that, although being a renewable resource, potable water could also be finite. In the environmental context, very often due to operational costs, the development of new water recycling techniques become significant when faced with the simple adaptation of effluent treatment before final disposal. Produced water comes from exploration operations and/or the production of oil and gas and is generally treated. Following the treatment, part of the produced water is recycled in secondary re-injection operations or steam generation. The remainder, which is the biggest amount, is expelled into the sea through underwater outlets. Millions of liters of water are expelled per day, containing heavy metals such as lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) in low concentrations. Some of this volume could be recycled for use in the irrigation of oleaginous cultures after this water has been given a suitable post-treatment. This treatment being specified in agreement with Class 3, of CONAMA Resolution No 357 (Brazil, 2005), which establishes the contents as <0,033 mg/L for Pb, <0,01 mg/L for Cd and <0,025 mg/L for Ni. Liquid-liquid extraction is a well known technology for the recovery of metals in aqueous mediums. This work studies the extraction of Pb, Cd, and Ni from a synthetic solution, using QAV solvent (aviation kerosene); and vegetal oil derivatives as the extractant. It is well known that vegetal oil derivatives have a strong complexation power on metals. A bench test basic investigation was made with the objective of studying the selectivity of coconut oil derivatives in the extraction of metals from synthetic solutions. The determination of the heavy metal concentrations in a complex matrix was made by using the atomic absorption spectrometry technique (AAS). The results of the preliminary experiments were promising. (author)

  7. Depletion of petroleum reserves and oil price trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusiaux, D.; Bauquis, P.R.

    2007-11-01

    This document is the report of the 'Petroleum' working group from the French Academy of Technology, coordinated by the authors in the framework of the Energy and Climate Change Commission chaired by Gilbert Ruelle. Firstly, it present a synthesis of the different points of view about reserves and the peak of world oil production (optimists, pessimists and official organizations). Secondly, it analyzes the mechanisms of oil price formation focusing on the long term without addressing the question of short term market behaviour. The last section is devoted to possible scenarios of the evolution of production profiles and prices in the medium and long term. (authors)

  8. Physicochemical determinations of petroleum, heavy fuel derivative and combustion nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias Bullain, Jorge; Padron Rodriguez, M.; Perez Barcala, B.; Lopez Guerra, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the investigation, a crude from Cuban Northern Heavy Oil Belt and its fuel oil fraction was characterized by chemical and physical techniques. Subsequent to the characterization of the derivative, MSI gas analyzer was performed, to identify and quantify concentrations of chemical species, in correspondence with EPA (2007) for external sources. Total suspended particles collected in filter holder were identified using the gravimetric method (ISO 9096). With the intention of knowing the magnitude of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons reported in literature were chosen the higher and lower molecular mass and measured on the basis of its polar covalent radii. Total aromatic hydrocarbons were identified using activated charcoal with subsequent elution with nhexane for analysis by ultraviolet spectroscopy in a Genesys 10 UV spectrophotometer. Environmental pollution control in the oil sector, is evaluated in three states. The particles in the states mentioned above, whose dimensions are between (1-100) x10-9 meters are called nanoparticles. Nanotechnology currently offers firm steps in the development of different nanoparticles, which are applied directly to the mineralogical industry. Contributions stand out sharply operations: exploration, drilling and refining oil. (Author)

  9. The petroleum challenge. Present day questions about oil and gas; Le defi petrolier. Questions actuelles du petrole et du gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussena, S.; Locatelli, C.; Pauwels, J.P.; Swartenbroekx, C

    2006-04-15

    Will the 21. century be the petroleum challenge century? The petroleum problem is no longer the affair of experts and journalists, it challenges also governments and consumers in pressing terms. If there is today a petroleum problem, there is no oil or gas shortage for the moment. The cumulated oil and gas reserves would allow to face the demand of the century, with the condition that investments in exploration, field development, production, and back-end of oil and gas industries will be done in time. This book, written by specialists of energy economics and geopolitics shows up some of the key questions of our energy future. In particular, it invites us to never forget the basic heavy trends of the hydrocarbons sector in order to never be trapped by superficial extrapolations of short term phenomena. Content: heavy trend of oil prices at the 2020 prospects, natural gas take over?; oil and gas geopolitics: enough of hydrocarbons for the 21. century; Russia and Caspian sea oil and gas weight; China: a new strategic actor of the energy scene; influence of 'futures' market, of speculation, and of stocks on hydrocarbon prices; which future for LNG?; natural gas in the USA: towards a new foreign dependence. (J.S.)

  10. Canadian operators boost heavy oil production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdue, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent technological advances in slurry pipelining, horizontal wells, and thermal recovery techniques have made recovery of Canadian heavy oil resources more economical. In addition, reduced government royalties have made investment in these difficult reservoirs more attractive. As a result, activity has increased in heavy-oil fields in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This paper review the various oil sand recovery projects under development in the area and the current government policies which are helping to develop them. The paper also provides brief descriptions of the equipment and technologies that have allowed a reduced cost in the development. Items discussed include surface mining techniques, horizontal drilling, reservoir engineering techniques, separation processes, and thermal recovery

  11. Subsurface ecosystems. Oil triggered life. Opportunities for the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Kraan, G.M.

    2010-10-05

    As it is getting more difficult to retrieve oil from the subsurface, there is a renewed interest from the petroleum industry regarding microbial processes in oil-water systems, like oil reservoirs and their associated refineries. Oil fields are specific ecosystems, they are oxygen depleted, contain a variety of hydrocarbons and often have elevated temperatures and pressures. Through human exploitation, active changes in oil field ecosystems are induced. An example is seawater injection to displace oil. Seawater injection causes a decrease in temperature and induces the growth of sulphate reducing bacteria due to the introduction of sulphate and thereby as a consequence the production of harmful H2S. The current idea is that microorganisms detected in, for example, production water from an oil well, hold additional information on the oil field itself and the processes that are occurring in this oil field during exploitation of the field, so-called 'Biomonitoring'. Through the application of 'smart well' technology, viz. clever exploitation of the oil field, more oil can be retrieved from the field. This however requires new information sources from the field itself. Biotechnology might offer an additional information source. Also it is expected that growth of microorganisms in oil field can plug so called 'thief zones' in oil fields, which forces injected water to take an alternative route and thereby displacing more of the oil. This process however has first to be understood on the pore level. This thesis investigates the concept of 'biomonitoring'. To this purpose the microbial community of water and core samples taken from various oil fields, their separation facilities, and other subsurface environments have been investigated with the use of various molecular techniques like denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library construction of 16S rRNA gene fragments. The presence of several species can be

  12. Proceedings of the Canadian Heavy Oil Association's annual business conference : out of the chute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for advanced technology experts in the upstream petroleum industry and heavy oil industry to exchange information about emerging technologies for resource recovery, refining, markets, trade and logistics. It was divided into 4 sessions entitled: (1) natural gas and upgrading alternatives, (2) project management issues, (3) project updates, and (4) business and markets. The presentations outlined the use of fuel substitutions and the implications for upgrading, controlling the capital costs of oil sand projects and construction issues facing heavy oil. Trends and factors affecting the petroleum industry in Canada were discussed with particular reference to the Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands and the need for a transportation corridor to bring products to southern markets. The conference featured 12 presentations, of which 6 were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  13. Bioremediation: is it the solution to reclamation of heavy oil contaminated soils in the Canadian climate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.; Nicholson, P.; Varga, M.; Boadi, D.; Yang, A.

    1997-01-01

    The issue of bioremediation of heavy oil contaminated soils in cold climates was discussed. No model of the bioremediation system for cold climates exists. Environmental groups use three environmental concepts as the basis to evaluate petroleum activities: (1) cradle to grave responsibility, (2) the precautionary principle, and (3) sustainable development. The reclamation of an abandoned petroleum production facility must meet stringent standards. Most sites are contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons, brine and other chemicals that have been used at the location. Bioremediation, either in-situ or ex-situ, is one of the lowest cost remediation techniques available and has been used extensively by the downstream petroleum industry in warm climates. However, there are many unresolved issues with the use of bioremediation in cold climates, for heavy or weathered crude oil products and in areas of clay or other low permeability. Some of these unresolved issues are highlighted

  14. Residency of rhenium and osmium in a heavy crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarzio, Jenna M.; Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2018-01-01

    Rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) isotope geochemistry is an emerging tool for the study of oil formation and migration processes, and a new technology for petroleum exploration. Little is known, however, about the residency of Re and Os within asphaltene and maltene sub-fractions of crude oil. This information is crucial for understanding the 187Re-187Os radiometric clock held in petroleum systems and for interpreting geochronology for key processes such as oil formation, migration, and biodegradation. In this study, a heavy crude oil was separated into soluble (maltene, MALT) and insoluble (asphaltene, ASPH) fractions using n-heptane as the asphaltene-precipitating agent. The asphaltenes were separated sequentially into sub-fractions using two different solvent pairs (heptane-dichloromethane and acetone-toluene), and the bulk maltenes were separated into saturate, aromatic, and resin (SAR) fractions using open column chromatography. Each asphaltene and maltene sub-fraction was analyzed for Re and Os. The asphaltene sub-fractions and the bulk ASPH, MALT, and crude oil were analyzed for a suite of trace metals by ICP-MS. Our results show that Re and Os concentrations co-vary between the asphaltene sub-fractions, and that both elements are found mostly in the more polar and aromatic sub-fractions. Significant Re and Os are also present in the aromatic and resin fractions of the maltenes. However, each asphaltene and maltene sub-fraction has a distinct isotopic composition, and sub-fractions are not isochronous. This suggests that asphaltene sub-fractionation separates Re-Os complexes to the point where the isotopic integrity of the geochronometer is compromised. The mobility of individual Re and Os isotopes and the decoupling possibilities between radiogenic 187Os produced from 187Re remain elusive, but their recognition in this study is a critical first step. Re and Os correlate strongly with Mo and Cd in the asphaltene sub-fractions, suggesting that these metals occupy

  15. Impact of the Prestige oil spill on marsh soils: Relationship between heavy metal, sulfide and total petroleum hydrocarbon contents at the Villarrube and Lires marshes (Galicia, Spain); Impacto de la marea negra del Prestige en suelos de marisma: relacion entre los contenidos de metales pesados, sulfuros e hidrocarburos en las marismas de Villarrube y Lires (Galicia, Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, L.; Marcet, P.; Covelo, E.F.; Vega, F.A. [Department of Vegetable Biology and Soil Science, Vigo (Spain); Fernandez-Feal, L.; Fernandez-Feal, C. [Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de la Coruna, Ferrol (Spain)

    2004-09-15

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of the Prestige oil spill on the total petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metal contents of soils in two marshes (Lires and Villarrube, Galicia, Spain) and the relationship between their oxidation-reduction potential and the solubility of heavy metals with sulfide and sulfate contents. Soil samples were taken from polluted and unpolluted areas and their petroleum hydrocarbon contents, heavy metal contents and other chemical characteristics were measured. The soils affected by the oil spill show remarkable contents of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and V. The Lires marsh soils are more affected by fuel oil than Villarrube marsh. The effects of the contaminating agents on the soils reach distances of up to 500 m from the coastline. In the first 400 m, there are important spatial variations because the fuel oil penetrated into the soils through tidal action and not directly. The Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and V contents of polluted soils were between 50 and 200 times higher than those of their unpolluted counterparts and the background concentrations in Galician coastal sediments. In the case of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and V, their origin through the fuel oil was corroborated by the high correlation (r > 0.90) between the concentrations of these metals and the total petroleum hydrocarbon content of the polluted soils, which shows the combined addition of these metals through the fuel oil. [Spanish] Los objetivos de este trabajo fueron determinar el efecto de la marea negra del buque tanque Prestige en el contenido total de hidrocarburos y de metales pesados en suelos de dos marismas (Lires y Villarrube, Galicia, Espana) y la relacion entre el potencial de oxidacion-reduccion y la solubilidad de los metales pesados con los contenidos de sulfuros y de sulfatos. Se tomaron muestras de suelos de las zonas contaminadas y no contaminadas y se determinaron diversas caracteristicas quimicas, el contenido total de hidrocarburos y de metales pesados. Los

  16. Suggestive evidence on the origin of petroleum and oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J C

    1923-01-01

    Oil shales and coals originated in fresh water muds that contained large amounts of spores, algae, and other nonwoody vegetable material. This organic debris was partly decomposed by bacterial action but not enough to increase the percentage of fats by removal of other plant substances. By contrast, petroleum was formed by thorough decomposition of nonfatty material in salt water. The main difference in bacterial action was due to differences in the saline content of the water in which the organic material was deposited. In fresh water, the amount of decay was small, whereas in salt water it was nearly complete.

  17. A study on ultra heavy oil gasification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoguchi, Kazuhiro; Ashizawa, Masami; Taki, Masato; Ishimura, Masato; Takeno, Keiji

    2000-07-01

    Raising the thermal efficiency of a thermal power plant is an important issue from viewpoints of effective energy utilization and environmental protection. In view of raising the thermal efficiency, a gas turbine combined cycle power generation is considered to be very effective. The thermal efficiency of the latest LNG combined cycle power plant has been raised by more than 50%. On the other hand, the diversification of fuels to ensure supply stability is also an important issue, particularly in Japan where natural resources are scarce. Because of excellent handling characteristics petroleum and LNG which produces clean combustion are used in many sectors, and so the demand for such fuels is expected to grow. However, the availability of such fuels is limited, and supplies will be exhausted in the near future. The development of a highly efficient and environment-friendly gas turbine combined cycle using ultra heavy oil such as Orimulsion{trademark} (trademark of BITOR) is thus a significant step towards resolving these two issues. Chubu Electric Power Co, Inc., the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) conducted a collaboration from 1994 to 1998 with the objective of developing an ultra heavy oil integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Construction of the ultra heavy oil gasification testing facility (fuel capacity:2.4t/d) was completed in 1995, and Orimulsion{trademark} gasification tests were carried out in 1995 and 1996. In 1997, the hot dedusting facility with ceramic filter and the water scrubber used as a preprocessor of a wet desulfurization process were installed. Gasification and clean up the syngs tests were carried out on Orimulsion{trademark}, Asmulsion{trademark} (trademark of Nisseki Mitsubishi K.K.), and residue oil in 1997 and 1998. The results of the collaboration effort are described below.

  18. A fundamental research for upgrading heavy oil using syngas as hydrogen source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, D.; Yuan, M.; Sun, X.; Zhao, S. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing

    2006-07-01

    The stock of heavy oil and residue from petroleum fractions has become more important as a component in supplying demands for fuel and petrochemical feeds. Finding economical means of upgrading heavy oils is extremely important in order to ensure future fuel supply. A number of new technologies for upgrading heavy oils have been evaluated, including residual fluid catalytic cracking (RFCC), hydrogenation, thermal conversion, and solvent deasphalting. However, the commercial application of such technologies is mainly constrained by the metal and residual carbon concentrations that are present in all heavy oils. Conventional technologies used to upgrade vacuum residue (VR) result in heavy coke formation, with a consequential reduction in the life of expensive, high-performance catalysts. The hydro upgrading process can significantly remove the concentration of heteroatom such as sulfur, nitrogen, and metals in the liquid products. This paper investigated upgrading of heavy oil using syngas as an alternative hydrogen source with a dispersed catalyst. The paper discussed the experiment with reference to the feedstock and catalyst precursors; finely dispersed catalysts preparation; experimental apparatus; experimental design and procedure; and analysis. The results were presented in terms of effects of catalyst dispersion; effect of hydro-upgrading heavy oil using syngas as alternative source; and effects of different catalysts on residue hydrocracking. Last, the paper discussed the properties of the hydrocracked oil treated with syngas. The study confirmed the effectiveness of the slurry bed hydrocracking catalyst using syngas as a hydrogen source. 23 refs., 8 tabs., 16 figs.

  19. Canadian heavy oil supply and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynon, G.

    1997-01-01

    The wealth of business opportunities presented by Canada's vast heavy oil and bitumen resources in the face of declining reserves of light and medium crude were discussed. It was argued that Western Canadian producers, as a group, appear to lack the appreciation of the impacts of midstream and downstream sectors of the heavy oil business. The vertical integration of the heavy oil industry in Venezuela was cited as an example of the direction that Canadian producers should travel to achieve the control over their own destiny through ownership of the means of transportation, refining and marketing that is commensurate with their growing importance in the energy sector. The opportunities are great, but long-term success will require a sophisticated and integrated business approach. 4 figs

  20. Radiation processing studies on residual fractions of Olowi petroleum crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfo, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Residual fuel oil is an inexpensive boiler fuel that can replace diesel in some industrial boilers. The viscous waxy nature of residual fuel oil makes it very difficult to use in industries where fuel storage tanks have no heating elements to keep the fuel at temperatures at which it would easily flow. Irradiation is currently being studied as a cost effective means of cracking heavy petroleum crude oil into lighter and more valuable products. Research has shown that irradiation can replace the conventional methods of cracking petroleum with economical benefits. Gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 source was applied to the residue obtained after refining crude oil in this research study, with the intention of causing a similar cracking phenomenon. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the possibility of using gamma radiation to reduce the viscosity of residual fractions of crude oil used as residual fuel oil. This was done by exposing samples of residual fuel oil in glass jars to 9 different doses of gamma radiation, at room temperature and an elevated temperature of 60 degrees Celsius to determine and quantify the effect of radiation on residual fuel oil obtained from the Tema Oil Refinery. The pour points of the irradiated samples were not affected by radiation doses up to 200 kGy while the changes in viscosity for irradiation at room temperature were not significant. Irradiation at 60 degrees Celsius induced a small but significant increase in viscosity at 1 kGy and 200 kGy absorbed doses of irradiation. Irradiation fuels were stable in relation to viscosity, density and pour point over a period of 20 days after exposure. The flash point of irradiated samples, however, decreased by 5.26, 10.53 and 11.34% for 30, 50 and 80 kGy absorbed doses of radiation respectively. Cumulative and continuous doses gave similar results for pour point, density, viscosity and flash point measurements up to 50 kGy. Comparative cost analysis of methods used in maintaining low

  1. Heavy mineral concentration from oil sand tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chachula, F.; Erasmus, N. [Titanium Corp. Inc., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation described a unique technique to recover heavy minerals contained in the froth treatment tailings produced by oil sand mining extraction operations in Fort McMurray, Alberta. In an effort to process waste material into valuable products, Titanium Corporation is developing technology to recover heavy minerals, primarily zircon, and a portion of bitumen contained in the final stage of bitumen processing. The process technology is being developed to apply to all mined oil sands operations in the Fort McMurray region. In 2004, Titanium Corporation commissioned a pilot research facility at the Saskatchewan Research Council to test dry oil sands tailings. In 2005, a bulk sampling pilot plant was connected to the fresh oil sands tailings pipeline on-site in Fort McMurray, where washed sands containing heavy minerals were processed at a pilot facility. The mineral content in both deposited tailings and fresh pipeline tailings was assessed. Analysis of fresh tailings on a daily basis identified a constant proportion of zircon and higher levels of associated bitumen compared with the material in the deposited tailings. The process flow sheet design was then modified to remove bitumen from the heavy minerals and concentrate the minerals. A newly modified flotation process was shown to be a viable processing route to recover the heavy minerals from froth treatment tailings. 8 refs., 9 tabs., 12 figs.

  2. Upgrading of heavy crude oil with supported and unsupported transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nares, H.R.; Schacht-Hernandez, P.; Cabrera-Reyes, M.C.; Ramirez-Garnica, M.; Cazarez-Candia, O. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Atepehuacan (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Heavy crude oil presents many problems such as difficulty in transportation, low processing capacity in refineries, and low mobility through the reservoir due to high viscosity which affects the index of productivity of the wells. Because of these challenges, it is necessary to enhance heavy crude oil, both aboveground and underground. The effects of several metallic oxides used to upgrade heavy crude oil properties were examined in order to increase the mobility of reservoir oil by reducing viscosity and improving the quality of the oil. This can be accomplished by reducing the asphaltene and sulfur contents and increasing the American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity using transition metal supported in alumina and unsupported from transition metals derived from either acetylacetonate or alkylhexanoate in liquid phase homogeneously mixed with heavy crude oil as well as metal transition supported in alumina. KU-H heavy crude oil from the Golf of Mexico was studied. The results were obtained by Simulated Distillation and True Boiling Point (TBP). It was concluded that the use of crude oil thermal hydrocracking allowed the API gravity to increase and considerably reduce the viscosity. As a result, the productivity index in wells was increased. However there is a high formation of coke that could damage the conductivity of the rock and then reduce the potential of oil recovery. 27 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  3. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunev, A G; Parkhomchuk, E V; Lysikov, A I; Parunin, P D; Semeikina, V S; Parmon, V N

    2015-01-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references

  4. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  5. Comparative study on sulphur reduction from heavy petroleum - Solvent extraction and microwave irradiation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Abdullahi Dyadya; Isah, Abubakar Garba; Umaru, Musa; Ahmed, Shehu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Technology, P.M.B 65, Minna (Nigeria); Abdullahi, Yababa Nma [National Petroleum Investment Management Services (Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation), Lagos (Nigeria)

    2012-07-01

    Sulphur- containing compounds in heavy crude oils are undesirable in refining process as they affect the quality of the final product, cause catalyst poisoning and deactivation in catalytic converters as well as causing corrosion problems in oil pipelines, pumps and refining equipment aside environmental pollution from their combustion and high processing cost. Sulphur reduction has being studied using microwave irradiation set at 300W for 10 and 15minutes and oxidative- solvent extraction method using n- heptane and methanol by 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 crude- solvent ratios after being oxidized with hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 oxidants. Percentage sulphur removal with n- heptane solvent by 1:1 and 1:2 are 81.73 and 85.47%; but extraction using methanol by different observed ratios gave less sulphur reduction. Indeed when microwave irradiated at 300W for 10 and 15minutes, 53.68 and 78.45% reduction were achieved. This indicates that microwave irradiation had caused oxidation by air in the oven cavity and results to formation of alkyl radicals and sulphoxide from sulphur compound in the petroleum. The prevailing sulphur found in the crude going by FT-IR results is sulphides which oxidized to sulphoxide or sulphones. It is clear that sulphur extraction with heptane is more efficient than microwave irradiation but economically due to demands for solvent and its industrial usage microwave irradiation can serve as alternative substitute for sulphur reduction in petroleum. Sulphur reduction by microwave radiation should be up- scaled from laboratory to a pilot plant without involving extraction column in the refining.

  6. Clean coal and heavy oil technologies for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, D.M. [GE Industrial & Power Systems, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Global power generation markets have shown a steady penetration of GT/CC technology into oil and gas fired applications as the technology has matured. The lower cost, improved reliability and efficiency advantages of combined cycles can now be used to improve the cost of electricity and environmental acceptance of poor quality fuels such as coal, heavy oil, petroleum coke and waste products. Four different technologies have been proposed, including slagging combustors, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). Details of the technology for the three experimental technologies can be found in the appendix. IGCC is now a commercial technology. In the global marketplace, this shift is being demonstrated using various gasification technologies to produce a clean fuel for the combined cycle. Early plants in the 1980s demonstrated the technical/environmental features and suitability for power generation plants. Economics, however, were disappointing until the model F GT technologies were first used commercially in 1990. The economic break-through of matching F technology gas turbines with gasification was not apparent until 1993 when a number of projects were ordered for commercial operation in the mid-1990s. GE has started 10 new projects for operation before the year 2000. These applications utilize seven different gasification technologies to meet specific application needs. Early plants are utilizing low-cost fuels, such as heavy oil or petroleum coke, to provide economics in first-of-a-kind plants. Some special funding incentives have broadened the applications to include power-only coal plants. Next generation gas turbines projected for commercial applications after the year 2000 will contribute to another step change in technology. It is expected that the initial commercialization process will provide the basis for clear technology choices on future plants.

  7. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

  8. 75 FR 11841 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Short Supply Regulations, Petroleum (Crude Oil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Short Supply Regulations, Petroleum (Crude Oil) AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security. ACTION... supporting documentation for license applications to export petroleum (crude oil) and is used by licensing...

  9. Use of Kinematic Viscosity Data for the Evaluation of the Molecular Weight of Petroleum Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, J. A.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Ortiz-Hernandez, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    A new laboratory procedure for the evaluation of the mean molecular weight (mean relative molecular mass) of petroleum oils with high accuracy is described. The density and dynamic viscosity of three commercial petroleum oils are measured at different temperatures. These experimental data are used to calculate the kinematic viscosity as a function…

  10. Geochemical characteristics of oil sands fluid petroleum coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesbitt, Jake A.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Chen, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The geochemical characteristics of fluid petroleum coke from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of northern Alberta, Canada were investigated. Continuous core samples were collected to 8 m below surface at several locations (n = 12) from three coke deposits at an active oil sands mine. Bulk elemental analyses revealed the coke composition was dominated by C (84.2 ± 2.3 wt%) and S (6.99 ± 0.26 wt%). Silicon (9210 ± 3000 mg kg"−"1), Al (5980 ± 1200 mg kg"−"1), Fe (4760 ± 1200 mg kg"−"1), and Ti (1380 ± 430 mg kg"−"1) were present in lesser amounts. Vanadium (1280 ± 120 mg kg"−"1) and Ni (230 ± 80 mg kg"−"1) exhibited the highest concentrations among potentially-hazardous minor and trace elements. Sequential extractions revealed potential for release of these metals under field-relevant conditions. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of Si and Ti oxides, organically-complexed V and hydrated Ni sulfate, and provided information about the asphaltenic carbon matrix. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the V and Ni K-edges revealed that these metals were largely hosted in porphyrins and similar organic complexes throughout coke grains. Minor differences among measured V and Ni K-edge spectra were largely attributed to slight variations in local coordination of V(IV) and Ni(II) within these organic compounds. However, linear combination fits were improved by including reference spectra for inorganic phases with octahedrally-coordinated V(III) and Ni(II). Sulfur and Fe K-edge XANES confirmed that thiophenic coordination and pyritic-ilmenitic coordination are predominant, respectively. These results provide new information on the geochemical and mineralogical composition of oil sands fluid petroleum coke and improve understanding of potential controls on associated water chemistry. - Highlights: • Oil sands fluid petroleum coke contains wide range of major, minor and

  11. Market study on the oil and petroleum industry in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The historical background of the Mexican petroleum industry is outlined and an overview is presented of the state of the Mexican economic environment. The Mexican market for oil and gas field equipment is estimated, with a focus on the oil monopoly PEMEX. The total imports of oil and gas field equipment are estimated to increase to US$280.4 million in 1992, and the most important foreign suppliers are led by the USA, which has a 72% share. Canadian exports of oil and gas field equipment have remained fairly stable during the last few years at $2.4-2.7 million. In general, prospects for Canadian suppliers to the Mexican market are best in the area of technologically sophisticated equipment. An end-user profile of PEMEX is presented, noting that it is the largest enterprise in Latin America and had $14.2 billion in sales in 1989. Equipment imported by PEMEX includes seamless steel pipe, drilling tools, gate and control valves, electric motors, processing and control equipment, steam and gas turbines, and telecommunications equipment. PEMEX activities in 1989 are reviewed, including those in the petrochemical sector, and projected activities are described. Major efforts planned by PEMEX include expansion of petrochemical production. Access to the Mexican market is discussed in terms of PEMEX purchasing policy, payment system, import requirements, the need for using a supplier agent, and use of the metric system and other standards. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Active carbon catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidetsugu; Terai, Satoshi [Technology Research Center, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 1818 Azafujimi, Togo, Mobara-shi, Chiba 297-00017 (Japan); Uchida, Masayuki [Business Planning and Exploring Department, Overseas Business Development and Marketing Division, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 2-8-1 Akanehama, Narashino-shi, Chiba 275-0024 (Japan); Cano, Jose L.; Ancheyta, Jorge [Maya Crude Treatment Project, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    The active carbon (AC) catalyst was studied by hydrocracking of Middle Eastern vacuum residue (VR) for heavy oil upgrading. It was observed that the active carbon has the affinity to heavy hydrocarbon compounds and adsorption selectivity to asphaltenes, and exhibits better ability to restrict the coke formation during the hydrocracking reaction of VR. The mesopore of active carbon was thought to play an important role for effective conversion of heavy hydrocarbon compounds into lighter fractions restricting carbon formation. The performance of the AC catalyst was examined by continuous hydrocracking by CSTR for the removal of such impurities as sulfur and heavy metals (nickel and vanadium), which are mostly concentrated in the asphaltenes. The AC catalyst was confirmed to be very effective for the removal of heavy metals from Middle Eastern VR, Maya/Istmo VR and Maya VR. The extruded AC catalysts were produced by industrial manufacturing method. The application test of the extruded AC catalyst for ebullating-bed reactor as one of the commercially applicable reactors was carried out at the ebullating-bed pilot plant for 500h. The ebullition of the extruded AC catalyst was successfully traced and confirmed by existing {gamma}-ray density meter. The extruded AC catalyst showed stable performance with less sediment formation at an equivalent conversion by conventional alumina catalyst at commercial ebullating-bed unit. The degradation of the AC catalyst at the aging test was observed to be less than that of the conventional alumina catalyst. Thus, the AC catalyst was confirmed to be effective and suitable for upgrading of heavy oil, especially such heavy oils as Maya, which contains much heavy metals.

  13. Investigation and development of heavy oil upgrading catalysts. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.K.; Lee, I.C.; Yoon, W.L.; Lee, H.T.; Chung, H.; Hwang, Y.J.; Park, S.H. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This study aimed at the domestic development of HDS catalysts which are most fundamental and wide-used in the petroleum refinery. In this year, some experimental works were conducted for developing the effective utilization technology of the novel dispersed-catalysts in the hydro-desulfurization of heavy oils, and improving the reaction performance of alumina-supported Mo-based hydro-treating catalysts conventionally used in most of refineries. First, it was experimentally proved that the dispersed catalysts of Co-Mo could be employed for the hydro-desulfurization of a heavy atmospheric residual oil excluding the catalyst deactivation. The utilization of a carbon-expanded reactor in combination with this dispersed catalyst system exhibited an enhanced reaction performance and provided an efficient way for the separation and recovery of the dispersed catalytic component from oils. Second, the tungsten-incorporated WCoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst revealed the improved catalytic performance in the various hydro-treating reactions and in the initial deactivation rates for the high pressure hydro-treatment of a heavy oil as compared with the commercial CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. This new experimental finding for the promoting role of the monomeric WO{sub 3} species in CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst may be generally applicable to the Mo-based alumina-sulfide phase, higher catalytic activity, and more extended service life. (author). 101 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve: United States energy security, oil politics, and petroleum reserves policies in the twentieth century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubouef, Bruce Andre

    The history of U.S. petroleum reserves policies in the twentieth century, including the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program, provides a case study of the economic and political aspects of national security, and shows the ways in which the American political economy influences national security. One key problem plagued federal petroleum reserve programs and proposals throughout the twentieth century. In a political economy which traditionally placed strong emphasis upon the sanctity of private property and free markets, could the government develop an emergency petroleum reserve policy despite opposition from the private sector? Previous literature on the SPR and oil-stockpiling programs has largely disregarded the historical perspective, focusing instead upon econometric models, suggesting future oil-stockpiling policy options. This study will also make conclusions about the future of governmental oil-stockpiling policies, particularly with regard to the SPR program, but it will do so informed by a systematic history of the emergency petroleum reserve impulse in the twentieth century. Through a study of the emergency petroleum reserve impulse, one can see how the American political economy of oil and energy changed over the twentieth century. As petroleum became crucial to the military and then economic security of the United States, the federal government sought to develop emergency petroleum reserves first for the military, then for the civilian economy. But while the American petroleum industry could deliver the energy "goods" to American energy consumers at a reasonable price, the companies reigned supreme in the political equation. While that was true, federal petroleum reserve programs and proposals conflicted with and were overwhelmed by the historic American tradition of individual economic and private property rights. The depletion of American petroleum reserves changed that political equation, and the ensuing energy crises of the 1970s not only

  15. Clerget 100 hp heavy-oil engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leglise, Pierre

    1931-01-01

    A complete technical description of the Clerget heavy-oil engine is presented along with the general characteristics. The general characteristics are: 9 cylinders, bore 120 mm, stroke 130 mm, four-stroke cycle engine, rated power limited to 100 hp at 1800 rpm; weight 228 kg; propeller with direct drive and air cooling. Moving parts, engine block, and lubrication are all presented.

  16. How equity markets view heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janisch, M. L. [Nesbitt Burns Research, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Factors that influence the equity market in investment decisions vis-a-vis the oil sands/heavy oil industry were reviewed. The importance of financing methods (debt, royalty trusts, common equity), liquidity of investments, absolute vs. relative performance, comparative economics vis-a-vis conventional oil producers, oil prices, operating cost drivers (technology, natural gas costs, cost/availability of diluent), transportation and refining capacity, were summarized. In the final analysis, consistent economic success on a large scale, combined with an assessment of available alternatives, were considered to be the most likely motivators for portfolio managers. As a cautionary note, it was noted that traditionally, oil and gas investors have not been known to be in the forefront to invest in research and development.

  17. How equity markets view heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janisch, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Factors that influence the equity market in investment decisions vis-a-vis the oil sands/heavy oil industry were reviewed. The importance of financing methods (debt, royalty trusts, common equity), liquidity of investments, absolute vs. relative performance, comparative economics vis-a-vis conventional oil producers, oil prices, operating cost drivers (technology, natural gas costs, cost/availability of diluent), transportation and refining capacity, were summarized. In the final analysis, consistent economic success on a large scale, combined with an assessment of available alternatives, were considered to be the most likely motivators for portfolio managers. As a cautionary note, it was noted that traditionally, oil and gas investors have not been known to be in the forefront to invest in research and development

  18. 33 CFR 155.1052 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. 155.1052 Section 155.1052....1052 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo. (a) Owners and operators of vessels that carry group V petroleum oil as a primary cargo...

  19. Research on oil recovery mechanisms in heavy oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E., Castanier, Louis M.

    2000-03-16

    The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties, (2) in-situ combustion, (3) additives to improve mobility control, (4) reservoir definition, and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx.

  20. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Biocrude Compositions Compared to Petroleum Crude and Shale Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Jacqueline M.; Billing, Justin M.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner M.

    2017-02-17

    We provide a direct and detailed comparison of the chemical composition of petroleum crude oil (from the Gulf of Mexico), shale oil, and three biocrudes (i.e., clean pine, microalgae Chlorella sp., and sewage sludge feedstocks) generated by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) reveals that HTL biocrudes are compositionally more similar to shale oil than petroleum crude oil and that only a few heteroatom classes (e.g., N1, N2, N1O1, and O1) are common to organic sediment- and biomass-derived oils. All HTL biocrudes contain a diverse range of oxygen-containing compounds when compared to either petroleum crude or shale oil. Overall, petroleum crude and shale oil are compositionally dissimilar to HTL oils, and >85% of the elemental compositions identified within the positive-ion electrospray (ESI) mass spectra of the HTL biocrudes were not present in either the petroleum crude or shale oil (>43% for negative-ion ESI). Direct comparison of the heteroatom classes that are common to both organic sedimentand biomass-derived oils shows that HTL biocrudes generally contain species with both smaller core structures and a lower degree of alkylation relative to either the petroleum crude or the shale oil. Three-dimensional plots of carbon number versus molecular double bond equivalents (with observed abundance as the third dimension) for abundant molecular classes reveal the specific relationship of the composition of HTL biocrudes to petroleum and shale oils to inform the possible incorporation of these oils into refinery operations as a partial amendment to conventional petroleum feeds.

  1. Crude petroleum-oil biodegradation efficiency of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from a petroleum-oil contaminated soil from North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kishore; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2007-05-01

    The efficiency of Bacillus subtilis DM-04 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa M and NM strains isolated from a petroleum contaminated soil sample from North-East India was compared for the biodegradation of crude petroleum-oil hydrocarbons in soil and shake flask study. These bacterial strains could utilize crude petroleum-oil hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and energy. Bioaugmentation of TPH contaminated microcosm with P. aeruginosa M and NM consortia and B. subtilis strain showed a significant reduction of TPH levels in treated soil as compared to control soil at the end of experiment (120 d). P. aeruginosa strains were more efficient than B. subtilis strain in reducing the TPH content from the medium. The plate count technique indicated expressive growth and biosurfactant production by exogenously seeded bacteria in crude petroleum-oil rich soil. The results showed that B. subtilis DM-04 and P. aeruginosa M and NM strains could be effective for in situ bioremediation.

  2. Value of NMR logging for heavy oil characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.; Chen, J.; Georgi, D. [Baker Hughes, Calgary, AB (Canada); Sun, B. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Non-conventional, heavy oil fields are becoming increasingly important to the security of energy supplies and are becoming economically profitable to produce. Heavy oil reservoirs are difficult to evaluate since they are typically shallow and the connate waters are very fresh. Other heavy oil reservoirs are oil-wet where the resistivities are not indicative of saturation. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detects molecular level interactions. As such, it responds distinctively to different hydrocarbon molecules, thereby opening a new avenue for constituent analysis. This feature makes NMR a more powerful technique than bulk oil density or viscosity measurements for characterizing oils, and is the basis for detecting gas in heavy oil fields. NMR logging, which measures fluid in pore space directly, is capable of separating oil from water. It is possible to discern movable from bound water by analyzing NMR logs. The oil viscosity can be also quantified from NMR logs, NMR relaxation time and diffusivity estimates. The unique challenges for heavy oil reservoir characterization for the NMR technique were discussed with reference to the extra-fast decay of the NMR signal in response to extra-heavy oil/tars, and the lack of sensitivity in measuring very slow diffusion of heavy oil molecules. This paper presented various methods for analyzing heavy oil reservoirs in different viscosity ranges. Heavy oil fields in Venezuela, Kazakhstan, Canada, Alaska and the Middle East were analyzed using different data interpretation approaches based on the reservoir formation characteristics and the heavy oil type. NMR direct fluid typing was adequate for clean sands and carbonate reservoirs while integrated approaches were used to interpret extra heavy oils and tars. It was concluded that NMR logs can provide quantitative measures for heavy oil saturation, identify sweet spots or tar streaks, and quantify heavy oil viscosity within reasonable accuracy. 14 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Pipeline technology. Petroleum oil - long-distance pipelines. Pipelinetechnik. Mineraloelfernleitungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krass, W; Kittel, A; Uhde, A

    1979-01-01

    All questions and concerns of pipeline technique are dealt with in detail. Some chapters can be applied for petroleum pipelines only or partly, for example the importance of petroleum pipelines, projecting, calculation, and operation. The sections of pipes and formings, laying, rights of way, and corrosion protection, accessories and remote effect technique, however, are of general interest, for example also for gas pipelines. In the chapter on working material, a very good summary of today's pipe working material including the thermomechanically treated steels is given. Besides methods of improving the toughness, the problems of the corrosion caused by strain cracking and the ways of avoiding it are pointed out. The pipe producing methods and, in the end of the chapter, the tests in the factory are explained. The section of laying deals with the laying methods being applied for years in pipeline construction, a big part referring to welding methods and tests. Active and passive corrosion protection are explained with all details. In addition to the solidity calculation presented with special regard to concerns of petroleum pipelines, theoretical fundaments and calculation methods for pressure are dealt with. Beside general questions of pumps, accessories, and drives, there is a section dealing with measurement and control techniques. Furthermore, remote effect and transmission techniques and news systems are explained in detail. Here, problems are referred to which are applicable not only to the operation of mineral oil pipelines. The book is completed by indications as to pipeline operation emphasizing general operation control, maintenance, repair methods and damage and their elimination. The last chapter contains a collection of the legal fundaments and the technical rules.

  4. Workshop Papers: Directions and Marketing of Synthetic Crude Oil and Heavy Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This workshop was organized by the National Centre for Upgrading Technology in an effort to bring together experts from the various sectors of the petroleum industry to outline their views of the directions that the synthetic crude oil market will pursue over the next decade and into the 21. century. The motivation for the Workshop came from the many announcements during 1996 and 1997 by several Canadian oil companies about plans to initiate or expand their heavy oil and synthetic crude production. During the same period, at least one US refiner also announced plans to revamp an existing refinery to allow it to process Canadian heavy oil and synthetic crude. The workshop was organized to review these plans and to discuss such questions as (1) Would the selected technologies be the familiar carbon rejection or hydrogen addition methods, or would there be radical advanced technologies? (2) Would the products be fully or partially upgraded? (3) How would they be processed in the refinery? (4) Would there be a market? This collection of papers or viewgraphs comprise all the formal presentations given at the workshop. The final section also contains the edited notes recorded during the question and answer periods. refs., tabs., figs

  5. Heavy Silicone Oil and Intraocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Morescalchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, many advances have been made in vitrectomy instrumentation, surgical techniques, and the use of different tamponade agents. These agents serve close retinal breaks, confine eventual retinal redetachment, and prevent proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR. Long-acting gases and silicone oil are effective internal tamponade agents; however, because their specific gravity is lower than that of the vitreous fluid, they may provide adequate support for the superior retina but lack efficacy for the inferior retina, especially when the fill is subtotal. Thus, a specific role may exist for an internal tamponade agent with a higher specific gravity, such as heavy silicone oils (HSOs, Densiron 68, Oxane HD, HWS 45-300, HWS 46-3000, and HeavySil. Some clinical evidence seems to presume that heavy tamponades are more prone to intraocular inflammation than standard silicone if they remain in the eye for several months. In this review, we discuss the fundamental clinical and biochemical/molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response after the use of heavy tamponade: toxicity due to impurities or instability of the agent, direct toxicity and immunogenicity, oil emulsification, and mechanical injury due to gravity. The physical and chemical properties of various HSOs and their efficacy and safety profiles are also described.

  6. Effects of petroleum oil and soybean oil in adjuvants for postemergence herbicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Soybean oil is an abundant and renewable resource through annual crop production. The replacement of paraffin oil with soybean oil in agricultural adjuvants would create an additional market for surplus soybeans and help alleviate dependence on non-renewable petroleum oil. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to compare effects of a petroleum oil-emulsifier blend (POC) and a soybean oil-emulsifier blend (SBOC) as adjuvants for postemergence herbicides. In field experiments, little difference was observed between POC and SBOC in the ability to enhance control of velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.) with 0.6 or 1.1 kg/ha bentazon [3-(1-methylethyl)-(1H)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide]. Control of giant foxtail (Setaria faberi Herrm.) with 0.1 kg/ha sethoxydim {2-[1-(ethoxyimino)butyl]-5-[2-(ethylthio)propyl]-3-hydroxy-2-cyclohexen-1-one} was enhanced more by POC than by SBOC. The effects of adjuvants and relative humidity (RH) on absorption, translocation, and metabolism of the methyl ester of 14 C-haloxyfop {2-[4-[[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy]phenoxy]propanoic acid} in corn (Zea mays L.) were investigated. Addition of 1.0% (v/v) POC to the treatment solution resulted in greater foliar absorption and translocation of 14 C than addition of 1.0% (v/v) SBOC

  7. Well integrity in heavy oil wells : challenges and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoutaou, S.; Osman, T.M.; Mjthab, M. [Schlumberger (Syrian Arab Republic); Succar, N. [Oudeh Petroleum, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2010-07-01

    The Oudeh Petroleum Company (OPC) has used cyclic steam (the Huff and Puff technique) since 2006 to produce heavy oil from its OPC field that has an estimated 79.49 to 95.39 million cubic meters of oil contained in the Jurassic and Triassic reservoirs of the Butmah and Kurachine formations in Syria. Accumulations of oil and gas are present in the main Oudeh structure at depths between 1300 and 2250 meters. The Huff and Puff technique involves 3 phases. In the first phase which lasts about 1 month, steam is injected at 348 degrees C and 17.MPa to melt the wax condensate in the formation in order to decrease heavy oil viscosity. Phase 2 involves 3 soaking days. In phase 3, which lasts 2 to 3 months, the production rate is doubled compared to wells without steam. The cycle is then resumed once the pressure drops. The temperature cycling can compromise the well integrity through loss of hydraulic isolation in the cement sheath and thereby reduce hydrocarbon recovery. This paper described how the OPC has managed to achieved complete well integrity using an advanced cement system in more than 200 wells exposed to steam injection temperatures up to 348 degrees C and the associated high induced thermal stresses. The methodology for risk analysis of the cement sheath failure under steam stimulation was described along with the selection criteria for the advanced cement system to withstand temperature cycling. Two case histories involving a 50 well database were presented. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  8. The method of purification of waste water of NPS from petroleum oil using UV-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulemin, V.V.; Kareta, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    The main methods of concentration and purification of radioactive waste water of russian NPS are distillation and ion exchange. When waste water containing petroleum oil and washing matter is distillated, part of petroleum and washing matters go to the condensate. The purification of this condensate leads to pollution of ion exchange resins by petroleum oil and reduction of the filter cycle number. The purification of condensate of Russian NPS from petroleum oil is carried out using active carbon and polymer filters, but this process is not effective and fails to give pure condensate. Therefore, the authors began to search for more effective methods of purification of waste water from petroleum oil. They found that UV-radiation makes it possible to purify water from petroleum matter to concentration of the organic phase less than 0.5 mg/dm3. In this process of purification the air, contained in the water phase, was used as an oxidant. When purification is carried out in the absence of sorbents, the quantity of radioactive solid waste, which have to be recovered, decreases. During the study of purification of waste water it was found that increasing of the temperature of the process increases the rate of UV-radiation-induced oxidation of organic phase. The increase in the initial concentration of petroleum products also increases the rate of petroleum oil decomposition. The content of ions in water phase decreases the purification rate. The investigations were carried out on the laboratory scale with water and condensate from Tver's NPS

  9. Effect of crude oil and refined petroleum product imports on the national security. Critical technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The report contains the results of an investigation requested under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act to study the effect of oil imports on the domestic petroleum industry and on United States energy security. It reviews previous energy security assessments and resulting initiatives, assesses current US energy security, and studies emergency petroleum requirements. The report finds that there have been substantial improvements in US energy security since the last Section 232 Petroleum finding in 1979. However, declining domestic oil production, rising oil imports, and growing dependence on potentially insecure sources of supply raise concerns of vulnerability to a major supply disruption

  10. Proceedings of the Go-Expo Gas and Oil Exposition and the 4. Annual Canadian International Petroleum Conference and the 54. Annual Technical Meeting of the Petroleum Society of CIM : Global Challenges and Technology Integration. CD-ROM ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    A series of technical papers dealing with various aspects of petroleum geology and resource development were presented at this conference and trade show which was attended by local and international participants. The 27 sessions reflected the changes facing the petroleum industry in terms of fluctuating product prices, aging staff, maturing basins, frontier development, and environmental concerns. The conference is truly international with nearly one third of the 250 presentations coming from outside of Canada. The presentations were targeted for managers, engineers, technologists, geologists, and other petroleum industry specialists dealing with issues such as: business development; conventional oil and gas recovery; conventional and unconventional heavy oil recovery; corrosion, pipelines and process engineering; drilling engineering; enhanced recovery; environmental management; production operations; regulatory and operations management; reservoir fluid characterization; reservoir simulation; risk management; well test analysis; and, well design and completions. A total of 124 papers have been processed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Process of transforming into light oils heavy oils from carbonization of lignites, coals, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mony, H

    1926-12-20

    A process is described for transforming into light oils the heavy oils coming from the carbonization of lignites, peats, coals, and shales, and heavy oils from original minerals and vegetables, consisting of heating the heavy oils or tars in the presence of one or more solid or liquid substances conveniently chosen, with a veiw to effect distillation of the oils under atmospheric pressure at an appropriate temperature, the solids or liquid substances favoring the formation of light products under the influence of heat, being preferably added to the oil before admitting it to the retort and heating, so that the light oils are obtained from the heavy oils in a single operation.

  12. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  13. Hydrogenation upgrading of heavy oil residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichko, A.A.; Maloletnev, A.S.; Mazneva, O.A.; Galkina, N.I. [Fossil Fuel Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Hydrogenation and Gasification Dept.; Suvorov, U.P.; Khadjiev, S.N. [Inst. Oil and Chemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation). Hydrogenation of Heavy Residues Dept.

    1997-12-31

    At present time in the world there is no simple and effective technology at low pressure (<15-20 MPa) which could give the opportunity to use oil residues for distillate fractions production. In Russia a process for hydrogenation (up 6 MPa hydrogen pressure) of high boiling point (b.p. >520 C) oil products, including high S, V and Ni contents ones, into distillates, feedstock for catalytic cracking (b.p. 360-520 C) and metal concentrates. The main point of the new process is as follows: the water solution of catalytic additive, for which purpose water soluble metal salts of VI-VIII groups are used, is mixed with heavy oil residues, dispersed and then subjected to additional supercavitation in a special apparatus. (orig.)

  14. Uptake of heavy metals by Brachiaria Decumbens and its mutant as a remediation agent for soil contaminated with oil sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nazrul Abd Wahid; Latiffah Noordin; Abdul Razak Ruslan; Hazlina Abdullah; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2006-01-01

    The Malaysian petroleum industry produces thousands of tonnes of oil sludge per year. Oil sludge is the residue accumulated during processing of petroleum at petroleum processing plants. Besides soil, mud and sand, oil sludge is often rich in radioactive substances, heavy metals and other toxic materials from hydrocarbon group which could contaminate and environment. In the present study the pasture grass Brachiaria decumbens and its mutant B. decumbens Kluang Comel were evaluated on their effectiveness as remediation agents for contaminated soils. The contaminating agent tested was the oil sludge with its hydrocarbons vaporised, obtained from the Waste Management Centre, MINT. Amongst the indicators for an effective remediation agent is the ability to accumulate heavy metals in their tissues without affecting their growth. This trial was conducted at MINT glasshouse, whereby the test plants were planted in pots in soil added with vaporised oil sludge. Analysis of heavy metals was through Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). This paper discusses the accumulation of heavy metals by B. decumbens and its mutant Kluang Comel and their growth performance, hence assessing their suitability as remediation agent in soil contaminated with oil sludge. (Author)

  15. Natural gas in 1927: Petroleum in 1927: The oil and gas fields of Ontario. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, R B

    1930-12-31

    This annual report presents figures for gas consumption in Ontario, gas wells and their production, and leakage. It includes licenses issued for the year and logs of wells. Information is also given on oil production in Ontario, petroleum refining and petroleum imported into Ontario.

  16. Review of oil families and their petroleum systems of the Williston Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    The petroleum system concept was first applied in 1974 (Dow/Williams) to identify three oil systems in the Williston Basin, and recent studies have expanded the number to at least nine. This paper reviews the petroleum geochemistry, oil-oil, and oil-source correlations of the oil systems of the Williston Basin, providing a new perspective and some new findings. Petroleum systems with a known source (documented oil-source correlation) include the Red River (Ordovician), Winnipegosis (Devonian), Bakken (Devonian-Mississippian), Madison (Mississippian), and Tyler (Pennsylvanian) systems. Petroleum systems with an identified source rock but no documented oil-source correlation are considered hypothetical and include the Winnipeg (Ordovician), Duperow (Devonian), and Birdbear (Devonian). The Deadwood (Cambrian-Ordovician) petroleum system is speculative because a good oil-prone source rock has not been identified. The stratigraphic distribution of the oil families from each system is generally limited to the same formation from which they were sourced due to efficient seals and a paucity of vertical migration pathways, but some notable exceptions do occur.

  17. Levels of Petroleum Hydrocarbons and some Heavy Metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    has outlets to the Atlantic Ocean. The river which supports major commercial ... acidification. Oils and solids or viscous grease present were separated from liquid samples by filtration. After extraction, the residue after solvent evaporation was weighed to determine the oil and grease content. Compounds volatilized at or ...

  18. 76 FR 68502 - National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Oil and Gas Lease Sale 2011 and Notice of Availability of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Oil and Gas Lease Sale 2011 and Notice of Availability of the Detailed Statement of Sale for Oil and Gas Lease Sale 2011 in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska AGENCY: Bureau of Land... tracts in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska. The United States reserves the right to withdraw any...

  19. Refining fuels of the heavy gas--oil type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzac, J F.A.

    1930-01-28

    This invention has for its object the production of a new type of gas-oil fuel, obtained from crude petroleum, shale oil, and peat oil, according to the method of treatment mentioned, by means of which is obtained from gas oil, shale oil, lignite oil, and peat oil (deprived of asphaltic, and bituminous, resinous, and sulfur compounds), a fuel suitable for running Diesel, Junkers, and Clerget motors and all others of the same kind, by diminishing considerably the fouling and attack on the metal.

  20. Petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here are briefly summarized 1)the OPEC decisions and their consequences concerning the production of petroleum in the world 2)some news about the petroleum industry in Chad and in Iraq 3)some news about the new pipelines constructed or to be constructed in the world 4)some news about the LPG industry (start of a LPG extraction unit in Argentina, legislation in France for LPG vehicles) 4)and some news about the petroleum distribution in France. (O.M.)

  1. Experimental and numerical modeling of heavy-oil recovery by electrical heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hascakir, B.; Akin, S. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Babadagli, T. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    This study examined the applicability of electrical heating as a heavy oil recovery system in 2 heavy oil fields in Turkey. The physical and chemical properties of samples from the 2 fields were compiled and measured. The samples were then subjected to electrical heating. A retort technique was used to determine oil recovery performance under various conditions. Different types of iron powders were also applied in order to reduce oil viscosity. In situ viscosity reduction levels during the heating process were measured using a history matching procedure that considered data obtained during the laboratory experiments. The study demonstrated that the addition of iron power to the oil samples caused the polar components of the oil to decrease. Oil viscosity was strongly influenced by the magnetic fields created by the iron powders. An analysis of the experimental data showed that significant viscosity reductions of 88 per cent were obtained for the samples when iron additions of 0.5 per cent were used. Data from the experiments were used to develop mathematical models in order to consider thermal diffusion coefficients, oil viscosity, and relative permeability parameters. It was concluded that the cost of producing 1 barrel of oil using the method cost approximately US $5. After a period of 70 days, 320 barrels of petroleum were produced using the method. Oil production rates increased to 440 barrels over the same time period when iron additions were used. 30 refs., 6 tabs., 12 figs.

  2. Heavy oils processing materials requirements crude processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloley, Andrew W. [CH2M Hill, Englewood, CO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, recommended best practices for crude unit materials selection have evolved to accommodate new operating requirements, feed qualities, and product qualities. The shift to heavier oil processing is one of the major changes in crude feed quality occurring over the last 20 years. The three major types of crude unit corrosion include sulfidation attack, naphthenic acid attack, and corrosion resulting from hydrolyzable chlorides. Heavy oils processing makes all three areas worse. Heavy oils have higher sulfur content; higher naphthenic acid content; and are more difficult to desalt, leading to higher chloride corrosion rates. Materials selection involves two major criteria, meeting required safety standards, and optimizing economics of the overall plant. Proper materials selection is only one component of a plant integrity approach. Materials selection cannot eliminate all corrosion. Proper materials selection requires appropriate support from other elements of an integrity protection program. The elements of integrity preservation include: materials selection (type and corrosion allowance); management limits on operating conditions allowed; feed quality control; chemical additives for corrosion reduction; and preventive maintenance and inspection (PMI). The following discussion must be taken in the context of the application of required supporting work in all the other areas. Within that context, specific materials recommendations are made to minimize corrosion due to the most common causes in the crude unit. (author)

  3. Remediation of soil co-contaminated with petroleum and heavy metals by the integration of electrokinetics and biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Wen-Hui; Xing, Ding-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Feng

    2013-09-15

    Successful remediation of soil co-contaminated with high levels of organics and heavy metals is a challenging task, because that metal pollutants in soil can partially or completely suppress normal heterotrophic microbial activity and thus hamper biodegradation of organics. In this study, the benefits of integrating electrokinetic (EK) remediation with biodegradation for decontaminating soil co-contaminated with crude oil and Pb were evaluated in laboratory-scale experiments lasting for 30 days. The treated soil contained 12,500 mg/kg of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and 450 mg/kg Pb. The amendments of EDTA and Tween 80, together with a regular refreshing of electrolyte showed the best performance to remediate this contaminated soil. An important function of EDTA-enhanced EK treatment was to eliminate heavy metal toxicity from the soil, thus activating microbial degradation of oil. Although Tween 80 reduced current, it could serve as a second substrate for enhancing microbial growth and biodegradation. It was found that oil biodegradation degree and microbial numbers increased toward the anode and cathode. Microbial metabolism was found to be beneficial to metal release from the soil matrix. Under the optimum conditions, the soil Pb and TPH removal percentages after 30 days of running reached 81.7% and 88.3%, respectively. After treatment, both the residual soil Pb and TPH concentrations met the requirement of the Chinese soil environmental quality standards. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. National extra heavy crude oil upgrade; Melhoramento de petroleos extra pesados nacionais no ambiente de producao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Lilian Camen; Zilio, Evaldo L.; Guimarae, Regina C.; Tosta, Luiz C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Barros, Ricardo S. de [Fundacao Universitaria Jose Bonifacio (FUJB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leite, Luiz Fernando T. [PETROBRAS S.A., Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios-ES

    2008-07-01

    Brazilian petroleums are becoming increasingly heavy, reaching values of up to 7 deg API, which classifies them as extra heavy. They are also very viscous, sometimes presenting values as 10184 mm{sup 2}/s to 50 deg C. These two factors affect production operations like lifting, flow assurance and primary processing, with implications on transporting and refining. Trading these kinds of oils is also difficult; once there are not many refineries in the world able to process them. Due to these facts and also to the lower yield on premium products, the international market value is lower than the reference oil, for example, oil 'Brent'. Studies indicate that in some heavy oils fields the process of well lifting and also the flow in pipelines is almost impracticable in a first analysis, mainly offshore field, impacting both technically and economically the development of the production of a new field. Therefore it becomes necessary implement efforts to develop alternatives to increase oil's API density and at the same time reduce the viscosity of extra heavy oil inside the well, i.e. through a process of upgrading assuring its flow and consequently their production, primary processing and refining, increasing, the value of marketing. (author)

  5. Pacific Basin Heavy Oil Refining Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hackett

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The United States today is Canada’s largest customer for oil and refined oil products. However, this relationship may be strained due to physical, economic and political influences. Pipeline capacity is approaching its limits; Canadian oil is selling at substantive discounts to world market prices; and U.S. demand for crude oil and finished products (such as gasoline, has begun to flatten significantly relative to historical rates. Lower demand, combined with increased shale oil production, means U.S. demand for Canadian oil is expected to continue to decline. Under these circumstances, gaining access to new markets such as those in the Asia-Pacific region is becoming more and more important for the Canadian economy. However, expanding pipeline capacity to the Pacific via the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline and the planned Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is only feasible when there is sufficient demand and processing capacity to support Canadian crude blends. Canadian heavy oil requires more refining and produces less valuable end products than other lighter and sweeter blends. Canadian producers must compete with lighter, sweeter oils from the Middle East, and elsewhere, for a place in the Pacific Basin refineries built to handle heavy crude blends. Canadian oil sands producers are currently expanding production capacity. Once complete, the Northern Gateway pipeline and the Trans Mountain expansion are expected to deliver an additional 500,000 to 1.1 million barrels a day to tankers on the Pacific coast. Through this survey of the capacity of Pacific Basin refineries, including existing and proposed facilities, we have concluded that there is sufficient technical capacity in the Pacific Basin to refine the additional Canadian volume; however, there may be some modifications required to certain refineries to allow them to process Western Canadian crude. Any additional capacity for Canadian oil would require refinery modifications or

  6. Combined strategy for the precipitation of heavy metals and biodegradation of petroleum in industrial wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.M.; Cabrera, G.; Gomez, J.M.; Abalos, A.; Cantero, D.

    2010-01-01

    The precipitation of chromium(III), copper(II), manganese(II) and zinc(II) by biogenic hydrogen sulfide generated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, Desulfovibrio sp., and the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the presence of heavy metal by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AT18 have been carried out. An anaerobic stirred tank reactor was used to generate hydrogen sulfide with Desulfovibrio sp. culture and the precipitation of more than 95% of each metal was achieved in 24 h (metal solutions contained: 60, 49, 50 and 80 mg L -1 of chromium, copper, manganese and zinc sulfates). A stirred tank reactor with P. aeruginosa AT18, in the presence of the heavy metal solution and 2% (v/v) of petroleum, led to the degradation of 60% of the total petroleum hydrocarbons and the removal of Cr(III) 99%, Cu(II) 93%, Zn(II) 46% and Mn(II) 88% in the medium through biosorption phenomena. These results enabled the development of an integrated system in which the two processes were combined. The overall aim of the study was achieved, with 84% of TPH degraded and all of the metals completely removed. Work is currently underway aimed at improving this system (decrease in operation time, culture of P. aeruginosa in anaerobic conditions) in an effort to apply this process in the bioremediation of natural media contaminated with heavy metals and petroleum.

  7. Efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-10-01

    This study describes the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from the soil samples collected from industrial dumping site. High concentrations of heavy metals (like iron, lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt and zinc) and petroleum hydrocarbons were present in the contaminated soil samples. Lipopeptide biosurfactant, consisting of surfactin and fengycin was obtained from Bacillus subtilis A21. Soil washing with biosurfactant solution removed significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbon (64.5 %) and metals namely cadmium (44.2 %), cobalt (35.4 %), lead (40.3 %), nickel (32.2 %), copper (26.2 %) and zinc (32.07 %). Parameters like surfactant concentration, temperature, agitation condition and pH of the washing solution influenced the pollutant removing ability of biosurfactant mixture. Biosurfactant exhibited substantial hydrocarbon solubility above its critical micelle concentration. During washing, 50 % of biosurfactant was sorbed to the soil particles decreasing effective concentration during washing process. Biosurfactant washed soil exhibited 100 % mustard seed germination contradictory to water washed soil where no germination was observed. The results indicate that the soil washing with mixture of lipopeptide biosurfactants at concentrations above its critical micelle concentration can be an efficient and environment friendly approach for removing pollutants (petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals) from contaminated soil.

  8. Density and viscosity modeling and characterization of heavy oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Creek, J

    2005-01-01

    to thousands of mPa center dot s. Essential to the presented extended approach for heavy oils is, first, achievement of accurate P nu T results for the EOS-characterized fluid. In particular, it has been determined that, for accurate viscosity modeling of heavy oils, a compressibility correction in the way...... are widely used within the oil industry. Further work also established the basis for extending the approach to heavy oils. Thus, in this work, the extended f-theory approach is further discussed with the study and modeling of a wider set of representative heavy reservoir fluids with viscosities up...

  9. Heavy crude oils - From Geology to Upgrading - An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huc, A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy oils, extra-heavy oils and tar sands are major players for the future of energy. They represent a massive world resource, at least the size of conventional oils. They are found all over the world but Canada and Venezuela together account, by themselves, for more than half of world deposits. They share the same origin as the lighter conventional oils, but their geological fate drove them into thick, viscous tar-like crude oils. Most of them result from alteration processes mediated by microbial degradation. They are characterized by a low content of lighter cuts and a high content of impurities such as sulfur and nitrogen compounds and metals; so, their production is difficult and deployment of specific processes is required in order to enhance their transportability and to upgrade them into valuable products meeting market needs, and honouring environmental requirements. Although these resources are increasingly becoming commercially producible, less than 1% of total heavy crude oil deposits worldwide are under active development. The voluntarily wide scope of this volume encompasses geology, production, transportation, upgrading, economics and environmental issues of heavy oils. It does not pretend to be exhaustive, but to provide an authoritative view of this very important energy resource. Besides presenting the current status of knowledge and technology involved in exploiting heavy oils, the purpose is to provide an insight into technical, economic and environmental challenges that should be taken up in order to increase the efficiency of production and processing, and finally to give a prospective view of the emerging technologies which will contribute to releasing the immense potential reserves of heavy oil and tar deposits. Contents: Part 1. Heavy Crude Oils.1. Heavy Crude Oils in the Perspective of World Oil Demand. 2. Definitions and Specificities. 3. Geological Origin of Heavy Crude Oils. 4. Properties and composition. Part 2. Reservoir Engineering

  10. Applying CFD in the Analysis of Heavy Oil/Water Separation Process via Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Angelim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years most of the oil reserves discovered has been related to heavy oil reservoirs whose reserves are abundant but still show operational difficulties. This fact provoked great interest of the petroleum companies in developing new technologies for increasing the heavy oil production. Produced water generation, effluent recovered from the production wells together with oil and natural gas, is among the greatest potential factors for environmental degradation. Thus, a new scenario of the oil industry appears requiring improvement in treatment units for produced water. Among the technological improvements in the facilities, the use of hydrocyclones has been applied in the treatment of the oily water. In this sense, this study aims to investigate numerically the separation process of heavy oil from a water stream via hydrocyclone, using the computational fluid dynamics technique. In the mathematical modeling was considered a two-phase, three-dimensional, stationary, isothermal and turbulent flow. Results of streamlines, pressure and volume fraction fields of the involved phases (oil and water into the hydrocyclone, and mechanical efficiency and pumping power of the fluids are shown and analyzed. In conclusion, it seems that with increasing fluid input velocity in the device there is an increase in pressure drop, indicating a greater pumping energy consumption of the mixture, and greatly influences the separation process efficiency.

  11. Biomarker fingerprinting : application and limitations for source identification and correlation of oils and petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.F.; Yang, C.; Hollebone, B.

    2004-01-01

    Biological markers or biomarkers are complex molecules originating from formerly living organisms. They are among the most important hydrocarbon groups in petroleum because every crude oil exhibits an essentially unique biomarker or fingerprint due to the wide variety of geological conditions under which oil is formed. When found in crude oils, rocks and sediments, biomarkers have the same structures as their parent organic molecules. Therefore, chemical analysis of source-characteristic and environmentally persistent biomarkers can provide valuable information in determining the source of spilled oil. Biomarkers can also be used to differentiate oils and to monitor the degradation process and the weathering state of oils under a range of conditions. The use of biomarker techniques to study oil spills has increased significantly in recent years. This paper provided case studies to demonstrate: (1) biomarker distribution in weathered oil and in petroleum products with similar chromatographic profiles, (2) sesquiterpenes and diamondoid biomarkers in oils and light petroleum products, (3) unique biomarker compounds in oils, (4) diagnostic ratios of biomarkers, and (5) biodegradation of biomarkers. It was noted that the trend to use biomarkers to study oil spills will continue. Continuous advances in analytical methods will further improve the application of oil hydrocarbon fingerprinting for environmental studies. 36 refs., 5 tabs., 12 figs

  12. China's new oil import status underpins world's most dynamic petroleum scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    China is poised to become a net importer of oil in 1994--95. That sets the stage for China importing more than 1 million b/d of crude oil and refined products on a net basis by the turn of the century. That development underpins a bigger story -- arguably the biggest story on the petroleum scene today. The turnabout that is seeing the world's fifth biggest oil producer go from significant oil exporter in recent years to major oil importer by the turn of the century points to several other truisms in the petroleum industry: That an oil demand surge in the Asia-Pacific region led by China will fuel overall world oil demand growth for years to come; that a refining and petrochemical boom in a country that accounts for about one fifth of the world's population has dramatic implications for those two industries; that privatization has gathered so much momentum in the global petroleum industry that even Communist China has embraced some form of it; that China's domestic crude supply shortfall is creating unprecedented opportunities for foreign upstream investors in one of the world's most prospective yet underexplored and underexploited regions; and that the same new openness that is distinguishing China's petroleum industry today is turning some of its state owned companies into major competitors to be reckoned with on the international scene, upstream and downstream. The paper discusses China's oil export/import balance, supply/demand outlook, policy changes, and new regulations governing export of crude oil and products

  13. Non-aqueous heavy oil extraction from oil sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George [National Nuclear Security Administration (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Kansas City plant operated by Honeywell has a long history of working with DOE NNSA on engineering and manufacturing services supporting national security requirements. The plant has developed a non-aqueous method for heavy oil extraction from oil sands. This method is environmentally friendly as it does not use any external body of water, which would normally be contaminated in the conventional method. It is a 2 phase process consisting of terpene, limonene or alpha pinene, and carbon dioxide. The CO2 and terpene phases are both closed loop systems which minimizes material loss. The limonene and alpha pinene are both naturally derived solvents that come from citrus sources or pine trees respectively. Carbon dioxide is an excellent co-solvent with terpene. There is also a possibility for heat loss recovery during the distillation phase. This process produces clean dry sand. Laboratory tests have concluded that this using non-aqueous liquids process works effectively.

  14. Comparative assessment of structural-mechanical properties of heavy oils of timano-pechorskaya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. К. Кондрашева

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical properties of heavy oils of Yaregskoe and Usinskoe deposits and the residues of atmospheric distillation of petroleum (fuel oil recovered from them are presented. The group composition of oil and the residues of its atmospheric distillation (fuel oil is determined. When using X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive spectrometer, the content of metals in the products is determined. A conclusion is drawn about the distribution of metals in the initial oil and fuel oil. On the basis of rheological characteristics, the type of liquids is determined in accordance with Newton's law, as well as the presence of an anomaly in the viscosity of the studied media at different temperatures. The energy values of the thixotropy of heavy oils of Usinskoe and Yaregskoe deposits, as well as the activation energy of the viscous flow of all media studied, are obtained. The phase transition of atmospheric residues at 60 °C is discovered. Dependences of the enthalpy and entropy of the viscous flow of the studied hydrocarbon media are obtained with an increase in temperature from 10 to 140 °C. The dependences of the oil molecules and atmospheric residues jumping frequency on viscosity are obtained for the first time.

  15. Heavy gas oils as feedstock for petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.D. [Nova Chemicals Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Du Plessis, D. [Alberta Energy Research Inst., Edmonton, AB (Canada)]|[Alberta Economic Development and Trade, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation reviewed the possibilities for converting heavy aromatic compounds and gas oils obtained from Alberta bitumen into competitively priced feedstock for high value refined products and petrochemicals. Upgrading bitumen beyond synthetic crude oil to refined products and petrochemicals would add value to bitumen in Alberta by expanding the petrochemical industry by providing a secure market for co-products derived from the integration of bitumen upgrading and refining. This presentation also reviewed conventional feedstocks and processes; by-products from bitumen upgrading and refining; production of light olefins by the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and hydrocracking process; deep catalytic cracking, catalytic pyrolysis and PetroFCC processes; technical and economic evaluations; and opportunities and challenges. Conventional feeds for steam cracking were listed along with comparative yields on feedstock. The use of synthetic gas liquids from oil sands plants was also reviewed. Current FCC type processes for paraffinic feedstocks are not suitable for Alberta's bitumen, which require better technologies based on hydrotreating and new ring opening catalysts. tabs., figs.

  16. Well performance relationships in heavy foamy oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.; Mahadevan, J. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The viscosities and thermodynamic properties of heavy oils are different from conventional oils. Heavy oil reservoirs have foamy behaviour and the gas/oil interface stabilizes in the presence of asphaltenes. In the case of conventional oils, gas evolves from the solution when the formation pressure reaches the bubble point pressure. This study modelled the fluid properties of heavy foamy oils and their influence on the inflow performance relationship (IPR). An expression for inflow performance in heavy oil was developed by including the properties of foamy oil into a space averaged flow equation assuming pseudo-steady state conditions. The unique feature of this study was that the density, formation volume factor and solution gas-oil ratio were modelled as functions of entrained gas fraction. The newly developed expression for inflow performance of foamy oils may also be used to model conventional oil inflow by setting the entrained gas fraction to zero in the fluid property models. The results of the inflow performance of foamy oil and conventional oil were compared and an outflow performance relationship was calculated. The study showed that the inflow performance in foamy oil is influenced by entrained gas. The surface flow rates and bottom-hole flow rates are also influenced by the presence of entrained gas, with heavy foamy oil showing a higher volumetric production rate than conventional oil. The outflow performance curve depended on the fluid properties of the foamy oil. A nodal analysis of the well performance showed that the conventional calculation methods underestimate the production from foamy oil wells because they do not consider the effect of entrained gas which lowers density and improves the mobility of foamy oil. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 20 figs., 1 appendix.

  17. Evaluation of AISI 316L stainless steel welded plates in heavy petroleum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Silva, Cleiton; Pereira Farias, Jesualdo; Batista de Sant'Ana, Hosiberto

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the study done on the effect of welding heating cycle on AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel corrosion resistance in a medium containing Brazilian heavy petroleum. AISI 316L stainless steel plates were welded using three levels of welding heat input. Thermal treatments were carried out at two levels of temperatures (200 and 300 deg. C). The period of treatment in all the trials was 30 h. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and analysis of X-rays dispersive energy (EDX) were used to characterize the samples. Weight loss was evaluated to determine the corrosion rate. The results show that welding heating cycle is sufficient to cause susceptibility to corrosion caused by heavy petroleum to the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

  18. Extra heavy oil and refinery residues upgrading through Eni Slurry Technology : first EST commercial unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rispoli, G.; Sanfilippo, D.; Amoroso, A [Eni S.p.A., Rome (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The production of heavy crude oils is projected to continue to grow in the upstream oil industry given that large reserves of unconventional extra heavy crude and bitumen exist in several geographic areas including Canada and Venezuela. As reserves of conventional crude oil continue to decline, these unconventional feedstocks are becoming an opportunity to pursue, but they require effective technologies for upgrading and meeting the growing demand for light and middle distillate fuels. This paper described the proprietary technology that offers a solution to upstream and downstream oil producers for bottom-of-the-barrel upgrading. En i Slurry Technology (EST) is constructing an industrial plant in its Sannazzaro refinery in Italy. The plant is designed to convert 23,000 BPSD of vacuum residue into high quality diesel and other valuable refinery streams such as liquefied petroleum gas, naphtha and jet fuel. EST is an H-addition process characterized by the use of a special homogeneous isothermal intrinsically safe reactor, and of a nano-dispersed non-ageing catalyst. EST converts more than 98 per cent of any type of residues to about 110 per cent volume of light products and distillates or extra heavy oils to high quality bottomless SCO. In typical performance, HDS is greater than 85 per cent, HDM greater than 99 per cent and HDCCR greater than 97 per cent. EST also achieves the target of zero fuel oil - zero coke. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  19. The heavy oil refiners needs in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the 1970s oil crisis, the high price differential that developed between heavy and light crude led to an expansion in heavy crude processing geared to producing light oil products. The subsequent collapse in prices meant that heavy crudes with low netbacks were shut in, heavy crude refining capacity exceeded the restrained production of heavy crudes, and refineries were operating at losses. However, the low prices for oil rekindled demand and spare production capacity has been absorbed. The crude oil price is forecast to rise to ca $27/bbl by the late 1990s, which is favorable for heavy crude oil production. Nevertheless, investments in heavy crude production are exposed to a high degree of risk. A strategy for dealing with this risk is to integrate into downstream, which makes more sense for heavy crude producers than for conventional producers. On the other hand, such integration is capital-intensive, and light oils will likely be favored in crude oil production developments for the next several years. Low prices for natural gas will make it hard to find markets for residual fuel made from heavy crudes. 8 figs

  20. New heavy crude oil flow improver increases delivery : application scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, J.; Johnston, R.; Lauzon, P. [ConocoPhillips Specialty Products Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Flow improvers or drag reducing agents have been used for over 25 years as a method to increase fluid flow in hydrocarbon pipelines. The technology is effective in refined projects, light and medium crude oils. This paper presented a new development in flow improver technology that allows treatment of heavy crude oil slates. It discussed case studies of flow improver treatment of heavy oils in various pipeline system as well as factors that affect commercial success. tabs., figs.

  1. Oil market structures-strategies and performances of the actors of the international petroleum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djermaine, Rebai

    1999-01-01

    The rises of petroleum prices as revealed by the oil crises of the 1970's are the consequences of a beside market perverse game between artificial factors. The public management and the intervention of public authorities have contributed to the unbalancing of oil markets and to the confusion of the actor's strategies in the international petroleum system. The chronical decay of the petroleum prices indicate the slow and silent come back of the economical forces (laws). The management of an exhaustible asset like petroleum, raises lot of intriguing problems. This work aims at exploring the problems linked with this type of management where the decisions of the profession, of private and public companies and of the governments are closely interfering. The study is largely inspired of the meso-economical approach which consists in examining the markets structure and their determining factors, and the strategies and results of the actors of the world petroleum system. The examination of the structures/strategies/results sequence does not neglect the relations and feedbacks between each of these elements. The economical theory of oligopoly and cartel markets is also used to examine the way how prices are determined in petroleum markets. A critical presentation of the energy models allows to show how it is possible to understand, foresee and control the evolution of these prices and the possible supply/demand equilibrium. The study takes also into consideration the debates and controversies about the 'green tax' and its impact of petroleum supply and demand. (J.S.)

  2. Causes for an asymmetric relation between the price of crude oil and refined petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.K.; Laskowski, C.

    2005-01-01

    We revisit the issue of asymmetries in the relation between the price of crude oil and refined petroleum products in the United States. An econometric analysis of monthly data indicates that the asymmetric relationship between the price of crude oil and motor gasoline is generated by refinery utilization rates and inventory behavior. The asymmetric relation between the price of crude oil and home heating oil probably is generated by contractual arrangements between retailers and consumers. Together, these results imply that price asymmetries may be generated by efficient markets. Under these conditions, there is little justification for policy interventions to reduce or eliminate price asymmetries in motor gasoline and home heating oil markets. (author)

  3. Reliable in the long run? Petroleum policy and long-term oil supplier reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toft, Peter; Duero, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Accelerating oil import dependence in energy consuming nations highlights the importance of having energy supplies at sufficient levels and at stable and reasonable prices. Consequently, it is crucial that oil exporters realize their full production potential. Current debates on energy security are often focused on short-term risks e.g. sudden disruptions due to wars, domestic instability, etc. However, when it comes to assessing oil supplier reliability it is equally important to assess their longer term ability and willingness to deliver oil to the global market. This study analyzes the effects of petroleum investment policies on crude oil production trends in 14 major oil producing countries (2000-2010) by focusing on the political-institutional frameworks that shape the investment conditions for the upstream oil sector. Our findings indicate that countries with less favorable oil sector frameworks systematically performed worse than countries with investor friendly and privatized sectors. The findings indicate that assessments based on remaining reserves and planned production capacities alone could inflate expectations about future oil supplies in a world where remaining crude reserves are located in countries with unfavorable investment frameworks. - Highlights: → We explore if policies favoring state-ownership in upstream oil undermine output expectations. → We compare petroleum policies of 14 major oil producers vis-a-vis production trends 2000-2010. → We find major differences between countries favorable to state-owned or private investors. → Substantial private investment seems needed for oil production to meet long-term demand growth.

  4. Research on heavy oil degradation by four thermophilic bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, M.; Chen, Q.; Liu, Z.; Li, Y. [Ocean Univ. of China, Qingdao, Shandong (China)

    2009-07-01

    The Shengli oilfield is the second largest onshore oil field in China, with a crude oil output of approximately 30 million tons per year. The large quantities of wastewater that are produced during thermal recovery methods have posed a challenge in terms of water reuse, reinjection and discharge. The important aspect of wastewater treatment is the removal of residual heavy oil. Biological methods are considered to be efficient in solving this problem. This paper reported on a study in which 4 thermophilic microorganisms which had the ability to biodegrade heavy oil were screened from heavy oil wastewater in the Shengli oilfield. Their degradation to heavy oil was discussed and the suitable biodegradation conditions of these bacteria were investigated. The study showed that the degrading efficiency of heavy oil by the 4 bacteria was up to 42.0, 47.6, 55.6 and 43.4 per cent in the wastewater which contained 500 mg per litre of heavy oil, respectively. The crude oil samples were analyzed using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) before and after degradation. The single 4 strains demonstrated strong biodegradability to normal alkanes and aromatics, and the average degrading efficiency was about 50 and 35 per cent. The degrading efficiency of the mixed 4 strains was better than the single ones, particularly for the poor biodegradable hydrocarbons such as phenanthrenes and fluorines. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs.

  5. Identification of key oil refining technologies for China National Petroleum Co. (CNPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haiyan; Yu Jianning; Xu Jian; Fan Yu; Bao Xiaojun

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the project 'Vision of the Key Petroleum Refining Technologies for China National Petroleum Co. (CNPC) in the Early 21st Century' undertaken by the Department of R and D Administration, CNPC, and its affiliate key laboratory, The Key Laboratory of Catalysis operated by China University of Petroleum, Beijing. The objective of the project was to identify the challenges and opportunities of CNPC's petroleum refining business given increasing economy globalization and stricter environmental regulations. Using the modified Delphi method, four key technologies for CNPC's oil refining industry were identified. They are: integrated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), hydroprocessing, residue hydrocracking, and high-grade lubricant production. The most significant technology will be the integrated FCC technology that can economically increase the yield of light fractions as well as upgrade transportation fuels. In China, FCC units produce about 80% and 30% commercial gasoline and diesel, respectively. To ensure compliance with future environmental legislation, hydroprocessing technologies, including those related to petroleum product hydrorefining and distillate hydrocracking, should be developed. By combining residue hydrocracking and FCC technologies, poorer quality residua can be processed. Supplying high-grade lube oils is one of the main tasks for CNPC's oil refining industry. Development of hydrodewaxing technologies to manufacture API group II/III base oil is the main direction for CNPC's lubricant production business

  6. Applications of biosurfactants in the petroleum industry and the remediation of oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cássia F S Silva, Rita; Almeida, Darne G; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie Asfora

    2014-07-15

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are important energy resources. However, petroleum is also a major pollutant of the environment. Contamination by oil and oil products has caused serious harm, and increasing attention has been paid to the development and implementation of innovative technologies for the removal of these contaminants. Biosurfactants have been extensively used in the remediation of water and soil, as well as in the main stages of the oil production chain, such as extraction, transportation, and storage. This diversity of applications is mainly due to advantages such as biodegradability, low toxicity and better functionality under extreme conditions in comparison to synthetic counterparts. Moreover, biosurfactants can be obtained with the use of agro-industrial waste as substrate, which helps reduce overall production costs. The present review describes the potential applications of biosurfactants in the oil industry and the remediation of environmental pollution caused by oil spills.

  7. Marine Oil-Degrading Microorganisms and Biodegradation Process of Petroleum Hydrocarbon in Marine Environments: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianliang; Yu, Yang; Bai, Yu; Wang, Liping; Wu, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Due to the toxicity of petroleum compounds, the increasing accidents of marine oil spills/leakages have had a significant impact on our environment. Recently, different remedial techniques for the treatment of marine petroleum pollution have been proposed, such as bioremediation, controlled burning, skimming, and solidifying. (Hedlund and Staley in Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 51:61-66, 2001). This review introduces an important remedial method for marine oil pollution treatment-bioremediation technique-which is considered as a reliable, efficient, cost-effective, and eco-friendly method. First, the necessity of bioremediation for marine oil pollution was discussed. Second, this paper discussed the species of oil-degrading microorganisms, degradation pathways and mechanisms, the degradation rate and reaction model, and the factors affecting the degradation. Last, several suggestions for the further research in the field of marine oil spill bioremediation were proposed.

  8. Applications of Biosurfactants in the Petroleum Industry and the Remediation of Oil Spills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia F. S. Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are important energy resources. However, petroleum is also a major pollutant of the environment. Contamination by oil and oil products has caused serious harm, and increasing attention has been paid to the development and implementation of innovative technologies for the removal of these contaminants. Biosurfactants have been extensively used in the remediation of water and soil, as well as in the main stages of the oil production chain, such as extraction, transportation, and storage. This diversity of applications is mainly due to advantages such as biodegradability, low toxicity and better functionality under extreme conditions in comparison to synthetic counterparts. Moreover, biosurfactants can be obtained with the use of agro-industrial waste as substrate, which helps reduce overall production costs. The present review describes the potential applications of biosurfactants in the oil industry and the remediation of environmental pollution caused by oil spills.

  9. Oil flow in deep waters: comparative study between light oils and heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreolli, Ivanilto [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Ultra deeper waters fields are being exploited due to technological development. Under this scenario, the flow design is accomplished through pipelines subjected to low temperature and high pressure. Moreover, these flow lines are usually long causing a fast fluid cooling, which may affect flow assurance in some cases. Problems during topsides production plant's restart might occur if the oil is viscous and even in steady state a significant different behavior can be noticed, if compared to a less viscous oil. A comparison between light and heavy oil through a case study with the objective to show some heavy oil flow particularities is the purpose of this paper. Permanent and transient analyses for a specific geometry are presented. The results showed that thermal and proper viscosity modeling are required for heavy oil flow, differently from that of light oil flow, due to the exponential viscosity dependence to temperature and because the predominant laminar regime. In addition, on heavier and heavier oil flow systems, it is essential to consider exportation system's restart. (author)

  10. Oil and gas - a sunset industry? The role of petroleum in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses (1) issues where insights and perceptions have improved over the last 25 years of oil and gas history, (2) summarises some of the most important changes or trends that have shaped energy industries and that are expected to affect developments in the future, and (3) discusses issues that should be considered when it is discussed what the future may bring to the Norwegian petroleum industry and to the energy industries in general. Because of the petroleum activities in the North Sea, Norway is soon the 7th biggest oil producer and is becoming the most important supplier to the Continental gas market. 41 refs., 45 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Oil and gas - a sunset industry? The role of petroleum in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report discusses (1) issues where insights and perceptions have improved over the last 25 years of oil and gas history, (2) summarises some of the most important changes or trends that have shaped energy industries and that are expected to affect developments in the future, and (3) discusses issues that should be considered when it is discussed what the future may bring to the Norwegian petroleum industry and to the energy industries in general. Because of the petroleum activities in the North Sea, Norway is soon the 7th biggest oil producer and is becoming the most important supplier to the Continental gas market. 41 refs., 45 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Testing Method of Degrading Heavy Oil Pollution by Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Zhao, Lin; Ma, Aijin

    2018-01-01

    With the development of human society, we are more and more relying on the petrochemical energy. The use of petrochemical energy not only brings us great convenience, but is also accompanied by a series of environmental pollution problems, especially oil pollution. Since it is impractical to restore all pollution problems, the proper use of some remedial measures, under the guidance of functional orientation, may be sufficient to minimize the risk of persistent and diffusing pollutants. In recent years, bioremediation technology has been gradually developed into a promising stage and has played a crucial role in the degradation of heavy oil pollution. Specially, microbes in the degradation of heavy oil have made a great contribution. This paper mainly summarizes the different kinds of microorganisms for degrading heavy oil and the detection method for degradation efficiency of heavy oil pollution.

  13. Heavy oil : PetroChina's perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, C. [PetroChina Co., Ltd., Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    This keynote presentation discussed China's future in relation to heavy oil refining. An overview of PetroChina's overseas operations was also presented. China currently has six 200,000 bpd refineries as well as an additional 12 refineries with a 100,000 bpd capacity that are able to process lower quality feedstocks with a high acid and sulphur content. Seven new 200,000 bpd refineries will be built by 2020. Poor and heavy crude oil from global heavy oil reserves will form a significant percentages of China's refinery feedstocks, and Canada is expected to provide a significant portion of its heavy oil and bitumen resources for further refining in China. China's existing refineries are being reconfigured and optimized for the processing of heavy crude oils. Additional hydrotreating and hydrocracking technologies have been added, and resid fluid catalytic cracking technologies have been retrofitted. China envisages a future with steady increases in oil consumption, high oil prices, and an increased reliance on heavy and poor quality crude oils. China's strong economic growth will increase demand for petrochemical feedstocks. Various research organizations and institutions have been established to accelerate innovation and technology development for ensuring that clean fuels standards are met. New refineries in China will include resid upgrading and new generation catalyst technologies. Details of various technologies were included. tabs., figs.

  14. The use of nuclear energy for obtaining petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldmann, H.; Koch, C.; Thelen, H.J.; Kappe, P.

    1982-01-01

    After some basic considerations of petroleum demand, petroleum supply and petroleum reserves, the article gives a survey of the various methods of obtaining petroleum. The use of energy in the form of steam and electricity in the previously used processes and in conventional deposits requires up to 50% of the energy contained in the oil obtained. Now unconventional sources of petroleum (tertiary petroleum, heavy fractions and shale oil) could become of interest to West Germany in the near future. The economy of production can be determined by the energy source used, to a large extent. A series of possibilities are discussed for using nuclear steam raising systems for this purpose. (UA) [de

  15. Applying CFD in the Analysis of Heavy-Oil Transportation in Curved Pipes Using Core-Flow Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Conceição

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase flow of oil, gas and water occurs in the petroleum industry from the reservoir to the processing units. The occurrence of heavy oils in the world is increasing significantly and points to the need for greater investment in the reservoirs exploitation and, consequently, to the development of new technologies for the production and transport of this oil. Therefore, it is interesting improve techniques to ensure an increase in energy efficiency in the transport of this oil. The core-flow technique is one of the most advantageous methods of lifting and transporting of oil. The core-flow technique does not alter the oil viscosity, but change the flow pattern and thus, reducing friction during heavy oil transportation. This flow pattern is characterized by a fine water pellicle that is formed close to the inner wall of the pipe, aging as lubricant of the oil flowing in the core of the pipe. In this sense, the objective of this paper is to study the isothermal flow of heavy oil in curved pipelines, employing the core-flow technique. A three-dimensional, transient and isothermal mathematical model that considers the mixture and k-e  turbulence models to address the gas-water-heavy oil three-phase flow in the pipe was applied for analysis. Simulations with different flow patterns of the involved phases (oil-gas-water have been done, in order to optimize the transport of heavy oils. Results of pressure and volumetric fraction distribution of the involved phases are presented and analyzed. It was verified that the oil core lubricated by a fine water layer flowing in the pipe considerably decreases pressure drop.

  16. Spatial distribution and sources of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbon in the sand flats of Shuangtaizi Estuary, Bohai Sea of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Yuan, Xiutang; Zhang, Anguo; Mao, Yuze; Li, Qiang; Zong, Humin; Wang, Lijun; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-06-15

    The concentrations of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) in surface sediments were investigated in the sand flats of Shuangtaizi Estuary, Bohai Sea of China in May, 2013. Ecological risk assessment indicated that most heavy metals cause low ecological risk to the estuarine environment, with the exception of Cd and Hg (considerable and moderate risk, respectively). Principal component analysis in combination with correlation analysis among heavy metals, PHCs and geological factors (e.g., granularity) was used to identify possible sources of pollutants in Shuangtaizi Estuary. Results showed that the main pollution sources of the area come from anthropogenic factors, such as sewage discharge and oil exploitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proceedings of the world heavy oil congress 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The World Heavy Oil Congress 2011 took place March 2011 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. This congress is an international gathering of heavy oil experts and professionals which takes place every 18 months to discuss issues and opportunities facing the heavy oil industry in terms of commercial, technical, regulatory and geo-political areas. Innovative solutions for improving performance, reducing costs and mitigating environmental impacts are presented. Hundreds of presentations were made, courses were delivered, and over 100 companies from 30 countries exhibited. The congress had support from various companies and government entities.This conference featured 133 papers, all of have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  18. Spectrometric methods for the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives — A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, Adriana; Saavedra, Alvaro; Tristão, Maria Luiza B.; Mendes, Luiz A.N.; Aucélio, Ricardo Q.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine determination in crude oil is made in order to guarantee that the oil does not contain levels of this element that might cause damages in the oil processing equipment. In petroleum products, the determination of chlorine is made, for instance, to evaluate if there are proper concentrations of organochloride compounds, which are used as additives. Such determinations are currently performed following official guidelines from the ASTM International and from the United States Environmental Protection Agency as well as protocols indicated by the Universal Oil Products. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy plays an important role in many of these official methods. In contrast, other spectrometric methods based on optical and mass detection are plagued by limitations related to both the fundamental characteristics of non-metals and to the complex sample matrices, which reflects in the small number of articles devoted to these applications. In this review, the current status of the spectrometric methods, especially the role played by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, is evaluated in terms of the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives. Comparison of the performance of the methods, limitations and potential new approaches to ensure proper spectrometric determinations of chlorine is indicated. - Highlights: • Critical evaluation of spectrometric methods for chlorine in petroleum products. • Reviews on element determination in petroleum have not address the case of chlorine. • Peculiarities of the spectrometric determination of Cl in petroleum are discussed. • The spectrometric approaches are detailed and compared to the official methods. • New trends in chlorine determination in petroleum products are indicated

  19. Degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by oil field isolated bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mixed consortium was prepared with 15 bacteria isolated by enrichment technique from the sample collected from an oil contaminated site. This consortium was incubated with crude oil to investigate the metabolic capability of bacteria. The degradation efficiency of the isolates in consortium was checked with 2% crude oil ...

  20. GC/MS determination of bicyclic sesquiterpanes in crude oils and petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.; Wang, Z.; Hollebone, B.; Brown, C.E.; Landriault, M.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted in which sesquiterpanes, a component of crude oils and petroleum products, were identified and characterized in an effort to determine the feasibility of using them as biomarkers for fingerprinting and identifying unknown lighter petroleum product spills. The study compared the distributions of sesquiterpanes in different oils, oil distillation fractions and refined products, including light and mid-range distillate fuels, residual fuels and lubricating oils. Evaporative weathering effects on sesquiterpane distribution and concentration were quantitatively studied and several diagnostic indices of sesquiterpane were developed for oil correlation and differentiation. Bicyclic sesquiterpanes in crude oils and oil products have much different abundances and distributions. Therefore, the relevant sesquiterpane ratios are different. Bicyclic sesquiterpanes are mostly partitioned into the medium distillation fractions. The study showed that concentrations of sesquiterpanes in crude oil and diesel fuel increase in proportion with the increase of weathering percentages. Relevant diagnostic ratios therefore remained stable. It was concluded that C 15 and C 16 sesquiterpanes may be alternative internal tracers to provide a direct way to estimate the depletion of oils, particularly diesels, in oil spill investigations. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  1. Heavy-metal removal from petroleum oily sludge using lemon- scented geraniums[General Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badawieh, A.; Elektorowicz, M. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Finding an acceptable method to manage oily sludge generated during petroleum processes is one of the challenges currently facing the petroleum industry. This study investigated the response of plants to heavy-metal removal from oily sludge to determine the feasibility of using phytoremediation technologies as a treatment method for oily sludge. In particular, scented geraniums (Pelargonium sp. Frensham) have shown a strong capability to survive harsh conditions such as poor soil, high/low temperatures, high heavy-metal concentrations and low water content. In response to this observation, this feasibility study placed scented geraniums in a series of pots containing oily sludge where heavy-metal concentrations were artificially increased up to 2000 ppm. Plants were grown in two systems over a period of 50 days. The first system included oily sludge and soil while the second system included oily sludge, soil and compost. The study revealed that the scented geraniums accumulated up to 1600 mg, 1000 mg, and 1200 mg, of cadmium, nickel and vanadium respectively per 1 kg of the plant's dry weight. The results suggest that phytoremediation technology may be a potential method for successfully treating or pretreating oily sludge in the field.

  2. The properties of heavy oils and Orimulsion : another look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.; Wang, Z.; Smith, P.

    2003-01-01

    A comparison was made between the physical properties and behaviour indicators of several heavy oils, including Orimulsion. Most heavy oils are rich in resins, asphaltenes, heavy saturates and heavy aromatics and their behaviour may vary during spills due to their different densities. The authors examined the change in density with changes in weathering and temperature. The authors noted two phenomena associated with the behaviour of heavy oils in water, namely sinking and over-washing. Sinking was defined as the bulk sinking of oil to the bottom or an intermediate layer. Over-washing was described as the washing of a layer of water over dense oil at sea while the oil is still close to the surface. The problem with over-washing is that it is not always visible to observers from a ship. The authors briefly reviewed the literature on the topic of dense oil behaviour. To determine whether extensive weathering could render oils heavier than water, weathering experiments were performed on dense oils. Results showed that weathering is rarely a sole factor in the bulk sinking of oil. For the oil to sink after weathering, its density would have to be very close to that of water. Weathering studies have shown that little weathering occurs on sunken oil after it is submerged. The uptake of particulate matter is the most important process in increasing density. The authors also discussed sinking prediction equations and provided a mathematical description of the conditions required for oil to be covered by a layer of water. A summary of the dynamics of Orimulsion as measured in a test tank was also included. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Characterization of heavy crude oils and petroleum residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissot, B.

    1984-01-01

    Proceedings of an international symposium held in Lyon in 1984, consisting of typescript versions of five plenary lectures and a large number of research papers in the areas of geochemical analysis, fractionation and characterization, and relations between structure and properties.

  4. Modeling and simulation of a pseudo-two-phase gas-liquid column reactor for thermal hydrocracking of petroleum heavy fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Matos

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a model to predict the behavior of velocity, gas holdup and local concentration fields in a pseudo-two-phase gas-liquid column reactor applied for thermal hydrocracking of petroleum heavy fractions. The model is based on the momentum and mass balances for the system, using an Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Using the k-epsilon model,fluid dynamics accounts for both laminar and turbulent flows, with discrete small bubbles (hydrogen flowing in a continuous pseudohomogeneous liquid phase (oil and catalyst particles. The petroleum is assumed to be a mixture of pseudocomponents, grouped by similar chemical structural properties, and the thermal hydrocracking is taken into account using a kinetic network based on these pseudocomponents.

  5. Oil sands and heavy oil development issues and prospects under a Liberal government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiry, J.

    1993-01-01

    A short review is presented of some of the factors affecting development of the western Canadian oil sands and heavy oil deposits to the year 2000. The Alberta oil sands resource has at least 1 trillion bbl of recoverable oil. At current prices, technology is the key to reducing costs to a more economic level. Cash operating costs have halved to $15/bbl over the past decade and the oil sands companies have programs to halve that figure again. A problem is the rising cost of natural gas as a fuel, which could jeopardize further development of both oil sand and heavy oil resources. In Saskatchewan, over 25 billion bbl of heavy oil are estimated to be in place. The biggest question is what percentage can be recovered; again, technology such as horizontal wells, 3-dimensional seismic, and steam assisted recovery is playing an important role. Concerns are expressed about the intentions of the new Liberal government concerning oil sand/heavy oil development, especially on the issues of foreign investment, exports, and environmental policy. A Liberal energy policy is not likely to allow U.S. direct investment in an oil sands plant to be tied to export of production, and the energy- and emissions-intensive nature of the oil sand/heavy oil industry will tend to make environmental approvals difficult

  6. Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms, SUPRI TR-127

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

    2001-09-07

    The program spans a spectrum of topics and is divided into five categories: (i) multiphase flow and rock properties, (ii) hot fluid injection, (iii) primary heavy-oil production, (iv) reservoir definition, and (v) in-situ combustion.

  7. Early Decomposition of Retained Heavy Silicone Oil Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of early decomposition of retained heavy silicone oil droplets. Case Report: The single highly myopic eye of a 16-year-old boy with history of scleral buckling and buckle revision developed redetachment due to inferior retinal dialysis. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and injection of heavy silicone oil. Early emulsification of the silicone oil was observed following surgery, which was removed 4 weeks later in another operation. Retained heavy silicone droplets lost their heavier- than-water specific gravity within 2 months together with extensive iris depigmentation, and release of pigment granules into the anterior chamber and vitreous cavity. Conclusion: This case report demonstrates that heavy silicone oil droplets can undergo in vivo chemical decomposition with possible toxic effects on ocular tissues.

  8. Soil Remediation Demonstration Project: Biodegradation of Heavy Fuel Oils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... Low-cost treatments applicable to small-scale spills are needed. The object of this CPAR project was to examine using cost-effective, on-site bioremediation techniques for heavy-oil-contaminated soil in cold regions...

  9. Dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons along the oil tanker route in the southern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Topgi, R; Noronha, R; Fondekar, S.P.; SenGupta, R

    Concentrations of dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons during 3 cruises (Nos. 51, 66 and 68) of R V Gaveshani, along the oil tanker route, in the southern Bay of Bengal at 0, 10 and 20 m were 19.95 + or - 3.38, 16.78 + or - 2.53 and 13.45 + or - 2.17 mu...

  10. The petroleum reserves: a peak oil or a plate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, B.

    2010-01-01

    With 1100 to 1200 Gbl of proved petroleum reserves, the world can still consume petroleum for 35 to 40 years; if we add 1000 to 1200 Gbl of reserves potentially recoverable and if the politico economical conditions allow it, it is 35 supplementary years that can be considered. In this context and while hydrocarbons will still represent 50% of the world 'energetic mixing' in 2030, the production capacity will reach its maximum at about 100 Mbl/day in 2020-2030 with a potential problem in 2015 due to the investment delays resulting of the crisis. Nevertheless, the detection, exploitation and disposal of these resources will imply non only gigantic investments (about 6000 milliards of dollars from now to 2030) but advanced experts and technologies too. (O.M.)

  11. Microbial enhanced heavy oil recovery by the aid of inhabitant spore-forming bacteria: an insight review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibulal, Biji; Al-Bahry, Saif N; Al-Wahaibi, Yahya M; Elshafie, Abdulkader E; Al-Bemani, Ali S; Joshi, Sanket J

    2014-01-01

    Crude oil is the major source of energy worldwide being exploited as a source of economy, including Oman. As the price of crude oil increases and crude oil reserves collapse, exploitation of oil resources in mature reservoirs is essential for meeting future energy demands. As conventional recovery methods currently used have become less efficient for the needs, there is a continuous demand of developing a new technology which helps in the upgradation of heavy crude oil. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is an important tertiary oil recovery method which is cost-effective and eco-friendly technology to drive the residual oil trapped in the reservoirs. The potential of microorganisms to degrade heavy crude oil to reduce viscosity is considered to be very effective in MEOR. Earlier studies of MEOR (1950s) were based on three broad areas: injection, dispersion, and propagation of microorganisms in petroleum reservoirs; selective degradation of oil components to improve flow characteristics; and production of metabolites by microorganisms and their effects. Since thermophilic spore-forming bacteria can thrive in very extreme conditions in oil reservoirs, they are the most suitable organisms for the purpose. This paper contains the review of work done with thermophilic spore-forming bacteria by different researchers.

  12. Microbial Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery by the Aid of Inhabitant Spore-Forming Bacteria: An Insight Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biji Shibulal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil is the major source of energy worldwide being exploited as a source of economy, including Oman. As the price of crude oil increases and crude oil reserves collapse, exploitation of oil resources in mature reservoirs is essential for meeting future energy demands. As conventional recovery methods currently used have become less efficient for the needs, there is a continuous demand of developing a new technology which helps in the upgradation of heavy crude oil. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR is an important tertiary oil recovery method which is cost-effective and eco-friendly technology to drive the residual oil trapped in the reservoirs. The potential of microorganisms to degrade heavy crude oil to reduce viscosity is considered to be very effective in MEOR. Earlier studies of MEOR (1950s were based on three broad areas: injection, dispersion, and propagation of microorganisms in petroleum reservoirs; selective degradation of oil components to improve flow characteristics; and production of metabolites by microorganisms and their effects. Since thermophilic spore-forming bacteria can thrive in very extreme conditions in oil reservoirs, they are the most suitable organisms for the purpose. This paper contains the review of work done with thermophilic spore-forming bacteria by different researchers.

  13. Government and industry roles in heavy oil resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Developing a heavy oil deposit in Canada requires proper reservoir selection and ongoing resrvoir management. The number of unexploited heavy oil reservoirs whch can be economically produced through primary methods is rapidly declining. In addition, primary recoveries of 5-10% of the heavy oil in place are unacceptable and recovery rates of over 50% are needed. Enhanced thermal recovery projects are therefore needed, but these entail significant technical and commodity pricing risks. It is suggested that provincial governments recognize those risks and offer incentives by not encumbering such projects with up-front royalties. If industry is to assume the risks, governments must develop a fiscal regime that allows for a satisfactory return on capital and acceptable sharing of profits. At the federal level, it is suggested to broaden the interpretation of research and development activity to include enhanced recovery projects, making the tax breaks available to scientific research also available to heavy oil development. Government policies favoring heavy oil in Saskatchewan and Alberta are cited as good examples of ways to encourage the heavy oil industry

  14. Assessment and bioremediation of heavy metals from crude oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessment of the levels of heavy metals present in crude oil contaminated soil and the application of the earthworm - Hyperiodrilus africanus with interest on the bioremediation of metals from the contaminated soil was investigated within a 90-days period under laboratory conditions. Selected heavy metals such as ...

  15. Petroleum system modeling capabilities for use in oil and gas resource assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Debra K.; Lewan, Michael; Roberts, Laura N.R.; Henry, Mitchell E.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: Petroleum resource assessments are among the most highly visible and frequently cited scientific products of the U.S. Geological Survey. The assessments integrate diverse and extensive information on the geologic, geochemical, and petroleum production histories of provinces and regions of the United States and the World. Petroleum systems modeling incorporates these geoscience data in ways that strengthen the assessment process and results are presented visually and numerically. The purpose of this report is to outline the requirements, advantages, and limitations of one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) petroleum systems modeling that can be applied to the assessment of oil and gas resources. Primary focus is on the application of the Integrated Exploration Systems (IES) PetroMod? software because of familiarity with that program as well as the emphasis by the USGS Energy Program on standardizing to one modeling application. The Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) is used to demonstrate the use of the PetroMod? software. Petroleum systems modeling quantitatively extends the 'total petroleum systems' (TPS) concept (Magoon and Dow, 1994; Magoon and Schmoker, 2000) that is employed in USGS resource assessments. Modeling allows integration of state-of-the-art analysis techniques, and provides the means to test and refine understanding of oil and gas generation, migration, and accumulation. Results of modeling are presented visually, numerically, and statistically, which enhances interpretation of the processes that affect TPSs through time. Modeling also provides a framework for the input and processing of many kinds of data essential in resource assessment, including (1) petroleum system elements such as reservoir, seal, and source rock intervals; (2) timing of depositional, hiatus, and erosional events and their influences on petroleum systems; (3) incorporation of vertical and lateral distribution and lithologies of

  16. Bioremediation and reclamation of soil contaminated with petroleum oil hydrocarbons by exogenously seeded bacterial consortium: a pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Bordoloi, Naba K

    2011-03-01

    Spillage of petroleum hydrocarbons causes significant environmental pollution. Bioremediation is an effective process to remediate petroleum oil contaminant from the ecosystem. The aim of the present study was to reclaim a petroleum oil-contaminated soil which was unsuitable for the cultivation of crop plants by using petroleum oil hydrocarbon-degrading microbial consortium. Bacterial consortium consisting of Bacillus subtilis DM-04 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa M and NM strains were seeded to 20% (v/w) petroleum oil-contaminated soil, and bioremediation experiment was carried out for 180 days under laboratory condition. The kinetics of hydrocarbon degradation was analyzed using biochemical and gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The ecotoxicity of the elutriates obtained from petroleum oil-contaminated soil before and post-treatment with microbial consortium was tested on germination and growth of Bengal gram (Cicer aretinum) and green gram (Phaseolus mungo) seeds. Bacterial consortium showed a significant reduction in total petroleum hydrocarbon level in contaminated soil (76% degradation) as compared to the control soil (3.6% degradation) 180 days post-inoculation. The GC analysis confirmed that bacterial consortium was more effective in degrading the alkane fraction compared to aromatic fraction of crude petroleum oil hydrocarbons in soil. The nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen compounds fraction was least degraded. The reclaimed soil supported the germination and growth of crop plants (C. aretinum and P. mungo). In contrast, seeds could not be germinated in petroleum oil-contaminated soil. The present study reinforces the application of bacterial consortium rather than individual bacterium for the effective bioremediation and reclamation of soil contaminated with petroleum oil.

  17. Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Undefined Petroleum Fractions Using Group Contributions Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Cisneros Humberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen solubility in heavy undefined petroleum fractions is estimated by taking as starting point a method of characterization based on functional groups [ Carreón-Calderón et al. (2012 Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 51, 14188-14198 ]. Such method provides properties entering into equations of states and molecular pseudostructures formed by non-integer numbers of functional groups. Using Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE data from binary mixtures of known compounds, interaction parameters between hydrogen and the calculated functional groups were estimated. Besides, the incorporation of the hydrogen-carbon ratio of the undefined petroleum fractions into the method allows the corresponding hydrogen solubility to be properly estimated. This procedure was tested with seven undefined petroleum fractions from 27 to 6 API over wide ranges of pressure and temperature (323.15 to 623.15 K. The results seem to be in good agreement with experimental data (overall Relative Average Deviation, RAD < 15%.

  18. Extraction of heavy oil by supercritical carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Spirov, Pavel; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2010-01-01

    The present study deals with the extraction of heavy oil by supercritical carbon dioxide at the pressure values changing from 16 to 56 MPa at the fixed value of temperature: 60oC. The amount of the recovered liquid phase of oil was calculated as a percentage of the extracted amount to the initial...... 40 gm of oil. The noticeable breackover point in the graph of the oil recovery versus pressure was observed at 27 MPa, which was in concordance with the conclusions from chromatographic analysis of the extracted oil samples. But the recovery rate of 14 % at this pressure value was not high enough...

  19. Hydrodynamic thickness of petroleum oil adsorbed layers in the pores of reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Algharaib, Meshal K; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2006-06-01

    The hydrodynamic thickness delta of adsorbed petroleum (crude) oil layers into the pores of sandstone rocks, through which the liquid flows, has been studied by Poiseuille's flow law and the evolution of (electrical) streaming current. The adsorption of petroleum oil is accompanied by a numerical reduction in the (negative) surface potential of the pore walls, eventually stabilizing at a small positive potential, attributed to the oil macromolecules themselves. After increasing to around 30% of the pore radius, the adsorbed layer thickness delta stopped growing either with time or with concentrations of asphaltene in the flowing liquid. The adsorption thickness is confirmed with the blockage value of the rock pores' area determined by the combination of streaming current and streaming potential measurements. This behavior is attributed to the effect on the disjoining pressure across the adsorbed layer, as described by Derjaguin and Churaev, of which the polymolecular adsorption films lose their stability long before their thickness has approached the radius of the rock pore.

  20. Case studies using the United States Coast Guard's Oil Identification System for petroleum spill source identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, P.W.; Castellano, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Oil Identification System (OIS) was developed in the 1970's at the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, to determine the unique, intrinsic properties which would allow the matching of a spilled oil with its correct source. The Central Oil Identification Laboratory (COIL) was established in 1978 as the operating facility to implement the OIS. The OIS encompasses four analytical methods; thin layer chromatography, fluorescence spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography. A sample can be studied according to each individual method or multi-methods approach can be chosen if no single technique gives unequivocal results. Combined these methods are greater than 99% effective. The authors recently utilized the OIS and the COIL for three petroleum spill investigations in New York. As part of the investigation to determine the source(s) of several different petroleum product spills, OIS was conducted along with a review of groundwater sample chromatograms

  1. Proceedings of the Ontario Petroleum Institute's 48. annual conference : Ontario oil, gas and storage conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference discussed issues related to Ontario's petroleum industry and evaluated the province's potential hydrocarbon plays. Geological studies of interest to oil and gas operators were presented along with storage opportunities for hydrocarbons in underground formations. Regulatory issues related to the environmental impacts of oil and gas operations on soil and groundwater were reviewed, and various mitigation options for treating soils impacted by hydrocarbons were discussed. New technologies currently being used in Ontario's petroleum industry were presented together with various investment and exploration opportunities. An economic update of recent oil and gas activities in the region was also presented. The conference was divided into 7 sessions, and featured 17 presentations, of which 11 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  2. The influence of asphaltenes of the petroleum on the rheology of O/W (Oil/Water) emulsions; Influencia de asfaltenos do petroleo sobre a reologia de emulsoes O/A (Oleo/Agua)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ronaldo Goncalves dos; Mohamed, Rahoma Sadeg; Loh, Watson; Bannwart, Antonio Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Heavy oils represent a large fraction of the Brazilian petroleum reserves and display a great potential for application as substitute to the conventional oils, provided a suitable technology for their transportation is available. The high viscosity of these heavy oils leads to high flow resistance and increase in the recovery and transportation costs. Methodologies employed to reduce these problems involve application of heat of addition of diluents or lighter oils, but are associated with high costs. Formation of low viscosity oil-in-water emulsions has been proposed as an alternative for the transportation of heavy oils, as investigated in this work. Preliminary results indicate significant viscosity decreases upon emulsification of heavy oils (viscosities greater than 1,000 cP) forming o/w emulsions with high oil content (between 50-65 vol. %), which display viscosities within 4-25 cP. Additionally, the effect of different surfactants, methodology of preparation and oil asphaltene content on the emulsion stability was also evaluated. These results confirm the potential of emulsification as a viable methodology for heavy oil transportation. (author)

  3. Effects of humic acid on phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil simultaneously contaminated with heavy metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soyoung Park; Ki Seob Kim; Jeong-Tae Kim; Daeseok Kang; Kijune Sung

    2011-01-01

    The use of humic acid (HA) to enhance the efficiency of phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel was evaluated in this study.A sample of soil was artificially contaminated with commercially available diesel fuel to an initial total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration of 2300 mg/kg and four heavy metals with concentrations of 400 mg/kg for Pb,200 mg/kg for Cu,12 mg/kg for Cd,and 160 mg/kg for Ni.Three plant species,Brassica campestris,Festuca arundinacea,and Helianthus annuus,were selected for the phytodegradation experiment.Percentage degradation of TPH in the soil in a control pot supplemented with HA increased to 45% from 30% without HA.The addition of HA resulted in an increases in the removal of TPH from the soil in pots planted with B.campestris,F.arundinacea,and H.annuus,enhancing percentage degradation to 86%,64%,and 85% from 45%,54%,and 66%,respectively.The effect of HA was also observed in the degradation of n-alkanes within 30 days.The rates of removal of n-alkanes in soil planted with B.campestris and H.annuus were high for n-alkanes in the range of C11-C28.A dynamic increase in dehydrogenase activity was observed during the last 15 days of a 30-day experimental period in all the pots amended with HA.The enhanced biodegradation performance for TPHs observed might be due to an increase in microbial activities and bioavailable TPH in soils caused by combined effects of plants and HA.The results suggested that HA could act as an enhancing agent for phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel and heavy metals.

  4. Evidence that the terms of petroleum contracts influence the rate of development of oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, M.B.; Russell, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents evidence that the main determinant of the rate of development of Libya's crude oil upstream activities, from 1961 to 1999, was the terms of the petroleum contractual agreements, which existed between the state and the international oil industry during that period, and that US sanctions against the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya failed to affect this rate of development. In keeping with other Members of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), Libya has, over three decades, been a key player in helping to regulate global production levels of oil and gas. However, the economic and political strengths and weaknesses of individual Members of OPEC vary widely and it is inevitable that the stresses arising from adherence to OPEC policies will vary proportionately to these strengths and weaknesses. It is instructive, therefore, to analyse how successfully Libya has exploited its own petroleum resources. The results are thought-provoking and send signals to the superpowers of the futility of economic sanctions against countries whose political policies they find distasteful. Further, the analysis highlights the need for OPEC Members to be fully informed of the significance of the terms of the petroleum agreements they employ in their countries. (author)

  5. Heavy crude oil and synthetic crude market outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation included an outline of the international heavy crude supply and demand versus Canadian heavy crude supply and disposition, and pricing outlook for synthetic crudes. Differences among crude oils such as light sweet, light sour, heavy and bitumen were described and illustrated with respect to their gravity, API, percentage of sulphur, metals and nitrogen. Internationally, heavy and sour crude supplies are forecast to increase significantly over the next four years. Discoveries of light sour crude in offshore Gulf of Mexico will provide a major new source of sour crude to U.S. Gulf Coast refineries. Venezuela's supplies of heavy and sour crude are also expected to increase over the next few years. Mexico and Canada have plans to increase their heavy crude production. All of the crudes will be aimed at the U.S. Gulf Coast and Midwest markets. Pentanes and condensates are also expected to increase based on the growing Canadian natural gas production. Diluent demand will also grow to match Canadian heavy crude/bitumen production. U.S. midwest refiners are proposing expansions to allow them to process more Canadian heavy crude oil. At present, only a few refineries are equipped to process significant amounts of synthetic crude. It was suggested that to absorb available heavy and synthetic production, increased penetration into both Canadian and U.S. markets will be required. Some refineries may have to be modified to process heavy and synthetic oil supplies. Heavy oil and synthetic producers may need to develop relationships with refiners such as joint ventures and term supply agreements to secure markets. 2 tabs., 12 figs

  6. Abstracts of Go-Expo 2003 : Gas and oil exposition and Canadian international petroleum conference 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The Go-Expo 2003 gas and oil exposition, held in conjunction with the Canadian international petroleum conference, showcased some of the newest technologies, products and services available to the petroleum industry. The more than 30 presentations featured case studies on new technologies pertaining to exploration, drilling and production, environmental strategies, information technology and e-commerce. The presenters represented academia, industry, as well as provincial and territorial governments. Some of the topics discussed included: coalbed methane drilling procedures, upgrading processes, in-line separation techniques, reducing emissions under the Kyoto Protocol, safety and pollution prevention in the industry, water abatement in gas wells, and integrated crisis management.

  7. Air toxics from heavy oil production and consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipfert, F.W.; DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    This report assesses the potential impact of recent Federal and state regulations for airborne toxic substances on the production and consumption of heavy fuel oils. Emissions of nickel from heavy oil production in California are considered in some detail, in conjunction with California state regulations for toxic emissions. Although the use of thermal energy from heavy crude oils could in theory be impacted by toxic air pollution regulations, recent trends towards the use of natural gas for the required extraction energy appear to provide substantial relief, in addition to reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants. However, the consumption of residual fuel oils containing toxic metals could result in higher population exposures to these substances and their attendant risks may be worthy of more detailed analysis

  8. Proceedings of the heavy oil Latin America congress 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This conference brought experts together to explore the challenges faced and opportunities available in the dynamic emerging market for heavy oil which Latin America offers. The conference was attended by over 700 delegates from around the world representing official and private agencies, Latin American governments, national oil companies and service companies in heavy oil producing countries. These participants were given the opportunity to learn about the entire value chain of Latin America's heavy oil industry, with emphasis on balancing challenging environmental and social issues with operational best practices, and they also the opportunity to share their knowledge and expertise with their peers. 17 of the 29 papers presented during this conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  9. The density behaviour of heavy oils in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.; Fieldhouse, B.

    2006-01-01

    The recent concern regarding the difficulty of cleaning up Low API gravity oils (LAPIO) spilled in water was discussed. Sinking and overwashing are 2 phenomena related to the behaviour of these heavy oils in water. Sinking refers to the complete submergence of the oil to the bottom of a waterbody, while over-washing refers to the overflowing of a layer of water over dense oil at sea when the oil is still close to the surface. The latter is important because even a micron-layer of water could render the oil undetectable, particularly at acute viewing angles, such as from a ship. This paper reviewed the properties of heavy oil, the prediction of density changes and the sinking/over-washing of heavy oil. In particular, it discussed a spill which occurred in August 2005 when 11 tank cars from train derailment spilled 800,000 litres of Bunker fuel mixed with high PAH-containing pole-treating oil into Lake Wabamun, Alberta. The behaviour of the oil included submergence, neutral buoyancy, resurfacing and formation of several types of aggregates of oil. This study summarized the behaviours and processes that transformed the particles of oil into small tar balls, larger logs, sheets, and large lumps into a slick. Sediment uptake or loss was found to be the major process that caused the changes in density. The behaviour of the oils was compared with respect to density and uptake of various types of sediment. The paper also reviewed the literature on dense oil behaviour. Weathering experiments performed on dense oils to determine if extensive weathering could render oils heavier than water showed that rarely is weathering the only factor in the bulk sinking of oil. Once an oil is submerged, little weathering occurs, either by dissolution or volatilization. The uptake of particulate matter is the most important process in increasing density. This study reviewed over-washing experiments to develop a mathematical solution of the conditions required for oil to be covered by a

  10. CG/MS quantitation of diamondoid compounds in crude oils and petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.; Wang, Z.D.; Hollebone, B.P.; Fingas, M.; Peng, X.; Landriault, M.

    2006-01-01

    Diamondoids are a class of saturated hydrocarbons that consist of 3-dimensionally fused cyclohexane rings. Diamondoid compounds in petroleum are the result of carbonium ion rearrangements of cyclic precursors on clay superacids in the source rock during oil generation. They are considered to be a problem due to their deposition during production of reservoir fluids and transportation of natural gas, gas condensates and light crude oils. At high concentrations, and with changes in pressure and temperature, diamondoid compounds can segregate out of reservoir fluids during production. Environmental scientists have considered fingerprinting the diamondoid hydrocarbons as a forensic method for oil spill studies. Since diamondoid compounds are thermodynamically stable, they have potential applications in oil-source correlation and differentiation for cases where traditional biomarker terpanes and steranes are absent because of environmental weathering or refining of petroleum products. Although there is increased awareness of possible use of diamondoid compounds for source identification, there is no systematic approach for using these compounds. Quantitative surveys of the abundances of diamondoids are not available. Therefore, this study developed a reliable analytical method for quantitative diamondoid analysis. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitatively determine diamondoid compounds (adamantane, diamantane and their alkylated homologues) in 14 fresh crude oils and 23 refined petroleum products, including light and mid-range distillate fuels, residual fuels and lubricating oils collected from different sources. Results were compared with 2 types of biomarker compounds in oil saturated hydrocarbon fractions. Several diagnostic ratios of diamondoids were developed based on their concentrations. Their potential use for forensic oil spill source identification was evaluated. 24 refs., 8 tabs., 4 figs

  11. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program's oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994

  12. Hydroprocessing full-range of heavy oils and bitumen using ultradispersed catalysts at low severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Enzo

    The progressive exhaustion of light crude oils is forcing the petroleum industry to explore new alternatives for the exploitation of unconventional oils. New approaches are searching for technologies able to produce, transport and refine these feedstocks at lower costs, in which symbiotic processes between the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and the conventional upgrading technologies are under investigation. The process explored in this thesis is an interesting alternative for in-situ upgrading of these crude oils in the presence of ultradispersed (UD) catalysts, which are included as a disperse phase able to circulate along with the processed feed. The objectives of this work are: (a) study the performance of UD catalysts in the presence of a full range (non fractioned) heavy oil and bitumen and (b) evaluate the recyclability of the UD catalysts. Four different heavy crude oils were evaluated in the presence with UD catalysts at a total pressure of 2.8 MPa, residence time of 8 hours and reaction temperatures from 360 up to 400ºC. Thermal and catalytic hydro-processing were compared in terms of conversion and product stability. A comparison between the different crude oils was additionally derived in terms of SARA, initial micro-carbon content and virgin oil stability among other properties. Advantages of catalytic hydro-processing over thermal hydro-processing were evidenced, with UD catalysts playing an essential hydrogenating role while retarding coke formation; microcarbon and asphaltenes reduction in the presence of UD catalysts was observed. To evaluate the feasibility of recycling the UD catalysts, a micro-slurry recycled unit was developed as part of this research. These main results showed: (a) a successful design of this unit, (b) that temperature, LHSV and fractional recycling ratio have more impact on VGO conversion, while pressure has almost no effect, and (c) an UD catalysts agglomeration process was detected, however this process is slow and reversible.

  13. Field portable petroleum analysis for validation of the site characterization and analysis penetrometer system petroleum, oil and lubricant sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.M.; Jones, P.; Porter, B.

    1995-01-01

    A petroleum, oil and lubricant (POL) sensor for the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) has been developed by the Tri-Services (e.g. Army, Navy and Air Force) to characterize the distribution of POL contaminants on military sites. The sensor is based on the detection of POL contaminants using a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometer. The SCAPS POL sensor has been shown to be a valuable tool for the rapid screening of POL contamination in the subsurface. However, many factors can affect the LIF response of a particular fuel at a particular site. These include fuel type, age of spill (e.g. weathering) and soil type. The LIF sensor also detects fluorescence from any naturally occurring fluorophores, including humic substances and fluorescent minerals. These factors lead to the development of an independent procedure for the verification of the POL sensor response. This paper describes a field portable total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbon (TRPH) method based on EPA Method 418.1 and its application to on site validation of the SCAPS POL sensor response at a number of contaminated sites

  14. Succession in the petroleum reservoir microbiome through an oil field production lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Alsop, Eric B; Lomans, Bartholomeus P; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Head, Ian M; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Subsurface petroleum reservoirs are an important component of the deep biosphere where indigenous microorganisms live under extreme conditions and in isolation from the Earth's surface for millions of years. However, unlike the bulk of the deep biosphere, the petroleum reservoir deep biosphere is subject to extreme anthropogenic perturbation, with the introduction of new electron acceptors, donors and exogenous microbes during oil exploration and production. Despite the fundamental and practical significance of this perturbation, there has never been a systematic evaluation of the ecological changes that occur over the production lifetime of an active offshore petroleum production system. Analysis of the entire Halfdan oil field in the North Sea (32 producing wells in production for 1-15 years) using quantitative PCR, multigenic sequencing, comparative metagenomic and genomic bins reconstruction revealed systematic shifts in microbial community composition and metabolic potential, as well as changing ecological strategies in response to anthropogenic perturbation of the oil field ecosystem, related to length of time in production. The microbial communities were initially dominated by slow growing anaerobes such as members of the Thermotogales and Clostridiales adapted to living on hydrocarbons and complex refractory organic matter. However, as seawater and nitrate injection (used for secondary oil production) delivered oxidants, the microbial community composition progressively changed to fast growing opportunists such as members of the Deferribacteres, Delta-, Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria, with energetically more favorable metabolism (for example, nitrate reduction, H 2 S, sulfide and sulfur oxidation). This perturbation has profound consequences for understanding the microbial ecology of the system and is of considerable practical importance as it promotes detrimental processes such as reservoir souring and metal corrosion. These findings provide a new

  15. Biological treatment process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil field produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellez, G.; Khandan, N.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil fields produced waters using biological treatment was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. Based on previous laboratory studies, a field-scale prototype system was designed and operated over a period of four months. Two different sources of produced waters were tested in this field study under various continuous flow rates ranging from 375 1/D to 1,800 1/D. One source of produced water was an open storage pit; the other, a closed storage tank. The TDS concentrations of these sources exceeded 50,000 mg/l; total n-alkanes exceeded 100 mg/l; total petroleum hydrocarbons exceeded 125 mg/l; and total BTEX exceeded 3 mg/l. Removals of total n-alkanes, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX remained consistently high over 99%. During these tests, the energy costs averaged $0.20/bbl at 12 bbl/D.

  16. Placing Brazil's heavy acid oils on international markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szklo, Alexandre Salem; Machado, Giovani; Schaeffer, Roberto; Felipe Simoes, Andre; Barboza Mariano, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This paper identifies the international market niches of Brazil's heavy acid oils. It analyzes the perspectives for making wider use of heavy acid oils, assessing their importance for certain oil-producing regions such as Brazil, Venezuela, West Africa, the North Sea and China. Within this context, the oil produced in the Marlim Field offshore Brazil is of specific interest, spurred by the development of its commercial brand name for placement on international markets and backed by ample production volumes. This analysis indicates keener international competition among acid oils produced in Brazil, the North Sea and the West Coast of Africa, through to 2010. However, over the long term, refinery conversion capacity is the key factor for channeling larger volumes of heavy acid oils to the international market. In this case, the future of acid oil producers will depend on investments in refineries close to oil product consumption centers. For Brazil, this means investments in modifying its refineries and setting up partnerships in the downstream segment for consumer centers absorbing all products of high added value, such as the USA and even Southeast Asia and Western Europe

  17. Estimating the capability of microalgae to physiological acclimatization and genetic adaptation to petroleum and diesel oil contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Lopez, Julia; Lopez-Rodas, Victoria [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Puerta de Hierro s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Costas, Eduardo, E-mail: ecostas@vet.ucm.es [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Puerta de Hierro s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microalgae are able to physiological acclimatization low doses of petroleum and diesel oil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When petroleum or oil concentration exceeds these limits, survival depend of rare mutations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Petroleum-resistant and diesel oil mutants occur spontaneously prior to oil exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After 300 generations of artificial selection resistant strains were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanobacteria has more difficulties to achieve petroleum resistance than Chlorophyta. - Abstract: There is increasing scientific interest in how phytoplankton reacts to petroleum contamination, since crude oil and its derivatives are generating extensive contamination of aquatic environments. However, toxic effects of short-term petroleum exposure are more widely known than the adaptation of phytoplankton to long-term petroleum exposure. An analysis of short-term and long-term effects of petroleum exposure was done using experimental populations of freshwater (Scenedesmus intermedius and Microcystis aeruginosa) and marine (Dunaliella tertiolecta) microalgae isolated from pristine sites without crude oil product contamination. These strains were exposed to increased levels of petroleum and diesel oil. Short-term exposure to petroleum or diesel oil revealed a rapid inhibition of photosynthetic performance and cell proliferation in freshwater and marine phytoplankton species. A broad degree of inter-specific variation in lethal contamination level was observed. When different strains were exposed to petroleum or diesel oil over the long-term, the cultures showed massive destruction of the sensitive cells. Nonetheless, after further incubation, some cultures were able to grow again due to cells that were resistant to the toxins. By means of a fluctuation analysis, discrimination between cells that had become resistant due to physiological acclimatization and resistant

  18. Estimating the capability of microalgae to physiological acclimatization and genetic adaptation to petroleum and diesel oil contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Lopez, Julia; Lopez-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microalgae are able to physiological acclimatization low doses of petroleum and diesel oil. ► When petroleum or oil concentration exceeds these limits, survival depend of rare mutations. ► Petroleum-resistant and diesel oil mutants occur spontaneously prior to oil exposure. ► After 300 generations of artificial selection resistant strains were obtained. ► Cyanobacteria has more difficulties to achieve petroleum resistance than Chlorophyta. - Abstract: There is increasing scientific interest in how phytoplankton reacts to petroleum contamination, since crude oil and its derivatives are generating extensive contamination of aquatic environments. However, toxic effects of short-term petroleum exposure are more widely known than the adaptation of phytoplankton to long-term petroleum exposure. An analysis of short-term and long-term effects of petroleum exposure was done using experimental populations of freshwater (Scenedesmus intermedius and Microcystis aeruginosa) and marine (Dunaliella tertiolecta) microalgae isolated from pristine sites without crude oil product contamination. These strains were exposed to increased levels of petroleum and diesel oil. Short-term exposure to petroleum or diesel oil revealed a rapid inhibition of photosynthetic performance and cell proliferation in freshwater and marine phytoplankton species. A broad degree of inter-specific variation in lethal contamination level was observed. When different strains were exposed to petroleum or diesel oil over the long-term, the cultures showed massive destruction of the sensitive cells. Nonetheless, after further incubation, some cultures were able to grow again due to cells that were resistant to the toxins. By means of a fluctuation analysis, discrimination between cells that had become resistant due to physiological acclimatization and resistant cells arising from rare spontaneous mutations was accomplished. In addition, an analysis was done as to the maximum capacity of

  19. Structural Study of Asphaltenes from Iranian Heavy Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davarpanah L.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, asphaltene precipitation from Iranian heavy crude oil (Persian Gulf off-shore was performed using n-pentane (n-C5 and n-heptane (n-C7 as light alkane precipitants. Several analytical techniques, each following different principles, were then used to structurally characterize the precipitated asphaltenes. The yield of asphaltene obtained using n-pentane precipitant was higher than asphaltene precipitated with the use of n-heptane. The asphaltene removal affected the n-C5 and n-C7 maltene fractions at temperatures below 204°C, as shown by the data obtained through the simulated distillation technique. Viscosity of heavy oil is influenced by the asphaltene content and behavior. The viscosity dependence of the test heavy oil on the shear rate applied was determined and the flow was low at y. above 25 s-1 . The reconstituted heavy oil samples were prepared by adding different amounts of asphaltenes to the maltenes (deasphalted heavy oil and asphaltene effects were more pronounced at the low temperature of 25°C as compared with those at the higher temperatures. According to the power law model used in this study the flowability of the test heavy oil exhibited a pseudoplastic character. Structural results obtained from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR spectroscopy showed the presence of the different functional groups in the precipitated asphaltenes. For instance, the presence of different hydrocarbons (aliphatic, aromatic and alicyclic based on their characteristics in the FTIR spectra was confirmed. Resins are effective dispersants, and removal of this fraction from the crude oil is disturbing to the colloidal nature of heavy oil; asphaltene flocculation and precipitation eventually occur. Appearance of pores in the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM images was used as an indicator of the resin detachment. With the use of 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy, two important structural parameters of the

  20. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Contamination Profile of Ochani Stream in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination profile, heavy metals and .... potential conduits for oil and water migrating from the ... by Gas Chromatography: Soil / sediment / sludge ..... fractions contained in the dump pits) which have.

  1. Floating Heavy Oil Recovery: Current State Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-27

    recovered oil to a chute cause some build-up of oil, but the retained amount was not considered substantial enough to warrant any design changes. The GT...unit was the Lamor Brush Conveyor (shown in Figure 7) which uses a yellow V- brush design to recover oils and uses a propeller to draw water through...deals with the transfer of product that has already been collected and contained (Moffatt et al., 2004). The Coast Guard Research and Development

  2. Membrane fractionation of biomass fast pyrolysis oil and impact of its presence on a petroleum gas oil hydrotreatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro , Ana; Hudebine , Damien; Dupassieux , Nathalie; Charon , Nadège; Geantet , Christophe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In order to limit the greenhouse effect causing climate change and reduce the needs of the transport sector for petroleum oils, transformation of lignocellulosic biomass is a promising alternative route to produce automotive fuels, chemical intermediates and energy. Gasification and liquefaction of biomass resources are the two main routes that are under investigation to convert biomass into biofuels. In the case of the liquefaction, due to the unstability of the lique...

  3. Tweens demulsification effects on heavy crude oil/water emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Hayati Roodbari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The demulsification role of Tweens (nonionic polymers was determined in the separation of water from heavy crude oil emulsion. According to the previous researches, these nonionic polymers, having hydrophilic and lipophilic groups, are appropriate for making oil in water emulsion. In this research their effects in certain concentrations on demulsifying of water in crude oil emulsion were proved. High molecular weight, alkenes’ chains and groups of ketone and ester in these polymers can improve their performance for the demulsification of water in crude oil emulsion. Their efficiencies are improved with electronegative groups such as oxygen. They leave no corrosion effect because they are neutral and do not leave counter ions.

  4. Should you trust your heavy oil viscosity measurement?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, L.; Miller, K.; Almond, R. [Petrovera Resources Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    For the last 60 years, the heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs from western Canada have been exploited with varying degrees of success. There are many factors that may effect heavy oil and bitumen production rates. Primary production rates, which vary greatly from field to field, were found to improve with the addition of steam. Viscosity is the single most valued criteria in predicting cold production response from a new field. It is also the criteria used to determine whether thermal process are needed to reduce oil viscosity, or whether horizontal or vertical wells should be used. This study examined why production forecasts based on oil viscosity alone have been poor. It is based on an extensive data collection project in the Elk Point area reservoir which has lower than expected and erratic cold production rates. Viscosity values from the same wells were found to vary by a factor of four or more. One of the objectives of this study was to encourage commercial labs to develop an industry-wide standard method of heavy oil sample cleaning and viscosity measurement. It is generally understood that viscosity increases with an increase in the concentration of asphaltenes, but there is little information to quantify the relationship. Some studies suggest that viscosity increases logarithmically with increasing asphaltenes. It was concluded that the prediction of the viscosity of heavy oils and bitumens is very empirical, but there are ways to improve data comparisons and evaluation by applying available information from other scientific fields. 23 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs.

  5. Comparison of the relative sensitivity of Arctic species to dispersed oil using total petroleum and PAH measures of toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extended periods of open water have expanded the potential opportunities for petroleum and gas exploration and production in the Arctic, increasing the focus on understanding the potential impacts of released oil on aquatic organisms. However, information regarding the toxicity o...

  6. Saurix Petroleum ja Infast Oil läksid offshore-firma kätte / Koit Brinkmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brinkmann, Koit

    2009-01-01

    Hollandi Antillidel registreeritud firmale CNP Investments N.V. kuulub 80 protsenti mootorikütuste hulgimüüja Saurix Petroleum aktsiatest ning samuti õlide ja kütuste hulgimüüja Infast Oil. Graafikud

  7. Wetland shoreline recession in the Mississippi River Delta from petroleum oiling and cyclonic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the relative impact of petroleum spill and storm surge on near-shore wetland loss by quantifying the lateral movement of coastal shores in upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana (USA), between June 2009 and October 2012, a study period that extends from the year prior to the Deepwater Horizon spill to 2.5 years following the spill. We document a distinctly different pattern of shoreline loss in the 2 years following the spill, both from that observed in the year prior to the spill, during which there was no major cyclonic storm, and from change related to Hurricane Isaac, which made landfall in August 2012. Shoreline erosion following oiling was far more spatially extensive and included loss in areas protected from wave-induced erosion. We conclude that petroleum exposure can substantially increase shoreline recession particularly in areas protected from storm-induced degradation and disproportionally alters small oil-exposed barrier islands relative to natural erosion.

  8. Injection of heavy fuel oil into the blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paloposki, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland); Hakala, J.; Mannila, P.; Laukkanen, J. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the injection and combustion of heavy fuel oil in blast furnaces. The injection of the oil was studied experimentally in a small-scale test rig. The combustion of the oil was analysed with a commercial computer program for flow and combustion simulations. Results from computer simulations show that the combustion of the oil can be improved by decreasing the size of the oil drops and by enhancing the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast. The devolatilization rate of the oil mainly depends on the size of the oil drops. The combustion rate of the volatiles mainly depends on the effectiveness of turbulent mixing with combustion air. Methods to decrease the size of the oil drops were sought in the experimental part of the study. Experimental results show that the size of the oil drops increases with increasing mass flow rate of the oil and decreases with increasing velocity of the hot blast. Methods to improve the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast are suggested but have not yet been experimentally tested. (author) (4 refs.)

  9. Injection of heavy fuel oil into the blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paloposki, T [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland); Hakala, J; Mannila, P; Laukkanen, J [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This study deals with the injection and combustion of heavy fuel oil in blast furnaces. The injection of the oil was studied experimentally in a small-scale test rig. The combustion of the oil was analysed with a commercial computer program for flow and combustion simulations. Results from computer simulations show that the combustion of the oil can be improved by decreasing the size of the oil drops and by enhancing the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast. The devolatilization rate of the oil mainly depends on the size of the oil drops. The combustion rate of the volatiles mainly depends on the effectiveness of turbulent mixing with combustion air. Methods to decrease the size of the oil drops were sought in the experimental part of the study. Experimental results show that the size of the oil drops increases with increasing mass flow rate of the oil and decreases with increasing velocity of the hot blast. Methods to improve the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast are suggested but have not yet been experimentally tested. (author) (4 refs.)

  10. Response of meiofauna to petroleum hydrocarbon of three fuel oils

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Farshchi, P.; Badesab, S.

    oil ,vas more than 50% in 25g/I'l 650/0 in 50 gil and 69% in 100g/I. In other cases the reductIon was higher. In lower con centrations (25g/l) the more sensItive taxa... in sediment con taining 100gl1 ofcrude oil (943.55 Ilg/g sediment) and the lowest in control tub as expected. Tub containing diesel had concentration ranging between 22.85 and 69.77Jlg/g while the tub with kerosene had the PHC concentration in the range of8...

  11. Determination of hydrogen content of petroleum products from Tema Oil Refinery using neutron backscatter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salifu, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen content of hydrocarbon materials is very important in several areas of industrial process such as mining, vegetable oil extraction and crude oil exploration and refining. A fast and more universal technique based on thermal neutron reflection was employed to determine the total hydrogen contents of petroleum samples from Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) and Crude oil samples from Jubilee field and Nigeria. The experimental set-up consisted of a source-holder housing a 1Ci Am-Be neutron source and a He-3 neutron detector. Two geometrical arrangements were considered and their sensitivities were compared. The set-up was used to measure the excess neutron count in both geometrical considerations and their reflection parameters were calculated as a function of hydrogen content of the samples. Calibration lines were deduced using liquid hydrocarbons containing well-known hydrogen and carbon contents as standards. Two linear equations were generated from the calibration lines and were used to further determine the hydrogen content of thirteen (13) petroleum samples obtained from Quality Control Department of TOR. The total hydrogen contents were found to be in the range of 7.211(hw %) - 15.069 (hw %) for vertical geometry and 7.206 (hw %) - 14.948 (hw %) for horizontal geometry respectively. The results obtained agreed constructively with other results obtained using different methodologies by other studies. The percentage error of the hydrogen contents denoted by (% E) for the various petroleum samples were also obtained and noticed to be within an acceptable range. The neutron backscatter technique was observed as an alternative and more generalized method for quality assurance and standardization in the petroleum industries

  12. Processes subject to integrated pollution control. Petroleum processes: oil refining and associated processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document, part of a series offering guidance on pollution control regulations issued by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution, (HMIP) focuses on petroleum processes such as oil refining and other associated processes. The various industrial processes used, their associated pollution release routes into the environment and techniques for controlling these releases are all discussed. Environmental quality standards are related to national and international agreements on pollution control and abatement. HMIP's work on air, water and land pollution monitoring is also reported. (UK)

  13. Impact of heavy metals on the oil products biodegradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukauskaite, Audrone; Jakubauskaite, Viktorija; Belous, Olga; Ambrazaitiene, Dalia; Stasiskiene, Zaneta

    2008-12-01

    Oil products continue to be used as a principal source of energy. Wide-scale production, transport, global use and disposal of petroleum have made them major contaminants in prevalence and quantity in the environment. In accidental spills, actions are taken to remove or remediate or recover the contaminants immediately, especially if they occur in environmentally sensitive areas, for example, in coastal zones. Traditional methods to cope with oil spills are confined to physical containment. Biological methods can have an advantage over the physical-chemical treatment regimes in removing spills in situ as they offer biodegradation of oil fractions by the micro-organisms. Recently, biological methods have been known to play a significant role in bioremediation of oil-polluted coastal areas. Such systems are likely to be of significance in the effective management of sensitive coastal ecosystems chronically subjected to oil spillage. For this reason the aim of this paper is to present an impact of Mn, Cu, Co and Mo quantities on oil biodegradation effectiveness in coastal soil and to determine the relationship between metal concentrations and degradation of two oil products (black oil and diesel fuel). Soil was collected in the Baltic Sea coastal zone oil products degradation area (Klaipeda, Lithuania). The experiment consisted of two parts: study on the influence of micro-elements on the oil product biodegradation process; and analysis of the influence of metal concentration on the number of HDMs. The analysis performed and results obtained address the following areas: impact of metal on a population of hydrocarbon degrading micro-organisms, impact of metals on residual concentrations of oil products, influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, inter-relation of metal concentrations with degradation rates. Statistical analysis was made using ;Statgraphics plus' software. The influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, the biodegradation process

  14. The great Canadian oil patch : the petroleum era from birth to peak. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, E.

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a history of the petroleum industry from its early years to the present day. Anecdotal tales of pioneers in the industry were related, with reference to the birth of the oil industry, the Turner Valley, early energy waste issues, and accidents. Norman Wells and the Canol Project were discussed, as was the accident at Leduc and issues surrounding Pembina. Issues concerning the great pipeline debate and Trans-Canada were related. An overview of the oil sands industry was provided along with historical information on Arctic development and offshore oil. The National Oil Policy was considered, with reference to the oil crisis, economic development and the rise and fall of the National Energy Program. Survivors of the oil industry crisis were discussed, with reference to the remaining large independent producers. Issues surrounding the end of the oil and gas age were also examined, with reference to issues concerning renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The Kyoto Protocol was reviewed in relation to the oil and gas industry. It was concluded that currently, low market prices mask external costs such as air pollution. It was also noted that if energy prices continue to rise, energy efficiency will increase, thereby reducing the gap between fossil and alternative fuels. In addition, it was suggested that the incentive to capture carbon dioxide emissions and sequester them to recover more oil from old fields will increase. refs., tabs., figs

  15. Chronic oiling of marine birds in California by natural petroleum seeps, shipwrecks, and other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Laird A; Nevins, Hannahrose; Martin, Marida; Sugarman, Susan; Harvey, James T; Ziccardi, Michael H

    2014-02-15

    We assessed temporal and spatial patterns of chronic oiling of seabirds in California during 2005-2010, using data on: (1) live oiled birds reported to the Oiled Wildlife Care Network (OWCN) from throughout the state, and (2) dead oiled birds found during systematic monthly beached-bird surveys in central California. A mean of 245 (± 141 SD) live miscellaneous oiled birds (not associated with known oil spills) were reported to the OWCN per year, and 0.1 oiled dead birds km(-1) per month were found on beach surveys in central California. Chemical fingerprinting of oiled feathers from a subset of these birds (n=101) indicated that 89% of samples tested were likely from natural petroleum seeps off southern and central California. There was a pronounced peak during late winter in the number of oiled birds reported in southern California, which we theorize may be related to large storm waves disturbing underwater seeps. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative analysis of fiscal terms for Alberta oil sands and international heavy and conventional oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Meurs, P.

    2007-01-01

    There are considerable differences between international heavy oil and Alberta oil sands projects, notably the high viscosity of the bitumen in the oil sands reservoirs. The oil sands bitumen do not flow to wells without heating the bitumen, thereby adding to the already high cost of Alberta oil sand operations. This report provided an economic comparison of Alberta oil sands and international heavy oil projects. It also included a brief scoping review to compare with conventional oil regimes. Full exploration costs including the costs of dry holes were allocated to conventional oil operations in order to obtain a proper comparison. This investigation included the costs of dry holes. The report was a follow up to an earlier study released on April 12, 2007 on the preliminary fiscal evaluation of Alberta oil sand terms. The report provided an economic framework and described project selection. It then provided a discussion of production, costs and price data. Four adjusted projects were presented and compared with Alberta. The Venezuelan royalty formula was also discussed. Last, the report provided a detailed fiscal analysis. Comparisons were offered with Cold Lake and Athabasca Mine. A review of some other fiscal systems applicable to conventional oil were also outlined. It was concluded that Alberta oil sands developments are very competitive. It would be possible to modestly increase government revenues, without affecting the international competitive position of Alberta with respect to conventional oil. There is also some possibility to increase the base royalty on the Alberta oil sands without losing competitiveness. tabs., figs

  17. Hydrocarbons dating by Re-Os method: experimental study of the Re-Os couple geochemical behaviour in oils during the evolution of a petroleum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdaoui, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    massive and very rapid transfer of Re and Os into oil, regardless of the operating conditions used or the type of oil (heavy or light, sulfur-rich or not). Combined with available data on the concentrations of these metals in groundwaters, the results of this study imply that the Re and Os observed in natural oils could be inherited from oil-water interactions occurring after oil expulsion from the source rock. Finally, the study by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (synchrotron radiation) of Re and Os in oils artificially enriched in these elements contributed to the proposal of a mechanism for Re and Os incorporation at the oil-water interface. It is suggested that asphaltenes play a key role in the rapid uptake of these metals, which then may undergo a kinetically slow process of complexation with organic matter. All results permit to propose a resetting of the geo-chronometer controlled by the transfer of Re and Os from formation waters to oils at the scale of petroleum fields. This mechanism implies that the geological event dated is the last hydrodynamic closure of the petroleum traps. (author) [fr

  18. Determination of Hydrogen and Carbon contents in crude oil and Petroleum fractions by NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadim, Mohammad A.; Wolny, R.A.; Al-Dhuwaihi, Abdullah S.; Al-Hajri, E.A.; Al-Ghamdi, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopic methods were developed for determining hydrogen and carbon contents in petroleum products. These methods are applicable to a wide of petroleum streams. A new reference standard, bis (trimethylsilyl) methane, BTMSM, is introduced fro both proton and carbon-13 NMR for the first time, which offers several advantages over those customarily employed. These methods are important for the calculation of the mass balance and hydrogen consumption in pilot plant studies. Unlike the ASTM D-5291 combustion method, the NMR methods also allow for the measurement of hydrogen and carbon content in low boiling fractions and those containing hydrogen as low as 1%. The NMR methods can also determine aromatic and aliphatic hydrogens carbons in a given sample without additional experimentation. The precision and accuracy of the newly developed NMR methods are compared with those of currently employed ASTM D-5291 combustion method. Using the proton NMR method, hydrogen content was determined in fifteen model compounds and sixty-eight petroleum fractions. The NMR and ASTM methods show an agreement within +5%for 48 out of a total number of 68 oil fractions. Using carbon-13 NMR, the carbon content was determined for four representative compounds and three fractions of crude oil. Both carbon-13 NMR and ASTM methods give comparable carbon content in model compounds and crude oil fractions. (author)

  19. Analysis of Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brashear, Jerry P.; North, Walter B.; Thomas Charles P.; Becker, Alan B.; Faulder, David D.

    2000-01-12

    Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers is a program of the National Oil Research Program, U.S. Department of Energy. Between 1995 and 1998, the program competitively selected and cost-shared twenty-two projects with small producers. The purpose was to involve small independent producers in testing technologies of interest to them that would advance (directly or indirectly) one or more of four national program objectives: (1) Extend the productive life of reservoirs; (2) Increase production and/or reserves; (3) Improve environmental performance; and (4) Broaden the exchange of technology information.

  20. Determination of pollutant elements and heavy metals in petroleum sludge and scale at Heglig field Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, N. T.

    2012-02-01

    The release of pollutant metals from petroleum industry in to ecosystems represents a serious hazard for the biosphere, because of their toxicity. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of some elements in petroleum sludge and scales collected from petroleum production area in Heglig oil field located in South Kordofan State. The concentration of Ca, Fe, V, Mn,Ni, Cu, Zn, Cs, Sr, Zr, Y and Pb in sludge and scale samples have been determined using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) equipped with a point source of 1 09C d. The concentration of Ca and Fe in scale samples were found to fall in range of 15,49-23.28% and 0.98-5.13%, respectively. The a verge elemental concentrations of Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr,Y, and Pb in scale samples were 2917.8, 567.74, 23.21, 23.05, 101.67, 31.38, 177.06 and 24.12 (mg/kg), respectively. The concentrations of Ca and Fe in sludge samples ranged from 1.98-8.82% and 0.71-5.19%, respectively and the a verge elemental concentrations of Cs, V, Mn,Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y and Zr were 7.44, 92,59, 557.36, 7.67, 162.72,28.67, 65.02, 45.64 and 52.15 (mg/kg), respectively. Correlation analysis revealed lock of any significant correlation between elemental concentrations in sludge and scales. (Author)

  1. Antioxidant Effect on Oxidation Stability of Blend Fish Oil Biodiesel with Vegetable Oil Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hossain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different phenolic synthetic antioxidants were used to improve the oxidation stability of fish oil biodiesel blends with vegetable oil biodiesel and petroleum diesel. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT most effective for improvement of the oxidation stability of petro diesel, whereas  tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ showed good performance in fish oil biodiesel. Fish oil/Rapeseed oil biodiesel mixed showed some acceptable results in higher concentration ofantioxidants. TBHQ showed better oxidation stability than BHT in B100 composition. In fish oil biodiesel/diesel mixed fuel, BHT was more effective antioxidant than TBHQ to increase oxidationstability because BHT is more soluble than TBHQ. The stability behavior of biodiesel/diesel blends with the employment of the modified Rancimat method (EN 15751. The performance ofantioxidants was evaluated for treating fish oil biodiesel/Rapeseed oil biodiesel for B100, and blends with two type diesel fuel (deep sulfurization diesel and automotive ultra-low sulfur or zero sulfur diesels. The examined blends were in proportions of 5, 10, 15, and 20% by volume of fish oilbiodiesel.

  2. Viscous fingering effects in solvent displacement of heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuthiell, D. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Kissel, G.; Jackson, C.; Frauenfeld, T.W.J.; Fisher, D. [Alberta Research Council, Devon, AB (Canada); Rispler, K. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Vapour Extraction (VAPEX) is a solvent-based process that is analogous to steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) for the recovery of heavy oil. A cyclic solvent process is preferred for thin reservoirs, particularly primary-depleted reservoirs. In a cyclic steam stimulation process, a solvent is injected into the reservoir for a period of time before oil is produced from the well. Viscous fingering is a phenomena that characterizes several solvent-based processes for the recovery of heavy oil. A combined experimental and simulation study was conducted to characterize viscous fingering under heavy oil recovery conditions (high ratio of oil to solvent viscosity). Four experiments were conducted in heavy oil-saturated sand packs. Three involved injection of a miscible, liquid solvent at the bottom of the sand pack. The heavy oil in these experiments was displaced upwardly. The fourth experiment involved top-down injection of a gaseous solvent. The miscible liquid displacement was dominated by one solvent finger which broke through to a producing well at the other end of the sand pack. Breakthrough times were similar to that at lower viscosity. The fourth experiment showed fingering along with features of a gravity-driven VAPEX process. Key features of the experiment and realistic fingering patterns were numerically simulated using a commercial reservoir simulator. It was emphasized that accurate modelling of dispersion is necessary in matching the observed phenomena. The simulations should include the capillary effects because of their significance for gaseous fingering and the VAPEX processes. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 20 figs.

  3. Exports of petroleum products, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    A summary is presented of exports of motor gasoline, middle distillate, aviation turbine fuel, heavy fuel oil, and partially processed oil from Canada for the 1989 calendar year. A discussion of petroleum product imports is included in order to put exports in the context of the overall trade. Exports of the above petroleum products averaged 30,400 m 3 /d in 1989, down 5% from 1988 levels. Motor gasoline shipments showed the largest decrease, down 1,500 m 3 to 7,700 m 3 /d. Export prices for light petroleum products stayed relatively close to USA spot prices except in June and July 1989, when attractive prices were obtained for shipments from the prairie provinces. The heavy fuel oil export price was similar to the USA east coast spot price in 1989, except in December. Canada's petroleum products imports in 1989 were 21,600 m 3 /d, compared to 18,400 m 3 /d in 1988. Imports of heavy fuel oil in eastern Canada rose 36% in 1989 because of industries switching from electricity and the high demand for thermal power generation. The USA remained Canada's largest trading partner in petroleum products. The top single exporter in 1989, as in 1988, was Newfoundland Processing, with a volume of 3,484,500 m 3 . 24 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Oil characterisation: assessment of composition, risks, degradation and remediation potential of total petroleum hydrocarbons in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lookman, R.; Vanermen, G.; Van De Weghe, H.; Gemoets, J.; Van der Sterren, G.; Alphenaar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Several methods are available for the characterization of petroleum hydrocarbons. The TPHCWG (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group) developed a method based on a silica column separation of aromatics and aliphatics and a GC-FID subdivision into equivalent-carbon fractions (EC) ('TPH-method'). This method was mainly developed for assessing human risks of oil compounds. Within NOBIS (Dutch Research program Biological In-situ Remediation), another method was developed based upon an equilibrium-experiment of the oil-polluted soil with water (column recirculation), which was further developed by TTE ('TTE-method'). This method uses measured water solubilities of individual oil components and GC-retention times yielding a subdivision of the hydrocarbons into compound classes that are relevant for assessing the remediation potential of the specific oil pollution. In this paper we present results of a research project in which we developed a new method, the 'OK-method' that combines these two procedures and allows a complete characterisation of the oil in terms of composition, (human) risks, volatility, solubility, plume behaviour (migration velocities of the soluble components) and aerobic degradation potential. (authors)

  5. Oil characterisation: assessment of composition, risks, degradation and remediation potential of total petroleum hydrocarbons in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lookman, R.; Vanermen, G.; Van De Weghe, H.; Gemoets, J. [Vito, Mol (Belgium); Van der Sterren, G.; Alphenaar, A. [TTE, Deventer (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    Several methods are available for the characterization of petroleum hydrocarbons. The TPHCWG (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group) developed a method based on a silica column separation of aromatics and aliphatics and a GC-FID subdivision into equivalent-carbon fractions (EC) ('TPH-method'). This method was mainly developed for assessing human risks of oil compounds. Within NOBIS (Dutch Research program Biological In-situ Remediation), another method was developed based upon an equilibrium-experiment of the oil-polluted soil with water (column recirculation), which was further developed by TTE ('TTE-method'). This method uses measured water solubilities of individual oil components and GC-retention times yielding a subdivision of the hydrocarbons into compound classes that are relevant for assessing the remediation potential of the specific oil pollution. In this paper we present results of a research project in which we developed a new method, the 'OK-method' that combines these two procedures and allows a complete characterisation of the oil in terms of composition, (human) risks, volatility, solubility, plume behaviour (migration velocities of the soluble components) and aerobic degradation potential. (authors)

  6. The case for a large heavy oil stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, P.

    2005-01-01

    EnCana Corporation markets significant proprietary and third party crude oil production in North America. This presentation presented details of EnCana's projected resources as well as estimated proved reserves in Canadian oil sands. Details of the Western Canadian heavy oil market were presented. Issues concerning Western Canadian Select (WCS) were also presented, including details of distillation and asphalt characteristics. Details of the WCS synthetic bitumen synergy were examined, as well as quality management issues. It was suggested that further optimization of WCS facilities include reduced operating complexity; less tank proliferation; delivery quality consistency; and reliability. WCS refiner advantages were also evaluated. Shipping and ramping details were discussed, along with growth potential. It was noted that WCS satisfies all the criteria for a benchmark crude. It was concluded that the case for a large Canadian heavy oil stream includes reduced operating complexity; optimized logistics; delivery quality consistency; improved stream liquidity; and enhanced price discovery. tabs., figs

  7. Proceedings of the Ontario Petroleum Institute's 46. annual conference : Ontario oil and gas conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for industry leaders and researchers to discuss issues related to Ontario's oil and gas industry. Economic profiles of the oil, gas, and salt resource industries were presented along with issues related to underground storage and abandoned oil wells. New technologies designed to improve production efficiency were also presented with particular reference to issues related to climate change and global energy needs. Other topics of discussion included gas storage facilities, the environmental impacts of the oil and gas industry, and issues related to site security. The conference was divided into 5 sessions. Two thesis award papers were also presented along with a keynote address that provided an overview of the petroleum industry's economic outlook. The conference featured 16 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  8. Down-hole catalytic upgrading of heavy crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, J.G.; Kessler, R.V.; Sawicki, R.A.; Belgrave, J.D.M.; Laureshen, C.J.; Mehta, S.A.; Moore, R.G.; Ursenbach, M.G. [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Several processing options have been developed to accomplish near-well bore in-situ upgrading of heavy crude oils. These processes are designed to pass oil over a fixed bed of catalyst prior to entering the production well, the catalyst being placed by conventional gravel pack methods. The presence of brine and the need to provide heat and reactant gases in a down-hole environment provide challenges not present in conventional processing. These issues were addressed and the processes demonstrated by use of a modified combustion tube apparatus. Middle-Eastern heavy crude oil and the corresponding brine were used at the appropriate reservoir conditions. In-situ combustion was used to generate reactive gases and to drive fluids over a heated sand or catalysts bed, simulating the catalyst contacting portion of the proposed processes. The heavy crude oil was found to be amenable to in-situ combustion at anticipated reservoir conditions, with a relatively low air requirement. Forcing the oil to flow over a heated zone prior to production results in some upgrading of the oil, as compared to the original oil, due to thermal effects. Passing the oil over a hydroprocessing catalyst located in the heated zone results in a product that is significantly upgraded as compared to either the original oil or thermally processed oil. Catalytic upgrading is due to hydrogenation and the results in about a 50% sulfur removal and an 8{degree} API gravity increase. Additionally, the heated catalyst was found to be efficient at converting CO to additional H{sub 2}. While all of the technologies needed for a successful field trial of in-situ catalytic upgrading exist, a demonstration has yet to be undertaken. 27 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Influence of Oil Viscosity on Alkaline Flooding for Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil viscosity was studied as an important factor for alkaline flooding based on the mechanism of “water drops” flow. Alkaline flooding for two oil samples with different viscosities but similar acid numbers was compared. Besides, series flooding tests for the same oil sample were conducted at different temperatures and permeabilities. The results of flooding tests indicated that a high tertiary oil recovery could be achieved only in the low-permeability (approximately 500 mD sandpacks for the low-viscosity heavy oil (Zhuangxi, 390 mPa·s; however, the high-viscosity heavy oil (Chenzhuang, 3450 mPa·s performed well in both the low- and medium-permeability (approximately 1000 mD sandpacks. In addition, the results of flooding tests for the same oil at different temperatures also indicated that the oil viscosity put a similar effect on alkaline flooding. Therefore, oil with a high-viscosity is favorable for alkaline flooding. The microscopic flooding test indicated that the water drops produced during alkaline flooding for oils with different viscosities differed significantly in their sizes, which might influence the flow behaviors and therefore the sweep efficiencies of alkaline fluids. This study provides an evidence for the feasibility of the development of high-viscosity heavy oil using alkaline flooding.

  10. Directions in refining and upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, B.; Parker, R. J.; Flint, L.

    1997-01-01

    The expansion of heavy oil transportation, marketing and refining facilities over the past two decades have been reviewed to show the strides that several Canadian refiners have taken to build up the facilities required to process synthetic crude oil (SCO). Key points made at a conference, convened by the National Centre for Upgrading Technology (NCUT), held in Edmonton during September 1997 to discuss current and future directions in the refining and marketing of heavy oil, bitumen and SCO, were summarized. Among the key points mentioned were: (1) the high entry barriers faced by centralized upgraders, (2) the advantages of integrating SCO or heavy oil production with downstream refining, (3) the stiff competition from Venezuela and Mexico that both SCO and heavy oil will face in the U.S. PADD II market, (4) the differences between Canadian refiners who have profited from hydrocracking and are better able to handle coker-based SCO, and American refiners who rely chiefly on catalytic cracking and are less able to process the highly aromatic SCO, and (5) the disproportionate cost in the upgrading process represented by the conversion of asphaltenes. Challenges and opportunities for key stakeholders, i.e. producers, refiners, marketers and technology licensors also received much attention at the Edmonton conference

  11. Fate and identification of spilled oils and petroleum products in the environment by GC-MS and GC-FID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.

    2003-01-01

    To effectively determine the fate of spilled oil in the environment and to successfully identify the source(s) of spilled oil and petroleum products is extremely important in many oil-related environmental studies and liability cases. This article briefly reviews the most recent developments and advances of the gas chromatography-based technologies that are most frequently used in oil-spill characterization and identification studies. The effects of oil weathering on the chemical composition features and changes of spilled oils in the environment are also addressed. The fingerprinting and data interpretation techniques discussed include recognition of distribution patterns of petroleum hydrocarbons, oil type screening and differentiation, analysis of 'source-specific marker' compounds, determination of diagnostic ratios of specific oil constituents, and application of various statistical and numerical analysis tools. (author)

  12. Research on weathering and biomarkers in heavy fuel oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, Z.; Yu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The fate of oil spilled in the ocean depends on several physicochemical and biological factors such as evaporation, dissolution, microbial degradation and photo-oxidation. These weathering processes decrease the low molecules in spilled oils which reduces the harmful effects of spilled oil to the ocean and biota near the spill. In addition to changing the composition of the oil, some weathering processes are key to identifying the spilled oil. As such, the relationship between the weathering processes and the changes in oil composition must be well understood. This paper used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to analyze changes of chemical components in heavy fuel oil by weathering in static seawater. The major alkanes of heavy fuel oil include C8 to C33, while the major aromatics include benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene. After 24 weeks of weathering in seawater, the alkanes from n-C8 to n-C15 evaporated in order of increasing carbon number. The susceptibility of n-alkanes was correlated with carbon numbers. The aromatics evaporated in order of increasing carbon and ring number as weathering time increased. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  13. Visualization of viscous coupling effects in heavy oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Arango, J.D. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory; Kantzas, A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    Some heavy oil reservoirs in Venezuela and Canada have shown higher than expected production rates attributed to the effects of foamy oil or enhanced solution gas drive. However, foamy oil 2-phase flow does not fully explain oil rate enhancement in heavy oil reservoirs. In this study, flow visualization experiments were conducted in a 2-D etched network micromodel in order to determine the effect of the viscosity ratio on oil mobility at the pore scale. The micromodel's pattern was characterized by macroscopic heterogeneities with a random network of larger pore bodies interconnected with a random network of smaller pore throats. Displacement tests were conducted with green-dyed distilled water as a wetting phase. N-octane, bromododecane and mineral oil were used as non-wetting phases. An unsteady-state method was used to obtain displacement data, and the Alternate method was used to calculate relative permeabilities. Results of the study showed that relative permeabilities depended on the viscosity ratio of the fluids flowing through the porous medium. Channel and annular flows co-existed, and water lubrication was stronger at higher water saturations. The results of the study explained the abnormally high production rates in heavier oil fields. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 14 figs.

  14. Monitoring of ground water quality and heavy metals in soil during large scale bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste in India: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation using microbes has been well accepted as an environmentally friendly and economical treatment method for disposal of hazardous petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste (oily waste and this type of bioremediation has been successfully conducted in laboratory and on a pilot scale in various countries, including India. Presently there are no federal regulatory guidelines available in India for carrying out field-scale bioremediation of oily waste using microbes. The results of the present study describe the analysis of ground water quality as well as selected heavy metals in oily waste in some of the large-scale field case studies on bioremediation of oily waste (solid waste carried out at various oil installations in India. The results show that there was no contribution of oil and grease and selected heavy metals to the ground water in the nearby area due to adoption of this bioremediation process. The results further reveal that there were no changes in pH and EC of the groundwater due to bioremediation. In almost all cases the selected heavy metals in residual oily waste were within the permissible limits as per Schedule – II of Hazardous Waste Management, Handling and Transboundary Movement Act, Amendment 2008, (HWM Act 2008, by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF, Government of India (GoI.

  15. Phytoremediation of some tropical soils contaminated with petroleum crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyibo, Charles

    2013-12-01

    This study was undertaken in three phases to identify (phase 1), screen (phase 11) and evaluate (phase 111) plants for their phytoremediation potential. In Phase 1, 15 plant species made up of grasses and legumes namely: Paspalum. vaginatum, Cynodon.dactylon, Pueraria. phaseoloides, Centrosema. pubescens, Panicum. maximum, Schrankia. leptocarpa, Eclipta. alba (Linn.), Cyperus. haspen (Linn.), Melastromastrum. capitatum, Acreceras. zizanoides Dandy, Pteridum aquilinum (Linn), Ludwigia.decurrens Walt,Setaria longiseta P.Beauv., Physalis angulata (Linn.), and Desmodium scorpiurus Desv.were identified on sites previously polluted by crude oil spills in the Niger Delta Area of Nigeria. The first 6 species were used in phase 11 while the first four species were earmarked (rolled over) for phase 111. Responses to Questionnaire indicated that majority of residents in the selected sites/communities had lived in these areas for 10 or more years had mainly JHS/SHS education; were self employed – mainly farmers and fishers although most were unemployed in the public sector. Adverse effects of the operations of oil companies particularly oil spillage on the environment and local residents include: loss of vegetation and farmlands, soil and water body contamination, weak social and cultural institutions (disrespect by youth for elders and institutions), militancy and hostage taking among youth from the area. In phase 11, seeds of legumes among the six selected species were collected from Accra, Aburi environs and Kusi in the Eastern region of Ghana; they were scarified, cultured in growth medium and the seedlings which emerged from them were transplanted into experimental pots, each containing 2000g of either Alajo or Toje soil series. One week after transplanting, each pot was simulated with a corresponding serial crude oil concentration of 0% (control) 1 % (24ml), 3% (83ml), 5.5% (130ml) and 8% (189ml) or 10% (237ml) in three replicates. These concentrations were arrived at

  16. The effect of low molecular weight multifunctional additives on heavy oil viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, T.B.P.; Yarranton, H.W.; Larter, S.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Crude oils contain many small multifunctional low molecular weight components that act as linking molecules between larger functionalized species. The linkage molecules have a significant impact on the flow properties of hydrocarbon systems. This study investigated the use of a low molecular weight multiheteroatom species (LMWMH) as a molecular Velcro linking high molecular weight components together. LMWMH species were added to Albertan bitumens and heavy oil, and their impact on viscosity was investigated. Results of the experimental studies were then compared with the effects of hydrocarbon solvents on similar samples. The LMWMH species included bifunctional species and analogous alkyl and aryl monoamines that acted as blocking molecules to hinder the association of larger petroleum species. Density and viscosity measurements were conducted. A correlation method was used to predict the viscosity of the solvent-diluted heavy oil and bitumen samples. The study showed that of the tested additives, only aniline demonstrated an additional viscosity-reducing effect. The aniline inhibited asphaltene association and is a promising candidate for enhanced in-situ bitumen viscosity reduction. 23 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Heavy oil supply economics and supply response to low oil prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, L.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of the heavy oil industry are examined, including prices, market demand, supply and supply costs. Price assumptions are provided for the reference case oil price (west Texas intermediate at Cushing). Supply cost methodology is explained. Capital and operating costs for various heavy oil and synthetic sources are derived from modeling results. The range of supply costs for heavy oil and bitumen from various sources, supply costs in terms of reference case market values and in terms of 1995-1996 average market values for Bow River crude, are derived. The CERI long term supply forecast model is explained. Western Canada upstream oil and gas cash flow and capital expenditures, eastern Canada exploration and expenditures by hydrocarbon type, and Canadian heavy oil and bitumen production based on reference case prices are estimated. Based on these projections the outlook for heavy oil at reference case prices for better than average quality resources is judged to be economic. Lower quality resources will require technology gains for successful commercialization. SAGD is a likely candidate in this respect. Again based on reference prices, production is forecast to decline by 100 Kb/d over the next five years. Diluent supply is considered to be adequate throughout the forecast period. As far as thermal bitumen is concerned, the growth could, in fact, exceed the projection, but if so, more upgrading will be required. 11 figs

  18. Investigation the Kinetic Models of Biological Removal of Petroleum Contaminated Soil Around Oil Pipeline Using Ryegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghaheri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The industrial revolution of the past century has resulted in significant damage to environmental resources such as air, water and soil. Petroleum contamination of soil is a serious problem throughout the oil producer countries. Remediation of petroleum contamination of soils is generally a slow and expensive process. Phytoremediation is a potentially less-damaging, cost-effective, but needs longer-term for remediation of contaminated land compared to the alternative methods. In this study the kinetics of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils in Khozestan were investigated. For this paper Ryegrass (Lolium perenne plant selected and the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH was analyzed after growth stage, every 10 days up to 90 days. The results of TPH concentration was fitted with zero-order kinetic, first-order kinetic and Higuchi model. The result indicated that degradation of TPH with presence of plants as a function of time was well fitted with the first-order kinetic model. The first-order rate constants (K and half-lives (T1/2 for TPH degradation were 0.0098 1/day and 71 day; respectively. The results of phytoremediation showed that there were 65% decreases in TPH concentration with Ryegrass during the 17 weeks.

  19. Heavy oil processing impacts refinery and effluent treatment operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornthwaite, P. [Nalco Champion, Northwich, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Heavy oils are becoming more common in Europe. The processing of heavier (opportunity or challenge) crudes, although financially attractive, introduce additional challenges to the refiner. These challenges are similar whether they come from imported crudes or in the future possibly from shale oils (tight oils). Without a strategy for understanding and mitigating the processing issues associated with these crudes, the profit potential may be eroded by decreased equipment reliability and run length. This paper focuses on the impacts at the desalter and how to manage them effectively while reducing the risks to downstream processes. Desalters have to deal with an increased viscosity, density (lower API gravity), higher solids loading, potential conductivity issues, and asphaltene stability concerns. All these factors can lead to operational problems impacting downstream of the desalter, both on the process and the water side. The other area of focus is the effluent from the desalter which can significantly impact waste water operations. This can take the form of increased oil under-carry, solids and other contaminants originating from the crudes. Nalco Champion has experience in working with these challenging crudes, not only, Azeri, Urals and African crudes, but also the Canadian oil sands, US Shale oil, heavy South American crudes and crudes containing metal naphthenates. Best practices will be shared and an outlook on the effects of Shale oil will be given. (orig.)

  20. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO THE USE OF HEAVY OIL RESIDUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Dashut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider an alternative approach to the existing oil refining, in which instead of a single priority that emerged in the traditional approach, we consider two: get the light component and a heavy residue used for the production of new construction materials.

  1. Bioremediation of petroleum wastes from the refining of lubricant oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.; Sambasivam, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The results of an initial feasibility study on the bioremediation of sludge are presented. The sludge used in the study was taken from a site containing waste produced during the refining of lubricant oils to which sulfuric acid had been added. The effectiveness of bioremediation was examined using shake flask experiments with indigenous and other bacteria sources and nutrient supplementation. The initial results show limited effectiveness of biological treatment at conditions employing indigenous bacteria and low (2%) sludge concentrations in Bushnell-Haas media. In addition, the indigenous bacteria were seen to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons naphthalene, penanthrene and pyrene which are present at some locations at the site. No apparent degradation of material was seen using conditions of high (30%) sludge concentrations in Bushnell-Haas medium under a variety of conditions. In addition, nutrients were rapidly depleted at these sludge concentrations, with the exception of sulfates which were produced when high sludge concentrations were used. 23 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Options for reducing oil content of sludge from a petroleum wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Lee, Jae-Young

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants at petroleum refineries often produce substantial quantities of sludge with relatively high concentrations of oil. Disposal of this waste is costly, in part because the high oil content requires use of secure disposal methods akin to handling of hazardous wastes. This article examines the properties of oily sludge and evaluates optional methods for reducing the oil content of this sludge to enable use of lower cost disposal methods. To reduce the oil content or break the structure of oily sludge, preliminary lab-scale experiments involving mechanical treatment, surfactant extraction, and oxidation are conducted. By applying surfactants, approximately 36% to 45% of oils are extracted from oily sludge. Of this, about 33% of oils are rapidly oxidised via radiation by an electron beam within 10 s of exposure. The Fenton reaction is effective for destruction of oily sludge. It is also found that 56% of oils were removed by reacting oily sludge with water containing ozone of 0.5 mg l(-1) over a period of 24 h. Oxidation using ozone thus can also be effectively used as a pretreatment for oily sludge. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Contamination by heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons: a threat to mangroves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís dos Santos Alencar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove ecosystem is one of the most productive ecosystems on the planet with relevant ecological importance. It offers several services such as protection of the coastal region, immobilization of contaminants, as it is a food source and refuge for various organisms. However, mangroves are threatened by human activities. Oil spills in areas close to mangroves, for example, are potential sources for the entry of contaminants such as heavy metals and hydrocarbons. Among other sources of threat, we list industrial waste and sewage, mining and fertilizer use. When they reach the mangroves, these contaminants may cause several negative effects and affect its balance.

  4. Greenhouse gases: How does heavy oil stack up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottenbreit, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Life-cycle emissions of direct greenhouse gases (GHG) have been calculated to elucidate the global warming impacts of various fossil fuel feedstocks. Calculations were made for the transportation sector using five fossil fuel sources: natural gas, light crude oil, conventional heavy oil, crude bitumen recovered through in-situ steam stimulation, and crude bitumen recovered through mining. Results suggest that fuels sourced from light crude oil have the lowest GHG emissions, while conventional heavy oil has the highest GHG emission levels for this application. Emissions of methane can constitute a significant portion of the life-cycle GHG emissions of a fossil fuel. For all the fossil fuels examined, except conventional heavy oil, GHG emissions associated with their production, transport, processing, and distribution are less than one third of their total life-cycle emissions. The remainder is associated with end use. This confirms that consumers of fossil fuel products, rather than fossil fuel producers, have the most leverage to reduce GHG emissions. 2 figs

  5. Canadian oilsands, heavy oil poised for surge in development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Operators in Canada's oilsands and heavy oil regions are on the brink of a period of growth that could last well into the next century. Several factors are combining in a scenario a National Task Force report on oilsands says could dramatically increase investment and production in the next 25 years. By then, massive oilsands and heavy oil reserves in northern Alberta could account for as much as 50%--perhaps more--of Canada's oil production. Technological improvements in recovery and processing have slashed production costs and put nonconventional oil on a more competitive footing with declining reserves of conventional crude in western Canada. At the same time, persistent lobbying by industry and a well researched national study have persuaded federal and provincial governments to introduce a new royalty and fiscal regime designed to bolster oilsands investment. New policies give clear incentives to investors to put money into oilsands and heavy oil projects. Policies also will provide a generic tax treatment for all new projects, long a major objective of oilsands promoters. Previously, royalty and tax agreements were negotiated for project case by case. This paper reviews the resource base and the new operational developments resulting from these policies

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) produces crude oil and associated hydrocarbons from the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) numbered 1, 2, and 3, and the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) numbered 1, 2, and 3 in a manner to achieve the greatest value and benefits to the US taxpayer. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC or Elk Hills), which is responsible for operations of NPR-1 and NPR-2; the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserve in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW), which is responsible for operations of NPR-3, NOSR-1, 2, and 3 and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC); and NPOSR Headquarters in Washington, DC, which is responsible for overall program direction. Each participant shares in the unit costs and production of hydrocarbons in proportion to the weighted acre-feet of commercially productive oil and gas formations (zones) underlying the respective surface lands as of 1942. The participating shares of NPR-1 as of September 30, 1996 for the US Government and Chevron USA, Inc., are listed. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

  7. Solar-Assisted Fast Cleanup of Heavy Oil Spill by a Photothermal Sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Jian; Shi, Yusuf; Wu, Mengchun; Li, Renyuan; Shi, Le; Jin, Yong; Qing, Weihua; Tang, Chuyang; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    of the photothermal effect to heating the heavy oil by using sunlight as energy source to significantly reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil and thus to achieve a fast heavy oil cleanup. A carbon nanotube (CNT) modified polyurethane sponge was fabricated

  8. Light and Heavy Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Fuel Consumption Evaluations Using Fuel Efficient Gear Oils (FEGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    UNCLASSIFIED LIGHT AND HEAVY TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLE FUEL CONSUMPTION EVALUATIONS USING FUEL EFFICIENT GEAR OILS (FEGO) FINAL... HEAVY TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLE FUEL CONSUMPTION EVALUATIONS USING FUEL EFFICIENT GEAR OILS (FEGO) FINAL REPORT TFLRF No. 477 by Adam C...August 2014 – March 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LIGHT AND HEAVY TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLE FUEL CONSUMPTION EVALUATIONS USING FEUL EFFICIENT GEAR OILS

  9. Evaluation of oil removal efficiency and enzymatic activity in some fungal strains for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsenzadeh Fariba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Petroleum pollution is a global disaster and there are several soil cleaning methods including bioremediation. Methods In a field study, fugal strains were isolated from oil-contaminated sites of Arak refinery (Iran and their growth ability was checked in potato dextrose agar (PDA media containing 0-10% v/v crude oil, the activity of three enzymes (Catalase, Peroxidase and Phenol Oxidase was evaluated in the fungal colonies and bioremediation ability of the fungi was checked in the experimental pots containing 3 kg sterilized soil and different concentrations of petroleum (0-10% w/w. Results Four fungal strains, Acromonium sp., Alternaria sp., Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium sp., were selected as the most resistant ones. They were able to growth in the subjected concentrations and Alternaria sp. showed the highest growth ability in the petroleum containing media. The enzyme assay showed that the enzymatic activity was increased in the oil-contaminated media. Bioremediation results showed that the studied fungi were able to decrease petroleum pollution. The highest petroleum removing efficiency of Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp., Alternaria sp. and Acromonium sp. was evaluated in the 10%, 8%, 8% and 2% petroleum pollution respectively. Conclusions Fungi are important microorganisms in decreasing of petroleum pollution. They have bioremediation potency that is related to their enzymatic activities.

  10. Evaluation of Oil Removal Efficiency and Enzymatic Activity in Some fungal Strains for Bioremediation of Petroleum-Polluted Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Mohsenzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Petroleum pollution is a global disaster and there are several soil cleaning methods including bioremediation.Methods: In a field study, fugal strains were isolated from oil-contaminated sites of Arak refinery (Iran and their growth ability was checked in potato dextrose agar (PDA media containing 0-10% v/v crude oil, the activity of three enzymes (Catalase, Peroxidase and Phenol Oxidase was evaluated in the fungal colonies and bioremediation ability of the fungi was checked in the experimental pots containing 3 kg sterilized soil and different concentrations of petroleum (0-10% w/w.Results: Four fungal strains, Acromonium sp., Alternaria sp., Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium sp., were selected asthe most resistant ones. They were able to growth in the subjected concentrations and Alternaria sp. showed thehighest growth ability in the petroleum containing media. The enzyme assay showed that the enzymatic activity was increased in the oil-contaminated media. Bioremediation results showed that the studied fungi were able to decrease petroleum pollution. The highest petroleum removing efficiency of Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp.,Alternaria sp. and Acromonium sp. was evaluated in the 10%, 8%, 8% and 2% petroleum pollution respectively.Conclusions: Fungi are important microorganisms in decreasing of petroleum pollution. They have bioremediation potency that is related to their enzymatic activities.

  11. Improved heavy oil recovery by low rate waterflooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, A. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Kantzas, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    Waterflooding techniques are frequently used to recover oil in low viscosity or marginal heavy oil reservoirs. This paper described a low-rate waterflooding oil recovery mechanism. The mechanism was determined by examining the effect of sand permeability on the impact of viscous force contributions. Changes in permeability and injection rates parameters were studied in order to evaluate the significance of imbibition, and a method of quantifying the effect of capillary forces was presented. The mechanism was demonstrated in an experimental study that used sand packs of varying permeabilities wet-packed into cores with overburden pressures. A fixed injection rate was used to investigate waterflooding in the different permeability systems with 2 different oils. Overall recovery rates were examined as a function of injection velocity. An analysis of normalized oil production rates demonstrated that viscous forces are more important during the early phases of waterflooding. The study showed that breakthrough oil recovery values increased with higher permeability values. However, when injection rates were reduced to low frontal velocity values, the correlation between sand permeability and breakthrough oil recovery resulted in low permeability rates. Lower permeability porous media resulted in more restrictive flow conditions. However, the capillary force components increased as a result of the smaller pore sizes, which in turn led to enhanced water imbibition and higher oil recovery values after water breakthrough. It was concluded that waterflooding rates can be modified later in the recovery process in order to improve final oil recovery values. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  12. Mapping reactor operating regimes for heavy gas oil hydrotreating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munteanu, Mugurel Catalin; Chen, Jinwen [CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Hydrotreating (HDT) is used in oil refineries at temperatures of 350-400 degree C and pressure of 50-100 bars in a fixed bed to improve the quality of distillate fraction. HDT operates as a gas-liquid-solid process, trickle bed. Efforts have been made to model it but volatilization of liquid oil is often ignored. The aim of this paper is to predict vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) for a typical heavy distillate feed in pilot plant hydrotreaters. The study was conducted under various operating conditions and a flash calculation program calibrated in-house was used to predict VLE. VLE values were found and results showed that higher pressure, lower gas/oil ratio and temperature should be used to maintain the desired operating regimes when hydrotreating heavy distillate feed. This study determined the operating conditions for maintaining the desired operating regimes and these findings could be useful for operators.

  13. Comparison between jojoba oil and other vegetable oils as a substitute to petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kinawy, O. [National Research centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)

    2004-06-15

    Jojoba oil and other vegetable oils, such as soybean, sunflower and castor oils, were evaluated to be used as lubricants. Three standard mineral lubricating oils were considered in this study as reference. The essential parameters tested for comparison were the oil viscosity, viscosity index, and viscosity--temperature and shear rate--shear stress relationships. The effect of excessive heating on the vegetable oils' stability was studied and the corresponding parameters were also measured. Jojoba oil was found to be the best among all tested oils, whereas it gave the minimum change in viscosity gradient and hence the highest viscosity index. There was a linear relation between shear rate and shear stress of all oils before and after heat deterioration. Therefore, these oils were considered as Newtonion liquids. However, the oil viscosity, as well as the rate of viscosity variation with temperature, ({delta}{sup '}{eta}/{delta}{tau}) were affected by heat deterioration being lowered in value, in case of jojoba oil, and higher value, in case of castor oil. Jojoba oil was examined for other important properties for its use as a lubricant, such as refractive index, acid value, peroxide value, saponification value, iodine value, flash, fire and pour points. (author)

  14. Expanding solvent SAGD in heavy oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, P.A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Das, S.; Wheeler, T.J. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Srinivasan, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) projects have proven effective for the recovery of oil and bitumen. Expanding solvent (ES) SAGD pilot projects have also demonstrated positive results of improved performance. This paper presented the results of a simulation study that investigated several important factors of the ES-SAGD process, including solvent types; concentration; operating pressure; and injection strategy. The objectives of the study were to examine the effectiveness of the ES-SAGD process in terms of production acceleration and energy requirements; to optimize solvent selection; to understand the effect of dilation in unconsolidated oil sands and the directional impact on reservoir parameters and oil production rate in ES-SAGD; and to understand the impact of operating conditions such as pressure, solvent concentration, circulation preheating period and the role of conduction heating and grid size in this process. The advantages of ES-SAGD over SAGD were also outlined. The paper presented results of sensitivity studies that were conducted on these four factors. Conclusions and recommendations for operating strategy were also offered. It was concluded that dilation is an important factor for SAGD performance at high operating pressure. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Carcinogenicity of petroleum lubricating oil distillates: effects of solvent refining, hydroprocessing, and blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, C A; Warne, T M; Little, R Q; Garvin, P J

    1984-01-01

    Certain refining processes were investigated to determine their influence on the dermal carcinogenic activity of petroleum-derived lubricating oil distillates. Specifically, the effects of solvent refining, hydroprocessing, a combination of both processes, and the blending of oils processed using each technique were evaluated in standard mouse skin-painting bioassays. The refining process used as well as the level or severity of treatment greatly influenced the carcinogenic outcome of processed lubricating oils. Solvent refining at severities normally used appeared to eliminate carcinogenicity. In contrast, hydroprocessing alone at mild levels of treatment was successful only in reducing the carcinogenic potency; severe hydroprocessing conditions were necessary to eliminate carcinogenic activity without the use of additional refining processes. Carcinogenic activity could also be eliminated by following moderate solvent refining with mild hydroprocessing. Blending of hydroprocessed oils with solvent-refined oils resulted in a substantial reduction or even elimination of carcinogenic activity. However, the degree of protection obtained varied with the particular distillates used and appeared largely dependent on the inherent biological activity of the hydroprocessed oil.

  16. Results of the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve Oil Leak Risk Assessment Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Linn, J.K.

    1998-12-01

    This study evaluated multiple, long-term environmental oil-contamination risk scenarios that could result from the potential leakage of UP to 1.5 million barrels of crude oil entombed in the Weeks Island SPR mine following site decommissioning and abandonment, and up to 100 years thereafter. This risk assessment also provides continuity with similar risk evaluations performed earlier and documented in the 1995 DOE Environmental Assessment for Decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility (EA). This current study was requested by the DOE to help them determine if their previous Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), in the EA, is still valid or needs to be rescinded. Based on the calculated environmental risk results (in terms of clean-up and remediation expenses) presented in this risk assessment, including the calculated average likelihoods of oil release and potential oil-leakage volumes, none of the evaluated risk events would appear to satisfy the definition of significant environmental impact in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) terminology. The DOE may combine these current results with their earlier evaluations and interpretations in the 1995 EA in order to assess whether the existing FONSI is still accurate, acceptable, and valid. However, from a risk evaluation standpoint, the assessment of impacts appears to be the same whether only 10,000 to 30,000 barrels of crude oil (as considered in the 1995 EA), or up to 1.5 million barrels of oil (as considered herein) are abandoned in the Weeks Island SPR facility

  17. Assessment of heavy metal and petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the Sultanate of Oman with emphasis on harbours, marinas, terminals and ports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, Barry P; Fowler, Scott W; Dobretsov, Sergey; van der Wiele, Henk; Al-Ghafri, Ahmed

    2017-08-15

    The assessment here includes data on levels of contaminants (petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals) in sediments and biomonitor organisms, including the eulittoral rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata and subtidal biomonitors, the barnacle Balanus trigonus and the antipatharian coral Antipathes sp., at harbours, marinas, terminals and large ports along the coastline of Oman. TBT levels in harbour and port sediments up to a maximum of 100ppb TBT dry weight are highlighted. Oysters contained concentrations up to 367ppm mg TPH/kg dry weight. The maximum levels of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were found in the subtidal sediments and barnacles at the oil tanker loading Single Buoy Mooring stations in Mina Al Fahal. In general, the levels of most of the contaminants analysed are at low to moderate concentrations compared to those in highly contaminated sites such as shipyards and dry docks, but continued monitoring is recommended especially during any dredging campaigns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proceedings of the 44. annual Ontario Petroleum Institute's oil and gas conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This annual conference focused on developments related to the Ontario Petroleum industry. Issues concerning hydrocarbon potential were examined as well as geological information related to oil and gas activities in the region. The conference was divided into 6 sessions. Session 1 provided updates on employment issues in Ontario's oil and gas industry with respect to regulations and staffing as well as an update of issues concerning the geosciences profession in the province. Session 2 examined approaches to predictive geochemistry for buried gas and oil targets. Session 3 presented a comparison of Cambrian reservoir rocks as well as details of a natural channel realignment project. Session 4 presented details of new renewable technologies for the Ontario petroleum industry as well as a regional stratigraphic synthesis for the Paleozoic of southern Ontario. Session 5 provided a primer on tax rules, workers industry needs and an update on training delivery. Session 6 examined approaches to contaminant control. A study of hydrodynamics at the ice-bed interface was also presented. The conference featured 13 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  19. Exports of petroleum products, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    A summary is presented of exports of motor gasoline, middle distillate, aviation turbine fuel, heavy fuel oil, and partially processed oil from Canada for the 1987 calendar year. A discussion of petroleum product imports is included in order to put exports in the context of the overall trade. Exports of the above petroleum products averaged 22,200 m 3 /d in 1987, up 15% from 1986 levels. Exports of middle distillates and aviation fuel had the largest gains in 1987. Export prices for light petroleum products stayed relatively close to USA spot prices. The heavy fuel oil price was below the New York spot price in the beginning of 1987 but remained close for the rest of the year. Canada's petroleum products exports were made to 5 countries while imports came from at least 13 countries. The USA remained Canada's largest trading partner in petroleum products. Exports to Japan and the Far East rose ca 60% over 1986. Product outturns for export were 9% of total Canadian refinery throughput. Exports of aviation turbine fuel from Ontario began in April 1987. The top single exporter in Canada was Irving Oil Ltd. with 2,485,000 m 3 . Irving was also the top exporter in 1986. 11 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Preparation Of Pure Carbon From Heavy Oil Fly Ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABU ZAID, A.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Egyptian production of heavy oil is approximately 12 million tons of heavy oil per year and approximately 5.3 million tons of this amount is used as fuel in the electric power stations. Based on the fact that the ash content of Egyptian heavy oil is approximately 0.2 %, about 10600 tons of fly ash is produced per/year which causes a lot of environmental problems such as dusting, release of the acidic liquids and heavy metals such as vanadium, nickel, zinc and unburned carbon. Treatment of fly ash by leaching of vanadium and zinc was carried out under different conditions to achieve the best leaching efficiency of both vanadium and zinc by sodium hydroxide. The leaching efficiency obtained was 91% for vanadium and 98% for zinc. This study was concerned with the precipitation of zinc at pH 7.5 as zinc hydroxide and the precipitation of vanadium as ammonium metavanadate at pH 8.5. Leaching of nickel, iron and other elements from the residue was carried out by 2M HCl under different conditions. The achieved leaching efficiency of nickel was 95% where as that of iron was 92%. Precipitation efficiency of both nickel and iron were 99.9%. The residue, which contains mainly unburned carbon, have been washed two times with water and dried at 200 o C then ground to < 300μm. According to the achieved analysis of the obtained carbon, it can be characterized as pure carbon

  1. Petroleum industry in 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document presents a detailed outlook of the petroleum industry in the world and more particularly in France in 2005: evolution of crude oil prices; petroleum exploration and production in the world and in France; the French para-petroleum and petroleum industry; the oil supplies; the refining activities; the evolution of products quality and the substitution fuels; the domestic transports, the storage and consumption of petroleum products; the fiscality, prices and distribution of petroleum products. (J.S.)

  2. Remediation plan for contaminated areas by naturally occurring radioactivity materials in Syrian Petroleum Company oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Al-Masri, M. S.; Awad, I.

    2006-01-01

    The present report contains a detailed plan for remediation of areas contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials in the syrian Petroleum Company Oil fields. This plan includes a description of the contaminated areas and the procedures that will be followed before and during the execution of the project in addition to the final radiation surveys according to the Syrian regulations. In addition, responsibilities of the main personnel who will carry out the work have been defined and the future monitoring program of the remediated areas was determined. (author)

  3. Remediation plan for contaminated areas by naturally occurring radioactivity materials in Syrian petroleum company oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwekani, R.; Al-Masri, M.S.; Awad, I.

    2005-08-01

    The present report contains a detailed plan for remediation of areas contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials in the Syrian petroleum company oil fields. This plan includes a description of the contaminated areas and the procedures that will be followed before and during the execution of the project in addition to the final radiation surveys according to the Syrian regulations. In addition, responsibilities of the main personnel who will carry out the work have been defined and the future monitoring program of the remediated areas was determined. (author)

  4. An approach for characterization and lumping of plus fractions of heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, I.; Hamouda, A.A. [Stavanger Univ., Stavanger (Norway)

    2008-10-15

    The constituents of hydrocarbons can be classified as either well-defined components or undefined petroleum fractions. This paper presented a newly developed method for characterizing plus fractions of heavy oil, which is particularly important for fluids with high molecular weight and high density. Characterization of plus fractions typically consists of 3 parts, notably splitting the fraction into a certain number of components groups called single carbon number (SCN); estimating the physico-chemical properties of the SCN; and lumping the generated SCN. SCN groups contain hundreds of isomers/components with the same number of carbon atoms. A unique molecular weight cannot be assigned for each SCN group because of the uncertainty of the isomers/components present. Therefore, this work focused on finding a new approach to characterize the undetermined fraction by first splitting the carbon number fraction into a representative number of SCN and then calculating their mole fraction and molecular weight. The method was based on the relationships between three parameter gamma distribution (TPG), experimental mole fraction, molecular weight and SCN data obtained from literature and industry. The method was applied to 5 different heavy oil sample fluids which all showed a left skewed distribution of the mole fraction as a function of carbon number. The predicted molecular weight was found to be close to the generalized molecular weight associated with carbon number, but it differed from one sample to another. 19 refs., 11 tabs., 15 figs.

  5. Chemically evolving systems for oil recovery enhancement in heavy oil deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, I. V.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Stasyeva, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory studies and field tests of new physicochemical technologies for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil fields under natural development conditions and with thermal-steam stimulation using oil-displacing "smart" systems. The systems are based on surfactants and buffer systems. Their rheological and acid-base properties can be regulated by their chemical evolution directly in the formation. Field tests of the technologies carried out on high-viscosity oil deposit in the Usinskoye oilfield have shown that the EOR technologies are environmentally friendly and technologically effective.

  6. A study of the effects of enhanced oil recovery agents on the quality of Strategic Petroleum Reserves crude oil. [Physical and chemical interactions of Enhanced Oil Recovery reagents with hydrocarbons present in petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The project was initiated on September 1, 1990. The objective of the project was to carry out a literature search to estimate the types and extents of long time interactions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents, such as surfactants, caustics and polymers, with crude oil. This information is necessary to make recommendations about mixing EOR crude oil with crude oils from primary and secondary recovery processes in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Data were sought on both adverse and beneficial effects of EOR agents that would impact handling, transportation and refining of crude oil. An extensive literature search has been completed, and the following informations has been compiled: (1) a listing of existing EOR test and field projects; (2) a listing of currently used EOR agents; and (3) evidence of short and long term physical and chemical interactions of these EOR-agents with hydrocarbons, and their effects on the quality of crude oil at long times. This information is presented in this report. Finally some conclusions are derived and recommendations are made. Although the conclusions are based mostly on extrapolations because of lack of specific data, it is recommended that the enhancement of the rates of biodegradation of oil catalyzed by the EOR agents needs to be further studied. There is no evidence of substantial long term effects on crude oil because of other interactions. Some recommendations are also made regarding the types of studies that would be necessary to determine the effect of certain EOR agents on the rates of biodegradation of crude oil.

  7. Figures on petroleum 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This table taken out from the 1981 annual report 1981 contains an introductory remark on the reorganization of mineral oil statistics up to January 82. It is followed by the tables ranged as follows: refinery capacity and production, crude oil supply, GDR-coverings, import of petroleum products, petroleum consumption, export of petroleum products, transport, oil storage tanks, motor vehicle stock, taxes and tariffs, petroleum export trade, energy consumption and world petroleum numbers. In parts the tables contain comparative figures back to 1950.

  8. Ranking oil viscosity in heavy-oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie, R.J.M. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada); Seccombe, J. [BP Alaska, AK (United States)

    2005-11-01

    This paper discussed attempts to identify lower viscosity zones within the Ugnu formation at Milne Point field in Alaska through the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. To date, only 1 well has been completed in the Ugnu, and BP Alaska is now engaged in studies to find ways to commercialize the formation. While geochemical analysis of oil samples extracted from sidewall cores has successfully identified sweet spots, the costs are prohibitive and they are too slow for real-time decision-making. NMR data acquisition offers a more economical, continuous and almost instantaneous alternative. Two wells were logged and analyzed using both logging while drilling (LWD) NMR and wire log (WL)-NMR tools. With the WL-NMR tool, data were collected in continuous passes and in a series of 45 minute stationary points, acquiring both routine T{sub 2} and diffusion editing data to predict oil viscosity. The LWD-NMR tool was set up to acquire T{sub 1} data when drilling. Forward modelling was used to generate NMR T{sub 2} spectra for reservoir parameters. The NMR logs indicate that the technology is a viable non-radioactive porosity measurement alternative. Data quality had high-vertical resolution and spectral resolution and showed good agreement with density-derived porosity. Zones with viscous oil were located and findings were validated by geochemical analyses. Bandwidth limitation was the only obstacle that prevented real time application of the NMR ranking process. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Geothermal and heavy-oil resources in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seni, S.J.; Walter, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group lie below medium- to heavy-oil reservoirs in the Eocene Jackson Group. This fortuitous association suggests the use of geothermal fluids for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). Geothermal fairways are formed where thick deltaic sandstones are compartmentalized by growth faults. Wilcox geothermal reservoirs in South Texas are present at depths of 11,000 to 15,000 ft (3,350 to 4,570 m) in laterally continuous sandstones 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) thick. Permeability is generally low (typically 1 md), porosity ranges from 12 to 24 percent, and temperature exceeds 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C). Reservoirs containing medium (20{degrees} to 25{degrees} API gravity) to heavy (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) oil are concentrated along the Texas Coastal Plain in the Jackson-Yegua Barrier/Strandplain (Mirando Trend), Cap Rock, and Piercement Salt Dome plays and in the East Texas Basin in Woodbine Fluvial/Deltaic Strandplain and Paluxy Fault Line plays. Injection of hot, moderately fresh to saline brines will improve oil recovery by lowering viscosity and decreasing residual oil saturation. Smectite clay matrix could swell and clog pore throats if injected waters have low salinity. The high temperature of injected fluids will collapse some of the interlayer clays, thus increasing porosity and permeability. Reservoir heterogeneity resulting from facies variation and diagenesis must be considered when siting production and injection wells within the heavy-oil reservoir. The ability of abandoned gas wells to produce sufficient volumes of hot water over the long term will also affect the economics of TEOR.

  10. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G. [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  11. Mass transfer of H2O between petroleum and water: implications for oil field water sample quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCartney, R.A.; Ostvold, T.

    2005-01-01

    Water mass transfer can occur between water and petroleum during changes in pressure and temperature. This process can result in the dilution or concentration of dissolved ions in the water phase of oil field petroleum-water samples. In this study, PVT simulations were undertaken for 4 petroleum-water systems covering a range of reservoir conditions (80-185 o C; 300-1000 bar) and a range of water-petroleum mixtures (volume ratios of 1:1000-300:1000) to quantify the extent of H 2 O mass transfer as a result of pressure and temperature changes. Conditions were selected to be relevant to different types of oil field water sample (i.e. surface, downhole and core samples). The main variables determining the extent of dilution and concentration were found to be: (a) reservoir pressure and temperature, (b) pressure and temperature of separation of water and petroleum, (c) petroleum composition, and (d) petroleum:water ratio (PWR). The results showed that significant dilution and concentration of water samples could occur, particularly at high PWR. It was not possible to establish simple guidelines for identifying good and poor quality samples due to the interplay of the above variables. Sample quality is best investigated using PVT software of the type used in this study. (author)

  12. Focusing on heavy oil, technology and people. Annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Financial information from CS Resources and a review of operations in 1995 was made available for the benefit of shareholders. CS Resources has been involved in the resource development of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin for some time. Since becoming public in 1989, CS Resources have experienced continued profitable growth through such programs as thermal and enhanced recovery of heavy oils, and through the exploration of natural gas and light crude oil. This report presented an operations review, consolidated financial statements, a seven year historical summary, production statistics, and a seven year share price and other common share information. tabs., figs

  13. US refining capacity for Canadian heavy oil : current overview and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paget, S.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provided an overview of the Canadian oil sands industry and investigated the potential heavy oil refining capacity of the United States. An outline of the first commercial developments of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) in Alberta's oil sands was provided. Canada's reserves were compared with oil shale and heavy oil reserves in the United States and Venezuela. Influences of Canadian developments from western Canadian conventional crude oil were reviewed, and an oil sands production forecast was provided. Recent refining developments in the United States include delayed coking; catalytic cracking; fluid coking; flexicoking; and LC-fining. However, many oil sand producers are now choosing to upgrade oil, and producers are currently saturating United States markets with heavy crude oil. Canadian crude prices reached $90 per barrel in 2006. Heavy oil pipelines are now being constructed and existing heavy oil pipelines are being expanded. ConocoPhillips is planning to invest $1 billion for a new heavy oil coker, while BP is investing $3 billion for a heavy oil refinery in Indiana which plans to refine Canadian crude oil supplies. However, bitumens from Alberta are volatile in price, and excess Canadian production must be exported. Less than 10 per cent of western Canadian crude has tidewater access, and capital providers are concerned about cost over-runs. In order for the Canadian oil sands industry to succeed, refining capacity in the United States must be expanded, and open access must be provided to the Gulf coast as well as to the Pacific Ocean. tabs., figs

  14. The Study on Global Oil and Gas Supply and Demand undertaken by the National Petroleum Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slutz, James

    2007-07-01

    The National Petroleum Council (NPC) Study on Global Oil and Gas is one of the most comprehensive studies on global oil and gas supply and demand projections ever undertaken to date. This study comprises approximately 250 experts from industry, government, research institutions, academia, energy ministries from around the world, national oil companies, and non-government organizations. The NPC study team has collected and analyzed global data on supply and demand trends through the year 2030. While other studies have examined the economic, environmental, security and geo-policy implications of the oil and gas supply and demand picture, this study examines all three political priorities simultaneously. The multi-dimensional foundations of the policy recommendations, and the diverse expertise of study group members, results in findings which are truly unique, and separate this study from numerous previous studies on global oil and gas supply and demand. Although key findings and policy recommendations will not be released prior to the study's release in June of 2007, the following paper provides the scope of work and the detailed project plan that will result in an energy outlook that is differentiated from all recent studies.

  15. The challenge of the second oil boom? [3. Millenium International Petroleum Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Third Millennium International Petroleum Conference is briefly reported at which the competitive challenges faced by the upstream industry were considered. An oil industry wanting to be successful in facing these challenges was perceived by Mobil Oil's Vice-President of Global Business Strategy as requiring the following attributes: the ability to partner with others; a truly global perspective; a balanced portfolio to manage risk; strong technological orientation; the capacity to attract an innovative work-force. The new background of energy geopolitics brought about by the integration of Russia, the CIS countries, China and India into the world market economy, was sketched by the former Exploration Director of Premier Oil. Attention was drawn to the concern and tension being created in the Middle East by the restructuring of oil and gas development arising out of the current US containment foreign policy. This policy is changing the geographical focus and regional strategies of US oil companies and contractors. Some examples of these were presented in papers by other US participants. Contributions from natioan producing companies from other countries demonstrated the opportunities offered to foreign countries by increased liberalisation. (UK)

  16. A Review of Laboratory-Scale Research on Upgrading Heavy Oil in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand for energy and the depletion of conventional crude oil, heavy oil in huge reserve has attracted extensive attention. However, heavy oil cannot be directly refined by existing processes unless they are upgraded due to its complex composition and high concentration of heteroatoms (N, S, Ni, V, etc.. Of the variety of techniques for heavy oil upgrading, supercritical water (SCW is gaining popularity because of its excellent ability to convert heavy oil into valued, clean light oil by the suppression of coke formation and the removal of heteroatoms. Based on the current status of this research around the world, heavy oil upgrading in SCW is summarized from three aspects: Transformation of hydrocarbons, suppression of coke, and removal of heteroatoms. In this work, the challenge and future development of the orientation of upgrading heavy oil in SCW are pointed out.

  17. Pipeline flow of heavy oil with temperature-dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza Quinones, Danmer; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: msc@puc-rio.br

    2010-07-01

    The heavy oil produced offshore needs to be transported through pipelines between different facilities. The pipelines are usually laid down on the seabed and are submitted to low temperatures. Although heavy oils usually present Newtonian behavior, its viscosity is a strong function of temperature. Therefore, the prediction of pressure drops along the pipelines should include the solution of the energy equation and the dependence of viscosity to temperature. In this work, an asymptotic model is developed to study this problem. The flow is considered laminar and the viscosity varies exponentially with temperature. The model includes one-dimensional equations for the temperature and pressure distribution along the pipeline at a prescribed flow rate. The solution of the coupled differential equation is obtained by second-order finite difference. Results show a nonlinear behavior as a result of coupled interaction between the velocity, temperature, and temperature dependent material properties. (author)

  18. Coal fired steam generation for heavy oil recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, K.

    1992-01-01

    In Alberta, some 21,000 m 3 /d of heavy oil and bitumen are produced by in-situ recovery methods involving steam injection. The steam generation requirement is met by standardized natural-gas-fired steam generators. While gas is in plentiful supply in Alberta and therefore competitively priced, significant gas price increases could occur in the future. A 1985 study investigating the alternatives to natural gas as a fuel for steam generation concluded that coal was the most economic alternative, as reserves of subbituminous coal are not only abundant in Alberta but also located relatively close to heavy oil and bitumen production areas. The environmental performance of coal is critical to its acceptance as an alternate fuel to natural gas, and proposed steam generator designs which could burn Alberta coal and control emissions satisfactorily are assessed. Considerations for ash removal, sulfur dioxide sorption, nitrogen oxides control, and particulate emission capture are also presented. A multi-stage slagging type of coal-fired combustor has been developed which is suitable for application with oilfield steam generators and is being commissioned for a demonstration project at the Cold Lake deposit. An economic study showed that the use of coal for steam generation in heavy oil in-situ projects in the Peace River and Cold Lake areas would be economic, compared to natural gas, at fuel price projections and design/cost premises for a project timing in the mid-1990s. 7 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Production of rhamnolipids and diesel oil degradation by bacteria isolated from soil contaminated by petroleum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Giuseppe G F; Figueirôa, Juciane V; Almeida, Thiago C M; Valões, Jaqueline L; Marques, Walber F; Duarte, Maria D D C; Gorlach-Lira, Krystyna

    2016-03-01

    Biosurfactants are microbial secondary metabolites. The most studied are rhamnolipids, which decrease the surface tension and have emulsifying capacity. In this study, the production of biosurfactants, with emphasis on rhamnolipids, and diesel oil degradation by 18 strains of bacteria isolated from waste landfill soil contaminated by petroleum was analyzed. Among the studied bacteria, gram-positive endospore forming rods (39%), gram positive rods without endospores (17%), and gram-negative rods (44%) were found. The following methods were used to test for biosurfactant production: oil spreading, emulsification, and hemolytic activity. All strains showed the ability to disperse the diesel oil, while 77% and 44% of the strains showed hemolysis and emulsification of diesel oil, respectively. Rhamnolipids production was observed in four strains that were classified on the basis of the 16S rRNA sequences as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Only those strains showed the rhlAB gene involved in rhamnolipids synthesis, and antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Erwinia carotovora, and Ralstonia solanacearum. The highest production of rhamnolipids was 565.7 mg/L observed in mineral medium containing olive oil (pH 8). With regard to the capacity to degrade diesel oil, it was observed that 7 strains were positive in reduction of the dye 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (2,6-DCPIP) while 16 had the gene alkane mono-oxygenase (alkB), and the producers of rhamnolipids were positive in both tests. Several bacterial strains have shown high potential to be explored further for bioremediation purposes due to their simultaneous ability to emulsify, disperse, and degrade diesel oil. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:262-270, 2016. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Using Polymer Alternating Gas to Enhance Oil Recovery in Heavy Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongzhi; Li, Weirong; Zhou, Tiyao; Dong, Zhenzhen

    2018-02-01

    CO2 has been used to recover oil for more than 40 years. Currently, about 43% of EOR production in U.S. is from CO2 flooding. CO2 flooding is a well-established EOR technique, but its density and viscosity nature are challenges for CO2 projects. Low density (0.5 to 0.8 g/cm3) causes gas to rise upward in reservoirs and bypass many lower portions of the reservoir. Low viscosity (0.02 to 0.08 cp) leads to poor volumetric sweep efficiency. So water-alternating-gas (WAG) method was used to control the mobility of CO2 and improve sweep efficiency. However, WAG process has some other problems in heavy oil reservoir, such as poor mobility ratio and gravity overriding. To examine the applicability of carbon dioxide to recover viscous oil from highly heterogeneous reservoirs, this study suggests a new EOR method--polymer-alternating gas (PAG) process. The process involves a combination of polymer flooding and CO2 injection. To confirm the effectiveness of PAG process in heavy oils, a reservoir model from Liaohe Oilfield is used to compare the technical and economic performance among PAG, WAG and polymer flooding. Simulation results show that PAG method would increase oil recovery over 10% compared with other EOR methods and PAG would be economically success based on assumption in this study. This study is the first to apply PAG to enhance oil recovery in heavy oil reservoir with highly heterogeneous. Besides, this paper provides detailed discussions and comparison about PAG with other EOR methods in this heavy oil reservoir.

  1. Steam injection and enhanced bioremediation of heavy fuel oil contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dablow, J.; Hicks, R.; Cacciatore, D.

    1995-01-01

    Steam injection has been shown to be successful in remediating sites impacted by heavy fuel oils. Field demonstrations at both pilot and full scale have removed No. 2 diesel fuel and Navy Special Fuel Oil (No. 5 fuel oil) from impacted soils. Removal mechanisms include enhanced volatilization of vapor- and adsorbed-phase contaminants and enhanced mobility due to decreased viscosity and associated residual saturation of separate- and adsorbed-phase contaminants. Laboratory studies have shown that indigenous biologic populations are significantly reduced, but are not eliminated by steam injection operations. Populations were readily reestablished by augmentation with nutrients. This suggests that biodegradation enhanced by warm, moist, oxygenated environments can be expected to further reduce concentrations of contaminants following cessation of steam injection operations

  2. Kinetics of petroleum oil biodegradation by a consortium of three protozoan isolates (Aspidisca sp., Trachelophyllum sp. and Peranema sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kachieng’a

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum oil is a complex mixture of substances, the majority of which are hydrocarbons; the latter represent an extremely important and heterogeneous group of compounds that find their way into water resources by anthropogenic or natural ways. The majority of toxic hydrocarbon components of petroleum are biodegradable, where bioremediation using microbial species has become an integral process for the restoration of oil-polluted areas. In this study, three bioremediation processes, namely natural attenuation, nutrient supplementation by adding glucose and biostimulation by adding Tween® 80, were carried out in various petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in polluted water media using a consortium of three protozoan isolates (Aspidisca sp., Trachelophyllum sp. and Peranema sp.. A first-order kinetics model was fitted to the biodegradation data to evaluate the biodegradation rate and to determine the corresponding half-life time. First-order kinetics satisfactorily described the biodegradation of the petroleum-based contaminants under abiotic conditions. The results showed an increase in the percentage removal of petroleum oil at the lower petroleum concentrations and a gradual percentage decrease in removing petroleum oil residues occurred when there was an increase in the initial concentrations of the petroleum oil: 39%, 27%, 22%, 12%, 10% for various petroleum oil concentrations of 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 mg/L, respectively. A similar trend was also observed in the glucose-supplemented culture media where the reduction was 45% and 78% for petroleum concentrations of 250 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively. Biodegradation of between 33 and 90% was achieved at a Tween® 80 concentration of between 50 mg/L and 250 mg/L. The degradation rate constants for the natural attenuation process ranged between ≥0 to ≤0.50, ≥0 to ≤0.35, ≥0 to ≤0.25, ≥0 to ≤ 0.14 and ≥ 0 to ≤0.11 for petroleum oil concentrations varying from 50, 100, 150

  3. Exports of petroleum products, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    A summary is presented of exports of motor gasoline, middle distillate, aviation turbine fuel, heavy fuel oil, and partially processed oil from Canada for the 1988 calendar year. A discussion of petroleum product imports is included in order to put exports in the context of the overall trade. Exports of the above petroleum products averaged 32,000 m 3 /d in 1988, up 44% from 1987 levels. Each product except aviation fuel registered increases in export volumes, which reached the highest total volume of the decade. The main reason for the large increase was the first full year of production from the export-directed refinery at Come By Chance, Newfoundland. Export prices for light petroleum products stayed relatively close to USA spot prices. The heavy fuel oil price was mostly above the USA east coast spot price during 1988. Attractive prices on the USA east coast resulted in a few cargoes of middle distillate and motor gasoline shipped from British Columbia. Petroleum products imports came from 12 countries; Quebec had the largest volume of imports in 1988. The USA remained Canada's largest trading partner in petroleum products. Western exporters view the Far East as an ongoing important market. The top single exporter in Canada was Newfoundland Processing, with 32% of the total export volume. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  5. Controllable synthesis in a continuous mode of unsupported molybdenum catalysts with micro/nano size for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Hill, J.M.; Pereira Almao, P.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Heavy oils contain significant amounts of impurities compared to conventional oils, thereby posing a challenge for hydroprocessing operations at refineries. Hydrodesulfurization is one of the important reactions involved in hydroprocessing. Transition metal sulfides have excellent properties in terms of sulphur removal. Molybdenum based catalysts have been used extensively in the petroleum industry for hydrotreating heavy oil fractions. Supported molybdenum based catalysts suffer strong deactivation in the traditional hydrotreating process due to the deposition of carbonaceous components on the surface of the catalyst when they are used in conventional fixed bed reactors. Unsupported catalysts have higher catalytic activity with better metal dispersion. Laboratory experiments were conducted in which micro/nano size unsupported molybdenum catalysts were synthesized from a water/oil emulsion. The catalysts were prepared in a continuous mode for online application to hydroprocessing or in situ upgrading. Dispersed molybdenum catalysts are more suitable for processing heavier feeds because they are less prone to deactivation. Also, their submicron size ensure high activities due to a large specific surface area. They are also sufficiently small to be readily dispersed in the residual oil. 4 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  6. NEB view of development potential and markets for heavy crude oil. [Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotland, W A; Gutek, A M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The phased reduction in total crude oil and equivalent exports, from 911 Mpbd in 1974 to 465 Mbpd in 1976, has no doubt had a disruptive effect on the rate of development of heavy crude oil reserves. The effect could have become more series as total exports continued to drop. However, the separate licensing of heavy crude oil for export will allow heavy crude oil to enter available markets until the early 1980s. The construction of one or several upgrading facilities by the early 1980s, combined with growing domestic requirements for heavy crude oil feedstock, could make the disposition of heavy oil largely independent of the purchasing patterns of export markets. The prospect of increased market stability combined with increasing cash flows should provide an appropriate environment to optimize the role that heavy oil resources can play in Canada's future energy balance. (12 refs.)

  7. Bioaccumulation of petroleum hydrocarbons in arctic amphipods in the oil development area of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jerry M; Durell, Gregory S

    2012-04-01

    An objective of a multiyear monitoring program, sponsored by the US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management was to examine temporal and spatial changes in chemical and biological characteristics of the Arctic marine environment resulting from offshore oil exploration and development activities in the development area of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. To determine if petroleum hydrocarbons from offshore oil operations are entering the Beaufort Sea food web, we measured concentrations of hydrocarbons in tissues of amphipods, Anonyx nugax, sediments, Northstar crude oil, and coastal peat, collected between 1999 and 2006 throughout the development area. Mean concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), saturated hydrocarbons (SHC), and sterane and triterpane petroleum biomarkers (StTr) were not significantly different in amphipods near the Northstar oil production facility, before and after it came on line in 2001, and in amphipods from elsewhere in the study area. Forensic analysis of the profiles (relative composition and concentrations) of the 3 hydrocarbon classes revealed that hydrocarbon compositions were different in amphipods, surface sediments where the amphipods were collected, Northstar crude oil, and peat from the deltas of 4 North Slope rivers. Amphipods and sediments contained a mixture of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and biogenic PAH. The SHC in amphipods were dominated by pristane derived from zooplankton, indicating that the SHC were primarily from the amphipod diet of zooplankton detritus. The petroleum biomarker StTr profiles did not resemble those in Northstar crude oil. The forensic analysis revealed that hydrocarbons in amphipod tissues were not from oil production at Northstar. Hydrocarbons in amphipod tissues were primarily from their diet and from river runoff and coastal erosion of natural diagenic and fossil terrestrial materials, including seep oils, kerogens, and peat. Offshore oil and gas exploration and development

  8. Uptake and elimination kinetics of heavy metals by earthworm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Earthworm inoculation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil is thought to catalyze the bioremediation. Most bioremediation studies focus on the petroleum hydrocarbon content and not on the heavy metals. Here, the uptake kinetics of heavy metals by earthworm in used engine oil contaminated soil was investigated.

  9. Bioremediation of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons in diesel contaminated soil with the earthworm: Eudrilus eugeniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekperusi, Ogheneruemu Abraham; Aigbodion, Iruobe Felix

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study on the bioremediation of diesel contaminated soil with the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae (Kingberg) was conducted. 5 ml of diesel was contaminated into soils in replicates and inoculated with E. eugeniae for 90 days. Physicochemical parameters, heavy metals and total petroleum hydrocarbons were analyzed using AAS. BTEX in contaminated soil and tissues of earthworms were determined with GC-FID. The activities of earthworms resulted in a decrease in pH (3.0 %), electrical conductivity (60.66 %), total nitrogen (47.37 %), chloride (60.66 %), total organic carbon (49.22 %), sulphate (60.59 %), nitrate (60.65 %), phosphate (60.80 %), sodium (60.65 %), potassium (60.67 %), calcium (60.67 %), magnesium (60.68 %), zinc (60.59 %), manganese (60.72 %), copper (60.68 %), nickel (60.58 %), cadmium (60.44 %), vanadium (61.19 %), chromium (53.60 %), lead (60.38 %), mercury (61.11 %), arsenic (80.85 %), TPH (84.99 %). Among the BTEX constituents, only benzene (8.35 %) was detected in soil at the end of the study. Earthworm tissue analysis showed varying levels of TPH (57.35 %), benzene (38.91 %), toluene (27.76 %), ethylbenzene (42.16 %) and xylene (09.62 %) in E. eugeniae at the end of the study. The study has shown that E. eugeniae could be applied as a possible bioremediator in diesel polluted soil.

  10. Microbial enhanced heavy crude oil recovery through biodegradation using bacterial isolates from an Omani oil field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayegh, Abdullah; Al-Wahaibi, Yahya; Al-Bahry, Saif; Elshafie, Abdulkadir; Al-Bemani, Ali; Joshi, Sanket

    2015-09-16

    Biodegradation is a cheap and environmentally friendly process that could breakdown and utilizes heavy crude oil (HCO) resources. Numerous bacteria are able to grow using hydrocarbons as a carbon source; however, bacteria that are able to grow using HCO hydrocarbons are limited. In this study, HCO degrading bacteria were isolated from an Omani heavy crude oil field. They were then identified and assessed for their biodegradation and biotransformation abilities under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Bacteria were grown in five different minimum salts media. The isolates were identified by MALDI biotyper and 16S rRNA sequencing. The nucleotide sequences were submitted to GenBank (NCBI) database. The bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis. To assess microbial growth and biodegradation of HCO by well-assay on agar plates, samples were collected at different intervals. The HCO biodegradation and biotransformation were determined using GC-FID, which showed direct correlation of microbial growth with an increased biotransformation of light hydrocarbons (C12 and C14). Among the isolates, B. licheniformis AS5 was the most efficient isolate in biodegradation and biotransformation of the HCO. Therefore, isolate AS5 was used for heavy crude oil recovery experiments, in core flooding experiments using Berea core plugs, where an additional 16 % of oil initially in place was recovered. This is the first report from Oman for bacteria isolated from an oil field that were able to degrade and transform HCO to lighter components, illustrating the potential use in HCO recovery. The data suggested that biodegradation and biotransformation processes may lead to additional oil recovery from heavy oil fields, if bacteria are grown in suitable medium under optimum growth conditions.

  11. Estimation of evaporative losses during storage of crude oil and petroleum products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlović Marina A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Storage of crude oil and petroleum products inevitably leads to evaporative losses. Those losses are important for the industrial plants mass balances, as well as for the environmental protection. In this paper, estimation of evaporative losses was performed using software program TANKS 409d which was developed by the Agency for Environmental Protection of the United States - US EPA. Emissions were estimated for the following types of storage tanks: fixed conical roof tank, fixed dome roof tank, external floating roof tank, internal floating roof tank and domed external floating roof tank. Obtained results show quantities of evaporated losses per tone of stored liquid. Crude oil fixed roof storage tank losses are cca 0.5 kg per tone of crude oil. For floating roof, crude oil losses are 0.001 kg/t. Fuel oil (diesel fuel and heating oil have the smallest evaporation losses, which are in order of magnitude 10-3 kg/tone. Liquids with higher Reid Vapour Pressure have very high evaporative losses for tanks with fixed roof, up to 2.07 kg/tone. In case of external floating roof tank, losses are 0.32 kg/tone. The smallest losses are for internal floating roof tank and domed external floating roof tank: 0.072 and 0.044, respectively. Finally, it can be concluded that the liquid with low volatility of low BTEX amount can be stored in tanks with fixed roof. In this case, the prevailing economic aspect, because the total amount of evaporative loss does not significantly affect the environment. On the other hand, storage of volatile derivatives with high levels of BTEX is not justified from the economic point of view or from the standpoint of the environment protection.

  12. Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

    2009-03-07

    Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to

  13. Petroleum and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    060,

    1965-02-01

    Substantial increases in demand for Canadian petroleum and natural gas in both domestic and export markets resulted in another good year throughout the main sectors of the industry. In February, production averaged 850,000 bpd, or about 8% more than 1963 output of crude oil and natural gas liquids. Construction began on the first full scale plant for the extraction of oil from the Athabasca bituminous sands. In 1964, exploratory and development drilling in western Canada increased 10% from the previous year. A total of 15.5 million ft was drilled, the largest since the record drilling year of 1956. The main oil field development areas in Alberta were the House Mountain, Deer Mountain and Goose River Fields, and the Bantry-Taber heavy oil region in southeastern Alberta. Oil reserves were increased substantially by waterflood pressure maintenance projects in many of the older oil fields. The largest oil accumulation discovered in 1964 was the Syvia-Honda Field in the Devonian Gilwood sandstone in N.-central Alberta. Two graphs illustrate the crude petroleum in Canada in millions of barrels from 1940 to 1964, and natural gas in Canada in billions of cu ft from 1950 to 1964. The outlook for the industry in 1965 is good.

  14. Reduction of light oil usage as power fluid for jet pumping in deep heavy oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.; Li, H.; Yang, D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Regina Univ., SK (Canada); Zhang, Q. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong (China); He, J. [China National Petroleum Corp., Haidan District, Beijing (China). PetroChina Tarim Oilfield Co.

    2008-10-15

    In deep heavy oil reservoirs, reservoir fluid can flow more easily in the formation as well as around the bottomhole. However, during its path along the production string, viscosity of the reservoir fluid increases dramatically due to heat loss and release of the dissolved gas, resulting in significant pressure drop along the wellbore. Artificial lifting methods need to be adopted to pump the reservoir fluids to the surface. This paper discussed the development of a new technique for reducing the amount of light oil used for jet pumping in deep heavy oil wells. Two approaches were discussed. Approach A uses the light oil as a power fluid first to obtain produced fluid with lower viscosity, and then the produced fluid is reinjected into the well as a power fluid. The process continues until the viscosity of the produced fluid is too high to be utilized. Approach B combines a portion of the produced fluid with the light oil at a reasonable ratio and then the produced fluid-light oil mixture is used as the power fluid for deep heavy oil well production. The viscosity of the blended power fluid continue to increase and eventually reach equilibrium. The paper presented the detailed processes of both approaches in order to indicate how to apply them in field applications. Theoretic models were also developed and presented to determine the key parameters in the field operations. A field case was also presented and a comparison and analysis between the two approaches were discussed. It was concluded from the field applications that, with a certain amount of light oil, the amount of reservoir fluid produced by using the new technique could be 3 times higher than that of the conventional jet pumping method. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Effect of temperature on the level of corrosion caused by heavy petroleum on AISI 304 and AISI 444 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Sampaio Eufrásio Machado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study on the influence of national heavy petroleum in the corrosion of the AISI 444 and AISI 304 stainless steels in simulated refining operation conditions. The petroleum was first characterized through physicochemical analysis (density, fluidity point, viscosity, sulfur concentration. In an attempt to understand the corrosion effect of temperature and of the type of heating the referred types of steel thermal treatments were carried out at three levels of temperature (200, 300 and 400 °C. The procedure was done in conditions close to those in the distillation column. Heat was gradually increased from room temperature, and directly heated to working temperature. Each treatment took 4 hours to be completed. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and the analysis of X rays dispersive energy (EDX were used after the trials to characterize the samples. The results show that treatment temperature, as well as the type of heating, has distinct influences on each type of steel.

  16. Experimental study of heavy oil-water flow structure effects on relative permeabilities in a fracture filled with heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shad, S.; Gates, I.D.; Maini, B.B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering]|[Alberta Ingenuity Centre for In Situ Energy, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    An experimental apparatus was used to investigate the flow of water in the presence of heavy oil within a smooth-walled fracture. Different flow patterns were investigated under a variety of flow conditions. Results of the experiments were used to determine the accuracy of VC, Corey, and Shad and Gates models designed to represent the behaviour of oil wet systems. The relative permeability concept was used to describe the behaviour of multiple phases flowing through porous media. A smooth-walled plexiglass Hele-Shaw cell was used to visualize oil and water flow. Changes in flow rates led to different flow regimes. The experiment demonstrated that water flowed co-currently in the form of droplets or slugs. Decreases in the oil flow rate enlarged the size of the water droplets as well as the velocity, until eventually the droplets coalesced and became water slugs. Droplet appearance or disappearance directly impacted the oil and water saturation levels. Changes in fluid saturation altered the pressure gradient. Darcy's law for the 2 liquid phases were used to calculate relative permeability curves. The study showed that at low water saturation, oil relative permeability reached as high as 2.5, while water relative permeability was lower than unity. In the presence of a continuous water channel, water drops formed in oil, and the velocity of the drops was lower than their velocity under a discontinuous water flow regime. It was concluded that the Shad and Gates model overestimated oil relative permeability and underestimated water relative permeability. 38 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  17. Aquatic toxicity of petroleum products and dispersant agents determined under the U.S. EPA Oil Spill Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development has developed baseline data on the ecotoxicity of selected petroleum products and several chemical dispersants as part of its oil spills research program. Two diluted bitumens (dilbits) from the Alberta Tar Sands were tested for acu...

  18. Solar-Assisted Fast Cleanup of Heavy Oil Spill by a Photothermal Sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Jian

    2018-04-16

    Rapid cleanup of heavy oil spill is always considered as a great challenge because the conventional porous oil sorbents cannot efficiently remove them due to the high viscosity of the oil (>1000 mPa·s). In this work, we take advantage of the photothermal effect to heating the heavy oil by using sunlight as energy source to significantly reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil and thus to achieve a fast heavy oil cleanup. A carbon nanotube (CNT) modified polyurethane sponge was fabricated as photothermal sorbent that exhibited superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity, as well as outstanding absorption capacity of heavy oil. Thanks to the excellent photothermal effect of CNTs, the modified sponge achieved nearly full sunlight absorption (99%). The resulting solar heating effectively reduced the viscosity of the heavy oil, which enabled the modified sponge to quickly absorb heavy oil of 20 times its own weight under sun illumination. This solar-assisted heavy oil sorbent design is promising for future remediation of viscous oil-spills.

  19. Building on comparative experience : the Venezuelan extra-heavy crude oil projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviewed legal considerations regarding heavy and extra heavy oil production in both Canada and Venezuela. The paper focused on Venezuela's extra heavy oil projects in the Orinoco Oil Belt, one of the world's largest accumulation of bitumen with an estimated reserve of 1.2 trillion barrels. The paper described the following four projects: the Petrozuata, Cerro Negro, SINCOR, and Hamaca heavy oil projects which are all congressionally approved joint ventures for extra-heavy crudes in the Orinoco Belt. It also described the legal regime which governs heavy oil projects in Venezuela, including the Organic Gaseous Hydrocarbon Law and the Organic Hydrocarbon Law. Twenty congressional conditions which have been imposed were also outlined along with the legal considerations and lessons learned regarding new extra-heavy crude projects under the two legal regimes. 1 fig

  20. Geomechanical analysis to predict the oil leak at the wellbores in Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2014-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in wellbores of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interbed between the caprock bottom and salt top. A three dimensional finite element model, which contains wellbore element blocks and allows each cavern to be configured individually, is constructed to investigate the wellbore damage mechanism. The model also contains element blocks to represent interface between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interbed behavior in a realistic manner. The causes of the damaged casing segments are a result of vertical and horizontal movements of the interbed between the caprock and salt dome. The salt top subsides because the volume of caverns below the salt top decrease with time due to salt creep closure, while the caprock subsides at a slower rate because the caprock is thick and stiffer. This discrepancy yields a deformation of the well. The deformed wellbore may fail at some time. An oil leak occurs when the wellbore fails. A possible oil leak date of each well is determined using the equivalent plastic strain failure criterion. A well grading system for a remediation plan is developed based on the predicted leak dates of each wellbore.

  1. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-08-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

  2. Cracking hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigle, A A.F.M.

    1922-12-20

    Hydrocarbon oils such as petroleum, peat, shale, or lignite oils, heavy tars, resin oils, naphthalene oils, etc., are vaporized by being fed from a tank through a preheater to the lower part of a vertical annular retort heated by a flame projected down the central cavity from a burner. The oil vapors rise through annular passages formed by disks, on which are placed chips of copper, iron, aluminum, etc., to act as catalysts.

  3. Structure and properties of compositions based on petroleum sulfonic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutorskii, I.A.; Sultanova, A.S.; Belkina, E.V.; Fomin, A.G. [Lomonosov Academy of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    Colloidal characteristics of compositions based on petroleum sulfonic acids were studied. Neutralized heavy oil residue exhibits surface-active properties and contains an ultradisperse filler. Analysis of the compositions by size-exclusion-chromatography shows deep structural changes in the heavy acid residue upon neutralization with calcium carbonate.

  4. Determination of asphaltenes in heavy oils using an on-column method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogel, E.; Ovalles, C.; Moir, M. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Schabron, J.F. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2009-07-01

    An improved analytical method for determining the asphaltene content in crude oil and petroleum samples was presented. The method used an on-column precipitation technique coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). The column has an inert packing material where the asphaltene was precipitated and re-dissolved using a solvent. Heavy crude oils with asphaltene contents ranging from 5 to 25 per cent w/w were tested. A blend of 90:10 dichloromethane and methanol was used to decrease the influence of hydrocarbon adsorption mechanisms from the polymeric liquid chromatographic phases. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to compare results obtained using the method with results obtained using traditional gravimetric methods. Regression analysis was used to determine the calibration constants. The study showed that the method can be used as replacement for conventional gravimetric methods when faster results are needed or when sample sizes are small. It was concluded that the method was able to accurately quantify asphaltene contents as low as 120 ppm. 8 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  5. Injection of multi-azimuth permeable planes in weakly cemented formations for enhanced heavy-oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, G. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[GeoSierra LLC, Norcross, GA (United States); Cavender, T.; Schultz, R.L. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Weakly cemented formations have minimal strength without fracture toughness. As such, the well stimulation process must be different from the fracturing process that occurs in hard rocks. This paper presented field injection experiments of multi-azimuth, injected, vertical planar geometries in several weakly cemented formations. The application of the method to shallow petroleum soft rock reservoirs was described, with particular reference to the thermal and solvent recovery of heavy oil. This study showed that in weakly cemented formations, a well-initiation device can control the azimuth of injected vertical planes, thereby controlling the rate of injection and the viscosity of the injected fluid. The concept of using the multi-azimuth, vertical permeable planes has strong potential in soft-rock formations for enhanced production in both shallow gas and shallow heavy-oil reservoirs. The method can be applied in a single well injector-producer for the continuous injection of steam and the continuous extraction of oil, similar to steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) and may be more efficient than a confined horizontal well pair typically used in SAGD. However, the authors noted that the effectiveness of the multi-azimuth process has yet to be proven for oil sand formations. 13 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  6. Gasification of coal as efficient means of environment protection and hydrogenation of heavy oils residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichko, A.A.; Maloletnev, A.S. [Fossil Fuel Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The Russia`s more then 50% of coals produced in its European part contain over 2,5% of sulphur, and the coals containing less than 1.5% of sulphurs comprise ca.20%. Thus, utilisation of the sulphide coals is inevitable, and there a problem arises concerning the technology of their sensible use and considering the requirements on the environment protection. Russia`s specialists have developed a design and construction for a steam-gas installation with a closed cycle gasification of the solid fuel. The gasification process will proceed in the fluidized bed under forced pressure of the steam-air blast. Characteristic features of this process are the following: a higher efficiency (the capacity of one gas generator is 3-3,5 times larger than that attained in the present gas generators of the Lurgy`s type): 2-2,5 times decreased fuel losses as compared to the Winkler`s generators; retention of the sensible heat, resulting in an increased total energy efficiency. The main task for petroleum refining industry at the present stage is the increase of depth of oil processing with the aim to intensify motor fuel production. One of the ways to solve the problem is to involve heavy oil residues into the processing. But the high metal and asphaltenes contents in the latter make the application of traditional methods and processes more difficult. Up to now there is no simple and effective technology which could give the opportunity to use oil residues for distillate fractions production. In Fossil fuel institute a process for hydrogenation of high boiling oil products, including with high sulphur, vanadium and nickel contents ones, into distillates and metals concentrates. The main point of the new process is as follows: the water solution of catalytic additive, for which purpose water soluble metal salts of VI-VIII groups are used, is mixed with tar, dispersed and then subjected to additional supercavitation in a special apparatus.

  7. On the definition of exergy efficiencies for petroleum systems: Application to offshore oil and gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Voldsund, Mari; Elmegaard, Brian; Ertesvåg, Ivar Ståle; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2014-01-01

    Exergy-based efficiencies are measures of the thermodynamic perfection of systems and processes. A meaningful formulation of these performance criteria for petroleum systems is difficult because of (i) the high chemical exergy of hydrocarbons, (ii) the large variety of chemical components, and (iii) the differences in operating conditions between facilities. This work focuses on offshore processing plants, considering four oil platforms that differ by their working conditions and designs. Several approaches from the scientific literature for similar processes are presented and applied to the four cases. They showed a low sensitivity to performance improvements, gave inconsistent results, or favoured facilities operating under certain conditions. We suggest an alternative formulation, called the component-by-component exergy efficiency, which builds on the decomposition of the exergy flows at the level of the chemical compounds. It allows therefore for sound comparisons of separation systems, while it successfully evaluates their theoretical improvement potentials. The platform displaying the lowest efficiency (1.7%) is characterised by little pumping and compression works, at the opposite of the one displaying the highest performance (29.6%). A more realistic measure of the technical potential for improving these systems can be carried out by splitting further the exergy destruction into its avoidable and unavoidable parts. - Highlights: • Different exergy efficiency definitions for petroleum systems are reviewed. • These definitions are applied to four oil and gas platforms and are revealed to be inapplicable. • A new formulation, namely the component-by-component efficiency, is proposed. • The performance of the offshore platforms under study varies between 1.7% and 29.6%

  8. Viscoplastic sculpting in stable triple layer heavy oil transport flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmadi, Parisa; Hormozi, Sarah; A. Frigaard, Ian

    2017-11-01

    In we introduced a novel methodology for efficient transport of heavy oil via a triple layer core-annular flow. Pumping pressures are significantly reduced by concentrating high shear rates to a lubricating layer, while ideas from Visco-Plastic Lubrication are used to eliminate interfacial instabilities. We purposefully position a shaped unyielded skin of a viscoplastic fluid between the transported oil and the lubricating fluid layer to balance the density difference between the fluids. Here we address the sculpting of the shaped skin within a concentric inflow manifold. We use the quasi-steady model to provide inputs to an axisymmetric triple layer computation, showing the development of the streamwise skin profile and establishment of the flow. For this, we use a finite element discretization with the augmented-Lagrangian method to represent the yield surface behaviour accurately and a PLIC method to track the interface motion.

  9. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase

  10. Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) demonstrate potential for use in soil bioremediation by increasing the degradation rates of heavy crude oil hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkosky, Luke; Barkley, Jaimie; Sabadell, Gabriel; Gough, Heidi; Davidson, Seana

    2017-02-15

    Crude oil contamination widely impacts soil as a result of release during oil and gas exploration and production activities. The success of bioremediation methods to meet remediation goals often depends on the composition of the crude oil, the soil, and microbial community. Earthworms may enhance bioremediation by mixing and aerating the soil, and exposing soil microorganisms to conditions in the earthworm gut that lead to increased activity. In this study, the common composting earthworm Eisenia fetida was tested for utility to improve remediation of oil-impacted soil. E. fetida survival in soil contaminated with two distinct crude oils was tested in an artificial (lab-mixed) sandy loam soil, and survival compared to that in the clean soil. Crude oil with a high fraction of light-weight hydrocarbons was more toxic to earthworms than the crude oil with a high proportion of heavy polyaromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The heavier crude oil was added to soil to create a 30,000mg/kg crude oil impacted soil, and degradation in the presence of added earthworms and feed, feed alone, or no additions was monitored over time and compared. Earthworm feed was spread on top to test effectiveness of no mixing. TPH degradation rate for the earthworm treatments was ~90mg/day slowing by 200days to ~20mg/day, producing two phases of degradation. With feed alone, the rate was ~40mg/day, with signs of slowing after 500days. Both treatments reached the same end point concentrations, and exhibited faster degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons C21, decreased. During these experiments, soils were moderately toxic during the first three months, then earthworms survived well, were active and reproduced with petroleum hydrocarbons present. This study demonstrated that earthworms accelerate bioremediation of crude oil in soils, including the degradation of the heaviest polyaromatic fractions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of molecular diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide and methane in heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y.; Tharanivasan, A.K.; Yang, C. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Vapour extraction (VAPEX) is a solvent-based thermal recovery process which is considered to be a viable process for recovering heavy oil. In order to develop a solvent-based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operation, it is necessary to know the rate and extent of oil mobilization by the solvent. The molecular diffusion coefficient of solvent gas in heavy oil must be known. In this study, the pressure decay method was used to measure the molecular diffusivity of a gas solvent in heavy oil by monitoring the decaying pressure. The pressure decay method is a non-intrusive method in which physical contact is made between the gas solvent and the heavy oil. The pressure versus time data are measured until the heavy oil reaches complete saturation. The diffusion coefficient can be determined from the measured data and a mathematical model. In this study, the molecular diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide-heavy oil and methane-heavy oil systems were measured and compared. The experiments were performed in closed high-pressure cells at constant reservoir temperature. An analytical solution was also obtained to predict the pressure in the gas phase and for the boundary conditions at the solvent-heavy oil interface for each solvent. Solvent diffusivity was determined by finding the best match of the numerically predicted and experimentally measured pressures.

  12. Proceedings of the World Heavy Oil Congress : unconventional oil challenging conventional expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This international technical and business conference provided a forum to promote heavy oil technology and foster relationships between supply and demand countries. The interactive forum between global industry professionals addressed technological, strategic and environmental challenges facing the unconventional oil industry, including seeking innovative, low cost technologies, driving high costs down; educating and leading the workforce to maintain high standards of production; and ensuring that the footprint on the land is as light as possible. It emphasized that as demand for the uses of heavy oil grows, so does the responsibility of managing sustainability not just from an environmental and social perspective, but also with respect to supply, including manpower and infrastructure. The technical conference featured sessions on advanced and enhanced processes; combustion processes; drilling and completions; geology and reservoir; heavy oil exploitation and development; mining, extraction and transportation; non thermal processes; production and operations; reservoir monitoring; SAGD processes; sustainable development; thermal processes; and, upgrading technology. All 124 presentations from the technical conference were catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  13. PERFORMANCE, EMISSION, AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF A CI ENGINE USING LIQUID PETROLEUM GAS AND NEEM OIL IN DUAL FUEL MODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanimuthu Vijayabalan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased environmental awareness and depletion of resources are driving the industries to develop viable alternative fuels like vegetable oils, compresed natural gas, liquid petroleum gas, producer gas, and biogas in order to provide suitable substitute to diesel for compression ignition engine. In this investigation, a single cylinder, vertical, air-cooled diesel engine was modified to use liquid petroleum gas in dual fuel mode. The liquefied petroleum gas, was mixed with air and supplied through intake manifold. The liquid fuel neem oil or diesel was injected into the combustion chamber. The performance, emission, and combustion characteristics were studied and compared for neat fuel and dual fuel mode. The experimental results on dual fuel engine show a reduction in oxides of nitrogen up to 70% of the rated power and smoke in the entire power range. However the brake thermal efficiency was found decreased in low power range due to lower calorific value of liquid petroleum gas, and increase in higher power range due to the complete burning of liquid petroleum gas. Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions were increased significantly at lower power range and marginal variation in higher power range.

  14. The petroleum industry in 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This 2004 edition of the petroleum industry activities presents results and data concerning the crude oil prices evolution, the petroleum exploration and production in france and in the world, the para-petroleum industry, the hydrocarbons supplies, the refining, the quality evolution of the substitution products and fuels, the internal transports of petroleum products, the petroleum products storage, the petroleum products consumption, the petroleum products prices and taxation, the petroleum products distribution. (A.L.B.)

  15. Profiles of Reservoir Properties of Oil-Bearing Plays for Selected Petroleum Provinces in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, P.A.; Attanasi, E.D.

    2015-11-05

    Profiles of reservoir properties of oil-bearing plays for selected petroleum provinces in the United States were developed to characterize the database to be used for a potential assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of oil that would be technically recoverable by the application of enhanced oil recovery methods using injection of carbon dioxide (CO2-EOR). The USGS assessment methodology may require reservoir-level data for the purposes of screening conventional oil reservoirs and projecting CO2-EOR performance in terms of the incremental recoverable oil. The information used in this report is based on reservoir properties from the “Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States Database” prepared by Nehring Associates, Inc. (2012). As described by Nehring Associates, Inc., the database “covers all producing provinces (basins) in the United States except the Appalachian Basin and the Cincinnati Arch.”

  16. Process of converting heavy hydrocarbons, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, F C

    1921-05-27

    A modification is described of the process of the principal Patent 373,060 for splitting and converting heavy hydrocarbons into low-boiling lighter products or into cylinder oil, characterized in that, in place of petroleum, brown-coal oil, shale oil, or the like is distilled in the presence of hydrosilicate as a catalyzer or is heated with refluxing.

  17. Visualized study of thermochemistry assisted steam flooding to improve oil recovery in heavy oil reservoir with glass micromodels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyu, X.; Liu, Huiqing; Pang, Zhanxi; Sun, Zhixue

    2018-01-01

    Steam channeling, one serious problem in the process of steam flooding in heavy oil reservoir, decreases the sweep efficiency of steam to cause a lower oil recovery. Viscosity reducer and nitrogen foam, two effective methods to improve oil recovery with different mechanism, present a satisfactory

  18. Low-temperature thermal decomposition of heavy petroleum distillates: interconnection between the electrical properties and concentration of paramagnetic centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolomatov, M.; Gafurov, M.; Rodionov, A.; Mamin, G.; González, L. Miquel; Vakhin, A.; Petrov, A.; Bakhtizin, R.; Khairudinov, I.; Orlinskii, S.

    2018-05-01

    Changes of paramagnetic centers (PC) concentration in petroleum dispersed systems (PDS) are studied in the process of low-temperature thermolysis. Complex investigation of physicochemical, rheological and electrophysical properties of high-boiling oil fractions is performed. Based on the analysis of the experimental results it can be concluded that the PDS under investigation can be regarded as amorphous broadband organic semiconductors for which PC plays a role of dopant. It shows the perspectives of the asphaltenes usage as a basis for the photovoltaic devices.

  19. Currency risk and prices of oil and petroleum products: a simulation with a quantitative model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniasi, L.; Ottavi, D.; Rubino, E.; Saracino, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the exchange rates of the US Dollar against the four major European currencies and the prices of oil and its main products in those countries. In fact, the sensitivity of the prices to the exchange rate movements is of fundamental importance for the refining and distribution industries of importing countries. The result of the analysis shows that in neither free market conditions, as those present in Great Britain, France and Germany, nor in regulated markets, i.e. the italian one, do the variations of petroleum product prices fully absorb the variation of the exchange rates. In order to assess the above relationship, we first tested the order of co-integration of the time series of exchange rates of EMS currencies with those of international prices of oil and its derivative products; then we used a transfer-function model to reproduce the quantitative relationships between those variables. Using these results, we then reproduced domestic price functions with partial adjustment mechanisms. Finally, we used the above model to run a simulation of the deviation from the steady-state pattern caused by exchange-rate exogenous shocks. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-24

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

  1. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date

  2. Proceedings of the Canadian Heavy Oil Association Conference : Heavy oil, the business of evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    gas industry to exchange knowledge about fueling options, emerging technologies for resource recovery, and markets and logistics. Most of the papers were presented in Power-Point format with several viewgraphs depicting processes used mostly to recover bitumen from the tar sand and oil sand deposits in Western Canada. The enhanced recovery methods ranged from chemical recovery and thermal recovery methods such as steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) and toe-to-heel air injection (THAI). Separation processes and sorbent recovery methods were also discussed. The conference featured 11 presentations, of which 5 were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  3. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons from crude oil-contaminated soil with the earthworm: Hyperiodrilus africanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekperusi, O A; Aigbodion, F I

    2015-12-01

    A study on the bioremediation potentials of the earthworm Hyperiodrilus africanus (Beddard) in soil contaminated with crude oil was investigated. Dried and sieved soils were contaminated with 5 ml each of crude oil with replicates and inoculated with earthworms and monitored daily for 12 weeks. Physicochemical parameters such as pH, total organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate, phosphate, sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium were determined using standard procedures. Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS), while BTEX constituents and earthworms tissues were analyzed using Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). The results showed that the earthworm significantly enhanced the physicochemical parameters of the contaminated soil resulting in a decrease of the total organic carbon (56.64 %), sulfate (57.66 %), nitrate (57.69 %), phosphate (57.73 %), sodium (57.69 %), potassium (57.68 %), calcium (57.69 %) and magnesium (57.68 %) except pH (3.90 %) that slightly increased. There was a significant decrease in the TPH (84.99 %), benzene (91.65 %), toluene (100.00 %), ethylbenzene (100.00 %) and xylene (100.00 %). Analyses of the tissues of the earthworm at the end of the experiment showed that the earthworms bioaccumulated/biodegraded 57.35/27.64 % TPH, 38.91/52.73 % benzene, 27.76/72.24 % toluene, 42.16/57.85 % ethylbenzene and 09.62/90.38 % xylene. The results showed that the earthworms H. africanus could be used to bioremediate moderately polluted soil with crude oil contamination in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

  4. Simultaneous valorization and biocatalytic upgrading of heavy vacuum gas oil by the biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wael Ahmed; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Awadh, Maysoon N; Obuekwe, Christian; El Nayal, Ashraf M

    2017-11-01

    Heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) is a complex and viscous hydrocarbon stream that is produced as the bottom side product from the vacuum distillation units in petroleum refineries. HVGO is conventionally treated with thermochemical process, which is costly and environmentally polluting. Here, we investigate two petroleum biotechnology applications, namely valorization and bioupgrading, as green approaches for valorization and upgrading of HVGO. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U strain grew on 20% v/v of HVGO as a sole carbon and sulfur source. It produced rhamnolipid biosurfactants in a growth-associated mode with a maximum crude biosurfactants yield of 10.1 g l -1 , which reduced the surface tension of the cell-free culture supernatant to 30.6 mN m -1 within 1 week of incubation. The rarely occurring dirhamnolipid Rha-Rha-C 12 -C 12 dominated the congeners' profile of the biosurfactants produced from HVGO. Heavy vacuum gas oil was recovered from the cultures and abiotic controls and the maltene fraction was extracted for further analysis. Fractional distillation (SimDist) of the biotreated maltene fraction showed a relative decrease in the high-boiling heavy fuel fraction (BP 426-565 °C) concomitant with increase in the lighter distillate diesel fraction (BP 315-426 °C). Analysis of the maltene fraction revealed compositional changes. The number-average (Mn) and weight-average (Mw) molecular weights, as well as the absolute number of hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles were higher in the biotreated maltene fraction of HVGO. These findings suggest that HVGO can be potentially exploited as a carbon-rich substrate for production of the high-value biosurfactants by P. aeruginosa AK6U and to concomitantly improve/upgrade its chemical composition. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Sunlight Induced Rapid Oil Absorption and Passive Room-Temperature Release: An Effective Solution toward Heavy Oil Spill Cleanup

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Mengchun

    2018-05-18

    Rapid cleanup and easy recovery of spilled heavy oils is always a great challenge due to their high viscosity (>103 mPa s). One of the efficient methods to absorb highly viscous oils is to reduce their viscosity by increasing their temperature. In this work, the authors integrate the sunlight‐induced light‐to‐heat conversion effect of polypyrrole (PPy) and thermoresponsive property of poly(N‐isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) into the melamine sponge, which successfully delivers a fast heavy oil absorption under sunlight and passive oil release underwater at room temperature. Thanks to the rationally designed functionalities, the PNIPAm/PPy functionalized sponges possess oleophilicity and hydrophobicity under sunlight. Due to the photothermal effect of PPy, the sponges locally heat up contacting heavy oil under sunlight and reduce its viscosity to a point where the oil voluntarily flow into the pores of the sponge. The material in this work is able to rapidly absorb the heavy oil with room temperature viscosity as high as ≈1.60 × 105 mPa s. The absorbed oil can be passively forced out the sponge underwater at room temperature due to the hydrophilicity of PNIPAm. The sunlight responsive and multifunctional sponge represents a meaningful attempt in coming up with a sustainable solution toward heavy oil spill.

  6. Sunlight Induced Rapid Oil Absorption and Passive Room-Temperature Release: An Effective Solution toward Heavy Oil Spill Cleanup

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Mengchun; Shi, Yusuf; Chang, Jian; Li, Renyuan; Ong, Chi Siang; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Rapid cleanup and easy recovery of spilled heavy oils is always a great challenge due to their high viscosity (>103 mPa s). One of the efficient methods to absorb highly viscous oils is to reduce their viscosity by increasing their temperature. In this work, the authors integrate the sunlight‐induced light‐to‐heat conversion effect of polypyrrole (PPy) and thermoresponsive property of poly(N‐isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) into the melamine sponge, which successfully delivers a fast heavy oil absorption under sunlight and passive oil release underwater at room temperature. Thanks to the rationally designed functionalities, the PNIPAm/PPy functionalized sponges possess oleophilicity and hydrophobicity under sunlight. Due to the photothermal effect of PPy, the sponges locally heat up contacting heavy oil under sunlight and reduce its viscosity to a point where the oil voluntarily flow into the pores of the sponge. The material in this work is able to rapidly absorb the heavy oil with room temperature viscosity as high as ≈1.60 × 105 mPa s. The absorbed oil can be passively forced out the sponge underwater at room temperature due to the hydrophilicity of PNIPAm. The sunlight responsive and multifunctional sponge represents a meaningful attempt in coming up with a sustainable solution toward heavy oil spill.

  7. Relation of sulfur with hydrocarbons in Brazilian heavy and extra-heavy crude oil; Relacao do enxofre com os hidrocarbonetos em petroleos pesados e extra pesados brasileiros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Sonia Maria Badaro Mangueira; Guimaraes, Regina Celia Lourenco; Silva, Maria do Socorro A. Justo da [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Alexander Vinicius Moraes da [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    As the occurrence of heavy and extra-heavy oils increases sensitively, their participation in the refineries feeding also becomes greater. Heavy oils usually have lower price than a light one, because they produce lower quality derivatives and it's more difficult to meet the specifications. Crude oils are a complex mixture, mostly compounded by carbon and hydrogen and also by impurities like sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen and metals. Sulfur is the third most abundant component of crude oils, following carbon and hydrogen. In general there is a strong positive correlation between the concentrations of polar compounds (aromatics, resins and asphaltenes), and the sulfur content. This work presents graphically sulfur content and polar compounds concentrations for Brazilian and foreign heavy and extra-heavy oils (< 20 deg API). The results of the data analysis indicate that Brazilian crude oils behave differently from foreign heavy and extra-heavy oils. (author)

  8. Acute aquatic toxicity of heavy fuel oils. Summary of relevant test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Paumen, M.L.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2011-12-15

    This report describes the experimental procedures and results obtained in acute ecotoxicity tests on several heavy fuel oil (HFO) samples. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of these samples were tested for toxicity to the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the crustacean zooplankter (Daphnia magna) and green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum). These results assist in determining the environmental hazard from heavy fuel oil.

  9. Acute aquatic toxicity of heavy fuel oils. Summary of relevant test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Paumen, M.L.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the experimental procedures and results obtained in acute ecotoxicity tests on several heavy fuel oil (HFO) samples. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of these samples were tested for toxicity to the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the crustacean zooplankter (Daphnia magna) and green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum). These results assist in determining the environmental hazard from heavy fuel oil.

  10. Proceedings of the oil sands and heavy oil technologies conference and exhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for oil sands industry leaders to review the current and future state of technology in this frontier environment. Presentations were delivered by key personnel involved in groundbreaking projects with a renewed focus on oil sands technology and equipment, viewed from the strategic level with case studies and reports on application technologies designed to optimize oil sands operations. The presentations addressed a wide range of issues related to the environmental impacts of oil sands processing facilities, including innovative water and wastewater solutions for heavy oil producers for bitumen mining, in-situ and upgrading facilities. New advances in sulphur treatment technologies were highlighted along with technologies designed to increase the energy efficiency and energy consumption rates of upgrader and processing facilities. Advances in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage systems were also discussed along with geopolitical and economic evaluations of the future of the oil sands industry. The conference featured 59 presentations, of which 48 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area

  12. Fingerprinting of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and other biogenic organic compounds (BOC) in oil-contaminated and background soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Yang, Z; Hollebone, B; Brown, C E; Landriault, M; Sun, J; Mudge, S M; Kelly-Hooper, F; Dixon, D G

    2012-09-01

    Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) or petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) are one of the most widespread soil contaminants in Canada, the United States and many other countries worldwide. Clean-up of PHC-contaminated soils costs the Canadian economy hundreds of millions of dollars annually. In Canada, most PHC-contaminated site evaluations are based on the methods developed by the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment (CCME). However, the CCME method does not differentiate PHC from BOC (the naturally occurring biogenic organic compounds), which are co-extracted with petroleum hydrocarbons in soil samples. Consequently, this could lead to overestimation of PHC levels in soil samples. In some cases, biogenic interferences can even exceed regulatory levels (300 μg g(-1) for coarse soils and 1300 μg g(-1) for fine soils for Fraction 3, C(16)-C(34) range, in the CCME Soil Quality Level). Resulting false exceedances can trigger unnecessary and costly cleanup or remediation measures. Therefore, it is critically important to develop new protocols to characterize and quantitatively differentiate PHC and BOC in contaminated soils. The ultimate objective of this PERD (Program of Energy Research and Development) project is to correct the misconception that all detectable hydrocarbons should be regulated as toxic petroleum hydrocarbons. During 2009-2010, soil and plant samples were collected from over forty oil-contaminated and paired background sites in various provinces. The silica gel column cleanup procedure was applied to effectively remove all target BOC from the oil-contaminated sample extracts. Furthermore, a reliable GC-MS method in combination with the derivatization technique, developed in this laboratory, was used for identification and characterization of various biogenic sterols and other major biogenic compounds in these oil-contaminated samples. Both PHC and BOC in these samples were quantitatively determined. This paper reports the characterization

  13. Life cycle greenhouse gas emission assessment of major petroleum oil products for transport and household sectors in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Amit; Vishwanathan, Saritha; Avashia, Vidhee

    2013-01-01

    Energy security concerns due to high oil import dependence and climate change concerns due to related greenhouse gas emissions are important policy discussions in India. Could life cycle assessment (LCA) of petroleum oil products provide inputs to crude oil sourcing and domestic oil pricing policies to address the two concerns? This paper presents a baseline study on LCA of petroleum products in India from Well to Storage depending on the oil source, type of refinery, product and the selected destinations. The LCA based GHG emissions are found to be higher by 4–12 per cent than GHG emissions from direct fuel consumption alone for LPG, 7–10 per cent for Gasoline, 3–9 per cent for Diesel and 4–10 per cent for Kerosene based on various supply chain routes supplying oil to six largest cities in India. Overall the energy used in oil exploration, refinery and transportation in the LCA have a share of 72–77 per cent, 11–15 per cent and 6–8 per cent, respectively. The paper proposes imposing a relative carbon cess for various oil products in different Indian cities. States could accommodate this additional carbon cess by reducing their respective state taxes without increasing the final delivery price to the consumers. - Highlights: ► LCA emissions are found to be higher by 4–12 per cent than direct fuel consumption emissions. ► Energy used in oil exploration, refinery and transportation in the LCA have a share of 72–77 per cent, 11–15 per cent and 6–8 per cent, respectively. ► Corresponding GHG emission shares are 60–66 per cent, 23–27 per cent and 5–8 per cent, respectively. ► The source of crude oil matters. E and P energy consumption is found highest for African countries. ► Differential carbon cess could be imposed without changing final delivery price to consumers

  14. Phytoremediation in the tropics--influence of heavy crude oil on root morphological characteristics of graminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkl, Nicole; Schultze-Kraft, Rainer; Infante, Carmen

    2005-11-01

    When studying species for phytoremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils, one of the main traits is the root zone where enhanced petroleum degradation takes place. Root morphological characteristics of three tropical graminoids were studied. Specific root length (SRL), surface area, volume and average root diameter (ARD) of plants grown in crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated soil were compared. Brachiaria brizantha and Cyperus aggregatus showed coarser roots in polluted soil compared to the control as expressed in an increased ARD. B. brizantha had a significantly larger specific root surface area in contaminated soil. Additionally, a shift of SRL and surface area per diameter class towards higher diameters was found. Oil contamination also caused a significantly smaller SRL and surface area in the finest diameter class of C. aggregatus. The root structure of Eleusine indica was not significantly affected by crude oil. Higher specific root surface area was related to higher degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons found in previous studies.

  15. Concentration of paramagnetic centres at low-temperature thermal destruction of asphaltenes of heavy petroleum distillates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolomatov M.U., Rodionov A.A., Gafurov M.R., Petrov A.V., Biktagirov T.B., Bakhtizin R.Z., Makarchikov S.O., Khairudinov I.Z., Orlinskii S.B.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes of paramagnetic centers (PC concentration in dispersed petroleum systems were studied in the process of low-temperature thermolysis. The kinetic model of PC concentration dynamics based on the processes of unpaired electrons formation during singlet-triplet transitions, weak chemical bonds dissociation and recombination of free radicals is proposed.

  16. Petroleum and Oil Fuel Lines (Apra Harbor through Antonio B. Won Pat Intl Airport to Tanguisson Power Plant), Guam, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a line feature dataset showing the track of petroleum and oil fuel lines that transport hazardous fluids from Apra Harbor through the Antonio B. Won Pat...

  17. Research and development in heavy and extra heavy oil upgrading in PDVSA-Intevep: aqua conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Pedro; Machin, Ivan; Salerno, Gladys; Cotte, Edgar; Higuerey, Ingrid; Andriollo, Antida; Cordova, Jose; Zacarias, Luis; Marzin, Roger; Rivas, Guaicaipuro

    1999-01-01

    After twenty five years of Intevep's creation, is now a good time to revise, from a technical and conceptual perspective, some of the ideas developed in one of the activities that this institution has more persistently sustained. The referred activity targets at the generation of new processes for the upgrading of the bitumen or extra heavy crude oils that Venezuela possesses. This revision concludes in an eclectic synthesis method for the selection and harmonization of the various different advances made through the research performed on processes such as HDH, coking, visbreaking, partial or selective steam reforming and others. Thus, from conceptually different research perspectives a new PDVSA's process already known as as aqua conversion has been assembled. The deepening in the use of this methodology may lead to other new and better upgrading technologies or to improve the existing for the same. All this keeping in mind that whatever these technologies are proprietary or from third parties is of low relevance in front of the mayor objective of commercializing the wide extra heavy oil reservoirs of this country

  18. Improving Oil Recovery (IOR) with Polymer Flooding in a Heavy-Oil River-Channel Sandstone Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Hongjiang

    2009-01-01

    Most of the old oil fields in China have reached high water cut stage, in order to meet the booming energy demanding, oil production rate must be kept in the near future with corresponding IOR (Improving Oil Recovery) methods. Z106 oilfield lies in Shengli Oilfields Area at the Yellow River delta. It was put into development in 1988. Since the oil belongs to heavy oil, the oil-water mobility ratio is so unfavourable that water cut increases very quickly. Especially for reservoir Ng21, the san...

  19. Worldwide cheap and heavy oil productions: A long-term energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseo, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Crude oil, natural gas liquids, heavy oils, deepwater oils, and polar oils are non-renewable energy resources with increasing extraction costs. Two major definitions emerge: regular or 'cheap' oil and non-conventional or 'heavy' oil. Peaking time in conventional oil production has been a recent focus of debate. For two decades, non-conventional oils have been mixed with regular crude oil. Peaking time estimation and the rate at which production may be expected to decline, following the peak, are more difficult to determine. We propose a two-wave model for world oil production pattern and forecasting, based on the diffusion of innovation theories: a sequential multi-Bass model. Historical well-known shocks are confirmed, and new peaking times for crude oil and mixed oil are determined with corresponding depletion rates. In the final section, possible ties between the dynamics of oil extraction and refining capacities are discussed as a predictive symptom of an imminent mixed oil peak in 2016. - Highlights: → Production of conventional and non-conventional oils in aggregate time series. → Decomposition modelling and forecasting with a multi-regime model. → Diffusion of innovation theories and appropriateness of applying Bass concepts to the extraction of oil resources. → Partially overlapping oil extraction processes. → Refining capacities and dynamics of oil extraction.

  20. Petroleum Sector (NAICS 324)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find relevant environmental regulations for the petroleum industry (NAICS 324), including National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)s for petroleum refineries and gasoline dispensing & effluent guidelines for oil and gas extraction

  1. Organic geochemistry and petrology of oil source rocks, Carpathian Overthrust region, southeastern Poland - Implications for petroleum generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruge, M.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Solecki, A.; Stankiewicz, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    The organic mailer rich Oligocene Menilite black shales and mudstones are widely distributed in the Carpathian Overthrust region of southeastern Poland and have excellent hydrocarbon generation potential, according to TOC, Rock-Eval, and petrographic data. Extractable organic matter was characterized by an equable distribution of steranes by carbon number, by varying amounts of 28,30-dinor-hopane, 18??(H)-oleanane and by a distinctive group of C24 ring-A degraded triterpanes. The Menilite samples ranged in maturity from pre-generative to mid-oil window levels, with the most mature in the southeastern portion of the study area. Carpathian petroleum samples from Campanian Oligocene sandstone reservoirs were similar in biomarker composition to the Menilite rock extracts. Similarities in aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon distributions between petroleum asphaltene and source rock pyrolyzates provided further evidence genetically linking Menilite kerogens with Carpathian oils.

  2. Letting Off Steam and Getting Into Hot Water - Harnessing the Geothermal Energy Potential of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodoriu, Catalin; Falcone, Gioia; Espinel, Arnaldo

    2007-07-01

    The oil industry is turning its attention to the more complex development of heavy oil fields in order to meet the ever increasing demands of the manufacturing sector. The current thermal recovery techniques of heavy oil developments provide an opportunity to benefit from the geothermal energy created during the heavy oil production process. There is scope to improve the current recovery factors of heavy oil reservoirs, and there is a need to investigate the associated geothermal energy potential that has been historically neglected. This paper presents a new concept of harnessing the geothermal energy potential of heavy oil reservoirs with the co-production of incremental reserves. (auth)

  3. Challenges of executing heavy oil projects in today's market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunka, G.

    2001-01-01

    Alberta's industrial project scene from 1981 to 2000 was presented in this power point presentation with particular focus on proposed bitumen recovery projects and heavy oil project challenges. A graph depicting GTG world orders by region (Americas, Asia and Europe) showed that U.S. market continues to drive global growth. Major industrial projects in Alberta were highlighted and employment requirements by sector were outlined. In addition, mitigation measures that are needed to successfully deal with the unique challenges of today's market were described. It was noted that in recent years lower capital expenditure by the industry in general has resulted in corporate downsizing or mergers which in turn have resulted in lower technical and operational knowledge. Some of the current challenges facing the industry are new demands for water treatment expertise and an aging workforce. It was concluded that effective mitigation will require a disciplined approach within a flexible framework.1 tab., 7 figs

  4. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01

    This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs thermally recoverable by steam drive which are equal to or greater than 2500 feet deep and contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range. Data were collected from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

  5. Report to Congress on the feasibility of establishing a heating oil component to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    Nine appendices to the main report are included in this volume. They are: Northeastern US distillate supply systems; New England fuel oil storage capacities and inventories; Characteristics of the northeast natural gas market; Documentation of statistical models and calculation of benefits; Regional product reserve study; Other countries` experience with refined product storage; Global refining supply demand appraisal; Summary of federal authorities relevant to the establishment of petroleum product reserves; Product stability and turnover requirements.

  6. Environmental Management System of Petroleum Industries: A case study of Oil and Gas Exploration in the Zamrud Field Conservation Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onny Setiani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background:The Zamrud Field is one of the oil fields managed by Caltex Pacific Indonesia (CPI a production sharing contractor of Pertamina. It is located in the Coastal Plain and  Pekanbaru (CPP Block. The government of Indonesia has designated Zamrud as a conservation area. The petroleum industry in Zamrud fields has received 14001 ISO Certificate on Environmental Management System. The production sharing contract between CPI and the Government of Indonesia expired in August 2002 Methods: .This case study describes how CPI managed the development  of oil and gas production and compared to  the environmental management system for  petroleum industries  that should be taken  in the Zamrud conservation areas. Results: A number of specific measures were employed by CPI  to protect this sensitive area including a green seismic project, zero-discharge drilling, water management, preservation of nature and regular monitoring and impact assessment. There are two  important points that should be in consideration  for the environmental management system by CPI in the Zamrud areas, including top soil utilization to maintain biological and nutrients quality and re-vegetation in all areas of significant disturbances. Conclusion: oil and gas  exploration and production in conservation areas has to be managed through high commitment to good environmental  and social practices. Key words     : Environmental Management System (EMS, Petroleum Industries, Zamrud Field

  7. Report to Congress on the feasibility of establishing a heating oil component to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    In the Autumn of 1996, consumers and Members of Congress from the Northeast expressed concern about high prices for heating oil and historically low levels of inventories. Some Members of Congress advocated building a Federal inventory of heating oil as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Regional reserves are authorized as part of the SPR for import dependent regions by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. In response, the Department of Energy (DOE) proposed a series of studies related to heating fuels, including a study of the desirability, feasibility, and cost of creating a Federal reserve containing distillate fuel. This report documents that study.

  8. Petroleum marketing monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-26

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  9. The 2003 guidebook of petroleum, gas and LPG. Every professional and web site in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legros, E.

    2003-01-01

    This guidebook is a joint special issue of 'Petrole et Gaz Informations' and 'GPL Actualites' journals. It is a complete and practical information tool which takes stock of: the economical activity during 2001 and 2002 (exploration/production, deep offshore activities, maritime transport and tanker-ships, European refining and new specifications, automotive fuels and future engines, lubricants, maritime transport of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), storage facilities and capacity, new standards for bitumen binders, natural gas prospects, sustainable development and ethical investment, air pollution abatement etc..); the 2002 economical key-data of oil and gas summarized in an atlas of maps and statistical tables; a list of public organizations and associations, and of oil and gas companies settled in France; a list of companies involved in oil and gas equipments, services and products sorted by sector; and a yearbook of the oil and gas professionals with their corporate and web sites. (J.S.)

  10. Optimal Physical and Nutrient Parameters for Growth of Trichoderma virens UKMP-1M for Heavy Crude Oil Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainon Hamzah; Buzarin, M.A.; Aidil Abdul Hamid; Thmanomar, O.; Sahidan Senafi

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the optimal parameters for the production of biomass of Trichoderma virens UKMP-1M, a fungus isolated from oil-polluted wastewater. The isolate showed maximum growth at day six after incubation in Mineral Salt Medium (MSM) in the presence of 3 % (v/ v) heavy Khefji Sour crude oil. Although it grew at pH between 5.0 and 7.0, it grew best at pH 5.5. T. virens UKMP-1M grew at temperatures between 25 and 35 degree Celsius, with its highest growth at 30 degree Celsius. Aeration by agitation at 200 rpm was shown to yield the greatest biomass. Peptone at concentration of 1.5 % (w/ v) was determined to be a better nitrogen source than urea, potassium nitrate (KNO 3 ), yeast extract, ammonium sulphate ((NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 ) and ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl). Addition of 1 % (v/ v) crude oil to the MSM medium led to higher biomass production than the addition of 3 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % (v/ v) crude oil. The result also revealed that 40 % of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), 100 % of pristane and 74 % of phytane compounds were degraded after 9 days of incubation at optimal physical and nutrient parameters. (author)

  11. Transformation of heavy gas oils derived from oil sands to petrochemical feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Plessis, D.; Laureshen, C. [Alberta Energy Research Inst., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Alberta's petrochemical industry is primarily based on ethane. However, ethane could potentially impede future growth of Alberta's petrochemical industry because of increasing cost and diminishing supplies. Alternately, the rapidly growing oil sands production could provide abundant new feedstocks. Different integration schemes and technologies were evaluated in this study. Research on converting bitumen-derived heavy gas oil into petrochemical feedstock has resulted in the development of two novel technologies and process integration schemes, notably the NOVA heavy oil laboratory catalyst (NHC) process and the aromatic ring cleavage (ARORINCLE) process. This paper described progress to date on these two projects. The paper presented the experimental results for each scheme. For the ARORINCLE process, results were discussed in terms of the effect of process parameters on the hydrogenation step; effect of process parameters on the ring cleavage step; and integrating the upgrading and petrochemical complex. Early laboratory stage results of these two technologies were found to be encouraging. The authors recommended that work should progress to larger scale demonstration of the NHC and ARORINCLE technologies., 13 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  12. A New Model for Describing the Rheological Behavior of Heavy and Extra Heavy Crude Oils in the Presence of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban A. Taborda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes for the first time a mathematical model for describing the rheological behavior of heavy and extra-heavy crude oils in the presence of nanoparticles. This model results from the combination of two existing mathematical models. The first one applies to the rheology of pseudoplastic substances, i.e., the Herschel-Bulkley model. The second one was previously developed by our research group to model the rheology of suspensions, namely the modified Pal and Rhodes model. The proposed model is applied to heavy and extra heavy crude oils in the presence of nanoparticles, considering the effects of nanoparticles concentration and surface chemical nature, temperature, and crude oil type. All the experimental data evaluated exhibited compelling goodness of fitting, and the physical parameters in the model follow correlate well with variations in viscosity. The new model is dependent of share rate and opens new possibilities for phenomenologically understanding viscosity reduction in heavy crude by adding solid nanoparticles and favoring the scale-up in enhanced oil recovery (EOR and/or improved oil recovery (IOR process.

  13. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  14. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  15. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  16. A study of the effects of enhanced oil recovery agents on the quality of Strategic Petroleum Reserves crude oil. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The project was initiated on September 1, 1990. The objective of the project was to carry out a literature search to estimate the types and extents of long time interactions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents, such as surfactants, caustics and polymers, with crude oil. This information is necessary to make recommendations about mixing EOR crude oil with crude oils from primary and secondary recovery processes in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Data were sought on both adverse and beneficial effects of EOR agents that would impact handling, transportation and refining of crude oil. An extensive literature search has been completed, and the following informations has been compiled: (1) a listing of existing EOR test and field projects; (2) a listing of currently used EOR agents; and (3) evidence of short and long term physical and chemical interactions of these EOR-agents with hydrocarbons, and their effects on the quality of crude oil at long times. This information is presented in this report. Finally some conclusions are derived and recommendations are made. Although the conclusions are based mostly on extrapolations because of lack of specific data, it is recommended that the enhancement of the rates of biodegradation of oil catalyzed by the EOR agents needs to be further studied. There is no evidence of substantial long term effects on crude oil because of other interactions. Some recommendations are also made regarding the types of studies that would be necessary to determine the effect of certain EOR agents on the rates of biodegradation of crude oil.

  17. Endocrine, Physiological and Histopathological Responses of Fish and their Larvae to Stress with Emphasis on Exposure to Crude Oil and Various Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. A. AL-Kindi

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Various endocrine and physiological responses of fish exposed to forceful physical and chemical stimuli are reviewed with emphasis on the effects of crude oils and their hydrocarbon constituents. The chemistry and toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbons are examined and methods for experimental exposure of fish to crude oil and petroleum hydrocarbons are considered. A variety of blood-borne parameters recognized as reliable tools in determining the relative severity of stress in fish are reviewed. The effects of stress and petroleum hydrocarbons on endocrine responses including changes in plasma catecholamines, corticosteroids, and thyroid hormones are reviewed. The physiological responses: changes in plasma glucose, osmotic and ionic regulation, blood oxygen, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration are explored, and histopathological effects of crude oil on fish are reviewed. Recent studies of the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on fish larvae are considered and the increased sensitivity of the early life stages of fish are highlighted.

  18. Laboratory Validation and Field Assessment of Petroleum Laboratory Technicians' Dermal Exposure to Crude Oil Using a Wipe Sampling Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Karen S; Mueller, Will; Arfaj, Ayman M; Llamas, Jose L; Buick, Jennifer; Todd, David; McGonagle, Carolyn

    2018-05-21

    Crude oil may cause adverse dermal effects therefore dermal exposure is an exposure route of concern. Galea et al. (2014b) reported on a study comparing recovery (wipe) and interception (cotton glove) dermal sampling methods. The authors concluded that both methods were suitable for assessing dermal exposure to oil-based drilling fluids and crude oil but that glove samplers may overestimate the amount of fluid transferred to the skin. We describe a study which aimed to further evaluate the wipe sampling method to assess dermal exposure to crude oil, with this assessment including extended sample storage periods and sampling efficiency tests being undertaken at environmental conditions to mimic those typical of outdoor conditions in Saudi Arabia. The wipe sampling method was then used to assess the laboratory technicians' actual exposure to crude oil during typical petroleum laboratory tasks. Overall, acceptable storage efficiencies up to 54 days were reported with results suggesting storage stability over time. Sampling efficiencies were also reported to be satisfactory at both ambient and elevated temperature and relative humidity environmental conditions for surrogate skin spiked with known masses of crude oil and left up to 4 h prior to wiping, though there was an indication of reduced sampling efficiency over time. Nineteen petroleum laboratory technicians provided a total of 35 pre- and 35 post-activity paired hand wipe samples. Ninety-three percent of the pre-exposure paired hand wipes were less than the analytical limit of detection (LOD), whereas 46% of the post-activity paired hand wipes were less than the LOD. The geometric mean paired post-activity wipe sample measurement was 3.09 µg cm-2 (range 1.76-35.4 µg cm-2). It was considered that dermal exposure most frequently occurred through direct contact with the crude oil (emission) or via deposition. The findings of this study suggest that the wipe sampling method is satisfactory in quantifying

  19. Characterization of federated oil fractions used for the PTAC project to study the petroleum fraction-specific toxicity to soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Jokuty, P.; Fingas, M.; Sigouin, L.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, the Petroleum Technology Alliance of Canada (PTAC) and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) launched an important research project for the oil and gas industry entitled A Fraction-Specific Toxicity and Derivation of Recommended Soil Quality Guidelines for Crude Oil in Agricultural Soils. The objective was to generate useful and relevant data that could be used to develop soil quality guidelines for petroleum hydrocarbon residuals in agricultural soils. The oil used in the study was Federated crude oil which was fractionated into four fractions using a distillation method. The fraction-based approach was used to support ecologically-relevant, risk-based, soil quality criteria for the protection of environmental health. This paper presented the nominal carbon number and boiling point ranges of these fractions and described the distillation procedures for producing the fractions from the Federated crude oil. The paper also presented the detailed chemical characterization results of each distillation fraction. The toxicity of the crude oil mixture to plants and soil invertebrates was also assessed using standardized toxicity tests. Tests were also conducted to assess the toxicity of fractions of the crude oil and the toxic interactions of the fractions responsible for a significant proportion of the toxicity. Phase 2 of the project was designed to determine if hydrocarbon residuals exceeding 1000 μg/g and weathered for short or long periods of time, posed an ecotoxicological risk or impaired soil physical, chemical and biological properties such that productivity of the agricultural soils was compromised. The objectives of phase 2 were to amend differently textured soils in field plots at sites with fresh crude oil and to monitor their toxicity to terrestrial organisms using laboratory-based ecotoxicity tests. The study showed that because of the nature of the chemical composition of hydrocarbons (such as boiling points, nominal carbon range

  20. In situ upgrading of heavy oil under steam injection with tetralin and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, A.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Mamora, D.D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Steam injection has become the most successful thermal recovery method for heavy oil production. Heavy oil refineries use upgrading processes to improve oil quality. They generally involve the use of catalysts that are used to remove heavy metals, sulfur and nitrogen, or used in hydro-treating and hydro-cracking. In-situ upgrading is thought to have advantages over conventional surface upgrading technology. Experiments were performed to verify the feasibility of in-situ upgrading of heavy crude oil. A hydrogen donor called tetralin was used along with an organometallic catalyst, at steam injection temperatures and pressures normally encountered in the field. Crude oil from the Jobo Oil Field, located in Venezuela was used. The paper described the experimental methodology with reference to the injection cell; fluid injection system; fluid production system; data measurement and recording system; and experimental procedure. It also discussed the extent of upgrading by comparing the properties of the original and produced oil. Oil properties that were measured and compared included hydrogen-to-carbon ratio; heavy metal content; viscosity; and API gravity. The paper also presented a comparison of oil recovery and fluid production between all cases. It was concluded that in the field, the reaction time was significantly longer than encountered in the experiments and may lead to further upgrading, assuming the catalyst could be dispersed in the formation. 10 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  1. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  2. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Petroleum marketing monthly, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: summary statistics; crude oil prices; prices of petroleum products; volumes of petroleum products; and prime supplier sales volumes of petroleum products for local consumption. 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  4. Millionaire underdogs: The Independent Petroleum Association of American and the politics of imported oil, 1921-1941

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staggs, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Smaller, usually non-integrated producers, or independents, demanded a protective tariff on imported petroleum, the one policy that would make the majors bear all the burdens of curtailment. In 1929 they created a national organization, the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPPA), and after 1929 spent the next 12 years lobbying Congress and the Executive for some form of protective legislation. The independents argued that protectionism was necessary in order to maintain a competitive balance in the industry, and that if the majors were allowed to buy them out, the country would face high monopolistic prices for petroleum products. This study explains why the independent oil producers wanted protectionist legislation in the 1920s and 1930s, how they influenced oil policy, and what the short-term and long-run effects of the compromise over import controls were for America. It focuses particularly on the IPAA and makes use of its publications and of archival and manuscript collections, government documents, and trade journals that illuminate its thinking and its political activities

  5. Design and implementation of a caustic flooding EOR pilot at Court Bakken heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J.; Chung, B.; Leung, L. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Successful waterflooding has been ongoing since 1988 at the Court Bakken heavy oil field in west central Saskatchewan. There are currently 20 injectors and 28 active oil producers in the Court main unit which is owned by Nexen and Pengrowth. The Court pool has an estimated 103.8 mmbbl of original oil in place (OOIP), of which 24 per cent has been successfully recovered after 20 years of waterflooding. A high-level enhanced oil recovery (EOR) screening study was conducted to evaluate other EOR technologies for a heavy oil reservoir of this viscosity range (17 degrees API). Laboratory studies showed that caustic flooding may enhance oil recovery after waterflooding at the Court Bakken heavy oil pool. A single well test demonstrated that caustic injection effectively reduced residual oil saturation. A sector model reservoir simulation revealed that caustic flood could achieve 9 per cent incremental oil recovery in the pilot area. Following the promising laboratory results, a successful caustic flood pilot was implemented at Court heavy oil pool where the major challenges encountered were low reservoir pressure and water channeling. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  6. Genotoxicity evaluation of buprofezin, petroleum oil and profenofos in somatic and germ cells of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, M A; Abdalla, E F

    1998-01-01

    The two pest control agents, buprofezin and petroleum oil (Super Royal), were tested to evaluate their potential mutagenicity, in comparison with the organophosphorus insecticide profenofos. Chromosomal aberration analysis was used in both somatic and germ cells of male mice. Single oral treatment at three different dose levels (1/16, 1/8 and 1/4 LD50) for each insecticide induced an increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in bone-marrow cells 24 h post-treatment, indicating a dose-dependent relationship. The percentage of chromosomal aberrations reached 23 +/- 0.73, 10.5 +/- 0.64 and 15 +/- 1.4 after treatment with the highest tested dose of profenofos, buprofezin and Super Royal, respectively. Such percentages did not exceed the corresponding value of the positive control, mitomycin C (29.2 +/- 0.69). The percentage of chromosomal aberrations induced by the different doses of profenofos was still highly significant even after excluding gaps. The same trend of results was noticed only at the highest tested dose of buprofezin and Super Royal. With respect to germ cells, profenofos is also a potent inducer of chromosomal aberrations in 1ry spermatocytes, giving percentages of 14 +/- 1.3 and 19 +/- 1.6 at the two higher doses of 4.25 and 8.5 mg kg(-1) body wt., respectively. Buprofezin and Super Royal had no significant effect on mouse spermatocytes at the tested concentrations. The various types of induced aberrations were examined and recorded in both somatic and germ cells. In conclusion, the present investigation indicates that the two pest control agents buprofezin and Super Royal are relatively much safer compounds than the conventional organophosphorus insecticides.

  7. Managing Exposure to Benzene and Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons at Two Oil Refineries 1977-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Tapani; Veijalainen, Henna; Santonen, Tiina

    2018-01-24

    Air concentrations of and inhalation exposure to total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and benzene was monitored separately at two oil refineries from 1977 to 2014. Prevention policies and control measures that may explain changes were surveyed. The aim was to evaluate how the application of of Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series OHSAS 18001.04 principles as well as Environmental protection Agency EPA and European Oil Company Organisation for Environment, Health and Safety CONCAWE practices have influenced air concentrations. Benzene air concentrations declined in 11 of 17 units, six of which were associated with declining exposures. Benzene air concentrations declined across all units on average by 46%. This amounts to an average yearly decline of 1.7%. TPH air concentrations declined in 10 of 17 units, seven of which were associated with declining exposures. The average decline in TPH air concentrations was 49%, corresponding to 1.3% per year. As a result, average working day exposure in 10 of 17 units have declined significantly and today, benzene and TPH exposure in most units are well below 10% of the current Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL 8h :s). A decline in air concentrations have coincided with consistent implementation of control measures. Such measures include on-line monitoring of leaks; benzene recovery; floating container roofs; improved valves and seals; hermetic pumps; recovery of loading gases and instalment of torches in terminals; cutback in coke combustion; a new production line spanning directly from the dock to aromatics production; and recovery of loading gases in the doc. Other tools in exposure management include personal leak monitors, on-line measurements, monitoring campaigns, risk assessment, and availability and user training of protective equipment. However, improvements are still needed. Hydrocarbon or benzene air concentrations have not declined in 8 of 17 units, in some of which concentrations exceed 10% of the relevant

  8. Managing Exposure to Benzene and Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons at Two Oil Refineries 1977–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Tapani; Veijalainen, Henna; Santonen, Tiina

    2018-01-01

    Air concentrations of and inhalation exposure to total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and benzene was monitored separately at two oil refineries from 1977 to 2014. Prevention policies and control measures that may explain changes were surveyed. The aim was to evaluate how the application of of Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series OHSAS 18001.04 principles as well as Environmental protection Agency EPA and European Oil Company Organisation for Environment, Health and Safety CONCAWE practices have influenced air concentrations. Benzene air concentrations declined in 11 of 17 units, six of which were associated with declining exposures. Benzene air concentrations declined across all units on average by 46%. This amounts to an average yearly decline of 1.7%. TPH air concentrations declined in 10 of 17 units, seven of which were associated with declining exposures. The average decline in TPH air concentrations was 49%, corresponding to 1.3% per year. As a result, average working day exposure in 10 of 17 units have declined significantly and today, benzene and TPH exposure in most units are well below 10% of the current Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL8h:s). A decline in air concentrations have coincided with consistent implementation of control measures. Such measures include on-line monitoring of leaks; benzene recovery; floating container roofs; improved valves and seals; hermetic pumps; recovery of loading gases and instalment of torches in terminals; cutback in coke combustion; a new production line spanning directly from the dock to aromatics production; and recovery of loading gases in the doc. Other tools in exposure management include personal leak monitors, on-line measurements, monitoring campaigns, risk assessment, and availability and user training of protective equipment. However, improvements are still needed. Hydrocarbon or benzene air concentrations have not declined in 8 of 17 units, in some of which concentrations exceed 10% of the relevant

  9. Treatment of Petroleum Sludge By Using Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) Method : Effect of Hydration Days to Heavy Metals Leaching and Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, N.; Kamil, N. A. F. M.; Kadir, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Petroleum sludge is one of the major solid wastes generated in the petroleum industry. Generally, there are numbers of heavy metals in petroleum sludge and one treatment that is gaining prominence to treat a variety of mixed organic and inorganic waste is solidification/stabilization (S/S) method. The treatment protects human health and the environment by immobilizing contaminants within the treated material and prevents migration of the contaminants. In this study, solidification/stabilization (S/S) method has been used to treat the petroleum sludge. The comparison of hydration days, namely, 7th and 28th days in these cement-based waste materials were studied by using Synthetic Precipitate Leaching Procedure (SPLP). The results were compared to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) standards. The results for leaching test concluded that less percentage OPC gave maximum concentration of heavy metals leaching due to deficient in Calcium Oxide (CaO), which is can caused weak solidification in the mixture. Physical and mechanical properties conducted such as compressive strength and density test. From the results, it shows addition up to of 30percentage PS give results which comply with minimum landfill dispose limit. The results shows correlation between strength and density are strong regression coefficient of 82.7%. In conclusion, S/S method can be alternative disposal method for PS in the same time complies with standard for minimum landfill disposal limit. The results for leaching test concluded the less OPC percentage gave maximum concentration of heavy metals leaching.

  10. Modeling of cumulative release on long term leaching behaviour of selected oil sludge from crude oil terminal and petroleum refining plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fadzil, S.; Khoo, K.S.; Sarmani, S.; Majid, A.Ab.; Hamzah, A.

    2013-01-01

    Management of oil sludge containing environmentally toxic elements is a major problem in crude oil processing industry. Oil sludge samples from the petroleum refinery plant in Melaka and crude oil terminal in Sarawak were analysed. The aim of present work is to study long term leaching behaviour of arsenic (As), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr) and zinc (Zn) from oil sludge. Tank leaching test was carried out and the samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results were studied using LeachXS software to plot the graphs of elements concentration in order to study the leaching behaviour of toxic elements in oil sludge. The long term leaching (100 years) modeling was calculated using equations referred to National Institute of Public Health and the Environment Bilthoven (RIVM) and the results were plotted for cumulative release in different areas of oil sludge. Tank leaching test of the oil sludge samples from petroleum refinery plant in Melaka showed concentrations of As, Co, Cr and Zn ranging from 0.205 to 1.102, 0.031-0.454, 0.016-0.086 and 0.409-8.238 mg/l, respectively while the concentrations of As, Co, Cr and Zn in oil sludge samples from crude oil terminal in Sarawak were in the range of 0.002-0.089, 0.001-0.033, 0.006-1.016 and 0.100-2.744 mg/l, respectively. On the other hand, results on cumulative release from the modeling of long term leaching (100 years) showed that As, Co, Cr and Zn concentrations were proportional to the quantity of oil sludge. In conclusion, during extrapolation of release of toxic elements using the data in the laboratory, several other factors were taken into account to suit environmental conditions such as soil moisture, the negative logarithm of the effective diffusion coefficient (pD e ) and temperature, while the long-term behaviour of As, Co, Cr and Zn was proportional to the quantity of oil sludge to be disposed off. (author)

  11. PM From the Combustion of heavy fuel oils

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2018-03-30

    This work presents an experimental study investigating the formation and oxidation of particulate matter from the combustion of heavy fuel oil, HFO, droplets. The study includes results from both a falling droplet in a drop tube furnace and a suspended droplet in a heated convective flow. The falling droplets in a heated coflow air with variable temperature path and velocity were combusted and the resulting particles, cenospheres, were collected. To characterize the microstructure of these particles, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis were used. The particles were found to have either a porous or a skeleton/membrane morphology. The percentage of particles of either type appears to be related to the thermal history, which was controlled by the heated co-flow velocity. In the suspended droplet experiments, by suspending the droplet on a thermocouple, the temperature inside the droplet was measured while simultaneously imaging the various burning phases. A number of specific phases were identified, from liquid to solid phase combustion are presented and discussed. The droplet ignition temperature was seen to be independent of the droplet size. However, the liquid phase ignition delay time and the droplet lifetime were directly proportional to the initial droplet diameter.

  12. Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1990-11-28

    Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Design of the PE-3 hot heavy oil loading line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayants, Alex; Lanan, Glenn; Janardhanan, K. [INTEC Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Gomes, Marcelino; Garcia, Amaury [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transportes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The leaking of the PE-2 pipeline into Guanabara Bay. Rio de Janeiro, during late 2000 attracted widespread attention in Brazil and around the world. The safe design and operation of pipelines transporting hot, heavy hydrocarbons is critical for avoiding future oil spills. Conventional methods for designing pipelines that transport hot products rely on soil overburden to control upheaval buckling. However, extremely poor soil strength, combined with sediment mobility, led to the failure of the PE-2 pipeline. The serious consequences led TRANSPETRO to specify that the highest standards (DNV Safety Class High) were to be applied to the design and fabrication of the replacement PE-3 pipeline. The design was also required to withstand a large number of operational cycles, i.e. three (3) hot to cold cycles per week for the entire 40 years of the pipeline's design life. To meet these design challenges, several pipeline configurations were examined. A unique zigzag configuration was selected for this pipeline project. (author)

  14. New Procedure to Develop Lumped Kinetic Models for Heavy Fuel Oil Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yunqing; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Roberts, William L.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure to develop accurate lumped kinetic models for complex fuels is proposed, and applied to the experimental data of the heavy fuel oil measured by thermogravimetry. The new procedure is based on the pseudocomponents representing

  15. The role of Canadian heavy crude oil in the North American market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mink, F J; Antonia, H A

    1977-01-01

    Canadian reserves of heavy gravity crude oil are vast and the potential producibility from those reserves is expected to be surplus to Canadian requirements into the 1990s. This study focuses on the impact that market constraints may have on the future supply of heavy gravity crude oils from the W. Canadian basin. It observes that severe export restrictions will not only limit the orderly development of available reserves in the area but also will impair the prospects of additional enhanced recovery of conventional heavy crude reserves and restrict future experimental applications of oil sands recovery in the Cold Lake deposit of Alberta. Since it is expected that export restrictions for heavy gravity crude oil will be lifted in the future, the outlook for expanded development of indigenous reserves is promising.

  16. Concentrations of viable oil-degrading microorganisms are increased in feces from Calanus finmarchicus feeding in petroleum oil dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størdal, Ingvild Fladvad; Olsen, Anders Johny; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Netzer, Roman; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Altin, Dag; Brakstad, Odd Gunnar

    2015-09-15

    Zooplankton are suggested to be biotic contributors to the transport and weathering of oil in marine environments due to their ingestion of oil. In the present experiment, feeding activity and microbial communities in feces from Calanus finmarchicus feeding in oil dispersions were characterized. Feeding activity was significantly reduced in oil dispersions. The microbial communities in clean and oil-containing copepod feces were dominated by Rhodobacteraceae family bacteria (Lesingera, Phaeobacter, Rugeria, and Sulfitobacter), which were suggested to be indigenous to copepod feces. The results also indicated that these bacteria were metabolizing oil compounds, as a significant increase in the concentrations of viable oil degrading microorganisms was observed in oil-containing feces. This study shows that bacteria in feces from copepods feeding in dilute oil dispersions have capacity for degradation of oil. Zooplankton may therefore contribute to weathering of oil by excreting feces with microbial communities already adapted to degradation of oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New heavy aggregate for offshore petroleum pipeline concrete coating Central West Sinai, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Abdou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the local materials used in concrete mix are studied in a manner that they can resist the aggressive marine environment and mechanical damage, which can occur at several stages during transportation, construction and installation of the pipelines. In earlier studies we succeeded in finding the Egyptian ilmenite ore adequate for concrete weight coating and already utilized for many pipeline projects in Egypt. According to the presence of about 30% titanium oxides in ilmenite composition which may be extracted to be used in others strategically fields, the object of this paper is to study and evaluate the mechanical, chemical and physical properties of another local hematite high density iron ore to be used in subsea concrete weight coating for offshore petroleum pipelines. The results indicate that the local material of Um Bogma hematite iron ore can substitute both imported iron ore and local ilmenite from Abu Ghalaga in this field to reduce the cost effective and increased economical value of local ores. Laboratory and field tests were conducted for the hematite ore forming a concrete mix, composed of hematite ore, cement and fresh water according to international concrete coating specification requirements, the ore produces a concrete mix with 190–195 pcf minimum dry density and compressive strength, after 28 days of hydration, varying from 40 to 45 N/mm2 (400–450 kg/cm2 which comply with the international standards and specifications of submarine petroleum pipeline coating. In addition, local hematite shows superior results than local ilmenite and achieves 190 pcf instead of 180 pcf in case of using ilmenite.

  18. Phytoremediation in the tropics - influence of heavy crude oil on root morphological characteristics of graminoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkl, Nicole; Schultze-Kraft, Rainer; Infante, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    When studying species for phytoremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils, one of the main traits is the root zone where enhanced petroleum degradation takes place. Root morphological characteristics of three tropical graminoids were studied. Specific root length (SRL), surface area, volume and average root diameter (ARD) of plants grown in crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated soil were compared. Brachiaria brizantha and Cyperus aggregatus showed coarser roots in polluted soil compared to the control as expressed in an increased ARD. B. brizantha had a significantly larger specific root surface area in contaminated soil. Additionally, a shift of SRL and surface area per diameter class towards higher diameters was found. Oil contamination also caused a significantly smaller SRL and surface area in the finest diameter class of C. aggregatus. The root structure of Eleusine indica was not significantly affected by crude oil. Higher specific root surface area was related to higher degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons found in previous studies. - Describing the effect of crude oil on root morphology of tropical graminoids the work assists in the selection of plant species for phytoremediation of oil-contaminated soils

  19. Phytoremediation in the tropics - influence of heavy crude oil on root morphological characteristics of graminoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkl, Nicole [Institute of Plant Production and Agroecology in the Tropics and Subtropics, Department of Biodiversity and Land Rehabilitation, University of Hohenheim, D-70593 Stuttgart (Germany) and PDVSA - Intevep, Centro de Investigacion y Apoyo Tecnologico de Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., Departamento de Ecologia y Ambiente, P.O. Box 76343, Caracas 1070-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: nmerkl@uni-hohenheim.de; Schultze-Kraft, Rainer [Institute of Plant Production and Agroecology in the Tropics and Subtropics, Department of Biodiversity and Land Rehabilitation, University of Hohenheim, D-70593 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: rsk@uni-hohenheim.de; Infante, Carmen [PDVSA - Intevep, Centro de Investigacion y Apoyo Tecnologico de Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., Departamento de Ecologia y Ambiente, P.O. Box 76343, Caracas 1070-A (Venezuela) and Universidad Simon Bolivar (USB), FUNINDES, Unidad de Gestion Ambiental, Caracas (Venezuela)]. E-mail: luchoben@cantv.net

    2005-11-15

    When studying species for phytoremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils, one of the main traits is the root zone where enhanced petroleum degradation takes place. Root morphological characteristics of three tropical graminoids were studied. Specific root length (SRL), surface area, volume and average root diameter (ARD) of plants grown in crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated soil were compared. Brachiaria brizantha and Cyperus aggregatus showed coarser roots in polluted soil compared to the control as expressed in an increased ARD. B. brizantha had a significantly larger specific root surface area in contaminated soil. Additionally, a shift of SRL and surface area per diameter class towards higher diameters was found. Oil contamination also caused a significantly smaller SRL and surface area in the finest diameter class of C. aggregatus. The root structure of Eleusine indica was not significantly affected by crude oil. Higher specific root surface area was related to higher degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons found in previous studies. - Describing the effect of crude oil on root morphology of tropical graminoids the work assists in the selection of plant species for phytoremediation of oil-contaminated soils.

  20. New technology for producing petrochemical feedstock from heavy oils derived from Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oballa, M.; Simanzhenkov, V.; Clark, P.; Laureshen, C.; Plessis du, D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presented the results of a study demonstrating the feasibility of producing petrochemical feedstock or petrochemicals from vacuum gas oils derived from oil sands. A typical bitumen upgrader flow scheme was integrated with several new technologies and coupled with an ethane/propane cracker. Technologies included steam cracking, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC); and the catalytic pyrolysis process (CPP). The scheme was then integrated with the Nova Heavy Oil Cracking (NHC) technology. The NHC process uses a reactor to perform catalytic cracking followed by a main tower that separates gas and liquid products. Aromatic ring cleavage (ARORINCLE) technology was explored as a method of catalytic treatment. Experimental runs were conducted in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. A stacked catalyst bed was used, followed by a zeolite-based noble metal catalyst. Examples from process run results were presented. Results indicated that the NHC technology should be used on an FCC unit technology platform. The ARORINCLE technology was considered for use on a hydrotreating unit technology platform. Once the catalysts are fully developed and demonstrated, the economics of the technologies will be enhanced through the construction of world-scale complexes integrating upgrading, refining and petrochemical plants. refs., tabs., figs

  1. Fouling reduction by ozone-enhanced backwashing process in ultrafiltration of petroleum-based oil in water emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanti, Nita; Prihatiningtyas, Indah; Kusworo, Tutuk Djoko

    2017-06-01

    Ultrafiltration membrane has been successfully applied for oily waste water treatment. However, one significant drawback of membrane technology is fouling which is responsible for permeate flux decline as well as reducing membrane performance. One method commonly used to reduce fouling is a backwashing process. The backwashing is carried out by a push of reversed flow from permeate side to the feed side of a membrane to remove fouling on the membrane pore and release fouling release fouling layer on the external side. However, for adsorptive fouling, the backwashing process was not effective. On the other hand, Ozone demonstrated great performance for reducing organics fouling. Hence this research was focused on backwashing process with ozone for removing fouling due to ultrafiltration of petroleum based oil emulsion. Gasoline and diesel oil were selected as dispersed phase, while as continuous phase was water added with Tween 80 as a surfactant. This research found that the Ozone backwashing was effective to improve flux recovery. In ultrafiltration of gasoline emulsion, the flux recovery after Ozone backwashing was in the range of 42-74%. For ultrafiltration of diesel oil emulsion, the permeate flux recovery was about 35-84%. In addition, foulant deposition was proposed and predicting that foulant deposition for ultrafiltration of gasoline-in-water emulsion was surfactant as the top layer and the oil was underneath the surfactant. On the other hand, for ultrafiltration of diesel oil-in-water emulsion, the oil was predicted as a top layer above the surfactant foulant.

  2. An overview of exposure to, and effects of, petroleum oil and organochlorine pollution in Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, BjoernMunro

    1996-01-01

    Most incidences involving oil pollution of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) seem to have occurred at the breeding sites. Because of the high concentration of animals at this time, even small oil spills will pollute many animals. As a result of chronic low-level pollution from coastal ship traffic and discharges from offshore petroleum activity in the North Sea, 50% of the grey seal pups at the largest breeding colony in Norway are polluted each year by oil. This oil pollution, as well as other cases of spills at breeding colonies, shows that oil produced little visible disturbance to the seals' behaviour and there is little mortality. The effects and mortality may, however, be more serious following a spill of crude oil, where animals may be affected by inhalation of toxic volatile compounds. High body burdens of PCBs and DDTs seem to have caused skull-bone lesions and occlusions of the uteri in grey seals in the Baltic Sea. Exposure to these persistent compounds has also been suspected to be the cause of reduction in the population of Baltic grey seals. There are indications that thyroid hormone and vitamin A status of grey seal pups are affected by the low exposure concentrations experienced at the Norwegian coast (1/20 of the concentration detected in grey seal pups from the Baltic Sea). This gives serious cause for concern about the effects that chronic low-level exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants may have on individuals and on populations of grey seals

  3. Natural gas in 1936: Petroleum in 1936: The gas and oil fields in the Guelph and Medina (Grimsby) formations: Appendix, the Brownsville Gas Field: Gas and oil in eastern Ontario. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, R B; Evans, C S

    1938-12-31

    Part V of this annual report consists of four separate reports: Natural gas, petroleum, gas and oil fields in the Guelph and Medina (Grimsby) formations, and gas and oil in eastern Ontario. The natural gas report discusses production and distribution; changes and improvements; consumption and rates; gas wells and their production; and licenses issued. The logs of wells are also included, being presented alphabetically by counties, townships, and owners, respectively. The petroleum report presents information on production and drilling by township; expansion; and petroleum importation and refining operations.

  4. Petroleum industry 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A survey on petroleum industry activities in France and in the world in 1996 is presented. The different parts and themes of the study are: evolution of the petroleum market (international and French markets, supply and demand, prices, mark-up and taxation in France and in Europe); activities in the petroleum industries (exploration and production, maritime transportation, inland transportation and storage, refining, quality of petroleum products and substitution fuels, oil distribution); environment and safety (refining, distribution and evolution of products, pipeline and maritime transportation, exploration and production); situation of the sector's companies (oil groups, para-petroleum French industry, scientific and technical research)

  5. Heavy metal, trace element and petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in the Arabian Gulf: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Afnan Mahmood Freije

    2015-01-01

    The Arabian Gulf environmental status was assessed based on studies conducted in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates (UAE) during 1983–2011. This review examines all sorts of pollutions in the Arabian Gulf area over the last three decades. Approximately 50 published studies were reviewed in order to determine the pollution status in the Arabian Gulf regarding heavy metals and organic substances. Three types of environmental pollutions including marine and coas...

  6. Simultaneous application of chemical oxidation and extraction processes is effective at remediating soil Co-contaminated with petroleum and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong-Chan; Lee, Chadol; Lee, Jeung-Sun; Baek, Kitae

    2017-01-15

    Chemical extraction and oxidation processes to clean up heavy metals and hydrocarbon from soil have a higher remediation efficiency and take less time than other remediation processes. In batch extraction/oxidation process, 3% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) could remove approximately 70% of the petroleum and 60% of the Cu and Pb in the soil, respectively. In particular, petroleum was effectively oxidized by H 2 O 2 without addition of any catalysts through dissolution of Fe oxides in natural soils. Furthermore, heavy metals bound to Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides could be extracted by metal-EDTA as well as Fe-EDTA complexation due to the high affinity of EDTA for metals. However, the strong binding of Fe-EDTA inhibited the oxidation of petroleum in the extraction-oxidation sequential process because Fe was removed during the extraction process with EDTA. The oxidation-extraction sequential process did not significantly enhance the extraction of heavy metals from soil, because a small portion of heavy metals remained bound to organic matter. Overall, simultaneous application of oxidation and extraction processes resulted in highly efficient removal of both contaminants; this approach can be used to remove co-contaminants from soil in a short amount of time at a reasonable cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Organic geochemistry of heavy/extra heavy oils from sidewall cores, Lower Lagunillas Member, Tia Juana Field, Maracaibo Basin, Venenzuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocco, R.; Alberdi, M. [PDVSA-Inteveo S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

    2002-10-01

    The study of 22 oils from sidewall cores taken at different depths in the Lower Lagunillas Member, well LSJ-AB, Tia Juana Field, Maracaibo Lake is presented, with the purpose of predicting the intervals that present the best crude oil quality. Differences were detected in the biodegradation levels of the studied samples, which are correlated with the depth at which the sidewall core was taken. The API gravity was considered for the oils from each sidewall core and it was found that toward the top of the sequence, the oils have an API gravity of 10.6-11.2{sup o}C, while toward the base part of the sequence, the well produces extra heavy oils with an API gravity that varies between 8.2 and 8.7{sup o}. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Pre-electrocoalescer unit adapted to the extra-heavy oil characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noik, C.; Dalmazzone, C. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Glenat, P. [Total, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a dehydration process that can break water oil emulsions to mobilize extra heavy oils and bitumen extra heavy oils. The dehydration process is based on solvent mixture with additives injection. It involves large amount of additives, fairly high operating temperatures, solvent addition, and long retention time inside the vessels. The process could be improved by electrocoalescence, thereby reducing the amount of additive and reducing the retention times of vessels to reach oil export specifications. However, commercial electrocoalescence processes are not suitable for extra heavy oils because of the presence of polar heavy components limiting the electrocoalescence effect and therefore, limiting the efficiency of electrostatic coalescer. This paper presented a study whose objective was to determine the most efficient electrocoalescence parameters considering the characteristics of two types of heavy crude oils issued from cold and thermal productions. The paper presented experimental results for electrocoalescence additive selection and for the optimization of electrical parameters. The paper described the materials and methods, including fluids characterization; viscosity; differential scanning calorimetry; dispersion rig; electrical stability tester; and electrocoalescer rig. It was concluded that crude oils produced by thermal production schemes seemed more sensitive to the temperature effect than crudes produced by cold production. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 23 figs.

  9. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System, Taranaki Basin Assessment Unit, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, Craig J.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System coincident Taranaki Basin Assessment Unit was recently assessed for undiscovered technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) World Energy Resources Project, World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 487 million barrels of oil, 9.8 trillion cubic feet of gas, and 408 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  10. The fate of oil and gas in a constrained natural system - implications from the Bakken petroleum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscio, G P.A.

    1995-07-01

    When petroleum is produced from its reservoir at present day, it has already been submitted to a complex array of natural processes, which have left their imprint on its chemical and physical properties. These processes involve the generation of petroleum in its source rock as a function of thermal evolution, and its migration to the reservoir. In order to achieve a better understanding of the effects that these processes have on the nature and occurrence of petroleum, it is crucial to investigate a study area that represents an integrated system encompassing all processes from the beginning of crude oil formation to entrapment. The Bakken Shale petroleum system of the Williston Basin (U.S.A./Canada) appears to fulfil these requirements as it covers a broad range of maturity incorporating all stages of catagenesis, and source and reservoir are closely associated, i.e. Bakken petroleum has not been submitted to long secondary migration routes. Combined with a basinwide uniformity in kerogen type, the latter feature constrains the broad scope of potential influences, and therefore the Bakken petroleum system is an ideal candidate to study petroleum generation, its expulsion and migration under natural conditions. By using a selected set of wells/core samples which were considered to be representative for the entire Bakken petroleum system based on comprehensive screening analyses on both kerogen and bitumen, the present study focussed on the following principal aspects: (1) Evolution of petroleum generation as a function of maturation; (2) Primary migration and distribution of crude oil in a constrained natural system; (3) Occurrence of gas in the immature zone; (4) Evaluation of the natural maturity series with simulation experiments. (orig./HS) [Deutsch] Die Prozesse und Phaenomene der natuerlichen Bildung und Migration von Erdoel und Erdgas laufen waehrend der Katagenese sowohl zeitlich als auch raeumlich zu grossen Teilen parallel zueinander ab und praegen die

  11. Anicteric hepatoxicity: a potential health risk of occupational exposures in Nigerian petroleum oil refining and distribution industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezejiofor, Tobias I Ndubuisi; Ezejiofor, Anthonet N; Orisakwe, Orish E; Nwigwe, Hariet C; Osuala, Ferdinand Ou; Iwuala, Moses Oe

    2014-01-22

    Literature abounds linking one's job to certain unpalatable health outcomes. Since exposures to hazardous conditions in industrial environments often results in sundry health effects among workers, we embarked on this study to investigate the hepatic health effects of occupational activities in the petroleum refining and distribution industry. Biochemical markers of liver functions were assayed in plasma, using Reflotron dry chemistry spectrophotometric system. The study was conducted on randomly selected workers of Port Harcourt Refining Company (PHRC) and Pipelines and Petroleum Product Marketing Company (PPMC) both in Alesa-Eleme near Port Harcourt, Nigeria, as well as non-oil work civil servants serving as control subjects. Results showed that, bilirubin ranged 0.3-1.6 mg/dl with a mean of 0.66±0.20mg/dl among the oil workers as against 0.5-1.00mg/dl with a mean of 0.58±0.13mg/dl in non-oil workers, Alkaline phosphatase ranged 50.00-296.00u/l (mean: 126.21±39.49u/l) in oil workers as against 40.20-111u/l (mean: 66.83±18.54u/l) for non-oil workers, Aspartic transaminases (AST) ranged 5.80-140.20u/l (mean: 21.81±11.49u/l) in oil workers against 18.00-44.00u/l (mean: 26.89±6.99u/l) for non-oil workers, while Alanine transaminases (ALT) ranged 4.90-86.00u/l (mean: 22.14±11.28u/l) in oil workers as against 10.00-86.60u/l (mean: 22.30±10.22u/l) for the non-oil workers. A close study of the results revealed that although the mean values for all the studied parameters were still within the parametric reference ranges, however, relative to the referents, there were significant increases (Pdifferentiation data showed that though the mean values for the parameters were higher in males than females, the increases were not significant in most cases (P>0.05), whereas data for age and exposure period classifications revealed that irrespective of the age of the worker, the effects are likely to start after the first five years, manifesting fully after the first decade

  12. Oil companies' customer records as a source of petroleum statistics; Oljeselskapenes kunderegistre som kilde i petroleumsstatistikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaksen, Elisabeth Thuestad; Hoeie, Henning; Flugsrud, Ketil

    2012-10-15

    Detailed sales data from oil companies' customer records are considered a better source of data for the sales statistics for petroleum products than today's more aggregated source basis. Using detailed data from sales transactions allow for a safer, more detailed and more consistent industry classification and geographic distribution of sales than what is possible with current practice. Particularly for sale to transport and the public sector will the detailed data could make a more proper distribution of sales.(eb)

  13. Petroleum marketing annual, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual contains statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the free-on-board and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. (VC)

  14. Case study in Venezuela : performance of multiphase meter in extra heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, A. [Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela); Bornia, O.; Pinguet, B. [Schlumberger Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    The performance of a multiphase meter that combines Venturi and multi energy gamma rays was investigated during operation in an extra heavy oil field in Venezuela. The Orocual field in Monagas is one of the most diverse oilfields in Venezuela. It produces gas condensate, light and medium oil and has recently started to produce from a heavy and extra-heavy oil reservoir, with a gravity between 8.6 and 11 API and a viscosity range from 6 Pa.s to more than 20 Pa.s at line conditions. Petroleos de Venezuela SA (PDVSA) is currently using cold production systems in this field. PDVSA attempted to estimate the liquid flow rate using conventional storage tanks but was unable to evaluate the gas production in such an environment of low GOR with emulsion, large amounts of foam and high viscosity. Since the density of heavy oil is close to the density of water, gravity separation cannot be applied. Also, since heavy oil is very viscous, proper separation requires a long retention time, which is not feasible in terms of space or economy. In addition, gas bubbles could not flow freely and remained as a gas phase trapped inside the liquid, resulting in an overestimation of some of the liquid flow rate. In order to measure the field's oil, water and gas flow rates, PDVSA tried several multiphase meters but found that a Venturi and multi energy gamma ray combination was the only solution able to accurately measure multiphase flow in its extra heavy oil. A test demonstrated that, compared to a tank system, the overall uncertainty of the Venturi combination was better than 2 per cent. This extended the operating envelope for PDVSA for using this multiphase metering technology, providing the capability to monitor and optimize in real-time the production in this extra heavy oil field. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Process for gasification of heavy hydrocarbons or salvaged oil. [German patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, C

    1978-09-14

    The invention refers to the separation of solids which are carried over during evaporation of salvaged oil (oil recovered from used oil or fat). They are removed by exposing the oil vapour to an acceleration of 500 g to 20,000g in a hot gas cyclone. Subsequently the cleaned gas is converted to fission gas in a fission gas generator using an air-water gas mixture and is taken to the combustion equipment. By this process salvaged oil and heavy hydrocarbons can be used for burning in Diesel engines without previous refining.

  16. Exports of petroleum products, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    A summary is presented of exports of motor gasoline, middle distillate, aviation turbine fuel, heavy fuel oil, and partially processed oil from Canada for the 1990 calendar year. Exports of the above petroleum products averaged 34,000 m 3 /d in 1990, up 12% from 1989 levels. The increase reflects increased output from the Come By Chance refinery in Newfoundland. Motor gasoline exports increased 35% to 10,500 m 3 /d, reflecting refinery upgrading in eastern Canada. Export prices were generally in line with spot product prices in the USA. Spot prices rose sharply following the Kuwait crisis in August 1990 but fell again in November. The spot price for jet fuel rose more dramatically in that period than for other products, reflecting increased military demand. In winter 1989/90 and during the Kuwait conflict, the export price of heating oil tended to track the USA spot price. Petroleum products imports in 1990 were 18,500 m 3 /d, compared to 21,900 m 3 /d in 1988. Imports were lower partially as a result of higher crude runs in Quebec and a Quebec refinery expansion. Imports of heavy fuel oil in eastern Canada continued to be strong in comparison to the mid-1980s. The top single exporter in 1990, as in 1989, was Newfoundland Processing, with a volume of 4,506,400 m 3 . 13 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Contamination Profile of Ochani Stream in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination profile, heavy metals and some physicochemical parameters were investigated in Ochani Stream site in Ejamah Ebubu, Eleme Local Government Area of Rivers State. The results show that a major crude oil spillage occurred at Ejamah Ebubu, Rivers State, Nigeria approximately 30 ...

  18. Ecodynamics of oil-degrading bacteria and significance of marine mixed populations in the degradation of petroleum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Tanaka, Hiroki; Komukai, Shyoko

    1993-01-01

    Ecological studies, screening of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, and studies of the potentials of various single and mixed bacterial populations in the utilization of petroleum compounds were carried out to understand the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in marine ecosystems. Populations of hydrocarbon utilizers were larger in coastal regions than in pelagic environments. Ecological observations indicated that oil-degrading bacteria were ubiquitously distributed in both temperate and tropical environments, irrespective of oil-polluted and unpolluted ecosystem. Bacteria were grown with n-tet-radecane, pristane, propylbenzene, phenanthrene, and crude oil as the sole carbon source; and substrate specificities of the purified strains were characterized. Based on the assimilation characteristics of the isolated strains, an artificial mixed-culture system was constructed. Biodegradation of crude oil by the natural mixed population was found to be higher than by the artificial mixed population. However, when some of the substrate-specific degraders were artificially mixed with natural microflora, the degradation of hard-to-degrade aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of crude oil was enhanced

  19. Future petroleum energy resources of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    and gas endowment estimates. Whereas petroleum resources in the world appear to be significant, certain countries such as the United States may run into import deficits, particularly oil imports from Mexico and natural gas from both Canada and Mexico. The new assessment has been used as the reference supply case in energy supply models by the International Energy Agency and the Energy Information Agency of the Department of Energy. Climate energy modeling groups such as those at Stanford University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and others have also used USGS estimates in global climate models. Many of these models using the USGS estimates converge on potential oil shortfalls in 2036-2040. However, recent articles using the USGS (2000) estimates suggest peaking of oil in 2020-2035 and peaking of non-OPEC (Organization of Petroleum-Exporting Countries) oil in 2015-2020. Such a short time framework places greater emphasis on a transition to increased use of natural gas; i.e., a methane economy. Natural gas in turn may experience similar supply concerns in the 2050-2060 time frame according to some authors. Coal resources are considerable and provide significant petroleum potential either by extracting natural gas from them, by directly converting them into petroleum products, or by utilizing them to generate electricity, thereby reducing natural gas and oil requirements by fuel substitution. Non-conventional oil and gas are quite common in petroleum provinces of the world and represent a significant resources yet to be fully studied and developed. Seventeen non-conventional AU including coal-bed methane, basin-center gas, continuous oil, and gas hydrate occurrences have been preliminarily identified for future assessment. Initial efforts to assess heavy oil deposits and other non-conventional oil and gas deposits also are under way.

  20. Enhancement of biodegradation of crude petroleum-oil in contaminated water by the addition of nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukred, A M; Hamid, A A; Hamzah, A; Yusoff, W M Wan

    2008-09-01

    Addition of nitrogen sources as supplementary nutrient into MSM medium to enhance biodegradation by stimulating the growth four isolates, Acinetobacter faecalis, Staphylococcus sp., Pseudomonas putida and Neisseria elongata isolated from petroleum contaminated groundwater, wastewater aeration pond and biopond at the oil refinery Terengganu Malaysia was investigated. The organic nitrogen sources tested not only supported growth but also enhances biodegradation of 1% Tapis crude oil. All four isolates showed good growth especially when peptone was employed as the organic nitrogen compared to growth in the basal medium. Gas chromatography showed that more then 91, 93, 94 and 95% degradation of total hydrocarbon was observed after 5 days of incubation by isolates Pseudomonas putida, Neisseria elongate, Acinetobacter faecalis and Staphylococcus sp., respectively.

  1. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yortsos, Yanis C.; Akkutlu, Yucel; Amilik, Pouya; Kechagia, Persefoni; Lu, Chuan; Shariati, Maryam; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis; Zhan, Lang

    2000-01-19

    The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil, with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose, the interaction of flow, transport and reaction at various scales (from the pore-network to the field scales) were studied. Particular mechanisms investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam process, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

  2. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorstos, Yanis C.

    2002-01-01

    The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose the interaction of flow transport and reaction at various scales from the pore network to the field scales were studied. Particular mechanisms to be investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam processes, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the Recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes

  3. Different Diversity and Distribution of Archaeal Community in the Aqueous and Oil Phases of Production Fluid From High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To get a better knowledge on how archaeal communities differ between the oil and aqueous phases and whether environmental factors promote substantial differences on microbial distributions among production wells, we analyzed archaeal communities in oil and aqueous phases from four high-temperature petroleum reservoirs (55–65°C by using 16S rRNA gene based 454 pyrosequencing. Obvious dissimilarity of the archaeal composition between aqueous and oil phases in each independent production wells was observed, especially in production wells with higher water cut, and diversity in the oil phase was much higher than that in the corresponding aqueous phase. Statistical analysis further showed that archaeal communities in oil phases from different petroleum reservoirs tended to be more similar, but those in aqueous phases were the opposite. In the high-temperature ecosystems, temperature as an environmental factor could have significantly affected archaeal distribution, and archaeal diversity raised with the increase of temperature (p < 0.05. Our results suggest that to get a comprehensive understanding of petroleum reservoirs microbial information both in aqueous and oil phases should be taken into consideration. The microscopic habitats of oil phase, technically the dispersed minuscule water droplets in the oil could be a better habitat that containing the indigenous microorganisms.

  4. Assessment of heavy metals concentration in soils around oil filling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    The distribution of metals in the environment ... Ghana Atomic Energy Commission laboratory for elemental analysis. ..... Arsenic is quite widely distributed in natural waters and is ..... remediation of soil aquifer systems contaminated with petroleum products: an ... contribution for the evaluation of anthropogenic inputs. J. Arid ...

  5. Increasing Heavy Oil in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies. Annual Report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, Edith

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs

  6. Petroleum contamination impact on macrobenthic communities under the influence of an oil refinery: Integrating chemical and biological multivariate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Natalia; Muniz, Pablo; Bícego, Márcia C.; Martins, César C.; Tommasi, Luiz Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Petroleum contamination impact on macrobenthic communities in the northeast portion of Todos os Santos Bay was assessed combining in multivariate analyses, chemical parameters such as aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon indices and concentration ratios with benthic ecological parameters. Sediment samples were taken in August 2000 with a 0.05 m 2 van Veen grab at 28 sampling locations. The predominance of n-alkanes with more than 24 carbons, together with CPI values close to one, and the fact that most of the stations showed UCM/resolved aliphatic hydrocarbons ratios (UCM:R) higher than two, indicated a high degree of anthropogenic contribution, the presence of terrestrial plant detritus, petroleum products and evidence of chronic oil pollution. The indices used to determine the origin of PAH indicated the occurrence of a petrogenic contribution. A pyrolytic contribution constituted mainly by fossil fuel combustion derived PAH was also observed. The results of the stepwise multiple regression analysis performed with chemical data and benthic ecological descriptors demonstrated that not only total PAH concentrations but also specific concentration ratios or indices such as ≥C24:petroleum related variables seemed to have a main influence on macrofauna community structure. The PCA ordination performed with the chemical data resulted in the formation of three groups of stations. The decrease in macrofauna density, number of species and diversity from groups III to I seemed to be related to the occurrence of high aliphatic hydrocarbon and PAH concentrations associated with fine sediments. Our results showed that macrobenthic communities in the northeast portion of Todos os Santos Bay are subjected to the impact of chronic oil pollution as was reflected by the reduction in the number of species and diversity. These results emphasise the importance to combine in multivariate approaches not only total hydrocarbon concentrations but also indices, isomer pair

  7. Development of a purification system at Dhruva to treat oil contaminated and chemically impure heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttraway, S.K.; Mishra, V.; Bitla, S.V.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Dhruva, a 100 MW (thermal) Research reactor uses Heavy Water as moderator, reflector and coolant. Normally during plant operation, the Heavy water from the system gets removed during operational and maintenance activities and this collected heavy water gets degraded and contaminated in the process. The degraded heavy water meeting the chemical specification requirement of the up gradation plant is sent for up gradation. Part of the Heavy water collected is contaminated with various organic and inorganic impurities and therefore cannot be sent for IP up gradation as it does not meet the chemical specification of the up gradation plant. This contaminated Heavy water was being stored in SS drums. Over the years of Reactor operation reasonable amount of contaminated Heavy water got collected in the plant. This Heavy water collected from leakages, during routine maintenance, operational activities and fuelling operation had tritium activity and variety of contamination including oil, chlorides, turbidity due to which the specific conductivity was very high. It was decided to purify this Heavy water in house to bring it up to up gradation plant chemical specification requirement. There were number of challenges in formulating a scheme to purify this Heavy water. The scheme needed to be simple and compact in design which could be set up in the plant itself. It should not pose radiological hazards due to radioactive Heavy water during its purification and handling. The contaminated Heavy water collected in drums had varying chemistry and IP. The purification plant should be able to do batch processing so that the different IP and chemical quality of Heavy water stored in different drums are not mixed during purification. It should be capable of removing the oil, chlorides, turbidity and decrease the conductivity to acceptable limits of the Up gradation plant. A purification plant was developed and commissioned after detail laboratory studies and trials. This paper explains

  8. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  9. Synthesis of compact patterns for NMR relaxation decay in intelligent "electronic tongue" for analyzing heavy oil composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshenkov, E. M.; Volkov, V. Y.; Kulagin, V. P.

    2018-05-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of pattern creation of the NMR sensor signal for subsequent recognition by the artificial neural network in the intelligent device "the electronic tongue". The specific problem of removing redundant data from the spin-spin relaxation signal pattern that is used as a source of information in analyzing the composition of oil and petroleum products is considered. The method is proposed that makes it possible to remove redundant data of the relaxation decay pattern but without introducing additional distortion. This method is based on combining some relaxation decay curve intervals that increment below the noise level such that the increment of the combined intervals is above the noise level. In this case, the relaxation decay curve samples that are located inside the combined intervals are removed from the pattern. This method was tested on the heavy-oil NMR signal patterns that were created by using the Carr-Purcell-Meibum-Gill (CPMG) sequence for recording the relaxation process. Parameters of CPMG sequence are: 100 μs - time interval between 180° pulses, 0.4s - duration of measurement. As a result, it was revealed that the proposed method allowed one to reduce the number of samples 15 times (from 4000 to 270), and the maximum detected root mean square error (RMS error) equals 0.00239 (equivalent to signal-to-noise ratio 418).

  10. Water Pollution and Treatments Part II: Utilization of Agricultural Wastes to Remove Petroleum Oils From Refineries Pollutants Present in Waste Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.A.; El-Emary, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Several natural agricultural wastes, of lignocellulose nature, such as Nile flower plant (ward El-Nil), milled green leaves, sugar cane wastes, palm tree leaves (carina), milled cotton stems, milled linseed stems, fine sawdust, coarse sawdust and palm tree cover were dried and then crushed to suitable size to be evaluated and utilized as adsorbents to remove oils floating or suspended in the waste water effluents from refineries and petroleum installations. The parameters investigated include effect of adsorbent type (adsorptive efficiency), adsorbate (type and concentration), mixing time, salinity of the water, adsorbent ratio to treated water, temperature, ph and stirring. Two different Egyptian crude oils varying in their properties and several refined products such as gasoline, kerosene, gas oil, diesel oil, fuel oil and lubricating oil were employed in this work in addition to the skimmed oil from the skim basin separator. Most of the agricultural wastes proved to be very effective in adsorbing oils from waste water effluents.

  11. Source rock contributions to the Lower Cretaceous heavy oil accumulations in Alberta: a basin modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbesi, Luiyin Alejandro; di Primio, Rolando; Anka, Zahie; Horsfield, Brian; Higley, Debra K.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the immense oil sand deposits in Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Western Canada sedimentary basin is still a matter of debate, specifically with respect to the original in-place volumes and contributing source rocks. In this study, the contributions from the main source rocks were addressed using a three-dimensional petroleum system model calibrated to well data. A sensitivity analysis of source rock definition was performed in the case of the two main contributors, which are the Lower Jurassic Gordondale Member of the Fernie Group and the Upper Devonian–Lower Mississippian Exshaw Formation. This sensitivity analysis included variations of assigned total organic carbon and hydrogen index for both source intervals, and in the case of the Exshaw Formation, variations of thickness in areas beneath the Rocky Mountains were also considered. All of the modeled source rocks reached the early or main oil generation stages by 60 Ma, before the onset of the Laramide orogeny. Reconstructed oil accumulations were initially modest because of limited trapping efficiency. This was improved by defining lateral stratigraphic seals within the carrier system. An additional sealing effect by biodegraded oil may have hindered the migration of petroleum in the northern areas, but not to the east of Athabasca. In the latter case, the main trapping controls are dominantly stratigraphic and structural. Our model, based on available data, identifies the Gordondale source rock as the contributor of more than 54% of the oil in the Athabasca and Peace River accumulations, followed by minor amounts from Exshaw (15%) and other Devonian to Lower Jurassic source rocks. The proposed strong contribution of petroleum from the Exshaw Formation source rock to the Athabasca oil sands is only reproduced by assuming 25 m (82 ft) of mature Exshaw in the kitchen areas, with original total organic carbon of 9% or more.

  12. Using Ramped Pyrolysis - Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry to Evaluate Petroleum Hydrocarbons Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Bacosa, H. P.; Liu, J.; Liu, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In summer of 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill polluted hundreds of miles of coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. A combination of human-mediated and natural weathering processes then altered the chemical composition (i.e. toxicity) of this spilled crude oil over time and space. One of the most important, yet challenging, aspects of oil spill science is to quantify these chemical changes in natural environments. In this study, we develop ramped pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to address this challenge. In this technique, 0.1mg of freeze-dried sample is pyrolyzed over a gradual temperature ramp (50-650°C). The eluded gas is cold-trapped over different thermal ranges (a.k.a. thermal slicing) and each range is individually analyzed via GC-MS, yielding quantifiable, compound-specific results. Py-GC-MS with thermal slicing has never been used for petroleum hydrocarbon analysis, but it has many advantages - it uses minimal sample, is time efficient and does not require sample preparation (minimizing compound loss and increasing the analytical window). During development of this method, we analyzed oiled sediments and tar collected on Grand Isle, Louisiana from 2010-2012. We quantified n-alkane (C10-C38), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hopane content and confirmed these results with traditional solvent extraction, silica gel fractionation and mass spectrometry. Overall, we found rapid depletion of n-alkanes and PAHs (>90% depletion) in all samples within one year of Deepwater Horizon. After this, n-alkanes were almost 100% depleted by 2012, while PAH degradation continued to a maximum total degradation of 99% and 98% in sediment and tar, respectively. This not only describes the fate of petroleum compounds in salt marshes and beach deposits over time, but also complements previous radiocarbon studies of the same samples showing different rates of degradation in different micro-environments. In addition, the results presented

  13. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, West Hackberry oil storage cavern fire and spill of September 21, 1978: an environmental assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A

    1980-02-29

    This report summarizes an environmental assessment of the fire and oil spill at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve site, West Hackberry, Louisiana. Subjective identification of oil contaminated habitats was supported by a more rigorous classification of samples utilizing discriminant analysis. Fourteen contaminated stations were identified along the shore of Black Lake just north and west of Wellpad 6, encompassing approximately 9 hectares. Seasonal variation in the structures of marsh and lake bottom communities in this contaminated area were not generally distinguishable from that of similar communities in uncontaminated habitats along the southern and southeastern shores of Black Lake. The major impact of spilled oil on the marsh vegetation was to accelerate the natural marsh deterioration which will eventually impact animals dependent on marsh vegetation for habitat structure. Vanadium, the predominate trace metal in the oil, and pyrogenic products due to the fire were found at the most distant sampling site (5 km) from Cavern 6 during Phase I, but were not detected downwind of the fire in excess of background levels in the later phases. Remote sensing evaluation of vegetation under the plume also indicated that stress existed immediately after the fire, but had disappeared by the end of the 1-year survey.

  14. Removing heavy fuel oil from the submerged wreck of the Jacob Luckenbach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffatt, C [PCCI Inc./GPC, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Beaver, T [Global Diving and Salvage Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Snyder, B [PCCI Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The Jacob Luckenbach cargo carrier sank in July 1953 just west of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California after being struck by another vessel. It was carrying a cargo of military vehicles and railroad parts and was topped with heavy No.6 residual oil in deep and double bottom tanks. In 2002, the sunken ship was named as the source of mystery oil spills along the California coast. In response, the United States Coast Guard contracted Titan Maritime LLC and PCCI Inc. to conduct a vessel assessment and removal available oil. Diving services were provided by Seattle-based Global Diving and Salvage. The recovery operation proved difficult due to cold-water saturation diving at depths to 55 metres, strong currents, bad weather and poor subsea visibility. Pumping the heavy residual oil from the tanks also proved to be difficult because some tanks contained oil that was much more viscous than normal No.6 fuel oil, and the tanks had to be heated to more than 78 degrees C to allow for better fluid flow. Some of the abnormal differences in fuel oil rheologies were described along with the tools used to find and recover the oil and to minimize leaks in the wreck. The project, although more difficult than expected, was successful in removing all accessible oil and mitigating the potential for a catastrophic oil release. More than 460 metric tons of heavy fuel oil and emulsified water-in-oil product was removed from the wreck. One of the most important lessons learned was that cohesiveness and a united front are very much needed when a diverse group of salvage personnel are brought together. 1 tab., 5 figs.

  15. Utilizing natural gas huff and puff to enhance production in heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenlong, G.; Shuhong, W.; Jian, Z.; Xialin, Z. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[PetroChina Co. Ltd., Beijing (China); Jinzhong, L.; Xiao, M. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China)

    2008-10-15

    The L Block in the north structural belt of China's Tuha Basin is a super deep heavy oil reservoir. The gas to oil ratio (GOR) is 12 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3} and the initial bubble point pressure is only 4 MPa. The low production can be attributed to high oil viscosity and low flowability. Although steam injection is the most widely method for heavy oil production in China, it is not suitable for the L Block because of its depth. This paper reviewed pilot tests in which the natural gas huff and puff process was used to enhance production in the L Block. Laboratory experiments that included both conventional and unconventional PVT were conducted to determine the physical property of heavy oil saturated by natural gas. The experiments revealed that the heavy oil can entrap the gas for more than several hours because of its high viscosity. A pseudo bubble point pressure exists much lower than the bubble point pressure in manmade foamy oils, which is relative to the depressurization rate. Elastic energy could be maintained in a wider pressure scope than natural depletion without gas injection. A special experimental apparatus that can stimulate the process of gas huff and puff in the reservoir was also introduced. The foamy oil could be seen during the huff and puff experiment. Most of the oil flowed to the producer in a pseudo single phase, which is among the most important mechanisms for enhancing production. A pilot test of a single well demonstrated that the oil production increased from 1 to 2 cubic metres per day to 5 to 6 cubic metres per day via the natural gas huff and puff process. The stable production period which was 5 to 10 days prior to huff and puff, was prolonged to 91 days in the first cycle and 245 days in the second cycle. 10 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  16. Hamaca Heavy Oil Project : lessons learned and an evolving development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gipson, L.J.; Owen, R.; Robertson, C.R. [Petrolera Ameriven/Phillips Petroleum, Caracas, (Venezuela)

    2002-07-01

    The Hamaca extra-heavy crude oil project is one of four integrated extra-heavy crude oil development projects underway in the Faja stratigraphic trap in the Orinoco heavy oil belt of eastern Venezuela. The Faja contains about 1.2 trillion barrels of heavy and extra heavy crude oil. It is divided into the Machete, Zuata, Hamaca and Cerro Negro regions that have been developed by Petroleos de Venezuela SA (PDVSA). The Hamaca region is further subdivided into 25 blocks. The Hamaca integrated project will involve the drilling of more than 1000 horizontal wells over a 35 year period. The project will also involve the installation of more than 200 miles of crude and naptha pipelines, plus an upgrading refinery to convert the 8 API extra heavy crude into a 26 API final product. This presentation describes the performance of the different well types and highlights Petrolera Ameriven's criteria and strategy for future development. Openhole log data superimposed on 2D and 3D seismic displays are presented to show how they can be used for geosteering. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Remaining recoverable petroleum in giant oil fields of the Los Angeles Basin, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Donald L.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a probabilistic geology-based methodology, a team of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists recently assessed the remaining recoverable oil in 10 oil fields of the Los Angeles Basin in southern California. The results of the assessment suggest that between 1.4 and 5.6 billion barrels of additional oil could be recovered from those fields with existing technology.

  18. Proceedings of the 5. NCUT upgrading and refining conference 2009 : bitumen, synthetic crude oil and heavy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference examined various upgrading technologies related to bitumen production. It provided a forum to review new developments to exploit oil sands bitumen and extra heavy crudes in terms of production, upgrading and environmental issues facing the industry. This 2009 conference focused on the many existing and emerging technical solutions that will help consolidate the position of the vast reserves in Western Canada as a sustainable source of crudes for North America and other selected markets. Some of the technical challenges that have an effect on upgrading include poor quality bitumen and heavy oils; bitumen and diluent blending; pipeline issues; desalting; fouling and corrosion; high costs; dependence on natural gas for energy; poor middle distillates; and greenhouse gas emissions. The sessions of the conference were entitled: heavy oil and bitumen upgrading technologies; secondary upgrading and refining technologies; bitumen transportation; and bitumen and heavy oil processability. The conference featured a total of 50 presentations and posters, of which 43 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  19. Petroleum Refinery Effluents Treatment by Advanced Oxidation Process with Methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoucheng, Wen [Yangtze Univ., HuBei Jingzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    Petroleum refinery effluents are waste originating from industries primarily engaged in refining crude oil. It is a very complex compound of various oily wastes, water, heavy metals and so on. Conventional processes are unable to effectively remove the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of petroleum refinery effluents. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was proposed to treat petroleum refinery effluents. In this paper, methanol was used to investigate co-oxidative effect of methanol on petroleum refinery effluents treatment. The results indicated that supercritical water oxidation is an effective process for petroleum refinery effluents treatment. Adding methanol caused an increase in COD removal. When reaction temperature is 440 .deg. C, residence time is 20 min, OE is 0.5 and initial COD is 40000 mg/L, and COD removal increases 8.5%.

  20. Petroleum Refinery Effluents Treatment by Advanced Oxidation Process with Methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucheng, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum refinery effluents are waste originating from industries primarily engaged in refining crude oil. It is a very complex compound of various oily wastes, water, heavy metals and so on. Conventional processes are unable to effectively remove the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of petroleum refinery effluents. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was proposed to treat petroleum refinery effluents. In this paper, methanol was used to investigate co-oxidative effect of methanol on petroleum refinery effluents treatment. The results indicated that supercritical water oxidation is an effective process for petroleum refinery effluents treatment. Adding methanol caused an increase in COD removal. When reaction temperature is 440 .deg. C, residence time is 20 min, OE is 0.5 and initial COD is 40000 mg/L, and COD removal increases 8.5%

  1. Potential to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide through reducing sulphur levels in heavy and light fuel oils - a discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushingham, M.; Bellamy, J.

    2001-01-01

    Background information on the sulphur levels in light fuel oil (used in residential heating) and heavy fuel oil (used as industrial fuel oil) is provided. In addition to the description of sulphur levels in light and heavy fuel oils, the report also provides a summary of regulatory limits in Canada and elsewhere, and a description of the emission benefits of decreasing sulphur in fuels. 4 refs., 10 tabs., 12 figs

  2. Quantification of compositional changes of petroleum hydrocarbons by GC/FID and GC/MS during a long-term bioremediation experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine S.; Arvin, Erik; Svensmark, Bo

    2000-01-01

    Samples from a long-term bioremediation experiment contaminated with two crude oils, Arabian Heavy and Gullfax, was used to analyze the compositional change of petroleum hydrocarbons. A time course of five different homologous series of petroleum hydrocarbons were analysed by GC/FID and GC...

  3. Personal exposure to benzene and 1,3-butadiene during petroleum refinery turnarounds and work in the oil harbour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstrom, M; Almerud, P; Andersson, E M; Strandberg, B; Sallsten, G

    2016-11-01

    Petroleum refinery workers' exposure to the carcinogens benzene and 1,3-butadiene has decreased during normal operations. However, certain occupational groups or events at the refineries still involve a risk of higher exposures. The aim of this study was to examine the personal exposure to benzene and 1,3-butadiene at refinery turnarounds and during work in the oil harbour. Personal exposure measurements of benzene and 1,3-butadiene were taken during work shifts, with a priori assumed higher benzene exposure, using PerkinElmer diffusive samplers filled with Carbopack X. Mean exposure levels were calculated, and repeated exposure measurements, when available, were assessed using mixed effect models. Group and individual compliance with the Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL) was tested for the different exposure groups. Mean benzene exposure levels for refinery workers during the three measured turnarounds were 150, 610 and 960 µg/m 3 , and mean exposures for oil harbour workers and sewage tanker drivers were 310 and 360 µg/m 3 , respectively. Higher exposures were associated with handling benzene-rich products. Most occupational groups did not comply with the Swedish OEL for benzene nor did the individuals within the groups. The exposure to 1,3-butadiene was very low, between Work within the petroleum refinery industry, with potential exposure to open product streams containing higher fractions of benzene, pose a risk of personal benzene exposures exceeding the OEL. Refinery workers performing these work tasks frequently, such as contractors, sewage tanker drivers and oil harbour workers, need to be identified and protected.

  4. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced recovery methods have become significant in the industry\\'s drive to increase recovery rates from oil and gas reservoirs. For heavy oil reservoirs, the immobility of the oil at reservoir temperatures, caused by its high viscosity, limits the recovery rates and strains the economic viability of these fields. While thermal recovery methods, such as steam injection or THAI, have extensively been applied in the field, their success has so far been limited due to prohibitive heat losses and the difficulty in controlling the combustion process. Electromagnetic (EM) heating via high-frequency EM radiation has attracted attention due to its wide applicability in different environments, its efficiency, and the improved controllability of the heating process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase recovery rates. Limited research has been undertaken so far to capture the nonlinear reservoir dynamics and significantly varying flow rates for thermally heated heavy oil reservoir that may notably change production rates and render conventional history matching frameworks more challenging. We present a new history matching framework for EM heated heavy oil reservoirs incorporating cross-well seismic imaging. Interfacing an EM heating solver to a reservoir simulator via Andrade’s equation, we couple the system to an ensemble Kalman filter based history matching framework incorporating a cross-well seismic survey module. With increasing power levels and heating applied to the heavy oil reservoirs, reservoir dynamics change considerably and may lead to widely differing production forecasts and increased uncertainty. We have shown that the incorporation of seismic observations into the EnKF framework can significantly enhance reservoir simulations, decrease forecasting

  6. Oil's role in free trade agreement crux of Mexico's petroleum sector dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Mexico's president Salinas' efforts at privatization have not yet touched Mexico's most valuable industry, oil. That remains under control of state owned Petroleos Mexicanos. Pemex and Mexico's huge oil union have come under increasing criticism for alleged abuses of power. In addition, controversy rages as to the true extent of Mexican oil resources and whether Pemex has the wherewithal to meet domestic demand and sustain oil exports. Critics also contend opening Mexico's oil sector to foreign participation would introduce new efficiencies and cost cutting measures in the cash strapped state oil industry. This paper reports that at the center of the controversy is the proposed Free Trade Agreement among Mexico, the U.S., and Canada, pushed strongly by Salinas. Oil's role in the FTA may prove the pact's main sticking point

  7. Biomarker chemistry and flux quantification methods for natural petroleum seeps and produced oils, offshore southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Leifer, Ira; Wong, Florence L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Campbell, Pamela L.; Lam, Angela; Hostettler, Frances D.; Greinert, Jens; Finlayson, David P.; Bradley, Eliza S.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained, natural oil seepage from the seafloor is common off southern California, and is of great interest to resource managers, who are tasked with distinguishing natural from anthropogenic oil sources. The major purpose of this study was to build upon the work previously funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that has refined the oil-fingerprinting process to enable differentiation of the highly similar Monterey Formation oils from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) production and adjacent natural seeps. In these initial studies, biomarker and stable carbon isotope ratios were used to infer the age, lithology, organic-matter input, and depositional environment of the source rocks for 388 samples of produced crude oil, seep oil, and tarballs mainly from coastal California. The analysis resulted in a predictive model of oil source families that could be applied to samples of unknown origin.

  8. The containment of heavy oil in flowing water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, H.M.; Goodman, R.H.; Nicholson, P.

    1992-01-01

    Viscous bitumen from Alberta oil sand deposits is diluted with a gas condensate before pipeline transport. Because of its unique properties, the diluent/bitumen mix (dilbit) may require novel containment and recovery techniques in the case of an accidental spill. Preliminary experiments were conducted in a large flowing water channel to determine whether several conventional containment devices could be utilized to trap weathered and emulsified dilbit and bitumen. These devices included a conventional river boom, a nylon fine-weave net, and a low-pressure bubble barrier. The behavior of the oil samples during boom failure was noted in order to understand more completely the mechanisms of failure. The river boom failed to hold viscous floating oil by vortex shedding at flows of under 0.25 m/s. A fine mesh net successfully trapped both floating and mid-channel neutrally buoyant oil but the retention time depends on the oil viscosity. The bubble barrier was not successful in trapping either floating viscous oil or neutrally buoyant oil. At low water velocities, the barrier was able to divert some oils but in an inconsistent manner. The results indicate that conventional barriers need improvement to be effective at higher water velocities and suggest that new concepts in containment should be considered. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Effects of silica-based nanostructures with raspberry-like morphology and surfactant on the interfacial behavior of light, medium, and heavy crude oils at oil-aqueous interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lingyun; Li, Chunyan; Korte, Caroline; Huibers, Britta M. J.; Pales, Ashley R.; Liang, Wei-zhen; Ladner, David; Daigle, Hugh; Darnault, Christophe J. G.

    2017-11-01

    Any efficient exploitation of new petroleum reservoirs necessitates developing methods to mobilize the crude oils from such reservoirs. Here silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) were used to improve the efficiency of the chemical-enhanced oil recovery process that uses surfactant flooding. Specifically, SiO2 NPs (i.e., 0, 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 wt%) and Tween®20, a nonionic surfactant, at 0, 0.5, and 2 critical micelle concentration (CMC) were varied to determine their effect on the stability of nanofluids and the interfacial tension (IFT) at the oil-aqueous interface for 5 wt% brine-surfactant-SiO2 nanofluid-oil systems for West Texas Intermediate light crude oil, Prudhoe Bay medium crude oil, and Lloydminster heavy crude oil. Our study demonstrates that SiO2 NPs may either decrease, increase the IFT of the brine-surfactant-oil systems, or exhibit no effects at all. For the brine-surfactant-oil systems, the constituents of the oil and aqueous substances affected the IFT behavior, with the nanoparticles causing a contrast in IFT trends according to the type of crude oil. For the light oil system (0.5 and 2 CMC Tween®20), the IFT increased as a function of SiO2 NP concentration, while a threshold concentration of SiO2 NPs was observed for the medium (0.5 and 2 CMC Tween®20) and heavy (2 CMC Tween®20) oil systems in terms of IFT trends. Concentrations below the SiO2 NP threshold concentration resulted in a decrease in IFT, and concentrations above this threshold resulted in an increase in IFT. The IFT decreased until the NP concentration reached a threshold concentration where synergetic effects between nonionic surfactants and SiO2 NPs are the opposite and result in antagonistic effects. Adsorption of both SiO2 NPs and surfactants at an interface caused a synergistic effect and an increased reduction in IFT. The effectiveness of the brine-surfactant-SiO2 nanofluids in decreasing the IFT between the oil-aqueous phase for the three tested crude oils

  10. Ex situ bioremediation of a soil contaminated by mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)--a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beškoski, Vladimir P; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Milić, Jelena; Ilić, Mila; Miletić, Srdjan; Solević, Tatjana; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2011-03-01

    Mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)-polluted soil was exposed to bioremediation in an ex situ field-scale (600 m(3)) study. Re-inoculation was performed periodically with biomasses of microbial consortia isolated from the mazut-contaminated soil. Biostimulation was conducted by adding nutritional elements (N, P and K). The biopile (depth 0.4m) was comprised of mechanically mixed polluted soil with softwood sawdust and crude river sand. Aeration was improved by systematic mixing. The biopile was protected from direct external influences by a polyethylene cover. Part (10 m(3)) of the material prepared for bioremediation was set aside uninoculated, and maintained as an untreated control pile (CP). Biostimulation and re-inoculation with zymogenous microorganisms increased the number of hydrocarbon degraders after 50 d by more than 20 times in the treated soil. During the 5 months, the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of the contaminated soil was reduced to 6% of the initial value, from 5.2 to 0.3 g kg(-1) dry matter, while TPH reduced to only 90% of the initial value in the CP. After 150 d there were 96%, 97% and 83% reductions for the aliphatic, aromatic, and nitrogen-sulphur-oxygen and asphaltene fractions, respectively. The isoprenoids, pristane and phytane, were more than 55% biodegraded, which indicated that they are not suitable biomarkers for following bioremediation. According to the available data, this is the first field-scale study of the bioremediation of mazut and mazut sediment-polluted soil, and the efficiency achieved was far above that described in the literature to date for heavy fuel oil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Origin of an unusual heavy oil from the Baiyinchagan depression, Erlian basin, northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haiping Huang [China University of Geosciences, Beijing (China); University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Guangxi Jin [China University of Geosciences, Beijing (China); Exploration and Development Institute, Puyang (China); Changsong Lin; Yabin Zheng [China University of Geosciences, Beijing (China)

    2003-01-01

    A detailed organic geochemical analysis of six oil samples from the Baiyinchagan depression in the Erlian basin, Northern China, was carried out in order to evaluate their origin. The oils are reservoired at a very shallow depth (223-560 m subsurface) and their chemical and physical properties vary greatly, ranging from normal to extremely heavy oil. The preservation of non-biodegraded oil in such a shallow reservoir is possibly related with palaeo-pasteurization of the reservoir before uplift. Maturity difference is not the primary control on the chemical and physical properties of the oils and there is considerable geochemical evidence to suggest the additional influence of in-reservoir/post-accumulation processes such as biodegradation, water-washing and (possibly) evaporation. Whereas some oils appear to be less affected, others are moderately biodegraded up to level 4 on the [Peters and Moldowan, 1993] scale, with sterane distributions largely unaffected and 25-norhopanes undetected. Contrary to classical biodegradation, the unusual heavy oil shows little evidence of biodegradation from aliphatic components. Water-washing is suggested to be the primary process leading to its formation since the severe alteration of soluble aromatic hydrocarbons is observed. In addition, since the oils have been uplifted significantly after accumulation, evaporation and/or leakage to modify oil compositions cannot be ruled out. (author)

  12. Petroleum apocalypse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochet, Y.

    2005-09-01

    Oil prices are increasing while current explanations for this phenomenon are no longer satisfactory. The cheap petroleum era is ending and this problem can seriously convulse our lifestyles. Transports, agriculture, plastics, clothes, medicines: petroleum is everywhere. This is why the rise of hydrocarbons price will not be a simple economic shock but the end of the world like the one we know. However, it is still possible to postpone this event to a later date and to limit its effects by the implementation of a new oil sobriety era. This implies to already organize the decay of materials and energy consumption, together with keeping solidarity, democracy and peace up. In this condition only the transition will be less painful. (J.S.)

  13. Water pollution potential of mineral oils with high content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (heavy fuel oil and neutral oil extracts); Untersuchungen zur Wassergefaehrdung durch Mineraloele mit hohen Gehalten an polycyclischen aromatischen Kohlenwasserstoffen (Heizoel Schwer und Extrakte)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, G. [Mobil Schmierstoff GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-01-01

    A data base on highly aromatic mineral oils has been compiled to classify mineral oil products according to their water-pollution potential (water hazard class or Wassergefaehrdungsklasse, WGK). This activity has been undertaken through the Commission for Water Hazardous Materials (Kommission Bewertung Wassergefaehrdender Stoffe, KBwS). In this special case, highly aromatic mineral oils containing a high concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Polyaromatische Kohlenwasserstoffe, PAK) were evaluated. A test method for measuring the elution potential of PAK into water was developed on petroleum products with high viscosity and high freeze point. This method was applied to determine the solubility of 23 PAK (including 16 PAK according to EPA 610 and 6 PAK according to the German drinking water regulation (Trinkwasserverordnung, TVO)) from heavy fuel oil and neutral oil extract in the aqueous phase. For the 6 PAK, according to TVO, a sum limit of 0,2 {mu}g/l in drinking water is permitted by German legislation. This limit was not exceeded in any of the water phases examined. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer die Einstufung von Mineraloelprodukten in die Wassergefaehrdungsklassen (WGK) durch die Kommission Bewertung Wassergefaehrdender Stoffe ist es notwendig, Basisdaten zur Verfuegung zu stellen. Im speziellen Fall handelt es sich um die Bewertung von Mineraloelen, die sich durch einen hohen Gehalt an polycyclischen aromatischen Kohlenwasserstoffen (PAK) auszeichnen. Zur Eluierbarkeit von PAK`s aus Produkten mit hoher Viskosiaet bzw. mit hohem Stockpunkt wurde eine Pruefmethode entwickelt. Diese Methode wurde zur Bestimmung der Loeslichkeit von 23 PAK`s (16 PAK`s nach EPA-Liste incl. 6 PAK`s der TVO) aus den Mineraloelen Heizoel Schwer und Neutralextrakt in der Wasserphase eingesetzt. Fuer die PAK der TVO ist in der TVO ein Summengrenzwert von 0,2 {mu}g/l Trinkwasser angegeben. Dieser Grenzwert wurde in keiner der untersuchten Wasserphasen ueberschritten. (orig.)

  14. An air quality emission inventory of offshore operations for the exploration and production of petroleum by the Mexican oil industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor, R.; Magdaleno, M.; Quintanar, A.; Gallardo, J. C.; López, M. T.; Jurado, R.; Miranda, A.; Aguilar, M.; Melgarejo, L. A.; Palmerín, E.; Vallejo, C. J.; Barchet, W. R.

    An air quality screening study was performed to assess the impacts of emissions from the offshore operations of the oil and gas exploration and production by Mexican industry in the Campeche Sound, which includes the states of Tabasco and Campeche in southeast Mexico. The major goal of this study was the compilation of an emission inventory (EI) for elevated, boom and ground level flares, processes, internal combustion engines and fugitive emissions. This inventory is so far the most comprehensive emission register that has ever been developed for the Mexican petroleum industry in this area. The EI considered 174 offshore platforms, the compression station at Atasta, and the Maritime Ports at Dos Bocas and Cayo Arcas. The offshore facilities identified as potential emitters in the area were the following: (1) trans-shipment stations, (2) a maritime floating port terminal, (3) drilling platforms, (4) crude oil recovering platforms, (5) crude oil production platforms, (6) linking platforms, (7) water injection platforms, (8) pumping platforms, (9) shelter platforms, (10) telecommunication platforms, (11) crude oil measurement platforms, and (12) flaring platforms. Crude oil storage tanks, helicopters and marine ship tankers were also considered to have an EI accurate enough for air quality regulations and mesoscale modeling of atmospheric pollutants. Historical ambient data measure at two onshore petroleum facilities were analyzed to measure air quality impacts on nearby inhabited coastal areas, and a source-receptor relationship for flares at the Ixtoc marine complex was performed to investigate health-based standards for offshore workers. A preliminary air quality model simulation was performed to observe the transport and dispersion patterns of SO 2, which is the main pollutant emitted from the offshore platforms. The meteorological wind and temperature fields were generated with CALMET, a diagnostic meteorological model that used surface observations and upper

  15. US Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements and management overview and supplemental financial and management information, September 30, 1995 and 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-15

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountant`s audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1995. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1995 statements. Their reports on the NPOSR internal control structure and compliance with laws and regulations are also provided.

  16. Petroleum Systems and Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas in the Raton Basin - Sierra Grande Uplift Province, Colorado and New Mexico - USGS Province 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Debra K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Raton Basin-Sierra Grande Uplift Province of southeastern Colorado and northeastern New Mexico (USGS Province 41). The Cretaceous Vermejo Formation and Cretaceous-Tertiary Raton Formation have production and undiscovered resources of coalbed methane. Other formations in the province exhibit potential for gas resources and limited production. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define two total petroleum systems and five assessment units. All five assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered gas resources. Oil resources were not assessed because of the limited potential due to levels of thermal maturity of petroleum source rocks.

  17. New technology for sulfide reductions and increased oil recovery: Petroleum project fact sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-14

    This Fact Sheet is written for the Inventions and Innovations Program about a new technology for sulfide reduction and increased oil recovery. The new technology, called Bio-Competitive Exclusion (BCX), results in greater oil production and prevents the production of corrosive hydrogen sulfide in oil and gas reservoirs. This BCX process is initiated and maintained by a new product, called Max-Well 2000, in which nutrients are custom designed to stimulate targeted beneficial microorganisms that live in every oil and gas reservoir. Rapid growth of these microorganisms excludes activity of harmful sulfide-producing bacteria and produces by-products that serve as effective tertiary oil recovery agents and as sulfide degradation agents. Oil and gas production is both increased and sweetened.

  18. Fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in the environment case study: insulating oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to develop the technical basis for establishing soil cleanup levels for electrical insulating oil that would protect human health and the environment in the State of Washington. Samples of insulating oil and ground water from electric utility sites were analyzed for physical and chemical properties. Oil dissolution and soil leachability tests were conducted to evaluate the mobility of the oil in the aqueous state. Results indicate that insulating oil is relatively immobile in the subsurface. As a result of this study, soil cleanup level for insulating oil at operating electrical substations in the State of Washington was increased from 200 mg/kg to 2000 mg/kg. 6 refs., 3 tabs

  19. The potential applications in heavy oil EOR with the nanoparticle and surfactant stabilized solvent-based emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, F. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The main challenges in developing the heavy oil reservoirs in the Alaska North Slope (ANS) include technical challenges regarding thermal recovery; sand control and disposal; high asphaltene content; and low in-situ permeability. A chemical enhanced oil recovery method may be possible for these reservoirs. Solvent based emulsion flooding provides mobility control; oil viscosity reduction; and in-situ emulsification of heavy oil. This study evaluated the potential application of nano-particle-stabilized solvent based emulsion injection to enhance heavy oil recovery in the ANS. The optimized micro-emulsion composition was determined using laboratory tests such as phase behaviour scanning, rheology studies and interfacial tension measurements. The optimized nano-emulsions were used in core flooding experiments to verify the recovery efficiency. The study revealed that the potential use of this kind of emulsion flooding is a promising enhanced oil recovery process for some heavy oil reservoirs in Alaska, Canada and Venezuela. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  20. Application of enhanced gas chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for monitoring petroleum weathering and forensic source fingerprinting in samples impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Puspa L; Wong, Roberto L; Overton, Edward B

    2017-10-01

    Accurate characterization of petroleum hydrocarbons in complex and weathered oil residues is analytically challenging. This is primarily due to chemical compositional complexity of both the oil residues and environmental matrices, and the lack of instrumental selectivity due to co-elution of interferences with the target analytes. To overcome these analytical selectivity issues, we used an enhanced resolution gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) mode (GC/MS/MS-MRM) to eliminate interferences within the ion chromatograms of target analytes found in environmental samples. This new GC/MS/MS-MRM method was developed and used for forensic fingerprinting of deep-water and marsh sediment samples containing oily residues from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The results showed that the GC/MS/MS-MRM method increases selectivity, eliminates interferences, and provides more accurate quantitation and characterization of trace levels of alkyl-PAHs and biomarker compounds, from weathered oil residues in complex sample matrices. The higher selectivity of the new method, even at low detection limits, provides greater insights on isomer and homolog compositional patterns and the extent of oil weathering under various environmental conditions. The method also provides flat chromatographic baselines for accurate and unambiguous calculation of petroleum forensic biomarker compound ratios. Thus, this GC/MS/MS-MRM method can be a reliable analytical strategy for more accurate and selective trace level analyses in petroleum forensic studies, and for tacking continuous weathering of oil residues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on improved oil recovery in spontaneous imbibition mechanism of heavy oil production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajmiri, M.; Ehsani, M. R.; Mousavi, S. M.; Roayaei, E.; Emadi, A.

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous imbibition (SI) gets a controversial subject in oil- wet carbonate reservoirs. The new concept of nanoparticles applications in an EOR area have been recently raised by researches about oil viscosity reduction and generate emulsion without surfactant. But a lot of questions have been remained about which nanoparticles can alter wettability from oil- wet to water- wet to improve oil recovery. This study introduces the new idea of adding ZnO nanoparticles (0.2%wt concentration) by experimental work on oil recovery. The main goals of this research were to prove that ZnO nanoparticles have the ability to reduce viscosity and also alter wettability. The ultimate objective was to determine the potential of these nanoparticles to imbibe into and displace oil. Through the use of Amott- cell, laboratory tests were conducted in two experiments on four cylindrical core samples (three sandstones and one carbonate) were taken from real Iranian heavy oil reservoir. In the first experiment, core samples were saturated by crude oil and in the second experiment, nanoparticles were flooding into core samples and then saturated by crude oil for about two weeks and after that they were immersed in distilled water and the amount of recovery was monitored during 30 days for both tests. We expected that ZnO nanoparticles decreased the surface tension which reduced the capillary forces through SI and wettability alteration took place towards a more water-wet system and caused the oil relative permeability to increase which dominated the gravitational forces to pull out the oil. Our results proved this expectation from ZnO nanoparticles clearly because carbonate core was oil- wet and the capillary pressure was high and negative to push water into the core so the original oil in place (OOIP) was zero whereas by adding ZnO nanoparticles OOIP was increased to 8.89%. SI yielded recovery values from 17.3, 2 and 15 without nanoparticles to 20.68, 17.57 and 36.2 % OOIP with

  2. Biotransformation of petroleum hydrocarbons and microbial communities in seawater with oil dispersions and copepod feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størdal, Ingvild Fladvad; Olsen, Anders Johny; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Netzer, Roman; Altin, Dag; Brakstad, Odd Gunnar

    2015-12-30

    To determine biotransformation of components in crude oil dispersions in the presence of feces from marine copepods, dispersed oil was incubated alone, with the addition of clean or oil-containing feces. We hypothesized that the feces would contribute with nutrients to bacteria, and higher concentrations of oil-degrading bacteria, respectively. Presence of clean feces resulted in higher degradation of aromatic oil compounds, but lower degradation of n-alkanes. Presence of oil-containing feces resulted in higher degradation of n-alkanes. The effect of clean feces on aromatic compounds are suggested to be due to higher concentrations of nutrients in the seawater where aromatic degradation takes place, while the lower degradation of n-alkanes are suggested to be due to a preference by bacteria for feces over these compounds. Large aggregates were observed in oil dispersions with clean feces, which may cause sedimentation of un-weathered lipophilic oil compounds towards the seafloor if formed during oil spills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Why is the oil price not about equilibrium?: An economic sociology account of petroleum markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyi, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    This opinion paper seeks to initiate discussion of the institutional and societal causes of oil price. On this basis, the social embeddedness concept is proposed instead of the frequently used producer-consumer juxtaposition. Observation shows no linearity between resource distribution imbalances and supply dynamics on the one hand and price on the other. As a socially endogenous factor, oil price generates practices and norms comprising benchmarks for resource valuation, stock market dynamics and risk aversion practices. A high oil price incentivises investments and inter-fuel competition, whereas a low oil price increases both political and market risks beyond the consumer-producer conceptualisation. Hence, it is argued that the notion of oil price affordability in energy security should be revised. - Highlights: •Oil price is not about affordability but about social embeddedness processes. •Producer-Consumer juxtaposition stems from resource-determinism concept. •Elevated oil price postpones peak oil and favors inter-fuel competition. •Important symbolisms surrounding the oil price exists in terms of business perspectives and political risk aversion.

  4. Growth Inhibition of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Produced Water from the Petroleum Industry Using Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamella Macedo de; Goulart, Fátima Regina de Vasconcelos; Marques, Joana Montezano; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Groposo, Claudia; Sousa, Maíra Paula de; Vólaro, Vanessa; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Seldin, Lucy

    2017-04-19

    Strategies for the control of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the oil industry involve the use of high concentrations of biocides, but these may induce bacterial resistance and/or be harmful to public health and the environment. Essential oils (EO) produced by plants inhibit the growth of different microorganisms and are a possible alternative for controlling SRB. We aimed to characterize the bacterial community of produced water obtained from a Brazilian petroleum facility using molecular methods, as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EO from different plants and their major components against Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 and against SRB growth directly in the produced water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of the genera Pelobacter and Marinobacterium , Geotoga petraea , and the SRB Desulfoplanes formicivorans in our produced water samples. Sequencing of dsrA insert-containing clones confirmed the presence of sequences related to D. formicivorans . EO obtained from Citrus aurantifolia , Lippia alba LA44 and Cymbopogon citratus , as well as citral, linalool, eugenol and geraniol, greatly inhibited (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 78 µg/mL) the growth of D. alaskensis in a liquid medium. The same MIC was obtained directly in the produced water with EO from L. alba LA44 (containing 82% citral) and with pure citral. These findings may help to control detrimental bacteria in the oil industry.

  5. Growth Inhibition of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Produced Water from the Petroleum Industry Using Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamella Macedo de Souza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for the control of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB in the oil industry involve the use of high concentrations of biocides, but these may induce bacterial resistance and/or be harmful to public health and the environment. Essential oils (EO produced by plants inhibit the growth of different microorganisms and are a possible alternative for controlling SRB. We aimed to characterize the bacterial community of produced water obtained from a Brazilian petroleum facility using molecular methods, as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EO from different plants and their major components against Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 and against SRB growth directly in the produced water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of the genera Pelobacter and Marinobacterium, Geotoga petraea, and the SRB Desulfoplanes formicivorans in our produced water samples. Sequencing of dsrA insert-containing clones confirmed the presence of sequences related to D. formicivorans. EO obtained from Citrus aurantifolia, Lippia alba LA44 and Cymbopogon citratus, as well as citral, linalool, eugenol and geraniol, greatly inhibited (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC = 78 µg/mL the growth of D. alaskensis in a liquid medium. The same MIC was obtained directly in the produced water with EO from L. alba LA44 (containing 82% citral and with pure citral. These findings may help to control detrimental bacteria in the oil industry.

  6. Oil and natural gas strategies for North American energy markets: a submission by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This proposal by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) focuses on improving North American energy markets and addressing the challenges involved in meeting continental energy requirements by urging a renewed policy effort to enhance the current market-based policies of free trade and competition that have already proven to respond to market changes better than command-control government policies. The proposal urges new strategies to support development of the oil and natural gas resources of North America, and the development of additional infrastructure to bring oil and natural gas supplies to market. The new strategy should be based on the success of free trade to increase non-discriminatory treatment of energy investment and trade in energy commodities, recognize resource development in North America as a policy priority, and reform regulatory practices to facilitate responsible, market-driven resource activity. The new strategy should also ensure competitive tax and royalty regimes as well as consistent and compatible environmental policies that eliminate layering and duplication and are competitive among the various jurisdictions. It should also recognize the continental and global nature of energy supply and the increasing interdependence of the partner nations' economies, encourage research and development, and ensure co-ordinated action on frontier natural gas development within a framework of inter-jurisdictional cooperation. Overall, the document is a thorough, credible presentation of the first principles of the oil and gas markets and an important first step towards influencing energy policy on a continental scale. 2 maps, 5 figs

  7. Well and Inflow Performance Relationship for Heavy Oil Reservoir under Heating Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Hakiki, Farizal

    2017-10-17

    Well and Inflow Performance Relationship, termed TPR and IPR, respectively have been the unfailing methods to predict well performance. It is further to determine the schemes on optimising production. The main intention of the study is to explore TPR and IPR under heating treatment for heavy oil well. Klamono is a mature field which mostly has depleted wells, it produces heavy oil within 18.5 °API (>0.95 g/cc oil density), and therefore, artificial lifting method is necessary. Sucker Road Pump (SRP) and Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) are the most deployed artificial lifting method in this reservoir. To boost the heavy oil production, the application of Electric Downhole Heater (EDH) in Well KLO-X1 is being studied. Whole Klamono\\'s production is more than 100,000 blpd within 97-99% water cut. By installing EDH, oil viscosity is decreased hence oil mobility ratio will play a role to decrease water cut. EDH is installed together with the tubing joint to simplify its application in the wellbore. The study shows that EDH application can elevate fluid (mixed oil and brine) temperature. Oil viscosity confirms a reduction from 68 to 46 cP. The gross well production is up to 12.2 bopd due optimising its outflow performance and reducing 97.5 to 96.9% water cut. The field data gives an incremental of 4.9 bopd. The computational results only show an attainment of net oil production up to 8.3 bopd (2 bopd incremental). The EDH works to lessen both density and viscosity as we hypothesised for the mechanism of thermally induced oil production improvement. The evaluation study on its economics aspect exhibits good result that is 1.4 USD/bbl additional profit margin according to field data despite the challenging annual rig rent cost. Following the field data, the expected net income through analytical model revealed that this project is financially promising.

  8. Pore-scale modelling of the effect of viscous pressure gradients during heavy oil depletion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondino, I. [Total E and P UK Ltd., London (United Kingdom); McDougall, S.R. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Hamon, G. [Total E and P Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    In solution gas drive, when the reservoir pressure is lowered below the bubble point, bubbles nucleate and grow within saturated oil. A period of internal gas-phase expansion maintains reservoir pressure, driving oil to the wellbore region. Continued pressure reduction eventually leads to the formation of a connected gas phase that is capable of being produced along with the oleic phase. As a result, the total produced gas-oil ratio in the well begins to increase. Once the connected gas phase develops, oil production begins to decrease. This general description can be inadequate in the context of heavy oils where additional characteristics, such as foamy oil, and atypically high recoveries are observed. In order to improve the simulation of solution gas drive for heavy oil in the framework of a pre-existing pore-scale network simulator, a dynamic gas-oil interface tracking algorithm was used to determine the mobilization of bubbles under intense pressure gradients. The model was used to characterize both the stationary capillary controlled growth of bubbles characteristic of slow depletion rates in the far wellbore region and the flow phenomena in the near wellbore region. A rationale for interpreting a range of flow mechanism, their associated gas relative permeabilities and critical gas saturations was also proposed. The paper first presented a description of the dynamic pore network model in terms of its' ability to model the porous space; and mobilize gas under viscous pressure gradients and unsteady-state gas relative permeabilities. The dynamic network modelling of heavy oil depletion experiments at different rates and the prediction of the experimental gas saturations were then presented along with a discussion on critical gas saturations. It was concluded that foamy oil behaviour can be observed in situations where capillary pressures are overcome by viscous pressure gradients. 47 refs., 5 tabs., 17 figs.

  9. Well and Inflow Performance Relationship for Heavy Oil Reservoir under Heating Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Hakiki, Farizal; Aditya, A.; Ulitha, D. T.; Shidqi, M.; Adi, W. S.; Wibowo, K. H.; Barus, M.

    2017-01-01

    Well and Inflow Performance Relationship, termed TPR and IPR, respectively have been the unfailing methods to predict well performance. It is further to determine the schemes on optimising production. The main intention of the study is to explore TPR and IPR under heating treatment for heavy oil well. Klamono is a mature field which mostly has depleted wells, it produces heavy oil within 18.5 °API (>0.95 g/cc oil density), and therefore, artificial lifting method is necessary. Sucker Road Pump (SRP) and Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) are the most deployed artificial lifting method in this reservoir. To boost the heavy oil production, the application of Electric Downhole Heater (EDH) in Well KLO-X1 is being studied. Whole Klamono's production is more than 100,000 blpd within 97-99% water cut. By installing EDH, oil viscosity is decreased hence oil mobility ratio will play a role to decrease water cut. EDH is installed together with the tubing joint to simplify its application in the wellbore. The study shows that EDH application can elevate fluid (mixed oil and brine) temperature. Oil viscosity confirms a reduction from 68 to 46 cP. The gross well production is up to 12.2 bopd due optimising its outflow performance and reducing 97.5 to 96.9% water cut. The field data gives an incremental of 4.9 bopd. The computational results only show an attainment of net oil production up to 8.3 bopd (2 bopd incremental). The EDH works to lessen both density and viscosity as we hypothesised for the mechanism of thermally induced oil production improvement. The evaluation study on its economics aspect exhibits good result that is 1.4 USD/bbl additional profit margin according to field data despite the challenging annual rig rent cost. Following the field data, the expected net income through analytical model revealed that this project is financially promising.

  10. Non-woven Textile Materials from Waste Fibers for Cleanup of Waters Polluted with Petroleum and Oil Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neznakomova, Margarita; Boteva, Silvena; Tzankov, Luben; Elhag, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of using non-woven materials (NWM) from waste fibers for oil spill cleanup and their subsequent recovery. Manufacture of textile and readymade products generates a significant amount of solid waste. A major part of it is deposited in landfills or disposed of uncontrollably. This slowly degradable waste causes environmental problems. In the present study are used two types of NWM obtained by methods where waste fibers are utilized. Thus, real textile products are produced (blankets) with which spills are covered and removed by adsorption. These products are produced by two methods: the strengthening of the covering from recovered fibers is made by entanglement when needles of special design pass through layers (needle-punching) or by stitching with thread (technology Maliwatt). Regardless of the random nature of the fiber mixture, the investigated products are good adsorbents of petroleum products. The nature of their structure (a significant void volume and developed surface) leads to a rapid recovery of the spilled petroleum products without sinking of the fiber layer for the sampled times. The used NWM can be burned under special conditions.

  11. How international oil and gas companies respond to local content policies in petroleum-producing developing countries: A narrative enquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoasong, Michael Zisuh

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses narrative analysis to critically examine the business practices used by five international oil and gas companies (IOCs) (Chevron, ExxonMobil, Shell, BP and Total) to respond to local content policies in petroleum-producing developing countries (Nigeria, Angola, Venezuela, Kazakhstan, Brazil, Indonesia, Yemen and Indonesia) during the period 2000–2012. The business practices include the formulation of local content strategies that are implemented through programmes and initiatives aimed at developing and using host country suppliers and workforce. Such practices and the narratives used to communicate them implicitly reflect the context in which the effectiveness of local content policies on economic development can be assessed. By comparing and contrasting the narratives across the five IOCs in relation to the wider literature, four emergent narrative strategies justifying the business practices of IOCs are identified and discussed. They include: (1) direct engagement to renegotiate local content requirements with governments, (2) legal compliance framework, (3) the business case for local content strategies, and (4) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. The conclusion considers the policy implications of these findings for local content development in petroleum-producing developing countries. - Highlights: • Local content policies define the local context that shape IOCs’ business practices. • Provides a narrative analysis of the business practices of IOCs in developing countries. • IOCs use four narrative strategies to relate their business practices to local content policies. • The business practices of IOCs can determine the effectiveness of local content policies

  12. Petroleum. [Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    An introductory chapter of world wide petroleum history is followed by a comprehensive record of the petroliferous basins of Venezuela. Exploration, productivity, production statistics, reserves, geologic structures, and the distribution of oil and gas fields are described separately for the Maracaibo-Falcon basin, Apure-Barinas basin, E. Venezuela basin, and Tuy-Cariaco basin. The descriptions include geographic distribution, geomorphologic outline of the basins, lithology and thickness of sediments, structural development, present structural conditions in which oil and gas fields occur, and their distribution in the basins. Economic factors are discussed in an appendix. 145 references.

  13. 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: heavy oil recovery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the application of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) which operates in a process steam/cogeneration (PS/C) mode in supplying steam for enhanced recovery of heavy oil and in exporting electricity. The technical and economic merits of an 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C are compared with those of coal-fired plants and (product) oil-fired boilers for this application. The utility requirements for enhanced oil recovery were calculated by establishing a typical pattern of injection wells and production wells for an oil field similar to that of Kern County, California. The safety and licensing issues of the nuclear plant were reviewed, and a comparative assessment of the alternative energy sources was performed. Technically and economically, the HTGR-PS/C plant has attractive merits. The major offsetting factors would be a large-scale development of a heavy oil field by a potential user for the deployment of a 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C; plant and the likelihood of available prime heavy oil fields for the mid-1990 operation

  14. Study on molecular modelling of the selectivity of catalysts for heavy petroleum fractions hydrocracking; Etude sur molecule modele des parametres regissant la selectivite des catalyseurs d'hydrocraquage des charges lourdes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, L.

    <