WorldWideScience

Sample records for heavy molecular states

  1. X(3872) and other possible heavy molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiang; Luo, Zhi-Gang; Zhu, Shi-Lin; Liu, Yan-Rui

    2009-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of the possible molecular states composed of a pair of heavy mesons such as D anti D,D * anti D,D * anti D * in the framework of the meson exchange model. The exchanged mesons include the pseudoscalar, scalar and vector mesons. Through our investigation, we find the following results. (1) The structure X(3764) is not a molecular state. (2) There exists strong attraction in the range r * anti D * system with J=0,1. If future experiments confirm Z + (4051) as a loosely bound molecular state, its quantum number is probably J P =0 + . Its partner state Φ **0 may be searched for in the π 0 χ c1 channel. (3) Vector meson exchange provides strong attraction in the D * anti D channel together with pion exchange. A bound state solution may exist with a reasonable cutoff parameter Λ∝1.4 GeV. X(3872) may be accommodated as a molecular state dynamically although drawing a very definite conclusion needs further investigation. (4) The B * anti B molecular state may exist. (orig.)

  2. Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS II: K-shell X-ray satellites in heavy ion impact on solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young K. Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS, an innershell-bound ultra-high-energy molecule, was previously proposed to explain a ∼40% efficiency of soft-X-ray generation in ∼0.05 keV/amu nanoparticle impact on solids. Here, the MIMS model has been extended and applied to interpreting the experimental K-shell X-ray satellite spectra for more than 40 years in keV-MeV/amu heavy-ion impact on solids. The binding energies of the K-shell MIMS of elements from Al to Ti were determined to be 80–200 eV. The successful extension of the model to the K-shell MIMS confirms that all elements in the periodic table and their combinations are subjected to the MIMS formation.

  3. Nuclear molecular structure in heavy mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arctaedius, T.; Bargholtz, C.

    1989-04-01

    A study is made of nuclear molecular configurations involving one heavy mass partner. The stability of these configurations to mass flow and to fission is investigated as well as their population in fusion reactions. It is concluded that shell effects in combination with the effects of angular momentum may be important in stabilizing certain configurations. A possible relation of these configurations to the so called superdeformed states is pointed out. The spectrum of rotational and vibrational trasitions within molecular configurations is investigated. For sufficiently mass-asymmetric systems the engergies of vibrational transitions are comparable to the neutron separation energy. Gamma radiation from such transitions may then be observable above the background of statistical transitions. The gamma spectrum and the directional distribution of the radioation following fusion reactions with 12 C and 16 O are calculated. (authors)

  4. Chemical equilibration due to heavy Hagedorn states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C; Koch-Steinheimer, P; Liu, F M; Shovkovy, I A; Stoecker, H

    2005-01-01

    A scenario of heavy resonances, called massive Hagedorn states, is proposed which exhibits a fast (t ∼ 1 fm/c) chemical equilibration of (strange) baryons and anti-baryons at the QCD critical temperature T c . For relativistic heavy ion collisions this scenario predicts that hadronization is followed by a brief expansion phase during which the equilibration rate is higher than the expansion rate, so that baryons and antibaryons reach chemical equilibrium before chemical freeze-out occurs

  5. Nuclear molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of polarization on the stability of α-cluster structures in 8 Be and 12 C nuclei are studied in the intrinsic states. The extent of the polarization of α-clusters is investigated by employing a molecular-orbital model. Two α-cluster structure of 8 Be is shown to be extremely stable, and a triangular configuration of three α-clusters is also shown to be stable, but the polarizations of α-clusters are found rather large. Gruemmer--Faessler's method is discussed and their results are shown to be trivial

  6. Molecular Ωb states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Dias, J. M.; Debastiani, V. R.; Oset, E.

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the recent finding of five Ωc states by the LHCb collaboration, and the successful reproduction of three of them in a recent approach searching for molecular states of meson-baryon with the quantum numbers of Ωc, we extend these ideas and make predictions for the interaction of meson-baryon in the beauty sector, searching for poles in the scattering matrix that correspond to physical states. We find several Ωb states: two states with masses 6405 MeV and 6465 MeV for JP = 1/2-; two more states with masses 6427 MeV and 6665 MeV for 3/2-; and three states between 6500 and 6820 MeV, degenerate with JP = 1/2-, 3/2-, stemming from the interaction of vector-baryon in the beauty sector.

  7. Deposition of molecular probes in heavy ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Esser, M

    1999-01-01

    By using polarized fluorescence techniques the physical properties of heavy ion tracks such as the dielectric number, molecular alignment and track radius can be traced by molecular fluorescence probes. Foils of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were used as a matrix for the ion tracks wherein fluorescence probes such as aminostyryl-derivatives can be incorporated using a suitable solvent, e.g. N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) as transport medium. The high sensitivity of fluorescence methods allowed the comparison of the probe properties in ion tracks with the virgin material. From the fluorescence Stokes shift the dielectric constants could be calculated, describing the dielectric surroundings of the molecular probes. The lower dielectric constant in the tracks gives clear evidence that there is no higher accommodation of the highly polar solvent DMF in the tracks compared with the virgin material. Otherwise the dielectric constant in the tracks should be higher than in the virgin material. The orientation of t...

  8. Searches for Heavy Quark States at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00357007; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk highlights the latest results of heavy quark searches from the ATLAS collaboration, mainly on resonance searches and vector-like quarks (VLQs) searches. Searches for $t\\bar{t}$ resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy at 8 and 13 TeV are presented. Limits are set for BSM particles such as topcolor-assisted technicolor $Z'$ , Kaluza-Klein (K-K) gluons $g_{KK}$ and K-K excitations of graviton $G_{KK}$ in the TC Randall-Sundrum (R-S) model of extra dimensions. VLQs arise naturally in many models such as Little Higgs and Composite Higgs and typically couple preferably to the third generation SM quarks and weak bosons. Limits are set for vector-like bottom (B) and top (T) quarks decay to lepton-plus-jets final states via Hb+X and Ht+X channels in two analyses using 8 and 13 TeV datasets from ATLAS.

  9. Searches for Heavy Quark States at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hok Chuen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk highlights the latest results of heavy quark searches from the ATLAS collaboration, mainly on resonance searches and vector-like quarks (VLQs) searches. Searches for t\\bar{t} resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy at 8 and 13 TeV are presented. Limits are set for BSM particles such as topcolor-assisted technicolor Z'_{TC} , Kaluza-Klein(K-K) gluons g_{KK} and K-K excitations of graviton G_{KK} in the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions. VLQs arise naturally in many models such as Little Higgs and Composite Higgs and typically couple preferably to the third generation SM quarks and weak bosons. Limits are set for vector-like bottom (B) and top (T) quarks decay to lepton-plus-jets final states via Hb+X and Ht+X channels in two analyses using 8 and 13 TeV datasets from ATLAS.

  10. Bound state of heavy quarks and antiquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1979-09-01

    Properties of the charmonium and upsilon families of heavy mesons are reviewed within the framework of quarkonium quantum mechanics. The implications of current data are analyzed and projections are made for heavier quarkonium families. 72 references

  11. Dipole cluster states in light, medium heavy and heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Moshe

    1984-01-01

    Tests of the Vibron cluster model in sup(18)O, sup(218)Ra and sup(156)Yb are reported, as well as a test in progress in sup(52)Ti. Low lying negative parity states which appear to be members of rotational bands of alternating parity states with enhanced B(E1) intraband deexcitation rates are found. The cluster band, within the model framework, is also characterized by large alpha decay widths and enhanced radiative deexcitation widths of several multipolarities B(E1), B(E2), B(E3). A discussion of the model and the underlying, newly suggested dipole degree of freedom is presented. (author)

  12. Dibaryon states containing two different types of heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leandri, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent series of papers we have shown that including heavy quarks in the dibaryon sector can lead to configurations stable against decay into two baryons. In this study we extend our previous work by a study of all the physical Q 2 q 4 [Q denotes a heavy quark and q denotes a member of the SU(3) F triplet representation] systems in a solvable chromomagnetic model. We propose a number of new heavy states which could be stable under strong interactions

  13. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy Ξ baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the mass spectra are obtained for doubly heavy Ξ baryons, namely, Ξ{sub cc}{sup +}, Ξ{sub cc}{sup ++}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup -}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub bc}{sup 0} and Ξ{sub bc}{sup +}. These baryons consist of two heavy quarks (cc, bb, and bc) with a light (d or u) quark. The ground, radial, and orbital states are calculated in the framework of the hypercentral constituent quark model with Coulomb plus linear potential. Our results are also compared with other predictions, thus, the average possible range of excited states masses of these Ξ baryons can be determined. The study of the Regge trajectories is performed in (n, M{sup 2}) and (J, M{sup 2}) planes and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Lastly, the ground state magnetic moments of these doubly heavy baryons are also calculated. (orig.)

  14. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1996-01-01

    A high current, low emittance, high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver accelerator scale beam. Using a high charge state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system, which consists of a gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 3D beam simulations and experimental feasibility study results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector. (orig.)

  15. Theory of heavy quark-antiquark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifman, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of data on Q anti Q quark-antiquark states is presented. Masses and leptonic widths of Q anti Q levels on the basis of QCD sum rules are determined. Spin effects in Q anti Q interactions are discussed. Hadronic transitions between quarkonium levels and the processes of tau/psi→γ + light hadrons, Y→γ + light hadrons are considered [ru

  16. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for HIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-04-01

    A high current low emittance high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver HIF (heavy ion fusion) driver accelerator scale beam. Using high-charge-state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system which consists of the gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 2D beam envelope simulations and experimental feasibility studies' results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector

  17. The influence of initial state fluctuations on heavy quark energy loss in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen A; Huang, Yajing; Qin, Guang-You

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of initial state fluctuations on the dynamical evolution of heavy quarks inside a quark–gluon plasma (QGP) created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The evolution of heavy quarks in QGP matter is described utilizing a modified Langevin equation that incorporates the contributions from both collisional and radiative energy loss. The spacetime evolution of the fireball medium is simulated with a (2 + 1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic model. We find that when the medium traversed by the heavy quark contains a fixed amount of energy, heavy quarks tend to lose more energy for greater fluctuations of the medium density. This may result in a larger suppression of heavy flavor observables in a fluctuating QGP matter than in a smooth one. The possibility of using hard probes to infer the information of initial states of heavy-ion collisions is discussed. (paper)

  18. Measurement of molecular diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide and methane in heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y.; Tharanivasan, A.K.; Yang, C. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Vapour extraction (VAPEX) is a solvent-based thermal recovery process which is considered to be a viable process for recovering heavy oil. In order to develop a solvent-based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operation, it is necessary to know the rate and extent of oil mobilization by the solvent. The molecular diffusion coefficient of solvent gas in heavy oil must be known. In this study, the pressure decay method was used to measure the molecular diffusivity of a gas solvent in heavy oil by monitoring the decaying pressure. The pressure decay method is a non-intrusive method in which physical contact is made between the gas solvent and the heavy oil. The pressure versus time data are measured until the heavy oil reaches complete saturation. The diffusion coefficient can be determined from the measured data and a mathematical model. In this study, the molecular diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide-heavy oil and methane-heavy oil systems were measured and compared. The experiments were performed in closed high-pressure cells at constant reservoir temperature. An analytical solution was also obtained to predict the pressure in the gas phase and for the boundary conditions at the solvent-heavy oil interface for each solvent. Solvent diffusivity was determined by finding the best match of the numerically predicted and experimentally measured pressures.

  19. Radiative width of molecular-cluster states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gai, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular states are characterized by enhanced electromagnetic deexcitations of many different multipolarities. The expected enhancement of E1, E2, and E3 transitions is examined by deriving molecular sum rules for radiative deexcitation widths and via a dimensionality approach. The enhancement of the E1 transitions is the most striking

  20. Fermionic molecular dynamics for ground states and collisions of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Bieler, K.; Schnack, J.

    1994-08-01

    The antisymmetric many-body trial state which describes a system of interacting fermions is parametrized in terms of localized wave packets. The equations of motion are derived from the time-dependent quantum variational principle. The resulting Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) equations include a wide range of semi-quantal to classical physics extending from deformed Hartree-Fock theory to Newtonian molecular dynamics. Conservation laws are discussed in connection with the choice of the trial state. The model is applied to heavy-ion collisions with which its basic features are illustrated. The results show a great variety of phenomena including deeply inelastic collisions, fusion, incomplete fusion, fragmentation, neck emission, promptly emitted nucleons and evaporation. (orig.)

  1. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    -based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available, as often the case for e.g. membrane proteins. Here we present an approach for heavy atom site identification based on a Molecular Replacement Parameter Matrix (MRPM) search. It involves an n-dimensional search...... to test a wide spectrum of molecular replacement parameters, such as clusters of different conformations. The result is scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions, from anomalous difference Fourier maps, that allow meaningful phases to be determined. The strategy was successfully applied...... but correct molecular replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts....

  2. Equilibrium charge state distributions of high energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.B.; Grant, I.S.; King, R.; Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium charge state fractions have been measured for N, O, Ne, S, Ar and Kr ions at 1.04 MeV/nucleon after passing through various stripping materials. Further data were obtained at higher energy for S ions (4.12 MeV/nucleon) and Ar ions (4.12 and 9.6 MeV/nucleon). The mean charge fractions can be fitted to universal curves for both solid and gaseous strippers. Measurements of the equilibrium fraction of krypton ions at 1.04 MeV/nucleon passing through heavy vapours have shown that a higher average charge state is obtained than for lighter gaseous strippers. (Auth.)

  3. Hot QCD equations of state and relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vinod; Kumar, Ravindra; Ravishankar, V.

    2007-11-01

    We study two recently proposed equations of state obtained from high-temperature QCD and show how they can be adapted to use them for making predictions for relativistic heavy ion collisions. The method involves extracting equilibrium distribution functions for quarks and gluons from the equation of state (EOS), which in turn will allow a determination of the transport and other bulk properties of the quark gluon-plasma. Simultaneously, the method also yields a quasiparticle description of interacting quarks and gluons. The first EOS is perturbative in the QCD coupling constant and has contributions of O(g5). The second EOS is an improvement over the first, with contributions up to O[g6ln(1/g)]; it incorporates the nonperturbative hard thermal contributions. The interaction effects are shown to be captured entirely by the effective chemical potentials for the gluons and the quarks, in both cases. The chemical potential is seen to be highly sensitive to the EOS. As an application, we determine the screening lengths, which are, indeed, the most important diagnostics for QGP. The screening lengths are seen to behave drastically differently depending on the EOS considered and therefore yield a way to distinguish the two equations of state in heavy ion collisions.

  4. Search for Λ anti Λ heavy states at ISA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaminio, V.; Lesnik, A.; Rehak, P.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of observing ΛantiΛ heavy states using the Isabelle storage rings is discussed. Not many particles are known to date to decay into ΛantiΛ. The J/psi is a notable exception, with a branching ratio of about 0.2% (vs. 7% into e + e - and μ + μ - ). However, it is not inconceivable that higher mass states, produced at Isabelle energies, will have substantial branching fractions into ΛantiΛ. If this will indeed be the case, then one may think of getting additional information on the properties of the new states by taking advantage of the parity-violating Λ and antiΛ decays. Detectors, rate and background considerations, and methods of particle detection are discussed

  5. Heavy-ion transfer to high-spin states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauterbach, C.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer reactions between very heavy ions, in particular about systems in which one or both collision partners are well deformed, are studied. These systems are expected to give rise to new phenomena which are related to the fact that the deformed nucleus has been Coulomb excited to a rotational or vibrational state at the time when the collision partners come into contact. In this paper the authors present results of experiments in which nuclei from the rare earth and the actinide region have been bombarded by various projectiles ranging from 34 S to 208 Pb at incident energies close to the Coulomb barrier. (Auth.)

  6. Cellular and molecular radiobiology of heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Roots, R.J.; Yang, T.C.H.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Craise, L.M.; Yezzi, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Accelerated heavy particles are candidates for use in cancer radiotherapy, and the major goal of our program has been to characterize the biological potential of Bevalac beams for this purpose. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values and oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) properties of monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams with initial energies of several hundred MeV/u have been measured as a function of residual range. Bevalac beams with Bragg peaks modified to encompass tumors of various sizes have also been studied using cultured cells in vitro

  7. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  8. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of weakly-bound projectile heavy-ion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morker Mitul R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-body classical molecular dynamics approach for heavy-ion reactions involving weakly bound projectiles is developed. In this approach a weakly bound projectile is constructed as a two-body cluster of the constituent tightly bound nuclei in a configuration corresponding to the observed breakup energy. This 3-body system with their individual nucleon configuration in their ground state is dynamically evolved for given initial conditions using the three-stage classical molecular dynamics approach (3S-CMD. Various levels of rigidbody constraints on the projectile constituents and the target are considered at appropriate stages. This 3-dimensional approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but internal excitations and breakup probabilities at distances close to the barrier also. Dynamical simulations of 6Li+209Bi show all the possible reaction mechanism like complete fusion, incomplete fusion, scattering and breakup scattering. Complete fusion cross sections of 6Li+209Bi and 7Li+209Bi reactions are calculated in this approach with systematic relaxations of the rigid-body constraints on one or more constituent nuclei.

  9. Extended Lagrangian Excited State Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J A; Sheppard, D; Tretiak, S; Niklasson, A M N

    2018-02-13

    An extended Lagrangian framework for excited state molecular dynamics (XL-ESMD) using time-dependent self-consistent field theory is proposed. The formulation is a generalization of the extended Lagrangian formulations for ground state Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008 100, 123004]. The theory is implemented, demonstrated, and evaluated using a time-dependent semiempirical model, though it should be generally applicable to ab initio theory. The simulations show enhanced energy stability and a significantly reduced computational cost associated with the iterative solutions of both the ground state and the electronically excited states. Relaxed convergence criteria can therefore be used both for the self-consistent ground state optimization and for the iterative subspace diagonalization of the random phase approximation matrix used to calculate the excited state transitions. The XL-ESMD approach is expected to enable numerically efficient excited state molecular dynamics for such methods as time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), Configuration Interactions Singles (CIS), and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  10. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  11. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-03-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts.

  12. Initial state with shear in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magas, V. K.; Gordillo, J.; Strottman, D.; Xie, Y. L.; Csernai, L. P.

    2018-06-01

    In the present work we propose a new way of constructing the initial state for further hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy ion collisions based on Bjorken-like solution applied streak by streak in the transverse plane. Previous fluid dynamical calculations in Cartesian coordinates with an initial state based on a streak by streak Yang-Mills field led for peripheral higher energy collisions to large angular momentum, initial shear flow and significant local vorticity. Recent experiments verified the existence of this vorticity via the resulting polarization of emitted Λ and Λ ¯ particles. At the same time parton cascade models indicated the existence of more compact initial state configurations, which we are going to simulate in our approach. The proposed model satisfies all the conservation laws, including conservation of a strong initial angular momentum, which is present in noncentral collisions. As a consequence of this large initial angular momentum we observe the rotation of the whole system as well as the fluid shear in the initial state, which leads to large flow vorticity. Another advantage of the proposed model is that the initial state can be given in both [t,x,y,z] and [τ ,x ,y ,η ] coordinates and thus can be tested by all 3+1D hydrodynamical codes which exist in the field.

  13. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  14. Cranked cluster wave function for molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Hisashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Wada, Takahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Construction of the cranked cluster wave function is discussed by focussing on three problems; the self-consistency between the potential and the density distribution, the properties of the rotational angular frequency which is strongly influenced by the inter-cluster Pauli principle and by the parity projection, and the spin alignment along the rotation axis with the resulting structure-change of the molecular state. (author)

  15. Experimental study on the secondary emission (atomic and molecular ions, aggregates, electrons) induced by the bombardment of surfaces by means of energetic heavy ions (∼ MeV/u). Effects of the charge state of the projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monart, B.

    1988-05-01

    The ionic and electronic emissions, induced by the sputtering of solid targets (organic and inorganic) with 1 MeV/u projectiles. The time-of-flight spectrometry is applied to the secondary emission analysis. The projectile velocity, the angle of attack (between the beam and the target), and the projectile's incident charge state, are taken into account. It is shown that the secondary emission depends on the charge of the incident ion and on the charge state changement in the material's bulk. A model, applying the theoretical calculations concerning the charge in the material's bulk, is proposed. The existence of an interaction depth, for the incident ion and the material, which depends on the secondary ions type and on the incident ion charge, is suggested. The calculated depth is about 200 angstroms for the aggregates ejected from a CsI target, sputtered with 14 Kr 18+ . The H + yield (coming from ∼ 10 angstroms) is used as a projectile charge probe, at the material surface. The experimental method allows, for the first time, the obtention of the equilibrium charge state in the condensed matter. The same method is applied to determine the non-equilibrium charges in the bulk of thin materials. The results show that, after leaving the material, the projectile presents a post-ionization state [fr

  16. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  17. Bibliography of molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions, 1950--75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Thomas, E.W.

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors.

  18. Bibliography of molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions, 1950--75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Thomas, E.W.

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on molecular dissociation in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors

  19. Bibliography of atomic and molecular excitation in heavy particle collisions, 1950--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, S.W.; Thomas, E.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on atomic and molecular excitation in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactions and authors

  20. Heavy-ion collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1993-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to study nucleus-nucleus collisions experimentally at intermediate and relativistic energies, with emphasis on measurement and interpretation of correlation effects that provide insight into the nuclear phase diagram and the nuclear equation of state. During the course of this reporting period, the PI returned to Kent from a 15-month leave at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, which had been devoted 100% to work on this research project. The EOS Time Projection Chamber at LBL's Bevalac accelerator has continued to be the major focus of research for all of the supported personnel; about a year ago, this detector successfully took data in production mode for the first time, and accumulated in excess of 1000 hours of beam time before the termination of the Bevalac in February 1993. Reduction and analysis of these data is currently our first priority. Effort has also been devoted to the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, in the form of contributions to the Conceptual Design Report, work on HV control hardware and software for use with the STAR Time Projection Chamber, and tracking software development

  1. Heavy-ion collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to study nucleus-nucleus collisions experimentally at intermediate and relativistic energies, with emphasis on measurement and interpretation of correlation effects that provide insight into the nuclear phase diagram and the nuclear equation of state. During the past year, the PI has been on leave at Lawrence Berkeley Lab and has worked on this research project full-time. A large fraction of the effort of the PI and graduate students has gone into preparing for experiments using the Time Projection Chamber at LBL's Bevalac accelerator; in March 1992, this device successfully took data in production mode for the first time, and the first physics analysis is now under way. The PI has carried out simulations that help to define the physics performance and engineering specifications of the recently-approved STAR detector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and has identified a new capability of this device with the potential for being an important quark-gluon plasma signature. A Postdoctoral Fellow, jointly supported by this grant and Kent State University, has been recruited to augment these efforts. Since May 1991, 11 journal papers have been published or submitted for publication; 2 conference proceedings and 9 reports or abstracts have also been published during the past year. One paper in Phys. Rev. Left., one in Phys. Rev. C, and one conference proceedings are based on the thesis project of one of the PI's Ph.D. students who is expected to graduate later this year. Partly in response to the impending closure of the Bevalac, the PI's group has recently joined the NA49 experiment at CERN

  2. The effect of low molecular weight multifunctional additives on heavy oil viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, T.B.P.; Yarranton, H.W.; Larter, S.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Crude oils contain many small multifunctional low molecular weight components that act as linking molecules between larger functionalized species. The linkage molecules have a significant impact on the flow properties of hydrocarbon systems. This study investigated the use of a low molecular weight multiheteroatom species (LMWMH) as a molecular Velcro linking high molecular weight components together. LMWMH species were added to Albertan bitumens and heavy oil, and their impact on viscosity was investigated. Results of the experimental studies were then compared with the effects of hydrocarbon solvents on similar samples. The LMWMH species included bifunctional species and analogous alkyl and aryl monoamines that acted as blocking molecules to hinder the association of larger petroleum species. Density and viscosity measurements were conducted. A correlation method was used to predict the viscosity of the solvent-diluted heavy oil and bitumen samples. The study showed that of the tested additives, only aniline demonstrated an additional viscosity-reducing effect. The aniline inhibited asphaltene association and is a promising candidate for enhanced in-situ bitumen viscosity reduction. 23 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Vicinage effects in energy loss and electron emission during grazing scattering of heavy molecular ions from a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian; Miskovic, Z.L.

    2005-01-01

    Vicinage effects in the energy loss and the electron emission spectra are studied in the presence of Coulomb explosion of swift, heavy molecular ions, during their grazing scattering from a solid surface. The dynamic response of the surface is treated by means of the dielectric theory within the specular reflection model using the plasmon pole approximation for the bulk dielectric function, whereas the angle-resolved energy spectra of the electrons emitted from the surface are obtained on the basis of the first-order, time-dependent perturbation theory. The evolution of the charge states of the constituent ions in the molecule during scattering is described by a nonequilibrium extension of the Brandt-Kitagawa model. The molecule scattering trajectories and the corresponding Coulomb explosion dynamics are evaluated for the cases of the internuclear axis being either aligned in the beam direction or randomly oriented in the directions parallel to the surface. Our calculations show that the vicinage effect in the energy loss is generally weaker for heavy molecules than for light molecules. In addition, there is clear evidence of the negative vicinage effect in both the energy loss and the energy spectra of the emitted electrons for molecular ions at lower speeds and with the axis aligned in the direction of motion

  4. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    We review the phenomenology and theory of bulk observables in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, focusing on recent developments involving event-by-event fluctuations in the initial stages of a heavy-ion collision, and how they manifest in observed correlations. We first define the relevant observables and show how each measurement is related to underlying theoretical quantities. Then we review the prevailing picture of the various stages of a collision, including the state-of-the-art modeling of the initial stages of a collision and subsequent hydrodynamic evolution, as well as hadronic scattering and freeze-out in the later stages. We then discuss the recent results that have shaped our current understanding and identify the challenges that remain. Finally, we point out open issues and the potential for progress in the field. (topical review)

  5. Quasi-molecular states in sd-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubono, S.; Ikeda, N.; Nomura, T.

    1988-08-01

    Quasi-molecular states near and below the threshold of the molecular configuration in sd-shell nuclei are discussed using recent experimental data with particle-gamma coincidence method and particle-particle coincidence method. Possible quasi-molecular states have been identified in 24 Mg as well as in 28 Si and 32 S. The important role of quasi-molecular states are discussed, specifically for the shape evolution of nuclei as a function of excitation energy and angular momentum. (author)

  6. Molecular design of high performance zwitterionic liquids for enhanced heavy-oil recovery processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Magadán, J M; Cartas-Rosado, A R; Oviedo-Roa, R; Cisneros-Dévora, R; Pons-Jiménez, M; Hernández-Altamirano, R; Zamudio-Rivera, L S

    2018-03-01

    Branched gemini zwitterionic liquids, which contain two zwitterionic moieties of linked quaternary-ammonium and carboxylate groups, are proposed as chemicals to be applied in the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The zwitterionic moieties are bridged between them through an alkyl chain containing 12 ether groups, and each zwitterionic moiety has attached a long alkyl tail including a CC double bond. A theoretical molecular mechanism over which EOR could rest, consisting on both the disaggregation of heavy oil and the reservoir-rock wettability alteration, was suggested. Results show that chemicals can both reduce the viscosity and remove heavy-oil molecules from the rock surface. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Xue, J.M. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Zhang, Y., E-mail: Zhangy1@ornl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Morris, J.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhu, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gao, Y.; Wang, Y.G.; Yan, S. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Weber, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (<{approx}25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

  8. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome

  9. Selective population of high-j states via heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early hopes of heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions was to populate states not seen easily or at all by other means. To date, however, I believe it is fair to say that spectroscopic studies of previously unknown states have had, at best, limited success. Despite the early demonstration of selectivity with cluster transfer to high-lying states in light nuclei, the study of heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions has emphasized the reaction mechanism. The value of using two of these reactions for spectroscopy of high spin states is demonstrated: 143 Nd( 16 O, 15 O) 144 Nd and 170 Er( 16 O, 15 Oγ) 171 Er

  10. Current state of molecular imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, J.; Wunder, A.

    2005-01-01

    The recent years have seen significant advances in both molecular biology, allowing the identification of genes and pathways related to disease, and imaging technologies that allow for improved spatial and temporal resolution, enhanced sensitivity, better depth penetration, improved image processing, and beneficial combinations of different imaging modalities. These advances have led to a paradigm shift in the scope of diagnostic imaging. The traditional role of radiological diagnostic imaging is to define gross anatomy and structure in order to detect pathological abnormalities. Available contrast agents are mostly non-specific and can be used to image physiological processes such as changes in blood volume, flow, and perfusion but not to demonstrate pathological alterations at molecular levels. However, alterations at the anatomical-morphological level are relatively late manifestations of underlying molecular changes. Using molecular probes or markers that bind specifically to molecular targets allows for the non-invasive visualization and quantitation of biological processes such as gene expression, apoptosis, or angiogenesis at the molecular level within intact living organisms. This rapidly evolving, multidisciplinary approach, referred to as molecular imaging, promises to enable early diagnosis, can provide improved classification of stage and severity of disease, an objective assessment of treatment efficacy, and a reliable prognosis. Furthermore, molecular imaging is an important tool for the evaluation of physiological and pathophysiological processes, and for the development of new therapies. This article comprises a review of current technologies of molecular imaging, describes the development of contrast agents and various imaging modalities, new applications in specific disease models, and potential future developments. (orig.)

  11. Efimov States of Heavy Impurities in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of two heavy impurity particles embedded in a gas of weakly-interacting light mass bosonic particles in the condensed state. Using the Bogoliubov approach to describe the bosonic gas and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the three-body dynamics, we calculate the modif......We consider the problem of two heavy impurity particles embedded in a gas of weakly-interacting light mass bosonic particles in the condensed state. Using the Bogoliubov approach to describe the bosonic gas and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the three-body dynamics, we calculate...... the modification to the heavy-heavy two-body potential due to the presence of the condensate. For the case of resonant interaction between the light bosons and the impurities, we present (semi)-analytical results for the potential in the limit of a large condensate coherence length. In particular, we find...

  12. Ground-state triply and doubly heavy baryons in a relativistic three-quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectra of the ground-state baryons consisting of three or two heavy (b or c) and one light (u,d,s) quarks are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model and the hyperspherical expansion. The predictions of masses of the triply and doubly heavy baryons are obtained by employing the perturbation theory for the spin-independent and spin-dependent parts of the three-quark Hamiltonian

  13. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  14. Investigation of the intermediate LK molecular orbital radiation in heavy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, W.; Kaun, K.-H.; Manfrass, P.

    1981-01-01

    The continuum consisting of an intensive low-energy and a high-energy components in heavy-ion atom collision systems with atomic numbers Z 1 , Z 2 > 28 is studied. The aim of the study is to prove that the C1 continuum cannot be caused by ridiative electron capture (REC) being molecular orbital (MO) radiation to the 2ptau level. It is shown that the comparison of the C1 yields obtained in Kr+Nb asymmetric collisions in gas and solid targets is associated with the formation of vacancies in the lower-Z collision partner and can be interpreted as quasimolecular radiation to the 2ptau orbital level. The strong suppression of the C2 component in the gas target experimets indicates that the MO radiation to the 1stau orbit is emitted preferentially in the two-collision process in symmetric and near-symmetric systems with Z 1 , Z 2 [ru

  15. The structure of quasi-molecular KX-ray spectra from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaun, K.-N.; Frank, W.; Manfrass, P.

    1976-01-01

    In the experiments with Ge, Nb, Kr and La ions continuum X-ray spectra having a two-component structure have been observed. Both components atr interpreted as quasi-molecular X-radiation caused by transitions to the 2psigma and 1ssigma states in the quasimolecule

  16. High charge state heavy ion production from a PIG source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bex, L.; Clark, D.J.; Ellsworth, C.E.; Flood, W.S.; Gough, R.A.; Holley, W.R.; Meriwether, J.R.; Morris, D.

    1975-03-01

    The comparison of pulsed vs. dc arc operation for nitrogen and argon shows a shift in charge distribution toward the higher charge states for the pulsed case. Tests with various magnetic field shapes along the arc column show a significant increase in high charge state output for a uniform field compared to the case with a field low at the cathodes. (U.S.)

  17. From electrochemical biosensors to biomimetic sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers in environmental determination of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malitesta, Cosimino; Di Masi, Sabrina; Mazzotta, Elisabetta

    2017-07-01

    Recent work relevant to heavy metal determination by inhibition-enzyme electrochemical biosensors and by selected biomimetic sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers has been reviewed. General features and peculiar aspects have been evidenced. The replace of biological component by artificial receptors promises higher selectivity and stability, while biosensors keep their capability of producing an integrated response directly related to toxicity of the samples.

  18. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of opportunities for exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. Here we will first give a brief overview of the large variety of experimental approaches to excited state phenomena made possible by REMPI. Then we will examine in more detail, recent studies of the three photon resonant, four photon (3 + 1) ionization of H 2 via the C 'PI/sup u/ state. Strong non-Franck-Condon behavior in the photoelectron spectra of this nominally simple Rydberg state has led to the examination of a variety of dynamical mechanisms. Of these, the role of doubly excited autoionizing states now seems decisive. Progress on photoelectron studies of autoionizing states in H 2 , excited in a (2 + 1) REMPI process via the E, F 1 Σ/sub g/ + will also be briefly discussed. 26 refs., 7 figs

  19. Excited state dynamics & optical control of molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Ted; Sension, Roseanne

    2014-03-01

    Chiral overcrowded alkenes are likely candidates for light driven rotary molecular motors. At their core, these molecular motors are based on the chromophore stilbene, undergoing ultrafast cis/trans photoisomerization about their central double bond. Unlike stilbene, the photochemistry of molecular motors proceeds in one direction only. This unidirectional rotation is a result of helicity in the molecule induced by steric hindrance. However, the steric hindrance which ensures unidirectional excited state rotation, has the unfortunate consequence of producing large ground state barriers which dramatically decrease the overall rate of rotation. These molecular scale ultrafast motors have only recently been studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. Our lab has studied the photochemistry and photophysics of a ``first generation'' molecular motor with UV-visible transient absorption spectroscopy. We hope to use optical pulse shaping to enhance the efficiency and turnover rate of these molecular motors.

  20. Heavy-to-light form factors for non-relativistic bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, G.; Feldmann, Th.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate transition form factors between non-relativistic QCD bound states at large recoil energy. Assuming the decaying quark to be much heavier than its decay product, the relativistic dynamics can be treated according to the factorization formula for heavy-to-light form factors obtained from the heavy-quark expansion in QCD. The non-relativistic expansion determines the bound-state wave functions to be Coulomb-like. As a consequence, one can explicitly calculate the so-called 'soft-overlap' contribution to the transition form factor

  1. Charge state distributions for heavy ions in carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, M.A.; Lebed, R.F.; Feinberg, B.

    1989-03-01

    We have extended the database of measured charge state distributions available in the literature through measurements at the SuperHILAC using carbon stripper foils in the energy range 1.2--8.5 MeV/u. Modifying a semi-empirical model to include the effect of electronic shells, we are able to correctly predict the mean charge state to within 1/2 a charge state for 6≤Z≤92 and energies from 30 keV/u to 16 MeV/u. We have determined parameters for the widths of the distributions for each electronic shell. For distributions lying across a shell boundary, we join the two Gaussians of different widths to get an asymmetric distribution. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. An eco-friendly approach for heavy metal adsorbent regeneration using CO2-responsive molecular octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Liang, Yen Nan; Hu, Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Perennial problems of adsorption in wastewater treatment include adsorbent recycling, generation of waste sludge and secondary pollution because harmful concentrated acids, bases or strong chelators are often used for adsorbent regeneration and adsorbate recovery. We report, for the first time, an eco-friendly regeneration concept demonstrated with a CO 2 -responsive octopus-like polymeric adsorbent. Various heavy metals can be scavenged at very high Q e by such adsorbent through coordination. Most importantly, the rapid and complete regeneration of the adsorbent and recovery of the heavy metal ions can be readily achieved by CO 2 bubbling within a few minutes under mild conditions, i.e., room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The adsorbent can then be restored to its adsorptive state and reused upon removal of CO 2 by simply bubbling another gas. This eco-friendly, effective, ultra-fast and repeatable CO 2 -triggered regeneration process using CO 2 -responsive adsorbent with versatile structure, morphology or form can be incorporated into a sustainable closed-loop wastewater treatment process to solve the perennial problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Control of triplet state generation in heavy atom-free BODIPY-anthracene dyads by media polarity and structural factors

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.; Karuthedath, Safakath; Polestshuk, Pavel M; Callaghan, Susan; Flanagan, Keith; Telitchko, Maxime; Wiesner, Thomas; Laquai, Fré dé ric; Senge, Mathias O

    2018-01-01

    A family of heavy atom-free BODIPY-anthracene dyads (BADs) exhibiting triplet excited state formation from charge-transfer states is reported. Four types of BODIPY scaffolds, different in the alkyl substitution pattern, and four anthracene derivatives have been used to access BADs. The fluorescence and intersystem crossing (ISC) in these dyads depend on donor-acceptor couplings and can be accurately controlled by the substitution or media polarity. Under conditions that do not allow charge transfer (CT), the dyads exhibit fluorescence with high quantum yields. Formation of charge-transfer states triggers ISC and the formation of long-lived triplet excited states in the dyads. The excited state properties were studied by steady-state techniques and ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to determine the parameters of the observed processes. Structural information for various BADs was derived from single crystal X-ray structure determinations alongside DFT molecular geometry optimization, revealing the effects of mutual orientation of subunits on the photophysical properties. The calculations showed that alkyl substituents on the BODIPY destabilize CT states in the dyads, thus controlling the charge transfer between the subunits. The effect of the dyad structure on the ISC efficiency was considered at M06-2X level of theory and a correlation between mutual orientation of the subunits and the energy gap between singlet and triplet CT states was studied using multireference CASSCF method.

  4. Control of triplet state generation in heavy atom-free BODIPY-anthracene dyads by media polarity and structural factors

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.

    2018-02-12

    A family of heavy atom-free BODIPY-anthracene dyads (BADs) exhibiting triplet excited state formation from charge-transfer states is reported. Four types of BODIPY scaffolds, different in the alkyl substitution pattern, and four anthracene derivatives have been used to access BADs. The fluorescence and intersystem crossing (ISC) in these dyads depend on donor-acceptor couplings and can be accurately controlled by the substitution or media polarity. Under conditions that do not allow charge transfer (CT), the dyads exhibit fluorescence with high quantum yields. Formation of charge-transfer states triggers ISC and the formation of long-lived triplet excited states in the dyads. The excited state properties were studied by steady-state techniques and ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to determine the parameters of the observed processes. Structural information for various BADs was derived from single crystal X-ray structure determinations alongside DFT molecular geometry optimization, revealing the effects of mutual orientation of subunits on the photophysical properties. The calculations showed that alkyl substituents on the BODIPY destabilize CT states in the dyads, thus controlling the charge transfer between the subunits. The effect of the dyad structure on the ISC efficiency was considered at M06-2X level of theory and a correlation between mutual orientation of the subunits and the energy gap between singlet and triplet CT states was studied using multireference CASSCF method.

  5. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Stefano; Gebauer, Ralph; Bariş Malcioğlu, O.; Saad, Yousef; Umari, Paolo; Xian, Jiawei

    2010-02-01

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  6. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, Stefano; Baris Malcioglu, O; Xian Jiawei [SISSA-Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); Gebauer, Ralph; Umari, Paolo [CNR DEMOCRITOS Theory-Elettra Group, c/o Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Saad, Yousef [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-02-24

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  7. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Stefano; Gebauer, Ralph; Bariş Malcioğlu, O; Saad, Yousef; Umari, Paolo; Xian, Jiawei

    2010-02-24

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  8. Harnessing molecular excited states with Lanczos chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroni, Stefano; Baris Malcioglu, O; Xian Jiawei; Gebauer, Ralph; Umari, Paolo; Saad, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    The recursion method of Haydock, Heine and Kelly is a powerful tool for calculating diagonal matrix elements of the resolvent of quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian operators by elegantly expressing them in terms of continued fractions. In this paper we extend the recursion method to off-diagonal matrix elements of general (possibly non-Hermitian) operators and apply it to the simulation of molecular optical absorption and photoemission spectra within time-dependent density-functional and many-body perturbation theories, respectively. This method is demonstrated with a couple of applications to the optical absorption and photoemission spectra of the caffeine molecule.

  9. 3D glasma initial state for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenke, Björn; Schlichting, Sören

    2016-01-01

    We extend the impact-parameter-dependent Glasma model to three dimensions using explicit small-x evolution of the two incoming nuclear gluon distributions. We compute rapidity distributions of produced gluons and the early-time energy momentum tensor as a function of space-time rapidity and transverse coordinates. Finally, we study rapidity correlations and fluctuations of the initial geometry and multiplicity distributions and make comparisons to existing models for the three-dimensional initial state.

  10. Ground states for light and heavy quark hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J T [Physics Dept., Philippines Univ., Manila (Philippines)

    1994-01-01

    According to de Rujula et al. if the degenerate multiplet masses are known then it is not necessary to parametrize the interactions. With degenerate multiplet masses calculated from the spinorial decomposition of the SU(2)xSU(2) part of the SU(6)xSU(6) symmetry, the ground states for 3, 4 and 5 quark hadrons are calculated in terms of the Cartan matrix integers n[sub [alpha

  11. Heavy atoms as molecular probes in studying the solvent dependence of the dynamics of triplet exciplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, U.; Winter, G.

    1981-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions between thiopyronine triplet (acceptor 3 A + ) and the electron donors (D), aniline, p-Br-aniline and p-I-aniline, are investigated by flash spectroscopy in solvents of different viscosity and polarity. Due to the heavy-atom effect the radical yield becomes very sensitive to the solvent influence, which can be explained by the dynamic properties of a triplet exciplex ( 3 (AD + )) formed as a primary product in the reaction between acceptor triplet and donor. Whereas on variation of solvent viscosity the solvent cage effect on the dissociation of 3 (AD + ) is observed, a change in solvent polarity is suggested to affect the radiationless deactivation of 3 (AD + ) to the ground state of the components. (author)

  12. Heavy metals balance in Polish and Dutch agronomy : Actual state and previsions for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dach, J.; Starmans, D.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the state of agro-ecosystem contamination with heavy metals in relation to the level of agricultural development. For this, the Polish and Dutch agricultural situations were compared. The intensive animal and vegetable production observed in the Netherlands over the past 20-30

  13. How decays and final-state interactions affect velocity correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieand, K.L.; Pratt, S.E.; Balantekin, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    We study rapidity correlations by calculating two-particle correlation functions and fractorial moments for a simple thermal model of ultrarelativistic-heavy-ion collisions. In this model correlations arise from decays of unstable hadrons and the final-state interactions of the measured particles. These correlations are shown to be similar but smaller than correlations due to phase separation. (orig.)

  14. Spectral flow of trimer states of two heavy impurities and one light condensed boson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The spectral flow of three-body (trimer) states consisting of two heavy (impurity) particles sitting in a condensate of light bosons is considered. Assuming that the condensate is weakly interaction and that an impurity and a boson have a zero-range two-body interaction, we use the Born...

  15. Moment ratios for heavy QQ- - states and their dependence on the quarkmass definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertlmann, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    When analyzing heavy qq - states with help of exponential moments we argue that a ratio of moments should be expanded rather than the moments themselves. Within a nonrelativistic approximation we show that the expanded ratio is totally independent on the quark mass definition, whereas the nonexpanded ratio of moments strongly depends on it. (Author)

  16. Molecular excited states from the SCAN functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, David J.; Peach, Michael J. G.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalised gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional is investigated for the calculation of time-dependent density-functional theory molecular excitation energies of local, charge-transfer and Rydberg character, together with the excited ? potential energy curve in H2. The SCAN results frequently resemble those obtained using a global hybrid functional, with either a standard or increased fraction of exact orbital exchange. For local excitations, SCAN can exhibit significant triplet instability problems, resulting in imaginary triplet excitation energies for a number of cases. The Tamm-Dancoff approximation offers a simple approach to improve the situation, but the excitation energies are still significantly underestimated. Understanding the origin of these (near)-triplet instabilities may provide useful insight into future functional development.

  17. Search for heavy resonances in diboson final states at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    With Run 2 of the LHC in full swing, and very successful data collection at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the large dataset collected so far provides a significantly improved sensitivity for discovery of new physics with respect to Run 1. Searches for new resonances in di-boson final states (HH, VH, VV, where V = W, Z) with the CMS detector are presented, including new results. The analyses are optimised for high sensitivity over a large range in resonance mass and consider different spin hypotheses. The performance of jet substructure techniques which are used to identify hadronic decays of highly-boosted W, Z, and H are also discussed.

  18. Electrical Control of Metallic Heavy-Metal-Ferromagnet Interfacial States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chong; Sun, Congli; Xu, Meng; Newhouse-Illige, Ty; Voyles, Paul M.; Wang, Weigang

    2017-09-01

    Voltage-control effects provide an energy-efficient means of tailoring material properties, especially in highly integrated nanoscale devices. However, only insulating and semiconducting systems can be controlled so far. In metallic systems, there is no electric field due to electron screening effects and thus no such control effect exists. Here, we demonstrate that metallic systems can also be controlled electrically through ionic rather than electronic effects. In a Pt /Co structure, the control of the metallic Pt /Co interface can lead to unprecedented control effects on the magnetic properties of the entire structure. Consequently, the magnetization and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the Co layer can be independently manipulated to any desired state, the efficient spin toques can be enhanced about 3.5 times, and the switching current can be reduced about one order of magnitude. This ability to control a metallic system may be extended to control other physical phenomena.

  19. Two-body molecular model for resonances in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.

    1978-01-01

    It is necessary to develop qualitative arguments on resonance mechanisms, which will give an overview on occurrences of resonances in heavy ion reactions, and further to identify typical examples of nuclear molecules among existing experimental data. In section 2, qualitative arguments on resonance mechanisms are given by exemplifying the 12 C + 16 O system with the 3 - excitation of the 16 O nucleus. In section 3 a simple formulation in the coupled channel framework is given. Resonances in the 12 C - 16 O system, which has been observed well above the Coulomb barrier, are investigated in section 4. In section 5 an old, but not yet solved problem on resonances in the 12 C + 12 C system which have been observed at sub-Coulomb energies, is taken up along the nuclear molecular picture. Further discussions are given on a role of the 20 Ne-α channel along the present simple qualitative picture given in section 2, which can be extended to rearrangement channels. (Auth.)

  20. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarei, Mehdi; Hempel, Stefan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Schaefer, Tina; Savaghebi, Gholamreza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Buscot, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions. - The molecular diversity of AMF was found to be influenced by a combination of soil heavy metal and other soil chemical parameters.

  1. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarei, Mehdi [Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture, University of Shiraz, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hempel, Stefan, E-mail: hempel.stefan@googlemail.co [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Biologie, Okologie der Pflanzen, Altensteinstrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wubet, Tesfaye; Schaefer, Tina [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Savaghebi, Gholamreza [Department of Soil Science Engineering, University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII), P.O. Box 31535-1897, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Buscot, Francois [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions. - The molecular diversity of AMF was found to be influenced by a combination of soil heavy metal and other soil chemical parameters.

  2. Excited State Contributions to the Heavy Baryon Fragmentation Functions in a Quark-Diquark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Adamov, A D; Goldstein, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Spin dependent fragmentation functions for heavy flavor quarks to fragment into heavy baryons are calculated in a quark-diquark model. The production of intermediate spin 1/2 and 3/2 excited states is explicity included. The resulting $\\Lambda_b$ production rate and polarization at LEP energies are in agreement with experiment. The $\\Lambda_c$ and $\\Xi_c$ functions are also obtained. The spin independent $f_1(z)$ is compared to data. The integrated values for production rates agree with the data.

  3. Harwell's atomic, molecular and solid state computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, A.H.

    1976-02-01

    This document is intended to introduce the computational facilities available in the fields of atomic, molecular the solid state theory on the IBM370/165 at Harwell. The programs have all been implemented and thoroughly tested by the Theory of Solid State Materials Group. (author)

  4. Electronic structure of molecular Rydberg states of some small molecules and molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Biao; Li Jiaming

    1993-01-01

    Based on an independent-particle-approximation (i.e. the multiple scattering self-consistent-field theory), the electronic structures of Rydberg states of the small diatomic molecules H 2 , He 2 and the He 2 + molecular ion were studied. The principal quantum number of the first state of the Rydberg series is determined from a convention of the limit of the molecular electronic configuration. The dynamics of the excited molecules and molecular ion has been elucidated. The theoretical results are in fair agreement with the existing experimental measurements, thus they can serve as a reliable basis for future refined treatment such as the configuration interaction calculation

  5. Low chromatic aberration hexapole for molecular state selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Yi; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-01-01

    In molecular beam state-selection experiments, the electrostatic hexapole acts as an optical lens, imaging molecules from the source to the focus. The molecular longitudinal velocity spread induces the phenomenon of chromatic aberration, which will reduce the state-selection purity. We propose a scheme which can effectively reduce the chromatic aberration by changing the hexapole voltage operating manner. The hexapole is already charged before molecules arrive at the entrance of the hexapole. When molecules are completely inside the hexapole, the voltage is switched off rapidly at an appropriate time. In this manner, faster molecules travel a longer hexapole focusing region than slower molecules. Therefore the focusing positions of molecules with different velocities become close. Numerical trajectory simulations of molecular state selection are carried out, and the results show that this low chromatic aberration hexapole can significantly improve the state purity from 46.2% to 87.0%. (paper)

  6. Nuclear molecular halo: the ubiquitous occurrence of van der Waals molecular states near threshold in molecular, nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Moshe

    1999-01-01

    The observation of large E1 strength near threshold in the electromagnetic dissociation of 11 Li poses a fundamental question: Is the large E1 strength due to the threshold or is it due to a low lying E1 state? Such molecular cluster states were observed in 18 O and in several nuclei near the drip line. We discuss the nature of the threshold effect as well as review the situation in Molecular (and Particle Physics) where such Molecular States are observed near the dissociation limit. We suggest that the situation in 11 Li is reminiscent of the argon-benzene molecule where the argon atom is loosely bound by a polarization (van der Waals) mechanism and thus leads to a very extended object lying near the dissociation limit. Such states are also suggested to dominate the structure of mesons [α 0 (980), f 0 (975)] and baryons [λ(1405)] with proposed Kaon molecular structure (Dalitz) near threshold. The inspection of such states throughout Physics allows us to gain insight into this phenomenon and suggest that a new collective Molecular Dipole Degree of Freedom plays a major role in the structure of hadrons (halo nuclei, mesons and baryons), and that quantitative tools such as the E1 Molecular Sum Rule are useful for elucidating the nature of the observed low lying E1 strength in halo nuclei. (author)

  7. Population and particle decay of isobaric analog states in medium heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.

    1980-05-01

    The systematic features of proton stripping and neutron pick-up reactions to Isobaric Analog States in medium heavy nuclei are presented. The ( 3 He,d) reaction investigated at high incident energy is shown to selectively excite high-spin particle-analog states. Similarly the ( 3 He,α) reaction populates hole-analog states. The recent results related to such highly excited states in a wide range of nuclei ( 48 Ca to 208 Pb) are discussed in the framework of the DWBA theory of direct reactions with special emphasis on the treatment of unbound proton states or deeply-bound neutron hole states. The particle decay of Isobaric Analog States are investigated using the ( 3 He,d p) and ( 3 He, α p) sequential processes. The experimental method developed at Orsay (0 0 detection) for particle-particle angular correlations is presented. The advantage and the limits of such approach are illustrated by typical examples of particle decays: core-excited states, neutron particle-hole multiplets and the first observation of the proton emission of hole-analog levels. In conclusion new experimental approaches such as asymmetry measurements for analog states observed in transfer reactions or possible population of double analog states in heavy nuclei are discussed

  8. From Electrochemical Biosensors to Biomimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers in Environmental Determination of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimino Malitesta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent work relevant to heavy metal determination by inhibition-enzyme electrochemical biosensors and by selected biomimetic sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers has been reviewed. General features and peculiar aspects have been evidenced. The replace of biological component by artificial receptors promises higher selectivity and stability, while biosensors keep their capability of producing an integrated response directly related to biological toxicity of the samples.

  9. Interfacial trap states in junctions of molecular semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlettwein, D.; Oekermann, T.; Jaeger, N.; Armstrong, N.R.; Woehrle, D.

    2002-01-01

    Interfacial states that were established in contacts of molecular semiconductors with aqueous electrolytes or in contacts with another organic semiconductor as a solid film were analyzed by photoelectrochemical experiments and by photoelectron spectroscopy. A crucial role of such states was indicated in the interfacial charge transfer and recombination kinetics of light-induced charge carriers and also in the energetic alignment in the solid contacts. Unsubstituted zinc-phthalocyanine (PcZn) served as model compound. The role of chemical interactions in the establishment of these interfacial states was investigated by use of different reaction partners, i.e., different redox couples in the electrolyte contacts and molecular semiconductors of different ionization potential in the solid contacts. Implications of these results for the use of organic semiconductor thin films in devices of molecular electronics and of dye molecules in dye-sensitized solar cells were also discussed

  10. Higgsplosion: Solving the hierarchy problem via rapid decays of heavy states into multiple Higgs bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoze, Valentin V.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    We introduce and discuss two inter-related mechanisms operative in the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at high energies. Higgsplosion, the first mechanism, occurs at some critical energy in the 25 to 103 TeV range, and leads to an exponentially growing decay rate of highly energetic particles into multiple Higgs bosons. We argue that this is a well-controlled non-perturbative phenomenon in the Higgs-sector which involves the final state Higgs multiplicities n in the regime nλ ≫ 1 where λ is the Higgs self-coupling. If this mechanism is realised in nature, the cross-sections for producing ultra-high multiplicities of Higgs bosons are likely to become observable and even dominant in this energy range. At the same time, however, the apparent exponential growth of these cross-sections at even higher energies will be tamed and automatically cut-off by a related Higgspersion mechanism. As a result, and in contrast to previous studies, multi-Higgs production does not violate perturbative unitarity. Building on this approach, we then argue that the effects of Higgsplosion alter quantum corrections from very heavy states to the Higgs boson mass. Above a certain energy, which is much smaller than their masses, these states would rapidly decay into multiple Higgs bosons. The heavy states become unrealised as they decay much faster than they are formed. The loop integrals contributing to the Higgs mass will be cut off not by the masses of the heavy states, but by the characteristic loop momenta where their decay widths become comparable to their masses. Hence, the cut-off scale would be many orders of magnitude lower than the heavy mass scales themselves, thus suppressing their quantum corrections to the Higgs boson mass.

  11. A Weighty Subject: Exploration for Heavy Minerals Across the State of Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, J.; Woolsey, A. I.; Yarbrough, L. D.; Platt, B. F.; Widanagamage, I. H.; Easson, G. L.

    2017-12-01

    Preliminary analysis has shown that an array of industrial minerals is known to occur in offshore deposits on the Gulf Coast as well as on-shore deposits in the Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene-Neogene clastic units, such as the Meridian Sand Member of the Eocene Tallahatta Formation in northeastern Mississippi. Furthermore, economic deposits occur within Holocene sediments along the Pearl and Pascagoula Rivers as well as along the modern Gulf of Mexico shoreline. These industrial minerals include suites of heavy minerals (specific gravity ≥2.97) that contain oxides of titanium (ilmenite, rutile, and leucoxene), oxides of zirconium (zircon), and the complex rare-earth-bearing phosphates (monazite and xenotime). These oxides are essential constituents of a wide-range of industrial materials critical to common technologies and the bulk of these mineral commodities are presently dependent on foreign supply. Current offshore deposits have been shown to be economic but are likely no longer accessible given their location within the Gulf Islands National Seashore. This comprehensive study is developing a heavy mineral occurrence dataset for the state of Mississippi including detailed analyses of the industrial mineral resources available within the state. More than 100 samples have been collected across the state from active and non-operating sand pit mining locations. The heavy mineral fraction of each sample was separated using lithium heteropolytungstates (LST) and gravity-based separation techniques. A grain mount for each sample was prepared with the heavy mineral fraction and the percentage values for each heavy mineral species were obtained from 200 grain counts per sample grain mount. Typical heavy mineral fraction for the sample set was approximately 0.9 % with an array from 0.0% to some samples ranging to a greater concentration of 7.5%. The resulting dataset will be further analyzed for geospatial similarities in trends and occurrences. Additional data

  12. Molecular states of HeH+. Energies and dynamical couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, A.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1983-01-01

    We complete the molecular results reported in a previous paper by presenting additional energies (for /sup 1,3/μ states) and radial couplings (between 'μ states) of the HeH + system. These results are needed to treat elastic and inelastic charge-exchange processes when full account is taken of momentum-transfer problems. We also present a formalism to calculate radial couplings between wave functions computed with the use of different variational methods and basis sets. The detailed form of the radial couplings is discussed and related to the Barat-Lichten correlation diagram. The effect of using finite basis sets in calculatig degenerate molecular energies is also discussed

  13. The possible Bπ molecular state and its radiative decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Gao, Lei [Tianjin University, School of Science, Tianjin (China); Li, Xue-Qian [Nankai University, School of Physics, Tianjin (China)

    2017-05-15

    Recently, several exotic bosons have been confirmed as multi-quark states. However, there are violent disputes about their inner structures, namely if they are molecular states or tetraquarks, or even mixtures of the two structures. It would be interesting to search experimentally for non-strange four-quark states with open charm or bottom which are lighter than Λ{sub c} or Λ{sub b}. Reasonable arguments indicate that they are good candidates of pure molecular states Dπ or Bπ because pions are the lightest boson. Both Bπ and Dπ bound states do not decay via the strong interaction. The Bπ molecule may decay into B* by radiating a photon, whereas the Dπ molecule can only decay via weak interaction. In this paper we explore the mass spectra of the Bπ molecular states by solving the corresponding instantaneous B-S equation. Then the rate of radiative decay vertical stroke (3)/(2), (1)/(2) right angle → B*γ is calculated and our numerical results indicate that the processes can be measured by the future experiment. We also briefly discuss the Dπ case. Due to the constraint of the final state phase space it can only decay via weak interaction. (orig.)

  14. 1-- and 0++ heavy four-quark and molecule states in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, R.M.; Fanomezana, F.; Narison, S.; Rabemananjara, A.

    2012-01-01

    We estimate the masses of the 1 -- heavy four-quark and molecule states by combining exponential Laplace (LSR) and finite energy (FESR) sum rules known perturbatively to lowest order (LO) in α s but including non-perturbative terms up to the complete dimension-six condensate contributions. This approach allows to fix more precisely the value of the QCD continuum threshold (often taken ad hoc) at which the optimal result is extracted. We use double ratio of sum rules (DRSR) for determining the SU(3) breakings terms. We also study the effects of the heavy quark mass definitions on these LO results. The SU(3) mass-splittings of about (50-110) MeV and the ones of about (250-300) MeV between the lowest ground states and their 1st radial excitations are (almost) heavy-flavor independent. The mass predictions summarized in Table 4 are compared with the ones in the literature (when available) and with the three Y c (4260,4360,4660) and Y b (10890)1 -- experimental candidates. We conclude (to this order approximation) that the lowest observed state cannot be a pure1 -- four-quark nor a pure molecule but may result from their mixings. We extend the above analyzes to the 0 ++ four-quark and molecule states which are about (0.5-1) GeV heavier than the corresponding 1 -- states, while the splittings between the 0 ++ lowest ground state and the 1st radial excitation is about (300-500) MeV. We complete the analysis by estimating the decay constants of the 1 -- and 0 ++ four-quark states which are tiny and which exhibit a 1/M Q behavior. Our predictions can be further tested using some alternative non-perturbative approaches or/and at LHC b and some other hadron factories.

  15. 1{sup --} and 0{sup ++} heavy four-quark and molecule states in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, R.M., E-mail: rma@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratoire Particules et Univers de Montpellier, CNRS-IN2P3, Case 070, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France); Fanomezana, F., E-mail: fanfenos@yahoo.fr [Institute of High-Energy Physics of Madagascar (iHEP-MAD), University of Antananarivo (Madagascar); Narison, S., E-mail: snarison@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire Particules et Univers de Montpellier, CNRS-IN2P3, Case 070, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France); Rabemananjara, A., E-mail: achris_01@yahoo.fr [Institute of High-Energy Physics of Madagascar (iHEP-MAD), University of Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2012-08-29

    We estimate the masses of the 1{sup --} heavy four-quark and molecule states by combining exponential Laplace (LSR) and finite energy (FESR) sum rules known perturbatively to lowest order (LO) in {alpha}{sub s} but including non-perturbative terms up to the complete dimension-six condensate contributions. This approach allows to fix more precisely the value of the QCD continuum threshold (often taken ad hoc) at which the optimal result is extracted. We use double ratio of sum rules (DRSR) for determining the SU(3) breakings terms. We also study the effects of the heavy quark mass definitions on these LO results. The SU(3) mass-splittings of about (50-110) MeV and the ones of about (250-300) MeV between the lowest ground states and their 1st radial excitations are (almost) heavy-flavor independent. The mass predictions summarized in Table 4 are compared with the ones in the literature (when available) and with the three Y{sub c}(4260,4360,4660) and Y{sub b}(10890)1{sup --} experimental candidates. We conclude (to this order approximation) that the lowest observed state cannot be a pure1{sup --} four-quark nor a pure molecule but may result from their mixings. We extend the above analyzes to the 0{sup ++} four-quark and molecule states which are about (0.5-1) GeV heavier than the corresponding 1{sup --} states, while the splittings between the 0{sup ++} lowest ground state and the 1st radial excitation is about (300-500) MeV. We complete the analysis by estimating the decay constants of the 1{sup --} and 0{sup ++} four-quark states which are tiny and which exhibit a 1/M{sub Q} behavior. Our predictions can be further tested using some alternative non-perturbative approaches or/and at LHC{sub b} and some other hadron factories.

  16. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  17. Covalently bound molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram von, Oertzen; Hans-Gerhard, Bohlen; Wolfram von, Oertzen

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear clustering in N=Z nuclei has been studied since many decades. States close to the decay thresholds, as described by the Ikeda diagram, are of particular interest. Recent studies in loosely bound systems, as observed with neutron-rich nuclei has revived the interest in cluster structures in nuclei, with additional valence neutrons, which give rise to pronounced covalent molecular structures. The Beryllium isotopes represent the first example of such unique states in nuclear physics with extreme deformations. In the deformed shell model these are referred to as super- and hyper-deformation. These states can be described explicitly by molecular concepts, with neutrons in covalent binding orbits. Examples of recent experiments performed at the HMI-Berlin demonstrating the molecular structure of the rotational bands in Beryllium isotopes are presented. Further work on chain states (nuclear polymers) in the carbon isotopes is in progress, these are the first examples of deformed structures in nuclei with an axis ratio of 3:1. A threshold diagram with clusters bound via neutrons in covalent molecular configurations can be established, which can serve as a guideline for future work. (authors)

  18. Closing the Wedge: Search Strategies for Extended Higgs Sectors with Heavy Flavor Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, Stefania; Shah, Nausheen R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-01-01

    We consider search strategies for an extended Higgs sector at the high-luminosity LHC14 utilizing multi-top final states. In the framework of a Two Higgs Doublet Model, the purely top final states ($t\\bar t, \\, 4t$) are important channels for heavy Higgs bosons with masses in the wedge above $2\\,m_t$ and at low values of $\\tan\\beta$, while a $2 b 2t$ final state is most relevant at moderate values of $\\tan \\beta$. We find, in the $t\\bar t H$ channel, with $H \\rightarrow t \\bar t$, that both single and 3 lepton final states can provide statistically significant constraints at low values of $\\tan \\beta$ for $m_A$ as high as $\\sim 750$ GeV. When systematics on the $t \\bar t$ background are taken into account, however, the 3 lepton final state is more powerful, though the precise constraint depends fairly sensitively on lepton fake rates. We also find that neither $2b2t$ nor $t \\bar t$ final states provide constraints on additional heavy Higgs bosons with couplings to tops smaller than the top Yukawa due to expec...

  19. Impact of different moderator ratios with light and heavy water cooled reactors in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As an issue of sustainable development in the world, energy sustainability using nuclear energy may be possible using several different ways such as increasing breeding capability of the reactors and optimizing the fuel utilization using spent fuel after reprocessing as well as exploring additional nuclear resources from sea water. In this present study the characteristics of light and heavy water cooled reactors for different moderator ratios in equilibrium states have been investigated. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is varied from 0.1 to 4.0. Four fuel cycle schemes are evaluated in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal (HM) recycling. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of SRAC 2000 code using nuclear data library from the JENDL 3.2. The results show a thermal spectrum peak appears for light water coolant and no thermal peak for heavy water coolant along the MFR (0.1 ≤ MFR ≤ 4.0). The plutonium quality can be reduced effectively by increasing the MFR and number of recycled HM. Considering the effect of increasing number of recycled HM; it is also effective to reduce the uranium utilization and to increase the conversion ratio. trans-Plutonium production such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm) productions are smaller for heavy water coolant than light water coolant. The light water coolant shows the feasibility of breeding when HM is recycled with reducing the MFR. Wider feasible area of breeding has been obtained when light water coolant is replaced by heavy water coolant

  20. Polar Kerr effect studies of time reversal symmetry breaking states in heavy fermion superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemm, E.R., E-mail: eschemm@alumni.stanford.edu [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Levenson-Falk, E.M. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kapitulnik, A. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute of Energy and Materials Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Polar Kerr effect (PKE) probes broken time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in superconductors. • Absence of PKE below Tc in CeCoIn{sub 5} is consistent with dx2-y2 order parameter symmetry. • PKE in the B phase of the multiphase superconductor UPt3 agrees with an E2u model. • Data on URu2Si2 show broken TRS and additional structure in the superconducting state. - Abstract: The connection between chiral superconductivity and topological order has emerged as an active direction in research as more instances of both have been identified in condensed matter systems. With the notable exception of {sup 3}He-B, all of the known or suspected chiral – that is to say time-reversal symmetry-breaking (TRSB) – superfluids arise in heavy fermion superconductors, although the vast majority of heavy fermion superconductors preserve time-reversal symmetry. Here we review recent experimental efforts to identify TRSB states in heavy fermion systems via measurement of polar Kerr effect, which is a direct consequence of TRSB.

  1. Polaronic and dressed molecular states in orbital Feshbach resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junjun; Qi, Ran

    2018-04-01

    We consider the impurity problem in an orbital Feshbach resonance (OFR), with a single excited clock state | e ↑⟩ atom immersed in a Fermi sea of electronic ground state | g ↓⟩. We calculate the polaron effective mass and quasi-particle residue, as well as the polaron to molecule transition. By including one particle-hole excitation in the molecular state, we find significant correction to the transition point. This transition point moves toward the BCS side for increasing particle densities, which suggests that the corresponding many-body physics is similar to a narrow resonance.

  2. Standards for the contents of heavy metals in soils of some states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.N. Vodyanitskii

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In line with the present-day ecological and toxicological data obtained by Dutch ecologists, heavy metals/metalloids form the following succession according to their hazard degree in soils: Se > Tl > Sb > Cd > V > Hg > Ni > Cu > Cr > As > Ba. This sequence substantially differs from the succession of heavy elements presented in the general toxicological Russian GOST (State Norms and Standards, which considers As, Cd, Hg, Se, Pb, and Zn to be strongly hazardous elements, whereas Co, Ni, Mo, Sb, and Cr to be moderately hazardous. As compared to the Dutch general toxicological approach, the hazard of lead, zinc, and cobalt is lower in soils, and that of vanadium, antimony, and barium is higher in Russia. MPC must been adopted for strongly hazardous thallium, selenium, and vanadium in Russia.

  3. The average equilibrium charge-states of heavy ions with Z > 60 stripped in He and H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganessian, Yu.T.; Lobanov, Yu.V.; Popeko, A.G.; Abdullin, F.Sh.; Kharitonov, Yu.P.; Ledovskoy, A.A.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium charges of heavy ions (61 < Z < 101) with energies from 5 to 100 MeV stripped in He and H2 have been measured. New empirical formulae for the average charge state are presented. (orig.)

  4. Charge states of fast heavy ions in solids; target atomic number dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shima, Kunihiro

    1985-01-01

    Discussions were carried out on the origin of Z 2 (atomic number) dependent charge states with respect to projectile electron loss and capture process, and on relationship between the Z 2 dependence and that of mean charge states for heavy ions of 1 MeV/u energy region. Present and previously reported results were examined on the equilibrium charge distributions, 9-bar, of 120 MeV 63 Cu, 25 and 40 MeV 35 Cl, 109 MeV Si and 59 MeV F ions. It was clarified that 9-bar became generally higher for lower Z 2 depending on increasing energy, and osillatory behavior with energy-depending amplitude was seen in 9-bar vs Z 2 . Discussions were carrid out on these phenomena and related matters. Z 2 oscillations of 9-bar of fast heavy ions might be due to those of electron capture cross section into projectile K and L vacancies for high and intermediate charge states, respectively. A quantitative interpretation of the Z 2 -dependent 9-bar values is in progress based on collision process and observation of projectile x-ray. The 9-bar value dependency on Z 2 in ion passing foils and decrease of Z 2 oscillation amplitude with increasing collision energy were quite similar to the Z 2 dependence in stopping powers or in effective charge states estimated from stopping powers. But there was some discrepancies in the Z 2 oscillation of 9-bar and that of stopping powers. (Takagi, S.)

  5. Properties of the Excited States of Molecular Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-13

    FIg. 1). techniques have beest applied to the study of quartet states of Oi. The four potential curves most relevant Guyon et al., using a synchrotron...8217 a’ a a C ’U ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2 2,~ C a ’I C~- C ’ 𔃺 𔃺 𔃺 ’ ’ C- ~ C-E-38- ’- u A() A09a 265 SRI INTERNATIONAL 14FNLO PARK CA MOLECULAR PHYSICS LAB F

  6. Monetary Valuation of Health Risks of Heavy Metals: State-of-the-art and some gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ščasný M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Health Impact Assessment (HIA is a fundamental part of modern decision-making process, in particular policies that affect releases, exposures or doses of pollutants including heavy metals. Traditionally, HIA focus is on risk assessment and securing safe levels of pollution exposure or dose. Only recently HIA has extended its focus to include evaluation of health effects in monetary terms that allows for a comprehensive Cost-Benefit Analysis, a widely used quantitative decision support tool to assess desirability of policies and projects based on economic rationale. The aim of this contribution is to review the state-of-the-art in valuation of health impacts related to heavy metals and discuss some gaps faced here. We start by introducing concept of risk in valuation literature, related mortality denominator, Value of Statistical Life (VSL and difficulties in deriving values for chronic health conditions. We then overview valuation of various health outcomes in five broad impact categories – carcinogenicity, dose toxicity, sensitization, effects on fertility and developmental toxicity and discuss difficulties in translating risk assessment and toxicological research findings of human health effects of heavy metal exposure/dose to changes in welfare in such a way that is comprehensible for general population. We briefly examine and discuss numerous issues and gaps in establishing such links between exposure and welfare impacts in the context of a study commissioned by European Chemicals Agency. The study’s goal is to deliver EU-wide values of willingness to pay for avoiding adverse health outcomes due to exposure to chemicals. We emphasize the necessity of such discussion among experts from different areas for the results to be useful for decision-making related to regulation of (not only heavy metals releases to the environment.

  7. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the density matrix functional introduced by Lieb, Solovej, and Yngvason for the investigation of heavy atoms in high magnetic fields. This functional describes exactly the quantum mechanical ground state of atoms and ions in the limit when the nuclear charge Z...... and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...... by other methods. For iron at B=1012 G the ground-state energy differs by less than 2% from the Hartree-Fock value. We have also studied the maximal negative ionization of heavy atoms in this model at various field strengths. In contrast to Thomas-Fermi type theories atoms can bind excess negative charge...

  8. Effects of final-state interaction and screening on strange and heavy quark production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chatterjee, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India)

    1996-10-01

    Final-state interaction and screening have a great influence on {ital q{anti q}} production cross sections, which are important quantities in many problems in quark-gluon plasma physics. They lead to an enhancement of the cross section for a {ital q{anti q}} color-singlet state and a suppression for a color-octet state. The effects are large near the production threshold. The presence of screening gives rise to resonances for {ital q{anti q}} production just above the threshold at specific plasma temperatures. These resonances, especially {ital c{anti c}} and {ital b{anti b}} resonances, may be utilized to search for the quark-gluon plasma by studying the temperature dependence of heavy-quark pair production just above the threshold.

  9. Particle hole excitations coupled to complex states in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolos, R.V.; Schmidt, R.

    1982-01-01

    The excitation of uncorrelated 1p-1h states in one nucleus due to the action of the time-dependent mean field of the other nucleus was studied earlier. No statistical assumptions or average procedures were made. Such a mechanism can be responsible for an appreciable excitation of the two nuclei during the short approach phase of the reaction (E* approximately> 100 MeV). The reversibility of the equations of motion leads to a deexcitation of the initially stored excitation energy into that of the relative motion for later times. This feedback behaviour of the internal excitation energy which results in particular to the deexcitation of high energetic 1p-1h pairs is probably not realistic due to the coupling of this states to more complex states with high density. It is studied the influence of this coupling due to the residual interaction between the nucleons on the dynamics of two colliding heavy ions

  10. Λ flow in heavy-ion collisions: The role of final-state interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.Q.; Ko, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Lambda flow in Ni+Ni collisions at SIS energies is studied in the relativistic transport model (RVUU 1.0). It is found that for primordial lambdas the flow is considerably weaker than proton flow. The inclusion of final-state interactions, especially the propagation of lambdas in the mean-field potential, brings the lambda flow close to that of protons. An accurate determination of the lambda flow in heavy-ion experiments is shown to be very useful for studying lambda properties in dense matter. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. Charge-state related effects in sputtering of LiF by swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ban-d' Etat, B. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la photonique, CIMAP-GANIL, CEA–CNRS–ENSICAEN–Univ. Caen, 14070 Caen (France); Bender, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la photonique, CIMAP-GANIL, CEA–CNRS–ENSICAEN–Univ. Caen, 14070 Caen (France); Grande, P.L. [Univ. Fed. Rio Grande do Sul, BR-91501970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lebius, H.; Lelièvre, D. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la photonique, CIMAP-GANIL, CEA–CNRS–ENSICAEN–Univ. Caen, 14070 Caen (France); Marmitt, G.G. [Univ. Fed. Rio Grande do Sul, BR-91501970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Rothard, H. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la photonique, CIMAP-GANIL, CEA–CNRS–ENSICAEN–Univ. Caen, 14070 Caen (France); Seidl, T.; Severin, D.; Voss, K.-O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Toulemonde, M., E-mail: toulemonde@ganil.fr [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la photonique, CIMAP-GANIL, CEA–CNRS–ENSICAEN–Univ. Caen, 14070 Caen (France); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Sputtering experiments with swift heavy ions in the electronic energy loss regime were performed by using the catcher technique in combination with elastic recoil detection analysis. The angular distribution of particles sputtered from the surface of LiF single crystals is composed of a jet-like peak superimposed on a broad isotropic distribution. By using incident ions of fixed energy but different charges states, the influence of the electronic energy loss on both components is probed. We find indications that isotropic sputtering originates from near-surface layers, whereas the jet component may be affected by contributions from depth up to about 150 nm.

  12. Physico-chemical characterization of polyethylene of ultra high molecular weight modified with gamma irradiation and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagarde, M; Del Grosso, M; Fasce, D; Dommarco, R; Laino, S; Fasce, L.A

    2012-01-01

    The ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a biomaterial widely used in total joint replacement. In this work, the effect of two different irradiation techniques on UHMWPE is analyzed. One technique involves gamma irradiation (γ) followed by a thermal treatment, thus modifying the material bulk. The other implies swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI), which have an effect only on the near surface layers. The surface nanomechanical properties are evaluated from depth sensing indentation experiments, while changes in crystallinity and chemical structure are determined by DSC and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that even when both techniques are able to improve the UHMWPE wear behavior, the effect on other mechanical properties and molecular structure modification is different. The γ irradiated sample exhibits lower crystallinity, hardness and modulus than the pristine UHMWPE, while the SHI irradiated sample exhibits higher crystallinity and enhanced mechanical properties than the later

  13. Improved production and function of llama heavy chain antibody fragments by molecular evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der R.H.; Geus, de B.; Frenken, G.J.; Peters, H.; Verrips, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve production level of llama heavy chain antibody fragments (V (HH)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae while retaining functional characteristics. For this purpose, the DNA shuffling technique was used on llama V (HH) fragments specific for the azo-dye reactive red-6. In

  14. MOLECULAR STUDIES OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA CHL-004'S INTERACTION WITH HEAVY METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy metal contamination of soils and sediments as the result of human activity is of worldwide concern. In particular lead, which has been used in the production of batteries, gasoline, paint and pigments, is a potent neurotoxin when taken internally. Ingestion of lead can resu...

  15. Development of PNTDs synthesized from monomers with different molecular length and analysis of molecular damages by heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hajime; Kodaira, Satoshi; Ihara, Daisuke; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Kusumoto, Tamon; Mori, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Benton, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Our interests for years lay to investigate the reason why CR-39 polymer has such high sensitivity as plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) on chemical structural aspects. We developed three PNTDs from three diacrylate compounds as monomers bearing different molecular length as well as different numbers of internal ether bonds. The polymer products obtained were colorless and transparent with 3-D molecular structures as CR-39 and different lattice structures each other. Our purpose of the current study was to investigate structural damages caused in newly prepared PNTDs and CR-39 by irradiation of Nitrogen ion (6 MeV/n, fluence of 5 x 10 11 cm -2 ). The structural damage by irradiation was analyzed by the magnitude of the relative absorbance of specific functional groups such as ester, C=O, ether and C-H bonds by means of FT-IR (ATR) method. The correlation between the relative absorbance and the molecular length of the monomers were discussed. (author)

  16. Hadronic molecular states from the K anti K* interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue, Pei-Liang; He, Jun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Institute of Modern Physics of CAS and Lanzhou University, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, the K anti K* interaction is studied in a quasipotential Bethe-Salpeter equation approach combined with the one-boson-exchange model. With the help of the hidden-gauge Lagrangian, the exchanges of pseudoscalar mesons (π and η) and vector mesons (ρ, ω and φ) are considered to describe the K anti K* interaction. Besides the direct vector-meson exchange which can be related to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term, pseudoscalar-meson exchanges also play important roles in the mechanism of the K anti K* interaction. The poles of scattering amplitude are searched to find the molecular states produced from the K anti K* interaction. In the case of quantum number I{sup G}(J{sup PC}) = 0{sup +}(1{sup ++}), a pole is found with a reasonable cutoff, which can be related to the f{sub 1}(1285) in experiment. Another bound state with 0{sup -}(1{sup +-}) is also produced from the K anti K* interaction, which can be related to the h{sub 1}(1380). In the isovector sector, the interaction is much weaker and a bound state with 1{sup +}(1{sup +}) relevant to the b{sub 1}(1235) is produced but at a larger cutoff. Our results suggest that in the hadronic molecular state picture the f{sub 1}(1285) and b{sub 1}(1235) are the strange partners of the X(3872) and Z{sub c}(3900), respectively. (orig.)

  17. Intermediate L-K molecular orbital radiation from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, K.H.; Jaeger, H.U.; Richter, H.; Woittennek, H.

    1975-09-01

    The structure of x-ray continua observed recently in violent collisions between intermediate mass atoms can be explained by a superposition of K molecular orbital (KMO) radiation and of an intermediate L-K molecular orbital (ILKMO) radiation of high intensity which is due to 2psigma vacancies. (author)

  18. Intermediate L-K molecular-orbital radiation from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, K.H.; Jaeger, H.U.; Richter, H.; Woittennek, H.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of X-ray continua observed recently in violent collisions between mean-mass atoms can be explained by a superposition of K molecular orbital (KMO) radiation and an intermediate L-K molecular orbital (ILKMO) radiation of high intensity which is due to 2psigma vacancies. (Auth.)

  19. The arbitrary l continuum states of the hyperbolic molecular potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Gao-Feng, E-mail: fgwei_2000@163.com [School of Physics and Mechatronics Engineering, Xi' an University of Arts and Science, Xi' an 710065 (China); Chen, Wen-Li, E-mail: physwlchen@163.com [Department of Basic Science, Xi' an Peihua University, Xi' an 710065 (China); Dong, Shi-Hai, E-mail: dongsh2@yahoo.com [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Within the framework of partial-wave method, we study in this Letter the arbitrary l continuum states of the Schrödinger equation with the hyperbolic molecular potential in terms of an improved approximation to the centrifugal term. We present the normalized radial wave functions and obtain analytical formula of phase shifts. In addition, the corresponding bound states are also discussed by studying the analytical properties of the scattering amplitude. We calculate the energy spectra and scattering phase shifts by the improved, previous approximations and the accurate methods, respectively and find that the improved approximation is better than the previous one since the present results are in better agreement with the accurate ones. - Highlights: • The hyperbolic potential with arbitrary l state is solved. • Improved approximation to centrifugal term is used. • Phase shift formula is derived analytically. • Accurate results are compared with the present results.

  20. Susceptible genes and molecular pathways related to heavy ion irradiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Kazuaki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Ishigami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Kawata, Tetsuya; Shibahara, Takahiko; Ito, Hisao; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Heavy ion beams are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by a higher relative biologic effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the difference of gene expression between heavy ion beams and X-rays in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)-derived cells. Materials and methods: The OSCC cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon or neon ion irradiation or X-rays using three different doses. We sought to identify genes the expression of which is affected by carbon and neon ion irradiation using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. The identified genes were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool to investigate the functional network and gene ontology. Changes in mRNA expression in the genes were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: The microarray analysis identified 84 genes that were modulated by carbon and neon ion irradiation at all doses in OSCC cells. Among the genes, three genes (TGFBR2, SMURF2, and BMP7) and two genes (CCND1 and E2F3), respectively, were found to be involved in the transforming growth factor β-signaling pathway and cell cycle:G1/S checkpoint regulation pathway. The qRT-PCR data from the five genes after heavy ion irradiation were consistent with the microarray data (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our findings should serve as a basis for global characterization of radiation-regulated genes and pathways in heavy ion-irradiated OSCC

  1. Electronic and structural ground state of heavy alkali metals at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbris, G.; Lim, J.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-02-01

    Alkali metals display unexpected properties at high pressure, including emergence of low-symmetry crystal structures, which appear to occur due to enhanced electronic correlations among the otherwise nearly free conduction electrons. We investigate the high-pressure electronic and structural ground state of K, Rb, and Cs using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements together with a b i n i t i o theoretical calculations. The sequence of phase transitions under pressure observed at low temperature is similar in all three heavy alkalis except for the absence of the o C 84 phase in Cs. Both the experimental and theoretical results point to pressure-enhanced localization of the valence electrons characterized by pseudogap formation near the Fermi level and strong s p d hybridization. Although the crystal structures predicted to host magnetic order in K are not observed, the localization process appears to drive these alkalis closer to a strongly correlated electron state.

  2. Magnetism and superconductivity driven by identical 4f states in a heavy-fermion metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Joe E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nair, S [MAX PLANCK INST.; Stockert, O [MAX PLANCK INST.; Witte, U [INST. FUR FESTKORPERPHYSIK; Nicklas, M [MAX PLANCK INST.; Schedler, R [HELMHOLTZ - ZENTRUM; Bianchi, A [UC, IRVINE; Fisk, Z [UC, IRVINE; Wirth, S [MAX PLANCK INST.; Steglich, K [HELMHOLTZ - ZENTRUM

    2009-01-01

    The apparently inimical relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has come under increasing scrutiny in a wide range of material classes, where the free energy landscape conspires to bring them in close proximity to each other. Particularly enigmatic is the case when these phases microscopically interpenetrate, though the manner in which this can be accomplished remains to be fully comprehended. Here, we present combined measurements of elastic neutron scattering, magnetotransport, and heat capacity on a prototypical heavy fermion system, in which antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are observed. Monitoring the response of these states to the presence of the other, as well as to external thermal and magnetic perturbations, points to the possibility that they emerge from different parts of the Fermi surface. Therefore, a single 4f state could be both localized and itinerant, thus accounting for the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity.

  3. Searches for diboson production at the Tevatron in final states containing heavy-flavor jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grivaz Jean-François

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent searches performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron for diboson production in final states containing heavy-flavor jets are reported. The searches for WZ and ZZ can be regarded as the ultimate benchmark for the corresponding searches for a low-mass Higgs boson in the WH and ZH final states. Using the exact same techniques as for those Higgs boson searches, the D0 collaboration measured a cross section for WZ/ZZ production of 1.13 ± 0.36 times its expectation in the standard model, with a diboson signal significance of 3.3 standard deviations (2.9 expected.

  4. The spectral distribution of intermediate L-K molecular-orbital radiation in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, K.-H.; Jager, H.-U.; Richter, H.; Woittennek, H.; Frank, W.; Gippener, P.; Kaun, K.-H.; Manfrass, P.

    1977-01-01

    Two distinct x-ray continua C1 and C2 above the characteristic lines are observed in high-energy collisions between atoms with atomic numbers of 28 to 57. This structure is explained by a superposition of K molecular-orbital (KMO) radiation and of an intermediate L-K molecular-orbital (ILKMO) radiation of high intensity which is due to 2psigma vacancies. In the framework of the dynamical theory of intermediate molecular phenomena and using a scaling of the H 2 + correlation diagram with screened state-dependent charges good agreement between the shapes of the measured and calculated spectra is obtained. (author)

  5. Molecular and excited state properties of isomeric scarlet disperse dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jihye; Szymczyk, Malgorzata; Mehraban, Nahid; Ding, Yi; Parrillo-Chapman, Lisa; El-Shafei, Ahmed; Freeman, Harold S.

    2018-06-01

    This work was part of an investigation aimed at characterizing the molecular and excited state properties of currently available disperse dyes developed to provide stability to extensive sunlight exposures when adsorbed on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers. Having completed the characterization of yellow, magenta, and cyan disperse dyes for PET-based fabrics used outdoors, our attention turned to the colors designed to enhance the color gamut of a standard 4-member (cyan/yellow/magenta/black) color set. The present study pertained specifically to the characterization of commercially available scarlet dyes. In this regard, HPLC analysis showed that a scarlet product used for PET coloration was mainly a 70/30 mixture of dyes, and the use of HRMS and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that these two dyes were azo compounds derived from isomeric pyridine-based couplers which differed in the location of the primary amino (sbnd NH2) and anilino (sbnd NHPh) groups attached to the pyridine ring. One dye structure has the sbnd NHPh group para to the azo group (Sc2), while the other has that group in the ortho position (Sc3). The presence of either ortho substituent provides photostabilization through intramolecular H-bonding with the azo moiety. Further, results from molecular modeling studies showed that the lower excited state oxidation potential of Sc3 relative to that of Sc2 allows Sc3 to function as an energy quencher for the excited state of Sc2 - through thermodynamically favorable electron transfer.

  6. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  7. Electrically Tunable g Factors in Quantum Dot Molecular Spin States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, M. F.; Scheibner, M.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Stinaff, E. A.; Bracker, A. S.; Korenev, V. L.; Reinecke, T. L.; Gammon, D.

    2006-11-01

    We present a magnetophotoluminescence study of individual vertically stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dot pairs separated by thin tunnel barriers. As an applied electric field tunes the relative energies of the two dots, we observe a strong resonant increase or decrease in the g factors of different spin states that have molecular wave functions distributed over both quantum dots. We propose a phenomenological model for the change in g factor based on resonant changes in the amplitude of the wave function in the barrier due to the formation of bonding and antibonding orbitals.

  8. Hidden beauty baryon states in the local hidden gauge approach with heavy quark spin symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, C.W.; Oset, E. [Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Using a coupled-channel unitary approach, combining the heavy quark spin symmetry and the dynamics of the local hidden gauge, we investigate the meson-baryon interaction with hidden beauty and obtain several new states of N around 11 GeV. We consider the basis of states {eta}{sub b} N, {Upsilon};N, B {Lambda}{sub b}, B {Sigma}{sub b}, B{sup *}{Lambda}{sub b}, B{sup *}{Sigma}{sub b}, B{sup *}{Sigma}{sub b}{sup *} and find four basic bound states which correspond to B {Sigma}{sub b}, B {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *}, B{sup *}{Sigma}{sub b} and B{sup *}{Sigma}{sub b}{sup *}, decaying mostly into {eta}{sub b} N and {Upsilon}N and with a binding energy about 50-130 MeV with respect to the thresholds of the corresponding channel. All of them have isospin I = 1/2, and we find no bound states or resonances in I = 3/2. The B {Sigma}{sub b} state appears in J = 1/2, the B {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *} in J = 3/2, the B{sup *}{Sigma}{sub b} appears nearly degenerate in J = 1/2, 3/2 and the B{sup *}{Sigma}{sub b}{sup *} appears nearly degenerate in J = 1/2, 3/2, 5/2. These states have a width from 2-110 MeV, with conservative estimates of uncertainties, except for the one in J = 5/2 which has zero width since it cannot decay into any of the states of the basis chosen. We make generous estimates of the uncertainties and find that within very large margins these states appear bound. (orig.)

  9. Early Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Diagnosed with Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Molecular Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT, a low grade B-cell lymphoma, arises in the lung it is referred to as bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT lymphoma. We describe a patient with a history of Sjögren’s syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis with dyspnea and imaging consistent with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP. However, while histology and immunohistochemistry lacked definitive features of a lymphoma, immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH polymerase chain reaction testing demonstrated B-cell monoclonality, consistent with an early BALT lymphoma.

  10. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ/sub u/ + , v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 π/sub u'/, v = 1,2, b 1 π/sub u'/, v = 3-5, and c 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization. 23 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  11. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ + /sub u/, v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 1,2, b 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 3-5, and c 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization

  12. On the physicochemical states of heavy metals of very small amounts in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Isao; Inoue, Yoriteru; Hashimoto, Noriaki.

    1976-01-01

    The physicochemical existence states of the heavy metals in river water were experimentally studied, with radioactive nuclides as tracers. The experimental samples taken from Kamo-river in the city of Kyoto were filtered through a membrane filter of 0.45 μm pore diameter. The radioactive nuclides of heavy metal tracers were added into the sample water, and pH was adjusted to the given value with hydrochloric solution on the acidic side and with sodium hydroxide solution on the alkaline side. After two days aging, the radioactivity ratios of the sediments on membrane filters to that of total passed samples were measured. The variation in the course of time of the concentrations of ionic tracers dialysed with cellulose tubes (24 angstrom pore diameter) was traced until the equilibrium condition was reached. The radioactivity of the supernatant of 20 ml of sample water added with 0.5 g of anion or cation exchange resin, and the concentrations of tracers in the upper layer of liquid in a centrifuge were measured. The existing conditions of elements such as zinc, cadmium, cobalt, strontium-yttrium were examined. In conclusion, the adsorption of all nuclides on the membrane filters increased with the increase of pH, but the significant difference was not recognized owing to the pore diameter (1.2 μm - 0.05 μm) excepting some experimental results. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Heavy metals pollution at municipal solid waste dumpsites in Kano and Kaduna states in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.U. Anake

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil samples collected from two major dumpsites each in Kano and Kaduna states were investigated for heavy metals pollution. Each of the dumpsite was divided into north, south, east and west. Four soil samples were collected at a depth of 0-15 cm from each part and pooled to form a composite sample. Soil samples from reserve areas within the same geographical locations as the dumpsites were collected as control. Acid-extractable cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, nickel (Ni and lead (Pb were determined using 2 M nitric acid solution and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The ranges of Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb levels for all the dumpsites were 0.30−49.8, 5.76−139, 0.39−19.1 and 42.6−9662 mg/kg, respectively. Kano dumpsite 2 was found to pollute most with Cd, Cr and Pb in 50-100 % soil samples collected having concentrations higher than the threshold limits set by regulatory body. Paper and food scraps showed higher percentages in both Kano and Kaduna dumpsites. The soil was high is sand for all the dumpsites implying high leaching potentials of the heavy metals pollutants.

  14. Heavy Rydberg behaviour in high vibrational levels of some ion-pair states of the halogens and inter-halogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Robert J.; Lawley, Kenneth P.; Ridley, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of heavy Rydberg resonances in the ion-pair spectra of I 2 , Cl 2 , ICl, and IBr. Extensive vibrational progressions are analysed in terms of the energy dependence of the quantum defect δ(E b ) rather than as Dunham expansions. This is shown to define the heavy Rydberg region, providing a more revealing fit to the data with fewer coefficients and leads just as easily to numbering data sets separated by gaps in the observed vibrational progressions. Interaction of heavy Rydberg states with electronic Rydberg states at avoided crossings on the inner wall of the ion-pair potential is shown to produce distinctive changes in the energy dependence of δ(E b ), with weak and strong interactions readily distinguished. Heavy Rydberg behaviour is found to extend well below near-dissociation states, down to vibrational levels ∼18 000-20 000 cm −1 below dissociation. The rapid semi-classical calculation of δ(E b ) for heavy Rydberg states is emphasised and shows their absolute magnitude to be essentially the volume of phase space excluded from the vibrational motion by avoiding core-core penetration of the ions

  15. The SU(3) structure of rotational states in heavy deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrio, M.; Wood, J.L.; Rowe, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The SU(3) coupling scheme provides an informative basis for the expansion of shell-model wave functions and their interpretation in collective-model terms. We show in this paper that it is possible, using the coupled-rotor-vibrator model, to infer averages of the distributions of SU(3) representation labels in heavy rotational nuclei by direct interpretation of physically observed E2 transition rates and quadrupole moments. We find that the distributions of SU(3) representation labels have nearly constant average values for states belonging to some well-defined rotational bands. These are bands of states having B(E2) values and quadrupole moments that follow the predictions of the rotor model. Such bands are interpreted as soft SU(3) bands in parallel with the concept of a soft rotor band with vibrational-shape fluctuations. The concept of a soft SU(3) band and its implications for beta-vibrational excited bands is developed. The average SU(3) representation labels inferred from experiment are interpreted by calculating those implied by the Nilsson model. An analysis of the SU(3) content of Nilsson wave functions also leads to two remarkable predictions. The first is that, in the asymptotic limit, the Nilsson model implies intrinsic states for a rotor band that are beta rigid. The second is that, although the intrinsic Nilsson state is axially symmetric, it generates a sequence of K=0, 2, 4,...bands. (orig.)

  16. Coherent state methods for semi-classical heavy-ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.; Raffray, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A semi-classical model of many fermion systems is developed in view of solving the Vlasov equation; it provides an unified description of both static and dynamic properties of the system. The phase space distribution functions are written as convolution products of generalized coherent state distributions with semi-probabilistic weight functions. The generalized coherent states are defined from the local constants of motion of the dynamical system; they may reduce to the usuel ones (eigen states of the annihilation operator) only at the harmonic limit. Solving the Vlasov equation consists in two steps: (i) search for weight functions which properly describe the initial density distributions (ii) calculation of the evolutions of the coherent state set which acts as a moving basis for the Vlasov equation solutions. Sample applications to statics are analyzed: fermions in a harmonic field, self-consistent nuclear slabs. Outlooks of dynamical applications are discussed with a special attention to the fast nucleon emission in heavy-ion reactions

  17. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  18. Search for promptly produced heavy quarkonium states in hadronic Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Maocun, C; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    A search has been made for direct production of heavy quarkonium states in more than 3 million hadronic Z^{0} decays in the 1991-1994 DELPHI data. Prompt J/\\psi, \\psi(2S) and \\Upsilon candidates have been searched for through their leptonic decay modes using criteria based on the kinematics and decay vertex positions. New upper limits are set at the 90 \\% confidence level for {Br( Z^0 \\rightarrow \\left( Q \\bar{Q} \\right) X ) / Br( Z^0 \\rightarrow \\mbox{hadrons})} for various strong production mechanisms of J/\\psi and \\Upsilon; these range down to 0.9 \\times 10^{-4}. The limits are set in the presence of a small excess (\\sim 1 \\% statistical probability of a background fluctuation) in the sum of candidates from prompt J/\\psi, \\psi(2S), \\Upsilon(1S), \\Upsilon(2S) and \\Upsilon(3S) relative to the estimated background.

  19. Quantum confinement and heavy surface states of Dirac fermions in bismuth (111) films: An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaldiev, V. V.; Volkov, V. A.

    2018-03-01

    Recent high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments have given a reason to believe that pure bismuth is a topologically nontrivial semimetal. We derive an analytic theory of surface and size-quantized states of Dirac fermions in Bi(111) films taking into account the new data. The theory relies on a new phenomenological momentum-dependent boundary condition for the effective Dirac equation. The boundary condition is described by two real parameters that are expressed by a linear combination of the Dresselhaus and Rashba interface spin-orbit interaction parameters. In semi-infinite Bi(111), near the M ¯ point the surface states possess anisotropical parabolic dispersion with very heavy effective mass in the Γ ¯-M ¯ direction order of ten free electron masses and light effective mass in the M ¯-K ¯ direction order of one hundredth of free electron mass. In Bi(111) films with equivalent surfaces, the surface states from top and bottom surfaces are not split. In such a symmetric film with arbitrary thickness, the bottom of the lowest quantum confinement subband in the conduction band coincides with the bottom of the bulk conduction band in the M ¯ point.

  20. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  1. High-energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks and other rare phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumalat, J.; Butler, J.; Gaines, I.

    1981-01-01

    We propose to study the photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks, charm and beauty, using a multiparticle spectrometer at the Tevatron. The apparatus is similar to that used in E87 and E401, but is upgraded to have a much larger acceptance, better γ and π 0 reconstruction capabilities, and a prompt decay vertex detector. To achieve high sensitivity to low cross sections, the experiment must run in a wide band photon beam, preferably the new beam proposed for the Proton East area. The experiment has two phases. Phase 1 is a 500 hour run with a thick target (1 interaction length) and a beam dump. This phase will produce a large sample of dimuon decays of T's and J/PSI's with energies up to 450 GeV and will measure the size of beauty photoproduction through the detection of multimuon final states. Phase 2 is a 1500 hour run with an open geometry and a 10% interaction length target. We will collect very large samples (> 10 6 ) of charm particle events and will search for specific B-meson and B-baryon final states. The power of the spectrometer and the flexibility of the trigger scheme we employ enables us to do sensitive searches for completely new phenomena with less bias than other experiments

  2. Resting-state, functional MRI on regional homogeneity changes of brain in the heavy smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shiqi; Wu Guangyao; Lin Fuchun; Kong Xiangquan; Zhou Guofeng; Pang Haopeng; Zhu Ling; Liu Guobing; Lei Hao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of self-awareness in the heavy smokers (HS) by using regional homogeneity (ReHo) combined with resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). Methods: Thirty HS and 31 healthy non-smokers (NS) matched for age and sex underwent a 3.0 T resting-state fMRI. The data were post-processed by SPM 5 and then the ReHo values were calculated by REST software. The ReHo values between the two groups were compared by two-sample t-test. The brain map with significant difference of ReHo value was obtained. Results: Compared with that in NS group, the regions with decreased ReHo value included the bilateral precuneus, superior frontal gyrus,medial prefrontal cortex, right angular gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, inferior occipital gyrus, cerebellum, and left middle frontal gyrus in HS group. The regions of increased ReHo value included the bilateral insula, parahippocampal gyrus, white matter of parietal lobe, pons, left inferior parietal lobule, lingual gyrus, thalamus, inferior orbital gyrus, white matter of temporal-frontal lobe, and cerebellum. The difference was more obvious in the left hemisphere. Conclusions: In HS, abnormal ReHo on a resting state which reflects network of smoking addiction. This method may be helpful in understanding the mechanism of self-awareness in HS. (authors)

  3. Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics: On-the-fly limiting of essential excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Naumov, Artem [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow 143026 (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pea 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Tretiak, Sergei, E-mail: serg@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The simulation of nonadiabatic dynamics in extended molecular systems involving hundreds of atoms and large densities of states is particularly challenging. Nonadiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) represent a significant numerical bottleneck in surface hopping approaches. Rather than using unreliable NACT cutting schemes, here we develop “on-the-fly” state limiting methods to eliminate states that are no longer essential for the non-radiative relaxation dynamics as a trajectory proceeds. We propose a state number criteria and an energy-based state limit. The latter is more physically relevant by requiring a user-imposed energy threshold. For this purpose, we introduce a local kinetic energy gauge by summing contributions from atoms within the spatial localization of the electronic wavefunction to define the energy available for upward hops. The proposed state limiting schemes are implemented within the nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics framework to simulate photoinduced relaxation in poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) and branched poly-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) oligomers for benchmark evaluation.

  4. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-09-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. Interest in this field may be provisionally divided into two general classes: Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states; open flavor states: The D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; and charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note we emphasize that there are many missing states in both categories -- states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to us would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular states. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner bar B decay remains to be seen. We suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  5. Solid State Pathways towards Molecular Complexity in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnartz, Harold; Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Bouwman, Jordy; Cuppen, Herma M.; Cuylle, Steven H.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Fedoseev, Gleb; Fuchs, Guido W.; Ioppolo, Sergio; Isokoski, Karoliina; Lamberts, Thanja; Öberg, Karin I.; Romanzin, Claire; Tenenbaum, Emily; Zhen, Junfeng

    2011-12-01

    It has been a long standing problem in astrochemistry to explain how molecules can form in a highly dilute environment such as the interstellar medium. In the last decennium more and more evidence has been found that the observed mix of small and complex, stable and highly transient species in space is the cumulative result of gas phase and solid state reactions as well as gas-grain interactions. Solid state reactions on icy dust grains are specifically found to play an important role in the formation of the more complex ``organic'' compounds. In order to investigate the underlying physical and chemical processes detailed laboratory based experiments are needed that simulate surface reactions triggered by processes as different as thermal heating, photon (UV) irradiation and particle (atom, cosmic ray, electron) bombardment of interstellar ice analogues. Here, some of the latest research performed in the Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics in Leiden, the Netherlands is reviewed. The focus is on hydrogenation, i.e., H-atom addition reactions and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar ice analogues at astronomically relevant temperatures. It is shown that solid state processes are crucial in the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, providing pathways towards molecular complexity in space.

  6. Heavy baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    We review the experimental and theoretical status of baryons containing one heavy quark. The charm and bottom baryon states are classified and their mass spectra are listed. The appropriate theoretical framework for the description of heavy baryons is the Heavy Quark Effective Theory, whose general ideas and methods are introduced and illustrated in specific examples. We present simple covariant expressions for the spin wave functions of heavy baryons including p-wave baryons. The covariant spin wave functions are used to determine the Heavy Quark Symmetry structure of flavour-changing current-induced transitions between heavy baryons as well as one-pion and one-photon transitions between heavy baryons of the same flavour. We discuss 1/m Q corrections to the current-induced transitions as well as the structure of heavy to light baryon transitions. Whenever possible we attempt to present numbers to compare with experiment by making use of further model-dependent assumptions as e.g. the constituent picture for light quarks. We highlight recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the inclusive decays of hadrons containing one heavy quark including polarization. For exclusive semileptonic decays we discuss rates, angular decay distributions and polarization effects. We provide an update of the experimental and theoretical status of lifetimes of heavy baryons and of exclusive nonleptonic two body decays of charm baryons. (orig.)

  7. Bound states via Higgs exchanging and heavy resonant di-Higgs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaofeng Kang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The existence of Higgs boson h predicted by the standard model (SM was established and hunting for clues to new physics (NP hidden in h has become the top priority in particle physics. In this paper we explore an intriguing phenomenon that prevails in NP associated with h, bound state (Bh, referring to the ground state only of relatively heavy particles ϕ out of NP via interchanging h. This is well-motivated due to the intrinsic properties of h: It has zero spin and light mass, capable of mediating Yukawa interactions; moreover, it may be strongly coupled to ϕ in several important contexts, from addressing the naturalness problem by compositeness/supersymmetry (SUSY/classical scale invariance to understanding neutrino mass origin radiatively and matter asymmetry by electroweak baryogensis. The new resonance Bh, being a neutral scalar boson, has important implications to the large hadron collider (LHC di-Higgs search because it yields a clear resonant di-Higgs signature at the high mass region (≳1 TeV. In other words, searching for Bh offers a new avenue to probe the hidden sector with a Higgs-portal. For illustration in this paper we concentrate on two examples, the stop sector in SUSY and an inert Higgs doublet from a radiative neutrino model. In particular, h-mediation opens a new and wide window to probe the conventional stoponium and the current date begins to have sensitivity to stoponium around TeV.

  8. Bound states via Higgs exchanging and heavy resonant di-Higgs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhaofeng

    2017-08-01

    The existence of Higgs boson h predicted by the standard model (SM) was established and hunting for clues to new physics (NP) hidden in h has become the top priority in particle physics. In this paper we explore an intriguing phenomenon that prevails in NP associated with h, bound state (Bh, referring to the ground state only) of relatively heavy particles ϕ out of NP via interchanging h. This is well-motivated due to the intrinsic properties of h: It has zero spin and light mass, capable of mediating Yukawa interactions; moreover, it may be strongly coupled to ϕ in several important contexts, from addressing the naturalness problem by compositeness/supersymmetry (SUSY)/classical scale invariance to understanding neutrino mass origin radiatively and matter asymmetry by electroweak baryogensis. The new resonance Bh, being a neutral scalar boson, has important implications to the large hadron collider (LHC) di-Higgs search because it yields a clear resonant di-Higgs signature at the high mass region (≳ 1 TeV). In other words, searching for Bh offers a new avenue to probe the hidden sector with a Higgs-portal. For illustration in this paper we concentrate on two examples, the stop sector in SUSY and an inert Higgs doublet from a radiative neutrino model. In particular, h-mediation opens a new and wide window to probe the conventional stoponium and the current date begins to have sensitivity to stoponium around TeV.

  9. Dynamical initial-state model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Schenke, Björn

    2018-02-01

    We present a fully three-dimensional model providing initial conditions for energy and net-baryon density distributions in heavy-ion collisions at arbitrary collision energy. The model includes the dynamical deceleration of participating nucleons or valence quarks, depending on the implementation. The duration of the deceleration continues until the string spanned between colliding participants is assumed to thermalize, which is either after a fixed proper time, or a fluctuating time depending on sampled final rapidities. Energy is deposited in space time along the string, which in general will span a range of space-time rapidities and proper times. We study various observables obtained directly from the initial-state model, including net-baryon rapidity distributions, two-particle rapidity correlations, as well as the rapidity decorrelation of the transverse geometry. Their dependence on the model implementation and parameter values is investigated. We also present the implementation of the model with 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamics, which involves the addition of source terms that deposit energy and net-baryon densities produced by the initial-state model at proper times greater than the initial time for the hydrodynamic simulation.

  10. Composites of Heavy Rain Producing Elevated Thunderstorms in the Central United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel P. McCoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite analyses of the atmosphere over the central United States during elevated thunderstorms producing heavy rainfall are presented. Composites were created for five National Weather Service County Warning Areas (CWAs in the region. Events studied occurred during the warm season (April–September during 1979–2012. These CWAs encompass the region determined previously to experience the greatest frequency of elevated thunderstorms in the United States. Composited events produced rainfall of >50 mm 24 hr−1 within the selected CWA. Composites were generated for the 0–3 hr period prior to the heaviest rainfall, 6–9 hours prior to it, and 12–15 hours prior to it. This paper focuses on the Pleasant Hill, Missouri (EAX composites, as all CWA results were similar; also these analyses focus on the period 0–3 hours prior to event occurrence. These findings corroborate the findings of previous authors. What is offered here that is unique is (1 a measure of the interquartile range within the composite mean fields, allowing for discrimination between variable fields that provided a strong reliable signal, from those that may appear strong but possess large variability, and (2 composite soundings of two subclasses of elevated thunderstorms. Also, a null case (one that fits the composite but failed to produce significant rainfall is also examined for comparison.

  11. 77 FR 50502 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; In-Use Heavy-Duty Vehicles (As...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL 9716-9] California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; In- Use Heavy-Duty Vehicles (As Applicable to Yard Trucks and Two-Engine Sweepers); Opportunity... control of emissions from new nonroad engines which are used in construction equipment or vehicles or used...

  12. Role of ion-pair states in the predissociation dynamics of Rydberg states of molecular iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vangerow, J; Bogomolov, A S; Dozmorov, N V; Schomas, D; Stienkemeier, F; Baklanov, A V; Mudrich, M

    2016-07-28

    Using femtosecond pump-probe ion imaging spectroscopy, we establish the key role of I(+) + I(-) ion-pair (IP) states in the predissociation dynamics of molecular iodine I2 excited to Rydberg states. Two-photon excitation of Rydberg states lying above the lowest IP state dissociation threshold (1st tier) is found to be followed by direct parallel transitions into IP states of the 1st tier asymptotically correlating to a pair of I ions in their lowest states I(+)((3)P2) + I(-)((1)S0), of the 2nd tier correlating to I(+)((3)P0) + I(-)((1)S0), and of the 3rd tier correlating to I(+)((1)D2) + I(-)((1)S0). Predissociation via the 1st tier proceeds presumably with a delay of 1.6-1.7 ps which is close to the vibrational period in the 3rd tier state (3rd tier-mediated process). The 2nd tier IP state is concluded to be the main precursor for predissociation via lower lying Rydberg states proceeding with a characteristic time of 7-8 ps and giving rise to Rydberg atoms I(5s(2)5p(4)6s(1)). The channel generating I((2)P3/2) + I((2)P1/2) atoms with total kinetic energy corresponding to one-photon excitation is found to proceed via a pump - dump mechanism with dramatic change of angular anisotropy of this channel as compared with earlier nanosecond experiments.

  13. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-01-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. (I) Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states. (II) Open flavor states (a) the D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; (b) Charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note the authors emphasize that there are many missing (undiscovered) states in both categories - states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to the authors would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular status. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner B decay remains to be seen. The authors suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undetermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  14. Entangled states decoherence in coupled molecular spin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Filippo; Szallas, Attila; Bellini, Valerio; Affronte, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Localized electron spins in solid-state systems are widely investigated as potential building blocks of quantum devices and computers. While most efforts in the field have been focused on semiconductor low-dimensional structures, molecular antiferromagnets were recently recognized as alternative implementations of effective few-level spin systems. Heterometallic, Cr-based spin rings behave as effective spin-1/2 systems at low temperature and show long decoherence times [1]; besides, they can be chemically linked and magnetically coupled in a controllable fascion [2]. Here, we theoretically investigate the decoherence of the Bell states in such ring dimers, resulting from hyperfine interactions with nuclear spins. Based on a microscopic description of the molecules [3], we simulate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening, spectral diffusion and electron-nuclear entanglement on the electron-spin coherence, estimating the role of the different nuclei (and of possible chemical substitutions), as well as the effect of simple spin-echo sequences. References: [1] F. Troiani, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 207208 (2005). [2] G. A. Timco, S: Carretta, F. Troiani et al., Nature Nanotech. 4, 173 (2009). [3] F. Troiani, V. Bellini, and M. Affronte, Phys. Rev. B 77, 054428 (2008).

  15. The nuclear equation of state in effective relativistic field theories and pion yields in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofen, M.; Cubero, M.; Gering, M.; Sambataro, M.; Feldmeier, H.; Noerenberg, W.

    1989-06-01

    Within the framework of relativistic field theory for nucleons, deltas, scalar and vector mesons, a systematic study of the nuclear equation of state and its relation to pion yields in heavy-ion collisions is presented. Not the compressibility but the effective nucleon mass at normal nuclear density turns out to be the most sensitive parameter. Effects from vaccum fluctuations are well modelled within the mean-field no-sea approximation by self-interaction terms for the scalar meson field. Incomplete thermalization in the fireball may be the reason for the low pion yields observed in heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  16. Equations of state of heavy metals: ab initio approaches; Equations d'etat des metaux lourds: approches ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.; Jollet, F.; Jomard, G.; Siberchicot, B.; Torrent, M.; Zerah, G.; Amadon, B.; Bouchet, J.; Richard, N.; Robert, G. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2005-07-01

    The determination of equations of states of heavy metals through ab initio calculation, i.e. without any adjustable parameter, allows to access to pressure and temperature thermodynamic conditions sometimes inaccessible to experiment. To perform such calculations, density functional theory (DFT) is a good starting point: when electronic densities are homogeneous enough, the local density approximation (LDA) remarkably accounts for thermodynamic properties of heavy metals, such as tantalum, or the light actinides, as well for static properties - equilibrium volume, elastic constants - as for dynamical quantities like phonon spectra. For heavier elements, like neptunium or plutonium, relativistic effects and strong electronic interactions must be taken into account, which requires more sophisticated theoretical approaches. (authors)

  17. Muonic-hydrogen molecular bound states, quasibound states, and resonances in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used as an exploratory tool to study bound states, quasibound states, and scattering resonances in muon (μ)--hydrogen (x)--hydrogen (y) molecular ions. Our purpose is to comment on the existence and nature of the narrow states reported in three-body calculations, for L=0 and 1, at approximately 55 eV above threshold and the family of states in the same partial waves reported about 1.9 keV above threshold. We first discuss the motivation for study of excited states beyond the well-known and well-studied bound states. Then we reproduce the energies and other properties of these well-known states to show that, despite the relatively large muon mass, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation gives a good, semiquantitative description containing all the essential physics. Born-Oppenheimer calculations of the s- and p-wave scattering of d-(dμ), d-(tμ), and t-(tμ) are compared with the accurate three-body results, again with general success. The places of disagreement are understood in terms of the differences in location of slightly bound (or unbound) states in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation compared to the accurate three-body calculations

  18. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by calixarene-based fluorescent molecular sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Faye, Djibril; Zhang, Han; Lefevre, Jean-Pierre; Delaire, J. A.; Leray, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and complexing properties of calixarene-based fluorescent sensors are reported. The calixarene bearing four dansyl fluorophores (Calix-DANS4) exhibits a very high affinity for the detection of lead. A fluorimetric micro-device based on the use of a Y-shape microchannel was developed and allows lead detection with a 5 ppb detection limit. For mercury detection, a fluorescent molecular sensor containing a calixarene anchored with four 8-quinolinoloxy groups (Calix-Q) has been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this sensor are sensitive to the presence of metal cations. An efficient fluorescence quenching is observed upon mercury complexation because of a photoinduced electron transfer from the fluorophore to the bound mercury. Calix-Q shows a high selectivity towards Hg2+ over interfering cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+) and a 70 ppb sensitivity.

  19. Molecular Clusters: Nanoscale Building Blocks for Solid-State Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Andrew; Champsaur, Anouck M; Roy, Xavier

    2018-04-17

    The programmed assembly of nanoscale building blocks into multicomponent hierarchical structures is a powerful strategy for the bottom-up construction of functional materials. To develop this concept, our team has explored the use of molecular clusters as superatomic building blocks to fabricate new classes of materials. The library of molecular clusters is rich with exciting properties, including diverse functionalization, redox activity, and magnetic ordering, so the resulting cluster-assembled solids, which we term superatomic crystals (SACs), hold the promise of high tunability, atomic precision, and robust architectures among a diverse range of other material properties. Molecular clusters have only seldom been used as precursors for functional materials. Our team has been at the forefront of new developments in this exciting research area, and this Account focuses on our progress toward designing materials from cluster-based precursors. In particular, this Account discusses (1) the design and synthesis of molecular cluster superatomic building blocks, (2) their self-assembly into SACs, and (3) their resulting collective properties. The set of molecular clusters discussed herein is diverse, with different cluster cores and ligand arrangements to create an impressive array of solids. The cluster cores include octahedral M 6 E 8 and cubane M 4 E 4 (M = metal; E = chalcogen), which are typically passivated by a shell of supporting ligands, a feature upon which we have expanded upon by designing and synthesizing more exotic ligands that can be used to direct solid-state assembly. Building from this library, we have designed whole families of binary SACs where the building blocks are held together through electrostatic, covalent, or van der Waals interactions. Using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) to determine the atomic structure, a remarkable range of compositional variability is accessible. We can also use this technique, in tandem with vibrational

  20. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  1. Bound states of a light atom and two heavy dipoles in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosa, D. S.; Bellotti, F. F.; Jensen, Aksel Stenholm

    2016-01-01

    We study a three-body system, formed by a light particle and two identical heavy dipoles, in two dimensions in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We present the analytic light-particle wave function resulting from an attractive zero-range potential between the light and each of the heavy particles...

  2. Thermal conductivity coefficients of water and heavy water in the liquid state up to 3700C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Neindre, B.; Bury, P.; Tufeu, R.; Vodar, B.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal conductivity coefficients of water and heavy water of 99.75 percent isotopic purity were measured using a coaxial cylinder apparatus, covering room temperature to their critical temperatures, and pressures from 1 to 500 bar for water, and from 1 to 1000 bar for heavy water. Following the behavior of the thermal conductivity coefficient of water, which shows a maximum close to 135 0 C, the thermal conductivity coefficient of heavy water exhibits a maximum near 95 0 C and near saturation pressures. This maximum is displaced to higher temperatures when the pressure is increased. Under the same temperature and pressure conditions the thermal conductivity coefficient of heavy water was lower than for water. The pressure effect was similar for water and heavy water. In the temperature range of our experiments, isotherms of thermal conductivity coefficients were almost linear functions of density

  3. Gauge invariant description of heavy quark bound states in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, S.E.

    1980-08-01

    A model for a heavy quark meson is proposed in the framework of a gauge-invariant version of quantum chromodynamics. The field operators in this formulation are taken to be Wilson loops and strings with quark-antiquark ends. The fundamental differential equations of point-like Q.C.D. are expressed as variational equations of the extended loops and strings. The 1/N expansion is described, and it is assumed that nonleading effects such as intermediate quark pairs and nonplanar gluonic terms can be neglected. The action of the Hamiltonian in the A 0 = 0 gauge on a string operator is derived. A trial meson wave functional is constructed consisting of a path-averaged string operator applied to the full vacuum. A Gaussian in the derivative of the path location is assumed for the minimal form of the measure over paths. A variational parameter is incorporated in the measure as the exponentiated coefficient of the squared path location. The expectation value of the Hamiltonian in the trial state is evaluated for the assumption that the negative logarithm of the expectation value of a Wilson loop is proportional to the loop area. The energy is then minimized by deriving the equivalent quantum mechanical Schroedinger's equation and using the quantum mechanical 1/n expansion to estimate the effective eigenvalues. It is found that the area law behavior of the Wilson loop implies a nonzero best value of the variational parameter corresponding to a quantum broadening of the flux tube

  4. Search for heavy neutral leptons in the trilepton final state at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The smallness of neutrino masses provides a tantalizing allusion to physics beyond the standard model (SM). Heavy neutral leptons (HNL), such as hypothetical sterile neutrinos, provide a potential explanation of this observation through the see-saw mechanism. If they exist, HNL could also provide answers about the underlying nature of dark matter as well as the observed baryon asymmetry in the universe. A search for the production of HNL at the LHC, originating from leptonic W boson decays through the mixing of the HNL with SM neutrinos, is presented in this seminar. The search focuses on signatures with three prompt leptons (electrons or muons) in the final state, which allow to probe the production of the HNL with masses ranging from 1 GeV up to 1.2 TeV. Using 36/fb of proton-proton collision data collected by CMS in 2016, the analysis is optimized for finding HNL with masses above and below that of the W boson.

  5. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  6. Search for heavy resonances decaying to two Higgs bosons in final states containing four b quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Rurua, Lali; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Jain, Sandhya; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Dellacasa, Giulio; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Markin, Oleg; Rusinov, Vladimir; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Benhabib, Lamia; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Jesus, Orduna; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lewis, Jonathan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Rupprecht, Nathaniel; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-07-04

    A search is presented for narrow heavy resonances X decaying into pairs of Higgs bosons (H) in proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. The search considers HH resonances with masses between 1 and 3 TeV, having final states of two b quark pairs. Each Higgs boson is produced with large momentum, and the hadronization products of the pair of b quarks can usually be reconstructed as single large jets. The background from multijet and $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ events is significantly reduced by applying requirements related to the flavor of the jet, its mass, and its substructure. The signal would be identified as a peak on top of the dijet invariant mass spectrum of the remaining background events. No evidence is observed for such a signal. Upper limits obtained at 95% confidence level for the product of the production cross section and branching fraction $\\sigma( \\mathrm{ gg \\to X } )\\, \\mathcal{B...

  7. Effects of heavy metals on plants and resistance mechanisms. A state-of-the-art report with special reference to literature published in Chinese journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shuiping

    2003-01-01

    As one of the consequences of heavy metal pollution in soil, water and air, plants are contaminated by heavy metals in some parts of China. To understand the effects of heavy metals upon plants and the resistance mechanisms, would make it possible to use plants for cleaning and remediating heavy metal-polluted sites. The research results on the effects of heavy metals on plants and resistant mechanisms are compiled from Chinese publications from scientific journals and university journals, mostly published during the last decade. Effects of heavy metals on plants result in growth inhibition, structure damage, a decline of physiological and biochemical activities as well as of the function of plants. The effects and bioavailability of heavy metals depend on many factors, such as environmental conditions, pH, species of element, organic substances of the media and fertilization, plant species. But, there are also studies on plant resistance mechanisms to protect plants against the toxic effects of heavy metals such as combining heavy metals by proteins and expressing of detoxifying enzyme and nucleic acid, these mechanisms are integrated to protect the plants against injury by heavy metals. There are two aspects on the interaction of plants and heavy metals. On one hand, heavy metals show negative effects on plants. On the other hand, plants have their own resistance mechanisms against toxic effects and for detoxifying heavy metal pollution. To study the effects of heavy metals on plants and mechanisms of resistance, one must select crop cultivars and/or plants for removing heavy metals from soil and water. More highly resistant plants can be selected especially for a remediation of the pollution site. The molecular mechanisms of resistance of plants to heavy metals should be studied further to develop the actual resistance of these plants to heavy metals. Understanding the bioavailability of heavy metals is advantageous for plant cultivation and phytoremediation

  8. Energetic disorder and exciton states of individual molecular rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Pavel; Barvik, Ivan; Zapletal, David

    2006-01-01

    Exciton states in molecular rings (resembling, e.g. the B850 ring from LH2 complexes of purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) with strong intermolecular interaction are still a question of interest [V. Sundstrom, T. Pullerits, R. van Grondelle, J. Phys. Chem. B 103 (1999) 2327]. In our theoretical model we use the ring of two-level systems, simulating, e.g., the bacteriochlorophylls B850. The dynamical aspects in ensemble of rings are reflected in optical line shapes of electronic transitions. The observed linewidths reflect the combined influence of different types of static and dynamic disorder. To avoid the broadening of lines due to ensemble averaging one uses the single-molecule spectroscopy technique to obtain a fluorescence-excitation spectrum. For zero disorder the exciton manifold features two non-degenerate and eight pairwise degenerate states. In the presence of energetic disorder the degeneracy of the exciton states is lifted and oscillator strength is redistributed among the exciton states. A satisfactory understanding of the nature of static disorder in light-harvesting systems has not been reached [S. Jang, S.F. Dempster, R.J. Silbey, J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6655]. In the local site basis, there can be present static disorder in both diagonal and off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix elements. Silbey et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6655] pointed out several questions: is former enough or the latter should be included as well? If both are considered, then there remains a question about whether they are independent or correlated. The distribution of the energetic separation E(k=+/-1) and relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments has been recently investigated [S. Jang, et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6655; C. Hofmann, T.J. Aartsma, J. Koehler, Chem. Phys. Lett. 395 (2004) 373]. In our present contribution we have extended such a type of investigation to four models of noncorrelated static disorder: (A) Gaussian disorder in the

  9. Effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids on soil solution properties of a heavy metal polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L H; Luo, Y M; Christie, P; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of EDTA and low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) on the pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metals in the soil solution in the rhizosphere of Brassica juncea grown in a paddy soil contaminated with Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd. The results show that EDTA and LMWOA have no effect on the soil solution pH. EDTA addition significantly increased the TOC concentrations in the soil solution. The TOC concentrations in treatments with EDTA were significantly higher than those in treatments with LMWOA. Adding 3 mmol kg(-1) EDTA to the soil markedly increased the total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in the soil solution. Compared to EDTA, LMWOA had a very small effect on the metal concentrations. Total concentrations in the soil solution followed the sequence: EDTA > citric acid (CA) approximately oxalic acid (OA) approximately malic acid (MA) for Cu and Pb; EDTA > MA > CA approximately OA for Zn; and EDTA > MA > CA > OA for Cd. The labile concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd showed similar trends to the total concentrations.

  10. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  11. Population of multi-quark states in exotic multiplets and thermalization in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.; Bleicher, M.; Haussler, S.; Stoecker, H.

    2008-01-01

    The recent discussion about experimental evidence for pentaquark states has revitalized the interest in exotic hadrons. If such states really exist, it is natural to assume that they will be formed at the late hadronization stage of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, given the success of quark recombination models in the description of hadronization. Here, we apply the qMD model to study the formation of color neutral exotic multi-quark clusters at hadronization. We search for color neutral clusters made up of up to six color charges, respectively. We thus obtain estimates for the numbers and phase space distributions of exotic hadronic states produced by clustering in heavy ion collisions, including the members of the pentaquark multiplets. We obtain particle abundances that are smaller than thermal model predictions. Moreover, the results obtained in recombination from ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions can be compared to the estimates based on equal population of the corresponding multiplets, and to results from fully thermalized systems. We find that the distribution of exotic hadrons from recombination over large multiplets provides a sensitive signal for thermalization and decorrelation of the initial, non-equilibrium state of the collision. (author)

  12. Search for heavy neutrinos in final states with two leptons and jets with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wenxiao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    ​This talk focuses on the search for exotic heavy Majorana or Dirac neutrinos and heavy gauge bosons in events with two same- or opposite-sign charged leptons and jets. Both searches conducted using pp collision data collected by the ATLAS detector with an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb−1 at √ s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √ s = 8 TeV are presented. The results are interpreted within the theoretical framework of Minimal Type-I Seesaw Model or Left-Right Symmetric Model and exclusion limits on the production cross-section times branching fraction for heavy neutrinos and heavy gauge bosons are obtained.

  13. Measurement of WW and WZ production in the lepton plus heavy flavor jets final state at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Sandra [Fermilab

    2016-11-16

    We present the CDF measurement of the diboson WW and WZ production cross section in a final state consistent with leptonic W decay and jets originating from heavy flavor quarks, based on the full Tevatron Run II dataset. The analysis of the di–jet invariant mass spectrum allows the observation of 3.7 sigma evidence for the combined production processes of either WW or WZ bosons. The different heavy flavor decay pattern of the W and Z bosons and the analysis of the secondary–decay vertex properties allow to independently measure the WW and WZ production cross section in a hadronic final state. The measured cross sections are consistent with the standard model predictions and correspond to signal significances of 2.9 and 2.1 sigma for WW and WZ production, respectively.

  14. Is the anomalous effect an experimental evidence for the excitation of new exotic states in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, D.B.; Ion, R.; Topor Pop, V.

    1984-10-01

    Lower bound on the mean free path of the projectile fragments from the relativistic heavy ion collisions are drived using generalized Rarita-Schwed's theorems. These bounds are compared with the experimental data on the anomalous mean free path observed in recent experiments. The near saturation of these bounds provide a specific interpretation of the anomalous effects as an experimental evidence for the excitation of those extreme nuclear states which saturate the limits of the convetional nuclear physics. (authors)

  15. Recent Progress in Constraining the Equation of State of Dense Neutron-Rich Nuclear Matter with Heavy-Ion Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Wen Dehua; Xiao Zhigang; Xu Chang; Yong Gaochan; Zhang Ming

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy E sym (ρ) is the most uncertain part of the Equation of State (EOS) of dense neutron-rich nuclear matter. In this talk, we discuss the underlying physics responsible for the uncertain E sym (ρ) especially at supra-saturation densities, the circumstantial evidence for a super-soft E sym (ρ) from analyzing π - /π + ratio in relativistic heavy-ion collisions and its impacts on astrophysics and cosmology.

  16. Search for heavy resonances decaying into the fully hadronic di-tau final state with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Marcus Matthias

    The discovery of a heavy neutral particle would be a direct hint for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis searches for new heavy neutral particles decaying into two tau leptons, which further decay into hadrons, are presented. They cover neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) as well as $Z'$ bosons, predicted by various theories with an extended gauge sector. Both analyses are based on the full 2012 proton-proton collision dataset taken by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The extended Higgs sector in the MSSM suggests additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons which decay into tau leptons in about 10\\% of the time. Given that the dominant final state, $\\phi\\to b\\bar{b}$, suffers from tremendous QCD initiated backgrounds, the decay into two tau leptons is the most promising final state to discover such new resonances. The fully hadronic final state is the dominant one with a branching fraction of about 42\\%. I...

  17. Molecular approaches to solar energy conversion: the energetic cost of charge separation from molecular-excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, James R

    2013-08-13

    This review starts with a brief overview of the technological potential of molecular-based solar cell technologies. It then goes on to focus on the core scientific challenge associated with using molecular light-absorbing materials for solar energy conversion, namely the separation of short-lived, molecular-excited states into sufficiently long-lived, energetic, separated charges capable of generating an external photocurrent. Comparisons are made between different molecular-based solar cell technologies, with particular focus on the function of dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells as well as parallels with the function of photosynthetic reaction centres. The core theme of this review is that generating charge carriers with sufficient lifetime and a high quantum yield from molecular-excited states comes at a significant energetic cost-such that the energy stored in these charge-separated states is typically substantially less than the energy of the initially generated excited state. The role of this energetic loss in limiting the efficiency of solar energy conversion by such devices is emphasized, and strategies to minimize this energy loss are compared and contrasted.

  18. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  19. Predissociation of high-lying Rydberg states of molecular iodine via ion-pair states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogomolov, Alexandr S. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya Str. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Grüner, Barbara; Mudrich, Marcel [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kochubei, Sergei A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, ac. Lavrent' yev ave., 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Baklanov, Alexey V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya Str. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Str. 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    Velocity map imaging of the photofragments arising from two-photon photoexcitation of molecular iodine in the energy range 73 500–74 500 cm{sup −1} covering the bands of high-lying gerade Rydberg states [{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;0{sub g}{sup +} and [{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;2{sub g} has been applied. The ion signal was dominated by the atomic fragment ion I{sup +}. Up to 5 dissociation channels yielding I{sup +} ions with different kinetic energies were observed when the I{sub 2} molecule was excited within discrete peaks of Rydberg states and their satellites in this region. One of these channels gives rise to images of I{sup +} and I{sup −} ions with equal kinetic energy indicating predissociation of I{sub 2} via ion-pair states. The contribution of this channel was up to about 50% of the total I{sup +} signal. The four other channels correspond to predissociation via lower lying Rydberg states giving rise to excited iodine atoms providing I{sup +} ions by subsequent one-photon ionization by the same laser pulse. The ratio of these channels varied from peak to peak in the spectrum but their total ionic signal was always much higher than the signal of (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of I{sub 2}, which was previously considered to be the origin of ionic signal in this spectral range. The first-tier E0{sub g}{sup +} and D{sup ′}2{sub g} ion-pair states are concluded to be responsible for predissociation of Rydberg states [{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;0{sub g}{sup +} and [{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;2{sub g}, respectively. Further predissociation of these ion-pair states via lower lying Rydberg states gives rise to excited I(5s{sup 2}5p{sup 4}6s{sup 1}) atoms responsible for major part of ion signal. The isotropic angular distribution of the photofragment recoil directions observed for all channels indicates that the studied Rydberg states are long-lived compared with the rotational period of the I{sub 2} molecule.

  20. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included

  1. Search for heavy resonances in two-particle final states with leptons, jets and photons at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Gueth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    At the LHC, the production of heavy resonances decaying into a pair of particles can be probed at unprecedented centre-of-mass energies. Two-particle resonances are predicted in a variety of BSM models and can be searched for in a largely model-independent fashion. Results from searches for resonances in final states with leptons, jets and photons based on the full dataset of 20/fb taken by the CMS detector in 2012 in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are presented. They are interpreted in terms of various theories of BSM physics ranging from generic heavy resonances such as the Z' to excited quarks or Randall-Sundrum gravitons. In the absence of a significant deviation from the expected SM background 95\\% CL limits are set on model parameters of the theories under study.

  2. Religiosity, Heavy Alcohol Use, and Vicarious Learning Networks among Adolescents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryczynski, Jan; Ward, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has found that religiosity may protect against risky alcohol and drug use behaviors among adolescents, but the social mechanics underpinning the relationship are not well understood. This study examined the relationship between religiosity, heavy drinking, and social norms among U.S. adolescents aged 12 to 17 years, using the…

  3. Hybrid emulsion spectrometer for the detection of hadronically produced heavy flavor states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, K.; Ushida, N.; Lander, R.L.; Mokhtarani, A.; Paolone, V.S.; Wilcox, J.O.; Yager, P.M.; Edelstein, R.M.; Freyberger, A.P.; Gibaut, D.B.; Lipton, R.J.; Nichols, W.R.; Potter, D.M.; Russ, J.R.; Zhang, Y.; Jang, H.I.; Kim, J.Y.; Pac, M.Y.; Baller, B.R.; Stefanski, R.J.; Nakazawa, K.; Tasaka, S.; Choi, Y.S.; Chung, K.H.; Kim, D.C.; Park, I.G.; Song, J.S.; Yoon, C.S.; Chikawa, M.; Abe, T.; Fujii, T.; Fujioka, G.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukushima, H.; Hara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Taruma, K.; Tsuzuki, Y.; Yokoyama, C.; Chang, S.D.; Cheon, B.G.; Cho, J.H.; Kang, J.S.; Kim, C.O.; Kim, K.Y.; Kim, T.Y.; Lee, J.C.; Lee, S.B.; Lim, G.Y.; Lim, I.T.; Nam, S.W.; Shin, T.S.; Sim, K.S.; Woo, J.K.; Isokane, Y.; Tsuneoka, Y.; Aoki, S.; Gauthier, A.; Hoshino, K.; Kitamura, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Miyanishi, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakanishi, S.; Niu, K.; Niwa, K.; Tajima, H.; Dunlea, J.M.; Frederiksen, S.G.; Kuramata, S.; Lundberg, B.G.; Oleynik, G.A.; Reay, N.W.; Reibel, K.; Rush, C.J.; Sidwell, R.A.; Stanton, N.R.; Moriyama, K.; Shibata, H.; Jaffery, T.S.; Kalbfleisch, G.R.; Skubic, P.L.; Snow, J.M.; Willis, S.E.; Yuan, W.Y.; Kusumoto, O.; Okusawa, T.; Teranaka, M.; Tominaga, T.; Watanabe, T.; Yamato, J.; Okabe, H.; Yokota, J.; Sato, Y.; Tezuka, I.; Bahk, S.Y.; Kim, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    A hybrid apparatus consisting of a movable emulsion target and a magnetic spectrometer was used in a fixed target Fermilab Tevatron experiment to study the production of heavy quarks by high-energy hadron beams. High-resolution silicon microstrip detectors were used for precise tracking in the dense particle environment. Details of the experimental apparatus, including the data acquisition system, are described. (orig.)

  4. [Theory of exotic superconducting and normal states of heavy electron and high Tc materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses: quadrupole Kondo effect; heavy electron transport properties; quadrupolar fluctuation mechanism for high-T c superconductors; research accomplishments for the t--J model of high-T c superconductors; interpretation of high-T c superconductors experimental data; and dynamics of strongly correlated systems

  5. Molecular and solid-state properties of tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate)-aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Richard L.; Kress, Joel D.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    We use a hybrid density-functional-theory approach to calculate ground-state electronic properties and a time-dependent density-functional-theory approach to investigate the excited state electronic properties of molecular tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate)-aluminum, Alq. The calculated molecular results are compared with measurements on dense solid-state films of Alq. We specifically consider: the optical absorption spectrum near the fundamental absorption threshold, the ionization potential, the single-particle energy gap, the static dielectric constant, and the electric-field dependence of the electron mobility. We find that the molecular calculations can describe the optical absorption spectrum near the fundamental absorption threshold without significant corrections for solid-state effects. The energies of the triplet excited states are computed and the lowest triplet is found to lie 0.64 eV below the lowest excited singlet state. In contrast, large dielectric corrections must be included for the molecular calculations to describe the ionization potential and single-particle energy gap. When these dielectric corrections are made, using the calculated molecular polarizability, which accurately gives the measured static dielectric constant, both the ionization potential and single-particle energy gap are well described. The calculated molecular dipole moment can be used to interpret the electric-field dependence of the electron mobility. The solid-state properties, determined from the molecular calculations, are then used in a device model to describe the measured current-voltage characteristics in Alq diodes. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  6. [Inhibition of Low Molecular Organic Acids on the Activity of Acidithiobacillus Species and Its Effect on the Removal of Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-wei; Wang, He-rul; Cao, Yan-xiao; Li, Fei; Cui, Chun-hong; Zhou, Li

    2016-05-15

    Application of organic fertilizer can reduce the solubility and bioavailability of heavy metals in contaminated soil, but in the flooded anaerobic environment, organic fertilizer will be decomposed to produce a large number of low molecular organic acids, which can inhibit the biological activity of Acidithiobacillus species. Batch cultures studies showed that the monocarboxylic organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid exhibited a marked toxicity to Acidithiobacillus species, as indicated by that 90% of inhibitory rate for Fe2 and So oxidation in 72 h were achieved at extremely low concentrations of 41.2 mg · L⁻¹, 78.3 mg · L⁻¹, 43.2 mg · L⁻¹, 123.4 mg · L⁻¹ and 81.9 mg 230. 4 mg · L⁻¹, 170.1 mg · L⁻¹, 123.4 mg · L⁻¹ respectively. Of these organic acids, formic acid was the most toxic one as indicated by that Fe2 and So oxidation was almost entirely inhibited at a low concentration. In addition, it was found that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was more sensitive to low molecular organic acids than Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. What's more, there was little effect on biological acidification process of heavy metal contaminated soil when organic acids were added at initial stage (Oh), but it was completely inhibited when these acids were added after 12 h of conventional biological acidification, thus decreasing the efficiency of heavy metals dissolution from soil.

  7. Predictions of the hidden-charm molecular states with the four quark components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Liu, Yan-Rui; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the T anti T-type molecular systems systematically via the one pion exchange model, where T denotes the narrow J P = 1 + D 1 meson or 2 + D 2 * meson and anti T is its antiparticle.With the effective potentials, we try to find the bound-state solutions of the corresponding systems, which provide crucial information of whether T anti T-type molecular states exist. By our analysis, we predict some T anti T-type molecular states which may be accessible at future experiments like LHCb and forthcoming BelleII. (orig.)

  8. Predictions of the hidden-charm molecular states with the four quark components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Liu, Yan-Rui [Shandong University, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation (MOE), Jinan (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    In this work, we study the T anti T-type molecular systems systematically via the one pion exchange model, where T denotes the narrow J{sup P} = 1{sup +} D{sub 1} meson or 2{sup +} D{sub 2}{sup *} meson and anti T is its antiparticle.With the effective potentials, we try to find the bound-state solutions of the corresponding systems, which provide crucial information of whether T anti T-type molecular states exist. By our analysis, we predict some T anti T-type molecular states which may be accessible at future experiments like LHCb and forthcoming BelleII. (orig.)

  9. Heavy Atom Substituents as Molecular Probes for Solvent Effects on the Dynamics of Short-lived Triplet Exciplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Gerhard; Steiner, Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    The influence of heavy atom substituents (Br, I) in the electron donor aniline on the electron transfer reaction with thiopyronine triplet is investigated by flash spectroscopy in solvents of different viscosity and polarity. Triplet quenching constants and radical yields are determined. The results are analysed in terms of decay constants of an intermediate triplet exciplex where the heavy atom substituents significantly enhance the intersystem crossing process leading to singlet ground stat...

  10. State-to-state inelastic and reactive molecular beam scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykke, K.R.; Kay, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) laser spectroscopic and molecular beam-surface scattering techniques are coupled to study inelastic and reactive gas-surface scattering with state-to-state specificity. Rotational, vibrational, translational and angular distributions have been measured for the inelastic scattering of HCI and N 2 from Au(111). In both cases the scattering is direct-inelastic in nature and exhibits interesting dynamical features such as rotational rainbow scattering. In an effort to elucidate the dynamics of chemical reactions occurring on surfaces we have extended our quantum-resolved scattering studies to include the reactive scattering of a beam of gas phase H-atoms from a chlorinated metal surface M-CI. The nascent rotational and vibrational distributions of the HCI product are determined using REMPI. The thermochemistry for this reaction on Au indicates that the product formation proceeding through chemisorbed H-atoms is slightly endothermic while direct reaction of a has phase H-atom with M-CI is highly exothermic (ca. 50 kcal/mole). Details of the experimental techniques, results and implications regarding the scattering dynamics are discussed. 55 ref., 8 fig

  11. Systematical calculations on the ground state properties of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Z.Z.; Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, Lanzhou; Mao, Y.C.; Zhi, Q.J.; Xu, C.; Dong, T.K.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of superheavy elements is now a hot topic in nuclear physics. Alpha-decay and spontaneous fission are two main decay modes in heavy and superheavy regions. Theoretical studies on alpha radioactivity and spontaneous fission can provide useful information for experiments. We investigate the alpha-decay and spontaneous fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei with different models. This includes the alpha-decay energies, alpha decay half-lives, and half-lives of spontaneous fission. The theoretical alpha-decay half-lives are in good agreement with experimental ones. The calculated half-lives of spontaneous fission are in reasonable agreement with present data. The properties of unknown nuclei are predicted. (author)

  12. Search for heavy resonances in diboson final states with the CMS detector at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, Thomas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Mukherjee, Swagata [Physics Institute III A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The search strategy for heavy resonances decaying to a pair of bosons in proton-proton collisions in the CMS detector at LHC is presented. Several New Physics scenarios including the recently proposed heavy vector triplet (HVT) simplified model predict the existence of Beyond Standard Model (BSM) resonances that have enhanced couplings to boson pairs. This search is particularly challenging, since for large resonance masses the two bosons are boosted and the final decay products are difficult to separate. This requires the development and use of dedicated techniques such as special tau reconstruction and lepton isolation approaches. In the absence of a significant deviation from the Standard Model expectation, upper limits are set on the signal cross section times branching ratio for the HVT signal model.

  13. 1{sup −−} and 0{sup ++} heavy four-quark and molecule states in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, R.M., E-mail: rma@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratoire Particules et Univers de Montpellier, CNRS-IN2P3, Case 070, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 - Montpellier (France); Fanomezana, F., E-mail: fanfenos@yahoo.fr [Institute of High-Energy Physics of Madagascar (iHEP-MAD), University of Antananarivo (Madagascar); Narison, S., E-mail: snarison@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire Particules et Univers de Montpellier, CNRS-IN2P3, Case 070, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 - Montpellier (France); Rabemananjara, A., E-mail: achris_01@yahoo.fr [Institute of High-Energy Physics of Madagascar (iHEP-MAD), University of Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2013-01-15

    We estimate the masses of the 1{sup −−} heavy four-quark and molecule states by combining exponential Laplace (LSR) and finite energy (FESR) sum rules known perturbatively to lowest order (LO) in α{sub s} but including non-perturbative terms up to the complete dimension-six condensate contributions. We use double ratio of sum rules (DRSR) for determining the SU(3) breakings terms. The SU(3) mass-splittings of about (50–110) MeV and the ones of about (250–300) MeV between the lowest ground states and their 1st radial excitations are (almost) heavy-flavour independent. The mass predictions summarized in Table 2 are compared with the ones in the literature (when available) and with the three Y{sub c}(4260,4360,4660) and Y{sub b}(10890)1{sup −−} experimental candidates. We conclude that the lowest observed state cannot be a pure1{sup −−} four-quark nor a pure molecule but may result from their mixings. We extend the above analyzes to the 0{sup ++} four-quark and molecule states which are about (0.5–1) GeV heavier than the corresponding 1{sup −−} states, while the splittings between the 0{sup ++} lowest ground state and the 1st radial excitation is about (300–500) MeV. We complete the analysis by estimating the decay constants of the 1{sup −−} and 0{sup ++} four-quark states. Our predictions can be tested using some alternative non-perturbative approaches or/and at LHC{sub b} or some other hadron factories.

  14. Mass spectra of hidden-charm molecular pentaquarks states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Smruti; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, the LHCb Collaboration has reported two hidden-charmed resonances P_c(4380) and P_c(4450) consistent with pentaquark states in the Λ_b"0 → K"-J/Ψp process with masses (widths) (4380 ±8 ± 29) MeV ((205 ±18 ± 86) MeV) and (4449.8 ±1.7 ± 2.5) MeV ((39 ±5 ±19) MeV), respectively. The observation of the P_c states has aroused the theorist's strong interest in the hidden-charm pentaquark states. They have been studied in various frameworks, such as the molecule-like pentaquark states, the diquark-diquark-antiquark type pentaquark states, the diquark-triquark type pentaquark states, re-scattering effects, etc. An identification of pentaquark states as exotic hadron has been one of the long standing problems in the physics of strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). A decade ago lots of discussion were made about pentaquarks states but due to lack of further experimental evidences the study of pentaquarks have been almost gone in the darkness. But, recent remarkable observation of two resonances i.e. P_c(4380) and P_c(4450) with hidden charm and the minimal quark content cc-baruud provided new impact for studies of pentaquark states and opens a new window to study the exotic hadronic matter

  15. Investigation of the energy loss and the charge state of high energy heavy ions in a hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, K.G.

    1991-07-01

    For heavy ions with energy of 1.4 to 5.9 MeV/u the energy loss and charge state after transmission through a totally ionized hydrogen plasma are investigated. Plasma target was a Z-pinch device incorporated in the beam optics of the accelerator by a pumping system. In the 20 cm long pinch hydrogen plasmas with densities up to 1.5x10 19 cm -3 and temperatures above 5 eV are produced, with ionization efficiency higher than 99%. The ions pass the plasma on the symmetry axis of the plasma column through small apertures in the electrodes. The energy loss was measured by time-of-flight method, the plasma density by interferometry along the pinch axis. For the first time the ion charge after transmission through the plasma has been determined by a charge spectrometer being a combination of a dipole magnet and a position sensitive detector with high time resolution. A growth of the average charge of heavy ions in plasma higher than the equilibrium charge in cold gas was discovered, caused by a reduction of electron capture by fast heavy ions in ionized matter. The electron loss rates in plasma and cold gas are equal. (orig./AH) [de

  16. The present state and perspectives of low-energy heavy ion biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chengling; Yu Zengliang

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between low-energy ions and matter has been concerned rarely comparing to that of high-energy ions. It is even more unusual to find studies of the interaction of low-energy ions and complicated organisms. However, the discovery of bioeffects induced by ion beam implantation has opened a new branch in the field of ion beam applications in the life science--Low-energy Heavy Ion Biology. The mutagenic effect of low energy heavy ions was firstly reported in 1986 in rice. Since then, a damage mechanism involved in energy absorption, mass deposition, and charge exchange has been proposed. Accumulating evidence has indicated that these three factors are key determinants in the bioeffects induced by low energy heavy ions, which has opened new opportunities for mutational breeding, gene transferring, cell modification, and cell fusion. In recent years, the ion beam implantation technique has been widely applied in many fields, and increasing research interest in the field has been seen. The authors summarize recent advances in research on the role of low-energy ions in terms of the mechanisms and applications

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations from putative transition states of alpha-spectrin SH3 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Vendruscolo, Michele; Mark, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    A series of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent were started from nine structural models of the transition state of the SH3 domain of alpha-spectrin, which were generated by Lindorff Larsen et al. (Nat Struct Mol Biol 2004;11:443-449) using molecular dynamics simulations in which

  18. Ultrafast Excited State Dynamics in Molecular Motors : Coupling of Motor Length to Medium Viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conyard, Jamie; Stacko, Peter; Chen, Jiawen; McDonagh, Sophie; Hall, Christopher R.; Laptenok, Sergey P.; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Photochemically driven molecular motors convert the energy of incident radiation to intramolecular rotational motion. The motor molecules considered here execute four step unidirectional rotational motion. This comprises a pair of successive light induced isomerizations to a metastable state

  19. Could Zb(10610) be a B*B-bar molecular state?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianrong; Zhong Ming; Huang Mingqiu

    2011-01-01

    Assuming the newly observed structure Z b (10610) as a bottomonium-like molecular state B*B-bar, we calculate its mass in the framework of QCD sum rules. The numerical result is 10.54±0.22 GeV for B*B-bar, which coincide with the mass of Z b (10610). This consolidates the statement made by Belle Collaboration that the Z b (10610) resonance could be a B*B-bar molecular state.

  20. Methods to extract information on the atomic and molecular states from scientific abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Ueshima, Yutaka; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Murata, Masaki; Kanamaru, Toshiyuki; Shirado, Tamotsu; Isahara, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new application of information technology to recognize and extract expressions of atomic and molecular states from electrical forms of scientific abstracts. Present results will help scientists to understand atomic states as well as the physics discussed in the articles. Combining with the internet search engines, it will make one possible to collect not only atomic and molecular data but broader scientific information over a wide range of research fields. (author)

  1. Development of the heavy-water organic-cooled reactor. Status report from the United States of America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trilling, C A [Atomics International, Division of North American Aviation, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1967-01-01

    In late 1964 the United States Atomic Energy Commission decided to undertake the development of the heavy-water-moderated nuclear power reactor as part of its overall programme for the development of advanced converter reactors. The inclusion of the heavy-water reactor concept was based on its indicated potential for achieving: efficient utilization of available fuel resources; generation of low cost electric power; feasibility of scale-up to very large single unit plant sizes for the dual purpose of generating power and desalting sea water. The excellent neutron economy inherent in heavy-water moderation allows a significant increase in the amount of power which can be generated from a given amount of ore. If one takes into account the amount of uranium required not only for burn-up but also to inventory new reactors in a rapidly expanding nuclear economy, heavy-water reactors show the potential of extracting one and a half to two times more power from the ore mined than light-water reactors. Such an improvement in dynamic fuel utilization will postpone the depletion of low cost uranium ore reserves, providing more time for the discovery of new ore resources and the development of economic fast breeder reactors. The excellent neutron economy of the heavy-water reactor also allows the achievement of appreciable burn-up with low enrichment fuel, with consequent low fuel cycle costs and therefore low energy generation costs. These low fuel cycle costs make the economics of this type of reactor rather insensitive to rising ore costs. They also make the concept well suited for the most economic production of the large quantities of heat required for water desalination. The use of individual pressure tubes for circulating the coolant through the reactor vessel lends itself to the development of a modular type design, which can be scaled up to very large single unit plant sizes by simply increasing the number of identical pressure tube modules and the number of coolant

  2. Charge-state-distributions of foil-excited heavy Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Kanter, E.P.; Koenig, W.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of foil-excited fast (MeV/amu) heavy ions have demonstrated large yields of high Rydberg atoms formed in such beams. Further experiments have suggested a strong target-thickness dependence of the yields of such atoms. These results have been puzzling in view of the supposed short mean free paths of such atoms in solids. In an effort to better understand these results, the authors have measured the yields of Rydberg atoms (napprox.100-200) in foil-excited 32 S ions at an incident energy of 125 MeV

  3. Titanium mineral resources in heavy-mineral sands in the Atlantic coastal plain of the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2018-04-16

    This study examined titanium distribution in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States; the titanium is found in heavy-mineral sands that include the minerals ilmenite (Fe2+TiO3), rutile (TiO2), or leucoxene (an alteration product of ilmenite). Deposits of heavy-mineral sands in ancient and modern coastal plains are a significant feedstock source for the titanium dioxide pigments industry. Currently, two heavy-mineral sands mining and processing operations are active in the southeast United States producing concentrates of ilmenite-leucoxene, rutile, and zircon. The results of this study indicate the potential for similar deposits in many areas of the Atlantic Coastal Plain.This study used the titanium analyses of 3,457 stream sediment samples that were analyzed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Geochemical Survey program. This data set was analyzed by an integrated spatial modeling technique known as Bayesian hierarchical modeling to map the regional-scale, spatial distribution of titanium concentrations. In particular, clusters of anomalous concentrations of titanium occur: (1) along the Fall Zone, from Virginia to Alabama, where metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Piedmont region contact younger sediments of the Coastal Plain; (2) a paleovalley near the South Carolina and North Carolina border; (3) the upper and middle Atlantic Coastal Plain of North Carolina; (4) the majority of the Atlantic Coastal Plain of Virginia; and (5) barrier islands and stretches of the modern shoreline from South Carolina to northeast Florida. The areas mapped by this study could help mining companies delimit areas for exploration.

  4. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  5. From Heavy-Ion Collisions to Compact Stars: Equation of State and Relevance of the System Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Mogliacci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we start by presenting state-of-the-art methods allowing us to compute moments related to the globally conserved baryon number, by means of first principle resummed perturbative frameworks. We focus on such quantities for they convey important properties of the finite temperature and density equation of state, being particularly sensitive to changes in the degrees of freedom across the quark-hadron phase transition. We thus present various number susceptibilities along with the corresponding results as obtained by lattice quantum chromodynamics collaborations, and comment on their comparison. Next, omitting the importance of coupling corrections and considering a zero-density toy model for the sake of argument, we focus on corrections due to the small size of heavy-ion collision systems, by means of spatial compactifications. Briefly motivating the relevance of finite size effects in heavy-ion physics, in opposition to the compact star physics, we present a few preliminary thermodynamic results together with the speed of sound for certain finite size relativistic quantum systems at very high temperature.

  6. Molecular detection using Rydberg, autoionizing, and cluster states. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, J.

    1989-08-17

    Continuing investigations of multiphoton ionization processes in naphthalene have established the geometry and spectroscopy of trimer and tetramer cluster states. A new, highly efficient ionization mechanism has been identified in the trimer. It is closely related to autoionization of 2-electron atoms by resonant 2-photon excitation and to exciton fusion in larger clusters.

  7. Search for Multi-quark Exotic States with Heavy Flavor at D0 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Alexei [Serpukhov, IHEP

    2017-12-20

    We present the results for multi-quark exotic states search from D0 Collaboration at the FNAL Tevatron. This includes an evidence for a state (X(5568)) with hadronic decays of Bs meson, a confirmation of the X(5568) state with semileptonic decays of Bs meson, and a search for exotic baryons decaying to J/ψΛ pairs.

  8. Triply heavy tetraquark states with the QQ anti Q anti q configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kan; Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Liu, Yan-Rui; Wu, Jing [Shandong University, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation (MOE), Jinan (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    In the framework of the color-magnetic interaction, we systematically investigate the mass splittings of the QQ anti Q anti q tetraquark states and estimate their rough masses in this work. These systems include the explicitly exotic states cc anti b anti q and bb anti c anti q and the hidden exotic states cc anti c anti q, cb anti b anti q, bc anti c anti q, and bb anti b anti q. If a state around the estimated mass region can be observed, its nature as a genuine tetraquark is favored. The strong decay patterns shown here will be helpful to the experimental search for these exotic states. (orig.)

  9. Microscopic approach in Inelastic Heavy-Ions Scattering with Excitation of Nuclear Collective States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, K.V.; Zemlyanya, E.V.; Khtina, I.N.; Lukyanov, V.K; Metawe, Z.; Hanna, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the density distribution of a deformed target-nucleus,the spherical λ = 0 and the deformed λ = 2 parts were considered. On this basis, the corresponding potential parts U 0 and U i nt(2) of a double-folding microscopic nucleus-nucleus optical potential are obtained. Then, for these potentials and by using the coupled- channel technique (ECIS), the elastic and inelastic amplitudes are calculated for 17 O heavy ions scattering on 2 + collective excited stat of various target nuclei. Besides,the same cross-sections are calculated in the frame of an adiabatic approach of the eikonal approximation, where the inelastic amplitude is the linear function of U i nt (2).Both the obtained results are compared with the experimental data, and also discus their efficiency in predicting the deformation parameters of nuclei

  10. An ion cooling and state characterization apparatus for studies of molecular ion dissociative interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Shihu; Vane, C R; Bannister, M E; Havener, C C; Meyer, F W; Krause, H F; Hettich, R L; Goeringer, D E; Van Berkel, G J

    2009-01-01

    An experimental capability is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multi-Charged Ion Research Facility (ORNL MIRF) to enable stored cooling and state characterization of molecular ions of essentially any mass. Ions selected from a variety of available sources are injected from the side into a 1.5 meter long electrostatic mirror trap, where excited internal states are cooled by radiative cooling. An electron beam target located near the middle of the ion-trap region, coupled with neutral fragment imaging detector systems at each end of the trap, permits state-specific studies of electron-molecular ion dissociation.

  11. [Adsorption of heavy metals on the surface of birnessite relationship with its Mn average oxidation state and adsorption sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Tan, Wen-Feng; Feng, Xiong-Han; Qiu, Guo-Hong; Liu, Fan

    2011-10-01

    Adsorption characteristics of mineral surface for heavy metal ions are largely determined by the type and amount of surface adsorption sites. However, the effects of substructure variance in manganese oxide on the adsorption sites and adsorption characteristics remain unclear. Adsorption experiments and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were combined to examine the adsorption characteristics of Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ sequestration by birnessites with different Mn average oxidation state (AOS), and the Mn AOS dependent adsorption sites and adsorption characteristics. The results show that the maximum adsorption capacity of Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ increased with increasing birnessite Mn AOS. The adsorption capacity followed the order of Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Cd2+. The observations suggest that there exist two sites on the surface of birnessite, i. e., high-binding-energy site (HBE site) and low-binding-energy site (LBE site). With the increase of Mn AOS for birnessites, the amount of HBE sites for heavy metal ions adsorption remarkably increased. On the other hand, variation in the amount of LBE sites was insignificant. The amount of LBE sites is much more than those of HBE sites on the surface of birnessite with low Mn AOS. Nevertheless, both amounts on the surface of birnessite with high Mn AOS are very close to each other. Therefore, the heavy metal ions adsorption capacity on birnessite is largely determined by the amount of HBE sites. On birnessite surface, adsorption of Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ mostly occurred at HBE sites. In comparison with Zn2+ and Cd2+, more Cu2+ adsorbed on the LBW sites. Pb2+ adsorption maybe occupy at both LBE sites and HBE sites simultaneously.

  12. Preparation and coherent manipulation of pure quantum states of a single molecular ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Kurz, Christoph; Hume, David B.; Plessow, Philipp N.; Leibrandt, David R.; Leibfried, Dietrich

    2017-05-01

    Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and atomic ions has led to advances including the observation of exotic phases of matter, the development of precision sensors and state-of-the-art atomic clocks. The same level of control in molecules could also lead to important developments such as controlled chemical reactions and sensitive probes of fundamental theories, but the vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom in molecules pose a challenge for controlling their quantum mechanical states. Here we use quantum-logic spectroscopy, which maps quantum information between two ion species, to prepare and non-destructively detect quantum mechanical states in molecular ions. We develop a general technique for optical pumping and preparation of the molecule into a pure initial state. This enables us to observe high-resolution spectra in a single ion (CaH+) and coherent phenomena such as Rabi flopping and Ramsey fringes. The protocol requires a single, far-off-resonant laser that is not specific to the molecule, so many other molecular ions, including polyatomic species, could be treated using the same methods in the same apparatus by changing the molecular source. Combined with the long interrogation times afforded by ion traps, a broad range of molecular ions could be studied with unprecedented control and precision. Our technique thus represents a critical step towards applications such as precision molecular spectroscopy, stringent tests of fundamental physics, quantum computing and precision control of molecular dynamics.

  13. Charge state analysis of heavy ions after penetration of uncleaned and sputter cleaned conducting surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, M.; Schosnig, M.; Kroneberger, K.; Tobisch, M.; Maier, R.; Kuzel, M.; Fiedler, C.; Hofmann, D.; Groeneveld, K.O.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the charge state distribution of fast ions inside a solid is of basic interest in various research fields as stopping power measurements etc. The existing models for the charge state evolution differ in the treatment of the projectile-exit-surface interaction, which has a strong influence on the final charge state distributions. We measured the charge state distributions for C + , N + , and O + (30≤E/M≤130 keV/u) impact on thin C, Cu, and Au foils, where the surface properties were modified by sputter cleaning. The mesurements show a pronounced change of the mean projectile charge state to lower values in the case of sputter cleaned surfaces. This result underlines the importance of the projectile-surface interaction for the generation of the outcoming charge state distribution. (orig.)

  14. Triply heavy tetraquark states with the $QQ\\bar{Q}\\bar{q}$ configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kan; Liu, Xiang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Yan-Rui; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the color-magnetic interaction, we systematically investigate the mass splittings of the $QQ\\bar{Q}\\bar{q}$ tetraquark states and estimated their rough masses in this work. These systems include the explicitly exotic states $cc\\bar{b}\\bar{q}$ and $bb\\bar{c}\\bar{q}$ and the hidden exotic states $cc\\bar{c}\\bar{q}$, $cb\\bar{b}\\bar{q}$, $bc\\bar{c}\\bar{q}$, and $bb\\bar{b}\\bar{q}$. If a state around the estimated mass region could be observed, its nature as a genuine tetraquark ...

  15. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  16. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue, T., E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kumaki, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  17. Discovering Unique, Low-Energy Transition States Using Evolutionary Molecular Memetic Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Ong, Y.S.; Handoko, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    In the last few decades, identification of transition states has experienced significant growth in research interests from various scientific communities. As per the transition states theory, reaction paths and landscape analysis as well as many thermodynamic properties of biochemical systems can...... be accurately identified through the transition states. Transition states describe the paths of molecular systems in transiting across stable states. In this article, we present the discovery of unique, low-energy transition states and showcase the efficacy of their identification using the memetic computing...... paradigm under a Molecular Memetic Computing (MMC) framework. In essence, the MMC is equipped with the tree-based representation of non-cyclic molecules and the covalent-bond-driven evolutionary operators, in addition to the typical backbone of memetic algorithms. Herein, we employ genetic algorithm...

  18. The solid-state terahertz spectrum of MDMA (Ecstasy) - A unique test for molecular modeling assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allis, Damian G.; Hakey, Patrick M.; Korter, Timothy M.

    2008-10-01

    The terahertz (THz, far-infrared) spectrum of 3,4-methylene-dioxymethamphetamine hydrochloride (Ecstasy) is simulated using solid-state density functional theory. While a previously reported isolated-molecule calculation is noteworthy for the precision of its solid-state THz reproduction, the solid-state calculation predicts that the isolated-molecule modes account for only half of the spectral features in the THz region, with the remaining structure arising from lattice vibrations that cannot be predicted without solid-state molecular modeling. The molecular origins of the internal mode contributions to the solid-state THz spectrum, as well as the proper consideration of the protonation state of the molecule, are also considered.

  19. The importance of initial-final state correlations for the formation of fragments in heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossiaux, P.B. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees]|[National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., East Lansing, MI (United States); Aichelin, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees

    1997-12-31

    Using quantum molecular dynamics simulations, the formation of fragments in symmetric reactions is investigated between beam energies of E = 30 A MeV and 600 A MeV. After a comparison with existing data some observables relevant to tackle equilibration are investigated. None of our simulations gives evidence that the system passes through a state of equilibrium. The production mechanisms are also investigated. (K.A.). 35 refs.

  20. Analysis of heavy-rain-producing elevated thunderstorms in the MO-KS-OK region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Laurel

    Most elevated thunderstorms in the United States occur in the Midwest, with a maximum in eastern Kansas (Colman 1990a). Elevated thunderstorms are defined as thunderstorms that occur over a very stable surface boundary layer (Colman 1990b). They may be better defined as convection occurring over a stable layer near the surface, essentially cut off from surface-based instability (Corfidi et al. 2006). Elevated mesoscale convective systems produce 30-70% of the total rainfall during the warm season over the Central Plains (Moore et al. 2003). 1.1 Purpose Elevated thunderstorms are still not very well understood. Elevated convection can take a variety of forms, and can be very similar to surface-based convection. Corfidi et al. (2006) describe the challenge of finding the originating layer of parcels making up a convective cloud. Surface-based convection often incorporates elevated parcels, and elevated convection can bring surface parcels into its updraft. The distinction between the two types of storms can be defined by where most of the parcels originate. This becomes especially hard to distinguish as convection transitions from surface-based to elevated and vice-versa (Corfidi et al. 2006). Colman (1990a), in his study, used three criteria to delineate elevated thunderstorm station reports from surface-based thunderstorm station reports: 1) The observation must lie on the cold side of an analyzed front that shows a clear contrast in temperature, dew-point temperature, and wind. 2) The station's wind, temperature, and dew-point temperature must be qualitatively similar to the immediately surrounding values. 3) The surface air on the warm side of the analyzed front must have a higher equivalent potential temperature (thetae) than the air on the cold side of the front (Colman 1990a). These three criteria have been incorporated into several studies since for the evaluation of elevated convection (e.g., Grant 1995; Rochette and Moore 1996; Moore et al. 1998; Moore et

  1. Bound states and molecular structure of systems with hyperons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaishi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Microscopic calculations are done for Σ-hypernuclear few-body systems by a method named ATMS. Among two- to five-body systems, only the Σ 4 He(0 + ) and Σ 4 H(0 + ) hypernuclei are expected to be bound: The binding energy and the width of the former are calculated to be 3.7 ∼ 4.6 MeV and 4.5 ∼ 7.9 MeV, respectively. The observation of Σ 4 He at KEK is in good agreement with the above prediction. The nucleus-Σ potential has a strong Lane term and a repulsive bump at short distance. The Lane term makes the system bound and the bump suppresses the ΣN → ΛN conversion. X-ray measurement of level shifts in the 4 He-Σ - , 3 He-Σ - and 3 H-Σ - atoms can provide another information on the Lane term. In 208 Pb, there may exist a peculiar state, Coulomb-assisted (atomnucleus) hybrid state, where Σ - is trapped in the surface region by the strong interaction with the aid of the inner centrifugal repulsion and the outer Coulomb attraction. An analysis is given for new data of Ξ -.12 C atomic or nuclear systems from the emulsion-counter experiment at KEK. The double-Λ hypernucleus formation rate is calculated for a stopped Ξ - on 4 He. A high branching ratio of 37% is obtained for the ΛΛ 4 H formation from a Ξ -.4 He atom. The detection of about 2.3 MeV neutron is proposed to search for lightest double-Λ hypernucleus ΛΛ 4 H. (author)

  2. Tricriticality for dimeric Coulomb molecular crystals in ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travěnec, Igor; Šamaj, Ladislav

    2017-12-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a system of dimers. Each dimer consists in a pair of equivalent charges at a fixed distance, immersed in a neutralizing homogeneous background. All charges interact pairwisely by Coulomb potential. The dimer centers form a two-dimensional rectangular lattice with the aspect ratio α\\in [0, 1] and each dimer is allowed to rotate around its center. The previous numerical simulations, made for the more general Yukawa interaction, indicate that only two basic dimer configurations can appear: either all dimers are parallel or they have two different angle orientations within alternating (checkerboard) sublattices. As the dimer size increases, two second-order phase transitions, related to two kinds of the symmetry breaking in dimer’s orientations, were reported. In this paper, we use a recent analytic method based on an expansion of the interaction energy in Misra functions which converges quickly and provides an analytic derivation of the critical behaviour. Our main result is that there exists a specific aspect ratio of the rectangular lattice α^*=0.714 106 840 000 71\\ldots which divides the space of model’s phases onto two distinct regions. If the lattice aspect ratio α>α* , we recover both types of the second-order phase transitions and find that they are of mean-field type with the critical exponent β = 1/2 . If 0.711 535≤slantα<α* , the phase transition associated with the discontinuity of dimer’s angles on alternating sublattices becomes of first order. For α=α* , the first- and second-order phase transitions meet at the tricritical point, characterized by the different critical index β = 1/4 . Such phenomenon is known from literature about the Landau theory of one-component fields, but in our two-component version the scenario is more complicated: the component which is already in the symmetry-broken state at the tricritical point also interferes and exhibits unexpectedly the mean-field singular

  3. Application of the interacting boson model to collective states in medium heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaup, U.

    1983-01-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model a systematic description of even-even isotopes of the medium heavy elements selenium, krypton, and strontium is given. The number of the free parameters could be kept very small by the determination of the physically relevant terms of the general model Hamiltonian. The variation of the collectivity from spherical to deformed, γ-soft nuclei could be mainly derived from the influence of the number of valence nucleons. All model parameters vary smoothly as function of the valence particle number and in qualitative agreement with predictions of a simplified microscopical model. Odd nuclei were studied in the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. Beside the phenomenological description of odd-even rubidium, technetium, and silver isotope this part of the thesis is occupied mainly by the microscopical theory of the boson-fermion model. The effect of the antisymmetrization of the last, odd particle with the core nucleons is discussed. The microscopic theory is supplemented by the derivation of the so called Pauli term from the interaction of identical nucleons. (orig./HSI) [de

  4. Heavy Metal Accumulation is Associated with Molecular and Pathological Perturbations in Liver of Variola louti from the Jeddah Coast of Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of waste water are discharged daily from the Jeddah Metropolitan Area into the Red Sea. Sewage draining into the Red Sea causes widespread chemical pollution that is toxic to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of pollution and assess the presence of heavy metals in fish tissue and study their association with biological and biochemical alterations. The average concentrations of heavy metals found in hepatic tissues of Variola louti fish from the polluted area, namely Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe and Zn, were 1.74, 9.69, 47.48, 4020.01 and 229.47 µg/g liver, respectively, that were significantly higher than that of samples taken from reference area (0.24, 1.98, 20.12, 721.93, 129.21 µg/g liver, respectively. The fold change of heavy metals in fish from the polluted area with respect of that of the reference area followed the order Cd > Fe > Cr > Cu > Zn. Analysis of nuclear DNA revealed that hepatic tissues of fish samples from the polluted area showed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as detected by flow cytometry and formation DNA-ladder. In addition, hepatic sections from polluted area fishes showed more fibrotic changes and collagen deposition by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome staining, respectively, compared to samples taken from the reference area. Moreover, the electrophoretic patterns of proteins of liver of fishes caught at the polluted area showed different patterns of proteins from that of the reference with bands at 42, 130 and 140 kDa, which is in a good agreement with the molecular weight of collagen type III. In conclusion, there were significant changes in the tissues of fishes in the polluted area at the cellular and the molecular levels that may be associated with an accumulation of heavy metals. Assessment of fishes as a sensitive biomonitor for the pollution of surface waters that may affect general health of human and wild life is conceivable.

  5. Heavy Metal Accumulation is Associated with Molecular and Pathological Perturbations in Liver of Variola louti from the Jeddah Coast of Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Elshal, Mohamed F; Kumosani, Taha A; Mal, Ahmad O; Ahmed, Youssri M; Almulaiky, Yaaser Q; Asseri, Amer H; Zamzami, Mazin A

    2016-03-21

    Large amounts of waste water are discharged daily from the Jeddah Metropolitan Area into the Red Sea. Sewage draining into the Red Sea causes widespread chemical pollution that is toxic to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of pollution and assess the presence of heavy metals in fish tissue and study their association with biological and biochemical alterations. The average concentrations of heavy metals found in hepatic tissues of Variola louti fish from the polluted area, namely Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe and Zn, were 1.74, 9.69, 47.48, 4020.01 and 229.47 µg/g liver, respectively, that were significantly higher than that of samples taken from reference area (0.24, 1.98, 20.12, 721.93, 129.21 µg/g liver, respectively). The fold change of heavy metals in fish from the polluted area with respect of that of the reference area followed the order Cd > Fe > Cr > Cu > Zn. Analysis of nuclear DNA revealed that hepatic tissues of fish samples from the polluted area showed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as detected by flow cytometry and formation DNA-ladder. In addition, hepatic sections from polluted area fishes showed more fibrotic changes and collagen deposition by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining, respectively, compared to samples taken from the reference area. Moreover, the electrophoretic patterns of proteins of liver of fishes caught at the polluted area showed different patterns of proteins from that of the reference with bands at 42, 130 and 140 kDa, which is in a good agreement with the molecular weight of collagen type III. In conclusion, there were significant changes in the tissues of fishes in the polluted area at the cellular and the molecular levels that may be associated with an accumulation of heavy metals. Assessment of fishes as a sensitive biomonitor for the pollution of surface waters that may affect general health of human and wild life is conceivable.

  6. Fulde-Ferrell-Like Molecular States in Spin-Orbit Coupled Ultracold Fermi Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chong; Fu, Li-Bin

    2017-08-01

    We study the molecular state in three-component Fermi gases with a single impurity of 6 Li immersing in a no-interacting Fermi sea of 40 K in the presence of an equal weight combination of Rashba-type and Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling. In the region where the Fermi sea has two disjointed Fermi surfaces, we find that there are two Fulde-Ferrell-like molecular states with dominating contributions from the lower helicity branch. Decreasing the scattering length or the spin-orbit coupled Fermi energy, we find the Fulde-Ferrell-like molecular state with small center-of-mass momentum is always energy favored and the other one will suddenly disappear. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) under Grant Nos. 2013CBA01502, 2013CB834100, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11374040, 11475027, 11575027, 11274051, and 11075020

  7. 16O + 16O molecular structures of superdeformed states in S isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Structures of excited states in S isotopes are investigated by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter β. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed (SD) bands are predicted in 33-36S except for negative-parity states in 36S. The SD bands have structures of 16O + 16O + valence neutron(s) in molecular orbitals around the two 16O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the valence neutron(s) in the SD states are δ and/or π molecular orbitals.

  8. Contribution to the heavy-ion optical potential from coupling to vibrational states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donangelo, R; Canto, L F; Hussein, M S

    1978-11-01

    The component of the optical potential in the elastic channel due to the coupling to vibrational states in Coulomb excitation is derived using a previously developed semiclassical method. Several numerical examples are worked out.

  9. Differential accumulation of heavy metals in the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima as a function of symbiotic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchelmore, Carys L.; Alan Verde, E.; Ringwood, Amy H.; Weis, Virginia M.

    2003-01-01

    The accumulation of metals by the North American Pacific Coast temperate sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima, and its dinoflagellate-algal symbiont Symbiodinium muscatinei was examined following laboratory metal exposures. Both, naturally occurring symbiotic and symbiont-free (aposymbiotic) anemones were used in this study to investigate differences in metal uptake due to the symbiotic state of the animal. The effects of metal exposures on the anemone-algal symbiosis were determined using measures of algal cell density and mitotic index (MI). Anemones were exposed to either cadmium, copper, nickel or zinc chloride (0, 10, 100 μg l -1 for Cd, Cu and Ni; 0, 100, 1000 μg l -1 for Zn) for 42 days followed by a 42-day recovery period in ambient seawater. Anemones were analyzed for metal content using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) at various time points during the study. Symbiotic anemones accumulated Cd, Ni and Zn to a greater extent than aposymbiotic anemones. A dramatically different pattern of Cu accumulation was observed, with aposymbiotic anemones accumulating higher levels than symbiotic anemones. Following recovery in ambient seawater, all tissue metal levels were reduced to near pre-exposure control levels in most cases. No changes in algal cell density or MI were observed in symbiotic anemone tentacle clips at any dose or time point in the Cd and Cu exposures. However, significant reductions in algal cell densities were observed in the Ni-exposed and some Zn-exposed animals, although levels returned to control values following recovery. There were no changes in mitotic index (MI) following Ni or Zn exposures. These results demonstrate that the extent of heavy metal accumulation depends upon cnidarian symbiotic state and the heavy metal in question

  10. Cascade γ-decay of a heavy nucleus compound state: the experimental picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Peculiarities of excitation and decay (for assigned final state of excited levels of 35 nuclei from 114 Cd to 200 Hg in energy range, equal approximately to the neutron binding energy, were studied in experiments with the use of the method of summation of amplitudes of coinciding pulses from Ge-detectors. Main features of the process of cascade γ-decay of compound states (neutron resonances) of the most complex nuclei were revealed in the whole range of levels dictating this process

  11. Molecular-state close-coupling theory including continuum states. I. Derivation of close-coupled equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, W.R.; Bandarage, G.

    1988-01-01

    We formulate a close-coupling theory of slow ion-atom collisions based on molecular (adiabatic) electronic states, and including the electronic continuum. The continuum is represented by packet states spanning it locally and constructed explicitly from exact continuum states. Particular attention is given to two fundamental questions: (1) Unbound electrons can escape from the local region spanned by the packet states. We derive close-coupled integral equations correctly including the escape effects; the ''propagator'' generated by these integral equations does not conserve probability within the close-coupled basis. Previous molecular-state formulations including the continuum give no account of escape effects. (2) Nonadiabatic couplings of adiabatic continuum states with the same energy are singular, reflecting the fact that an adiabatic description of continuum behavior is not valid outside a local region. We treat these singularities explicitly and show that an accurate representation of nonadiabatic couplings within the local region spanned by a set of packet states is well behaved. Hence an adiabatic basis-set description can be used to describe close coupling to the continuum in a local ''interaction region,'' provided the effects of escape are included. In principle, the formulation developed here can be extended to a large class of model problems involving many-electron systems and including models for Penning ionization and collisional detachment processes

  12. Studies of isotopic effects in the excited electronic states of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Rare gas halogen (RGH) lasers serve as convenient tools for a range of photophysical processes which exhibit isotope effects. This document summarizes progress in the production of molecular systems in their electronic excited states with the aid of RGH lasers, and the various isotopic effects one can study under these conditions. We conclude that the basic physical mechanisms involved in the isotopically sensitive characteristics of excited molecular electronic states are sufficiently selective to be useful in both the detection and separation of many atomic materials

  13. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-04-22

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  14. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Roberts, William L.; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  15. Towards a Unified Quark-Hadron-Matter Equation of State for Applications in Astrophysics and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels-Uwe F. Bastian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We outline an approach to a unified equation of state for quark-hadron matter on the basis of a Φ − derivable approach to the generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck equation of state for a cluster decomposition of thermodynamic quantities like the density. To this end we summarize the cluster virial expansion for nuclear matter and demonstrate the equivalence of the Green’s function approach and the Φ − derivable formulation. As an example, the formation and dissociation of deuterons in nuclear matter is discussed. We formulate the cluster Φ − derivable approach to quark-hadron matter which allows to take into account the specifics of chiral symmetry restoration and deconfinement in triggering the Mott-dissociation of hadrons. This approach unifies the description of a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma with that of a medium-modified hadron resonance gas description which are contained as limiting cases. The developed formalism shall replace the common two-phase approach to the description of the deconfinement and chiral phase transition that requires a phase transition construction between separately developed equations of state for hadronic and quark matter phases. Applications to the phenomenology of heavy-ion collisions and astrophysics are outlined.

  16. Heavy quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  17. Regularization of absorber or doorway states in heavy-particle collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Riera, A.; Sanchez, P.

    1994-01-01

    We present a unified theoretical basis of the recently proposed regularization method of absorber or doorway states. The theory is applicable to the close-coupling solutions of time-dependent Schroedinger equations corresponding to Hamiltonians containing singular terms and with a partial continuum spectrum. The presentation and illustration are restricted to the treatment of atomic collisions. (author)

  18. Channel coupling in heavy quarkonia: Energy levels, mixing, widths, and new states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilkin, I. V.; Simonov, Yu. A.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of channel coupling via decay products is used to study energy shifts, level mixing as well as the possibility of new near-threshold resonances in cc, bb systems. The Weinberg eigenvalue method is formulated in the multichannel problems, which allows one to describe coupled-channel resonances and wave functions in a unitary way, and to predict new states due to channel coupling. Realistic wave functions for all single-channel states and decay matrix elements computed earlier are exploited, and no new fitting parameters are involved. Examples of level shifts, widths, and mixings are presented; the dynamical origin of X(3872) and the destiny of the single-channel 2 3 P 1 (cc) state are clarified. As a result a sharp and narrow peak in the state with quantum numbers J PC =1 ++ is found at 3.872 GeV, while the single-channel resonance originally around 3.940 GeV becomes increasingly broad and disappears with growing coupling to open channels.

  19. Deep-hole and high-lying particle states in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.

    1985-01-01

    Our present knowledge on single-particle strength functions from one nucleon transfer reactions is reviewed. Results on deeply-bound neutron hole states in the Sn and Pb region are discussed with emphasis on the investigation of a very large excitation energy range. The first measurements on the γ-decay of deeply-bound hole states in the Sn isotopes are reported. High energy neutron and proton stripping reactions are used to study the particle response function. These reactions are particularly well suited to the study of high-spin outer subshells. For the proton states, the behaviour of the 1h 11/2 and 1i 13/2 strength distributions, as a function of deformation in the Sm region, is discussed. Strong transitions to high-lying neutron states are observed in the 112, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124 Sn and 208 Pb nuclei. The empirical systematics for both proton and neutron particle strength distributions are compared to the predictions from the quasi particle-phonon and the single-particle vibration coupling nuclear models. (orig.)

  20. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of different states of the KRb+ molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korek, M.; Younis, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text.The molecular activities in ultra-cold alkali atom trapping stimulate theoretical developments to compute relevant adiabatic potential curves, especially in the framework of the pseudopotential methods. For these methods the molecular ion KRb+ is treated as system with one active electron moving in a field of two ionic cores, where core valence electron interactions are presented by an effective potential. Potential energies have been calculated over a wide range of internuclear distance (5.0-60a o ) for the lowest states of symmetry 2 Σ, 2 Π, 2 Δ and Ω for the molecular ion KRb+. To avoid an over estimation of the dissociation energy the perturbative treatment is replaced by an l-dependent core-polarization potential of the Foucrault et al. For the one valence electron of the two considered atoms, we recalculated the polarization potential cut-off parameters r k l , and r R b l by taking l=0,1,2 and r i 2 =r i 3 . Molecular orbital for the molecular ion KRb+ were derived from Self Consistent Field calculations (SCF), and full valence Configuration Interaction (IC) calculations were performed. Extensive tables of energy values versus internuclear distance are displayed and molecular spectroscopic constants have been derived, for the first time, for the bound states with regular shape

  1. Mapeamento de chuvas intensas no estado de Minas Gerais Mapping of heavy rainfalls in the state of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rogério de Mello

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Estudos associados a chuvas extremas são constituídos de eventos de interesse prático para a gestão dos recursos naturais, como manejo de bacias hidrográficas e conservação dos solos e da água. A distribuição espacial desses eventos possibilita inferir sobre áreas onde sua ocorrência é acentuada e desprovida de informações técnicas. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram promover, a partir de dados pontuais de 177 estações meteorológicas e com a utilização de técnicas geoestatísticas, o mapeamento de chuvas intensas para o Estado de Minas Gerais e identificar as áreas mais vulneráveis no tocante à ocorrência dessas chuvas nesse Estado. Foi constatado que as maiores intensidades ocorrem nas regiões leste e noroeste de Minas Gerais, o que pode ser explicado pela maior influência da Zona de Convergência do Atlântico Sul, além de ocorrência de chuvas convectivas. Foi possível, também, constatar e mapear intensidades intermediárias nas regiões sul e central e os menores valores para as regiões norte e nordeste de Minas Gerais. Para maiores durações, verificou-se, para a região sul, ocorrência de altas intensidades, o que está associado à entrada com maior frequência de frentes frias, produzindo chuvas de longa duração.Studies of heavy rainfall are of practical interest for the conservation management of natural resources such as watersheds and soil and water. The spatial distribution of these natural rainfall events allows conclusions about regions where the occurrence of heavy rain is more frequent and to estimate their magnitude for locations without rainfall data sets. Thus, the purpose of this study was to map heavy rainfall data from 177 meteorological stations, using a geostatistical approach, for Minas Gerais, identifying the most vulnerable regions in terms of the occurrence of heavy rain. The highest values were estimated for the East and Northwest regions of the state, which can be explained by the

  2. Probing the nuclear equation of state by heavy-ion reactions and neutron star properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, P K; Cassing, W; Thoma, M H [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Giessen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss the nuclear equation of state (EOS) using a non-linear relativistic transport model. From the baryon flow for Ni + Ni as well as Au + Au systems we find that the strength of the vector potential has to be reduced at high density or at high relative momenta to describe the experimental flow data at 1-2 A GeV. We use the same dynamical model to calculate the nuclear EOS and then employ this EOS to neutron star structure calculations. We consider the core of the neutron star to be composed of neutrons with an admixture of protons, electrons, muons, sigmas and lambdas at zero temperature. We find that the nuclear equation of state is softer at high densities and hence the maximum mass and the radius of the neutron star are in the observable range of M {proportional_to} 1.7 M{sub s}un and R = 8 km, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Searches for Natural Supersymmetry in Hadronic Final States with Heavy Flavor at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Bart

    This thesis presents the hadronic-channel supersymmetric searches for direct sbottom and gluino-mediated sbottom and stop production performed on 4.71 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. These signatures are characterized by final states with multiple b-tagged jets and missing transverse energy, and the analysis strategy is chosen accordingly. Particular emphasis is placed on the utilization of the simplified models approach in signal characterization, optimization, and interpretation of results. No significant excess is observed resulting in limits set at 95% confidence level. Relative to the previous versions of the analyses, this iteration represents a several-fold increase in sensitivity to the new physics signatures considered. This is largely due to the use of three b-tag signal regions as well as signal regions based on initial state radiation.

  4. Searches for Natural Supersymmetry in Hadronic Final States with Heavy Flavor at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Bart Clayton [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This thesis presents the hadronic-channel supersymmetric searches for direct sbottom and gluino-mediated sbottom and stop production performed on 4.71 fb-1 of √s = 7 TeV data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. These signatures are characterized by final states with multiple b-tagged jets and missing transverse energy ( ET ) and the analysis strategy is chosen accordingly. Particular emphasis is placed on the utilization of the simplified models approach in signal characterization, optimization, and interpretation of results. No significant excess is observed resulting in limits set at 95% confidence level. Relative to the previous versions of the analyses, this iteration represents a several-fold increase in sensitivity to the new physics signatures considered. This is largely due to the use of three b-tag signal regions as well as signal regions based on initial state radiation.

  5. Chemical equilibrium model for high- Tc and heavy fermion superconductors: the density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallio, A.; Hissa, J.; Hayrynen, T.; Braysy, V.; Sakkinen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical equilibrium model is based on the idea of correlated electron pairs, which in singlet state can exist as quasimolecules in the superfluid and normal states of a superconductor. These preformed pairs are bosons which can undergo a Bose-Einstein condensation in analogy with the superfluidity of 4 He+ 3 He-mixture. The bosons (B ++ ) and the fermions (h + ) are in chemical equilibrium with respect to the reaction B ++ ↔ 2h + , at any temperature. The mean densities of bosons and fermions (quasiholes) n B (T) and n h (T) are determined from the thermodynamics of the equilibrium reaction in terms of a single function f(T). By thermodynamics the function f(T) is connected to equilibrium constant φ(T) by 1-f(T) = [1 + φ(T)] -1/2 . Using a simple power law, known to be valid near T = 0, for the chemical constant φ(T) α/t 2γ , t = T/T*, the mean density of quasiholes is given in closed form. This enables one to calculate the corresponding density of states (DOS) D(E) N s /N(0), by solving an integral equation. The NIS- tunneling conductivity near T = 0, given by D(E) compares well with the most recent experiments: D(E) ∼ E γ , for small E and a finite maximum of right size, corresponding to 'finite quasiparticle lifetime'. The corresponding SIS-tunneling conductivity is obtained from a simple convolution and is also in agreement with recent break junction experiments of Hancotte et al. The position of the maximum can be used to obtain the scaling temperature T*, which comes close to the one measured by Hall coefficient in the normal state. A simple explanation for the spingap effect in NMR is given. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  6. A new state of the H sub 2 sup + molecular ion

    CERN Document Server

    Carbonell, J; Hilico, L; Kilic, S; Lazauskas, R

    2002-01-01

    A new state of the H sub 2 sup + molecular ion with binding energy of 1.09 x 10 sup - sup 9 a.u. below the first dissociation limit is predicted, using highly accurate numerical nonrelativistic quantum calculations. It is the first L=0 excited state, antisymmetric with respect to the exchange of the two protons. It manifests itself as a huge p-H scattering length of a = 750 +-5 Bohr radii.

  7. Molecular Dynamics and Morphology of High Performance Elastomers and Fibers by Solid State NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical structure and physical state of the residual phosphorous in PBO fiber...ssNMR) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical structure and physical state of the residual phosphorous in PBO fiber, which has been long suspected to...Jason Cain, Jian H. Yu, David Veysset, Keith A. Nelson . Probing the Influence of Molecular Dynamics of Matrix Elastomers on Ballistic Impact Back-face

  8. Two-photon decay of K-shell vacancy states in heavy atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilakovac, K.; Uroic, M.; Majer, M.; Pasic, S.; Vukovic, B.

    2006-01-01

    Two-photon decay has been extensively studied in atomic, nuclear and particle physics since the 1930s when the problem of stability of the 2s state of the hydrogen atom emerged. Since then, many theoretical and experimental investigations have been made on hydrogen and one-electron (H-like) ions and on helium and two-electron (He-like) ions. The work on two-photon decay in many-electron systems involving inner shells started about 30 years ago and, in the meantime, two-photon decay of the K-shell vacancy state has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental studies. Experimental results have been obtained for 2s->1s and higher-state electron ->1s two-photon transitions in molybdenum, and for 2s -> 1s, 3s -> 1s, 3d -> 1s and 4sd -> 1s two-photon transitions in silver, xenon, hafnium and mercury. Nonrelativistic and relativistic calculations of the processes have been made. The relativistic calculations for transitions in molybdenum, silver and xenon atoms are in a reasonable agreement with the experimental results, but some problems remain to be solved. A review of investigations of two-photon transitions in atomic systems is presented

  9. Pressure-induced valence change and moderate heavy fermion state in Eu-compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Fuminori; Okauchi, Keigo; Sato, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Ai; Akamine, Hiromu; Ashitomi, Yosuke; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Valenta, Jaroslav; Prchal, Jiri; Sechovský, Vladimir; Aoki, Dai; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2018-05-01

    A pressure-induced valence transition has attracted much attention in Eu-compounds. Among them, EuRh2Si2, EuNi2Ge2, and EuCo2Ge2 reveal the valence transition around 1, 2, and 3 GPa, respectively. We have succeeded in growing single crystals of EuT2X2 (T: transition metal, X: Si, Ge) and studied electronic properties under pressure. EuRh2Si2 indicates a first-order valence transition between 1 and 2 GPa, with a large and prominent hysteresis in the electrical resistivity. At higher pressures, the first-order valence transition changes to a cross-over regime with an intermediate valence state. Tuning of the valence state with pressure is reflected in a drastic change of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity in EuRh2Si2 single crystals. Effect of pressure on the valence states on EuRh2Si2, EuIr2Si2, EuNi2Ge2, and EuCo2Ge2, as well as an isostructural related compound EuGa4, are reviewed.

  10. The effect of molecular structure on emissions and performance of a heavy-duty compression-ignition engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, L.; Boot, M.D.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous previous studies have reported that the reduction of emissions by adapting oxygenated bio-fuels chiefly depend on the overall oxygen percentage of the blended oxygenates. However, the effect of molecular structures of the fuels has sometimes only been attributed to differences in

  11. Efimov states and bound state properties in selected nuclear and molecular three-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    The search is made among selected three-body systems for possible Efimov state behavior. In order to carry out this analysis of phenomenological potentials a new mathematical approach, the FCM (Faddeev-coordinate-momentum) technique, is developed. The analysis then proceeds through the framework of the Faddeev equations by employing the UPE (unitary pole expansion) to reduce these equations to numerically feasible form. The systems chosen for analysis are the 4 He trimer and the three-α model of 12 C. Efimov states are not found in 12 C, thus answering speculation among nuclear theorists. The 4 He trimer, on the other hand, manifests Efimov states for each potential considered and the characteristics of these states are extensively analyzed. Since Efimov states are predicted by all of the phenomenological potentials considered, these states would seem to be a realistically fundamental property of the 4 He trimer system

  12. Encapsulation and solid state sequestration of gases by calix[6]arene-based molecular containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavendomme, Roy; Ajami, Daniela; Moerkerke, Steven; Wouters, Johan; Rissanen, Kari; Luhmer, Michel; Jabin, Ivan

    2017-06-13

    Two calix[6]arene-based molecular containers were synthesized in high yields. These containers can encapsulate small guests through a unique "rotating door" complexation process. The sequestration of greenhouse gases is clearly demonstrated. They can be stored in the solid state for long periods and released via dissolution of the inclusion complex.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen fluoride at several thermodynamic states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreitmeir, M.; Bertagnolli, H.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a simple but interesting system for studies of the influence of hydrogen bonds on physical properties. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF at several thermodynamic states, where we examine the microscopic structure of the liquid as well...

  14. Molecular dynamics study on glass and molten state of AgI-AgPO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2017-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on molten and glass state of AgI-AgPO3 have been performed to investigate the structural features and transport properties. In MD, the screened Born-Mayer type potentials including the effect of polarizability of ions have been used. The structure, conductivity, shear viscosity, and Voronoi polyhedron are discussed in relation with the temperature change.

  15. Predictive equation of state method for heavy materials based on the Dirac equation and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, John M.; Mattsson, Ann E.

    2012-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally predictive base for equation of state properties. Available approximations to the exchange/correlation functional provide accurate predictions for many materials in the periodic table. For heavy materials however, DFT calculations, using available functionals, fail to provide quantitative predictions, and often fail to be even qualitative. This deficiency is due both to the lack of the appropriate confinement physics in the exchange/correlation functional and to approximations used to evaluate the underlying equations. In order to assess and develop accurate functionals, it is essential to eliminate all other sources of error. In this talk we describe an efficient first-principles electronic structure method based on the Dirac equation and compare the results obtained with this method with other methods generally used. Implications for high-pressure equation of state of relativistic materials are demonstrated in application to Ce and the light actinides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed andoperated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Possibility of Pc (4380) and Pc (4450) penta-quark states as candidates for charmed meson-baryon molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodkumar, P.C.; Patel, Smruti

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of two hidden-charm resonances by the LHCb Collaboration in the J/ψp invariant mass distribution denoted as P c , with masses (widths) (4380 ± 8 ± 29) MeV ((205±18±86) MeV) and (4449.8±1.7±2.5) MeV ((39±5±19) MeV), respectively has immediately attracted a lot of attention from the whole community since they could be the long-searching-for pentaquark states in the heavy flavor sector. The high mass and the decay channel J/ψp suggest that these two states must have minimal quark content of cc¯uud, which can be called pentaquark-charmonium states. Soon after the experimental results released, much theoretical effort was paid into this field and many ideas were inspired.There have been several attempted assignments, such as the molecule-like pentaquark states, the diquark-diquark-antiquark type pentaquark states the diquark-triquark type pentaquark states, re-scattering effects, etc. Search for pentaquarks is one of the most challenging theoretical and experimental problems in the physics of strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The last rise and down of the pentaquark study happened at ten years ago due to claim of finding of the strange pentaquark Θ by the LEPS collaboration. But now this topic received serious attention since discovery of P c has rekindled the hope for long searched mysterious pentaquark states

  17. Transition probabilities of 36Cl and 36Ar excited states in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, G.J.; Alexander, T.K.; Forster, J.S.; McDonald, A.B.; Towner, I.S.

    The reactions 2 H( 35 Cl,pγ) and 2 H( 35 Cl,nγ) have been used to determine by the recoil-distance method, the lifetimes of levels in 36 Cl and 36 Ar respectively. Large discrepancies exist in the literature for some lifetimes of 36 Cl levels. Transition rates found for decay of the negative parity states in 36 Ar (4178 (3 - ), 4974 (2 - ) and 5171 (5 - ) keV), are compared whith the Maripuu-Hokken model and RPA and TDA predictions [fr

  18. Heavy weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The paper mentions the important thing that it was for the country, exporting the first shipping of crude de Castilla to a company of asphalts in United States. It was not a common sale, as those that it carries out the company with the crude of Cusiana or Cano Limon. The new of this shipping is that it was the first successful test of marketing the Colombian heavy crude in the exterior, since previously it was almost considered a curse to find heavy crude by the difficulties of its transport. Today it can be taken to any refinery of the world and the best test is that, after almost a year of efforts to overcome the barriers of the transport, the company achieved its conduction from the Castilla Field, in proximities to Villavicencio, until the Covenas Port, in the Caribbean Colombian coast

  19. Progress and tendency in heavy ion irradiation mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Libin; Li Wenjian; Qu Ying; Li Ping

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the intermediate energy heavy ion biology has been concerned rarely comparing to that of the low-energy ions. In this paper, we summarized the advantage of a new mutation breeding method mediated by intermediate energy heavy ion irradiations. Meanwhile, the present state of this mutation technique in applications of the breeding in grain crops, cash crops and model plants were introduced. And the preview of the heavy ion irradiations in gene-transfer, molecular marker assisted selection and spaceflight mutation breeding operations were also presented. (authors)

  20. Heavy leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility that a new lepton may exist is discussed under the headings; theoretical reasons for the introduction of heavy leptons, classification of heavy leptons (ortho and paraleptons), discrimination between different types of lepton, decays of charged heavy leptons, production of charged heavy leptons (in e + e - storage rings, neutrino production, photoproduction, and hadroproduction), neutral heavy leptons, and hadroleptons. (U.K.)

  1. Quantum mechanical modeling of molecular properties of systems with heavy-atoms in condensed phases and on interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejniczak, M.; Gomes, A.S.P.; Bast, R.

    2015-07-01

    We report an implementation of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensor in the frozen density embedding (FDE) scheme - in which the total system is divided into interacting subsystems - using the four-component (4c) relativistic Dirac-Coulomb (DC) Hamiltonian and the non-collinear spin density functional theory (SDFT). The formalism takes into account the magnetic balance between the large and the small components of molecular spinors and assures the gauge-origin independence of results. This implementation has been applied to hydrogen-bonded H 2 X---H 2 O complexes (X = Se, Te, Po) and compared with the super-molecular calculations and with the approach based on the integration of the magnetically induced current density vector. (authors)

  2. Interaction of VUV-photons with molecules. Spectroscopy and dynamics of molecular superexcited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A survey is given of recent progress in experimental studies of the interaction of VUV-photons with molecules, i.e., those of photoabsorption, photoionization, and photodissociation of molecules in the excitation photon energy range of 10-50 eV, with a particular emphasis placed on current understanding of the spectroscopy and dynamics of formed molecular superexcited states. These studies are of great importance in understanding the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter. Molecules studied are ranged from simple diatomic and triatomic molecules to polyatomic molecules such as hydrocarbons. Most of the observed molecular superexcited states are assigned to high Rydber states which are vibrationally, doubly, or inner-core excited and converge to each of ion states. Non-Rydberg superexcited states are also observed. Dissociation into neutral fragments in comparison with ionization is of unexpectedly great importance in the observed decay of each of these state-assigned superexcited molecules. Dissociation dynamics as well as its products of superexcited states are remarkably different from those of lower excited states below about ionization thresholds. Some remarks are also presented of molecules in the condensed phase

  3. Recent developments in high charge state heavy ion beams at the LBL 88-inch Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, R.A.; Clark, D.J.; Glasgow, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in design and operation of the internal PIG sources at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron have led to the development of high charge state (0.4 16 O 8+ . Total external intensities of these beams range from 10 12 particles/s for 6 Li 3+ to 0.1 particles/s for 16 O 8+ . Techniques have been developed for routine tune-out of the low intensity beams. These include use of model beams and reliance on the large systematic data base of cyclotron parameters which has been developed over many years of operation. Techniques for delivery of these weak beams to the experimental target areas are presented. Source design and operation, including special problems associated with Li, Be, and B beams are discussed

  4. Possible D(*) anti D(*) and B(*) anti B(*) molecular states in the extended constituent quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, You-Chang; Tan, Zhi-Yun; Ping, Jialun; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-01-01

    The possible neutral D (*) anti D (*) and B (*) anti B (*) molecular states are studied in the framework of the constituent quark models, which is extended by including the s-channel one-gluon exchange. Using different types of quark-quark potentials, we solve the four-body Schroedinger equation by means of the Gaussian expansion method. The bound states of D (*) anti D (*) with J PC = 1 ++ , 2 ++ and B (*) anti B (*) with J PC = 0 ++ , 1 +- , 1 ++ , 2 ++ are obtained. The molecular states D* anti D with J PC = 1 ++ and B* anti B with J PC = 1 +- are good candidates for X(3872) and Z 0 b (10610), respectively. The dependence of the results on the model parameters is also discussed. (orig.)

  5. Orange rust in sugarcane: molecular identification in Rio de Janeiro State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Vanessa Borges Castro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. cultivation is one of the major agricultural activities in the Brazilian states. This study aimed to molecularly identify the pathogen associated with rust in sugarcane cultivars in the state of Rio de Janeiro and to suggest a control strategy. Among the 14 PCR-tested cultivars, Puccinia kuehnii infection was identified for RB947520, RB92606, RB835486, RB72454, SP89-11I5, SP83-2847, both from infected leaf sample and from urediniospores. Puccinia kuehnii was not detected by PCR for the cultivars RB955971, RB951541, RB92579, RB867515, RB855536, SP91-1049, SP80-3280, SP80-1816. This is the first molecular detection of this fungus in the state of Rio de Janeiro for six of the 14 analyzed cultivars.

  6. Exact ground-state correlation functions of an atomic-molecular Bose–Einstein condensate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Jon; Shen, Yibing

    2018-05-01

    We study the ground-state properties of an atomic-molecular Bose–Einstein condensate model through an exact Bethe Ansatz solution. For a certain range of parameter choices, we prove that the ground-state Bethe roots lie on the positive real-axis. We then use a continuum limit approach to obtain a singular integral equation characterising the distribution of these Bethe roots. Solving this equation leads to an analytic expression for the ground-state energy. The form of the expression is consistent with the existence of a line of quantum phase transitions, which has been identified in earlier studies. This line demarcates a molecular phase from a mixed phase. Certain correlation functions, which characterise these phases, are then obtained through the Hellmann–Feynman theorem.

  7. Phase equilibria of binary mixtures by molecular simulation and cubic equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral V.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular simulation data were used to study the performance of equations of state (EoS and combining rules usually employed in thermodynamic property calculations. The Monte Carlo method and the Gibbs ensemble technique were used for determining composition and densities of vapor and liquid phases in equilibrium for binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids. Simulation results are compared to data in the literature and to those calculated by the t-PR-LJ EoS. The use of adequate combining rules has been shown to be very important for the satisfactory representation of molecular simulation data.

  8. Characterization of heavy metals in a uranium ore region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Jairo Dias; dos Santos Amaral, Romilton; dos Santos Júnior, José Araújo; Genezini, Frederico Antonio; Menezes, Rômulo Simões Cezar; de Oliveira, Iane Andrade

    2014-03-01

    The concentrations of As, Zn, Co, Cr, and Ba were determined in soil samples from an anomalous uranium ore region in the countryside of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The main land use system in this region is dairy farming, and there is a need to evaluate the potential risk of milk contamination. Twenty-three soil samples were activated with neutrons and analyzed using a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer system. The results, recorded in mg kg(-1), varied from 0.4 to 6.7 for As, from 17.0 to 110.0 for Zn, from 2.8 to 38.4 for Co, from 12.1 to 65.5 for Cr, and from 443.0 to 1,497.0 for Ba. All of the Ba concentrations were higher than the intervention value adopted by the Brazilian National Environmental Board. This finding justifies research in other environmental areas to predict the toxicological risks to the local population.

  9. MR molecular imaging of tumours using ferritin heavy chain reporter gene expression mediated by the hTERT promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of ChengDu Medical College, Department of Radiology, ChengDu (China); Gong, Ming-fu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Wang, Guang-xian; Su, Tong-sheng; Wen, Li; Zhang, Dong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter and the modified ferritin heavy chain (Fth) reporter gene, reporter gene expression for MRI was examined in telomerase positive and negative tumour cells and xenografts. Activity of the reporter gene expression vector Lenti-hTERT-Fth1-3FLAG-Puro was compared to constitutive CMV-driven expression and to the untransfected parental control in five tumour cell lines: A549, SKOV3, 293T, U2OS and HPDLF. In vitro, transfected cells were evaluated for FLAG-tagged protein expression, iron accumulation and transverse relaxation. In vivo, tumours transduced by lentiviral vector injection were imaged using T2*WI. Changes in tumour signal intensity were validated by histology. Only telomerase positive tumour cells expressed FLAG-tagged Fth and displayed an increase in R2* above the parental control, with a corresponding change in T2*WI. In addition, only telomerase positive tumours, transduced by injection of the reporter gene expression construct, exhibited a change in signal intensity on T2*WI. Tumour histology verified the expression of FLAG-tagged Fth and iron accumulation in telomerase positive tissue. Reporter gene expression for MRI, using the Fth reporter and the hTERT promoter, may be a useful strategy for the non-invasive diagnosis of many types of cancer. (orig.)

  10. Unknown risk: co-exposure to lead and other heavy metals among children living in small-scale mining communities in Zamfara State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrem, Casey; Tirima, Simba; von Lindern, Ian; von Braun, Margrit; Worrell, Mary Claire; Mohammad Anka, Shehu; Abdullahi, Aishat; Moller, Gregory

    2014-08-01

    The lead poisoning crisis in Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria has been called the worst such case in modern history and it presents unique challenges for risk assessment and management of co-exposure to multiple heavy metals. More than 400 children have died in Zamfara as a result of ongoing lead intoxication since early in 2010. A review of the common toxic endpoints of the major heavy metals advances analysis of co-exposures and their common pathologies. Environmental contamination in Bagega village, examined by X-ray fluorescence of soils, includes lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and manganese. Co-exposure risk is explored by scoring common toxic endpoints and hazard indices to calculate a common pathology hazard risk ranking of Pb > As > Hg > Cd > Mn. Zamfara presents an extreme picture of both lead and multiple heavy metal mortality and morbidity, but similar situations have become increasingly prevalent worldwide.

  11. Hot nuclei with high spin states in collisions between heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galin, J.

    1991-01-01

    In the first part of this contribution we have shown that pretty hot nuclei could be obtained in peripheral collisions of Kr+Au. The collisions considered in the chosen example give rise to a nucleus of Z=28 with a kinetic energy of 1600 MeV (i.e. a velocity close to 27 MeV/u to be compared with the 32 MeV/u of the beam). The excitation energy deposited in the non-detected target like-nucleus, deduced from the neutron multiplicity measurements, amounts to 700 MeV (T= 6 MeV). In the second part of the contribution one used the well known properties of fission, and particularly its sensitivity to spin, to show in a qualitative way that pretty high spin values are into play. A more quantitative analysis together with additional measurements are still needed in order to infer precise figures of spin. It can be noted that for the 29 MeV/u Pb+Au reaction 1 max amounts to 1700 ℎ. If we assume that the sticking or rolling conditions can be fulfilled for initial angular momenta of about 2/3 1 max , then a projectile-like (and its target partner) could acquire an intrinsic spin of about 160 ℎ. The behavior of a Pb-like nucleus brought in such an exotic state (T=6 MeV and J=160ℎ)) is certainly worth to be studied in detail. It is also worth recalling that, when obtained in peripheral collisions, the hot nuclei thus formed do not suffer much initial compression at variance with what happens in more central collisions. There is thus an interesting field to be explored of hot, high spin but uncompressed nuclei

  12. Effect of mining on heavy metal concentration in soils from the vicinity of Itakpe iron ore mine in kogi state, nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amune, C.O.M.; Kakulu, S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of mining oil from 1takpe iron ore mining area in Kogi State, Nigeria were studied through the determination of the heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mg, Ni. Ph and Zn) using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Soil samples were collected during the dry and rainy seasons. Significant levels of heavy metals were found. Median topsoil concentrations (0-15 cm) for Ed, Cu, Mg, Ni, Pb and Zn were 0.16+0.02, 0.151-0.03, 0.041+0.03, 0.110.02, 0.07+0.(0 1, 0.04+0.04, micro/g, respectively. The heavy metal concentrations of control soil were relatively lower than those in the 1takpe mining environment soil and within levels of total metal contamination nation in the normal soil content intervals and maximum allowable limits of heavy metals in soils. Correlations analysis shows that heavy metals were closely correlated with each other except for Pb, indicating the studied metals are from the same pollutant resource. This shows, mining as contributing to the metallic levels in the 1takpe mining site. (author)

  13. Dehybridization of f and d states in the heavy-fermion system YbRh2Si2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, D.; Sobota, J. A.; Yang, S.-L.; Pfau, H.; Kim, D.-J.; Mo, S.-K.; Fisk, Z.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2018-04-01

    We report an optically induced reduction of the f -d hybridization in the prototypical heavy-fermion compound YbRh2Si2 . We use femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to monitor changes of spectral weight and binding energies of the Yb 4 f and Rh 4 d states before the lattice temperature increases after pumping. Overall, the f -d hybridization decreases smoothly with increasing electronic temperature up to ˜250 K but changes slope at ˜100 K . This temperature scale coincides with the onset of coherent Kondo scattering and with thermally populating the first excited crystal electrical field level. Extending previous photoemission studies, we observe a persistent f -d hybridization up to at least ˜250 K , which is far larger than the coherence temperature defined by transport but in agreement with the temperature dependence of the noninteger Yb valence. Our data underlines the distinction of probes accessing spin and charge degrees of freedom in strongly correlated systems.

  14. Study on characteristics for different moderation ratios of heavy water coolant with different reactor types in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Several characteristics for different moderation ratios of heavy water coolant with different reactor types in equilibrium states have been investigated. Performances of PWR and CANDU reactors are compared. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000 code. In the present study, we have compared the characteristics for different moderator to fuel ratio (MFR, 0.1 to 30), different burn-up for CANDU type and four fuels cycle schemes. Nuclide density of 235 U at MFR=1.9 decreases with increasing number of confined HM, while 235 U at higher MFR has the opposite trend. However, the nuclide density of fissile material at higher MFR is lower except 238 U. CANDU type requires lower uranium enrichment and obtains higher conversion ratio than PWR type. Lowest burn-up requires the lowest uranium enrichment and obtains the highest conversion ratio. The breeding condition can be obtained for plutonium recycle cases at MFR=2.1 of Case 4 and MFR=1.4 of Case 3. The natural uranium can be achieved at MFR=14 of plutonium recycle cases, and it can be used easier by increasing number of confined HM. (author)

  15. Assessment of some heavy metals in fruit from local market in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omer, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    Fruits play important role in providing the individuals daily needs from vitamins iron, potassium and metals that need in the daily food as dietary supplementation or as an important elements that from some hormones or enzymes in small concentrations, if exists in high concentrations become toxic with bad effects. This study aims to detect some of metals and find this elements their concentrations in some fruits that is most consumed in Sudan which are: bananas, oranges, tomatoes and watermelons. These fruits were randomly collected from local markets in Khartoum state from the three localities: Khartoum, Bahri and Omdurman. Another sample was collected from the original farm to represent the samples. That's to compare was dried and pressured into pulled to be analyze it. The following metals were detecting: Br, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Zn in ppm K, Ca and Fe measured in g/kg. It was found that the mean concentration of these metals in banana: 52.66, 28.01, 50.31, 15.79, 0.57, 31.98, 60.92, 10,07, 1.42, 18.41, 5.37 and 19.22 respectively. And the mean concentration of them in orange: 6.80, 9.83, 19.00, 52.88, 0.35, 26.54, 13.05, 41.53, 1.74, 49.80, 14.85, and 15.41, respectively. The mean concentration of them in tomato: 39.30, 5.45, 50.52, 20.03, 0.88, 62.45, 82.13, 9.44, 1.79, 59.78, 26.38, and 41.31, respectively. The mean concentration of metals watermelon: 33.00, 6.96, 26.08, 14.30, 1. 32, 43.93, 52,67, 6.01, 1.69. 38.51, 43.90, and 25,45, respectively. It is noted that these concentrations were far higher than the concentrations in other countries underwent the same study. The statistics showed in some fruits that the significant ratio between the case and the control was p < 0.05 i.e. the significant is different and may be caused by pollution.(Author)

  16. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Antinori, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  17. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  18. Developing a Macroscopic Mechanistic Model for Low Molecular Weight Diffusion through Polymers in the Rubbery State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Lopez, Brais; Huguet, P.; Gontard, N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to determine the Fickian diffusivity of two families of low molecular weight molecules through amorphous polystyrene in the rubbery state. Different effects of the temperature on diffusivity for each of the families suggested that molecular mobility is controlled...... by both the volume and flexibility of the diffusing substance when the movement of polymer chains can generate stress induced deformation of molecules. The diffusing molecules were represented as Newtonian spring–bead systems, which allowed us to quantify their flexibility, in function of the vibration...... frequency of their bonds by reconstructing their theoretical spectra. Results showed that the use of molecular descriptors that take into account flexibility rather than the most stable conformation of the diffusing molecules may improve the description of the diffusion behavior caused by variations...

  19. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  20. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy baryons Ω{sub cc}, Ω{sub bb} and Ω{sub bc}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India); Thakkar, Kaushal [GIDC Degree Engineering college, Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Abrama, Navsari (India)

    2016-10-15

    We discuss the mass spectrum of Ω baryon with two heavy quarks and one light quark (ccs, bbs, and bcs). The main goal of the paper is to calculate the ground state masses and after that, the positive and negative parity excited states masses are also obtained within a hypercentral constituent quark model, using Coulomb plus linear potential framework. We also added a first order correction to the potential. The mass spectra up to 5S for radial excited states and 1P-5P, 1D-4D, and 1F-2F states for orbital excited states are computed for Ω{sub cc}, Ω{sub bb} and Ω{sub bc} baryons. Our obtained results are compared with other theoretical predictions, which could be a useful complementary tool for the interpretation of experimentally unknown heavy baryon spectra. The Regge trajectory is constructed in both the (n{sub r}, M{sup 2}) and the (J, M{sup 2}) planes for Ω{sub cc}, Ω{sub bb} and Ω{sub bc} baryons and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Magnetic moments of doubly heavy Ω{sup '}s are also calculated. (orig.) 8.

  1. Molecular structure of self-assembled chiral nanoribbons and nanotubules revealed in the hydrated state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Reiko; Artzner, Franck; Laguerre, Michel; Huc, Ivan

    2008-11-05

    A detailed molecular organization of racemic 16-2-16 tartrate self-assembled multi-bilayer ribbons in the hydrated state is proposed where 16-2-16 amphiphiles, tartrate ions, and water molecules are all accurately positioned by comparing experimental X-ray powder diffraction and diffraction patterns derived from modeling studies. X-ray diffuse scattering studies show that molecular organization is not fundamentally altered when comparing the flat ribbons of the racemate to chirally twisted or helical ribbons of the pure tartrate enantiomer. Essential features of the three-dimensional molecular organizations of these structures include interdigitation of alkyl chains within each bilayer and well-defined networks of ionic and hydrogen bonds between cations, anions, and water molecules between bilayers. The detailed study of diffraction patterns also indicated that the gemini headgroups are oriented parallel to the long edge of the ribbons. The structure thus possesses a high cohesion and good crystallinity, and for the first time, we could relate the packing of the chiral molecules to the expression of the chirality at a mesoscopic scale. The organization of the ribbons at the molecular level sheds light on a number of their macroscopic features. Among these are the reason why enantiomerically pure 16-2-16 tartrate forms ribbons that consist of exactly two bilayers, and a plausible mechanism by which a chirally twisted or helical shape may emerge from the packing of chiral tartrate ions. Importantly, the distinction between commonly observed helical and twisted morphologies could be related to a subtle symmetry breaking. These results demonstrate that accurately solving the molecular structure of self-assembled soft materials--a process rarely achieved--is within reach, that it is a valid approach to correlate molecular parameters to macroscopic properties, and thus that it offers opportunities to modulate properties through molecular design.

  2. Spectral properties of minimal-basis-set orbitals: Implications for molecular electronic continuum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhoff, P. W.; Winstead, C. L.

    Early studies of the electronically excited states of molecules by John A. Pople and coworkers employing ab initio single-excitation configuration interaction (SECI) calculations helped to simulate related applications of these methods to the partial-channel photoionization cross sections of polyatomic molecules. The Gaussian representations of molecular orbitals adopted by Pople and coworkers can describe SECI continuum states when sufficiently large basis sets are employed. Minimal-basis virtual Fock orbitals stabilized in the continuous portions of such SECI spectra are generally associated with strong photoionization resonances. The spectral attributes of these resonance orbitals are illustrated here by revisiting previously reported experimental and theoretical studies of molecular formaldehyde (H2CO) in combination with recently calculated continuum orbital amplitudes.

  3. Molecular states of HeH/sup +/. Energies and dynamical couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, A.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1983-01-01

    We complete the molecular results reported in a previous paper by presenting additional energies (for /sup 1,3/..sigma.. states) and radial couplings (between '..sigma.. states) of the HeH/sup +/ system. These results are needed to treat elastic and inelastic charge-exchange processes when full account is taken of momentum-transfer problems. We also present a formalism to calculate radial couplings between wave functions computed with the use of different variational methods and basis sets. The detailed form of the radial couplings is discussed and related to the Barat-Lichten correlation diagram. The effect of using finite basis sets in calculatig degenerate molecular energies is also discussed.

  4. On the use of Cox regression to examine the temporal clustering of flooding and heavy precipitation across the central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallakpour, Iman; Villarini, Gabriele; Jones, Michael P.; Smith, James A.

    2017-08-01

    The central United States is plagued by frequent catastrophic flooding, such as the flood events of 1993, 2008, 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2016. The goal of this study is to examine whether it is possible to describe the occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events at the sub-seasonal scale in terms of variations in the climate system. Daily streamflow and precipitation time series over the central United States (defined here to include North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan) are used in this study. We model the occurrence/non-occurrence of a flood and heavy precipitation event over time using regression models based on Cox processes, which can be viewed as a generalization of Poisson processes. Rather than assuming that an event (i.e., flooding or precipitation) occurs independently of the occurrence of the previous one (as in Poisson processes), Cox processes allow us to account for the potential presence of temporal clustering, which manifests itself in an alternation of quiet and active periods. Here we model the occurrence/non-occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events using two climate indices as time-varying covariates: the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American pattern (PNA). We find that AO and/or PNA are important predictors in explaining the temporal clustering in flood occurrences in over 78% of the stream gages we considered. Similar results are obtained when working with heavy precipitation events. Analyses of the sensitivity of the results to different thresholds used to identify events lead to the same conclusions. The findings of this work highlight that variations in the climate system play a critical role in explaining the occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events at the sub-seasonal scale over the central United States.

  5. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron.

  6. A simple scaling law for the equation of state and the radial distribution functions calculated by density-functional theory molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) and the radial distribution functions obtained by density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) obey a simple scaling law. At given temperature, the thermodynamic properties and the radial distribution functions given by a DFT-MD simulation remain unchanged if the mole fractions of nuclei of given charge and the average volume per atom remain unchanged. A practical interest of this scaling law is to obtain an EOS table for a fluid from that already obtained for another fluid if it has the right characteristics. Another practical interest of this result is that an asymmetric mixture made up of light and heavy atoms requiring very different time steps can be replaced by a mixture of atoms of equal mass, which facilitates the exploration of the configuration space in a DFT-MD simulation. The scaling law is illustrated by numerical results.

  7. Heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpakchieva, R.; Cherepanov, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The international school-seminar on heavy ion physics had been organized in Dubna in may of 1993. The scientific program of reports covers the following main topics: synthesis and properties of heavy nuclei; synthesis and investigation of properties of exotic nuclei; experiments with radioactive nuclear beams; interaction between complex nuclei at low and intermediate energies. It also includes reports on laser spectroscopy and exotic nuclear beams, on some application of heavy ion beams for the problems of solid state physics, on construction of multidetector facilities and on developing of heavy ion accelerator complexes. Short communication

  8. The metal-binding function of metallothioneins and the state of antioxidant defense of carp gills under water pollution by heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyar, O.B.; Fal'fushins'ka, G.Yi.; Arsan, V.O.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the influence of waterborne heavy metal ions on the metal-binding function of metallothioneins and the antioxidant defence in gills, carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) was exposed to copper, zinc, manganese, and lead ions in environmentally realistic concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 0.12, and 0.01 mg/l, respectively) or their mix for 14 days. The results indicate that the metal poisoning provokes the changes in the copper, manganese, and zinc contents in gills and their distribution among the molecular forms of metallothioneins and another tissue targets

  9. Ultrathin reduced graphene oxide films as transparent top-contacts for light switchable solid-state molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Jevric, Martyn; Hauptmann, Jonas Rahlf

    2013-01-01

    A new type of solid-state molecular junction is introduced, which employs reduced graphene oxide as a transparent top contact that permits a self-assembled molecular monolayer to be photoswitched in situ, while simultaneously enabling charge-transport measurements across the molecules. The electr......A new type of solid-state molecular junction is introduced, which employs reduced graphene oxide as a transparent top contact that permits a self-assembled molecular monolayer to be photoswitched in situ, while simultaneously enabling charge-transport measurements across the molecules...

  10. Splitting Fermi Surfaces and Heavy Electronic States in Non-Centrosymmetric U3Ni3Sn4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Arvind; Harima, Hisatomo; Nakamura, Ai; Shimizu, Yusei; Homma, Yoshiya; Li, DeXin; Honda, Fuminori; Sato, Yoshiki J.; Aoki, Dai

    2018-04-01

    We report the single-crystal growth of the non-centrosymmetric paramagnet U3Ni3Sn4 by the Bridgman method and the Fermi surface properties detected by de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments. We have also investigated single-crystal U3Ni3Sn4 by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, magnetization, electrical resistivity, and heat capacity measurements. The angular dependence of the dHvA frequencies reveals many closed Fermi surfaces, which are nearly spherical in topology. The experimental results are in good agreement with local density approximation (LDA) band structure calculations based on the 5f-itinerant model. The band structure calculation predicts many Fermi surfaces, mostly with spherical shape, derived from 12 bands crossing the Fermi energy. To our knowledge, the splitting of Fermi surfaces due to the non-centrosymmetric crystal in 5f-electron systems is experimentally detected for the first time. The temperature dependence of the dHvA amplitude reveals a large cyclotron effective mass of up to 35 m0, indicating the heavy electronic state of U3Ni3Sn4 due to the proximity of the quantum critical point. From the field dependence of the dHvA amplitude, a mean free path of conduction electrons of up to 1950 Å is detected, reflecting the good quality of the grown crystal. The small splitting energy related to the antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction is most likely due to the large cyclotron effective mass.

  11. Comparison of synthetic chelators and low molecular weight organic acids in enhancing phytoextraction of heavy metals by two ecotypes of Sedum alfredii Hance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Islam, Ejazul; Li, Tingqiang; Yang, Xiaoe; Jin, Xiaofen; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2008-05-01

    Lab scale and pot experiments were conducted to compare the effects of synthetic chelators and low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) on the phytoextraction of multi-contaminated soils by two ecotypes of Sedum alfredii Hance. Through lab scale experiments, the treatment dosage of 5 and 10 mM for synthetic chelators and LMWOA, respectively, and the treatment time of 10 days were selected for pot experiment. In pot experiment, the hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) was found more tolerant to the metal toxicity compared with the non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE). EDTA for Pb, EDDS for Cu, and DTPA for Cu and Cd were found more effective to enhance heavy metal accumulation in the shoots of S. alfredii Hance. Compared with synthetic chelators, the phytoextraction ability of LMWOA was lesser. Considering the strong post-harvest effects of synthetic chelators, it is suggested that higher dosage of LMWOA could be practiced during phytoextraction, and some additional measures could also be taken to lower the potential environmental risks of synthetic chelators in the future studies.

  12. Identifying Multiquark Hadrons from Heavy Ion Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Akira; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-01-01

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  13. Industrial water treatment with heavy metals through zeolites and bioremediation systems with aquatic plants especially Eichhornia crassipes. State of art review

    OpenAIRE

    Uriel Fernando Carreño-Sayago

    2014-01-01

    In this review we explore different opportunities to use a cheap natural material for removing and retention of heavy metals from polluted waters by waste of different processes. Two research systems will be addressed: the first through a material known as zeolite or more generally porous  luminosilicates, which may be synthesized or extracted from the mines of clays and minerals, being used in its natural state or after modification processes and doping. The other mechanism is bioremediation...

  14. Search for heavy resonances decaying into a vector boson and a Higgs boson in final states with charged leptons, neutrinos, and b quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Dvornikov, Oleg; Makarenko, Vladimir; Zykunov, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Sharma, Archana; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; El-khateeb, Esraa; Elgammal, Sherif; Mohamed, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Alexakhin, Vadim; Belotelov, Ivan; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Wei; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Tong, Henry Yee-shian; Wu, Jun-yi; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; 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Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; 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Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Kumar, Ajay; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; 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Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-05-10

    A search for heavy resonances decaying to a Higgs boson and a vector boson is presented. The analysis is performed using data samples collected in 2015 by the CMS experiment at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 2.2-2.5 fb$^{-1}$. The search is performed in channels in which the vector boson decays into leptonic final states ($\\mathrm{Z} \\to \

  15. Search for heavy resonances decaying into a vector boson and a Higgs boson in the (ll, lnu, nunu) bb final state

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for heavy resonances in final states with a Higgs boson and a vector boson, performed using 2.17--2.52 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected in 2015 by the CMS experiment at the LHC in proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=13\\,\\text{TeV}$, is presented. The leptonic vector boson decays ($\\text{Z} \\to \

  16. Dynamics of relaxation to a stationary state for interacting molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luiza V. F.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2018-01-01

    Motor proteins are active enzymatic molecules that drive a variety of biological processes, including transfer of genetic information, cellular transport, cell motility and muscle contraction. It is known that these biological molecular motors usually perform their cellular tasks by acting collectively, and there are interactions between individual motors that specify the overall collective behavior. One of the fundamental issues related to the collective dynamics of motor proteins is the question if they function at stationary-state conditions. To investigate this problem, we analyze a relaxation to the stationary state for the system of interacting molecular motors. Our approach utilizes a recently developed theoretical framework, which views the collective dynamics of motor proteins as a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process of interacting particles, where interactions are taken into account via a thermodynamically consistent approach. The dynamics of relaxation to the stationary state is analyzed using a domain-wall method that relies on a mean-field description, which takes into account some correlations. It is found that the system quickly relaxes for repulsive interactions, while attractive interactions always slow down reaching the stationary state. It is also predicted that for some range of parameters the fastest relaxation might be achieved for a weak repulsive interaction. Our theoretical predictions are tested with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The implications of our findings for biological systems are briefly discussed.

  17. Efficient Syntheses of Novel Fluoro-Substituted Pentacenes and Azapentacenes: Molecular and Solid-State Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaben, Jonas; Münster, Niels; Klues, Michael; Breuer, Tobias; Hofmann, Philipp; Harms, Klaus; Witte, Gregor; Koert, Ulrich

    2015-09-21

    Non-symmetrical 6,13-disubstituted pentacenes bearing trifluoromethyl and aryl substituents have been synthesized starting from pentacenequinone. Diazapentacenes with a variety of fluorine substituents were prepared either via a Hartwig-Buchwald aryl amination route or by a SNAr strategy. As a result of a non-symmetric substitution pattern containing electron-donating substituents in combination with electron-accepting fluorine substituents, the synthesized compounds feature distinct molecular dipoles. All compounds are analyzed regarding their optoelectronic properties in solution with special focus on the frontier orbital energies as well as their molecular packing in the crystal structures. The analyses of isolated molecules are complemented by thin-film studies to examine their solid-state properties. A precise comparison between these and the molecular properties gave detailed insights into the exciton binding energies of these compounds, which are explained by means of a simple model considering the molecular packing and polarizabilities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Microscopic and Molecular Detection of Camel Piroplasmosis in Gadarif State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Mohamed Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The socioeconomic importance of camels (Camelus dromedarius could not be neglected in the Sudan. The present study was planned to confirm the presence of piroplasmosis in camels from the Eastern region of the Sudan (Gedarif State using microscopical (blood film and molecular technique (PCR. A total of 55 camels of different sexes (34 females and 21 males were sampled from four localities of the state between January 2011 and January 2012. The prevalence rates using parasitological and molecular examinations were 43.6% and 74.5%, respectively. The prevalence rates significantly vary between the localities (p=0.011 but not between the different sexes (p=0.515. PCR technique showed higher sensitivity than microscopy. The present paper was to be the first report investigating camel piroplasmosis using both parasitological and molecular methods in the Eastern region of the Sudan. Further studies in the phylogenetic sequencing are to be continued for parasite speciation. Moreover, studies on the clinical and economic consequences of camel piroplasmosis are recommended.

  19. Studies of thermophysical properties of high-energy-density states in matter using intense heavy ion beams at the future Fair accelerator facilities: The HEDgeHOB collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Deutsch, C.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Gryaznov, V.; Fortov, V.E.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Ni, P.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Piriz, A.R.; Wouchuk, G.

    2006-01-01

    Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are believed to be a very efficient and novel tool to create states of High-Energy-Density (HED) in matter. This paper shows with the help of numerical simulations that the heavy ion beams that will be generated at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) will allow one to use two different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. The German government has recently approved the construction of FAIR at Darmstadt. First scheme named HIHEX (Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion), will generate high-pressure, high-entropy states in matter by volumetric isochoric heating. The heated material will then be allowed to expand in an isentropic way. Using this scheme, it will be possible to study important regions of the phase diagram that are either difficult to access or are even unaccessible using traditional methods of shock compression. The second scheme would allow one to achieve low-entropy compression of a sample material like hydrogen or water to produce conditions that are believed to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. This scheme is named LAPLAS after Laboratory Planetary Sciences. (authors)

  20. Determination of the protonation state of the Asp dyad: conventional molecular dynamics versus thermodynamic integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Yali; Sun, Bin; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-03-01

    The protonation state of the Asp dyad is important as it can reveal enzymatic mechanisms, and the information this provides can be used in the development of drugs for proteins such as memapsin 2 (BACE-1), HIV-1 protease, and rennin. Conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been successfully used to determine the preferred protonation state of the Asp dyad. In the present work, we demonstrate that the results obtained from conventional MD simulations can be greatly influenced by the particular force field applied or the values used for control parameters. In principle, free-energy changes between possible protonation states can be used to determine the protonation state. We show that protonation state prediction by the thermodynamic integration (TI) method is insensitive to force field version or to the cutoff for calculating nonbonded interactions (a control parameter). In the present study, the protonation state of the Asp dyad predicted by TI calculations was the same regardless of the force field and cutoff value applied. Contrary to the intuition that conventional MD is more efficient, our results clearly show that the TI method is actually more efficient and more reliable for determining the protonation state of the Asp dyad.

  1. Potential curves and spectroscopic study of the electronic states of the molecular ion LiCs+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moughrabi, A.; Korek, M.; Allouche, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Due to a very accurate high-resolution techniques and to the spectacular developments in ultracold alkali atom trapping developments which are at the root of photo association spectroscopy there has been a renewed interest on the spectroscopic study of alkali dimers. The existence of new experimental data on these species has stimulated theoretical approaches, necessary to provide predictions accurate enough to be useful for interpretation and evenly for guidance of experiments. With the aim of improving the accuracy of predictions we will perform a theoretical study of the electronic structure of the molecular ion LiCs + , using a method mainly in the way by which core-valence effects are taken into account. To investigate the electronic structure of LiCs + we will use the package CIPSI (Configuration Interaction by Perturbation of a multiconfiguration wave function Selected Interactively) of the Laboratoire de Physique Quantique (Toulouse, France). The atoms Li and Cs will be treated through non-empirical effective one electron core potentials of Durand and Barthelat type. Molecular orbitals for LiCs + will be derived from Self Consistent Field Calculations (SCF) and full valence Configuration Interaction (IC) calculations. A core-core interaction more elaborated than the usual approximation 1/R will be taken into account as the sum of an exponential repulsive term plus a long range dispersion term approximated by the well known London formula. Potential energy calculations will be performed for different molecular states, for numerous values of the inter-nuclear distance R in a wide range. Spectroscopic constants have been derived for the bound states with a regular shape A ro vibrational study have been performed for the ground states with a calculation of the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. A calculation for the transition dipole moment and matrix elements have been done for the bound states

  2. Equation of state of dense plasmas: Orbital-free molecular dynamics as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics for high-Z elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danel, J.-F.; Blottiau, P.; Kazandjian, L.; Piron, R.; Torrent, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-10-15

    The applicability of quantum molecular dynamics to the calculation of the equation of state of a dense plasma is limited at high temperature by computational cost. Orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on a semiclassical approximation and possibly on a gradient correction, is a simulation method available at high temperature. For a high-Z element such as lutetium, we examine how orbital-free molecular dynamics applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature. For the normal mass density and twice the normal mass density, we show that the pressures calculated with the quantum approach converge monotonically towards those calculated with the orbital-free approach; we observe a faster convergence when the orbital-free approach includes the gradient correction. We propose a method to obtain an equation of state reproducing quantum molecular dynamics results up to high temperatures where this approach cannot be directly implemented. With the results already obtained for low-Z plasmas, the present study opens the way for reproducing the quantum molecular dynamics pressure for all elements up to high temperatures.

  3. Observation of the Distribution of Molecular Spin States by Resonant Quantum Tunneling of the Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Ohm, T.; Sangregorio, C.; Sessoli, R.; Mailly, D.; Paulsen, C.

    1999-05-01

    Below 360 mK, Fe8 magnetic molecular clusters are in the pure quantum relaxation regime and we show that the predicted ``square-root time'' relaxation is obeyed, allowing us to develop a new method for watching the evolution of the distribution of molecular spin states in the sample. We measure as a function of applied field H the statistical distribution P\\(ξH\\) of magnetic energy bias ξH acting on the molecules. Tunneling initially causes rapid transitions of molecules, thereby ``digging a hole'' in P\\(ξH\\) (around the resonant condition ξH = 0). For small initial magnetization values, the hole width shows an intrinsic broadening which may be due to nuclear spins.

  4. Solubility of gases and solvents in silicon polymers: molecular simulation and equation of state modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Economou, Ioannis; Makrodimitri, Zoi A.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    of gas and solvent solubilities using the test particle insertion method of Widom. Polymer chains are modelled using recently developed realistic atomistic force fields. Calculations are performed at various temperatures and ambient pressure. A crossover in the temperature dependence of solubility......) and also the phase equilibria of these mixtures over a wide composition range. In all cases, the agreement between model predictions/correlations and literature experimental data, when available, is excellent.......The solubility of n-alkanes, perfluoroalkanes, noble gases and light gases in four elastomer polymers containing silicon is examined based on molecular simulation and macroscopic equation of state modelling. Polymer melt samples generated from molecular dynamics ( MD) are used for the calculation...

  5. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-01-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute–solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute–solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems. (paper)

  6. ETBP (Extended True Boiling Point) curve extension of extra heavy crudes; Extensao da curva PEV (Ponto de Ebulicao Verdadeiro) de petroleos extrapesados por destilacao molecular e ampliacao da caracterizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Rodrigo S.; Batistella, Cesar B.; Maciel, Maria Regina W.; Maciel Filho, Rubens [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica; Medina, Lilian C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    For the determination of the TBP (True Boiling Point) Curve, which defines the yield of petroleum products, the ASTM D2892 method for petroleum distillation and ASTM D5236 method for vacuum distillation of heavy hydrocarbons were applied. Furthermore, from these distillations, cuts that are submitted to several analyses to determine its physical-chemical properties are obtained, and all this information generates the evaluation of petroleum. For heavy petroleum, these conventional methods have been limited, since the total distilled percentage determined for temperatures up to 565 deg C (maximum reached with ASTM D5236 method) is lower for these oils, reducing the points of the curve, limiting its information. To improve this data set for heavy oils, a methodology for the extension of TBP curve through molecular distillation was established. It was possible to reach values up to 700 deg C, representing a considerable progress for the extension of TBP curve. The objective of this work is to present the results of Extended TBP curve for a heavy petroleum and characterization carried out through the cuts and residues obtained in molecular distillation of the residue 'Zeta' 400 deg C+ (fancy name), made by ASTM D2892 method. (author)

  7. Development of a new scanning method for solid states track detector in the heavy nuclei explorer experiment (HNX-ECCO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, N.; Sekiguchi, M.; Nakamura, S.; Kitamura, T.; Tawara, H.; Doke, T.

    2001-01-01

    The HNX (Heavy Nuclear eXplorer) project has been tentatively accepted as one of the NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) Program. Purpose of this project is the measurement of abundances for heavy nuclei in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). This information will contribute to get a great knowledge for the origin of GCR. HNX has two large and high sensitive detectors, ENTICE (Energetic Trans-Ion Composition Experiment) and ECCO (Extremely Heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer). ECCO experimental module consists the large BP-1 glass detectors (total area; 23 m 2 ), will collect the GCRs (∼2,000 events for Pt-group and ∼100 events for actinide) with its high charge resolution (<0.35 e) in space at least 3 years. We report the outline of HNX project and the new techniques for the measurement of large glass detectors. (author)

  8. Spectroscopic Parameter and Molecular Constant Investigations on Low-Lying States of BeF Radical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Feng Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential energy curves (PECs of X2Σ+, A2Πr and B2Σ+ states of BeF radical have been investigated using the complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF method, followed by the highly accurate valence internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (MRCI approach at the correlation-consistent basis sets, cc-pV5Z for Be and aug-cc-pV6Z for F. Based on the PECs of X2Σ+, A2Πr and B2Σ+ states, the spectroscopic parameters (De, Re, ωe, ωeχe, αe and Be have also been determined in the present work. With the PECs determined at the present level of theory, vibrational states have been predicted for each state when the rotational quantum number J equals zero (J = 0. The vibrational levels, inertial rotation and centrifugal distortion constants are determined for the three states, and the classical turning points are also calculated for the X2Σ+ state. Compared with the available experiments and other theories, it can be seen that the present spectroscopic parameter and molecular constant results are more fully in agreement with the experimental findings.

  9. Superconductivity, Mott-Hubbard states, and molecular orbital order in intercalated fullerides

    CERN Document Server

    Iwasa, Y

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of chemically doped fullerene superconductors and related compounds, with particular focus on Mott-Hubbard states and the role of molecular orbital degeneracy. Alkaline-earth metal fullerides produce superconductors of several kinds, all of which have states with higher valence than (C sub 6 sub 0) sup 6 sup - , where the second lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (the LUMO + 1 state) is filled. Alkali-metal-doped fullerides, on the other hand, afford superconductors only at the stoichiometry A sub 3 C sub 6 sub 0 (A denotes alkali metal) and in basically fcc structures. The metallicity and superconductivity of A sub 3 C sub 6 sub 0 compounds are destroyed either by reduction of the crystal symmetry or by change in the valence of C sub 6 sub 0. This difference is attributed to the narrower bandwidth in the A sub 3 C sub 6 sub 0 system, causing electronic instability in Jahn-Teller insulators and Mott-Hubbard insulators. The latter metal-insulator transition is driven by...

  10. Study of the molecular mobility of methyl-methacrylate and methacrylic acid copolymers by solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Maria Ines B.; Mansur, Claudia R.E.; Monteiro, Elisabeth E.C.

    1997-01-01

    Several methyl-methacrylate/methacrylic acid copolymers were prepared in the presence of concentrated nitric acid. The obtained copolymers were characterized by molecular weigh determination and hydrolization degree. The molecular mobility of these copolymers was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. Results are presented

  11. Searches for heavy resonances in all-jet final states with top quarks using jet substructure techniques with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usai, Emanuele

    2017-12-15

    While the Standard Model is very successful in describing subnuclear phenomena, it is not a complete theory of particle physics. Several new theories have been developed to address its issues. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of high-mass resonances. In some cases these resonances have an enhanced coupling to third generation quarks or to a hypothetical new generation of heavy non-chiral quarks. This thesis describes two searches for new phenomena compatible with these theories, in particular a search is presented for resonant top-antitop production, and the first search for heavy resonances decaying to a top quark and a heavy top quark partner T is shown. The searches target the all-jets decay channels and use data collected by the CMS Experiment at the CERN LHC between 2012 and 2015 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. Due to the high mass of the resonances considered, the final state particles have a high Lorentz-boost. To reconstruct the hadronic decay of the top quarks and W bosons, jet substructure techniques such as top quark and W boson tagging algorithms, and boosted b jet identification are employed. These algorithms are studied with a particular focus on their validation and performance assessment. No signs of physics beyond the Standard Model are observed, but stringent limits are placed on the production of heavy resonances decaying to top-antitop quark pairs or a top quark and a heavy T quark.

  12. Searches for heavy resonances in all-jet final states with top quarks using jet substructure techniques with the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usai, Emanuele

    2017-12-01

    While the Standard Model is very successful in describing subnuclear phenomena, it is not a complete theory of particle physics. Several new theories have been developed to address its issues. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of high-mass resonances. In some cases these resonances have an enhanced coupling to third generation quarks or to a hypothetical new generation of heavy non-chiral quarks. This thesis describes two searches for new phenomena compatible with these theories, in particular a search is presented for resonant top-antitop production, and the first search for heavy resonances decaying to a top quark and a heavy top quark partner T is shown. The searches target the all-jets decay channels and use data collected by the CMS Experiment at the CERN LHC between 2012 and 2015 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. Due to the high mass of the resonances considered, the final state particles have a high Lorentz-boost. To reconstruct the hadronic decay of the top quarks and W bosons, jet substructure techniques such as top quark and W boson tagging algorithms, and boosted b jet identification are employed. These algorithms are studied with a particular focus on their validation and performance assessment. No signs of physics beyond the Standard Model are observed, but stringent limits are placed on the production of heavy resonances decaying to top-antitop quark pairs or a top quark and a heavy T quark.

  13. Resonant Ion Pair Formation in Electron Collisions with Ground State Molecular Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong, W.; Dunn, G.H.; Djuric, N.; Greene, C.H.; Neau, A.; Zong, W.; Larsson, M.; Al-Khalili, A.; Neau, A.; Derkatch, A.M.; Vikor, L.; Shi, W.; Rosen, S.; Le Padellec, A.; Danared, H.; Ugglas, M. af

    1999-01-01

    Resonant ion pair formation from collisions of electrons with ground state diatomic molecular ions has been observed and absolute cross sections measured. The cross section for HD + is characterized by an abrupt threshold at 1.9thinspthinspeV and 14 resolved peaks in the range of energies 0≤E≤14 eV . The dominant mechanism responsible for the structures appears to be resonant capture and stabilization, modified by two-channel quantum interference. Data on HF + show structure correlated with photoionization of HF and with dissociative recombination of electrons with this ion. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  14. Could Zc(3900) be a IGJP = 1+1+ D∗ D-bar molecular state?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Chun-Yu; Liao, Xin-Hua; Liu, Yong-Lu; Huang, Ming-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the recently observed narrow resonance Z c (3900), which is assumed to be a D ∗ D-bar molecular state with quantum numbers I G J P = 1 + 1 + . Using QCD sum rules, we consider contributions up to dimension 8 in the operator product expansion and work at the leading order in α s . The mass we arrived at is (3.88 ± 0.17) GeV, which coincides with the mass of Z c (3900). (paper)

  15. Hybrid Light-Matter States in a Molecular and Material Science Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-11-15

    The notion that light and matter states can be hybridized the way s and p orbitals are mixed is a concept that is not familiar to most chemists and material scientists. Yet it has much potential for molecular and material sciences that is just beginning to be explored. For instance, it has already been demonstrated that the rate and yield of chemical reactions can be modified and that the conductivity of organic semiconductors and nonradiative energy transfer can be enhanced through the hybridization of electronic transitions. The hybridization is not limited to electronic transitions; it can be applied for instance to vibrational transitions to selectively perturb a given bond, opening new possibilities to change the chemical reactivity landscape and to use it as a tool in (bio)molecular science and spectroscopy. Such results are not only the consequence of the new eigenstates and energies generated by the hybridization. The hybrid light-matter states also have unusual properties: they can be delocalized over a very large number of molecules (up to ca. 10 5 ), and they become dispersive or momentum-sensitive. Importantly, the hybridization occurs even in the absence of light because it is the zero-point energies of the molecular and optical transitions that generate the new light-matter states. The present work is not a review but rather an Account from the author's point of view that first introduces the reader to the underlying concepts and details of the features of hybrid light-matter states. It is shown that light-matter hybridization is quite easy to achieve: all that is needed is to place molecules or a material in a resonant optical cavity (e.g., between two parallel mirrors) under the right conditions. For vibrational strong coupling, microfluidic IR cells can be used to study the consequences for chemistry in the liquid phase. Examples of modified properties are given to demonstrate the full potential for the molecular and material sciences. Finally an

  16. Search for heavy resonances that decay into a vector boson and a Higgs boson in hadronic final states at √(s) = 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Adam, W. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Vienna (Austria); Collaboration: CMS Collaboration; and others

    2017-09-15

    A search for heavy resonances with masses above 1 TeV, decaying to final states containing a vector boson and a Higgs boson, is presented. The search considers hadronic decays of the vector boson, and Higgs boson decays to b quarks. The decay products are highly boosted, and each collimated pair of quarks is reconstructed as a single, massive jet. The analysis is performed using a data sample collected in 2016 by the CMS experiment at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb{sup -1}. The data are consistent with the background expectation and are used to place limits on the parameters of a theoretical model with a heavy vector triplet. In the benchmark scenario with mass-degenerate W{sup '} and Z{sup '} bosons decaying predominantly to pairs of standard model bosons, for the first time heavy resonances for masses as high as 3.3 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level, setting the most stringent constraints to date on such states decaying into a vector boson and a Higgs boson. (orig.)

  17. Theory of exotic superconductivity and normal states of heavy electron and high temperature superconductivity materials. Progress report, February 15, 1994--February 14, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    This is a progress report for the DOE project covering the period 2/15/94 to 2/14/95. The PI had a fruitful sabbatical during this period, and had some important new results, particularly in the area of new phenomenology for heavy fermion superconductivity. Significant new research accomplishments are in the area of odd-in-time-reversal pairing states/staggered superconductivity, the two-channel Kondo lattice, and a general model for Ce impurities which admits one-, two-, and three-channel Kondo effects. Papers submitted touch on these areas: staggered superconductivity - a new phenomenology for UPt 3 ; theory of the two-channel Kondo lattice in infinite dimensions; general model of a Ce 3+ impurity. Other work was done in the areas: Knight shift in heavy fermion alloys and compounds; symmetry analysis of singular pairing correlations for the two-channel Kondo impurity model

  18. Method for estimating critical properties of heavy compounds suitable for cubic equations of state and its application to the prediction of vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ioannis, Smirlis; Iakovos, Yakoumis

    1997-01-01

    S. The proposed scheme employs a recent group-contribution method (Constantinou et al. Fluid Phase Equilib. 1995, 103 (1), 11) for estimating the acentric factor. The two critical properties are estimated via a generalized correlation for the ratio T-c/P-c (with the van der Waals surface area) and the cubic Eo...... pressures for several nonpolar and slightly polar heavy compounds with very satisfactory results, essentially independent of the experimental point used. Furthermore, the method yields critical properties for heavy alkanes (N-c > 20) and other compounds which are in very good agreement with recent available......Cubic equations of state (EoS) are often used for correlating and predicting phase equilibria. Before extending any EoS to mixtures, reliable vapor-pressure prediction is essential. This requires experimental, if possible, critical temperatures T-c, pressures P-c, and acentric factor omega...

  19. Steady state analysis of Boolean molecular network models via model reduction and computational algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Aguilar, Boris; Hinkelmann, Franziska; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2014-06-26

    A key problem in the analysis of mathematical models of molecular networks is the determination of their steady states. The present paper addresses this problem for Boolean network models, an increasingly popular modeling paradigm for networks lacking detailed kinetic information. For small models, the problem can be solved by exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. But for larger models this is not feasible, since the size of the phase space grows exponentially with the dimension of the network. The dimension of published models is growing to over 100, so that efficient methods for steady state determination are essential. Several methods have been proposed for large networks, some of them heuristic. While these methods represent a substantial improvement in scalability over exhaustive enumeration, the problem for large networks is still unsolved in general. This paper presents an algorithm that consists of two main parts. The first is a graph theoretic reduction of the wiring diagram of the network, while preserving all information about steady states. The second part formulates the determination of all steady states of a Boolean network as a problem of finding all solutions to a system of polynomial equations over the finite number system with two elements. This problem can be solved with existing computer algebra software. This algorithm compares favorably with several existing algorithms for steady state determination. One advantage is that it is not heuristic or reliant on sampling, but rather determines algorithmically and exactly all steady states of a Boolean network. The code for the algorithm, as well as the test suite of benchmark networks, is available upon request from the corresponding author. The algorithm presented in this paper reliably determines all steady states of sparse Boolean networks with up to 1000 nodes. The algorithm is effective at analyzing virtually all published models even those of moderate connectivity. The problem for

  20. 75 FR 70237 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; California Heavy-Duty On-Highway Otto...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... for the current CARB categories of heavy-duty vehicles are within-the-scope of the previously granted...) (Diesel) and 53 FR 7022 (March 4, 1988) (Otto-cycle). \\3\\ 69 FR 59920 (October 6, 2004). CARB's current... threshold test of materiality and * * * thereafter assess such material evidence against a standard of proof...

  1. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms. Volume 1, State-of-the-art and potential applications at the SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Benemann, J.R. [Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  2. Superatom spectroscopy and the electronic state correlation between elements and isoelectronic molecular counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppernick, Samuel J; Gunaratne, K D Dasitha; Castleman, A W

    2010-01-19

    Detailed in the present investigation are results pertaining to the photoelectron spectroscopy of negatively charged atomic ions and their isoelectronic molecular counterparts. Experiments utilizing the photoelectron imaging technique are performed on the negative ions of the group 10 noble metal block (i.e. Ni-, Pd-, and Pt-) of the periodic table at a photon energy of 2.33 eV (532 nm). The accessible electronic transitions, term energies, and orbital angular momentum components of the bound electronic states in the atom are then compared with photoelectron images collected for isoelectronic early transition metal heterogeneous diatomic molecules, M-X- (M = Ti,Zr,W; X = O or C). A superposition principle connecting the spectroscopy between the atomic and molecular species is observed, wherein the electronic structure of the diatomic is observed to mimic that present in the isoelectronic atom. The molecular ions studied in this work, TiO-, ZrO-, and WC- can then be interpreted as possessing superatomic electronic structures reminiscent of the isoelectronic elements appearing on the periodic table, thereby quantifying the superatom concept.

  3. Correlation of the vapor pressure isotope effect with molecular force fields in the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollin, J.S.; Ishida, T.

    1976-07-01

    The present work is concerned with the development and application of a new model for condensed phase interactions with which the vapor pressure isotope effect (vpie) may be related to molecular forces and structure. The model considers the condensed phase as being represented by a cluster of regularly arranged molecules consisting of a central molecule and a variable number of molecules in the first coordination shell. The methods of normal coordinate analysis are used to determine the modes of vibration of the condensed phase cluster from which, in turn, the isotopic reduced partition function can be calculated. Using the medium cluster model, the observed vpie for a series of methane isotopes has been successfully reproduced with better agreement with experiment than has been possible using the simple cell model. We conclude, however, that insofar as the medium cluster model provides a reasonable picture of the liquid state, the vpie is not sufficiently sensitive to molecular orientation to permit an experimental determination of intermolecular configuration in the condensed phase through measurement of isotopic pressure ratios. The virtual independence of vapor pressure isotope effects on molecular orientation at large cluster sizes is a demonstration of the general acceptability of the cell model assumptions for vpie calculations

  4. Self-interaction corrected density functional calculations of molecular Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Hildur; Zhang, Yao; Weber, Peter M.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the wave function and energy of Rydberg excited states of molecules. A good estimate of the Rydberg state orbital is obtained using ground state density functional theory including Perdew-Zunger self-interaction correction and an optimized effective potential. The total energy of the excited molecule is obtained using the Delta Self-Consistent Field method where an electron is removed from the highest occupied orbital and placed in the Rydberg orbital. Results are presented for the first few Rydberg states of NH 3 , H 2 O, H 2 CO, C 2 H 4 , and N(CH 3 ) 3 . The mean absolute error in the energy of the 33 molecular Rydberg states presented here is 0.18 eV. The orbitals are represented on a real space grid, avoiding the dependence on diffuse atomic basis sets. As in standard density functional theory calculations, the computational effort scales as NM 2 where N is the number of orbitals and M is the number of grid points included in the calculation. Due to the slow scaling of the computational effort with system size and the high level of parallelism in the real space grid approach, the method presented here makes it possible to estimate Rydberg electron binding energy in large molecules

  5. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  6. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  7. Current state of knowledge of the concentration of mercury and other heavy metals in fresh water fish in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancera Rodriguez, Nestor Javier; Alvarez Leon, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    One of the most important environmental problems in the country refers to the indiscriminate use of chemical precursors in illicit activities, the use of heavy metals as mercury in mining activities, the spill of served waters and another type of compound related with the industrial activities of raw and the inadequate agricultural practices. This has led to chemical contamination especially by heavy metals, considered one of the most dangerous for the aquatic ecosystems and the present species in them. Fish have the capacity to store these compounds in their organism in a concentration higher than that in the surrounding environment (water), therefore, their concentration are important indicators of the contamination level, but also this implies that their consumption can become a serious health problem for the populations that feeds from them. The concentration of heavy metals in fish of fresh water is better known in the basin of the Magdalena river, especially in the region of the Mojana and in the marshes of the south of the department of Bolivar where the levels of contamination by mercury and other metals has been studied due to the development of multiple industrial activities, including gold mining and petrochemical industries. However, little is known in the country about the problem generated by the disposal heavy metals in rivers and lakes and their impact on the fish resource, deterioration of ecosystems and human health. Based in the current norms bio-assays have been used to check the effects of the aquatic contamination on fresh waters fish and the evaluation of at least three parameters (heavy metals, temperature, effluents) in eight species of fresh waters fish: carassius auratus, oreochromis spp., piractus brachypomus, prochilodus magdalenae, astyanax fasciatus, colossoma bidens, gambusia affinis and grundulus bogotensis

  8. Current State of Knowledge of the Concentration of Mercury and Other Heavy Metals in Fresh Water Fish in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Javier Mancera-Rodríguez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important environmental problems in the country refers to the indiscriminate use of chemical precursors in illicit activities, the use of heavy metals as mercury in mining activities, the spill of served waters and another type of compound related with the industrial activities of raw and the inadequate agricultural practices. This has led to chemical contamination especially by heavy metals, considered one of the most dangerous for the aquatic ecosystems and the present species in them. Fish have the capacity to store these compounds in their organism in a concentration higher important indicators of the contamination level, but also this implies that their consumption can become a serious health problem for the populations that feeds from them. The concentration of heavy metals in fish of fresh water is better known in the basin of the Magdalena river, especially in the region of the Mojana and in the marshes of the south of the Department of Bolivar where the levels of contamination by mercury and other metals has been studied due to the development of multiple industrial activities, including gold mining and petrochemical industries. However, little is known in the country about the problem generated by the disposal heavy metals in rivers and lakes and their impact on the fish resource, deterioration of ecosystems and human health. Based in the current norms bio-assays have been used to check the effects of the aquatic contamination on fresh waters fish and the evaluation of at least three parameters (heavy metals, temperature, effluents in eight species of fresh waters fish: Carassius auratus, Oreochromis spp., Piractus brachypomus, Prochilodus magdalenae, Astyanax fasciatus, Colossoma bidens, Gambusia affinis and Grundulus bogotensis.

  9. Isolate extended state in the DNA molecular transistor with surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Le, E-mail: wang_le917@gs.zzu.edu.cn; Qin, Zhi-Jie

    2016-02-01

    The field effect characteristic of a DNA molecular device is investigated in a tight binding model with binary disorder and side site correlation. Using the transfer-matrix method and Landauer–Büttiker theory, we find that the system has isolated extended state that is irrespective of the DNA sequence and can be modulated by the gate voltage. When the gate voltage reaches some proper value, the isolated extended state appears at the Fermi level of the system and the long range charge transport is greatly enhanced. We attribute this phenomenon to the combination of the external field, the surface interaction, and the intrinsic disorder of DNA. The result is a generic feature of the nanowire with binary disorder and surface interaction.

  10. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin; Maier, Elke; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Benz, Roland; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics of warm dense iron and a five-phase equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Crockett, Scott

    2018-05-01

    Through quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), utilizing both Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) and orbital-free density functional theory, we calculate the equation of state of warm dense iron in the density range 7 -30 g/cm 3 and temperatures from 1 to 100 eV. A critical examination of the iron pseudopotential is made, from which we find a significant improvement at high pressure to the previous QMD calculations of Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 023101 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.023101]. Our results also significantly extend the ranges of density and temperature that were attempted in that prior work. We calculate the shock Hugoniot and find very good agreement with experimental results to pressures over 20 TPa. These results are then incorporated with previous studies to generate a five-phase equation of state for iron.

  12. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Maier, Elke [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Benz, Roland [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam, E-mail: alange@fmp-berlin.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles.

  13. The peptide-receptive transition state of MHC-1 molecules: Insight from structure and molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson H.; Mage, M.; Dolan, M.; Wang, R.; Boyd, L.; Revilleza, M.; Natarajan, K.; Myers, N.; Hansen, T.; Margulies, D.

    2012-05-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins of the adaptive immune system require antigenic peptides for maintenance of mature conformation and immune function via specific recognition by MHC-I-restricted CD8(+) T lymphocytes. New MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum are held by chaperones in a peptide-receptive (PR) transition state pending release by tightly binding peptides. In this study, we show, by crystallographic, docking, and molecular dynamics methods, dramatic movement of a hinged unit containing a conserved 3(10) helix that flips from an exposed 'open' position in the PR transition state to a 'closed' position with buried hydrophobic side chains in the peptide-loaded mature molecule. Crystallography of hinged unit residues 46-53 of murine H-2L(d) MHC-I H chain, complexed with mAb 64-3-7, demonstrates solvent exposure of these residues in the PR conformation. Docking and molecular dynamics predict how this segment moves to help form the A and B pockets crucial for the tight peptide binding needed for stability of the mature peptide-loaded conformation, chaperone dissociation, and Ag presentation.

  14. Equations of states for an ionic liquid under high pressure: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Mauro C.C.; Pádua, Agílio A.H.; Gomes, Margarida F.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We compare different equation of states, EoS, for an ionic liquid under high pressure. • Molecular dynamics, MD, simulations have been used to evaluate the best EoS. • MD simulations show that a group contribution model can be extrapolated to P ∼ 1.0 GPa. • A perturbed hard-sphere EoS also fits the densities calculated by MD simulations. - Abstract: The high-pressure dependence of density given by empirical equation of states (EoS) for the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (or triflate), [C 4 C 1 im][TfO], is compared with results obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two EoS proposed for [C 4 C 1 im][TfO] in the pressure range of tens of MPa, which give very different densities when extrapolated to pressures beyond the original experiments, are compared with a group contribution model (GCM). The MD simulations provide support that one of the empirical EoS and the GCM is valid in the pressure range of hundreds of MPa. As an alternative to these EoS that are based on modified Tait equations, it is shown that a perturbed hard-sphere EoS based on the Carnahan–Starling–van der Waals equation also fits the densities calculated by MD simulations of [C 4 C 1 im][TfO] up to ∼1.0 GPa

  15. Spin degeneracy of Hadronic molecules in the heavy quark region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2018-03-01

    Hadronic molecules have been considered to appear close to the hadron-hadron threshold. For the heavy mesons, \\bar D and B, the one pion exchange potential is enhanced by the mass degeneracy of heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons, caused by the heavy quark spin symmetry. In this study, we investigate new hadronic molecules formed by the heavy meson {P≤ft( * \\right)} = {\\bar D≤ft( * \\right)},{B≤ft( * \\right)} and a nucleon N, being P (*) N. As the interaction between P (*) and N, the pion and vector meson (ρ and ω) exchanges are considered. By solving the coupled-channel Schrödinger equations for P N and P*N, we obtain the bound and resonant states in the charm and bottom sectors, and in the in nite heavy quark mass limit. In the molecular states, the PN - P*N mixing effect is important, where the tensor force of the one pion exchange potential generates the strong attraction. In the heavy quark limit, we obtain the degeneracy of the states for J P = 1/2- and 3/2-.

  16. Formulation of state projected centroid molecular dynamics: Microcanonical ensemble and connection to the Wigner distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Lindsay; Hernández de la Peña, Lisandro; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    A derivation of quantum statistical mechanics based on the concept of a Feynman path centroid is presented for the case of generalized density operators using the projected density operator formalism of Blinov and Roy [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 7822-7831 (2001)]. The resulting centroid densities, centroid symbols, and centroid correlation functions are formulated and analyzed in the context of the canonical equilibrium picture of Jang and Voth [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 2357-2370 (1999)]. The case where the density operator projects onto a particular energy eigenstate of the system is discussed, and it is shown that one can extract microcanonical dynamical information from double Kubo transformed correlation functions. It is also shown that the proposed projection operator approach can be used to formally connect the centroid and Wigner phase-space distributions in the zero reciprocal temperature β limit. A Centroid Molecular Dynamics (CMD) approximation to the state-projected exact quantum dynamics is proposed and proven to be exact in the harmonic limit. The state projected CMD method is also tested numerically for a quartic oscillator and a double-well potential and found to be more accurate than canonical CMD. In the case of a ground state projection, this method can resolve tunnelling splittings of the double well problem in the higher barrier regime where canonical CMD fails. Finally, the state-projected CMD framework is cast in a path integral form.

  17. Formulation of state projected centroid molecular dynamics: Microcanonical ensemble and connection to the Wigner distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Lindsay; Hernández de la Peña, Lisandro; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2017-06-07

    A derivation of quantum statistical mechanics based on the concept of a Feynman path centroid is presented for the case of generalized density operators using the projected density operator formalism of Blinov and Roy [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 7822-7831 (2001)]. The resulting centroid densities, centroid symbols, and centroid correlation functions are formulated and analyzed in the context of the canonical equilibrium picture of Jang and Voth [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 2357-2370 (1999)]. The case where the density operator projects onto a particular energy eigenstate of the system is discussed, and it is shown that one can extract microcanonical dynamical information from double Kubo transformed correlation functions. It is also shown that the proposed projection operator approach can be used to formally connect the centroid and Wigner phase-space distributions in the zero reciprocal temperature β limit. A Centroid Molecular Dynamics (CMD) approximation to the state-projected exact quantum dynamics is proposed and proven to be exact in the harmonic limit. The state projected CMD method is also tested numerically for a quartic oscillator and a double-well potential and found to be more accurate than canonical CMD. In the case of a ground state projection, this method can resolve tunnelling splittings of the double well problem in the higher barrier regime where canonical CMD fails. Finally, the state-projected CMD framework is cast in a path integral form.

  18. Unfolding mechanism of thrombin-binding aptamer revealed by molecular dynamics simulation and Markov State Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Liyun; Xiao, Xiuchan; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Yu, Xinyan; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2016-04-05

    Thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) with the sequence 5'GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG3' could fold into G-quadruplex, which correlates with functionally important genomic regionsis. However, unfolding mechanism involved in the structural stability of G-quadruplex has not been satisfactorily elucidated on experiments so far. Herein, we studied the unfolding pathway of TBA by a combination of molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and Markov State Model (MSM). Our results revealed that the unfolding of TBA is not a simple two-state process but proceeds along multiple pathways with multistate intermediates. One high flux confirms some observations from NMR experiment. Another high flux exhibits a different and simpler unfolding pathway with less intermediates. Two important intermediate states were identified. One is similar to the G-triplex reported in the folding of G-quadruplex, but lack of H-bonding between guanines in the upper plane. More importantly, another intermediate state acting as a connector to link the folding region and the unfolding one, was the first time identified, which exhibits higher population and stability than the G-triplex-like intermediate. These results will provide valuable information for extending our understanding the folding landscape of G-quadruplex formation.

  19. Molecular control of steady-state dendritic cell maturation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Gianna Elena; Ma, Averil

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized sentinels responsible for coordinating adaptive immunity. This function is dependent upon coupled sensitivity to environmental signs of inflammation and infection to cellular maturation-the programmed alteration of DC phenotype and function to enhance immune cell activation. Although DCs are thus well equipped to respond to pathogens, maturation triggers are not unique to infection. Given that immune cells are exquisitely sensitive to the biological functions of DCs, we now appreciate that multiple layers of suppression are required to restrict the environmental sensitivity, cellular maturation, and even life span of DCs to prevent aberrant immune activation during the steady state. At the same time, steady-state DCs are not quiescent but rather perform key functions that support homeostasis of numerous cell types. Here we review these functions and molecular mechanisms of suppression that control steady-state DC maturation. Corruption of these steady-state operatives has diverse immunological consequences and pinpoints DCs as potent drivers of autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  20. Molecular-state cross-section calculations for H+Csarrow-right-leftH-+Cs+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Kimura, M.; Sato, H.

    1984-01-01

    Pseudopotential molecular-structure calculations have been used to obtain the seven lowest 1 Σ and 1 Pi states of CsH. These states and their associated radial and rotational coupling terms have been used to calculate the cross sections for H - +Cs + ion-pair production in H+Cs(6s) and H+Cs((6p) collisions at energies from 0.1 to 10 keV. The ion-ion mutual neutralization cross section, H - +Cs + →H+Cs, is also presented. The cross-section calculations were done with the perturbed-stationary-state method, modified to include two-electron translation factors. The ion-pair production cross section for ground-state reactants is in good agreement with experiment; collisions of H with excited Cs((6p) show an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the ion-pair production cross section at 100 eV. The ion-ion mutual neutralization cross section is found to be large, attaining a value of 1.3 x 10 -14 cm 2 at 0.1 keV

  1. Application of quasi-steady state methods to molecular motor transport on microtubules in fungal hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvergne, Duncan; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2015-08-21

    We consider bidirectional transport of cargo by molecular motors dynein and kinesin that walk along microtubules, and/or diffuse in the cell. The motors compete to transport cargo in opposite directions with respect to microtubule polarity (towards the plus or minus end of the microtubule). In recent work, Gou et al. (2014) used a hierarchical set of models, each consisting of continuum transport equations to track the evolution of motors and their cargo (early endosomes) in the specific case of the fungus Ustilago maydis. We complement their work using a framework of quasi-steady state analysis developed by Newby and Bressloff (2010) and Bressloff and Newby (2013) to reduce the models to an approximating steady state Fokker-Plank equation. This analysis allows us to find analytic approximations to the steady state solutions in many cases where the full models are not easily solved. Consequently, we can make predictions about parameter dependence of the resulting spatial distributions. We also characterize the overall rates of bulk transport and diffusion, and how these are related to state transition parameters, motor speeds, microtubule polarity distribution, and specific assumptions made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Search for a heavy resonance decaying into a vector boson and a Higgs boson in semileptonic final states at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A search for heavy resonances decaying into a vector boson and the standard model Higgs boson is presented, in final states containing b quark-antiquark pairs from the decay of the Higgs boson and leptons (electrons and muons) or missing transverse momentum, because of undetected neutrinos, from the decay of the vector bosons. The analysis is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected in 2016 by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$. The data are found to be consistent with the background expectations. Exclusion limits are set in the context of spin-1 heavy vector resonances and spin-0 two Higgs doublet models, also including the presence of dark matter. In a model with heavy vector triplet, W' and Z' resonances with a degenerate mass smaller than $2.9~\\mathrm{TeV}$ are excluded at $95\\%$ confidence level if the couplings to the standard model bosons dominate.

  3. Searches for heavy resonances in all-jet final states with top quarks using jet substructure techniques with the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Usai, Emanuele; Haller, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    While the Standard Model is very successful in describing subnuclear phenomena, it is not acomplete theory of particle physics. Several new theories have been developed to address itsissues. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of high-mass resonances.In some cases these resonances have an enhanced coupling to third generation quarks or toa hypothetical new generation of heavy non-chiral quarks. This thesis describes two searchesfor new phenomena compatible with these theories, in particular a search is presented forresonant top-antitop production, and the first search for heavy resonances decaying to a topquark and a heavy top quark partner T is shown.The searches target the all-jets decay channels and use data collected by the CMS Experiment at the CERN LHC between 2012 and 2015 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and13 TeV. Due to the high mass of the resonances considered, the final state particles have ahigh Lorentz-boost. To reconstruct the hadronic decay of the top quarks and W...

  4. Low-energy heavy-atom impact as a tool for production and classification of doubly excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy heavy-atom impact may be an efficient way of preferentially populating doubly excited levels. Using neon as an example, this paper discusses why this is so. The similarity of the structure of the energy level diagrams for doubly excited neon and the level scheme for neutral magnesium is pointed out, suggesting that collective quantum numbers may describe the electron pair. (orig.)

  5. Heavy metals distribution and risk assessment in soil from an informal E-waste recycling site in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isimekhai, Khadijah A; Garelick, Hemda; Watt, John; Purchase, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Informal E-waste recycling can pose a risk to human health and the environment which this study endeavours to evaluate. The distribution of a number of heavy metals in soil from an informal recycling site in the largest market for used and new electronics and electrical equipment in West Africa was investigated. The potential bioavailability of heavy metals, extent of contamination, potential risk due to the recycling activities and impact of external factors such as rainfall were also assessed. The concentrations of all the heavy metals tested were higher in the area where burning of the waste occurred than at the control site, suggesting an impact of the recycling activities on the soil. The order of total metal concentrations was Cu > Pb > Zn > Mn > Ni > Sb > Cr > Cd for both the dry and wet seasons. The total concentrations of Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn were all significantly higher (p  Sb > Zn > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr. When the risk was assessed using the Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI), Cu was found to contribute the most to the potential ecological risk and Cd gave rise to the greatest concern due to its high toxic-response factor within the study site. Similarly, utilising the Risk Assessment Code (RAC) suggested that Cd posed the most risk in this site. This research establishes a high level of contamination in the study site and underscores the importance of applying the appropriate chemical speciation in risk assessment.

  6. Heavy rain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge of the effect of heavy rain on airplane performance. Although the effects of heavy rain on airplane systems and engines are generally known, only recently has the potential aerodynamic effect of heavy rain been recognized. In 1977 the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) conducted a study of 25 aircraft accidents and incidents which occurred between 1964 and 1976 in which low-altitude wind shear could have been a contributing factor. Of the 25 cases (23 approach or landing and 2 take-off) in the study, ten cases had occurred in a rain environment, and in five cases these were classified as intense or heavy rain encounters. These results led to the reconsideration of high-intensity, short-duration rainfall as a potential weather-related aircraft safety hazard, particularly in the take-off and/or approach phases of flight.

  7. Effect of Molecular Packing and Charge Delocalization on the Nonradiative Recombination of Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2016-09-05

    In organic solar cells, a major source of energy loss is attributed to nonradiative recombination from the interfacial charge transfer states to the ground state. By taking pentacene–C60 complexes as model donor–acceptor systems, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of how molecular packing and charge delocalization impact these nonradiative recombination rates at donor–acceptor interfaces is provided.

  8. Search for new physics in $t\\bar{t}$ final states with additional heavy-flavor jets with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)702756; Juste Rozas, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation presents searches in $t\\bar{t}$ final states with additional heavy-flavor jets using $20.3\\ {fb^{-1}}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 8\\ TeV$, recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Exploiting this final state, three analyses are presented that address the instability of the Higgs boson mass from different perspectives. The main challenge for the presented analyses lies in the precise modeling of the background, in particular $t\\bar{t}+b\\bar{b}$. Since no measurements have been performed yet on the $t\\bar{t}$ production with additional heavy-flavor jets, the analyses have to rely on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the background. Recent developments in MC simulation have improved the description of the background, and a great effort is invested in porting the state-of-the-art predictions into the analyses. The systematic uncertainties on the modeling of the $t\\bar{t}+b\\bar{b}$ background constitute the main source of sensitivity degradation. In order to reduce the impact of ...

  9. Determination of some heavy metals in oreochromis niloticus, clarias gariepinus and synodontis spp from the coastal water of Ondo State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaolu, S.S.

    2002-01-01

    Some heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, Co, Mn, and Cr) were determined in Oreochromis niloticus, Clarias graiepinus and Synodontis spp obtained from the coastal water of Ondo State. All metals examined and detected in all fish samples. Iron, manganese and cadmium were found to be the most abundant metals in the fish samples with an average values of 35.8, 31.3, and 12.5 mg kg-1 respectively. Except for manganese, iron and cadmium, Syndrontis spp has the highest concentration for virtually all the metals under examination. (author)

  10. Detectable states, cycle fluxes, and motility scaling of molecular motor kinesin: An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The process by which a kinesin motor couples its ATPase activity with concerted mechanical hand-over-hand steps is a foremost topic of molecular motor physics. Two major routes toward elucidating kinesin mechanisms are the motility performance characterization of velocity and run length, and single-molecular state detection experiments. However, these two sets of experimental approaches are largely uncoupled to date. Here, we introduce an integrative motility state analysis based on a theorized kinetic graph theory for kinesin, which, on one hand, is validated by a wealth of accumulated motility data, and, on the other hand, allows for rigorous quantification of state occurrences and chemomechanical cycling probabilities. An interesting linear scaling for kinesin motility performance across species is discussed as well. An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis provides a powerful tool to bridge motility and state characterization experiments, so as to forge a unified effort for the elucidation of the working mechanisms of molecular motors.

  11. Heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, C.

    1974-01-01

    This review of the present state of work on heavy-ion accelerators pays particular attention to the requirements for nuclear research. It is divided into the following sections: single-particle versus collective acceleration, heavy-ion accelerators, beam quality, and a status report on the UNILAC facility. Among the topics considered are the recycling cyclotron, linacs with superconducting resonators, and acceleration to the GeV/nucleon range. (8 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  12. Search for long-lived, heavy particles in final states with a muon and multi-track displaced vertex in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Valenta, J.; Vrba, Václav; Zeman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 719, 4-5 (2013), 280-298 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : new particle * search for * particle * heavy * scattering * neutralino * lifetime * neutralino * mass * R parity * violation * ATLAS * channel cross Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 6.019, year: 2013

  13. Realisation and crossed molecular beams study of H2/O chemical reactions at several excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Jacqueline

    1986-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the reactive collision O + H 2 OH + H in a crossed beam experiment. This process including several channels taken a part in the chemistry of the upper atmosphere as well as in the combustion of hydrogen. According to the electronic or vibrational state of the reactants, the OH radical is produced in its ground electronic state OH (X 2 π) or in its first excited state OH (A 2 Σ + ). When the reactants are in their ground state, the reaction is endothermic in the conditions of the experiment (center of mass kinetic energy ≅ 0.12 eV). The following reactions have been obtained: O( 1 D) +H 2 (v=O) → OH (X 2 π) +H( 2 S) and O( 1 D) +H 2 (v≥5) → OH (A 2 Σ + ) +H( 2 S). The atomic oxygen is produced in its excited state O( 1 D) in a radio-frequency discharge which dissociates the molecular oxygen seeded in a carrier gas (He or Ar) and the hydrogen molecules are excited vibrationally by electron bombardment. The first reaction is studied by time-of-flight measurements. In this way, it has been possible to observe the different vibrational levels on which the OH radical is produced. The analysis of this vibrational distribution shows the competition between the abstraction and insertion-dissociation mechanisms. In the second reaction, the analysis of the spontaneous fluorescence of OH (A 2 Σ + ) reveals a very hot and non-Boltzmann rotational excitation. (author) [fr

  14. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  15. A molecular dynamics study of the effects of fast molecular motions on solid-state NMR parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Hodgkinson, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 43 (2013), s. 8705-8712 ISSN 1466-8033 Grant - others:Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union(XE) FP7-299242 People Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * DFT calculations * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.858, year: 2013

  16. Combined, solid-state molecular property and gamma spectrometers for CBRNE detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ben; Grate, Jay; Pearson, Brett; Gallagher, Neal; Wise, Barry; Whitten, Ralph; Adams, Jesse

    2013-05-01

    Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc. (Nevada Nano) has developed a multi-sensor solution to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) detection that combines the Molecular Property Spectrometer™ (MPS™)—a micro-electro-mechanical chip-based technology capable of measuring a variety of thermodynamic and electrostatic molecular properties of sampled vapors and particles—and a compact, high-resolution, solid-state gamma spectrometer module for identifying radioactive materials, including isotopes used in dirty bombs and nuclear weapons. By conducting multiple measurements, the system can provide a more complete characterization of an unknown sample, leading to a more accurate identification. Positive identifications of threats are communicated using an integrated wireless module. Currently, system development is focused on detection of commercial, military and improvised explosives, radioactive materials, and chemical threats. The system can be configured for a variety of CBRNE applications, including handheld wands and swab-type threat detectors requiring short sample times, and ultra-high sensitivity detectors in which longer sampling times are used. Here we provide an overview of the system design and operation and present results from preliminary testing.

  17. Hydrazone based molecular glasses for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aich, R.; Tran-Van, F.; Goubard, F.; Beouch, L.; Michaleviciute, A.; Grazulevicius, J.V.; Ratier, B.; Chevrot, C.

    2008-01-01

    Biscarbazole and terthiophene based molecular glasses with hydrazone functional goups (named respectively 2CzMPH and 3TDPH) have been synthesized and the thermal, optical and electrochemical properties have been studied. Differential scanning calorimetry characterizations confirm the metastable amorphous properties of these molecules with glass transition temperatures at 80 deg. C for the 3TDPH and 93 deg. C for the 2CzMPH. Their electrochemical properties have been studied and showed the effect of the conjugated hydrazone groups on the electronic delocalization of the structures. The concept of solid state dye-sensitized solar cells using hydrazone based molecular glasses has been verified with the elaboration of a SnO 2 : F/nc-TiO 2 /Ru-dye/2CzMPH /Au devices. Under full sunlight (98 mW/cm 2 , air mass 1.5) the I-V characterization of the device give a short circuit photocurrents I sc = 0.42 mA/cm 2 , open circuit voltage V oc = 500 mV with a fill factor of 0.35

  18. Hydrazone based molecular glasses for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aich, R. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Polymeres et des Interfaces (EA 2528), Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France); Ecole Electricite de Production et Methodes Industrielles, Cergy Pontoise (France); Tran-Van, F. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Polymeres et des Interfaces (EA 2528), Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)], E-mail: francois.tran-van@u-cergy.fr; Goubard, F.; Beouch, L. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Polymeres et des Interfaces (EA 2528), Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France); Michaleviciute, A.; Grazulevicius, J.V. [Department of Organic Technology, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu Plentas 19, Kaunas LT-50254 (Lithuania); Ratier, B. [X-LIM., departement MINACOM, UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences, 123 av. Albert Thomas 87060 Limoges cedex France (France); Chevrot, C. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie des Polymeres et des Interfaces (EA 2528), Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2008-08-30

    Biscarbazole and terthiophene based molecular glasses with hydrazone functional goups (named respectively 2CzMPH and 3TDPH) have been synthesized and the thermal, optical and electrochemical properties have been studied. Differential scanning calorimetry characterizations confirm the metastable amorphous properties of these molecules with glass transition temperatures at 80 deg. C for the 3TDPH and 93 deg. C for the 2CzMPH. Their electrochemical properties have been studied and showed the effect of the conjugated hydrazone groups on the electronic delocalization of the structures. The concept of solid state dye-sensitized solar cells using hydrazone based molecular glasses has been verified with the elaboration of a SnO{sub 2}: F/nc-TiO{sub 2}/Ru-dye/2CzMPH /Au devices. Under full sunlight (98 mW/cm{sup 2}, air mass 1.5) the I-V characterization of the device give a short circuit photocurrents I{sub sc} = 0.42 mA/cm{sup 2}, open circuit voltage V{sub oc} = 500 mV with a fill factor of 0.35.

  19. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, S.M., E-mail: simon.eldridge@dpi.nsw.gov.au [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); NSW Department of Primary Industries, Bruxner Highway, Wollongbar, NSW 2477 (Australia); Chen, C.R. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Xu, Z.H. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Nelson, P.N. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870 (Australia); Boyd, S.E. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Meszaros, I. [Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia); Chan, K.Y. [Graduate School of Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  20. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state 13 C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes

  1. Heavy flavors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.; Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    A range of issues pertaining to heavy flavors at the SSC is examined including heavy flavor production by gluon-gluon fusion and by shower evolution of gluon jets, flavor tagging, reconstruction of Higgs and W bosons, and the study of rare decays and CP violation in the B meson system. A specific detector for doing heavy flavor physics and tuned to this latter study at the SSC, the TASTER, is described. 36 refs., 10 figs

  2. Path integral molecular dynamics for exact quantum statistics of multi-electronic-state systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinzijian; Liu, Jian

    2018-03-14

    An exact approach to compute physical properties for general multi-electronic-state (MES) systems in thermal equilibrium is presented. The approach is extended from our recent progress on path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), Liu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024103 (2016)] and Zhang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 147, 034109 (2017)], for quantum statistical mechanics when a single potential energy surface is involved. We first define an effective potential function that is numerically favorable for MES-PIMD and then derive corresponding estimators in MES-PIMD for evaluating various physical properties. Its application to several representative one-dimensional and multi-dimensional models demonstrates that MES-PIMD in principle offers a practical tool in either of the diabatic and adiabatic representations for studying exact quantum statistics of complex/large MES systems when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, Condon approximation, and harmonic bath approximation are broken.

  3. Search of molecular ground state via genetic algorithm: Implementation on a hybrid SIMD-MIMD platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucello, N.; D'Agostino, G.; Pisacane, F.

    1997-01-01

    A genetic algorithm for the optimization of the ground-state structure of a metallic cluster has been developed and ported on a SIMD-MIMD parallel platform. The SIMD part of the parallel platform is represented by a Quadrics/APE100 consisting of 512 floating point units, while the MIMD part is formed by a cluster of workstations. The proposed algorithm is composed by a part where the genetic operators are applied to the elements of the population and a part which performs a further local relaxation and the fitness calculation via Molecular Dynamics. These parts have been implemented on the MIMD and on the SIMD part, respectively. Results have been compared to those generated by using Simulated Annealing

  4. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. I. Microwave spectra and molecular structure in the ground state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Baba, Masaaki, E-mail: baba@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki [Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We observed microwave absorption spectra of some deuterated benzenes and accurately determined the rotational constants of all H/D isotopomers in the ground vibrational state. Using synthetic analysis assuming that all bond angles are 120°, the mean bond lengths were obtained to be r{sub 0}(C–C) = 1.3971 Å and r{sub 0}(C–H) = r{sub 0}(C–D) = 1.0805 Å. It has been concluded that the effect of deuterium substitution on the molecular structure is negligibly small and that the mean bond lengths of C–H and C–D are identical unlike small aliphatic hydrocarbons, in which r{sub 0}(C–D) is about 5 mÅ shorter than r{sub 0}(C–H). It is considered that anharmonicity is very small in the C–H stretching vibration of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  5. Molecular adsorbates on HOPG: Toward modulation of graphene density of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Michelle; Einstein, Theodore; Cullen, William

    2013-03-01

    Ordered molecular superlattices, particularly those made of planar aromatics with their attendant pi orbitals, have the potential to break the graphene sublattice degeneracy and create a band gap. Trimesic acid (TMA) is a promising candidate due to its self-assembly into symmetry-breaking superlattices nearly commensurate with that of graphene. We have used the graphite (0001) surface as a model system to explore the impact of TMA thin films on band structure. By examining correlations between STM topography and STS maps of corresponding regions, we are able to investigate the effects of TMA on the local density of states. Work supported by the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC, DMR 0520471 and Shared Experimental Facilities.

  6. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin-lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  7. Homeostatic and circadian contribution to EEG and molecular state variables of sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, Thomas; Mongrain, Valérie; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Mang, Géraldine M; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Besides their well-established role in circadian rhythms, our findings that the forebrain expression of the clock-genes Per2 and Dbp increases and decreases, respectively, in relation to time spent awake suggest they also play a role in the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Here, we determined whether time of day modulates the effects of elevated sleep pressure on clock-gene expression. Time of day effects were assessed also for recognized electrophysiological (EEG delta power) and molecular (Homer1a) markers of sleep homeostasis. EEG and qPCR data were obtained for baseline and recovery from 6-h sleep deprivation starting at ZT0, -6, -12, or -18. Mouse sleep laboratory. Male mice. Sleep deprivation. The sleep-deprivation induced changes in Per2 and Dbp expression importantly varied with time of day, such that Per2 could even decrease during sleep deprivations occurring at the decreasing phase in baseline. Dbp showed similar, albeit opposite dynamics. These unexpected results could be reliably predicted assuming that these transcripts behave according to a driven damped harmonic oscillator. As expected, the sleep-wake distribution accounted for a large degree of the changes in EEG delta power and Homer1a. Nevertheless, the sleep deprivation-induced increase in delta power varied also with time of day with higher than expected levels when recovery sleep started at dark onset. Per2 and delta power are widely used as exclusive state variables of the circadian and homeostatic process, respectively. Our findings demonstrate a considerable cross-talk between these two processes. As Per2 in the brain responds to both sleep loss and time of day, this molecule is well positioned to keep track of and to anticipate homeostatic sleep need. Curie T; Mongrain V; Dorsaz S; Mang GM; Emmenegger Y; Franken P. Homeostatic and circadian contribution to EEG and molecular state variables of sleep regulation. SLEEP 2013;36(3):311-323.

  8. Source Identification and Sequential Leaching of Heavy Metals in Soil Samples Collected from Selected Dump Sites in Ekiti State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    , E.E. Awokunmi; , S.S. Asaolu; , O.O Ajayi; , A.O. Adebayo

    2011-01-01

    Ten heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, Ni, Co, Cd, Cr and Sn) in fractioned and bulk soil samples collected from four dump sites located in AdoEkiti and Ikere -Ekiti, South western Nigeria were analysed using a modified Tessier’s procedure and acid digestion to obtain the distribution pattern of metal in this region. The metals were found to have been distributed in all phases with Fe, Cr, and Sn dominating the residual fraction (90.12 - 94.88%), Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn were found in all the extrac...

  9. Phytoremediation of soils polluted by heavy metals and metalloids using crops: (i the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Marchiol

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation has a strong potential as a natural, solar-energy driven remediation approach for the treatment of soils and sediments polluted. Research has focused several aspects of the process of uptake, translocation and storage of heavy metals in plants. However we can not predict when the technique could find practical application on large scale. Beyond the evaluation of the best suited species, little has been inquired on the multiple aspects of the agronomic management of phytoextraction. This review provides a synthesis of current knowledge on phytoextraction of metals from soils and their accumulation in plants.

  10. Phytoremediation of soils polluted by heavy metals and metalloids using crops: (i the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Zerbi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation has a strong potential as a natural, solar-energy driven remediation approach for the treatment of soils and sediments polluted. Research has focused several aspects of the process of uptake, translocation and storage of heavy metals in plants. However we can not predict when the technique could find practical application on large scale. Beyond the evaluation of the best suited species, little has been inquired on the multiple aspects of the agronomic management of phytoextraction. This review provides a synthesis of current knowledge on phytoextraction of metals from soils and their accumulation in plants.

  11. État des connaissances sur le traitement thermique des produits lourds State of the Art of the Thermal Treatment of Heavy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blouri B.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Après rappel du traitement thermique des hydrocarbures comme un moyen de viscoréduction des charges lourdes, craquage en oléfines gazeuses, ou pyrolyse totale en gaz de synthèse, le mécanisme réactionnel de vapocraquage des produits lourds constitue la première partie de l'article. Le craquage des huiles lourdes s'effectue selon un mécanisme radicalaire, tandis que les dépôts de carbone sont formés par des réactions de cycloadditions et polycondensations à des températures moyennes et par l'intermédiaire des radicaux à haute température. L'étude expérimentale du craquage thermique du n-tétracosane, du méthyl-6 eicosane et du dodécylbenzène constitue la deuxième partie de l'article et elle met en évidence, grâce à un mécanisme réactionnel du type moléculaire, la possibilité de craquage contrôlé d'une isoparaffine ou d'un hydrocarbure aromatique lourd en hydrocarbure liquide plus léger. After reviewing the thermal treatment of hydrocarbons as a way of visbreaking heavy feedstock, cracking them into gaseous olefins, or totally pyrolyzing them into synthetic gas, the first part of this article describes the reac-tion mechanism of the steam cracking of heavy products. Heavy oils are cracked by a radical mechanism, while carbon deposits are formed by cycloaddition and polycondensation reactions at mean temperatures and by the intermediary of radicals at high temperature. An experimental investigation of the thermal cracking of n-tetracosane, 6-methyleicosane and dodecylbenzene makes up the second part of the article. A reaction mechanism of the molecular type is used to describe the possibility of the controlled cracking of an isoparaffin or of a heavy aromatic hydrocarbon into a lighter liquid hydrocarbon.

  12. Structured pathway across the transition state for peptide folding revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipi Thukral

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Small globular proteins and peptides commonly exhibit two-state folding kinetics in which the rate limiting step of folding is the surmounting of a single free energy barrier at the transition state (TS separating the folded and the unfolded states. An intriguing question is whether the polypeptide chain reaches, and leaves, the TS by completely random fluctuations, or whether there is a directed, stepwise process. Here, the folding TS of a 15-residue β-hairpin peptide, Peptide 1, is characterized using independent 2.5 μs-long unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations (a total of 15 μs. The trajectories were started from fully unfolded structures. Multiple (spontaneous folding events to the NMR-derived conformation are observed, allowing both structural and dynamical characterization of the folding TS. A common loop-like topology is observed in all the TS structures with native end-to-end and turn contacts, while the central segments of the strands are not in contact. Non-native sidechain contacts are present in the TS between the only tryptophan (W11 and the turn region (P7-G9. Prior to the TS the turn is found to be already locked by the W11 sidechain, while the ends are apart. Once the ends have also come into contact, the TS is reached. Finally, along the reactive folding paths the cooperative loss of the W11 non-native contacts and the formation of the central inter-strand native contacts lead to the peptide rapidly proceeding from the TS to the native state. The present results indicate a directed stepwise process to folding the peptide.

  13. Heavy ion collisions with A = 1057: Aspects of nuclear stability and the nuclear equation of state in coalescing neutron-star binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Evans, C.R.; Detweiler, S.L.

    1987-12-01

    The dynamics of the final stages of the coalescence of two neturon stars (such as the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16) is an unsolved problem in astrophysics. Such systems are probably efficient generators of gravitational radiation, and may be significant contributors to heavy-element nucleosynthesis. The input physics for the study of such systems is similar to that required for the strudy of heavy-ion collision hydrodynamics; e.g., a finite temperature nuclear equation of state, properties of nuclei away from stability, etc. We discuss the development of a relativistic hydrodynamics code in three spatial dimensions for the purpose of studying such neutron-star systems. The properties of the mass-radius relation (determined by the nuclear equation of state) may lead to a proposed mechanism by which hot, highly neutronized matter is ejected from the coalescing stars. This material is photodisintegrated into a free (mostly) neutron gas which may subsequently experience rapid-neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis. 15 refs., 4 figs

  14. Heavy ion elastic scatterings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Diffraction and refraction play an important role in particle elastic scattering. The optical model treats correctly and simultaneously both phenomena but without disentangling them. Semi-classical discussions in terms of trajectories emphasize the refractive aspect due to the real part of the optical potential. The separation due to to R.C. Fuller of the quantal cross section into two components coming from opposite side of the target nucleus allows to understand better the refractive phenomenon and the origin of the observed oscillations in the elastic scattering angular distributions. We shall see that the real part of the potential is responsible of a Coulomb and a nuclear rainbow which allows to determine better the nuclear potential in the interior region near the nuclear surface since the volume absorption eliminates any effect of the real part of the potential for the internal partial scattering waves. Resonance phenomena seen in heavy ion scattering will be discussed in terms of optical model potential and Regge pole analysis. Compound nucleus resonances or quasi-molecular states can be indeed the more correct and fundamental alternative

  15. Dating of Barra Bonita (Rio Tiete - Sao Paulo State, Brazil) reservoir sediments with 210 Pb: historical distribution of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazotti, Raul I.; Silverio, Patricia F.; Mozeto, Antonio A.; Nascimento, Marcos R.L. do

    2002-01-01

    This work presents data on 210 Pb dating and heavy metal contamination of sediment cores collected from the Barra Bonita reservoir, one of the hydroelectric reservoir built in the Tiete River, SE Brazil about 40 years ago. Age calculations were done through the CRS (constant rate of supply) and CIC (constant initial concentration) models. It is well known that dating of lake sediment which are ≥ 100 years old poses no problem as atmospheric 210 Pb activity decreases to almost zero with sediment depth. In this work we present considerations and suggestions towards the applicability of these two models for reservoir dating as a study-case and for lakes in general with ages ≤ 100 years. The results show a good agreement between the CRS and CIC models. In addition, it was also evaluated the historical contamination of heavy metals (total and acid-extractable fraction). Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn showed an increase in concentration from the bottom to the top part of the cores. This would probably reflect an increase in land use of the Barra Bonita reservoir watershed for the last 40 years. (author)

  16. Charge-changing processes of heavy ions in matter. Non-equilibrium charge state distribution of sulfur ions after carbon foil penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Sataka, Masao; Sugai, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Sugiyama, Koji; Komaki, Ken-ichiro

    2005-01-01

    Charge state distributions of 2.0 MeV/u (64 MeV) sulfur ions of various initial charge states (6+, 10+, 11+, 13+) after passing through 0.9, 1.1, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.7, 6.9 and 10 μg/cm 2 carbon foils have been studied experimentally using the heavy ion spectrometer 'ENMA'. Measured charge state distributions do not flat off to establish equilibrium within the measured thickness, proving to be the first systematic measurement of non-equilibrium charge state distribution using solid target at this energy range. The mean charge states and their distribution widths almost saturate to 12.4 and 1.03, respectively, for all initial charge states examined. Calculation with ETACHA code, developed by Rozet et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 107 (1996) 67], is employed, although the present impact energy is lower than the assumed energy region for this code. It was also confirmed that a certain portion of 16 O q+ (q=3, 4, 7) beam is included in 32 S q+ (q=6, 8, 14) beam provided from the Tandem Accelerator, which originates in the Negative Ion Source forming O 2 - . (author)

  17. Search for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor in γ + jet final states in proton-proton collisions at √{ s } = 13TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. 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H.; Barney, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bianco, M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; Chapon, E.; Chen, Y.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Deelen, N.; Dobson, M.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Fallavollita, F.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gilbert, A.; Gill, K.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Jafari, A.; Janot, P.; Karacheban, O.; Kieseler, J.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Ngadiuba, J.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Rabady, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Selvaggi, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Stakia, A.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Verweij, M.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Caminada, L.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Backhaus, M.; Bäni, L.; Berger, P.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dorfer, C.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Klijnsma, T.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Reichmann, M.; Sanz Becerra, D. A.; Schönenberger, M.; Shchutska, L.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Vesterbacka Olsson, M. L.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D. H.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Del Burgo, R.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Schweiger, K.; Seitz, C.; Takahashi, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Chang, Y. H.; Cheng, K. y.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Steen, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Bakirci, M. N.; Bat, A.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Tok, U. G.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E. A.; Agaras, M. N.; Atay, S.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Köseoglu, I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Davignon, O.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Linacre, J.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Borg, J.; Breeze, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Elwood, A.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Matsushita, T.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Palladino, V.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Shtipliyski, A.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wardle, N.; Winterbottom, D.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Zahid, S.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Smith, C.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hadley, M.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, J.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Pazzini, J.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Yu, D.; Band, R.; Brainerd, C.; Breedon, R.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Stolp, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Wang, Z.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Regnard, S.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Karapostoli, G.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Gilbert, D.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bornheim, A.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Quach, D.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Alyari, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Joshi, B. M.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Shi, K.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Eno, S. C.; Feng, Y.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Hu, M.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Hiltbrand, J.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Wadud, M. A.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Freer, C.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wamorkar, T.; Wang, B.; Wisecarver, A.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Bucci, R.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Li, W.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Siddireddy, P.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wightman, A.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Qiu, H.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xiao, R.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Freed, S.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Shi, W.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Zhang, A.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Poudyal, N.; Sturdy, J.; Thapa, P.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    A search is presented for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor that decay to γ +jet final states. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at √{ s } = 13TeV at the LHC. A signal would appear as a resonant contribution to the invariant mass spectrum of the γ +jet system, above the background expected from standard model processes. No resonant excess is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the excited quark cross section and its branching fraction as a function of its mass. These are the most stringent limits to date in the γ + jet final state, and exclude excited light quarks with masses below 5.5 TeV and excited b quarks with masses below 1.8 TeV, assuming standard model like coupling strengths.

  18. Comprehensive representation of the Lennard-Jones equation of state based on molecular dynamics simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieprzyk, S.; Brańka, A. C.; Maćkowiak, Sz.; Heyes, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    The equation of state (EoS) of the Lennard-Jones fluid is calculated using a new set of molecular dynamics data which extends to higher temperature than in previous studies. The modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (MBWR) equation, which goes up to ca. T ˜ 6, is reparametrized with new simulation data. A new analytic form for the EoS, which breaks the fluid range into two regions with different analytic forms and goes up to ca. T ≃ 35, is also proposed. The accuracy of the new formulas is at least as good as the MBWR fit and goes to much higher temperature allowing it to now encompass the Amagat line. The fitted formula extends into the high temperature range where the system can be well represented by inverse power potential scaling, which means that our specification of the equation of state covers the entire (ρ, T) plane. Accurate analytic fit formulas for the Boyle, Amagat, and inversion curves are presented. Parametrizations of the extrema loci of the isochoric, CV, and isobaric, CP, heat capacities are given. As found by others, a line maxima of CP terminates in the critical point region, and a line of minima of CP terminates on the freezing line. The line of maxima of CV terminates close to or at the critical point, and a line of minima of CV terminates to the right of the critical point. No evidence for a divergence in CV in the critical region is found.

  19. Recoil ion spectroscopy with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.F.; Mann, R.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines the production of very high charge state ions in single ion-atom collisions. Topics considered include some aspects of highly ionized atoms, experimental approaches, the production of highly charged target ions (monoatomic targets, recoil energy distribution, molecular fragmentation, outer-shell rearrangement, lifetime measurements, a comparison of projectile-, target-, and plasma-ion stripping), and secondary collision experiments (selective electron capture, potential applications). The heavy-ion beams for the described experiments were provided by accelerators such as tandem Van de Graaff facility and the UNILAC

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of transport properties and equation of state of supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwobi, Obika C.

    Many chemical propulsion systems operate with one or more of the reactants above the critical point in order to enhance their performance. Most of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods used to predict these flows require accurate information on the transport properties and equation of state at these supercritical conditions. This work involves the determination of transport coefficients and equation of state of supercritical fluids by equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on parallel computers using the Green-Kubo formulae and the virial equation of state, respectively. MD involves the solution of equations of motion of a system of molecules that interact with each other through an intermolecular potential. Provided that an accurate potential can be found for the system of interest, MD can be used regardless of the phase and thermodynamic conditions of the substances involved. The MD program uses the effective Lennard-Jones potential, with system sizes of 1000-1200 molecules and, simulations of 2,000,000 time-steps for computing transport coefficients and 200,000 time-steps for pressures. The computer code also uses linked cell lists for efficient sorting of molecules, periodic boundary conditions, and a modified velocity Verlet algorithm for particle displacement. Particle decomposition is used for distributing the molecules to different processors of a parallel computer. Simulations have been carried out on pure argon, nitrogen, oxygen and ethylene at various supercritical conditions, with self-diffusion coefficients, shear viscosity coefficients, thermal conductivity coefficients and pressures computed for most of the conditions. Results compare well with experimental and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) values. The results show that the number of molecules and the potential cut-off radius have no significant effect on the computed coefficients, while long-time integration is necessary for accurate determination of the

  1. Molecular water oxidation mechanisms followed by transition metals: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Xavier; Maji, Somnath; Bofill, Roger; García-Antón, Jordi; Escriche, Lluís; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-02-18

    One clean alternative to fossil fuels would be to split water using sunlight. However, to achieve this goal, researchers still need to fully understand and control several key chemical reactions. One of them is the catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen, which also occurs at the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II in green plants and algae. Despite its importance for biology and renewable energy, the mechanism of this reaction is not fully understood. Transition metal water oxidation catalysts in homogeneous media offer a superb platform for researchers to investigate and extract the crucial information to describe the different steps involved in this complex reaction accurately. The mechanistic information extracted at a molecular level allows researchers to understand both the factors that govern this reaction and the ones that derail the system to cause decomposition. As a result, rugged and efficient water oxidation catalysts with potential technological applications can be developed. In this Account, we discuss the current mechanistic understanding of the water oxidation reaction catalyzed by transition metals in the homogeneous phase, based on work developed in our laboratories and complemented by research from other groups. Rather than reviewing all of the catalysts described to date, we focus systematically on the several key elements and their rationale from molecules studied in homogeneous media. We organize these catalysts based on how the crucial oxygen-oxygen bond step takes place, whether via a water nucleophilic attack or via the interaction of two M-O units, rather than based on the nuclearity of the water oxidation catalysts. Furthermore we have used DFT methodology to characterize key intermediates and transition states. The combination of both theory and experiments has allowed us to get a complete view of the water oxidation cycle for the different catalysts studied. Finally, we also describe the various deactivation pathways for

  2. Temporal variations of heavy metals levels in Perna viridis, on the Chacopata-Bocaripo lagoon axis, Sucre State, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rafael; Acosta, Vanessa; Segnini, Mary Isabel; Brito, Leonor; Martínez, Gregorio

    2015-02-28

    Perna viridis was used as biomonitor to assess heavy metal levels in the Chacopata-Bocaripo lagoon axis, Venezuela, during rain and drought seasons. The mussels were weighed and measured. The metal concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For rain period, the order of bioavailability was: Cu>Ni>Mn>Co>Cd>Pb, and for drought: Cu>Mn>Ni>Co>Pb>Cd. The concentrations of Ni, Co, Cd and Pb showed significant differences (P<0.05) in both periods. There was higher metal accumulation during drought season, possibly related to upwelling, since it produces an increase in primary productivity, which translates more food into organisms, making metals bioavailable for mussels. Only Cu and Mn showed significant relationships between the size and metal concentration, during drought period, it may be because of the organisms need for these essential metals in different physiological processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The heavy-duty vehicle future in the United States: A parametric analysis of technology and policy tradeoffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askin, Amanda C.; Barter, Garrett E.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a parametric analysis of factors that can influence advanced fuel and technology deployments in U.S. Class 7–8 trucks through 2050. The analysis focuses on the competition between traditional diesel trucks, natural gas vehicles (NGVs), and ultra-efficient powertrains. Underlying the study is a vehicle choice and stock model of the U.S. heavy-duty vehicle market. The model is segmented by vehicle class, body type, powertrain, fleet size, and operational type. We find that conventional diesel trucks will dominate the market through 2050, but NGVs could have significant market penetration depending on key technological and economic uncertainties. Compressed natural gas trucks conducting urban trips in fleets that can support private infrastructure are economically viable now and will continue to gain market share. Ultra-efficient diesel trucks, exemplified by the U.S. Department of Energy's SuperTruck program, are the preferred alternative in the long haul segment, but could compete with liquefied natural gas (LNG) trucks if the fuel price differential between LNG and diesel increases. However, the greatest impact in reducing petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions is had by investing in efficiency technologies that benefit all powertrains, especially the conventional diesels that comprise the majority of the stock, instead of incentivizing specific alternatives. -- Highlights: •We present a parametric analysis of factors U.S. Class 7–8 trucks through 2050. •Conventional diesels will be more than 70% of U.S. heavy-duty vehicles through 2050. •CNG trucks are well suited to large, urban fleets with private refueling. •Ultra-efficient long haul diesel trucks are preferred over LNG at current fuel prices

  4. Concentrations of heavy metals in river sediments of the Canes River Basin, the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Meneses Silva, M.; Teixeira de Andrade, G.

    2010-01-01

    Research about chimism in the Bengalas river basin was performed as a part of the environmental study project developed in the area, encompassing several knowledge fields. Among these, Environmental Geochemistry played an important role. This work presents the results related to heavy metals in stream sediments, indicating its origins (natural or anthropic) and its availability for aquatic biota. The basin under study has 135.07 Km2, laying in the oriental portion of the Teresópolis country, 100 Km far from the of Rio de Janeiro city. The rivers forming the Bengalas basin cut Pre-Cambrian terrain, formed by Orthognaiss takes 70% of the area, post-tectonic granite(20%), migmatite gneiss (10%) and gabro dikes. The methodology used was the determination of the content of heavy metals through sequencial extraction technique, consisting in the selective remove of metals in the geochemical fractions found in the sediments, cation exchange (bioavailable), carbonaceous, reducible and organic (potentially bioavailable) and residual (non available).The analyze of the results showed that iron was present in all sequential phases and predominated in the residual phase The same behavior was verified for zinc and copper. Manganese had the best distribution through the fractions due to its redox character, allowing bigger solubility and transportation; it appeared in the exchange, residual, organic and carbonaceous phases. Cadmium was found only in the carbonaceous phase, confirming its geochemical tendency. Chrome, on the other hand, was present in the residual and organic phase, while lead was found in the residual and carbonaceous phase

  5. Concluding Remarks: Connecting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Neutron Star Mergers by the Equation of State of Dense Hadron- and Quark Matter as signalled by Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Steinheimer, Jan; Bovard, Luke; Mukherjee, Ayon; Schramm, Stefan; Takami, Kentaro; Papenfort, Jens; Wechselberger, Natascha; Rezzolla, Luciano; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-07-01

    The underlying open questions in the fields of general relativistic astrophysics and elementary particle and nuclear physics are strongly connected and their results are interdependent. Although the physical systems are quite different, the 4D-simulation of a merger of a binary system of two neutron stars and the properties of the hot and dense matter created in high energy heavy ion collisions, strongly depend on the equation of state of fundamental elementary matter. Neutron star mergers represent optimal astrophysical laboratories to investigate the QCD phase structure using a spectrogram of the post-merger phase of the emitted gravitational waves. These studies can be supplemented by observations from heavy ion collisions to possibly reach a conclusive picture on the QCD phase structure at high density and temperature. As gravitational waves (GWs) emitted from merging neutron star binaries are on the verge of their first detection, it is important to understand the main characteristics of the underlying merging system in order to predict the expected GW signal. Based on numerical-relativity simulations of merging neutron star binaries, the emitted GW and the interior structure of the generated hypermassive neutron stars (HMNS) have been analyzed in detail. This article will focus on the internal and rotational HMNS properties and their connection with the emitted GW signal. Especially, the appearance of the hadon-quark phase transition in the interior region of the HMNS and its conjunction with the spectral properties of the emitted GW will be addressed and confronted with the simulation results of high energy heavy ion collisions.

  6. Heavy fermion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Cooke, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The heavy-fermion ground state occurs in a few select metallic compounds as a result of interactions between f-electron and conduction-electron spins. A characteristically large electronic heat capacity at low temperature indicates that the effective electron mass of these materials is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that expected for a free-electron metal. This heavy-fermion ground state can become superconducting or antiferromagnetic, exhibiting very unusual properties. These materials and the role of muon spin rotation in their study are briefly discussed

  7. Homeostatic and Circadian Contribution to EEG and Molecular State Variables of Sleep Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, Thomas; Mongrain, Valérie; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Mang, Géraldine M.; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Besides their well-established role in circadian rhythms, our findings that the forebrain expression of the clock-genes Per2 and Dbp increases and decreases, respectively, in relation to time spent awake suggest they also play a role in the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Here, we determined whether time of day modulates the effects of elevated sleep pressure on clock-gene expression. Time of day effects were assessed also for recognized electrophysiological (EEG delta power) and molecular (Homer1a) markers of sleep homeostasis. Design: EEG and qPCR data were obtained for baseline and recovery from 6-h sleep deprivation starting at ZT0, -6, -12, or -18. Setting: Mouse sleep laboratory. Participants: Male mice. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Results: The sleep-deprivation induced changes in Per2 and Dbp expression importantly varied with time of day, such that Per2 could even decrease during sleep deprivations occurring at the decreasing phase in baseline. Dbp showed similar, albeit opposite dynamics. These unexpected results could be reliably predicted assuming that these transcripts behave according to a driven damped harmonic oscillator. As expected, the sleep-wake distribution accounted for a large degree of the changes in EEG delta power and Homer1a. Nevertheless, the sleep deprivation-induced increase in delta power varied also with time of day with higher than expected levels when recovery sleep started at dark onset. Conclusions: Per2 and delta power are widely used as exclusive state variables of the circadian and homeostatic process, respectively. Our findings demonstrate a considerable cross-talk between these two processes. As Per2 in the brain responds to both sleep loss and time of day, this molecule is well positioned to keep track of and to anticipate homeostatic sleep need. Citation: Curie T; Mongrain V; Dorsaz S; Mang GM; Emmenegger Y; Franken P. Homeostatic and circadian contribution to EEG and molecular state

  8. Spectroscopy of doubly heavy baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, S.S.; Kiselev, V.V.; Likhoded, A.K.; Onishchenko, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Within a nonrelativistic quark model featuring a QCD-motivated Buchmueller-Tye potential, the mass spectra for the families of doubly heavy baryons are calculated by assuming the quark-diquark structure of the baryon wave functions and by taking into account spin-dependent splitting. Physically motivated evidence that, in the case where heavy quarks have identical flavors, quasistationary excited states may be formed in the heavy-diquark subsystem is analyzed

  9. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation

  10. Search for a heavy composite Majorana neutrino in the final state with two leptons and two quarks at s=13TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Sirunyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A search for physics beyond the standard model in the final state with two same-flavour leptons (electrons or muons and two quarks produced in proton–proton collisions at s=13TeV is presented. The data were recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2.3fb−1. The observed data are in good agreement with the standard model background prediction. The results of the measurement are interpreted in the framework of a recently proposed model in which a heavy Majorana neutrino, Nℓ, stems from a composite-fermion scenario. Exclusion limits are set for the first time on the mass of the heavy composite Majorana neutrino, mNℓ, and the compositeness scale Λ. For the case mNℓ=Λ, the existence of Ne (Nμ is excluded for masses up to 4.60 (4.70 TeV at 95% confidence level. Keywords: CMS, Exotica

  11. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON THE LIQUID DROP MODEL OF HEAVY NUCLEI AND QUANTUM APPROACH TO LIGHT NUCLEI FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Suzuki, Hideyuki, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to {approx}1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes.

  12. Constraints on the high-density nuclear equation of state from the phenomenology of compact stars and heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaehn, T.; Blaschke, D.; Typel, S.; Dalen, E. N. E. van; Faessler, A.; Fuchs, C.; Gaitanos, T.; Wolter, H. H.; Grigorian, H.; Ho, A.; Weber, F.; Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Miller, M. C.; Roepke, G.; Truemper, J.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2006-01-01

    A new scheme for testing nuclear matter equations of state (EoSs) at high densities using constraints from neutron star (NS) phenomenology and a flow data analysis of heavy-ion collisions is suggested. An acceptable EoS shall not allow the direct Urca process to occur in NSs with masses below 1.5M · , and also shall not contradict flow and kaon production data of heavy-ion collisions. Compact star constraints include the mass measurements of 2.1±0.2M · (1σ level) for PSR J0751+1807 and of 2.0±0.1M · from the innermost stable circular orbit for 4U 1636-536, the baryon mass--gravitational mass relationships from Pulsar B in J0737-3039 and the mass-radius relationships from quasiperiodic brightness oscillations in 4U 0614+09 and from the thermal emission of RX J1856-3754. This scheme is applied to a set of relativistic EoSs which are constrained otherwise from nuclear matter saturation properties. We demonstrate on the given examples that the test scheme due to the quality of the newly emerging astrophysical data leads to useful selection criteria for the high-density behavior of nuclear EoSs

  13. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON THE LIQUID DROP MODEL OF HEAVY NUCLEI AND QUANTUM APPROACH TO LIGHT NUCLEI FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to ∼1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes

  14. New Equations of State Based on the Liquid Drop Model of Heavy Nuclei and Quantum Approach to Light Nuclei for Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-08-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to ~1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes.

  15. Search for heavy resonances decaying into a vector boson and a Higgs boson in final states with charged leptons, neutrinos, and b quarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Khachatryan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A search for heavy resonances decaying to a Higgs boson and a vector boson is presented. The analysis is performed using data samples collected in 2015 by the CMS experiment at the LHC in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 2.2–2.5 fb−1. The search is performed in channels in which the vector boson decays into leptonic final states (Z→νν, W→ℓν, and Z→ℓℓ, with ℓ=e,μ, while the Higgs boson decays to collimated b quark pairs detected as a single massive jet. The discriminating power of a jet mass requirement and a b jet tagging algorithm are exploited to suppress the standard model backgrounds. The event yields observed in data are consistent with the background expectation. In the context of a theoretical model with a heavy vector triplet, a resonance with mass less than 2 TeV is excluded at 95% confidence level. The results are also interpreted in terms of limits on the parameters of the model, improving on the reach of previous searches.

  16. Influence of heavy hadronic states on the QCD phase diagram and on the freeze-out within a hadronic chiral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeb, G.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the thermodynamical properties of strongly interacting hadronic matter and the microscopic in-medium properties of hadrons are investigated at high temperatures and high baryonic densities within a chiral flavor-SU(3) model. The applied model is a generalized σ-ω model in mean-field approximation with baryons and mesons as effective degrees of freedom. It is built on spontaneously broken chiral symmetry and scale invariance. The phase transition behavior is systematically analyzed and is thus shown to depend significantly on the couplings of additional heavier hadronic degrees of freedom. A phase diagram in qualitative agreement with current lattice QCD (lQCD) calculations can result from an according coupling of the lowest lying baryonic decuplet to the model. Alternatively, the coupling of a heavy baryonic test-resonance is investigated, which effectively represents the spectrum of the heavy hadronic states. For a certain range of parameters one can even obtain a phase diagram in quantitative agreement with the lQCD calculations and, simultaneously, a successful description of the ground state properties of nuclear matter. It is shown that (within the model assumptions) the phase transition region is experimentally accessible for the CBM experiment at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI Darmstadt. The chiral model is further applied to particle yield ratios measured in heavy-ion collisions from AGS, SPS and RHIC. For these investigations parameter sets with strongly differing phase diagrams due to different couplings of the baryon decuplet are used and in addition an ideal hadron gas. At the lower and mid collision energies the chiral parameter sets show an improved description as compared to the ideal hadron gas, especially for parameter sets with phase diagrams similar to the lQCD predictions. The interaction within the chiral model leads to in-medium modifications of the chemical potentials and the hadron masses. Therefore the resulting freeze

  17. Molecular characterization of the pSinB plasmid of the arsenite oxidizing, metallotolerant Sinorhizobium sp. M14 - insight into the heavy metal resistome of sinorhizobial extrachromosomal replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Dziewit, Lukasz; Decewicz, Przemyslaw; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Radlinska, Monika; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. M14 is an As(III)-oxidizing, psychrotolerant strain, capable of growth in the presence of extremely high concentrations of arsenic and many other heavy metals. Metallotolerant abilities of the M14 strain depend upon the presence of two extrachromosomal replicons: pSinA (∼ 109 kb) and pSinB (∼ 300 kb). The latter was subjected to complex analysis. The performed analysis demonstrated that the plasmid pSinB is a narrow-host-range repABC-type replicon, which is fully stabilized by the phd-vapC-like toxin-antitoxin stabilizing system. In silico analysis showed that among the phenotypic gene clusters of the plasmid pSinB, eight modules are potentially involved in heavy metals resistance (HMR). These modules carry genes encoding efflux pumps, permeases, transporters and copper oxidases, which provide resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc. The functional analysis revealed that the HMR modules are active and have an effect on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values observed for the heterological host cells. The phenotype was manifested by an increase or decrease of the MICs of heavy metals and it was strain specific. The analysis of distribution of the heavy metal resistance genes, i.e. resistome, in Sinorhizobium spp. plasmids, revealed that the HMR modules are common in these replicons. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Manipulating molecular quantum states with classical metal atom inputs: demonstration of a single molecule NOR logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, We-Hyo; Manzano, Carlos; Renaud, Nicolas; de Mendoza, Paula; De Sarkar, Abir; Ample, Francisco; Hliwa, Mohamed; Echavarren, Antonio M; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan; Joachim, Christian

    2011-02-22

    Quantum states of a trinaphthylene molecule were manipulated by putting its naphthyl branches in contact with single Au atoms. One Au atom carries 1-bit of classical information input that is converted into quantum information throughout the molecule. The Au-trinaphthylene electronic interactions give rise to measurable energy shifts of the molecular electronic states demonstrating a NOR logic gate functionality. The NOR truth table of the single molecule logic gate was characterized by means of scanning tunnelling spectroscopy.

  19. Designing molecular dynamics simulations to shift populations of the conformational states of calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozlem Aykut

    Full Text Available We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca(2+-CaM. We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca(2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca(2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca(2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength.

  20. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  1. Studying the molecular determinants of potassium channel structure and function in membranes by solid-state NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR) has made remarkable progress in the structural characterization of membrane proteins systems at atomic resolution. Such studies can be further aided by the use of molecular dynamic simulations. Moreover, ssNMR data can be directly compared to functional

  2. Surface functionalization of solid state ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene through chemical grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherazi, Tauqir A.; Rehman, Tayyiba; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Shaikh, Ahson Jabbar; Shahzad, Sohail Anjum; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Raza, Rizwan; Waseem, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder was functionalized with styrene using chemical grafting technique. The grafting process was initiated through radical generation on base polymer matrix in the solid state by sodium thiosulfate, while peroxides formed at radical sites during this process were dissociated by ceric ammonium nitrate. Various factors were optimized and reasonably high level of monomer grafting was achieved, i.e., 15.6%. The effect of different acids as additive and divinyl benzene (DVB) as a cross-linking agent was also studied. Post-grafting sulfonation was conducted to introduce the ionic moieties to the grafted polymer. Ion-exchange capacity (IEC) was measured experimentally and is found to be 1.04 meq g-1, which is in close agreement with the theoretical IEC values. The chemical structure of grafted and functionalized polymer was characterized by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and thermal properties were investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal analysis depicts that the presence of radicals on the polymer chain accelerates the thermal decomposition process. The results signify that the chemical grafting is an effective tool for substantial surface modification and subsequent functionalization of polyethylene.

  3. State of the art and new developments in molecular diagnostics for hemoglobinopathies in multiethnic societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harteveld, C L

    2014-02-01

    For detecting carriers of thalassemia traits, the basic part of diagnostics consists of measurement of the hematological indices followed by mostly automatic separation and measurement of the Hb fractions, while direct Hb separation either on high pressure liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis is sufficient to putatively identify carriers of the common Hb variants like HbS, C, E, D, and O-Arab. A putative positive result is reported together with an advice for parents, partner, or family analysis. For couples, presumed at-risk confirmation at the DNA level is essential. In general, this part of diagnostics is done in specialized centers provided with sufficient experience and the technical tools needed to combine hematological and biochemical interpretation with identification of the mutations at the molecular level. State-of-the-art tools are usually available in centers that also provide prenatal diagnosis and should consist of gap-PCR for the common deletions, direct DNA sequencing for all kind of point-mutations and the capacity to uncover novel or rare mutations or disease mechanisms. New developments are MLPA for large and eventually unknown deletion defects and microarray technology for fine mapping and primer design for breakpoint analysis. Gap-PCR primers designed in the region flanking the deletion breakpoints can subsequently be used to facilitate carrier detection of uncommon deletions in family members or isolated populations in laboratories where no microarray technology or MLPA is available. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Enzymatic logic calculation systems based on solid-state electrochemiluminescence and molecularly imprinted polymer film electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wenjing; Liang, Jiying; Shen, Li; Jin, Yue; Liu, Hongyun

    2018-02-15

    The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) films were electropolymerized on the surface of Au electrodes with luminol and pyrrole (PY) as the two monomers and ampicillin (AM) as the template molecule. The electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity peak of polyluminol (PL) of the AM-free MIP films at 0.7V vs Ag/AgCl could be greatly enhanced by AM rebinding. In addition, the ECL signals of the MIP films could also be enhanced by the addition of glucose oxidase (GOD)/glucose and/or ferrocenedicarboxylic acid (Fc(COOH) 2 ) in the testing solution. Moreover, Fc(COOH) 2 exhibited cyclic voltammetric (CV) response at the AM-free MIP film electrodes. Based on these results, a binary 3-input/6-output biomolecular logic gate system was established with AM, GOD and Fc(COOH) 2 as inputs and the ECL responses at different levels and CV signal as outputs. Some functional non-Boolean logic devices such as an encoder, a decoder and a demultiplexer were also constructed on the same platform. Particularly, on the basis of the same system, a ternary AND logic gate was established. The present work combined MIP film electrodes, the solid-state ECL, and the enzymatic reaction together, and various types of biomolecular logic circuits and devices were developed, which opened a novel avenue to construct more complicated bio-logic gate systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state in the single-component molecular material Pd(tmdt)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Rina; Sari, Dita Puspita; Mohd-Tajudin, Saidah Sakinah; Ashi, Retno; Watanabe, Isao; Ishibashi, Shoji; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Ogura, Satomi; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    A family of compounds built by a single molecular species, M (tmdt) 2, with a metal ion, M , and organic ligands, tmdt, affords diverse electronic phases due to M -dependent interplays between d electrons in M , and π electrons in tmdt. We investigated the spin state in Pd (tmdt) 2 , a π -electron system without a d -electron contribution, through 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and muon-spin resonance experiments. The temperature profiles of the NMR linewidth, relaxation rate, and asymmetry parameter in muon decay show an inhomogeneous antiferromagnetic order with moments distributed around ˜0.1 μB that onsets at above 100 K. This result provides an example of the antiferromagnetic order in a pure π -electron system in M (tmdt) 2, and it demonstrates that correlation among the π electrons is so strong as to give the Néel temperature over 100 K. The small and inhomogeneous moments are understandable as the crucial disorder effect in correlated electrons situated near the Mott transition.

  6. Equation of state and transport properties of warm dense helium via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhi-Guo [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Cheng, Yan [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, Qi-Feng, E-mail: chenqf01@gmail.com, E-mail: xrchen@scu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Chen, Xiang-Rong, E-mail: chenqf01@gmail.com, E-mail: xrchen@scu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The equation of state, self-diffusion, and viscosity coefficients of helium have been investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the warm dense matter regime. Our simulations are validated through the comparison with the reliable experimental data. The calculated principal and reshock Hugoniots of liquid helium are in good agreement with the gas-gun data. On this basis, we revisit the issue for helium, i.e., the possibility of the instabilities predicted by chemical models at around 2000 GPa and 10 g/cm{sup 3} along the pressure isotherms of 6309, 15 849, and 31 623 K. Our calculations show no indications of instability in this pressure-temperature region, which reconfirm the predictions of previous QMD simulations. The self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of warm dense helium have been systematically investigated by the QMD simulations. We carefully test the finite-size effects and convergences of statistics, and obtain numerically converged self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients by using the Kubo-Green formulas. The present results have been used to evaluate the existing one component plasma models. Finally, the validation of the Stokes-Einstein relationship for helium in the warm dense regime is discussed.

  7. Heavy oils clean up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collitt, R.

    1997-01-01

    High production, transport and refining costs have long led oil companies to shun heavy crude oils. Advances in the technology of upgrading heavy oils, however, are likely to reduce transport costs and improve the refinery output. Research and development by Venezuela's state oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), has resulted in a process called Aquaconversion which permits the upgrading of heavy crude oils using a catalyst and the hydrogen from steam. This may be carried out at the wellhead in small low-pressure and relatively inexpensive units. In addition, higher distillate yields of higher value could be produced by revamping the thermal cracking units of refineries to incorporate the new technology. This has generated considerable interest in Venezuela's large extra-heavy crude oil reserves and has led multinational oil companies along with PDVSA to pledge $17 billion to their development. Even at a $2 to $3 per barrel upgrading cost, Venezuela's extra heavy crudes are competitive with lighter oils from other countries. Other major markets for the new technology are likely to be China and Russia, given their own large heavy crude reserves. (UK)

  8. The folding mechanism and key metastable state identification of the PrP127-147 monomer studied by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuangyan; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Yuwei; Yao, Xiaojun; Han, Wei; Liu, Huanxiang

    2017-05-10

    The structural transition of prion proteins from a native α-helix (PrP C ) to a misfolded β-sheet-rich conformation (PrP Sc ) is believed to be the main cause of a number of prion diseases in humans and animals. Understanding the molecular basis of misfolding and aggregation of prion proteins will be valuable for unveiling the etiology of prion diseases. However, due to the limitation of conventional experimental techniques and the heterogeneous property of oligomers, little is known about the molecular architecture of misfolded PrP Sc and the mechanism of structural transition from PrP C to PrP Sc . The prion fragment 127-147 (PrP127-147) has been reported to be a critical region for PrP Sc formation in Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome and thus has been used as a model for the study of prion aggregation. In the present study, we employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques to study the conformational change of this fragment that could be relevant to the PrP C -PrP Sc transition. Employing extensive replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and conventional MD simulations, we sample a huge number of conformations of PrP127-147. Using the Markov state model (MSM), we identify the metastable conformational states of this fragment and the kinetic network of transitions between the states. The resulting MSM reveals that disordered random-coiled conformations are the dominant structures. A key metastable folded state with typical extended β-sheet structures is identified with Pro137 being located in a turn region, consistent with a previous experimental report. Conformational analysis reveals that intrapeptide hydrophobic interaction and two key residue interactions, including Arg136-His140 and Pro137-His140, contribute a lot to the formation of ordered extended β-sheet states. However, network pathway analysis from the most populated disordered state indicates that the formation of extended β-sheet states is quite slow (at the millisecond

  9. Industrial water treatment with heavy metals through zeolites and bioremediation systems with aquatic plants especially Eichhornia crassipes. State of art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Fernando Carreño-Sayago

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review we explore different opportunities to use a cheap natural material for removing and retention of heavy metals from polluted waters by waste of different processes. Two research systems will be addressed: the first through a material known as zeolite or more generally porous  luminosilicates, which may be synthesized or extracted from the mines of clays and minerals, being used in its natural state or after modification processes and doping. The other mechanism is bioremediation through algae, some bacteria and especially aquatic plants such as Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth. We will evaluate the viability of joining these two types complementing each other. Investigations into the feasibility of Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth as feedstock for biofuels are also reviewed.

  10. Molecular plasmonics: The role of rovibrational molecular states in exciton-plasmon materials under strong-coupling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Charron, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We extend the model of exciton-plasmon materials to include a rovibrational structure of molecules using wave-packet propagations on electronic potential energy surfaces. Our model replaces conventional two-level emitters with more complex molecules, allowing us to examine the influence of alignment and vibrational dynamics on strong coupling with surface plasmon-polaritons. We apply the model to a hybrid system comprising a thin layer of molecules placed on top of a periodic array of slits. Rigorous simulations are performed for two types of molecular systems described by vibrational bound-bound and bound-continuum electronic transitions. Calculations reveal new features in transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra, including the observation of significantly higher values of the Rabi splitting and vibrational patterns clearly seen in the corresponding spectra. We also examine the influence of anisotropic initial conditions on optical properties of hybrid materials, demonstrating that the optical response of the system is significantly affected by an initial prealignment of the molecules. Our work demonstrates that prealigned molecules could serve as an efficient probe for the subdiffraction characterization of the near-field near metal interfaces.

  11. Observations of Heavy Ions in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    There are two sources for the hot ions in the magnetosphere: the solar wind and the ionosphere. The solar wind is predominantly protons, with about 4% He++ and less than 1% other high charge state heavy ions. The ionospheric outflow is also predominantly H+, but can contain a significant fraction of heavy ions including O+, N+, He+, O++, and molecular ions (NO+, N2+, O2+). The ionospheric outflow composition varies significantly both with geomagnetic activity and with solar EUV. The variability in the contribution of the two sources, the variability in the ionospheric source itself, and the transport paths of the different species are all important in determining the ion composition at a given location in the magnetosphere. In addition to the source variations, loss processes within the magnetosphere can be mass dependent, changing the composition. In particular, charge exchange is strongly species dependent, and can lead to heavy ion dominance at some energies in the inner magnetosphere. In this talk we will review the current state of our understanding of the composition of the magnetosphere and the processes that determine it.

  12. Heavy quarks photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.

    1996-08-01

    The state of the art of the theoretical calculations for heavy quarks photoproduction is reviewed. The full next-to-leading order calculation and two possible resummations, the high energy one for total cross sections and the large p T one for differential cross sections, are described. (orig.)

  13. Simulations of the dissociation of small helium clusters with ab initio molecular dynamics in electronically excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closser, Kristina D.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics resulting from electronic excitations of helium clusters were explored using ab initio molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed with configuration interaction singles and adiabatic classical dynamics coupled to a state-following algorithm. 100 different configurations of He 7 were excited into the 2s and 2p manifold for a total of 2800 trajectories. While the most common outcome (90%) was complete fragmentation to 6 ground state atoms and 1 excited state atom, 3% of trajectories yielded bound, He 2 * , and <0.5% yielded an excited helium trimer. The nature of the dynamics, kinetic energy release, and connections to experiments are discussed

  14. Horizontal and Vertical Distribution of Heavy Metals in Farm Produce and Livestock around Lead-Contaminated Goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Orisakwe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hitherto studies in response to the June 2010 lead poisoning, Zamfara State, Nigeria, have focused on clinical interventions without information on livestock and other metals. Objective. This study has investigated the distribution of heavy metals in farm produce and livestock around lead-contaminated goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Nigeria. Methods. Vegetables, soil, water, blood, and different meat samples were harvested from goat, sheep, cattle, and chicken from Dareta, Abare, and Gusau communities. The samples were digested with 10 mL of a mix of nitric and perchloric acids; the mixture was then heated to dryness. Lead, cadmium, zinc, chromium, copper, magnesium, and nickel were analysed using flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The daily intake, bioaccumulation factor, and target hazard quotient (THQ were calculated. Results. Chicken bone-muscles from Dareta had the highest concentrations of lead, zinc, and nickel (28.2750, 16.1650, and 4.2700 mg/kg, resp., while chicken brain had the highest levels of cadmium, magnesium (0.3800 and 67.5400 mg/kg, and chromium (6.1650 mg/kg, kidney tissue inclusive. Conclusion. In addition to lead, cadmium may also be of concern in the contaminated mining communities of Zamfara State, Nigeria, given the high levels of cadmium in meat and vegetables samples from these areas.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of a solid-state nanopore with self-aligned carbon nanoelectrodes for molecular detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinney, Patrick S; Collins, Scott D; Smith, Rosemary L; Howitt, David G

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic molecular sensors based on resistive pulse nanopore modalities are envisioned as facile DNA sequencers. However, recent advances in nanotechnology fabrication have highlighted promising alternative detection mechanisms with higher sensitivity and potential single-base resolution. In this paper we present the novel self-aligned fabrication of a solid-state nanopore device with integrated transverse graphene-like carbon nanoelectrodes for polyelectrolyte molecular detection. The electrochemical transduction mechanism is characterized and found to result primarily from thermionic emission between the two transverse electrodes. Response of the nanopore to Lambda dsDNA and short (16-mer) ssDNA is demonstrated and distinguished. (paper)

  16. Scaling behaviour of leptonic decay constants for heavy quarkonia and heavy mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of QCD sum rules one uses a scheme, allowing one to apply the conditions of both nonrelativistic heavy quark motion inside mesons and the heavy quark flavour independence of nonsplitting nS-state density. In the leading order an analitic expression is derived for leptonic constants of both heavy quarkonia and heavy mesons with a single heavy quark. The expression allows one explicitly to determine scaling properties of the constants. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  17. Search for excited states of light and heavy flavor quarks in the $\\gamma$+jet final state in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-11-13

    A search is presented for excited quarks of light and heavy flavor that decay to $\\gamma$+jet final states. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV at the LHC. A signal would appear as a resonant contribution to the invariant mass spectrum of the $\\gamma$+jet system, above the background expected from standard model processes. No resonant excess is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the excited quark cross section and its branching fraction as a function of its mass. These are the most stringent limits to date in the $\\gamma$+jet final state, and exclude excited light quarks with masses below 5.5 TeV and excited b quarks with masses below 1.8 TeV, assuming standard model couplings.

  18. Heavy quark fragmentation functions in the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmentation of b-bar-antiquark into polarized B c * -mesons and b-quark into P-wave (c-bar b) states in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory. The heavy quark fragmentation functions in longitudinally and transversely polarized S-wave b-bar c-states and P-wave mesons containing b-, c-quarks also, with the exact account of corrections of first order in 1/m b . 20 refs., 2 figs

  19. Interactive effects of nutrition, reproductive state and pollution on molecular stress responses of mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Carmen; Albentosa, Marina; Sokolova, Inna

    2017-10-01

    Marine bivalves including mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis are commonly used as sentinels for pollution monitoring and ecosystem health assessment in the coastal zones. Use of biomarkers to assess the pollution effects assumes that the effects of pollutants on the biomarkers exceed the natural background variability; yet this assumption has rarely been tested. We exposed mussels at different reproductive stages and nutritive states to two concentrations of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (fluoranthene, 3 and 60 μg L -1 ) for three weeks. Expression levels of the molecular biomarkers related to the detoxification and general stress response [cytochrome P450 oxidase (CYP450), glutathione S-transferases (GST-α; GST-S1; GST-S2), the multixenobiotic resistance protein P-glycoprotein (PgP), metallothioneins (MT10 and MT20), heat shock proteins (HSP22, HSP70-2; HSP70-3; HSP70-4), as well as mRNA expression of two reproduction-related genes, vitellogenin (Vitel) and vitelline coat lysin M7 (VCLM7)] were measured. The mussels' nutrition and reproductive state affected the baseline mRNA levels of molecular biomarkers and modulated the transcriptional responses of biomarker genes to the pollutant exposure. Thus, mussel physiological state could act as a confounding factor in the evaluation of the response of pollution through molecular biomarkers. The biomarker baseline levels must be determined across a range of physiological states to enable the use of biomarkers in monitoring programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Heavy quark and magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, Ahmad; Jallu, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic moments and transition moments of heavy hadrons including the conventional particles are obtained under the SU(5) truth symmetry scheme. To this end state vectors are defined and the quark additivity principle is taken into account. (author)

  1. Heavy flavour production at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Barsuk, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The present write-up reports recent LHCb results on production of quarkonium and open flavour states, as well as selected results on associated production, central exclusive production and pro- duction in heavy ion collisions.

  2. Bose-Einstein correlations and the equation of state of nuclear matter in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlei, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental spectra of the CERN/SPS experiments NA44 and NA49 are fitted while using four different equations of state of nuclear matter within a relativistic hydrodynamic framework. For the freeze-out temperatures, T f = 139 MeV and T f = 116 MeV, respectively, the corresponding freeze-out hypersurfaces and Bose-Einstein correlation functions for identical pion pairs are discussed. It is concluded, that the Bose-Einstein interferometry measures the relation between the temperature and the energy density in the equation of state of nuclear matter at the late hadronic stage of the fireball expansion. It is necessary, to use the detailed detector acceptances in the calculations for the Bose-Einstein correlations

  3. Heavy flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    1998-01-01

    This volume is a collection of review articles on the most outstanding topics in heavy flavour physics. All the authors have made significant contributions to this field. The book reviews in detail the theoretical structure of heavy flavour physics and confronts the Standard Model and some of its extensions with existing experimental data.This new edition covers new trends and ideas and includes the latest experimental information. Compared to the previous edition interesting new activities are included and some of the key contributions are updated. Particular attention is paid to the discover

  4. Force-field parameters from the SAFT-γ equation of state for use in coarse-grained molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2014-01-01

    A description of fluid systems with molecular-based algebraic equations of state (EoSs) and by direct molecular simulation is common practice in chemical engineering and the physical sciences, but the two approaches are rarely closely coupled. The key for an integrated representation is through a well-defined force field and Hamiltonian at the molecular level. In developing coarse-grained intermolecular potential functions for the fluid state, one typically starts with a detailed, bottom-up quantum-mechanical or atomic-level description and then integrates out the unwanted degrees of freedom using a variety of techniques; an iterative heuristic simulation procedure is then used to refine the parameters of the model. By contrast, with a top-down technique, one can use an accurate EoS to link the macroscopic properties of the fluid and the force-field parameters. We discuss the latest developments in a top-down representation of fluids, with a particular focus on a group-contribution formulation of the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT-γ). The accurate SAFT-γ EoS is used to estimate the parameters of the Mie force field, which can then be used with confidence in direct molecular simulations to obtain thermodynamic, structural, interfacial, and dynamical properties that are otherwise inaccessible from the EoS. This is exemplified for several prototypical fluids and mixtures, including carbon dioxide, hydrocarbons, perfluorohydrocarbons, and aqueous surfactants.

  5. The Role of Antisymmetric Exchange on the Quantum Interference between States of Different Spin Length in a dimeric Molecular Nanomagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barco, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    We report direct evidence of quantum oscillations of the total spin length of a dimeric molecular nanomagnet through the observation of quantum interference associated with tunneling trajectories between states having different spin quantum numbers. As we outline, this is a consequence of the unique characteristics of a molecular Mn12 wheel which behaves as a (weak) ferromagnetic exchange-coupled molecular dimer: each half of the molecule acts as a single-molecule magnet (SMM), while the weak coupling between the two halves gives rise to an additional internal spin degree of freedom within the molecule, namely that its total spin may fluctuate. This extra degree of freedom accounts for several magnetization tunneling resonances that cannot be explained within the usual giant spin approximation. More importantly, the observation of quantum interference provides unambiguous evidence for the quantum mechanical superposition involving entangled states of both halves of the wheel. Magnetization results obtained in two other versions of this compound, in which the ligands have been modified, show that slight variations of the relative distance between the Mn ions determine whether the molecule behaves as a rigid magnetic unit of spin S = 7 or as two exchange-coupled halves of spin S = 7/2. We analyze the effect of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange interaction in a molecule with a centre of inversion symmetry and propose a formal model to account for the observed broken degeneracy that preserves the molecular inversion symmetry.

  6. Transition-state analysis of a Vmax mutant of AMP nucleosidase by the application of heavy-atom kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.W.; Mentch, F.; Banks, G.A.; Horenstein, B.A.; Schramm, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    The transition state of the V max mutant of AMP nucleosidase from Azotobacter vinelandii has been characterized by heavy-atom kinetic isotope effects in the presence and absence of MgATP, the allosteric activator. The enzyme catalyzes hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of AMP at approximately 2% of the rate of the normal enzyme with only minor changes in the K m for substrate, the activation constant for MgATP, and the K i for formycin 5'-phosphate, a tight-binding competitive inhibitor. Isotope effects were measured as a function of the allosteric activator concentration that increases the turnover number of the enzyme from 0.006 s -1 . The kinetic isotope effects were measured with the substrates [1'- 3 H]AMP, [2'- 2 H]AMP, [9- 15 N]AMP, and [1',9- 14 C, 15 N]AMP. All substrates gave significant kinetic isotope effects in a pattern that establishes that the reaction expresses intrinsic kinetic isotope effects in the presence or absence of MgATP. Transition-state analysis using bond-energy and bond-order vibrational analysis indicated that the transition state for the mutant enzyme has a similar position in the reaction coordinate compared to that for the normal enzyme. The mutant enzyme is less effective in stabilizing the carbocation-like intermediate and in the ability to protonate N7 of adenine to create a better leaving group. This altered transition-state structure was confirmed by an altered substrate specificity for the mutant protein

  7. Nuclear cluster states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, W.D.M.; Merchant, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    We review clustering in light nuclei including molecular resonances in heavy ion reactions. In particular we study the systematics, paying special attention to the relationships between cluster states and superdeformed configurations. We emphasise the selection rules which govern the formation and decay of cluster states. We review some recent experimental results from Daresbury and elsewhere. In particular we report on the evidence for a 7-α chain state in 28 Si in experiments recently performed at the NSF, Daresbury. Finally we begin to address theoretically the important question of the lifetimes of cluster states as deduced from the experimental energy widths of the resonances. (Author)

  8. Fatal toxoplasmosis in a southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides) from São Paulo state, Brazil: Pathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Stéfanie Vanessa; Pena, Hilda F J; Talebi, Mauricio G; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Diaz-Delgado, Josué; Gennari, Solange M; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2018-04-01

    We report the pathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of fatal acute systemic toxoplasmosis in an adult, female, free-living southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides) from São Paulo state, Brazil. PCR-RFLP genotyping analysis identified the #21 genotype of Toxoplasma gondii. This represents the first report of acute toxoplasmosis involving this genotype in humans and animals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanowires and Nanomushrooms for Solid State Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-05-01

    InGaN is a promising semiconductor for solid state lighting thanks to its bandgap which spans the entire visible regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. InGaN is grown heteroepitaxially due to the absence of a native substrate; however, this results in a strained film and a high dislocation density—two effects that have been associated with efficiency droop, which is the disastrous drop in efficiency of a light-emitting diode (LED) as the input current increases. Heteroepitaxially grown nanowires have recently attracted great interest due to their property of eliminating the detrimental effects of the lattice mismatch and the corollary efficiency droop. In this study, InGaN nanowires were grown on a low-cost Si (111) substrate via molecular beam epitaxy. Unique nanostructures, taking the form of mushrooms, have been observed in localized regions on the samples. These nanomushrooms consist of a nanowire body with a wide cap on top. Photoluminescence characterization revealed that the nanowires emit violet-blue, whilst the nanomushrooms emit a broad yellow-orange-red luminescence. The simultaneous emission from the nanowires and nanomushrooms forms white light. Structural characterization of a single nanomushroom via transmission electron microscopy revealed a simultaneous increase in indium and decrease in gallium at the interface between the body and the cap. Furthermore, the cap itself was found to be indium-rich, confirming it as the source of the longer wavelength yellow-orange-red luminescence. It is believed that the nanomushroom cap formed as a consequence of the saturation of growth on the c-plane of the nanowire. It is proposed that the formation of an indium droplet on the tip of the nanowire saturated growth on the c-plane, forcing the indium and gallium adatoms to incorporate on the sidewall m-planes instead, but only at the nanowire tip. This resulted in the formation of a mushroom-like cap on the tip. How and why the indium droplets formed is not

  10. Heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoze, V.A.

    1983-10-01

    We discuss the results accumulated during the last five years in heavy quark physics and try to draw a simple general picture of the present situation. The survey is based on a unified point of view resulting from quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  11. Combination of Markov state models and kinetic networks for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations of peptide folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Isolde H; Fersht, Alan R; Settanni, Giovanni

    2011-06-09

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the TZ1 beta-hairpin peptide have been carried out using an implicit model for the solvent. The trajectories have been analyzed using a Markov state model defined on the projections along two significant observables and a kinetic network approach. The Markov state model allowed for an unbiased identification of the metastable states of the system, and provided the basis for commitment probability calculations performed on the kinetic network. The kinetic network analysis served to extract the main transition state for folding of the peptide and to validate the results from the Markov state analysis. The combination of the two techniques allowed for a consistent and concise characterization of the dynamics of the peptide. The slowest relaxation process identified is the exchange between variably folded and denatured species, and the second slowest process is the exchange between two different subsets of the denatured state which could not be otherwise identified by simple inspection of the projected trajectory. The third slowest process is the exchange between a fully native and a partially folded intermediate state characterized by a native turn with a proximal backbone H-bond, and frayed side-chain packing and termini. The transition state for the main folding reaction is similar to the intermediate state, although a more native like side-chain packing is observed.

  12. Application of the stabilization method to the molecular states of LiHe3+: Energies and radial couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, A.; Mendizabal, R.; Pelayo, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-01-01

    We have used the stabilization method to perform calculations on autoionizing states of the LiHe 3+ system which are involved in Li 3+ +He collisions. The molecular energies and radial couplings are calculated with use of programs developed at our laboratory. For both short and large internuclear distances, the stabilization treatment is complemented by block-diagonalization techniques. Our calculations allow us to draw conclusions on the conditions under which these methods can be used to calculate energy positions and radial couplings for states that lie in an ionization continuum

  13. Application of the stabilization method to the molecular states of LiHeT : Energies and radial couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, A.; Mendizabal, R.; Pelayo, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-01-01

    We have used the stabilization method to perform calculations on autoionizing states of the LiHeT system which are involved in LiT +He collisions. The molecular energies and radial couplings are calculated with use of programs developed at our laboratory. For both short and large internuclear distances, the stabilization treatment is complemented by block-diagonalization techniques. Our calculations allow us to draw conclusions on the conditions under which these methods can be used to calculate energy positions and radial couplings for states that lie in an ionization continuum.

  14. Impact of Interfacial Molecular Conformation and Aggregation State on the Energetic Landscape and Performance in Organic Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier

    2016-11-25

    In organic photovoltaics (OPVs) the key processes relevant to device operation such as exciton dissociation and free carriers recombination occur at the donor-acceptor (D-A) interface. OPV devices require the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architecture to function efficiently. In these BHJs, D-A interfaces are arranged in three dimensions, which makes molecular arrangements at these interfaces ill defined and hard to characterize. In addition, molecular materials used in OPVs are inherently disordered and may exhibit variable degrees of structural order in the same BHJ. Yet, D-A molecular arrangements and structure are crucial because they shape the energy landscape and photovoltaic (PV) performance in OPVs. Studies that use well-defined model systems to look in details at the interfacial molecular structure in OPVs and link it to interfacial energy landscape and device operation are critically lacking. We have used in situ photoelectron spectroscopy and ex situ x-ray scattering to study D-A interfaces in tailored bilayers and BHJs based on small molecule donors. We show preferential miscibility at the D-A interface depending on molecular conformation in zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/ C60 bilayers and we derive implications for exciton dissociation. Using sexithiophene (6T), a crystalline donor, we show that the energy landscape at the D-A interface varies markedly depending on the molecular composition of the BHJ. Both the ionization energies of sexithiophene and C60 shift by over ~0.4 eV while the energy of the charge transfer state shifts by ~0.5 eV depending on composition. Such shifts create a downward energy landscape that helps interfacial excitons to overcome their binding energies. Finally, we demonstrate that when both disordered and ordered phases of D coexist at the interface, low-lying energy states form in ordered phases and significantly limit the Voc in devices. Overall our work underlines the importance of the aggregation and conformation states of

  15. Hexaquark states as possible candidates for di-baryonic molecular states with Yukawa potential in a semi-relativistic scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Smruti J., E-mail: fizix.smriti@gmail.com; Vinodkumar, P. C. [P. G. Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, VallabhVidyanagar - 388120, Gujarat (India)

    2016-05-06

    We study the mass spectra of hexaquark states as di-hadronic molecules with Yukawa potential in a semi-relativistic scheme. We have solved numerically the relevant equation using mathematica notebook of Range-Kutta method including effective Yukawa like potential between two baryons to model the two-body interaction and have calculated their masses and binding energy. We have been able to assign the J{sup P} values for many of the exotic states according to their compositions. We have predicted some of the di-baryonic exotic states for which experimental as well as theoretical data are not available and we look forward to see the experimental support in favour of our predictions. So in the absence of such results our predictions can be used as guidelines for future experimental and theoretical analysis of exotic states.

  16. Hexaquark states as possible candidates for di-baryonic molecular states with Yukawa potential in a semi-relativistic scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Smruti J.; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    We study the mass spectra of hexaquark states as di-hadronic molecules with Yukawa potential in a semi-relativistic scheme. We have solved numerically the relevant equation using mathematica notebook of Range-Kutta method including effective Yukawa like potential between two baryons to model the two-body interaction and have calculated their masses and binding energy. We have been able to assign the J"P values for many of the exotic states according to their compositions. We have predicted some of the di-baryonic exotic states for which experimental as well as theoretical data are not available and we look forward to see the experimental support in favour of our predictions. So in the absence of such results our predictions can be used as guidelines for future experimental and theoretical analysis of exotic states.

  17. Molecular Symmetry Analysis of Low-Energy Torsional and Vibrational States in the S_{0} and S_{1} States of p-XYLENE to Interpret the Rempi Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Peter; Gardner, Adrian M.; Tuttle, William Duncan; Wright, Timothy G.

    2017-06-01

    The electronic transition S_{1} ← S_{0} of p-xylene (pXyl) has been observed by REMPI spectroscopy. Its analysis required a detailed investigation of the molecular symmetry of pXyl whose methyl groups are almost free internal rotors. The molecular symmetry group of pXyl has 72 operators. This group, called [33]D_{2h}, is isomorphic to G_{36}(EM), the double group for ethane and dimethyl acetylene even though it is NOT a double group for pXyl. Loosely speaking, the group symbol, [33]D_{2h}, indicates that is for a molecule with two threefold rotors on a molecular frame with D_{2h} point group symmetry. The transformation properties of the (i) free internal rotor basis functions for the torsional coordinates, (ii) the asymmetric rotor (Wang) basis functions for the Eulerian angles, (iii) nuclear spin functions, (iv) potential function, and (v) transitions dipole moment functions were determined. The forms of the torsional potential in the S_{0} and S_{1} states and the dependence of the first order torsional splittings on the potential coefficients have been obtained. AM Gardner, WD Tuttle, P. Groner, TG Wright, J. Chem. Phys., submitted Dec 2016 P Groner, JR Durig, J. Chem. Phys., 66 (1977) 1856 PR Bunker, P Jensen, Molecular Symmetry and Spectroscopy (1998, NRC Research Press, Ottawa, 2nd ed.)

  18. Radiation from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, J.R.; Lee, Y.K.

    1975-01-01

    A study of x rays produced in heavy ion collisions has led to a search for molecular orbital x rays, concentrating on 35 Cl ions on Al, NaCl, and C targets. Preliminary analysis of the angular dependence of continuum x rays has tentatively identified quasi-molecular K x rays. Other work completed and in progress is discussed. (3 figures) (U.S.)

  19. Molecular dynamics in supercooled liquid and glassy states of antibiotics: azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin studied by dielectric spectroscopy. Advantages given by the amorphous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjanowicz, K; Zakowiecki, D; Kaminski, K; Hawelek, L; Grzybowska, K; Tarnacka, M; Paluch, M; Cal, K

    2012-06-04

    Antibiotics are chemical compounds of extremely important medical role. Their history can be traced back more than one hundred years. Despite the passing time and significant progress made in pharmacy and medicine, treatment of many bacterial infections without antibiotics would be completely impossible. This makes them particularly unique substances and explains the unflagging popularity of antibiotics within the medical community. Herein, using dielectric spectroscopy we have studied the molecular mobility in the supercooled liquid and glassy states of three well-known antibiotic agents: azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin. Dielectric studies revealed a number of relaxation processes of different molecular origin. Besides the primary α-relaxation, observed above the respective glass transition temperatures of antibiotics, two secondary relaxations in the glassy state were identified. Interestingly, the fragility index as well as activation energies of the secondary processes turned out to be practically the same for all three compounds, indicating probably much the same molecular dynamics. Long-term stability of amorphous antibiotics at room temperature was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique, and calorimetric studies were performed to evaluate the basic thermodynamic parameters. Finally, we have also checked the experimental solubility advantages given by the amorphous form of the examined antibiotics.

  20. Molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition of proteins: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, A; Bonini, F; Turner, A P F; Piletsky, S A

    2007-01-15

    Molecular imprinting has proved to be an effective technique for the creation of recognition sites on a polymer scaffold. Protein imprinting has been a focus for many chemists working in the area of molecular recognition, since the creation of synthetic polymers that can specifically recognise proteins is a very challenging but potentially extremely rewarding objective. It is expected that molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with specificity for proteins will find application in medicine, diagnostics, proteomics, environmental analysis, sensors and drug delivery. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the progress achieved in the decade between 1994 and 2005, with respect to the challenging area of MIPs for protein recognition. The discussion furnishes a comparative analysis of different approaches developed, underlining their relative advantages and disadvantages and highlighting trends and possible future directions.

  1. Relativistic four-component potential energy curves for the lowest 23 covalent states of molecular bromine (Br2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José da Silva; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L; M de Macedo, Luiz Guilherme

    2014-08-07

    The covalent excited states and ground state of the Br2 molecule has been investigated by using four-component relativistic COSCI and MRCISD methods. These methods were performed for all covalent states in the representation Ω((±)). Calculated potential energy curves (PECs) were obtained at the four-component COSCI level, and spectroscopic constants (R(e), D(e), D0, ω(e), ω(e)x(e), ω(e)y(e), B(e), α(e), γ(e), Te, Dv) for bounded states are reported. The vertical excitations for all covalent states are reported at COSCI, MRCISD, and MRCISD+Q levels. We also present spectroscopic constants for two weakly bounded states (A':(1)2u and B':(1)0(-)u) not yet reported in the literature, as well as accurate analytical curves for all five relativistic molecular bounded sates [the ground state X:0 g(+) and the excited states A:(1)1(u), B:(1)0(u)(+), C:(2)1(u), and B':(1)0(u)(-)] found in this work.

  2. Smooth transition from sudden to adiabatic states in heavy-ion fusion reactions at deep-subbarrier incident energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatoshi, Ichikawa; Kouichi, Hagino; Akira, Iwamoto

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel extension of the standard coupled-channel (CC) model in order to account for the steep falloff of fusion cross sections at deep-subbarrier incident energies. We introduce a damping factor in the coupling potential in the CC model, simulating smooth transitions from sudden to adiabatic states in deep- subbarrier fusion reactions. The CC model extended with the damping factor can reproduce well not only the steep falloff of the fusion cross section but also the saturation of the logarithmic derivatives for the fusion cross sections at deep-subbarrier energies for the 16 O+ 208 Pb, 64 Ni+ 64 Ni, and 58 Ni+ 58 Ni reactions at the deep-subbarrier energies. The important point in our model is that the transition takes place at different places for each Eigen channel. We conclude that the smooth transition from the two-body to the adiabatic one-body potential is responsible for the steep falloff of the fusion cross section

  3. Manipulating the spin states in a double molecular magnets tunneling junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xi [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Zhengzhong, E-mail: zeikeezhang@126.com [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Nano Science and Technology Institute, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-17

    We theoretically explore the spin transport through nano-structures consisting of two serially coupled single-molecular magnets (SMM) sandwiched between two nonmagnetic electrodes. We find that the magnetization of SMM can be controlled by the spin transfer torque with respect to the bias voltage direction, and the electron current can be switched on/off in different magnetic structures. Such a manipulation is performed by full electrical manner, and needs neither external magnetic field nor ferromagnetic electrodes in the tunneling junction. The proposal device scheme can be realized with the use of the present technology and has potential applications in molecular spintronics or quantum information processing.

  4. Unique interplay between electronic states and dihedral angle for the molecular rotor of diphenyldiacetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster

    2011-01-01

    A new analysis of the optical properties of the molecular rotor 1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiyne (diphenyl-diacetylene, DPDA) is presented, taking account of the conformational dynamics. The absorption spectra are interpreted in terms of simultaneous contributions from planar as well as non-planar rota......A new analysis of the optical properties of the molecular rotor 1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiyne (diphenyl-diacetylene, DPDA) is presented, taking account of the conformational dynamics. The absorption spectra are interpreted in terms of simultaneous contributions from planar as well as non...

  5. Manipulating the spin states in a double molecular magnets tunneling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Zhengzhong; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically explore the spin transport through nano-structures consisting of two serially coupled single-molecular magnets (SMM) sandwiched between two nonmagnetic electrodes. We find that the magnetization of SMM can be controlled by the spin transfer torque with respect to the bias voltage direction, and the electron current can be switched on/off in different magnetic structures. Such a manipulation is performed by full electrical manner, and needs neither external magnetic field nor ferromagnetic electrodes in the tunneling junction. The proposal device scheme can be realized with the use of the present technology [6] and has potential applications in molecular spintronics or quantum information processing.

  6. Heavy flavours: theory summary

    OpenAIRE

    Corcella, Gennaro

    2005-01-01

    I summarize the theory talks given in the Heavy Flavours Working Group. In particular, I discuss heavy-flavour parton distribution functions, threshold resummation for heavy-quark production, progress in fragmentation functions, quarkonium production, heavy-meson hadroproduction.

  7. The role of binary and many-centre molecular interactions in spin crossover in the solid state. Part II. Non-ideality parameters defined via binary molecular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudriavtsev, A.B.; Linert, W.

    2005-01-01

    Parameters of the formalism [1-6] describing spin crossover in the solid state have been defined via molecular potentials in model systems of neutral and ionic complexes. In the first instance Lennard-Jones and electric dipole-dipole potentials have been used whereas in ionic systems Lennard-Jones and electric point-charge potentials have been used. Electric dipole-dipole interaction of neutral complexes brings about a positive excess energy controlled by the difference of electric dipole moments of HS and LS molecules. Differences of the order of Δμ = 1-2D cause an abrupt spin crossover in systems with T 1/2 = 100-150K. Magnetic coupling contributes both to the excess energy and excess entropy, however the overall effect is equivalent to a modest positive excess energy. Ionic systems in the absence of specific interactions are characterized by very small excess energies corresponding to practically linear van't Hoff plots. Detectable positive and negative excess energies in these systems may arise from interactions of ligands belonging to neighbouring complexes. The HOMO-LUMO overlap in HS-LS pairs can bring about a nontrivial variation of the shape of transition curves. Examples of regression analysis of experimental transition curves in terms of molecular potentials are given. (author)

  8. Evaluate the use of space monitoring methods for the study of the ecological state of the territory contaminated with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroik G.A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of modern Earth remote sensing systems are investigated in the space environmental monitoring of areas, contaminated with heavy metals, and the best of them are identified. The most informative E-field radiation spectrum zones for remote indication of heavy metals are identified and the special spectral indexes are offered.

  9. Biomagnification of some heavy and essential metals in sediments, fishes and crayfish from Ondo State coastal region, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaolu, S.S.; Olaofe, O.

    2005-01-01

    The bio magnifications levels of some essential (Fe, Zn, Cu) and toxic metals (Pb, Ni, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn) were determined in sediments, three kinds of fish (Oreochromis niloticus, Synodonthis sp., and Clarias gariepinus) and crayfish from the Ondo State coastal region. The metal bio magnification in the fish and crayfish was several times greater than in water, while that in the sediments was several thousand-folds greater than in both the organisms and water. Among the metals examined in water, Fe was the most abundant with average values of 146.7 and 74.3 mg/1, respectively, for wet and dry seasons, while Co was the least with average values of 2.4 and 1.6 mg/1. In the sediments, concentrations of Pb, Ni, Fe, Cr, Co and Mn in the wet season were relatively higher than those obtained for the dry season. Fe with an average of 50.9 mg/kg in C, gariepinus was the most abundant metal in the fish samples, while Cu with an average value of 0.3 mg/kg in O. niloticus was the least. The metal bio magnification for most of the metals for both seasons was found to vary widely from one location to the other. This was confirmed by the coefficient of variation that ranged from 31% to 144% and 29% to 130% in the wet and dry seasons, respectively. The present study has shown that fish, crayfish and sediments can be used to monitor the pollution level of metals in the Nigerian coastal water. (author)

  10. Highly accurate bound state calculations of the two-center molecular ions by using the universal variational expansion for three-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Alexei M.

    2018-03-01

    The universal variational expansion for the non-relativistic three-body systems is explicitly constructed. This universal expansion can be used to perform highly accurate numerical computations of the bound state spectra in various three-body systems, including Coulomb three-body systems with arbitrary particle masses and electric charges. Our main interest is related to the adiabatic three-body systems which contain one bound electron and two heavy nuclei of hydrogen isotopes: the protium p, deuterium d and tritium t. We also consider the analogous (model) hydrogen ion ∞H2+ with the two infinitely heavy nuclei.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A-CpA and transition state-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formoso, Elena; Matxain, Jon M; Lopez, Xabier; York, Darrin M

    2010-06-03

    The mechanisms of enzymes are intimately connected with their overall structure and dynamics in solution. Experimentally, it is considerably challenging to provide detailed atomic level information about the conformational events that occur at different stages along the chemical reaction path. Here, theoretical tools may offer new potential insights that complement those obtained from experiments that may not yield an unambiguous mechanistic interpretation. In this study, we apply molecular dynamics simulations of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A, an archetype ribonuclease, to study the conformational dynamics, structural relaxation, and differential solvation that occur at discrete stages of the transesterification and cleavage reaction. Simulations were performed with explicit solvation with rigorous electrostatics and utilize recently developed molecular mechanical force field parameters for transphosphorylation and hydrolysis transition state analogues. Herein, we present results for the enzyme complexed with the dinucleotide substrate cytidilyl-3',5'-adenosine (CpA) in the reactant, and transphosphorylation and hydrolysis transition states. A detailed analysis of active site structures and hydrogen-bond patterns is presented and compared. The integrity of the overall backbone structure is preserved in the simulations and supports a mechanism whereby His12 stabilizes accumulating negative charge at the transition states through hydrogen-bond donation to the nonbridge oxygens. Lys41 is shown to be highly versatile along the reaction coordinate and can aid in the stabilization of the dianionic transition state, while being poised to act as a general acid catalyst in the hydrolysis step.

  12. Molecular properties of steroids involved in their effects on the biophysical state of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Jorge J

    2015-10-01

    The activity of steroids on membranes was studied in relation to their ordering, rigidifying, condensing and/or raft promoting ability. The structures of 82 steroids were modeled by a semi-empirical procedure (AM1) and 245 molecular descriptors were next computed on the optimized energy conformations. Principal component analysis, mean contrasting and logistic regression were used to correlate the molecular properties with 212 cases of documented activities. It was possible to group steroids based on their properties and activities, indicating that steroids having similar molecular properties have similar activities on membranes. Steroids having high values of area, partition coefficient, volume, number of rotatable bonds, molar refractivity, polarizability or mass displayed ordering, rigidifying, condensing and/or raft promoting activity on membranes higher than those steroids having low values in such molecular properties. After a variable selection procedure circumventing correlation problems among descriptors, area and log P were found as the most relevant properties in governing and predicting the activity of steroids on membranes. A logistic regression model as a function of the area and log P of the steroids is proposed, which is able to predict correctly 92.5% of the cases. A rationale of the findings is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Epidemic Severe Malaria Caused by Plasmodium vivax in the State of Amazonas, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Suarez, C.F., Florez, C., del Portillo, H.A.; Andrade, L.E. Direct Submission to NCBI gene bank. Submitted 03-JAN-1997. Laboratorio de Biologia Molecular...Departamento de Biologia , Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Santa Fe de Bogota, D.C., Colombia. Nardin, E.H.; Zavala, F

  14. Double Drell-Yan measurement, heavy Higgs searches in the four leptons final state and forward muons performance with the ATLAS detector.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00374537

    In this thesis, physics studies are presented using data collected by the ATLAS detector at CERN on 2012 corresponding to L = 20.3 fb$^{-1}$, at the LHC $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. The studies performed refer to the identification of events in final states with two Z bosons decaying to four leptons (electrons, muons). Furthermore, the effect of QED radiative corrections in the $Z \\rightarrow \\ell \\ell$ process and the muon reconstruction efficiency in the forward region of the ATLAS detector have been studied. The first study is the cross-section of the Double Drell-Yan process $Z+Z\\rightarrow4\\ell$. The cross-section is measured to be $~0.74^{+0.51}_{-0.44}(\\text{stat.})^{+0.21}_{-0.14}(\\text{syst.})$ fb. Due to the large uncertainties a 95\\% CL upper limit in the cross-section is set of $1.54$ fb. This result is converted to a 95\\% CL lower limit on the phenomelogical factor $\\sigma_{eff}$ of $0.40$ mb. The second study is the search for an additional heavy Higgs boson in the $H \\rightarrow ZZ \\rightarrow 4 \\ell$ ...

  15. Search for mesons and glueballs decaying into multiphoton final states produced in central hadron collisions and study of inclusive production of heavy quark mesons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at:\\\\ a)\tthe search for neutral mesons and glueballs produced in central hadron-proton collisions and, simultaneously, \\\\b)\tthe study of inclusive hadronic production of neutral heavy quark mesons. \\\\ \\\\These states are observed through their decay into many photons in the 4092-cell electromagnetic Calorimeter GAMS-4000. \\\\ \\\\The NAl2 setup is supplemented with a forward magnetic spectrometer equiped with multiwire Proportional chambers (MWPC) and newly developed microstrip gas chambers (MSGC). The high spatial resolution of the latter allows to measure the momentum loss of the interacting hadron in the liquid hydrogen target (LH$_{2}$) to a precision better than 1.5 GeV/c, i.e. $3 \\times 10^{-3}$ for a 450 GeV/c proton. A system for the measurement of the time of flight (TOF) and ionization of the proton recoiling in the target completes the constraints on neutral meson production reactions. \\\\ \\\\A fast decision on the energy deposited in GAMS and the momentum of the interacting hadro...

  16. Fabrication of γ-Fe2O3 Nanoparticles by Solid-State Thermolysis of a Metal-Organic Framework, MIL-100(Fe, for Heavy Metal Ions Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtao Hei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were prepared via a solid-state conversion process of a mesoporous iron(III carboxylate crystal, MIL-100(Fe. First, the MIL-100(Fe crystal that served as the template of the metal oxide was synthesized by a low-temperature (<100°C synthesis route. Subsequently, the porous γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were fabricated by facile thermolysis of the MIL-100(Fe powders via a two-step calcination treatment. The obtained γ-Fe2O3 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques, and then used as an adsorbent for heavy metal ions removal in water treatment. This study illustrates that the metal-organic frameworks may be suitable precursors for the fabrication of metal oxides nanomaterials with large specific surface area, and the prepared porous γ-Fe2O3 exhibits a superior adsorption performance for As(V and As(III ions removal in water treatment.

  17. Dual fluorescence of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer of HBFO: mechanistic understanding, substituent and solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Xuebo

    2014-03-07

    A combined approach of the multiconfigurational perturbation theory with the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus methodology has been employed to calculate the minimum potential energy profiles and the rates of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer (ESIPT) for the WOLED material molecule of HBFO and its four meta- or para-substituted compounds in gas phase, acetonitrile and cyclohexane solvents. The kinetic control for these reactions is quantitatively determined and extensively studied on the basis of the accurate potential energy surfaces when the thermodynamic factor associated with the free energy change becomes negligible in the case of the existence of a significant barrier in the ESIPT process. These computational efforts contribute to a deep understanding of the ESIPT mechanism, dual emission characteristics, kinetic controlling factor, substituent and solvent effects for these material molecules. The white light emission is generated by the establishment of dynamic equilibrium between enol and keto forms in the charge transfer excited SCT((1)ππ*) state. The performance of white light emission is quantitatively demonstrated to be mainly sensitive to the molecular tailoring approach of the electronic properties of meta- or para- substituents by the modulation of the forward/backward ESIPT rate ratio. The quality of white light emission is slightly tunable through its surrounding solvent environment. These computational results will provide a useful strategy for the molecular design of OLED and WOLED materials.

  18. Temperature dependence of the partially localized state in a 2D molecular nanoporous network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio, E-mail: ipiquerozulaica@gmail.com [Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Nowakowska, Sylwia [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ortega, J. Enrique [Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Manuel Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento Física Aplicada I, Universidad del País Vasco, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Stöhr, Meike [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Gade, Lutz H. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 270, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jung, Thomas A. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Lobo-Checa, Jorge, E-mail: jorge.lobo@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A state of a 2D porous network is demonstrated to originate from the Shockley state. • The temperature evolution of both states is followed by means of ARPES. • Identical energy shifts are observed for both states, proving their common origin. - Abstract: Two-dimensional organic and metal-organic nanoporous networks can scatter surface electrons, leading to their partial localization. Such quantum states are related to intrinsic surface states of the substrate material. We further corroborate this relation by studying the thermally induced energy shifts of the electronic band stemming from coupled quantum states hosted in a metal-organic array formed by a perylene derivative on Cu(111). We observe by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that both, the Shockley and the partially localized states, shift by the same amount to higher binding energies upon decreasing the sample temperature, providing evidence of their common origin. Our experimental approach and results further support the use of surface states for modelling these systems, which are expected to provide new insight into the physics concerning partially confined electronic states: scattering processes, potential barrier strengths, excited state lifetimes or the influence of guest molecules.

  19. Origin and role of gap states in organic semiconductor studied by UPS: as the nature of organic molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews experimental studies on ‘bridging electronic structure and charge transport property of organic semiconductors’ performed using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and related methods mainly in Chiba University, Japan, in particular on the investigation of the origin and the role of electronic states existing in the highest occupied molecular orbital band–lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band (HOMO–LUMO) gap. We summarize experimental observations including direct measurements of ‘invisible’ gap states with ultrahigh sensitivity UPS, which demonstrate that there exist intrinsic gap states in organic semiconductors. We firstly describe the nature of organic molecular solids to understand features of organic semiconductors because such intrinsic gap states are a result of the interplay of these features, which give the principal difference between the organic semiconductor and inorganic counterpart. We then discuss (i) the origin and role of the band gap states in relation to intermolecular interaction/band dispersion and electron–phonon coupling, (ii) the Fermi level pinning issue in organic semiconductors, and (iii) the method of computing the Fermi level position within the HOMO–LUMO gap for experimental groups. The gap states of organic semiconductors appear easily when a weak perturbation is applied to the organic system, namely by contact with other material, by injecting a charge, by elevating temperature, and by exposure to 1 atm gas. What we finally found is that tailing states of HOMO and LUMO always exist, and their energy distributions must not be symmetric; they thus produce a larger Fermi level shift from the mid gap position than previously thought. Furthermore, as shown by computational work, Fermi level pinning , which is a well-known phenomena in semiconductor devices field, occurs in weakly interacting organic/conductor systems without any gap states if the system temperature is not zero ( T

  20. Origin and role of gap states in organic semiconductor studied by UPS: as the nature of organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews experimental studies on ‘bridging electronic structure and charge transport property of organic semiconductors’ performed using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and related methods mainly in Chiba University, Japan, in particular on the investigation of the origin and the role of electronic states existing in the highest occupied molecular orbital band-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band (HOMO-LUMO) gap. We summarize experimental observations including direct measurements of ‘invisible’ gap states with ultrahigh sensitivity UPS, which demonstrate that there exist intrinsic gap states in organic semiconductors. We firstly describe the nature of organic molecular solids to understand features of organic semiconductors because such intrinsic gap states are a result of the interplay of these features, which give the principal difference between the organic semiconductor and inorganic counterpart. We then discuss (i) the origin and role of the band gap states in relation to intermolecular interaction/band dispersion and electron-phonon coupling, (ii) the Fermi level pinning issue in organic semiconductors, and (iii) the method of computing the Fermi level position within the HOMO-LUMO gap for experimental groups. The gap states of organic semiconductors appear easily when a weak perturbation is applied to the organic system, namely by contact with other material, by injecting a charge, by elevating temperature, and by exposure to 1 atm gas. What we finally found is that tailing states of HOMO and LUMO always exist, and their energy distributions must not be symmetric; they thus produce a larger Fermi level shift from the mid gap position than previously thought. Furthermore, as shown by computational work, Fermi level pinning, which is a well-known phenomena in semiconductor devices field, occurs in weakly interacting organic/conductor systems without any gap states if the system temperature is not zero (T  >  0). We

  1. Evolution of heavy ions (He{sup 2+}, H{sup +}) radiolytic yield of molecular hydrogen vs. ''Track-Segment'' LET values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crumiere, Francis; Vandenborre, Johan; Blain, Guillaume; Fattahi, Massoud [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Haddad, Ferid [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Cyclotron Arronax, Saint Herblain (France)

    2017-08-01

    Ionizing radiation's effects onto water molecules lead to the ionization and/or the excitation of them. Then, these phenomena are followed by the formation of radicals and molecular products. The linear energy transfer (LET), which defines the energy deposition density along the radiation length, is different according to the nature of ionizing particles. Thus, the values of radiolytic yields, defined as the number of radical and molecular products formed or consumed by unit of deposited energy, evolve according to this parameter. This work consists in following the evolution of radiolytic yield of molecular hydrogen and ferric ions according to the ''Track-Segment'' LET of ionizing particles (protons, helions). Concerning G(Fe{sup 3+}) values, it seems that the energy deposited into the Bragg peak does not play the main role for the Fe{sup 3+} radiolytic formation, whereas for the G(H{sub 2}) it is the case with a component around 40% of the Bragg peak in the dihydrogen production. Therefore, as main results of this work, for high energetic Helion and Proton beams, the G(Fe{sup 3+}) values, which can be used for further dosimetry studies for example during the α radiolysis experiments, and the primary g(H{sub 2}) values for the Track-Segment LET, which can be used to determine the dihydrogen production by α-emitters, are published.

  2. Heavy quark spin symmetry and SU(3)-flavour partners of the X(3872)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo-Duque, C., E-mail: carloshd@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Nieves, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Pavón Valderrama, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2013-09-20

    In this work, an Effective Field Theory (EFT) incorporating light SU(3)-flavour and heavy quark spin symmetries is used to describe charmed meson–antimeson bound states. At Lowest Order (LO), this means that only contact range interactions among the heavy meson and antimeson fields are involved. Besides, the isospin violating decays of the X(3872) will be used to constrain the interaction between the D and a D{sup ¯⁎} mesons in the isovector channel. Finally, assuming that the X(3915) and Y(4140) resonances are D{sup ⁎}D{sup ¯⁎} and D{sub s}{sup ⁎}D{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ⁎} molecular states, we can determine the four Low Energy Constants (LECs) of the EFT that appear at LO and, therefore, the full spectrum of molecular states with isospin I=0, 1/2 and 1.

  3. Experimental heavy quarkonium physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugge, L.

    1986-08-01

    Following some brief arguments on why heavy quarkonium spectroscopy is an important field of particle physics, some points on experimental techniques are discussed. Parts of the basic quarkonium phenomenology, including discussions of various items related to potensial models, are then presented. An up-to-date presentation is given of the state-of-the-art of experimental charmonium and bottomonium spectroscopy below open flavour threshold, including the confrontation of experimental results to representative theoretical predictions

  4. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, D M

    1989-08-01

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs.

  5. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs

  6. Slow molecular dynamics in the β relaxation of semicrystalline polymers studied by pure exchange 13C solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Eduardo R. de; Becker-Guedes, Fabio; Bonagamba, Tito J.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics in the amorphous regions of semicrystalline polymers exert important influences on mechanical properties, but have been notoriously difficult to characterize. Two new solid-state NMR techniques, PUREX (pure exchange) and CODEX (center band-only detection of exchange) NMR, make it possible to analyze the molecular motions near the glass transition in the amorphous regions of semicrystalline polymers. This is achieved by selectively suppressing the otherwise dominant signals of the static segments in the crystallites. We have applied both NMR techniques to study the slow motions near the glass transition in semicrystalline polymers (β relaxation) and in fully amorphous samples for reference. The studied polymers were isotactic poly(1-butene) (iPB1) (form I), syndiotactic and atactic polypropylenes (sPP, and aPP, respectively), as well as polyisobutylene (PIB). We have analyzed the geometry and time scale of the slow molecular motion for all samples and determined the apparent activation energies. (author)

  7. Controlling Variables in Molecular Gel Science: How Can We Improve the State of the Art?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Weiss

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available By design, no references are included in this article. It is intended to be a series of recommendations in which the focus is on lab practices for investigating substances rather than on the substances being investigated. Thus, it discusses some specific areas of concern identified by the author. Other scientists are encouraged to add to or amend the contents. This article should be read as a “living” document, like a blog in which many gel scientists work, over time, to achieve a consensus about reporting everything from acronyms and definitions to procedures and methods. For those entering the field and seeking compendia on the subject, the author suggests “Googling” the words “molecular gels” or “molecular gels books”.

  8. Heavy quarks and their experimental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelquist, T.

    1975-09-01

    Recent theoretical work on heavy quark dynamics is reviewed. In the context of a color gauge theory of strong interactions, the structure of heavy quark-antiquark bound states and their decay properties is discussed. The emphasis is on the dynamical differences between heavy and light quark bound states. It is suggested that the former will more directly reflect the structure of the underlying field theory

  9. Molecular simulations and Markov state modeling reveal the structural diversity and dynamics of a theophylline-binding RNA aptamer in its unbound state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becka M Warfield

    Full Text Available RNA aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind with high specificity and affinity to target ligands. In the absence of bound ligand, secondary structures of RNA aptamers are generally stable, but single-stranded and loop regions, including ligand binding sites, lack defined structures and exist as ensembles of conformations. For example, the well-characterized theophylline-binding aptamer forms a highly stable binding site when bound to theophylline, but the binding site is unstable and disordered when theophylline is absent. Experimental methods have not revealed at atomic resolution the conformations that the theophylline aptamer explores in its unbound state. Consequently, in the present study we applied 21 microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations to structurally characterize the ensemble of conformations that the aptamer adopts in the absence of theophylline. Moreover, we apply Markov state modeling to predict the kinetics of transitions between unbound conformational states. Our simulation results agree with experimental observations that the theophylline binding site is found in many distinct binding-incompetent states and show that these states lack a binding pocket that can accommodate theophylline. The binding-incompetent states interconvert with binding-competent states through structural rearrangement of the binding site on the nanosecond to microsecond timescale. Moreover, we have simulated the complete theophylline binding pathway. Our binding simulations supplement prior experimental observations of slow theophylline binding kinetics by showing that the binding site must undergo a large conformational rearrangement after the aptamer and theophylline form an initial complex, most notably, a major rearrangement of the C27 base from a buried to solvent-exposed orientation. Theophylline appears to bind by a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Finally, our modeling indicates that when Mg2+ ions are

  10. Dynamical symmetries of molecular states in atomic, nuclear and hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iachello, F.; Cseh, J.; Levai, G.

    1995-01-01

    The algebraic description of dipole degrees of freedom is discussed. These degrees of freedom are relevant to two and few-body systems, as well as in the collective motion of many-body systems. Applications to molecular, nuclear and hadron spectroscopy are presented. Different internal degrees of freedom can also be coupled to the spatial ones, leading to realistic models of several complex systems. (author)

  11. Influence of Frenkel Excitons and Charge Transfer States on the Spectroscopic Properties of Organic Molecular Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Gisslén, Linus Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Perylene derivatives are robust organic dyes absorbing and emitting light in the visible range and in the near infrared. They display a strong tendency to self-assemble into molecular aggregates, liquid crystals, or even crystals. In this thesis, we have demonstrated a successful realization of a theoretical approach describing the fundamental interactions influencing on exciton transfer in crystalline perylenes pigments. Furthermore, the microscopic parameter set obtained has allowed to calc...

  12. Localised quantum states of atomic and molecular particles physisorbed on carbon-based nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Trachta, Michal; Bludský, Ota; Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 11 (2014), "114702-1"-"114702-10" ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/11/0436; GA ČR GAP208/10/0725 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic structure * carbon nanostructures * graphene * quantum mechanics * physisorbed Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  13. Evidence for momentum-dependent heavy-fermionic electronic structures: Soft x-ray ARPES for the superconductor CeNi2Ge2 in the normal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Y.; Aratani, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Mori, T.; Tsuruta, A.; Tachibana, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Kiss, T.; Yamasaki, A.; Yasui, A.; Yamagami, H.; Miyawaki, J.; Ebihara, T.; Saitoh, Y.; Sekiyama, A.

    2018-03-01

    We present clear experimental evidence for the momentum-dependent heavy fermionic electronic structures of the 4 f -based strongly correlated system CeNi2Ge2 by soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A comparison between the experimental three-dimensional quasiparticle dispersion of LaNi2Ge2 and CeNi2Ge2 has revealed that heavy fermionic electronic structures are seen in the region surrounding a specific momentum. Furthermore, the wave vectors between the observed "heavy spots" are consistent with a result of neutron scattering reflecting magnetic correlations, which could be a trigger for the superconductivity in CeNi2Ge2 .

  14. Molecular Dynamic Simulation Insights into the Normal State and Restoration of p53 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As a tumor suppressor protein, p53 plays a crucial role in the cell cycle and in cancer prevention. Almost 50 percent of all human malignant tumors are closely related to a deletion or mutation in p53. The activity of p53 is inhibited by over-active celluar antagonists, especially by the over-expression of the negative regulators MDM2 and MDMX. Protein-protein interactions, or post-translational modifications of the C-terminal negative regulatory domain of p53, also regulate its tumor suppressor activity. Restoration of p53 function through peptide and small molecular inhibitors has become a promising strategy for novel anti-cancer drug design and development. Molecular dynamics simulations have been extensively applied to investigate the conformation changes of p53 induced by protein-protein interactions and protein-ligand interactions, including peptide and small molecular inhibitors. This review focuses on the latest MD simulation research, to provide an overview of the current understanding of interactions between p53 and its partners at an atomic level.

  15. Remarkable solvent-dependent excited-state chirality : A molecular modulator of circularly polarized luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, Richard A.; Huck, N.P.M.; Piet, J.J.; Warman, J.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Dekkers, H.P J M; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The photochemical control of ground- and excited-state chirality of (M)-cis-(1) and (P)-trans(2)-2-nitro-7-(dimethylamino)-9-(2',3'-dihydro-1'H-naphtho[2,1-b]-thiopyran-1'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene is described. It is shown that while ground state chirality can be controlled photochemically by

  16. Remarkable solvent-dependent excited-state chirality : a molecular modulator of circularly polarized luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van R.A.; Huck, H.P.M.; Piet, J.J.; Warman, J.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The photochemical control of ground- and excited-state chirality of (M)-cis-(1) and (P)-trans-(2)-2-nitro-7-(dimethylamino)-9-(2',3' -dihydro-1'H-naphtho[2,1-b]-thiopyran-1'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene is described. It is shown that while ground state chirality can be controlled photochemically by