WorldWideScience

Sample records for heavy ion beam-driven

  1. Recent US advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev, E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2007-01-01

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport, and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by >50X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. We are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy

  2. Beam losses in heavy ion drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafin, E R; Hofmann, I; Spiller, P J

    2002-01-01

    While beam loss issues have hardly been considered in detail for heavy ion fusion scenarios, recent heavy ion machine developments in different labs (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC)) have shown the great importance of beam current limitations due to ion losses. Two aspects of beam losses in heavy ion accelerators are theoretically considered: (1) secondary neutron production due to lost ions, and (2) vacuum pressure instability due to charge exchange losses. Calculations are compared and found to be in good agreement with measured data. The application to a Heavy-Ion Driven Inertial Fusion (HIDIF) scenario is discussed. 12 Refs.

  3. Inertial Fusion Driven By Intense Heavy-Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Dorf, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Perkins, L.J.; Terry, M.R.; Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Ni, P.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Takakuwa, J.H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R.A.; Koniges, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  4. Repetition rates in heavy ion beam driven fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    The limits on the cavity gas density required for beam propagation and condensation times for material vaporized by target explosions can determine the maximum repetition rate of Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) driven fusion reactors. If the ions are ballistically focused onto the target, the cavity gas must have a density below roughly 10-4 torr (3×1012 cm-3) at the time of propagation; other propagation schemes may allow densities as high as 1 torr or more. In some reactor designs, several kilograms of material may be vaporized off of the target chamber walls by the target generated x-rays, raising the average density in the cavity to 100 tor or more. A one-dimensional combined radiation hydrodynamics and vaporization and condensation computer code has been used to simulate the behavior of the vaporized material in the target chambers of HIB fusion reactors.

  5. Repetition rates in heavy ion beam driven fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The limits on the cavity gas density required for beam propagation and condensation times for material vaporized by target explosions can determine the maximum repetition rate of Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) driven fusion reactors. If the ions are ballistically focused onto the target, the cavity gas must have a density below roughly 10 -4 torr (3 x 10 12 cm -3 ) at the time of propagation; other propagation schemes may allow densities as high as 1 torr or more. In some reactor designs, several kilograms of material may be vaporized off of the target chamber walls by the target generated x-rays, raising the average density in the cavity to 100 tor or more. A one-dimensional combined radiation hydrodynamics and vaporization and condensation computer code has been used to simulate the behavior of the vaporized material in the target chambers of HIB fusion reactors

  6. Target design for the cylindrical compression of matter driven by heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A.R. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es; Temporal, M. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lopez Cela, J.J. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Grandjouan, N. [LULI, UMR 7605, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Tahir, N.A. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Serna Moreno, M.C. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Portugues, R.F. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-21

    The compression of a cylindrical sample of hydrogen contained in a hollow shell of Pb or Au has been analyzed in the framework of the experiments to be performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 to be constructed at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. The target implosion is driven by an intense beam of heavy ions with a ring-shaped focal spot. We report the results of a parametric study of the final state of the compressed hydrogen in terms of the target and beam parameters. We consider the generation of the annular heated region by means of a radio-frequency wobbler that rotates the beam at extremely high frequencies in order to accommodate symmetry constraints. We have also studied the hydrogen conditions that can be achieved with a non-rotating beam with Gaussian focal spot and the possibility to use a beam stopper as an alternative way to avoid the direct heating of the sample. Finally, we report the analysis of the hydrodynamic instabilities that affect the implosion and the mitigating effects of the elastoplastic properties of the shell.

  7. Target design for the cylindrical compression of matter driven by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piriz, A.R.; Temporal, M.; Lopez Cela, J.J.; Grandjouan, N.; Tahir, N.A.; Serna Moreno, M.C.; Portugues, R.F.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    2005-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical sample of hydrogen contained in a hollow shell of Pb or Au has been analyzed in the framework of the experiments to be performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 to be constructed at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. The target implosion is driven by an intense beam of heavy ions with a ring-shaped focal spot. We report the results of a parametric study of the final state of the compressed hydrogen in terms of the target and beam parameters. We consider the generation of the annular heated region by means of a radio-frequency wobbler that rotates the beam at extremely high frequencies in order to accommodate symmetry constraints. We have also studied the hydrogen conditions that can be achieved with a non-rotating beam with Gaussian focal spot and the possibility to use a beam stopper as an alternative way to avoid the direct heating of the sample. Finally, we report the analysis of the hydrodynamic instabilities that affect the implosion and the mitigating effects of the elastoplastic properties of the shell

  8. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as open-quotes driversclose quotes for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a open-quotes taxonomyclose quotes of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area

  9. Implosion of multilayered cylindrical targets driven by intense heavy ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2002-11-01

    An analytical model for the implosion of a multilayered cylindrical target driven by an intense heavy ion beam has been developed. The target is composed of a cylinder of frozen hydrogen or deuterium, which is enclosed in a thick shell of solid lead. This target has been designed for future high-energy-density matter experiments to be carried out at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The model describes the implosion dynamics including the motion of the incident shock and the first reflected shock and allows for calculation of the physical conditions of the hydrogen at stagnation. The model predicts that the conditions of the compressed hydrogen are not sensitive to significant variations in target and beam parameters. These predictions are confirmed by one-dimensional numerical simulations and thus allow for a robust target design.

  10. Beam modulation for heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, T.; Minohara, S.; Sudou, M.

    1993-01-01

    The first clinical trial of heavy ion radiation therapy is scheduled in 1994 by using the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In order to start the clinical trial, first, it is necessary to know the physical characteristics of high energy heavy ions in human bodies, for example, dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distribution. Also the knowledge on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions is required. Based on these biophysical properties of heavy ions, monoenergetic heavy ion beam should be modulated so as to make the spread Bragg peak suitable to heavy ion radiation therapy. In order to establish a methodology to obtain the most effective spread Bragg peak for heavy ion radiation therapy, a heavy ion irradiation port at the RIKEN ring cyclotron facility was constructed. By using a 135 MeV/u carbon beam, the biophysical properties of the heavy ions were investigated, and a range modulator was designed to have uniform biological response in the spread Bragg peak. The physical and biological rationality of the spread Bragg peak were investigated. The dose, LET and biological effect of a monoenergetic heavy ion beam, the design of the range modulator, and the distributions of LET and biological dose for the spread Bragg peak are reported. (K.I.)

  11. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; El-Guebaly, L.; Engelstad, R.; Hassanein, A.; Klein, A.; Kulcinski, G.; Larsen, E.; Lee, K.; Lovell, E.; Moses, G.

    1981-12-01

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present dessign is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.) [de

  12. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1996-01-01

    A high current, low emittance, high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver accelerator scale beam. Using a high charge state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system, which consists of a gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 3D beam simulations and experimental feasibility study results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector. (orig.)

  13. Design of a distributed radiator target for inertial fusion driven from two sides with heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, M.; Callahan-Miller, D.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the status of a distributed radiator heavy ion target design. In integrated calculations this target ignited and produced 390-430 MJ of yieldwhen driven with 5.8-6.5 MJ of 3-4 GeV Pb ions. The target has cylindrical symmetry with disk endplates. The ions uniformly illuminate these endplates in a 5mm radius spot. We discuss the considerations which led to this design together with some previously unused design features: low density hohlraum walls in approximate pressure balance with internal low-Z fill materials, radiationsymmetry determined by the position of the radiator materials and particle ranges, and early time pressure symmetry possibly influenced by radiation shims. We discuss how this target scales to lower input energy or to lower beam power. Variant designs with more realistic beam focusing strategies are also discussed. We show the tradeoffs required for targets which accept higher particle energies

  14. Direct-driven target implosion in heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, the driver beam illumination non-uniformity leads a degradation of fusion energy output. A fuel target alignment error would happen in a fusion reactor; the target alignment error induces heavy ion beam illumination non-uniformity on a target. On the other hand, heavy ion beam accelerator provides a capability to oscillate a beam axis with a high frequency. The wobbling beams may provide a new method to reduce or smooth the beam illumination non-uniformity. First we study the effect of driver irradiation non-uniformity induced by the target alignment error (dz) on the target implosion. We found that dz should be less than about 130 μm for a sufficient fusion energy output. We also optimize the wobbling scheme. The spiral wobbling heavy ion beams would provide a promissing scheme to the uniform beam illumination. (paper)

  15. The cooling of confined ions driven by laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyna, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    We finalize the dynamics of confined ions driven by a quantized radiation field. The ions can absorb photons from an incident laser beam and relax back to the ground state by either induced emissions or spontaneous emissions. Here we assume that the absorption of photons is immediately followed by spontaneous emissions, resulting in single-level ions perturbed by the exchange of momentum with the radiation field. The probability distribution of the ions is calculated using singular expansions in the low noise asymptotic limit. The present calculations reproduce the quantum results in the limit of heavy particles in static traps, and the classical results of ions in radio-frequency confining wells

  16. Lithium ion beam driven hohlraums for PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukart, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    In our light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, fusion capsules are driven with an intense x-ray radiation field produced when an intense beam of ions penetrates a radiation case and deposits energy in a foam x-ray conversion region. A first step in the program is to generate and measure these intense fields on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). Our goal is to generate a 100-eV radiation temperature in lithium ion beam driven hohlraums, the radiation environment which will provide the initial drive temperature for ion beam driven implosion systems designed to achieve high gain. In this paper, we describe the design of such hohlraum targets and their predicted performance on PBFA II as we provide increasing ion beam intensities

  17. Inertial fusion with heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.; Hofmann, I.; Arnold, R.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principle of inertial confinement is the irradiation of a small pellet filled with DT-fuel by laser or particle beams in order to compress the fuel and ignite it. As 'drivers' for this process large laser installations and light-ion devices have been built since then and the results obtained during the past few years have increased our confidence, that the ignition conditions might be reached. Further conditions, however, have to be fulfilled for operating a power plant. In particular, the driver needs to have enough efficiency to be economical, and for a continuous energy production a high repetition rate and availability is required. It is less than ten years since it was realized that heavy ion beams might be a promising candidate for achieving inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Due to the evolution of high-energy and heavy-ion physics during the past 25 years, accelerators have attained a high technical and technological standard and an excellent operational reliability. Nevertheless, the heavy ion driver for a fusion power plant requires beam specifications exceeding those of existing accelerators considerably. (Auth.)

  18. A beam profile monitor for heavy ion beams at high impact energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, A.; Stiebing, K.E.; Bethge, K.; Froehlich, O.; Koehler, E.; Mueller, A.; Rueschmann, G.

    1994-01-01

    A beam profile monitor for heavy ion beams has been developed for the use in experiments at the Heavy Ion Synchrotron SIS at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt (GSI). Four thin scintillation fibres are mounted on one wheel and scan the ion beam sequentially in two linearly independent directions. They are read out via one single photomultiplier common to all four fibres into one time spectrum, which provides all information about beam position, beam extension, time structure and lateral homogeneity of the beam. The system operates in a wide dynamic range of beam intensities. ((orig.))

  19. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan D.A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Celata, C.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Debonnel, C.S.; Grote, D.P.; Efthimiom, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.E.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Rose, D.V.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Startsev, E.A.; Tabak, M.; Thoma, C.; Vay, J-L; Wadron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.R.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  20. Simulation of electron cloud effects to heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Fatih; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud (EC) driven instability can cause beam loss, emittance growth, trajectory change and wake fields. Mentioned crucial effects of EC motivated researchers to understand the EC build up mechanism and the effects of EC to the beam. This motivation also induced the progress of developing new simulation codes. EC simulations can roughly be divided into two classes such as, softwares whose goals are to simulate the build up of the EC during the passage of a bunch train and the codes which model the interaction of a bunch with an EC. The aim of this study is to simulate the effects of electron cloud (EC) on the dynamics of heavy ion beams which are used in heavy ion synchrotron (SIS-18) at GSI. To do this, a 3-D and self-consistent simulation program based on particle in cell (PIC) method is used. In the PIC cycle, accurate solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained by employing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. As a model, we assumed a perfectly conducting beam pipe which was uniformly (or randomly) loaded with the electrons. Then as parallel with the realistic cases in SIS-18, a single bunch consisting of U{sup +73} ions was extracted which could propagate in this pipe. Due to EC-ion bunch interaction, electrons gained energy and their displacements were observed. Electric and magnetic field components and EC charge density were calculated, numerically.

  1. Beam dynamics in heavy ion induction LINACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1981-10-01

    Interest in the use of an induction linac to accelerate heavy ions for the purpose of providing the energy required to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated a theoretical effort to investigate various beam dynamical effects associated with high intensity heavy ion beams. This paper presents a summary of the work that has been done so far; transverse, longitudinal and coupled longitudinal transverse effects are discussed

  2. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  3. Heavy ion fusion- Using heavy ions to make electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of using nuclear fusion as a source of commercial electrical power has been pursued worldwide since the 1950s. Two approaches, using magnetic and inertial confinement of the reactants, are under study. This paper describes the difference between the two approaches, and discusses in more detail the heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion concept. A multibeam induction linear accelerator would be used to bring ∼100 heavy ion beams to a few GeV. The beams would then heat and compress a target of solid D-T. This approach is unique among fusion concepts in its ability to protect the reaction chamber wall from neutrons and debris

  4. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Watson, R. L.; Horvat, V.; Zaharakis, K. E.; Peng, Y.

    2002-01-01

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters

  5. Cellular radiobiology of heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Roots, R.J.; Yang, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of this research program: relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio of silicon ion beams; heavy ion effects on the cell cycle; the potentiation effect (2 doses of high LET heavy-ion radiations separated by 2 to 3 hours); potentially lethal damage in actively growing cells and plateau growth cells; radiation induced macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry; lethal effects of dual radiation; and the development of a biophysical repair/misrepair model

  6. Study on broad beam heavy ion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yumiko; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Hitomi; Nanbu, S.; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2003-01-01

    To achieve the heavy ion radiotherapy more precisely, it is important to know the distribution of the electron density in a human body, which is highly related to the range of charged particles. From a heavy ion CT image, we can directly obtain the 2-D distribution of the electron density in a sample. For this purpose, we have developed a broad beam heavy ion CT system. The electron density was obtained using some kinds of solutions targets. Also the dependence of the spatial resolution on the target size and the kinds of beams was estimated in this work using cylinders targets of 40, 60 and 80 mm in diameter, each of them has a hole of 10 mm in diameter at the center of it. (author)

  7. Development of an intermediate energy heavy-ion micro-beam irradiation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Mingtao; Wang Zhiguang; He Yuan; Gao Daqing; Yang Xiaotian; Liu Jie; Su Hong; Man Kaidi; Sheng Li'na

    2008-01-01

    The micro-beam irradiation system, which focuses the beam down the micron order and precisely delivers a predefined number of ions to a predefined spot of micron order, is a powerful tool for radio-biology, radio-biomedicine and micromachining. The Institute of Modern Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences is developing a heavy-ion micro-beam irradiation system up to intermediate energy. Based on the intermediate and low energy beam provided by Heavy Ion Research Facility of Lanzhou, the micro-beam system takes the form of the magnetic focusing. The heavy-ion beam is conducted to the basement by a symmetrical achromatic system consisting of two vertical bending magnets and a quadrupole in between. Then a beam spot of micron order is formed by magnetic triplet quadrupole of very high gradient. The sample can be irradiated either in vacuum or in the air. This system will be the first opening platform capable of providing heavy ion micro-beam, ranging from low (10 MeV/u) to intermediate energy (100 MeV/u), for irradiation experiment with positioning and counting accuracy. Target material may be biology cell, tissue or other non-biological materials. It will be a help for unveiling the essence of heavy-ion interaction with matter and also a new means for exploring the application of heavy-ion irradiation. (authors)

  8. Cooled heavy ion beams at the ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, M.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Klepper, O.; Nolden, F.; Reich, H.; Schlitt, B.; Spaedtke, P.; Winkler, T.

    1996-01-01

    The storage ring ESR has been used in various operational modes for experiments with electron cooled heavy ion beams. Besides the standard storage mode including injection and beam accumulation the deceleration of highly charged ions has been demonstrated. Beams of highly charged ions have been injected and accumulated and finally decelerated to a minimum energy of 50 MeV/u. An ultraslow extraction method using charge changing processes is now also available for cooled beams of highly charged ions. For in ring experiments the internal gas jet and the cold electron beam of the cooling system are applied as targets. High precision mass spectrometry by Schottky noise detection has been demonstrated. Operation at transition energy has been achieved with cooled beams opening the field for experiments which require an isochronous revolution of the ions. (orig.)

  9. First heavy ion beam tests with a superconducting multigap CH cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, W.; Aulenbacher, K.; Basten, M.; Busch, M.; Dziuba, F.; Gettmann, V.; Heilmann, M.; Kürzeder, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Podlech, H.; Rubin, A.; Schnase, A.; Schwarz, M.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2018-02-01

    Very compact accelerating-focusing structures, as well as short focusing periods, high accelerating gradients and short drift spaces are strongly required for superconducting (sc) accelerator sections operating at low and medium energies for continuous wave (cw) heavy ion beams. To keep the GSI-super heavy element (SHE) program competitive on a high level and even beyond, a standalone sc cw linac (Helmholtz linear accelerator) in combination with the GSI high charge state injector (HLI), upgraded for cw operation, is envisaged. Recently the first linac section (financed by Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and GSI) as a demonstration of the capability of 217 MHz multigap crossbar H-mode structures (CH) has been commissioned and extensively tested with heavy ion beam from the HLI. The demonstrator setup reached acceleration of heavy ions up to the design beam energy. The required acceleration gain was achieved with heavy ion beams even above the design mass to charge ratio at high beam intensity and full beam transmission. This paper presents systematic beam measurements with varying rf amplitudes and phases of the CH cavity, as well as phase space measurements for heavy ion beams with different mass to charge ratio. The worldwide first and successful beam test with a superconducting multigap CH cavity is a milestone of the R&D work of HIM and GSI in collaboration with IAP in preparation of the HELIAC project and other cw-ion beam applications.

  10. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Research for High Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  11. Hydrodynamic motion of a heavy-ion-beam-heated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, J.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Mueller, R.W.; Mahrt-Olt, K.; Arnold, R.C.; Schneider, V.; Maruhn, J.

    1990-01-01

    The first experimental study is reported of a plasma produced by a heavy-ion beam. Relevant parameters for heating with heavy ions are described, temperature and density of the plasma are determined, and the hydrodynamic motion in the target induced by the beam is studied. The measured temperature and the free-electron density are compared with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic-model calculation. In accordance with the model, a radial rarefaction wave reaching the center of the target was observed and the penetration velocity of the ion beam into the xenon-gas target was measured

  12. Experimental investigations of plasma lens focusing and plasma channel transport of heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauschwitz, T.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Reginato, L.; Leemans, W.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1995-04-01

    Final focusing of ion beams and propagation in a reactor chamber are crucial questions for heavy ion beam driven Fusion. An alternative solution to ballistic quadrupole focusing, as it is proposed in most reactor studies today, is the utilization of the magnetic field produced by a high current plasma discharge. This plasma lens focusing concept relaxes the requirements for low emittance and energy spread of the driver beam significantly and allows to separate the issues of focusing, which can be accomplished outside the reactor chamber, and of beam transport inside the reactor. For focusing a tapered wall-stabilized discharge is proposed, a concept successfully demonstrated at GSI, Germany. For beam transport a laser pre-ionized channel can be used

  13. Simulations of longitudinal beam dynamics of space-charge dominated beams for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.A.C.

    1994-12-01

    The longitudinal instability has potentially disastrous effects on the ion beams used for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion. This instability is a open-quotes resistive wallclose quotes instability with the impedance coining from the induction modules in the accelerator used as a driver. This instability can greatly amplify perturbations launched from the beam head and can prevent focusing of the beam onto the small spot necessary for fusion. This instability has been studied using the WARPrz particle-in-cell code. WARPrz is a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic axisymmetric code. This code includes a model for the impedance of the induction modules. Simulations with resistances similar to that expected in a driver show moderate amounts of growth from the instability as a perturbation travels from beam head to tail as predicted by cold beam fluid theory. The perturbation reflects off the beam tail and decays as it travels toward the beam head. Nonlinear effects cause the perturbation to steepen during reflection. Including the capacitive component of the, module impedance. has a partially stabilizing effect on the longitudinal instability. This reduction in the growth rate is seen in both cold beam fluid theory and in simulations with WARPrz. Instability growth rates for warm beams measured from WARPrz are lower than cold beam fluid theory predicts. Longitudinal thermal spread cannot account for this decrease in the growth rate. A mechanism for coupling the transverse thermal spread to decay of the longitudinal waves is presented. The longitudinal instability is no longer a threat to the heavy ion fusion program. The simulations in this thesis have shown that the growth rate for this instability will not be as large as earlier calculations predicted

  14. Longitudinal dynamics and stability in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Grote, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    Successful transport of induction-driven beams for heavy-ion fusion requires careful control of the longitudinal space charge. The usual control technique is the periodic application of time-varying longitudinal electric fields, called 'ears', that on the average, balance the space-charge field. this technique is illustrated using a fluid/envelope code CIRCE, and the sensitivity of the method to errors in these ear fields is illustrated. The possibility that periodic ear fields also excite the longitudinal instability is examined

  15. Symplectic Tracking of Multi-Isotopic Heavy-Ion Beams in SixTrack

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal; De Maria, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The software SixTrack provides symplectic proton tracking over a large number of turns. The code is used for the tracking of beam halo particles and the simulation of their interaction with the collimators to study the efficiency of the LHC collimation system. Tracking simulations for heavy-ion beams require taking into account the mass to charge ratio of each particle because heavy ions can be subject to fragmentation at their passage through the collimators. In this paper we present the derivation of a Hamiltonian for multi-isotopic heavy-ion beams and symplectic tracking maps derived from it. The resulting tracking maps were implemented in the tracking software SixTrack. With this modification, SixTrack can be used to natively track heavy-ion beams of multiple isotopes through a magnetic accelerator lattice.

  16. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fimognari, P. J.; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  17. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fimognari, P. J., E-mail: PJFimognari@XanthoTechnologies.com; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R. [Xantho Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  18. Jason: heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callan, C.G. Jr.; Dashen, R.F.; Garwin, R.L.; Muller, R.A.; Richter, B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1978-02-01

    A few of the problems in heavy-ion-driven inertial-fusion systems are reviewed. Nothing was found within the scope of this study that would in principle bar such systems from delivering the energy and peak power required to ignite the fuel pellet. Indeed, ion-fusion seems to show great promise, but the conceptual design of ion-fusion systems is still in a primitive state. A great deal of work, mostly theoretical, remains to be done before proceeding with massive hardware development. Conclusions are given about the state of the work

  19. On the symmetry of cylindrical implosions driven by a rotating beam of fast ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basko, M.M.; Schlegel, T.; Maruhn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense beams of heavy ions are one of the promising ways to create high energy density states in matter. To ensure the needed azimuthal symmetry of the beam energy deposition, it was proposed [Sharkov et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 1 (2001)] to rotate the ion beam around the target axis. Combining analytical calculations with two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, a lower limit is established on the frequency ν of the beam rotation dictated by the target hydrodynamics. This limit is shown to be directly proportional to the desired radial convergence ratio C r for stepwise beam power profiles, and to C r 1/2 for smooth pulses. With a smooth pulse, 6-10 beam revolutions per pulse should be sufficient to reach C r ≅30, while a stepwise pulse requires ≅100 revolutions. Also, the upper bound on the asymmetry of the elliptical focal spot of a rotating ion beam is calculated

  20. Target design for heavy ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Metzler, N.

    1981-07-01

    Target design for Heavy Ion Beam Fusion and related physics are discussed. First, a modified version of the Kidder-Bodner model for pellet gain is presented and is used to define the working point (Esub(beam) = 4.8 MJ, Gain 83) for a reactor size target. Secondly, stopping of heavy ions in hot dense plasma is investigated and numerical results for stopping powers and ranges of 10 GeV Bi-ions in Pb, Li, and PbLi-alloy are given. Finally, results of an explicit implosion calculation, using the 1-D code MINIHY, are discussed in detail. The hydrodynamic efficiency is found to be about 5%. Special attention is given to the shock sequence leading to the ignition configuration. Also the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the absorber-pusher interface is estimated. (orig.)

  1. Heavy-ion-driven electronuclear process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Sosnin, A.N.; Filinova, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    Results of Monte Carlo mathematical experiments with electronuclear process in uranium and thorium homo- and heterogeneous targets irradiated by protons and heavy ions are presented. It is shown that neutron yield is the highest while using the deuteron beam and sharply decreases in case of heavier projectiles. Time dependent non-linear effects stipulated by an accumulation of fissile nuclides are discussed. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tab

  2. Electron-Cloud Simulation and Theory for High-Current Heavy-Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Lee, E; Azevedo, T; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-01-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary- electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability: (1) We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2) We simulate of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration). One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3) We report first results from a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics

  3. Electron-cloud simulation and theory for high-current heavy-ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy-ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron-cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds (also applicable to other accelerators. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability. (1 We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2 We simulate the effect of specified electron-cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing-mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope “breathing” mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3 We report first results from a long-time-step algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics.

  4. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In this report the activities of the GSI Darmstadt (FRG) during 1985 concerning inertial confinement fusion by heavy ion beams. Short communications and abstracts are presented concerning a Z-pinch experiment, heavy ion pumped lasers and X-ray spectroscopy, the study of ion-ion collisions, a RFQ development and beam transport studies, accelerator theory, targets for SIS/ESR experiments, the rayleigh-Taylor instability, studies on the equation of state for matter under high pressure, as well as the development of computer codes. (HSI)

  5. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams

  6. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for HIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-04-01

    A high current low emittance high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver HIF (heavy ion fusion) driver accelerator scale beam. Using high-charge-state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system which consists of the gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 2D beam envelope simulations and experimental feasibility studies' results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector

  7. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This Annual Report summarizes research activities carried out in 1988 in the framework of the government-funded program 'High Energy Density in Matter produced by Heavy Ion Beams'. It addresses fundamental problems of the generation of heavy ion beams and the investigation of hot dense plasmas produced by these beams. Its initial motivation and its long-term goal is the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion by intense heavy ion beams. Two outstanding events deserve to be mentioned explicity, the Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Conference held in Darmstadt and organized by GSI end of June and the first heavy ion beam injected into the new SIS facility in November. The former event attracted more than hundred scientists for three days to the 4th Conference in this field. This symposium showed the impressive progress since the last conference in Washington two years ago. In particular the first beams in MBE-4 at LBL and results of beam plasma interaction experiments at GSI open new directions for future investigations. The ideas for non-Lionvillean injection into storage rings presented by Carlo Rubbia will bring the discussion of driver scenarios into a new stage. The latter event is a milestone for both machine and target experiments. It characterizes the beginning of the commissioning phase for the new SIS/ESR facility which will be ready for experiments at the end of this year. The commissioning of SIS is on schedule and first experiments can start at the beginning of 1990. A status report of the accelerator project is included. Theoretical activities were continued as in previous years, many of them providing guide lines for future experiments, in particular for the radiation transport aspects and for beam-plasma interaction. (orig.)

  8. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This annual report summarizes the results of research carried out in 1986 within the framework of the program 'High Energy Density in Matter Produced by Heavy Ion Beams' which is funded by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology. Its initial motivation and its ultimate goal is the question whether inertial confinement can be achieved by intense beams of heavy ions. (orig./HSI)

  9. HIBALL-II - an improved conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; Corradini, M.; El-Guebaly, L.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.; Klein, A.; Kulcinski, G.; Larsen, E.; Lovell, E.; Moses, G.; Peterson, R.; Pong, L.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Symon, K.; Vogelsang, W.; White, A.; Wittenberg, L.; Beckert, K.; Bock, R.; Boehne, D.; Hofmann, I.; Keller, R.; Mueller, R.; Bozsik, I.; Jahnke, A.; Brezina, J.; Nestle, H.; Wendel, W.; Wollnik, H.; Lessmann, E.; Froehlich, R.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Kessler, G.; Moellendorff, U. von; Moritz, N.; Plute, K.; Schretzmann, K.; Sze, D.

    1985-07-01

    An improved design of the HIBALL inertial-confinement fusion power station is presented. The new RF-linac based heavy ion driver has improved concepts for beam stacking, bunching and final focusing. The new target design takes into account radiation transport effects in a coarse approximation. The system of four reactors with a net total output of 3.8 GW electric is essentially the same as described earlier, however, progress in the analysis has enhanced its credibility and self-consistency. Considerations of environmental and safety aspects and cost estimates are given. (orig.) [de

  10. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  11. Intense pulsed heavy ion beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm 2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm 2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al (1-3)+ ) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89%. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were successively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm 2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration. (author)

  12. Improvement of herbage by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongmei; Hao Jifang; Wei Zengquan; Xie Zhongkui; Li Fengqin; Wang Yajun

    2004-01-01

    Herbage seeds of legume and grass were irradiated in penetration by 80 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ ions. The results of field tests and observations of the root-tip cells showed that growth of the seedling was obviously weakened with increasing doses. Frequencies of chromosomal aberration and micronucleus increased significantly with increasing doses. According to the field growth tests, radiation sensitivity of grass herbage to the heavy ion beams was much higher than leguminous herbage, and suitable dose of the heavy ion irradiation for the grass and leguminous herbage is 20-30 Gy and 150 Gy, respectively

  13. Development of heavy-ion beams at the INS 176-cm SF cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kenji; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Tanabe, Tetsumi; Sakurada, Yuzo; Yamazaki, Tsutomu.

    1982-10-01

    Heavy-ion beams at the INS SF cyclotron have been developed since the first beam was obtained in 1974. Multiply-charged heavy ions of gaseous material lighter than Ne have been successfully accelerated. An internal ion source for solid material has been made and high-intensity beams of sup(6,7)Li 3 + have been obtained. A pulsed arc power supply of the current-regulator type was constructed by using a tetrode. Two models of the PIG source of the self-heated cold-cathode type have been made and one of them is now in use. Some of the cyclotron components were also improved for efficient use of heavy-ion beams. (author)

  14. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  15. Induction linac drivers for commercial heavy-ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1987-11-01

    This paper discusses induction linac drivers necessary to accelerate heavy ions at inertial fusion targets. Topics discussed are: driver configurations, the current-amplifying induction linac, high current beam behavior and emittance growth, new considerations for driver design, the heavy ion fusion systems study, and future studies. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators seek to provide the scientific and technical basis for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an integrated source-to-target physics experiment recently included in the list of future facilities planned by the U.S. Department of Energy. To optimize the design of IBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-VNL research is addressing several key issues (representative, not inclusive): gas and electron cloud effects which can exacerbate beam loss at high beam perveance and magnet aperture fill factors; ballistic neutralized and assisted-pinch focusing of neutralized heavy ion beams; limits on longitudinal compression of both neutralized and un-neutralized heavy ion bunches; and tailoring heavy ion beams for uniform target energy deposition for high energy density physics (HEDP) studies.

  17. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated

  18. New cultivar produced by heavy-ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaya, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Kenichi; Iwaki, Kazunari [Suntory Flowers Ltd., Higashiomi, Shiga (Japan); Ichida, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yoriko; Saito, Hiroyuki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    The RIKEN accelerator research facility (RARF) is the one of the biggest facilities to accelerate heavy ions in all over the world since 1986. We started our trials in plant breeding since 1993. Soon we found that the ion beam is highly effective in the cause of mutagenesis of tobacco embryos during the fertilization without damage to other plant tissue. RIKEN and Suntory Flowers Ltd. have jointly developed some new ornamental varieties of Verbena and Petunia using ion-beam irradiation. We already put 5 new flower cultivars on the market in Japan, USA, Canada and EU since 2002. We report here a new variety of Torenia obtained by ion-beam irradiation. (author)

  19. New cultivar produced by heavy-ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Kenichi; Iwaki, Kazunari; Ichida, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yoriko; Saito, Hiroyuki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    The RIKEN accelerator research facility (RARF) is the one of the biggest facilities to accelerate heavy ions in all over the world since 1986. We started our trials in plant breeding since 1993. Soon we found that the ion beam is highly effective in the cause of mutagenesis of tobacco embryos during the fertilization without damage to other plant tissue. RIKEN and Suntory Flowers Ltd. have jointly developed some new ornamental varieties of Verbena and Petunia using ion-beam irradiation. We already put 5 new flower cultivars on the market in Japan, USA, Canada and EU since 2002. We report here a new variety of Torenia obtained by ion-beam irradiation. (author)

  20. The TMX heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    A heavy ion beam probe has been used to measure the radial space potential distribution in the central cell of TMX. This was the first beam probe system to utilize computer control, CAMAC instrumentation, and fast time response for broadband fluctuation capabilities. The fast time response was obtained using off-line processing of the energy analyzer detector signals and wideband transimpedance amplifiers. The on-axis space potential was found to be 300--400 V, with φ e /T ec ∼8. The radial potential profile is parabolic when gas box fueling is used. The frequency of observed fluctuations was found to agree with the E x B plasma rotation frequency during the discharge. The measured Tl ++ secondary ion current level is consistent with calculations, given reasonable assumptions for beam attenuation

  1. Beam instability during high-current heavy-ion beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2005-01-01

    In driver system for heavy ion inertial fusion, beam dynamics is investigated by particle-in-cell simulations during final beam bunching. The particle simulations predict that the beam is transported with the localized transverse charge distribution induced by the strong space charge effect. The calculation results also show that the emittance growth during the longitudinal bunch compression for various particle distributions at the initial conditions and with two types of transverse focusing model, which are a continuous focusing and an alternating gradient focusing lattice configurations. (author)

  2. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  3. Coherent instability of the heavy ion beam in the storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, A.

    1981-01-01

    The storage ring as the final part of a driver for heavy ion fusion is required to provide heavy ions (A asymptotically equals 200) with energy of 5 -- 10 GeV and such a high intensity as 1 -- 6 x 10 15 ions/pulse. So as to raise the number of ions which can be accumulated in a ring, singlly charged heavy ion is used for its relatively smaller incoherent space charge force compared with higher charge states. The intensity limit due to incoherent space charge force is 0.7 -- 1.4 x 10 15 ions for U 1 + . Much more severe limits exist due to coherent motion of heavy ion beams (0.8 -- 2 x 10 13 for longitudinal motion and 0.9 -- 1.1 x 10 12 for transverse motion), because of the relatively lower velocity of the accumulated ions. It seems unrealistic to use a lot of rings in order to operate below such intensity limits of the above instability. Therefore the number of the storage rings is constrained within a reasonable value (3 -- 7) and the possibility of compressing the bunches of heavy ion beams before the instability grows fatally large is studied. (author)

  4. Proceedings of the heavy ion fusion workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R C [ed.

    1978-01-01

    These proceedings contain reviews of current laboratory programs dealing with inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions, as well as several individually abstracted invited talks, workshop reports and contributed papers.

  5. Ballistic-neutralized chamber transport of intense heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.; Clark, R.E.; Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor chamber are presented. The ballistic-neutralized transport scheme studied uses 4 GeV Pb +1 ion beams injected into a low-density, gas-filled reactor chamber and the beam is ballistically focused onto an ICF target before entering the chamber. Charge and current neutralization of the beam is provided by the low-density background gas. The ballistic-neutralized simulations include stripping of the beam ions as the beam traverses the chamber as well as ionization of the background plasma. In addition, a series of simulations are presented that explore the charge and current neutralization of the ion beam in an evacuated chamber. For this vacuum transport mode, neutralizing electrons are only drawn from sources near the chamber entrance

  6. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  7. Effect of focusing field error during final beam bunching in heavy-ion-beam driven inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Kawata, S.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-01-01

    Emittance growth due to the transverse focusing field error is investigated during the final beam bunching in the energy driver system of heavy ion inertial fusion. The beam bunch is longitudinally compressed during the transport with the field error in the continuous focusing (CF) or the alternating gradient (AG) field lattices. Numerical calculation results show the only 2% difference of the emittance growth between the cases with and without field error in the CF lattice. In the case of the AG lattice model with the field error of 10%, the emittance growth of 2.4 times is estimated, and the major difference between the CF and AG models is indicated from the numerical simulations. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Negative-Ion-Beam Driver Concepts for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, Larry R.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of producing and using atomically neutral heavy ion beams produced from negative ions as drivers for an inertial confinement fusion reactor. Bromine and iodine appear to be the most attractive elements for the driver beams. Fluorine and chlorine appear to be the most appropriate feedstocks for initial tests of extractable negative ion current densities. With regards to ion sources, photodetachment neutralizers, and vacuum requirements for accelerators and beam transport, this approach appears feasible within existing technology, and the vacuum requirements are essentially identical to those for positive ion drivers except in the target chamber. The principal constraint is that this approach requires harder vacuums in the target chamber than do space-charge-neutralized positive ion drivers. With realistic (but perhaps pessimistic) estimates of the total ionization cross section, limiting the ionization of a neutral beam to less than 5% while traversing a four -meter path would require a chamber pressure of no more than 5 x 10 -5 torr. Alternatively, even at chamber pressures that are too high to allow propagation of atomically neutral beams, the negative ion approach may still have appeal, since it precludes the possibly serious problem of electron contamination of a positive ion beam during acceleration, drift compression, and focusing

  9. Measurement of residual radioactivity in cooper exposed to high energy heavy ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Nakamura, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Ito, Sachiko; Fukumura, Akifumi

    1999-03-01

    The residual radioactivities produced by high energy heavy ions have been measured using the heavy ion beams of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The spatial distribution of residual radioactivities in 3.5 cm, 5.5 cm and 10 cm thick copper targets of 10 cm x 10 cm size bombarded by 290 MeV/u, 400 MeV/u-{sup 12}C ion beams and 400 MeV/u-{sup 20}Ne ion beam, respectively, were obtained by measuring the gamma-ray activities of 0.5 mm thick copper foil inserted in the target with a high purity Ge detector after about 1 hour to 6 hours irradiation. (author)

  10. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Baca, D.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Franks, R.M.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Hoon, M.J.L. de; Kaganovich, I.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G.-L.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Yu, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents (∼100's Amperes/beam) and ion energies (∼1-10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tune depressions, and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now being constructed at LBNL. The mission of the HCX will be to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned. The step which bridges the gap between the IBX and an engineering test facility for fusion has been designated the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE (like the IBX) will provide an

  11. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, A.R., E-mail: Roberto.Piriz@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω.

  12. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, A.; Piriz, A.R.; Tahir, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω

  13. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985

  14. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  15. A synchronous beam sweeper for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory provides a wide range of accelerated heavy ions from the periodic table. Frequently, the beam delivery rate of 12 MHz is too fast for the type of experiment on line. Reaction by-products from a target bombardment may have a decay interval much longer than the dead time between beam bunches. To prevent data from being corrupted by incoming ions a beam sweeper was developed which synchronously eliminates selected beam bunches to suit experimental needs. As the SWEEPER is broad band (DC to 6 MHz) beam delivery rates can be instantaneously changed. Ion beam bunches are selectively kicked out by an electrostatic dipole electrode pulsed to 2 kVDC. The system has been used for almost three years with several hundred hours of operating time logged to date. Beam bunch delivery rates of 6 MHz down to 25 kHz have been provided. Since this is a non-resonant system any beam delivery rate from 6 MHz down to zero can be set. In addition, burst modes have been used where beam is supplied in 12 MHz bursts and then shut down for a period of time set by the user. 3 figs

  16. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P; Covo, Kireeff M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.; Prost, L.

    2004-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy

  17. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.; Bieniosek, F.; Celata, C.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.; Yu, S.; Barnard, J.; Callahan, D.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.; Lund, S.; Davidson, R.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.

    2005-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy. (author)

  18. The emittance of high current heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, N.R.; Devaney, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantation is the main application for high current heavy ion beams. Transfer ratio is defined as the ratio of the total ion current leaving the ion source to the current delivered to the endstation. This ratio is monitored and logged and its importance is explained. It is also affected by other factors, such as the isotopic and molecular composition of the total ion beam. The transfer ratio reveals the fraction of ions which are intercepted by parts of the beamline system. The effects of these ions are discussed in two categories: processing purity and reliability. In discussing the emittance of ribbon beams, the two orthogonal planes are usually considered separately. Longitudinal emittance is determined by slot length and by plasma ion temperature. It has already been revealed that the longitudinal divergence of the beams from BF3 is perhaps double that of the beam from arsenic vapour or argon, at the same total perveance from the ion source. This poses the question: why is the ion temperature higher for BF3 than for As or Ar? The transverse emittance is in practical terms dominated by the divergence. It is the most fruitful area for improvement in most real-world systems. There is an intrinsic divergence arising from initial ion energies within the plasma, and there is emittance growth that can occur as a result of aberration in the beam extraction optics. (N.K.)

  19. Electrosprayed Heavy Ion and Nanodrop Beams for Surface Engineering and Electrical Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Studies At the macroscale, the surface of a Taylor cone just before ion emission is an equipotential with a normal electric field strength found from...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0246 Electrosprayed Heavy Ion and Nanodrop Beams for Surface Engineering M Gamero-Castano UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Final...298 (Re . 8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 1 Electrosprayed Heavy Ion and Nanodrop Beams for Surface Engineering and Electrical Propulsion

  20. Scaled beam merging experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Seidl

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy ion fusion drivers. However, the resultant transverse phase space dilution must be minimized so as not to sacrifice focusability at the target. A prototype combining experiment has been completed employing four 3-mA Cs^{+} beams injected at 160 keV. The focusing elements upstream of the merge consist of four quadrupoles and a final combined-function element (quadrupole and dipole. Following the merge, the resultant single beam is transported in a single alternating gradient channel where the subsequent evolution of the distribution function is diagnosed. The results are in fair agreement with particle-in-cell simulations. They indicate that for some heavy ion fusion driver designs, the phase space dilution from merging is acceptable.

  1. Dynamics of heavy ion beams during longitudinal compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Brandon, S.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    Heavy ion beams with initially uniform line charge density can be compressed longitudinally by an order of magnitude in such a way that the compressed beam has uniform line charge density and velocity-tilt profiles. There are no envelope mismatch oscillations during compression. Although the transverse temperature varies along the beam and also varies with time, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth has been observed. Scaling laws for beam radius and transport system parameters are given

  2. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration for ion-driven fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chenkun; Albright, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of 100s of MeV energy and < 10% energy spread. An overdense run-scale foil target driven by a high intensity laser pulse can produce an ion beam that has attractive properties for this application. The Break Out Afterburner (BOA) is one laser-ion acceleration mechanism proposed to generate such beams, however the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. The spectral and spatial qualities of the beam quickly evolve as the ion beam and co-moving electrons continue to interact with the laser. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread. Particle-In-Cell simulations reveal the dynamics of the ion beam under control. Optimal conditions for improving the spectral and spatial spread of the ion beam is explored for current laser and target parameters, leading to generation of ion beams of energy 100s of MeV and 6% energy spread, a vital step for realizing ion-driven fast ignition.

  3. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The experimental activities at GSI were concentrated on the progress in beam-plasma interaction experiments of heavy ion with ionized matter, plasma -lens forming devices, intense beam at high temperature experimental area, and charge exchange collisions of ions. The development to higher intensities and phase space densities during 1993 for the SIS and the ESR is recorded. The possibility of studying of funneling of two beams in a two-beam RFQ is studied. Specific results are presented with respect to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The problem of ion stopping in plasma and pumping X-ray lasers with heavy ion beams are discussed. Various contributions deal with dense plasma effects, shocks and opacity. (HP)

  4. Heavy ion particle beam interaction with a hot ionized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei-Cas, R.; Bardy, J.; Beuve, M.A.; Laget, J.P.; Menier, A.; Renaud, M.

    1983-03-01

    The present status of the experimental facility consisting of a heavy ion beam travelling through a laser created plasma target is described. Some aspects such as laser-tandem coupling, beam performances, constraints on the plasma parameter ranges, plasma and beam diagnostics are analyzed

  5. Heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpakchieva, R.; Cherepanov, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The international school-seminar on heavy ion physics had been organized in Dubna in may of 1993. The scientific program of reports covers the following main topics: synthesis and properties of heavy nuclei; synthesis and investigation of properties of exotic nuclei; experiments with radioactive nuclear beams; interaction between complex nuclei at low and intermediate energies. It also includes reports on laser spectroscopy and exotic nuclear beams, on some application of heavy ion beams for the problems of solid state physics, on construction of multidetector facilities and on developing of heavy ion accelerator complexes. Short communication

  6. Design and Status of the ELIMED Beam Line for Laser-Driven Ion Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Pablo Cirrone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Charged particle acceleration using ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses has gathered a strong interest in the scientific community and it is now one of the most attractive topics in the relativistic laser-plasma interaction research. Indeed, it could represent the future of particle acceleration and open new scenarios in multidisciplinary fields, in particular, medical applications. One of the biggest challenges consists of using, in a future perspective, high intensity laser-target interaction to generate high-energy ions for therapeutic purposes, eventually replacing the old paradigm of acceleration, characterized by huge and complex machines. The peculiarities of laser-driven beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy and installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams in multidisciplinary applications. ELIMED will represent the first user’s open transport beam line where a controlled laser-driven ion beam will be used for multidisciplinary and medical studies. In this paper, an overview of the beamline, with a detailed description of the main transport elements, will be presented. Moreover, a description of the detectors dedicated to diagnostics and dosimetry will be reported, with some preliminary results obtained both with accelerator-driven and laser-driven beams.

  7. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  8. The Z-pinch as plasma lens for the focusing of heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfers, M.

    1992-04-01

    In the present thesis the influence of a Z-pinch plasma on the shape of heavy-ion beams and the for the understanding of this interaction most important plasma parameters were studied. For this the Z-pinch at the heavy-ion accelerator UNILAC was operated. The magnet field gradients of up to (25 ± 3) T/m occuring in the Z-pinch lead to the plasma-lens effect - the focusing of a charged-particle beam traversing axially the Z-pinch. In this thesis for the first time the focusing of a heavy-ion beam by the azimutal magnetic field of a Z-pinch is described. Different beams with an original diameter of 10 mm were focused. The smallest measured beam diameter amounts to 1 mm half-width. The beam energy amounts to 11.4 MeV/u, which leads at gold as projectile matter to a beam energy of 2.25 GeV. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. New results on the beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katrik, Peter; Hoffmann, Dieter H.H.; Mustafin, Edil; Strasik, Ivan; Pavlovic, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Activation of high-energy heavy-ion accelerators due to beam losses is a serious issue for accelerator parts like collimators, magnets, beam-lines, fragment separator targets, etc. The beam losses below 1 W/m are considered as tolerable for 'hands-on' maintenance in proton machines. In our previous studies, the FLUKA2008 code has been used for establishing a scaling law expanding the existing beam-loss tolerance for 1 GeV protons to heavy ions. This scaling law enabled specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200 MeV/u up to 1 GeV/u. FLUKA2008 allowed nucleus-nucleus interactions down to 100 MeV/u only. In this work, we review our previous results and extend activation simulations to lower energies with the help of the new FLUKA version, namely FLUKA2011. It includes models for nucleus-nucleus interactions below 100 MeV/u. We also tried to expand the scaling law to lower energies. This, however, needs further studies, because the heavy-ion-induced nuclide composition starts deviating from the proton-induced nuclide composition at energies below 150 MeV/u. (authors)

  10. New beam for the CERN fixed target heavy ion programme

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, C E; O'Neill, M

    2002-01-01

    The physicists of the CERN heavy ion community (SPS fixed target physics) have requested lighter ions than the traditional lead ions, to scale their results and to check their theories. Studies have been carried out to investigate the behaviour of the ECR4 for the production of an indium beam. Stability problems and the low melting point of indium required some modifications to the oven power control system which will also benefit normal lead ion production. Present results of the source behaviour and the ion beam characteristics will be presented.

  11. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82 + 208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  12. Heavy ion fusion experiments at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.; Callahan, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    We review the status of the experimental campaign being carried out at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, involving scaled investigations of the acceleration and transport of space-charge dominated heavy ion beams. The ultimate goal of these experiments is to help lay the groundwork for a larger scale ion driven inertial fusion reactor, the purpose of which is to produce inexpensive and clean electric power

  13. Intense ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense beams of light of heavy ions are being studied as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers for high yield and energy. Heavy and light ions have common interests in beam transport, targets, and alternative accelerators. Self-pinched transport is being jointly studied. This article reviews the development of intense ion beams for ICF. Light-ion drivers are highlighted because they are compact, modular, efficient and low cost. Issues facing light ions are: (1) decreasing beam divergence; (2) increasing beam brightness; and (3) demonstrating self-pinched transport. Applied-B ion diodes are favored because of efficiency, beam brightness, perceived scalability, achievable focal intensity, and multistage capability. A light-ion concept addressing these issues uses: (1) an injector divergence of ≤ 24 mrad at 9 MeV; (2) two-stage acceleration to reduce divergence to ≤ 12 mrad at 35 MeV; and (3) self-pinched transport accepting divergences up to 12 mrad. Substantial progress in ion-driven target physics and repetitive ion diode technology is also presented. Z-pinch drivers are being pursued as the shortest pulsed power path to target physics experiments and high-yield fusion. However, light ions remain the pulsed power ICF driver of choice for high-yield fusion energy applications that require driver standoff and repetitive operation. 100 refs

  14. DNA damage and chromosome aberration induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kahoru; Funada, Aya; Aoki, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human cells (human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells and GM05389 human normal fibroblasts) irradiated with heavy ion beams on the basis of linear energy transfer (LET) values. The LET dependences of cell death were observed for the both cells by the method of colony assay. The LET dependences of the chromosomal aberrations, breaks and gaps, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were also observed for the both cells using the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. From these results it is suggested that exchange formation is essential for the cell death caused by heavy ion beam irradiation. It is suspected that the densely ionizing track structure of hight LET heavy ions inhibits the effective repair in the chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks and finally induce much exchange in the cells, which should be essential cause of cell death. (author)

  15. Beam analysis spectrometer for relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Subramanian, T.S.; McDonald, W.J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Sadoff, A.; Gabor, G.

    1983-01-01

    A versatile spectrometer useful for measuring the mass, charge, energy, fluence and angular distribution of primaries and fragments associated with relativistic heavy ion beams is described. The apparatus is designed to provide accurate physical data for biology experiments and medical therapy planning as a function of depth in tissue. The spectrometer can also be used to measure W, the average energy to produce an ion pair, range-energy, dE/dx, and removal cross section data of interest in nuclear physics. (orig.)

  16. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  17. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  18. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.; Woodruff, K.H.; MacFarland, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    High energy, heavy-ion beams offer superior discrimination of tissue electron densities at very low radiation doses. This characteristic has potential for diagnostic medical imaging of neoplasms arising in the soft tissues and organs because it can detect smaller inhomogeneities than x rays. Heavy-ion imaging may also increase the accuracy of cancer radiotherapy planning involving use of accelerated charged particles. In the current physics research program of passive heavy-ion imaging, critical modulation transfer function tests are being carried out in heavy-ion projection radiography and heavy-ion computerized tomography. The research goal is to improve the heavy-ion imaging method until it reaches the limits of its theoretical resolution defined by range straggling, multiple scattering, and other factors involved in the beam quality characteristics. Clinical uses of the imaging method include the application of heavy-ion computerized tomography to heavy-ion radiotherapy planning, to the study of brain tumors and other structures of the head, and to low-dose heavy-ion projection mammography, particularly for women with dense breasts where other methods of diagnosis fail. The ions used are primarily 300 to 570 MeV/amu carbon and neon ions accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac

  19. Heavy ion beam factory for material science based on the KEK digital accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Ken, E-mail: takayama@post.kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Adachi, Toshikazu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Arai, Teruo; Arakawa, Dai [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Asao, Hiroyuki [NEC Network-Sensor, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8501 (Japan); Barata, Yuji; Harada, Shinya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tokyo City University, Todoroki, Tokyo 158-8586 (Japan); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Iwata, Taiki; Kadokura, Eiichi; Kwakubo, Tadamichi; Kubo, Tomio [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Leo, Kwee Wah [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Liu, Xingguaung [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Mochiki, Koichi [Tokyo City University, Todoroki, Tokyo 158-8586 (Japan); Munemoto, Naoya [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatusda, Yokohama, Knagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okada, Yoshihito [NEC Network-Sensor, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8501 (Japan); Okamura, Katsuya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-01

    The KEK digital accelerator (DA) is an alternative to high-voltage electrostatic accelerators and conventional cyclotrons and synchrotrons, which are commonly used as swift heavy ion beam drivers. Compared with conventional accelerators, KEK-DA is capable of delivering a wider variety of ion species with various energies, as a result of its intrinsic properties. It is expected to serve as a heavy ion beam factory for research in materials science. Plans for its utilization include unique application programs, such as laboratory-based space science using virtual cosmic rays, heavy-ion mutagenesis in microorganisms, deep ion implantation, and modification of materials, which may be categorized into systematic studies of the spatial and temporal evolution of the locally and highly excited states of materials.

  20. Nonuniformity mitigation of beam illumination in heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, S; Noguchi, K; Suzuki, T; Kurosaki, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Zhang, W; Xie, J; Zhang, H; Dai, D

    2014-01-01

    In inertial fusion, a target DT fuel should be compressed to typically 1000 times the solid density. The target implosion nonuniformity is introduced by a driver beam’s illumination nonuniformity, for example. The target implosion should be robust against the implosion nonuniformities. In this paper, the requirement for implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion non-uniformity should be less than a few percent. The implosion dynamics is also briefly reviewed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). Heavy ions deposit their energy inside the target energy absorber, and the energy deposition layer is rather thick, depending on the ion particle energy. Then nonuniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination in HIF are discussed. A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF, wobbling heavy ion beam illumination was also introduced to realize a uniform implosion. The wobbling HIB axis oscillation is precisely controlled. In the wobbling HIBs’ illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space on an HIF target. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may contribute to the reduction of the HIBs’ illumination nonuniformity by its smoothing effect on the HIB illumination nonuniformity and also by a growth mitigation effect on the Rayleigh–Taylor instability. (invited comment)

  1. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson's equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models

  2. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K + beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  3. Beam-transport system for high-resolution heavy-ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, P.; Kashy, E.

    1980-01-01

    A method is given to adjust a beam-transport system to the requirements of high-energy resolution heavy-ion spectroscopy. The results of a test experiment performed on a MP tandem with a 12 C beam are shown. A drastic improvement in energy resolution is obtained for a kinematical factor K=1/p dp/dtheta=0.12 [fr

  4. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.; Remec, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  5. Transport of intense particle beams with application to heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, H.L.; Chambers, F.W.; Lee, E.P.; Yu, S.S.; Briggs, R.J.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    An attractive feature of the high energy (> GeV) heavy ion beam approach to inertial fusion, as compared with other particle beam systems, is the relative simplicity involved in the transport and focusing of energy on the target inside a reactor chamber. While this focusing could be done in vacuum by conventional methods with multiple beams, there are significant advantages in reactor design if one can operate at gas pressures around one torr. In this paper we summarize the results of our studies of heavy ion beam transport in gases. With good enough charge and current neutralization, one could get a ballistically-converging beam envelope down to a few millimeters over a 10 meter path inside the chamber. Problems of beam filamentation place important restrictions on this approach. We also discuss transport in a self-focused mode, where a relatively stable pressure window is predicted similar to the observed window for electron beam transport

  6. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}  W/  cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200  MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration.

  7. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.; Bieniosek, F.; Celata, C.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.; Yu, S.; Barnard, J.; Callahan, D.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.; Lund, S.; Davidson, R.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.

    2005-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy-ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high-energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy-ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high-energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy

  8. Studies on the feasibility of heavy ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This Annual Report summarizes experimental and theoretical investigations carried out in the framework of a feasibility study of inertial confinement fusion by heavy ion beams, funded by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology. After the completion of the conceptual design study HIBALL with an upgraded version, the investigations concentrated in 1984 mainly on problems of accelerator and target physics. In the area of accelerator physics the main interest was in the production and acceleration of high intensity heavy ion beams of high phase space density and in beam dynamics theory, in the area of target physics on beam-target interaction, radiation hydrodynamics, instabilities and the equation of state of highly compressed hot matter. (orig./AH)

  9. Characteristics of bipolar-pulse generator for intense pulsed heavy ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igawa, K.; Tomita, T.; Kitamura, I.; Ito, H.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beams are expected to be applied to the implantation technology for semiconductor materials. In the application it is very important to purify the ion beam. In order to improve the purity of an intense pulsed ion beams we have proposed a new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named 'bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA)'. A prototype of the experimental system has been developed to perform proof of principle experiments of the accelerator. A bipolar pulse generator has been designed for the generation of the pulsed ion beam with the high purity via the bipolar pulse acceleration and the electrical characteristics of the generator were evaluated. The production of the bipolar pulse has been confirmed experimentally. (author)

  10. Dosimetry in heavy ion beams using various detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabcová, Kateřina; Jadrníčková, Iva; Molokanov, A. G.; Spurný, František

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 10 (2010), s. 1384-1386 ISSN 1350-4487. [Neutron and Ion Dosimetry Symposium /11./. Cape Town, 12.10.2009-16.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0171; GA AV ČR IAA100480902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : tack-etched detectors * LET spectra * TLD * heavy ion beams Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.019, year: 2010

  11. Heavy ion beam scanner for 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator, BARC- TIFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, P.; Surendran, P.; Ninave, N.G.; Sparrow, Hillary; Gupta, S.K.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Iyer, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ions from Pelletron accelerator were used for varied purposes, where beam is confined to the target in a small area by focusing. Larger area can be irradiated by defocusing the beam using quadrupoles but the size limitation of the defocused beam as well as Gaussian distribution of the particles in the specified area brings its own drawbacks. Uniform distribution over a large area needs scanning of the beam across the target. This difficulty was experienced during the initial attempts to make track etch membrane filters using heavy ions from Pelletron Accelerator. A beam scanner will fulfill this need effectively. The filters made are presently being used as supported liquid membranes (Slam) in separation sciences where their performance are at par with commercial membranes. These membranes are also being used by DRDO, Jodhpur for medical application. A beam scanner magnet as per our specification was made by Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore

  12. Studies on the feasibility of heavy ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The studies on the ''Feasibility of Heavy Ion Beams for Inertial Confinement'' funded by the German Ministry of Research and Technology have been continued in the same extent as in previous years. This Annual Report summarizes the scientific results of research carried out in the framework of this project at various research laboratories and universities. The principal aims of this research program are the identification and investigation of key issues of the heavy ion ICF concept based on a RF linac driver. Work done in 1983 concentrated on problems of accelerator and target physics: The theoretical investigations on the dynamics of high-intensity beams were continued. For the first time a low frequency RFQ for a high A/q ratio, to be used as a first unit of an injector, was put into operation. Theoretical target studies concentrated more on fundamental physics problems in the ICF targets, and on considerations for the generation of dense plasmas by intense beams of heavy ions. (orig./GG) [de

  13. Pilot production of track etch membranes (TEMS) using heavy ion beam scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, J.P.; Surendran, P.; Sparrow, Hillary; Ninawe, N.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Acharya, N.; Kulshreshta, V.; Rajesh Kumar; Vijay, Y.K.; Kurup, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Various methods for making TEMs were conducted at Pelletron Accelerator Facility. The technique for production using ion beam scattering was also established. This is an effort to make TEMs on pilot basis at BARC- TIFR Pelletron Accelerator using Heavy Ion Beam Scanner till large rolling mechanism is implemented

  14. Heavy ion medical accelerator, HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Satoru

    1993-01-01

    The heavy ion beam is undoutedly suitable for the cancer treatment. The supriority of the heavy ions over the conventional radiations including protons and neutrons comes mainly from physical characteristics of a heavy particle with multiple charges. A straggling angle due to a multiple Coulomb scattering process in a human body is small for heavy ions, and the small scattering angle results in a good dose localization in a transverse direction. An ionization ratio of the heavy ion beam makes a very sharp peak at the ends of their range. The height of the peak is higher for the heavier ions and shows excellent biomedical effects around Ne ions. In order to apply heavy ion beams to cancer treatment, Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has been constructed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The accelerator complex consists of two ion sources, two successive linac tanks, a pair of synchrotron rings, a beam transport system and an irradiation system. An operation frequency is 100 MHz for two linacs, and the ion energy is 6.0 MeV/u at the output end of the linac. The other four experimental rooms are prepared for basic experiments. The synchrotron accelerates ions up to 800 MeV/u for a charge to mass ratio of 1/2. The long beam transport line provides two vertical beams in addition with two horizontal beams for the treatment. The three treatment rooms are prepared one of which is equipped with both horizontal and vertical beam lines. The whole facility will be open for all scientists who have interests in the heavy ion science as well as the biophysics. The conceptual design study of HIMAC started in 1984, and the construction of the accelerator complex was begun in March 1988. The beam acceleration tests of the injector system was successfully completed in March of this year, and tests of the whole system will be finished throughout this fyscal year. (author)

  15. The steering and manipulation of ion beams for low-energy heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beanland, D.G.; Freeman, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Both electrostatic and magnetic fields are used in low-energy accelerators. Electrostatic fields are essential in the acceleration stages and they are commonly used for ion beam scanning and focussing. Magnetic fields are only infrequently used as lenses, but they are essential for mass analysis and are sometimes employed for beam steering. The electrostatic mirror is a versatile and compact lens which has hitherto received little attention for the controlled manipulation of heavy ions. In addition to energy analysis it can be used to steer, focus and scan such beams and its flexibility and usefulness can be further increased by shaping the electrostatic field in the mirror space. The use of a computer programme to model the focussing behaviour of a variety of lens shapes is described and it is shown that the focal properties of the mirror can be controlled to produce a parallel, convergent or divergent output beam. The use of mirrors for two-dimensional beam focusing is also outlined. To permit the use of the mirror system with heavy ions an apertured front plate, without field-defining gauzes, was utilized. In consequence an additional electrode was incorporated in the lens structure to prevent penetration of the positive electric field along the beam axes outside the mirror space. This factor and the compact design of the mirror, contributed to the minimisation of space-charge defocussing effects which normally militate against the use of such electrostatic lenses with high intensity ion beams. The results of experiments confirming the computer predictions are briefly described and, in conclusion some possible applications of electrostatic mirrors in electromagnetic isotope separators and low energy accelerators are outlined. (Auth.)

  16. Cell survival in spheroids irradiated with heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Biological investigations with accelerated heavy ions have been carried out regularly at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac for the past four years. Most of the cellular investigations have been conducted on cell monolayer and suspension culture systems. The studies to date suggest that heavy charged particle beams may offer some radiotherapeutic advantages over conventional radiotherapy sources. The advantages are thought to lie primarily in an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and better tissue distribution dose. Experiments reported here were conducted with 400 MeV/amu carbon ions and 425 MeV/amu neon ions, using a rat brain gliosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids. Studies have been carried out with x-rays and high-energy carbon and neon ion beams. These studies evaluate high-LET (linear energy transfer) cell survival in terms of RBE and the possible contributions of intercellular communication. Comparisons were made of the post-irradiation survival characteristics for cells irradiated as multicellular spheroids (approximately 100 μm and 300 μm diameters) and for cells irradiated in suspension. These comparisons were made between 225-kVp x-rays, 400 MeV/amu carbon ions, and 425 MeV/amu neon ions

  17. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams. Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    Research activities presented in this annual report were carried out in 1987 in the framework of the government-funded program 'High Energy Density in Matter Produced by Heavy Ion Beams'. It addresses fundamental problems of the generation and investigation of hot dense matter. Its initial motivation and its ultimate goal is the question whether inertial confinement can be achieved by intense heavy ion beams. The new accelerator facility SIS/ESR now under construction at GSI will provide an excellent potential for research in this field. The construction work at the new validity is on schedule. The building construction is near completion and the SIS accelerator will have its first beam at the beginning of next year. First experiments at lower intensity will start in summer 1989 and the full program will run after the cooler and storage ring ESR has got operational. Accordingly, the planning and the preparation of the high energy density experiments at this unique facility was an essential part of the activities last year. In this funding period emphasis was given to the experimental activities at the existing accelerator. In addition to a number of accelerator-oriented and instrumental developments, an experiment on beam-plasma interaction had first exciting results, a significant increase of the stopping power for heavy ions in plasma was measured. Other important activities were the investigation of dielectronic recombination of highly charged ions, spectroscopic investigations aiming at the pumping of short wavelength lasers by heavy ion beams and a crossed beam experiment for the determination of Bi + + Bi + ionization cross sections. As in previous years theoretical work an space-charge dominated beam dynamics as well as on hydrodynamics of dense plasmas, radiation transport and beam plasma interaction was continued, thus providing a basis for the future experiments. (orig.)

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on atomic physics with fast heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, E.P.; Minchinton, A.

    1983-01-01

    The Workshop on Atomic Physics with Fast Heavy-Ion Beams was held in the Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory on January 20 and 21, 1983. The meeting brought together approx. 50 practitioners in the field of accelerator-based atomic physics. The workshop was held to focus attention on possible areas of atomic physics research which would benefit from use of the newest generation of accelerators designed to produce intense high-quality beams of fast heavy ions. Abstracts of individual paper were prepared separately for the data base

  19. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Alex, E-mail: af@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion Science (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, each of which has a unique arrival time and may have a unique kinetic energy. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of “main-pulse” beams relative to “foot-pulse” beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying “differential acceleration” to individual beams or sets of beams at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams “sooner” and others “later,” it is possible to simplify the beam line configuration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use differential acceleration to effect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams (e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model configurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.

  20. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, each of which has a unique arrival time and may have a unique kinetic energy. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of “main-pulse” beams relative to “foot-pulse” beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying “differential acceleration” to individual beams or sets of beams at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams “sooner” and others “later,” it is possible to simplify the beam line configuration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use differential acceleration to effect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams (e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model configurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy

  1. Heavy ion fusion targets; issues for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, Roger O.

    2014-01-01

    During the last 36 years researchers have suggested and evaluated a large number of target designs for heavy ion inertial fusion. The different target designs can be classified according to their mode of ignition, their method of implosion, and their size. Ignition modes include hot-spot ignition and fast ignition. Methods of implosion include direct drive and indirect drive. Historically there has been significant work on indirectly driven targets with hot-spot ignition. Recently there has been increasing interest in directly driven targets with ion driven fast ignition. In principle, fast ignition might lead to improved target performance. On the other hand, fast ignition imposes stringent requirements on accelerators and beam physics. Furthermore, fast ignition magnifies the importance of a number of traditional target physics issues associated with ion beam energy deposition and fuel preheat. This paper will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various classes of targets. It will also discuss some issues that must be resolved to assess the feasibility of ion fast ignition

  2. Filamentation of a converging heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Buchanan, H.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A major concern in the use of heavy ion beams as igniters in pellet fusion systems is the vulnerability of the beam to the transverse flamentation instability. The undesirable consequence of this mode is the transverse heating of the beam to the extent that convergence on the pellet becomes impossible. This work considers the case of a beam injected into a gas filled reactor vessel, where finite pulse length and propagation distance play an important role in limiting growth. Two geometries are analyzed: a nonconverging case where the radius at injection is nearly equal to the desired radius at the pellet, and a converging case in which the injection radius is large and the beam is pre-focused to converge at the target. It is found that a cold beam will be severely disrupted if the product of the magnetic plasma frequency and the propagation distance is much larger than unity

  3. Ion sources for induction linac driven heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.W.

    1993-08-01

    The use of ion sources in induction linacs for heavy ion fusion is fundamentally different from their use in the rf linac-storage rings approach. Induction linacs require very high current, short pulse extraction usually with large apertures which are dictated by the injector design. One is faced with the problem of extracting beams in a pulsed fashion while maintaining high beam quality during the pulse (low-emittance). Four types of sources have been studied for this application. The vacuum arc and the rf cusp field source are the plasma types and the porous plug and hot alumino-silicate surface source are the thermal types. The hot alumino-silicate potassium source has proved to be the best candidate for the next generation of scaled experiments. The porous plug for potassium is somewhat more difficult to use. The vacuum arc suffers from noise and lifetime problems and the rf cusp field source is difficult to use with very short pulses. Operational experience with all of these types of sources is presented

  4. Ion sources for induction linac driven heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.W.

    1994-01-01

    The use of ion sources in induction linacs for heavy ion fusion is fundamentally different from their use in the rf linac-storage rings approach. Induction linacs require very high current, short pulse extraction usually with large apertures which are dictated by the injector design. One is faced with the problem of extracting beams in a pulsed fashion while maintaining high beam quality during the pulse (low emittance). Four types of sources have been studied for this application. The vacuum arc and the rf cusp field source are the plasma-types and the porous plug and hot alumino--silicate surface source are the thermal types. The hot alumino--silicate potassium source has proved to be the best candidate for the next generation of scaled experiments. The porous plug for potassium is somewhat more difficult to use. The vacuum arc suffers from noise and lifetime problems and the rf cusp field source is difficult to use with very short pulses. Operational experience with all of these types of sources is presented

  5. Ion-beam synthesis and photoluminescence of SiC nanocrystals assisted by MeV-heavy-ion-beam annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamsuwan, J.; Intarasiri, S.; Kirkby, K.; Chu, P.K.; Singkarat, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    This work explored a novel way to synthesize silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals for photoluminescence. Carbon ions at 90 keV were implanted in single crystalline silicon wafers at elevated temperature, followed by irradiation using xenon ion beams at an energy of 4 MeV with two low fluences of 5 × 10 13 and 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 at elevated temperatures for annealing. X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the formation of nanocrystalline SiC. Photoluminescence was measured from the samples. The results demonstrated that MeV-heavy-ion-beam annealing could indeed induce crystallization of SiC nanocrystals and enhance emission of photoluminescence with violet bands dominance due to the quantum confinement effect.

  6. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  7. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained

  8. Proceedings of the RCNP cascade project workshop 'heavy ion secondary beam course'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    In the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, as one of the experimental facilities utilizing the heavy ion beam from the ring cyclotron, the construction of the heavy ion secondary beam course has been in progress. This course can supply the unstable nuclei produced by a heavy ion reaction as a secondary beam, and is expected to become the powerful experimental facility for elucidating the condition of atomic nuclei in the extreme condition and their reaction mode. At present, the arrangement is advanced aiming at the utilization from the end of fiscal year 1991. Toward the start of joint utilization experiment, in order to examine the expected physics, concrete experimental plan and the preparation plan accompanying them, the workshop including the introduction of the course was held. On December 15, 1990, the workshop with the theme on the nuclear reaction by unstable nucleus beam was held, and on January 26, 1991, that with the theme on the spectroscopy of unstable nuclei was held. In each meeting, there were more than 20 participants. In this report, the gists of 18 papers are collected. (K.I.)

  9. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Aseev, V.N.; Lessner, E.S.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-01-01

    A low beam-loss budget is an essential requirement for high-intensity machines and represents one of their major design challenges. In a high-intensity heavy-ion machine, losses are required to be below 1 W/m for hands-on-maintenance. The driver linac of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is designed to accelerate beams of any ion to energies from 400 MeV per nucleon for uranium up to 950 MeV for protons with a beam power of up to 400 kW. The high intensity of the heaviest ions is achieved by acceleration of multiple-charge-state beams, which requires a careful beam dynamics optimization to minimize effective emittance growth and beam halo formation. For beam loss simulation purposes, large number of particles must be tracked through the linac. Therefore the computer code TRACK has been parallelized and calculations are being performed on the JAZZ cluster recently inaugurated at ANL. This paper discusses how this powerful tool is being used for simulations for the RIA project to help decide on the high-performance and cost-effective design of the driver linac

  10. Overview of U.S. heavy ion fusion progress and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.; Bieniosek, F.; Celata, C.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.; Yu, S.; Barnard, J.; Callahan, D.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.; Lund, S.; Davidson, R.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.

    2004-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy

  11. Energy loss of heavy ion beams in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, T; Hotta, T [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1997-12-31

    The energy loss of heavy-ion beams (HIB) is studied by means of Vlasov theory and Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations in a plasma. The interaction of HIB with a plasma is of central importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A number of studies on the HIB interaction with target plasma have been published. It is important for heavy-ion stopping that the effects of the non-linear interaction of HIB within the Vlasov theory are included. Reported are results of a numerical study of nonlinear effects to the stopping power for HIB in plasma. It is shown that the PIC simulations of collective effects of the stopping power are in a good agreement with the Vlasov theory. (author). 2 tabs., 1 fig., 5 refs.

  12. Studies on the production of high energy density in matter with intense heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the framework of the present thesis the interaction of an intense heavy-ion beam with a small, but macroscopic, amount of matter is studied. Thereby high energy densities are produced in the target matter. For this experiment it was for the first time possible to heat matter with ion beams from conventional heavy-ion accelerators up to plasma conditions. A Kr + ion beam was first accelerated with the heavy-ion accelerator MAXILAC to 45 keV/u and then focused by a fine-focusing lens on a closed xenon gas target. The light emitted from the target was space- and time-resolved taken up with a spectrometer as well a streak and CCD camera. Thereby the radial development of the plasma and the penetration behaviour of the ion beam were consecuted. The free-electron density of the plasma was determined from the Stark-broadening of emission lines (n e ≅ 4x10 16 cm -3 ). The electron temperature amounted in the center of the pipelet kT ≅ 0.75 eV. (orig./HSI) [de

  13. Scaling of heavy ion beam probes for reactor-size devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.; Jennings, W.C.; Connor, K.A.; Schoch, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy ion beam probes for reactor-size plasma devices will require beam energies of approximately 10 MeV. Although accelerator technology appears to be available, beam deflection systems and parallel plate energy analyzers present severe difficulties if existing technology is scaled in a straightforward manner. We propose a different operating mode which will use a fixed beam trajectory and multiple cylindrical energy analyzers. Development effort will still be necessary, but we believe the basic technology is available

  14. Time of Flight based diagnostics for high energy laser driven ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, V.; Milluzzo, G.; Alejo, A.; Amico, A. G.; Booth, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Doria, D.; Green, J.; Kar, S.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Margarone, D.; McKenna, P.; Padda, H.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Romagnani, L.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Borghesi, M.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays the innovative high power laser-based ion acceleration technique is one of the most interesting challenges in particle acceleration field, showing attractive characteristics for future multidisciplinary applications, including medical ones. Nevertheless, peculiarities of optically accelerated ion beams make mandatory the development of proper transport, selection and diagnostics devices in order to deliver stable and controlled ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. This is the main purpose of the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration) beamline that will be realized and installed within 2018 at the ELI-Beamlines research center in the Czech Republic, where laser driven high energy ions, up to 60 MeV/n, will be available for users. In particular, a crucial role will be played by the on-line diagnostics system, recently developed in collaboration with INFN-LNS (Italy), consisting of TOF detectors, placed along the beamline (at different detection distances) to provide online monitoring of key characteristics of delivered beams, such as energy, fluence and ion species. In this contribution an overview on the ELIMAIA available ion diagnostics will be briefly given along with the preliminary results obtained during a test performed with high energy laser-driven proton beams accelerated at the VULCAN PW-laser available at RAL facility (U.K.).

  15. Time of Flight based diagnostics for high energy laser driven ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuderi, V.; Margarone, D.; Schillaci, F.; Milluzzo, G.; Amico, A.G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Romano, F.; Alejo, A.; Doria, D.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Booth, N.; Green, J.; McKenna, P.; Padda, H.; Romagnani, L.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the innovative high power laser-based ion acceleration technique is one of the most interesting challenges in particle acceleration field, showing attractive characteristics for future multidisciplinary applications, including medical ones. Nevertheless, peculiarities of optically accelerated ion beams make mandatory the development of proper transport, selection and diagnostics devices in order to deliver stable and controlled ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. This is the main purpose of the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration) beamline that will be realized and installed within 2018 at the ELI-Beamlines research center in the Czech Republic, where laser driven high energy ions, up to 60 MeV/n, will be available for users. In particular, a crucial role will be played by the on-line diagnostics system, recently developed in collaboration with INFN-LNS (Italy), consisting of TOF detectors, placed along the beamline (at different detection distances) to provide online monitoring of key characteristics of delivered beams, such as energy, fluence and ion species. In this contribution an overview on the ELIMAIA available ion diagnostics will be briefly given along with the preliminary results obtained during a test performed with high energy laser-driven proton beams accelerated at the VULCAN PW-laser available at RAL facility (U.K.).

  16. Studies of heavy ion beam transport in a magnetic quadrupole channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klabunde, J.; Reiser, M.; Schonlein, A.; Spadtke, P.; Struckmeier, J.

    1983-01-01

    In connection with the West German Heavy Ion Fusion Program the first stage (six periods) of a magnetic quadrupole channel (FODO type) to study the transport of intense ion beams was built at GSI. Different ion beams can be used and the variation of the brightness of these beams (hence of the tune depression sigma/sigma /SUB o/ ) is sufficiently large that regions of theoretically predicted instabilities can be covered. The initial studies are being carried out with a high-brightness beam of 190 keV Ar+ ions and currents of a few mA. Since the pulse length is > 0.5 ms and the pressure is between 10 -6 and 10 -7 torr partial space charge neutralization occurs. Clearing electrodes can be used to remove the electrons from the beam. Results of theoretical studies, measurements of charge neutralization effects and first results of transport experiments are reported

  17. Consideration of fluctuation in secondary beam intensity of heavy ion beam probe measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.; Lee, S.; Hamada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Heavy ion beam probes have capability to detect local electron density fluctuation in the interior of plasmas through the detected beam intensity fluctuation. However, the intensity fluctuation should suffer a certain degree of distortion from electron density and temperature fluctuations on the beam orbits, and as a result the signal can be quite different from the local density fluctuation. This paper will present a condition that the intensity fluctuation can be regarded as being purely local electron density fluctuation, together with discussion about the contamination of the fluctuation along the beam orbits to the beam intensity fluctuation. (author)

  18. Heavy ion beams from an Alphatross source for use in calibration and testing of diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. J.; Brown, G. M.; Ho, D.; Stockler, B. F. O. F.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Ion beams from the 1.7 MV Pelletron Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo have been used to test and calibrate many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) diagnostics and high energy density physics (HEDP) diagnostics used at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The ion source on this accelerator, a radio-frequency (RF) alkali-metal charge exchange source called an Alphatross, is designed to produce beams of hydrogen and helium isotopes. There is interest in accelerating beams of carbon, oxygen, argon, and other heavy ions for use in testing several diagnostics, including the Time Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup (TRTF). The feasibility of generating these heavy ion beams using the Alphatross source will be reported. Small amounts of various gases are mixed into the helium plasma in the ion source bottle. A velocity selector is used to allow the desired ions to pass into the accelerator. As the heavy ions pass through the stripper canal of the accelerator, they emerge in a variety of charge states. The energy of the ion beam at the high-energy end of the accelerator will vary as a function of the charge state, however the maximum energy deliverable to target is limited by the maximum achievable magnetic field produced by the accelerator's steering magnet. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. Experimental study of the transport limits of intense heavy ion beams in the HCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prost, L.R.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Dugan, C.C.; Faltens, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Haber, I.

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high space-charge intensity (line charge density up to ∼ 0.2 (micro)C/m) over long pulse durations (4 (micro)s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. The experiment also contributes to the practical baseline knowledge of intense beam manipulations necessary for the design, construction and operation of a heavy ion driver for inertial fusion. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and beam steering, matching, image charges, halo, electron cloud effects, and longitudinal bunch control. We first present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K + ion beam transported through the first ten electrostatic transport quadrupoles, measured with optical beam-imaging and double-slit phase-space diagnostics. This includes studies at two different radial fill factors (60% and 80%), for which the beam transverse distribution was characterized in detail. Additionally, beam energy measurements will be shown. We then discuss the first results of beam transport through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles (located downstream of the electrostatic quadrupoles), where the beam dynamics become more sensitive to the presence of secondary electrons

  20. RF plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon S.; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-01-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being used as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus the ion beam to a small spot size. A radio frequency (RF) plasma source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The goal is to operate the source at pressures ∼ 10 -5 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10 -4 -10 -1 Torr and electron densities in the range of 10 8 -10 11 cm -3 . Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10 -6 Torr range with densities of 10 11 cm -3 . Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with the NTX facility and experiments have begun

  1. Identifying heavy-ion-beam fusion design and system features with high economic leverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    We have conducted parametric economic studies for heavy-ion-beam fusion electric power plants. We examined the effects on the cost of electricity of several design parameters: maximum achievable chamber pulse rate, driver cost, target gain, and electric conversion efficiency, and net electric power. We found with reasonable assumptions on driver cost, target gain, and electric conversion efficiency, a 2 to 3 GWe heavy-ion-beam fusion power plant, with a chamber pulse rate of 5 to 10 Hz, can be competitive with nuclear and coal power plants

  2. The heavy ion fusion research program in West Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study on the feasibility of heavy ion beam for inertial confinement fusion was started four years ago, setting the main goal to identify and investigate the key issues of heavy ion fusion concept. The fund for this program has been provided by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. In this paper, the outline of the present research is shown, and some recent achievement is summarized. Moreover, the idea about the goal and the new direction of the future program are discussed. In the present program, two activities are distinguished, that is, the expermental and theoretical studies on accelerators, target physics and atomic physics, and the conceptual design study for a heavy ion-driven power plant. A RF linac with storage rings was chosen as the driver concept. In the accelerator research, ion source studies, RFQ development and beam transport measurement have been considered. Two beam transport experiments were carried out. In the conceptual design study, the HIBALL driver concept, the reactor chamber having the first wall protection using Pb-Li eutectic and so on have been studied. An accelerator facility of modest size has been suggested for basic accelerator physics studies. (Kako, I.)

  3. Illumination non-uniformity of spirally wobbling beam in heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Noguchi, K.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A.I.

    2016-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, the driver beam illumination non-uniformity leads a degradation of fusion energy output. The illumination non-uniformity allowed is less than a few percent in inertial fusion target implosion. Heavy ion beam (HIB) accelerator provides a capability to oscillate a beam axis with a high frequency. The wobbling beams may provide a new method to reduce or smooth the beam illumination non-uniformity. In this paper the HIBs wobbling illumination scheme was optimized. (paper)

  4. Simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating through a gaseous fusion target chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Oliver, B.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Clark, R.E.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.

    2002-01-01

    In heavy-ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF), an ion beam is transported several meters through the reactor chamber to the target. This standoff distance mitigates damage to the accelerator from the target explosion. For the high perveance beams and millimeter-scale targets under consideration, the transport method is largely determined by the degree of ion charge and current neutralization in the chamber. This neutralization becomes increasingly difficult as the beam interacts with the ambient chamber environment and strips to higher charge states. Nearly complete neutralization permits neutralized-ballistic transport (main-line HIF transport method), where the ion beam enters the chamber at roughly 3-cm radius and focuses onto the target. In the backup pinched-transport schemes, the beam is first focused outside the chamber before propagating at small radius to the target. With nearly complete charge neutralization, the large beam divergence is contained by a strong magnetic field resulting from roughly 50-kA net current. In assisted-pinched transport, a preformed discharge channel provides the net current and the discharge plasma provides nearly complete charge and current neutralization of the beam. In self-pinched transport, the residual net current results solely from the beam-driven breakdown of the ambient gas. Using hybrid particle-in-cell simulation codes, the behavior of HIF driver-scale beams in these three transport modes is examined. Simulations of neutralized ballistic transport, at a few-mTorr flibe pressure, show excellent neutralization given a preformed or photoionized (from the heated target) plasma. Two- and three-dimensional simulations of assisted-pinch transport in roughly 1-Torr Xe show the importance of attaining >1-μs magnetic diffusion time to limit self-field effects and achieve good transport efficiency. For Xe gas pressures ranging from 10-150 mTorr, calculations predict a robust self-magnetic force sufficient for self

  5. An induction Linac driven heavy-ion fusion systems model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuckerman, D.S.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Waganer, L.M.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized systems model of a heavy-ion fusion (HIF) reactor power plant is presented. The model can be used to analyze the behavior and projected costs of a commercial power plant using an induction linear accelerator (Linac) as a driver. Each major component of the model (targets, reactor cavity, Linac, beam transport, power flow, balance of plant, and costing) is discussed. Various target, reactor cavity, Linac, and beam transport schemes are examined and compared. The preferred operating regime for such a power plant is also examined. The results show that HIF power plants can compete with other advanced energy concepts at the 1000-MW (electric) power level [cost of electricity (COE) -- 50 mill/kW . h] provided that the cost savings predicted for Linacs using higher charge-state ions (+3) can be realized

  6. Dynamics of beam-driven Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves including electrostatic decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, B.; Willes, A.J.; Robinson, P.A.; Cairns, I.H.

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of Langmuir waves and ion-acoustic waves stimulated by a hot electron beam in an initially homogeneous plasma is investigated numerically in time, position, and wave number space. Quasilinear interactions between the beam particles and Langmuir waves, nonlinear interactions between the Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves through Langmuir decay processes, and spontaneous emission are taken into account in the kinetic theory employed. For illustrative parameters of those in the solar wind near 1 a.u., nonlinear Langmuir decays are observed to transfer the beam-driven Langmuir waves rapidly out of resonance. The scattered Langmuir waves then undergo further decays, moving sequentially toward small wave numbers, until decay is kinematically prohibited. The main features of the evolution of Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves are spatially inhomogeneous. The scattered Langmuir spectra increase and eventually reach or exceed the beam-driven Langmuir spectra at a given spatial location (except in regions where further decays proceed). The ion-acoustic waves are relatively weak and subject to damping at the later stages of their evolution. The development of fine structures in the product Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves are observed, due to depletion of their energy by decay and dominant damping effects, respectively. The propagation of the beam is essentially unaffected by the operation of the decay process. The decay process is thus slaved to the primary beam-plasma evolution, as assumed in previous studies. A variation of the ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature is found to affect not only the ion-acoustic wave levels through effects on the damping rate, but also the dynamics of decay via effects on the decay rate. The latter was not addressed in previous studies. Furthermore, spontaneous emission of ion-acoustic waves is found to affect the dynamics of decay, thus its inclusion is necessary to correctly model the Langmuir and ion-acoustic spectra

  7. Radioactive ion beam production challenges at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigs, M.J.; Alton, G.D.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Tatum, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive ion beam (RIB) project at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) will provide for reconfiguration of the HHIRF accelerator system to enable provision of low-intensity RIBs for nuclear and astrophysics research. As we have progressed with the design of the reconfiguration, we have encountered several challenges that were not immediately obvious when first contemplating the project. The challenges do not seem insurmountable but should keep life interesting for those of us doing the work. A brief review of the project will allow a better understanding of the challenges in RIB production. Radioactive ion beams will be produced with the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) postacceleration technique. In particular, radioactive atoms will be produced by reactions in the thick stopping target of an ISOL-type target-ion source assembly using intense beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron equipped with a light-ion internal source. This ISOL target-ion source assembly will be mounted on a high-voltage platform with a mass separator. The target ion source will operate at potentials up to 50 kV with respect to the high voltage platform. The radioactive atoms produced by nuclear reactions in the target diffuse to the surface of the heated target material, desorb from this surface, and effuse through a heated transfer tube into an ion source where ionization and extraction take place. Two types of ion sources will be initially considered. A Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge source, similar to those used by the ISOLDE facility at CERN and by the UNISOR facility at ORNL, will be built to produce positive ions. These positive ions will be focused through an alkali vapor charge-exchange canal to produce negative ions for tandem injection. In addition, a direct negative surface ionization addition or modification to the above source will be built and investigated

  8. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Toshio, E-mail: seki@sakura.nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Aoki, Takaaki [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Life Science, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto Univ., Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsuo, Jiro [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi{sub 3}-keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi{sub 3} ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis.

  9. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Toshio; Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishihara, Akihiko; Matsuo, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi 3 -keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi 3 ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis

  10. Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam diode using gas puff plasma gun as ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Higashiyama, M.; Takata, S.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun has been developed in order to generate a high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam for the implantation process of semiconductors and the surface modification of materials. The nitrogen plasma produced by the plasma gun is injected into the acceleration gap of the diode with the external magnetic field system. The ion diode is operated at diode voltage approx. =200 kV, diode current approx. =2 kA and pulse duration approx. =150 ns. A new acceleration gap configuration for focusing ion beam has been designed in order to enhance the ion current density. The experimental results show that the ion current density is enhanced by a factor of 2 and the ion beam has the ion current density of 27 A/cm 2 . In addition, the coaxial type Marx generator with voltage 200 kV and current 15 kA has been developed and installed in the focus type ion diode. The ion beam of ion current density approx. =54 A/cm 2 is obtained. To produce metallic ion beams, an ion source by aluminum wire discharge has been developed and the aluminum plasma of ion current density ∼70 A/cm 2 is measured. (author)

  11. Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams -- prioritized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.; Davidson, R.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Kaganovich, I.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Qin, H.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Vay, J-L.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    This study group was initiated to consider whether there were any 'show-stopper' issues with accelerators for heavy-ion warm-dense matter (WDM) and heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF), and to prioritize them. Showstopper issues appear to be categorized as limits to beam current; that is, the beam is expected to be well-behaved below the current limit, and significantly degraded in current or emittance if the current limit is exceeded at some region of an accelerator. We identified 14 issues: 1-6 could be addressed in the near term, 7-10 may provide attractive solutions to performance and cost issues, 11-12 address multibeam effects that cannot be more than partially studied in near-term facilities, and 13-14 address new issues that are present in some novel driver concepts. Comparing the issues with the new experimental, simulation, and theoretical tools that we have developed, it is apparent that our new capabilities provide an opportunity to reexamine and significantly increase our understanding of the number one issue--halo growth and mitigation

  12. Heavy ion beam probe diagnostic system for ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevali, A.; Misium, J.; Lewis, J.F.; Connor, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The potential structure in non-axisymmetric toroidal confinement devices is largely responsible for the particle drift surfaces. A heavy ion beam probe diagnostic, which can directly determine the potential, is thus planned for ATF. The most significant device characteristics affecting the implementation of such a system on this complex magnetic geometry that were not encountered on tokamaks are the large toroidal separation (15 degrees) of vertical and horizontal ports and substantial magnetic return fields in the region of the ion optics and energy analyzer electric fields. The status of the design is presented with particular emphasis on the choice of energy analyzer required by the large dispersion in ion trajectories produced by this field

  13. Detector issues for relativistic heavy ion experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, H.

    1986-04-01

    Several aspects of experiments using relativistic heavy ion beams are discussed. The problems that the current generation of light ion experiments would face in using gold beams are noted. A brief review of colliding beam experiments for heavy ion beams is contrasted with requirements for SSC detectors. 11 refs., 13 figs

  14. Structure and dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied with the electron beam ion trap in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Hu, Zhimin; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J.; Tong Xiaomin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the structure and the dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied through dielectronic recombination (DR) observations performed with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap. By measuring the energy dependence of the ion abundance ratio in the trap at equilibrium, we have observed DR processes for open shell systems very clearly. Remarkable relativistic effects due to the generalized Breit interaction have been clearly shown in DR for highly charged heavy ions. We also present the first result for the coincidence measurement of two photons emitted from a single DR event.

  15. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-01-01

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm2 and with atomic fraction >90 percent was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D+ beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create ∼ 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. We observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations

  16. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-01-01

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm 2 and with atomic fraction > 90% was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D + beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create ∼ 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. They observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations

  17. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H{sup −} current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  18. The e+, e- background at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) generated by beam crossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoades-Brown, M.J.; Ludlam, T.; Wu, J.; Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.

    1990-01-01

    At the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), fully stripped heavy ions will circulate in each of two rings up to beam energies of 250 (Z/A) GeV/u. During the beam crossing, the peripheral electromagnetic interaction between the heavy ions is sufficient to induce copious production of di-lepton pairs. These pairs are a potential source of background for the detectors at RHIC. In this paper we discuss the expected number of e + ,e - pairs, given the accepted initial luminosity value L of the collider. More importantly, we also calculate the differential cross sections for the angle, energy, rapidity and momentum distribution of the leptons. Using the luminosity L of the collider, these differential cross sections are normalized to the expected number of leptons per second. We restrict ourselves to e + ,e - production, a discussion of μ + ,μ - and τ + τ - distributions will be published later. The results are presented for the expected worst case, namely 197 Au 79+ ions at a beam kinetic energy of 100 GeV/u. This is forseen to be the heaviest ion for high luminosity experiments at RHIC. We note for a given energy, the cross section for e + ,e - production scales as Z 4 , where Z is the atomic number of the ions

  19. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  20. Exploring the QCD Phase Structure with Beam Energy Scan in Heavy-ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xfluo@mail.ccnu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Beam energy scan programs in heavy-ion collisions aim to explore the QCD phase structure at high baryon density. Sensitive observables are applied to probe the signatures of the QCD phase transition and critical point in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and SPS. Intriguing structures, such as dip, peak and oscillation, have been observed in the energy dependence of various observables. In this paper, an overview is given and corresponding physics implications will be discussed for the experimental highlights from the beam energy scan programs at the STAR, PHENIX and NA61/SHINE experiments. Furthermore, the beam energy scan phase II at RHIC (2019–2020) and other future experimental facilities for studying the physics at low energies will be also discussed.

  1. Drift Compression and Final Focus for Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Non-periodic, Time-dependent Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Qin; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-01

    In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a non-periodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the sam e focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

  2. Beam instrumentation for the BNL Heavy Ion Transfer Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkover, R.L.; Buxton, W.; Castillo, V.; Feigenbaum, I.; Lazos, A.; Li, Z.G.; Smith, G.; Stoehr, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Transfer Line (HITL) was constructed to transport beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff (TVDG) to be injected into the AGS. Because the beam line is approximately 2000 feet long and the particle rigidity is so low, 20 beam monitor boxes were placed along the line. The intensity ranges from 1 to 100 nanoAmps for the dc trace beam used for line set-up, to over 100 μA for the pulsed beam to be injected into the AGS. Profiles are measured using multiwire arrays (HARPS) while Faraday cups and beam transformers monitor the intensity. The electronics stations are operated through 3 Instrumentation Controllers networked to Apollo workstations in the TVDG and AGS control rooms. Details of the detectors and electronics designs and performance will be given

  3. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo; Bae, Chang-Hyu; Ozaki, Takuo

    2000-01-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M 1 seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M 3 progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to 14 N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M 1 progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M 1 seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  4. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Friedman, A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the research status in the following areas of research in the field of heavy ion inertial fusion: (1) RF accelerators, storage rings, and synchrotrons; (2) induction linacs; (3) recirculation induction accelerator approach; (4) a new accelerator concept, the ''Mirrortron''; (5) general issues of transport, including beam merging, production of short, fat quadrupoles with nearly linear focusing, calculations of beam behaviour in image fields; 3-D electrostatic codes on drift compression with misalignments and transport around bends; (6) injectors, ion sources and RFQs, a.o., on the development of a 27 MHz RFQ to be used for the low energy portion of a new injector for all ions up to Uranium, and the development of a 2 MV carbon ion injector to provide 16 C + beams of 0.5 A each for ILSE; (7) beam transport from accelerator to target, reporting, a.o., the feasibility to suppress third-order aberrations; while Particle-in-Cell simulations on the propagation of a non-neutral ion beam in a low density gas identified photo-ionization by thermal X-rays from the target as an important source of defocusing; (9) heavy ion target studies; (10) reviewing experience with laser drivers; (11) ion cluster stopping and muon catalyzed fusion; (12) heavy ion systems, including the option of a fusion-fission burner. 1 tab

  5. Interaction of heavy ions beams with hot and dense plasmas. Application to inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Gilles

    1987-01-01

    The subject of this work is the variation with time, on one of the energy and charge state of an heavy ion beam which through a plasma, and on another side, of a target used in ion inertial confinement fusion. We take in account projectile excitation, and higher order corrections to the Born stopping power formula are calculated. Comparison with experimental results in gas and solid are good. In hot plasma case, non-equilibrium charge states are described. We present an hydrodynamic simulation code of one dimension and three temperatures. We show that the shortening of the heavy ions beams with temperature reinforces the radiative transfer importance. (author) [fr

  6. Acceleration systems for heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.

    1977-01-01

    Heavy-ion beam pulse parameters needed to achieve useful electric power generation through inertial confinement fusion have been set forth. For successful ignition of a high-gain D-T target a few magajoules of energy per pulse, delivered at a peak power of several hundred terawatts, are needed; it must be deposited with an energy density of 20 to 30 magajoules per gram of the target material on which it impinges. Additional requirements must be met if this form of fusion is to be used for practical power generation; for example, the igniter system for a 1 GWe power plant should have a repetition rate in the neighborhood of 1 to 10 Hz, an overall electrical conversion efficiency from mains to beam of greater than 10%, and high availability. At present under discussion are the needs for a Heavy-Ion Demonstration Experiment (HIDE); an example set of parameters is given for comparison with those for a power plant

  7. On the energy gain enhancement of DT+D3He fuel configuration in nuclear fusion reactor driven by heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khoshbinfar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that advanced fuels be employed in the second generation of nuclear fusion reactors. Theoretical calculations show that in such a fuel, a high plasma temperature about 100 keV is a requisite for reaction rate improvement of nuclear fusion. However, creating such a temporal condition requires a more powerful driver than we have today. Here, introducing an optimal fuel configuration consisting of DT and D-3He layers, suitable for inertial fusion reactors and driven by heavy ion beams, the optimal energy gain conditions have been simulated and derived for 1.3 MJ system. It was found that, in this new fuel configuration, the ideal energy gain, is 22 percent more comparing with energy gain in corresponding single DT fuel layer. Moreover, the inner DT fuel layer contributed as an ignition trigger, while the outer D3He fuel acts as particle and radiation shielding as well as fuel layer.

  8. Overview of Theory and Modeling in the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, R C; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; De Hoon, M; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I D; Lee, E P; Lee, W W; Lund, S M; Olson, C L; Qin, H; Rose, D V; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E A; Tzenov, Stephan I; Vay, J L; Welch, D R; Yu, S S

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents analytical and simulation studies of intense heavy ion beam propagation, including the injection, acceleration, transport and compression phases, and beam transport and focusing in background plasma in the target chamber. Analytical theory and simulations that support the High Current Experiment (HCX), the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and the advanced injector development program are being used to provide a basic understanding of the nonlinear beam dynamics and collective processes, and to develop design concepts for the next-step Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE), and a heavy ion fusion driver. Three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear perturbative simulations have been applied to collective instabilities driven by beam temperature anisotropy and to two-stream interactions between the beam ions and any unwanted background electrons. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the 2 MV Electrostatic Quadrupole (ESQ) injector have clarified t...

  9. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-01-01

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  10. Improved beam-energy calibration technique for heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, A.M.J.; Garcia, A.; Gil, Salvador

    1989-01-01

    A simple technique for beam energy calibration of heavy-ion accelerators is presented. A thin hydrogenous target was bombarded with 12 C and 19 F, and the energies of the protons knocked out, elastically were measured at several angles using two detectors placed at equal angles on opposite sides of the beam. The use of these two detectors cancels the largest errors due to uncertainties in the angle and position at which the beam hits the target. An application of this energy calibration method to an electrostatic accelerator is described and the calibration constant of the analyzing magnet was obtained with an estimated error of 0.4 (Author) [es

  11. Heavy ion beam micromachining on LiNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesprias, F.; Venturino, M.; Debray, M.E.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Kreiner, A.J.; Minsky, D.; Fischer, M.; Lamagna, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work 3D micromachining of x-cut lithium niobate crystals was performed using the high energy heavy ion microbeam (HIM) at the Tandar Laboratory, Buenos Aires. The samples were machined using 35 Cl beams at 70 MeV bombarding energy combined with wet etching with hydrofluoric acid solutions at room temperature. As the ion beam penetrates the sample, it induces lattice damage increasing dramatically the local etching rate of the material. This technique was applied to the fabrication of 3D waveguides with long control electrodes. The resulting structures indicate that well defined contours with nearly vertical sidewalls can be made. The results also show that with fluences of only 5 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 , this technique is suitable for the fabrication of different shapes of LiNbO 3 control-waveguides that can be used in different optical devices and matched with the existing optical fibers.

  12. Performance of MBE-4: An experimental multiple beam induction linear accelerator for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, A.I.; Fessenden, T.J.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.H.; Meuth, H.

    1988-06-01

    An experimental induction linac, called MBE-4, has been constructed to demonstrate acceleration and current amplification of multiple heavy ion beams. This work is part of a program to study the use of such an accelerator as a driver for heavy ion inertial fusion. MBE-4 is 16m long and accelerates four space-charge-dominated beams of singly-charged cesium ions, in this case from 200 keV to 700 keV, amplifying the current in each beam from 10mA by a factor of nine. Construction of the experiment was completed late in 1987 and we present the results of detailed measurements of the longitudinal beam dynamics. Of particular interest is the contribution of acceleration errors to the growth of current fluctuations and to the longitudinal emittance. The effectiveness of the longitudinal focusing, accomplished by means of the controlled time dependence of the accelerating fields, is also discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Heavy ion driven LMF design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.

    1991-08-01

    The USA Department of Energy has conducted a multi-year study of the requirements, designs and costs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The primary purpose of the LMF would be testing of weapons physics and effects simulation using the output from microexplosions of inertial fusion pellets. It does not need a high repetition rate, efficient driver system as required by an electrical generating plant. However there would be so many features in common that the design, construction and operation of an LMF would considerably advance the application of inertial confinement fusion to energy production. The DOE study has concentrated particularly on the LMF driver, with design and component development undertaken at several national laboratories. Principally, these are LLNL (Solid State Laser), LANL (Gas Laser), and SNLA (Light Ions). Heavy Ions, although considered a possible LMF driver did not receive attention until the final stages of this study since its program management was through the Office of Energy Research rather than Defense Programs. During preparation of a summary report for the study it was decided that some account of heavy ions was needed for a complete survey of the driver candidates. A conceptual heavy ion LMF driver design was created for the DOE report which is titled LMC Phase II Design Concepts. The heavy ion driver did not receive the level of scrutiny of the other concepts and, unlike the others, no costs analysis by an independent contractor was performed. Since much of heavy ion driver design lore was brought together in this exercise it is worthwhile to make it available as an independent report. This is reproduced here as it appears in the DOE report

  14. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U 90+ beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  15. Ion optics and beam dynamics optimization at the HESR storage ring for the SPARC experiments with highly charged heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr

    2015-06-24

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is a part of an upcoming International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. A key part of a scientific program, along with antiproton physics, will be physics with highly-charged heavy ions. Phase-space cooled beams together with fixed internal target will provide an excellent environment for storage ring experiments at the HESR for the SPARC collaboration. Until recently, however, the existing ion optical lattice for the HESR was designed only for the experiments with antiproton beams. The thesis presents a new ion optical mode developed specifically for the operation of the HESR with highly charged heavy ions. The presence of the errors, such as beam momentum spread, magnetic field impurities or magnets misalignments, leads to disruption of beam dynamics: exciting of resonant motion and loss of beam stability. Within the paper, these effects are investigated with the help of numerical codes for particle accelerator design and simulation MAD-X and MIRKO. A number of correction techniques are applied to minimize the nonlinear impact on the beam dynamics and improve the experimental conditions. The application of the analytical and numerical tools is demonstrated in the experiment with uranium U{sup 90+} beam at the existing storage ring ESR, GSI.

  16. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Bae, Chang-Hyu [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea); Ozaki, Takuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Wang, Jing Ming [Akita Prefectural Univ. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M{sub 1} seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M{sub 3} progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to {sup 14}N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M{sub 1} progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M{sub 1} seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  17. Radiation therapy using high-energy heavy-ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    1995-01-01

    The clinical trial of the heavy-ion radiotherapy was started at June 1994 after pre-clinical experiments using 290 MeV/u carbon beam. In this paper, an irradiation system for the heavy-ion radiotherapy installed at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) and the physical characteristics of the therapeutic beam were discussed. (author)

  18. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ((ge)1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the ∼4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and (del)B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam

  19. Basic atomic interactions of accelerated heavy ions in matter atomic interactions of heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstikhina, Inga; Winckler, Nicolas; Shevelko, Viacheslav

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the recent experimental and theoretical results on interactions of heavy ions with gaseous, solid and plasma targets from the perspective of atomic physics. The topics discussed comprise stopping power, multiple-electron loss and capture processes, equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state fractions in penetration of fast ion beams through matter including relativistic domain. It also addresses mean charge-states and equilibrium target thickness in ion-beam penetrations, isotope effects in low-energy electron capture, lifetimes of heavy ion beams, semi-empirical formulae for effective cross sections. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in atomic, plasma and accelerator physics.

  20. A heavy ion linac complex for RI beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki

    1995-01-01

    A heavy ion linac complex for RI-beams has been under construction since fiscal year 1992 at INS. The linac complex comprises following accelerating structures: a 25.5-MHz split coaxial RFQ (SCRFQ), a 51-MHz interdigital-H (IH) linac, and a 25.5-MHz rebuncher cavity. The SCRFQ with modulated vanes accelerates ions with a charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) greater than 1/30 from 2 to 170 keV/u. The IH linac comprises four cavities and three magnetic quadrupole triplets placed between cavities, accelerates ions with q/A≥1/10, and varies the output energy continuously in the range 0.17 ∼1.05 MeV/u. The rebuncher cavity with six accelerating gaps is a double coaxial λ/4 resonator, and the total accelerating voltage is 200 kV. (author)

  1. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 μs. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within ± 100 μm. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information

  2. Physics design of heavy-ion irradiation beam line on HI-13 tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Fei; Peng Zhaohua; Hu Yueming; Jiao Xuesheng; Chen Dongfeng; Cao Yali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heavy-ion microporous membrane is a new kind of filter material, which has prosperous application in the fields of medical and biological agents, electronic, food, environmental science, materials science, etc. Purpose: Polyester membranes were irradiated with 32 S produced by HI-13 tandem accelerator to develop a microporous membrane at CIAE, and the irradiation uniformity is determined by the beam distribution, also the microporous uniformity is required higher than 90%. Methods: An octupole magnet was used to correct the beam distribution from Gauss to uniform. Meanwhile, main parameters of beam line were given, and the alignment tolerances for optical elements were also analyzed. Results: Alignment tolerance of the optical elements could cause great influence on the beam center deviation in the process of correction, which would destroy the irradiation uniformity. Steering magnet was applied to meet with the design requirements. Conclusion: This study provides a practical and feasible way for industrial production of heavy-ion microporous membrane. (authors)

  3. Therapy tumor with the heavy ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Li Wenjian

    2002-01-01

    As physical characteristic of heavy ions Bragg peak, therapy tumor with heavy ions is becoming advanced technology. So, many countries have developed the technology and used to treat tumor, the societal and economic effects are beneficial to people. The authors show the development, present situation and information of research in world of advanced radiotherapy with heavy ions

  4. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    With controlled thermonuclear fusion holding out the possibility of a prolific and clean new source of energy, the goal remains elusive after many years of continual effort. While the conventional Tokamak route with magnetic confinement continues to hit the headlines, other alternatives are now becoming competitive. One possible solution is to confine the thermonuclear fuel pellet by high power beams. Current research and perspectives for future work in such inertial confinement was the subject of the 'Prospects for Heavy Ion Fusion' European Research Conference held in Aghia Pelaghia, Crete, last year. Its main focus was on the potential of heavy ion accelerators as well as recent advances in target physics with high power lasers and light ion beams. Carlo Rubbia declared that high energy accelerators, with their high efficiency, are the most promising approach to economical fusion energy production. However the need for cost saving in the driver accelerator requires new ideas in target design tailored to the particularities of heavy ion beams, which need to be pushed to the limits of high current and phase space density at the same time

  5. Studies on the production of high energy densities in matter by intense heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, J.

    1989-08-01

    In the framework of the present thesis the interaction of an intense heavy-ion beam with a small, but macroscopical amount of matter is studied. Thereby high energy densities in the target matter are produced. For this experiment it was for the first time possible to heat matter with ion beams from conventional heavy-ion accelerators up to plasma conditions. A KR + -ion beam was first accelerated with the heavy-ion accelerator MAXILAC to 45 keV/u and then focussed by a fine-focusing lens to a closed xenon gas target. The light emitted from the target was space- and time resolved taken up by a spectrometer as well as by a streak and CCD camera. Thereby the radial development of the plasma and the penetration behaviour of the ion beam was observed. The free electron density of the plasma was determined from the Stark broadening of emission lines (n e ≅ 4x10 16 cm -3 ). The temperature could be determined by different methods (shock-wave velocity, degree of ionization, line ratios). The electron temperature amounted in the center of the pipe to kT ≅ 0.75 eV. For the opacity of the target by which the emitted light power is determined under the assumption of the two-dimensional model (equilibrium between emitted and absorbed energy) the value κ p ≅ 7700 cm 2 /g resulted. (orig./HSI) [de

  6. Towards the heavy-ion program at J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, H.; Chujo, T.; Gunji, T.; Harada, H.; Imai, K.; Kaneta, M.; Kinsho, M.; Liu, Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Nishio, K.; Ozawa, K.; Saha, P.K.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sato, S.; Tamura, J.

    2014-01-01

    A future heavy-ion program at J-PARC has been discussed. The QCD phase structure in high baryon density regime will be explored with heavy ions at the beam momenta of around 10 A GeV/c at the beam rate of 10 10 –10 11  Hz. For this quest, a large acceptance spectrometer is designed to measure electrons and muons, and rare probes such as multi-strangeness and charmed hadrons/nuclei. A heavy-ion acceleration scheme is under study with a new heavy-ion linac and a new booster ring, which accelerate and inject beams into the existing Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron and Main Ring synchrotron. An overview of the heavy-ion program and an accelerator design, as well as physics goals and a conceptual design of the heavy-ion experiment are discussed

  7. Towards the heavy-ion program at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, H.; Chujo, T.; Gunji, T.; Harada, H.; Imai, K.; Kaneta, M.; Kinsho, M.; Liu, Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Nishio, K.; Ozawa, K.; Saha, P. K.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sato, S.; Tamura, J.

    2014-11-01

    A future heavy-ion program at J-PARC has been discussed. The QCD phase structure in high baryon density regime will be explored with heavy ions at the beam momenta of around 10 A GeV/c at the beam rate of 1010-1011 Hz. For this quest, a large acceptance spectrometer is designed to measure electrons and muons, and rare probes such as multi-strangeness and charmed hadrons/nuclei. A heavy-ion acceleration scheme is under study with a new heavy-ion linac and a new booster ring, which accelerate and inject beams into the existing Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron and Main Ring synchrotron. An overview of the heavy-ion program and an accelerator design, as well as physics goals and a conceptual design of the heavy-ion experiment are discussed.

  8. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists

  9. RF Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2003-10-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1 - 100 times the ion beam density and at a length 0.1-0.5 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. An ECR source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The ECR source operates at 13.6 MHz and with solenoid magnetic fields of 0-10 gauss. The goal is to operate the source at pressures 10-5 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10-4 - 10-1 Torr. Electron densities in the range of 10^8 - 10^11 cm-3 have been achieved. Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10-6 Torr range with densities of 10^11 cm-3. Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with NTX and is being used in the experiments. The plasma is approximately 10 cm in length in the direction of the beam propagation. Modifications to the source will be presented that increase its length in the direction of beam propagation.

  10. Production of intense beams of highly charged heavy ions from RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS and liquid He free SC-ECRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Kidera, M.; Kageyama, T.; Kase, M.; Yano, Y.; Higurashi, Y.; Kurita, T.; Imanaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed the high performance ECRISs for RIKEN RI Beam factory project and successfully produced intense beams of highly charged heavy ions. RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS can especially produce intense beams of medium charge states of heavy ions (1.3 mA of Ar 8+ , 200 eμA of Xe 20+ ) by applying the various techniques, e.g., Al cylinder method, biased electrode method, optimization of the plasma electrode position. Very recently, we successfully produced intense beams of highly charged heavy ions (10 eμA of Xe 30+ , 1 eμA of Xe 36+ ) from the Liquid He free SC-ECRIS with operational frequency of 14 GHz

  11. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomo, T., E-mail: nagatomo@riken.jp; Kase, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Nakagawa, T. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tzoganis, V. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO{sub 2} (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF{sub 2}, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy {sup 12}C{sup 4+}, {sup 16}O{sup 4+}, and {sup 40}Ar{sup 11+} ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  12. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Kolchin, Pavel; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-01-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond the space-charge limit. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1 100 times the ion beam density and at a length [similar]0.1 2 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. An Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to support a joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The ECR source operates at 13.6 MHz and with solenoid magnetic fields of 1 10 gauss. The goal is to operate the source at pressures [similar]10[minus sign]6 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10[minus sign]4 10[minus sign]1 Torr. Electron densities in the range of 108 to 1011 cm[minus sign]3 have been achieved. Low-pressure operation is important to reduce ion beam ionization. A cusp magnetic field has been installed to improve radial confinement and reduce the field strength on the beam axis. In addition, axial confinement is believed to be important to achieve lower-pressure operation. To further improve breakdown at low pressure, a weak electron source will be placed near the end of the ECR source. This article also describes the wave damping mechanisms. At moderate pressures (> 1 mTorr), the wave damping is collisional, and at low pressures (< 1 mTorr) there is a distinct electron cyclotron resonance.

  13. Towards the heavy-ion program at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chujo, T. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Gunji, T. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Harada, H. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kaneta, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kinsho, M. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Liu, Y. [J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nagamiya, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nishio, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ozawa, K. [J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Saha, P.K. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakaguchi, T. [Broohaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sato, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tamura, J. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A future heavy-ion program at J-PARC has been discussed. The QCD phase structure in high baryon density regime will be explored with heavy ions at the beam momenta of around 10 A GeV/c at the beam rate of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} Hz. For this quest, a large acceptance spectrometer is designed to measure electrons and muons, and rare probes such as multi-strangeness and charmed hadrons/nuclei. A heavy-ion acceleration scheme is under study with a new heavy-ion linac and a new booster ring, which accelerate and inject beams into the existing Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron and Main Ring synchrotron. An overview of the heavy-ion program and an accelerator design, as well as physics goals and a conceptual design of the heavy-ion experiment are discussed.

  14. Liquid-film stripper for high-intensity heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, B.T.; Merrill, P.; Syversrud, H.K.; Wada, R.; Yourd, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    Electron strippers are widely used in heavy ion accelerators such as tandem Van de Graaff generators and heavy ion linacs. The SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, employs a fluorocarbon oil vapor stripper at 113 keV/A for its high intensity injector ABEL, while after acceleration to 1.199 MeV/A a 35 μg/cm 2 carbon foil stripper is used. At present, the lifetime of these foils is about 1 hour for an 40 Ar beam of approx. 1 μA average particle current. With higher intensity high mass (100 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 238) beams available from ABEL injector the lifetime is expected to drop drastically and might be as low as one minute. A different approach to solve the stripper foil lifetime problem uses a thin free standing oil film spun from the edge of a sharp-edged rotating disc touching the surface of an oil reservoir. Areas of about 10 cm 2 with areal densities down to 20 μg/cm 2 have been reported. The work described here is based on the same concept, and produces a constantly regenerated, stable, free standing oil film of appropriate thickness for use at the SuperHILAC

  15. Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research in the U. S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alex

    2002-12-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed.

  16. Overview of heavy ion fusion accelerator research in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed

  17. Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed

  18. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  19. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  20. CERN Heavy-Ion Facility design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.; Angert, N.; Bourgarel, M.P.; Brouzet, E.; Cappi, R.; Dekkers, D.; Evans, J.; Gelato, G.; Haseroth, H.; Hill, C.E.; Hutter, G.; Knott, J.; Kugler, H.; Lombardi, A.; Lustig, H.; Malwitz, E.; Nitsch, F.; Parisi, G.; Pisent, A.; Raich, U.; Ratzinger, U.; Riccati, L.; Schempp, A.; Schindl, K.; Schoenauer, H.; Tetu, P.; Umstaetter, H.H.; Rooij, M. van; Weiss, M.

    1993-01-01

    The design of the CERN Heavy-Ion Facility is described. This facility will be based on a new ion linear accelerator (Linac 3), together with improvements to the other accelerators of the CERN complex to allow them to cope with heavy ions, i.e. to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the Proton Synchrotron (PS) and the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). For this reference design, the pure isotope of lead, 208 Pb, is considered. The bulk of the report describes Linac 3, a purpose-built heavy-ion linac mainly designed and constructed in collaboration with several CERN member state laboratories, but also with contributions from non-member states. Modifications and improvements to existing CERN accelerators essentially concern the RF acceleration, beam control and beam monitoring (all machines), beam kickers and septa at the input and output of the PSB, and major vacuum improvements, aiming to reduce the pressure by factors of at least seven and three in the PSB and PS respectively. After injection from the Electron Cyclotron Resonance source at 2.5 keV/u the partially stripped heavy-ion beam is accelerated successively by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole and an Interdigital-H linac to 4.2 MeV/u. After stripping to 208 Pb 53+ , the beam is again accelerated, firstly in the PSB (to 98.5 MeV/u), then in the PS (to 4.25 GeV/u). The final stage of acceleration in the SPS takes the fully stripped 208 Pb 82+ ions to 177 GeV/u, delivering a beam of 4.10 8 ions per SPS supercycle (15.2 s) to the experiments. The first physics run with lead ions is scheduled for the end of 1994. Finally, some requirements for carrying out heavy-ion physics at the Large Hadron Collider are mentioned. (orig.)

  1. Control the length of beam trajectory with a quadruple triplet for heavy ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wei, Shaoqing; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Do Gyun; Kim, Jang Youl

    2016-01-01

    Beam trajectory is needed to be controlled in heavy ion accelerator system. Quadruple magnets are widely used in heavy ion accelerator for focusing the transporting particles. A quadruple triplet system which consists of three consecutive quadrupoles, Q1, Q2 and Q3, is used to control beam trajectory at a focused position. Q1 and Q3 have symmetry with respect to Q2. The beam trajectory in magnet system is affected by higher order fields existed in real fields. For quadrupoles, the representation simulation of beam trajectory was carried out to study the beam trajectory and to estimate an effect of higher order field in triplet system. SCALA program was used to simulate the beam trajectory in OperaTM. SCALA can analyze a large number of beam trajectories at the same time by adjusting the size of finite element of the emitter. With OperaTM and MatlabTM programs, the position of focused beam spot in quadruple triplet system can be increased or decreased using evolution strategy (ES) method, therefore the length of triplet system can be controlled. Finally, the quadruple triplet system with the appropriate length and expected beam spot range was suggested in this paper

  2. Control the length of beam trajectory with a quadruple triplet for heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wei, Shaoqing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Gyun; Kim, Jang Youl [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Beam trajectory is needed to be controlled in heavy ion accelerator system. Quadruple magnets are widely used in heavy ion accelerator for focusing the transporting particles. A quadruple triplet system which consists of three consecutive quadrupoles, Q1, Q2 and Q3, is used to control beam trajectory at a focused position. Q1 and Q3 have symmetry with respect to Q2. The beam trajectory in magnet system is affected by higher order fields existed in real fields. For quadrupoles, the representation simulation of beam trajectory was carried out to study the beam trajectory and to estimate an effect of higher order field in triplet system. SCALA program was used to simulate the beam trajectory in OperaTM. SCALA can analyze a large number of beam trajectories at the same time by adjusting the size of finite element of the emitter. With OperaTM and MatlabTM programs, the position of focused beam spot in quadruple triplet system can be increased or decreased using evolution strategy (ES) method, therefore the length of triplet system can be controlled. Finally, the quadruple triplet system with the appropriate length and expected beam spot range was suggested in this paper.

  3. Heavy ion beam transport through liquid lithium first wall ICF reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    This analysis addresses the critical issue of the final transport of a heavy ion beam in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The beam must traverse the reaction chamber from the final focusing lens to the target without being disrupted. This requirement has a strong impact on the reactor design. It is essential to the development of ICF fusion reactor technology, that the restrictions placed on the reactor engineering parameters by final beam transport consideration be understood early on

  4. Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.

    2004-01-01

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm 2 was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm 2 of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl - was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm 2 , sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source

  5. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  6. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  7. Helicon plasma potential measurements using a heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Schoch; K. Connor; J. Si

    2005-01-01

    A Heavy Ion Beam Probe, HIBP, has been installed on a helicon plasma device. The objective was to measure plasma fluctuations at the 13.55MHz RF frequency. This offers a unique challenge for the HIBP, because the transit time of the probing ion is long compared to the fluctuations of interest. For previous HIBPs, the transit time has been short compared to the period of the fluctuations which permits one to assume that the magnetic and electric fields are static. Modeling has shown that the diagnostic will still accurately measure the average potential. The fluctuating potential was to be detected but the absolute magnitude is difficult to determine with signal from a single point. However, modeling indicates multipoint measurements will allow one to resolve the absolute fluctuation magnitude. Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER5452985 During the funding of this grant, a helicon plasma discharge device was built and operated. A Heavy Ion Beam Probe primary system was installed and operated. A primary beam detector was installed and primary beam was detected both with and without plasma. Attempts were made to detect secondary ions using the primary beam detector, without success. Given the lack of a detectable signal, the energy analyzer of the HIBP system was never installed. It is available for installation if there is a reason to do so in the future. Analysis of the system indicated that the plasma electron temperature, estimated to be a few eV, was the likely reason for the lack of detectable secondary ions. A change of ion species to either Boron or Magnesium would greatly increase the signal, but neither of these ions have been used in a HIBP system. The ion source used in this system is made by using a charge exchange process to create a zeolite loaded with the desired ion. Attempts were made to use charge exchange to load Magnesium into a zeolite, and were not successful. It is felt that Magnesium and/or Boron zeolite sources could be created, but

  8. A Scaled Beam-Combining Experiment for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Chupp, W.W.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.M.; Ghiorso, W.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; MacLaren, S.; Peters, C.; Seidl, P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for induction linac heavy ion fusion drivers. The resultant transverse emittance increase, due predominantly to enharmonic space charge forces, must be kept minimal so that the beam remains focusable at the target. A prototype combining experiment has been built and preliminary results are presented. Four sources each produce up to 4.8 mA Cs+ beams at 160 keV. Focusing upstream of the merge consists of four quadruples and a final combined-function element (quadruple ampersand dipole). All lattice elements of the prototype are electrostatic. Due to the small distance between beams near the merge (-3-4 mm), the electrodes here are a cage of small rods, each at different voltage

  9. Numerical Study of Instabilities Driven by Energetic Neutral Beam Ions in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, E.V.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental observations from NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] suggest that many modes in a subcyclotron frequency range are excited during neutral-beam injection (NBI). These modes have been identified as Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAEs) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAEs), which are driven unstable through the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. The injection velocities of the NBI ions in NSTX are large compared to Alfven velocity, V(sub)0 > 3V(sub)A, and a strong anisotropy in the fast-ion pitch-angle distribution provides the energy source for the instabilities. Recent interest in the excitation of Alfven Eigenmodes in the frequency range omega less than or approximately equal to omega(sub)ci, where omega(sub)ci is the ion cyclotron frequency, is related to the possibility that these modes can provide a mechanism for direct energy transfer from super-Alfvenic beam ions to thermal ions. Numerical simulations are required in order to find a self-consistent mode structure, and to include the effects of finite-Larmor radius (FLR), the nonlinear effects, and the thermal plasma kinetic effects

  10. Beam dynamics studies of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.

    1995-04-01

    A driver-scale injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator project has been built at LBL. This machine has exceeded the design goals of high voltage (> 2 MV), high current (> 0.8 A of K + ) and low normalized emittance (< 1 π mm-mr). The injector consists of a 750 keV diode pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provides strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. The fully 3-D PIC code WARP together with EGUN and POISSON were used to design the machine and analyze measurements of voltage, current and phase space distributions. A comparison between beam dynamics characteristics as measured for the injector and corresponding computer calculations will be presented

  11. Nuclear physics with heavy ions. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, R.; Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some results obtained in nuclear physics with heavy ions in the energy range up to 10 MeV/nucleon are summarized. A short review of the tendencies in the development of heavy ion accelerators is followed by a classification of the mechanisms observed in heavy ion interactions. The characteristics of the various types of reactions are presented. Applications of heavy ion beams in other branches of sciences are discussed. (author)

  12. Consideration of magnetic field fluctuation measurements in a torus plasma with heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, A.; Fujisawa, A.; Ohshima, S.; Nakano, H.

    2004-03-01

    The article discusses feasibility of magnetic fluctuation measurement with a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) in an axisymmetric torus configuration. In the measurements, path integral fluctuation along the probing beam orbit should be considered as is similar to the density fluctuation measurements with HIBP. A calculation, based on an analytic formula, is performed to estimate the path integral effects for fluctuation patterns that have difference in profile, the correlation length, the radial wavelength, and the poloidal mode number. In addition, the large distance between the plasma and the detector is considered to lessen the path integral effect. As a result, it is found that local fluctuation of magnetic field can be properly detected with a heavy ion beam probe. (author)

  13. Non-destructive profile measurement of intensive heavy ion beams; Zerstoerungsfreie Profilmessung intensiver Schwerionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Frank

    2010-02-08

    Within the framework of the FAIR-project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI (Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research), high intensity beams from protons to uranium ions with kinetic energies up to 30 AGeV are foreseen. Present GSI-accelerators like the UNILAC and the Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS-18) with a magnetic rigidity of 18 Tm will be used as injectors for the future synchrotron (SIS-100). Their beam current will be increased by up to two orders of magnitude. An accurate beam position and beam profile measurement is mandatory for a safe operation of transport sections, in particular in front of production targets (Fragment Separator (FRS)-target, anti p-production-target and Warm Dense Matter (WDM)-targets). Conventional intercepting profile monitors will not withstand the thermal stress of intensive ion beams, particularly for low energy applications or focused beams. For transverse profile determination a non-intercepting Beam Induced Fluorescence (BIF)-monitor was developed, working with residual gas. The BIF-monitor exploits fluorescence light emitted by residual gas molecules after atomic collisions with beam ions. Fluorescence-images were recorded with an image-intensified camera system, and beam profiles were obtained by projecting these images. Within the scope of this dissertation the following topics have been investigated: The photon yield, profile shape and background contribution were determined for different ion species (H{sup +}, S{sup 6+}, Ar{sup 18+}, K{sup +}, Ni{sup 9+}, Xe{sup 48+}, Ta{sup 24+}, Au{sup 65+}, U{sup 73+}), beam energies (7.7 AkeV-750 AMeV), gas pressures (10{sup -6}-3 mbar) and gas species (N{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Applying an imaging spectrograph and narrowband 10 nm interference filters, the spectral response was mapped and associated with the corresponding gas transitions. Spectrally resolved beam profiles were also obtained form the spectrographic images. Major results are the light yield showing a

  14. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; (c) Development of elliptic beam theory; and (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX)

  15. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  16. Development of dual-beam system using an electrostatic accelerator for in-situ observation of swift heavy ion irradiation effects on materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M.; Asozu, T.; Sataka, M.; Iwase, A.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed the dual beam system which accelerates two kinds of ion beams simultaneously especially for real-time ion beam analysis. We have also developed the alternating beam system which can efficiently change beam species in a short time in order to realize efficient ion beam analysis in a limited beam time. The acceleration of the dual beam is performed by the 20 UR Pelletron™ tandem accelerator in which an ECR ion source is mounted at the high voltage terminal [1,2]. The multi-charged ions of two or more elements can be simultaneously generated from the ECR ion source, so dual-beam irradiation is achieved by accelerating ions with the same charge to mass ratio (for example, 132Xe11+ and 12C+). It enables us to make a real-time beam analysis such as Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) method, while a target is irradiated with swift heavy ions. For the quick change of the accelerating ion beam, the program of automatic setting of the optical parameter of the accelerator has been developed. The switchover time for changing the ion beam is about 5 min. These developments have been applied to the study on the ion beam mixing caused by high-density electronic excitation induced by swift heavy ions.

  17. Development of dual-beam system using an electrostatic accelerator for in-situ observation of swift heavy ion irradiation effects on materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, M., E-mail: matsuda.makoto@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-Tokai), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asozu, T.; Sataka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-Tokai), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    We have developed the dual beam system which accelerates two kinds of ion beams simultaneously especially for real-time ion beam analysis. We have also developed the alternating beam system which can efficiently change beam species in a short time in order to realize efficient ion beam analysis in a limited beam time. The acceleration of the dual beam is performed by the 20 UR Pelletron™ tandem accelerator in which an ECR ion source is mounted at the high voltage terminal [1,2]. The multi-charged ions of two or more elements can be simultaneously generated from the ECR ion source, so dual-beam irradiation is achieved by accelerating ions with the same charge to mass ratio (for example, {sup 132}Xe{sup 11+} and {sup 12}C{sup +}). It enables us to make a real-time beam analysis such as Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) method, while a target is irradiated with swift heavy ions. For the quick change of the accelerating ion beam, the program of automatic setting of the optical parameter of the accelerator has been developed. The switchover time for changing the ion beam is about 5 min. These developments have been applied to the study on the ion beam mixing caused by high-density electronic excitation induced by swift heavy ions.

  18. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  19. Longitudinal beam compression for heavy-ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Brandon, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    A scheme is described for compressing a heavy-ion beam longitudinally in such a way that the compressed pulse has uniform line-charge density and longitudinal momentum. Attaining these conditions will be important in the final focusing of a beam on a small fuel capsule in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The longitudinal dynamics can be approximately described by a one-dimensional (1-D) fluid model for charged particles. Recognizing the similarity between the 1-D charged particle equations of motion and the 1-D equations for ideal-gas flow permits us to calculate the evolution of the line-charge density and velocity profile using self-similar solutions and the method of characteristics, developed for unsteady supersonic gas dynamics, for different regions along the beam. Simple physical arguments show that although the longitudinal and transverse temperatures vary along the beam following the adiabatic laws, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth is to be expected. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm all the physical arguments. The compressed beam has negligible longitudinal momentum spread and can therefore avoid chromatic aberrations in final focus. (author) 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Linear Energy Transfer-Dependent Change in Rice Gene Expression Profile after Heavy-Ion Beam Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kotaro; Kazama, Yusuke; Morita, Ryouhei; Hirano, Tomonari; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Usuda, Sachiko; Hayashi, Yoriko; Ohbu, Sumie; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Abe, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    A heavy-ion beam has been recognized as an effective mutagen for plant breeding and applied to the many kinds of crops including rice. In contrast with X-ray or γ-ray, the heavy-ion beam is characterized by a high linear energy transfer (LET). LET is an important factor affecting several aspects of the irradiation effect, e.g. cell survival and mutation frequency, making the heavy-ion beam an effective mutagen. To study the mechanisms behind LET-dependent effects, expression profiling was performed after heavy-ion beam irradiation of imbibed rice seeds. Array-based experiments at three time points (0.5, 1, 2 h after the irradiation) revealed that the number of up- or down-regulated genes was highest 2 h after irradiation. Array-based experiments with four different LETs at 2 h after irradiation identified LET-independent regulated genes that were up/down-regulated regardless of the value of LET; LET-dependent regulated genes, whose expression level increased with the rise of LET value, were also identified. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of LET-independent up-regulated genes showed that some GO terms were commonly enriched, both 2 hours and 3 weeks after irradiation. GO terms enriched in LET-dependent regulated genes implied that some factor regulates genes that have kinase activity or DNA-binding activity in cooperation with the ATM gene. Of the LET-dependent up-regulated genes, OsPARP3 and OsPCNA were identified, which are involved in DNA repair pathways. This indicates that the Ku-independent alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway may contribute to repairing complex DNA legions induced by high-LET irradiation. These findings may clarify various LET-dependent responses in rice.

  1. The ELIMED transport and dosimetry beamline for laser-driven ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F., E-mail: francesco.romano@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; De Luca, G.; Gallo, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. Fanola [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino (Italy); Universita' di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino (Italy); Korn, G. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Larosa, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Leanza, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Universita' di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Manna, R.; Marchese, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino (Italy); Margarone, D. [ELI-Beamlines Project, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-01

    A growing interest of the scientific community towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams has led to the development of several projects aiming to demonstrate the possible use of these beams for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, laser-accelerated particles differ from the conventional beams typically used for multiscipilinary and medical applications, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. The peculiarities of optically accelerated beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy) and that will be installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines) facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, an overview of the beamline along with a detailed description of the main transport elements as well as the detectors composing the final section of the beamline will be presented.

  2. Hyperfine interaction studies with pulsed heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, P.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy-ion reactions using pulsed beams have had a strong impact on the study of hyperfine interactions. Unique advantages offered by this technique have considerably extended the scope, detail and systematic range of its applications beyond that possible with radioactivity or light-ion reaction. This survey will cover a brief description of the methodological aspects of the field and recent applications to selected problems in nuclear and solid state physiscs illustrating its role. These include measurements of nuclear magnetic and electric quadrupole moments of high spin isomers, measurements of hyperfine magnetic fields at impurities in 3d and rare-earths ferromagnetic hosts, studies of paramagnetic systems, especially those exhibiting valence instabilities, and investigations of electric field gradients of impurities in noncubic metals. Future prospects of this technique will be briefly assessed. (orig.)

  3. Development of high-current pulsed heavy-ion-beam technology for applications to materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Ochiai, Yasushi; Masugata, Katsumi [University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam technology for applications to materials processing is described. We have developed a magnetically insulated ion diode for the generation of intense pulsed metallic ion beams in which a vacuum arc plasma gun is used as the ion source. When the ion diode was successfully operated at a diode voltage of 220 kV and a diode current of 10 kA, an ion beam with an ion current density of >200 A/cm{sup 2} and a pulse duration of 40 ns was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by using a Thomson parabola spectrometer, and the ion beam consisted of aluminum ions (Al{sup (1-3)+}) with an energy of 140 - 740 keV and protons with an energy of 160 - 190 keV; the purity was estimated to be 89%, which was much higher than that of the pulsed ion beam produced in a conventional ion diode. The development of a bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. When a bipolar pulse with a voltage of {+-}90 kV and a pulse duration of about 65 ns was applied to the drift tube of the BPA, the ion beam with an ion current density of 2 A/cm{sup 2} and a pulse duration of 30 ns was observed 25 mm downstream from the cathode surface, which suggested bipolar pulse acceleration.

  4. Quasi-monoenergetic ion beam acceleration by laser-driven shock and solitary waves in near-critical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Huang, T. W.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-01-01

    Ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas driven by intense laser pulses is investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model has been given for clarification of the ion acceleration dynamics in relation to different laser and target parameters. Two distinct regimes have been identified, where ions are accelerated by, respectively, the laser-induced shock wave in the weakly driven regime (comparatively low laser intensity) and the nonlinear solitary wave in the strongly driven regime (comparatively high laser intensity). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 94.6 MeV and an energy spread 15.8% are obtained by intense laser pulses at intensity I_0 = 3 × 10"2"0" W/cm"2 and pulse duration τ = 0.5 ps in the strongly driven regime, which is more advantageous than that got in the weakly driven regime. In addition, 233 MeV proton beams with narrow spread can be produced by extending τ to 1.0 ps in the strongly driven regime.

  5. Quasi-monoenergetic ion beam acceleration by laser-driven shock and solitary waves in near-critical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B., E-mail: bqiao@pku.edu.cn; Huang, T. W.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Yan, X. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas driven by intense laser pulses is investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model has been given for clarification of the ion acceleration dynamics in relation to different laser and target parameters. Two distinct regimes have been identified, where ions are accelerated by, respectively, the laser-induced shock wave in the weakly driven regime (comparatively low laser intensity) and the nonlinear solitary wave in the strongly driven regime (comparatively high laser intensity). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 94.6 MeV and an energy spread 15.8% are obtained by intense laser pulses at intensity I{sub 0} = 3 × 10{sup 20 }W/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration τ = 0.5 ps in the strongly driven regime, which is more advantageous than that got in the weakly driven regime. In addition, 233 MeV proton beams with narrow spread can be produced by extending τ to 1.0 ps in the strongly driven regime.

  6. Multicharged and intense heavy ion beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutner, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron plasma-are source (PIG), duoplasmatron (DP), laser source (LS), electron beam ion source (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance source (ECRS) from the viewpoint of generating intense and high charge state beams are considered. It is pointed out that for the last years three types of multicharged ion sources-EBIS, ECR and LS have been essentially developed. In the EBIS source the Xe 48+ ions are produced. The present day level of the development of the electron-beam ionization technique shows that by means of this technique intensive uranium nuclei beams production becomes a reality. On the ECR source Xe 26+ approximately 4x10 10 h/s, Asub(r)sup(12+) approximately 10 12 h/s intensive ion beams are produced. In the laser source a full number of C 6+ ions during one laser pulse constitutes not less than 10 10 from the 5x10mm 2 emission slit. At the present time important results are obtained pointing to the possibility to separate the ion component of laser plasma in the cyclotron central region. On the PIG source the Xe 15+ ion current up to 10μA per pulse is produced. In the duoplasmatron the 11-charge state of xenon ion beams is reached [ru

  7. Studies on the feasibility of heavy ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This Annual Report summarizes the scientific results of work carried out in 1982 in the framework of a feasibility study for inertial confinement fusion with heavy ion beams funded by the German Ministry of Research and Technology. The principal aim of this basic research program is the investigation of key problems and the identification of critical issues of the heavy ion ICF concept in the fields of accelerator research, atomic physics, target physics, and reactor design. The research is carried out by about ten working groups at various research centers and universities. One of the highlights in 1982 was a symposium held end of March at GSI which focussed on a critical analysis of the HIBALL accelerator concept. Whereas technical issues and hardware parameters were found feasible the beam dynamics in the storage rings turned out to be beyond the so far believed stability limits. As a consequence a revised accelerator scenario based on a lower charge state and a higher linac current has been investigated during the last year. First considerations were made on an experimental facility necessary for the study of high-intensity beam dynamics and of beam target interaction. Experimental studies of this kind will be of increasing importance for the future of the project. (orig.) [de

  8. Modeling Drift Compression in an Integrated Beam Experiment for Heavy-Ion-Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Celata, C. M.; Yu, S. S.

    2003-10-01

    The Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) is an induction accelerator being designed to further develop the science base for heavy-ion fusion. The experiment is being developed jointly by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. One conceptual approach would first accelerate a 0.5-1 A beam of singly charged potassium ions to 5 MeV, impose a head-to-tail velocity tilt to compress the beam longitudinally, and finally focus the beam radiallly using a series of quadrupole lenses. The lengthwise compression is a critical step because the radial size must be controlled as the current increases, and the beam emittance must be kept minimal. The work reported here first uses the moment-based model HERMES to design the drift-compression beam line and to assess the sensitivity of the final beam profile to beam and lattice errors. The particle-in-cell code WARP is then used to validate the physics design, study the phase-space evolution, and quantify the emittance growth.

  9. Heavy ion beams from the new Hungarian ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biri, S.; Valek, A.; Ditroi, F.; Koivisto, H.; Arje, J.; Stiebing, K.; Schmidt, L.

    1998-01-01

    The first beams of highly charged ions in Hungary were obtained in fall of 1996. The new 14.5 GHz ECR ion source of ATOMKI produced beams of multiply charged ions with remarkable intensities at first experiments. Since then, numerous further developments were carried out. An external electrondonor electrode drastically increased the plasma density and, consequently, the intensity of highly charged ions. These upgrades concentrated mainly on beams from gaseous elements and were carried out by the ECRIS team of ATOMKI. Another series of experiments - ionising from solids - however, was done in the framework of an international collaboration. The first metal ion beam has been extracted from the ECRIS in November 1997 using the known method of Metal Ions from Volatile Compounds (MIVOC). The possibility to put the MIVOC chamber inside the ion source was also tested and the dosing regulation problem of metal vapours inside the ion source was solved. As a result, beams of more than 10 μA of highly charged Fe and Ni ions were produced. (author)

  10. Heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, C.

    1974-01-01

    This review of the present state of work on heavy-ion accelerators pays particular attention to the requirements for nuclear research. It is divided into the following sections: single-particle versus collective acceleration, heavy-ion accelerators, beam quality, and a status report on the UNILAC facility. Among the topics considered are the recycling cyclotron, linacs with superconducting resonators, and acceleration to the GeV/nucleon range. (8 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  11. Ion beam driven expansion of super-range multilayer plane targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piriz, A.R.

    1987-08-01

    The expansion of a multilayer plane target driven by an ion beam which has a range shorter than the thickness of the slab is described by means of a simple analytic model. The effect of a two-layer structure is studied and criteria for the optimization of the kinetic energy of the unheated part of the slab, the payload, are set. (author). 14 refs, 3 figs

  12. Effect of beam-attenuation modulation on fluctuation measurements by heavy-ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.; Sloan, M.L.; Wootton, A.J.

    1991-03-01

    Beam-attenuation modulation arising from density fluctuations along the orbit of the heavy-ion beam probe can distort the local amplitude, coherence, and phase derived from one- and two-point correlation measurements. Path-integral expressions for these effects are derived and applications to TEXT data are discussed. The effects depend critically on the ratio of the average fluctuation amplitude, n e , along the beam path to the local n e at the sample volume. Because the fluctuation amplitude is small in the core and rises sharply toward the plasma edge, the contamination effect is negligible in a radial zone near the edge but rises sharply to the interior of a critical radius. With increasing average plasma density, bar n e , the interior contamination increases strongly and the critical radius moves outward. 16 refs., 12 figs

  13. Topical problems of accelerator and applied heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.; Deitinghoff, H.; Junior, P.H.; Schempp, A.

    1990-12-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named seminar. They deal with high-intensity linacs for heavy ions, the free-electron laser, applications of heavy-ion beams, MEQALAC, the ESR Schottky-diagnosis system, the analysis of GaAs by ion-beam methods, a light-ion synchrotron for cancer therapy, a device for the measurement of the momentum spread of ion beams, the European Hadron facility, the breakdown fields at electrons in high vacuum, a computer program for the calculation of electric quadrupoles, a focusing electrostatic mirror, storage and cooling of Ar beams, the visualization of heavy ion tracks in photographic films, the motion of ions in magnetic fields, the CERN heavy ion program, linear colliders, the beam injection from a linac into a storage ring, negative-ion sources, wake field acceleration, RFQ's, a dense electron target, the matching of a DC beam into the RFQ, electron emission and breakdown in vacuum, and 1-1.5 GeV 300 mA linear accelerator, the production of high-current positive-ion beams, high-current beam experiments at GSI, improvement of the Frankfurt EBIS, the physics of the violin, double layers, beam formation with coupled RFQ's, atomic nitrogen beam for material modification, compact superconducting synchrotron-radiation sources, industrial property rights, a RF ion source for thin film processes, beam-cavity interactions in the RFQ linac, atomic physics with crossed uranium beams, proton linacs, the interdigital H-type structure, injection of H - beams into a RFQ accelerator, the production of MOS devices by ion implantation, the application of RFQ's, the Frankfurt highly-charged ion facility, RF acceleration techniques for beam current drive in tokamaks, space-charge neutralized transport, and storage rings for synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. (HSI)

  14. Plasma focus as an heavy ion source in the problem of heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribkov, V.A.; Dubrovskij, A.V.; Kalachev, N.V.; Krokhin, O.N.; Silin, P.V.; Nikulin, V.Ya.; Cheblukov, Yu.N.

    1984-01-01

    Results of experiments on the ion flux formation in a plasma focus (PF) to develop a multicharged ion source for thermonuclear facility driver are presented. In plasma focus accelerating section copper ions were injected. Advantages of the suggested method of ion beam formation are demonstrated. Beam emittance equalling < 0.1 cmxmrad is obtained. Plasma focus ion energy exceeds 1 MeV. Plasma focus in combination with a neodymium laser is thought to be a perspective ion source for heavy ion fusion

  15. Polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, K.; Ishihara, M.; Takahashi, N.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents a few key experiments which provide direct evidence of the polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions. The theory of polarization observables and measurements is given with the necessary formulae. The polarization phenomena is described and studies of product nuclear polarization in heavy-ion reactions are discussed. Studies of heavy-ion reactions induced by polarized beams are examined

  16. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 μsec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  17. A raster scanning power supply system for controlling relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Nyman, M.; Halliwell, J.; Lutz, I.; Dwinell, R.

    1987-03-01

    A power supply system is currently being designed and constructed to sweep an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy ion beam in a raster scanning mode for radiotherapy use. Two colinear dipole magnets with orthogonally oriented magnetic fields are driven by the system to produce a rectangular field (40 x 40 cm max.) with a uniform dose (+-2.5%) to a target volume 6 meters away. The ''fast'' horizontal scanning magnet is driven by a single power supply which in conjunction with a triac bridge network and a current regulated linear actuator will produce a 1200 cm/sec max. sweep rate. The ''slow'' (40 cm/sec) vertical scanning magnet will be controlled by dual current regulated linear actuators in a push-pull configuration. The scanner system can provide off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions

  18. Progress and prospects of ion-driven fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Juan C.; Albright, Brian J.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gautier, D. Cort; Hegelich, Bjoern M.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Yin Lin; Honrubia, J.J.; Temporal, M.

    2009-01-01

    Fusion fast ignition (FI) initiated by laser-driven ion beams is a promising concept examined in this paper. FI based on a beam of quasi-monoenergetic ions (protons or heavier ions) has the advantage of a more localized energy deposition, which minimizes the required total beam energy, bringing it close to the ∼10 kJ minimum required for fuel densities ∼500 g cm -3 . High-current, laser-driven ion beams are most promising for this purpose. Because they are born neutralized in picosecond timescales, these beams may deliver the power density required to ignite the compressed DT fuel, ∼10 kJ/10 ps into a spot 20 μm in diameter. Our modelling of ion-based FI include high fusion gain targets and a proof of principle experiment. That modelling indicates the concept is feasible, and provides confirmation of our understanding of the operative physics, a firmer foundation for the requirements, and a better understanding of the optimization trade space. An important benefit of the scheme is that such a high-energy, quasi-monoenergetic ignitor beam could be generated far from the capsule (≥1 cm away), eliminating the need for a reentrant cone in the capsule to protect the ion-generation laser target, a tremendous practical benefit. This paper summarizes the ion-based FI concept, the integrated ion-driven FI modelling, the requirements on the ignitor beam derived from that modelling, and the progress in developing a suitable laser-driven ignitor ion beam.

  19. Development of exploding wire ion source for intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Y.; Murata, T.; Ito, H.; Masugata, K.

    2012-01-01

    A Novel exploding wire type ion source device is proposed as a metallic ion source of intense pulsed heavy ion beam (PHIB) accelerator. In the device multiple shot operations is realized without breaking the vacuum. The basic characteristics of the device are evaluated experimentally with an aluminum wire of diameter 0.2 mm, length 25 mm. Capacitor bank of capacitance 3 μF, charging voltage 30 kV was used and the wire was successfully exploded by a discharge current of 15 kA, rise time 5.3 μs. Plasma flux of ion current density around 70 A/cm 2 was obtained at 150 mm downstream from the device. The drift velocity of ions evaluated by a time-of-flight method was 2.7x10 4 m/sec, which corresponds to the kinetic energy of 100 eV for aluminum ions. From the measurement of ion current density distribution ion flow is found to be concentrated to the direction where ion acceleration gap is placed. From the experiment the device is found to be acceptable for applying PHIB accelerator. (author)

  20. Linear Energy Transfer-Dependent Change in Rice Gene Expression Profile after Heavy-Ion Beam Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Ishii

    Full Text Available A heavy-ion beam has been recognized as an effective mutagen for plant breeding and applied to the many kinds of crops including rice. In contrast with X-ray or γ-ray, the heavy-ion beam is characterized by a high linear energy transfer (LET. LET is an important factor affecting several aspects of the irradiation effect, e.g. cell survival and mutation frequency, making the heavy-ion beam an effective mutagen. To study the mechanisms behind LET-dependent effects, expression profiling was performed after heavy-ion beam irradiation of imbibed rice seeds. Array-based experiments at three time points (0.5, 1, 2 h after the irradiation revealed that the number of up- or down-regulated genes was highest 2 h after irradiation. Array-based experiments with four different LETs at 2 h after irradiation identified LET-independent regulated genes that were up/down-regulated regardless of the value of LET; LET-dependent regulated genes, whose expression level increased with the rise of LET value, were also identified. Gene ontology (GO analysis of LET-independent up-regulated genes showed that some GO terms were commonly enriched, both 2 hours and 3 weeks after irradiation. GO terms enriched in LET-dependent regulated genes implied that some factor regulates genes that have kinase activity or DNA-binding activity in cooperation with the ATM gene. Of the LET-dependent up-regulated genes, OsPARP3 and OsPCNA were identified, which are involved in DNA repair pathways. This indicates that the Ku-independent alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway may contribute to repairing complex DNA legions induced by high-LET irradiation. These findings may clarify various LET-dependent responses in rice.

  1. Accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Sawyer, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Accelerator technology development is presented for heavy ion drivers used in inertial confinement fusion. The program includes construction of low-velocity ''test bed'' accelerator facilities, development of analytical and experimental techniques to characterize ion beam behavior, and the study of ion beam energy deposition

  2. Use of spectra from foil-excited heavy-ion beams to interpret radiation from plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra from foil-excited heavy ion beams can be used to investigate the relative abundance and charge state composition of heavy metal contaminants which cause severe radiative energy losses in tokamak-produced plasmas. The degree of ionization of these metals in the tokamak plasma is not well known because of uncertainties in ionization and recombination rates and particle confinement times. Only a few stages of ionization are typically prominent in foil-excited spectra, however, and both the most probable charge state and distribution width are well known. Highly ionized heavy ions (e.g., Ti, Mo, W and Au) which span the range of charge states found in present tokamaks were produced by passing beams from the Brookhaven MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility through 20 μg/cm 2 carbon stripping foils. EUV radiation was recorded with a grazing incidence spectrometer. Comparisons of the beam-foil spectra with radiation from plasmas, and recent direct determinations of atomic oscillator strengths for principal resonance lines of such highly ionized species as Li-like iron (Fe 23+ ), Na-like bromine (Br 24+ ), and Cu-like iodine (I 24+ ) are discussed

  3. Physics and radiobiology of heavy charged particles in relation to the use of ion beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Haberer, T.; Schardt, D.; Scholz, M.

    1993-07-01

    Heavy charged particles are the most advanced tool of an external subcutane radiotherapy of deep seated tumors. Small angular- and lateral-scattering and the increase of the energy deposition with penetration depth are the physical basis for a more efficient tumor targeting. High biological efficiency in the tumor is the prerequisite for a successful treatment of tumors radioresistant against sparsely ionizing radiation. The possibility to perform target conform irradiation and to control the achieved/actual distribution using PET techniques guarantees that biological highly efficient stepping particles can be restricted to the tumor volume only. Although the physical and radiobiological properties of ion beams are very favourable for therapy, the necessity to produce these particles in an accelerator restricts a general application of heavy ions up to now. Presently the heavy ion accelerator SIS at GSI is the only source of heavy ion beams, sufficient in energy and intensity for therapy. A therapy unit is in preparation at GSI, the status of this project is given at the end of the paper. (orig.)

  4. Ion beam studies. Pt. 3(a): the modelling of electrostatic mirrors for the manipulation and focussing of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beanland, D.G.; Freeman, J.H.

    1976-06-01

    Electrostatic mirrors have been used to steer, focus and scan intense beams of heavy ions. In this paper, an account is given of the computer modelling of such mirrors. Consideration is given to aperture effects in the lens and it is shown that shaped fields can be used to control the focussing behaviour. The mirror structure incorporates an additional negatively-biased electrode to prevent the penetration of the electric field through the apertures and along the beam trajectories outside the mirror space. This factor and the compact design minimise the space-charge de-focussing effects which normally militate against the use of such electrostatic lenses with high intensity ion beams. The experimental verification of the modelling for a variety of ion-beam manipulation requirements will be described in a subsequent paper. (author)

  5. Theoretical study of cylindrical energy analyzers for MeV range heavy ion beam probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Hamada, Y.

    1993-07-01

    A cylindrical energy analyzer with drift spaces is shown to have a second order focusing for beam incident angle when the deflection angle is properly chosen. The analyzer has a possibility to be applied to MeV range heavy ion beam probes, and will be also available for accurate particle energy measurements in many other fields. (author)

  6. Range shortening, radiation transport, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena in ion-beam-driven inertial-fusion-reactor-size targets: Implosion, ignition, and burn phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, K.A.; Tahir, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the theory of the energy deposition of ions in cold materials and hot dense plasmas together with numerical calculations for heavy and light ions of interest to ion-beam fusion. We have used the gorgon computer code of Long, Moritz, and Tahir (which is an extension of the code originally written for protons by Nardi, Peleg, and Zinamon) to carry out these calculations. The energy-deposition data calculated in this manner has been used in the design of heavy-ion-beam-driven fusion targets suitable for a reactor, by its inclusion in the medusa code of Christiansen, Ashby, and Roberts as extended by Tahir and Long. A number of other improvements have been made in this code and these are also discussed. Various aspects of the theoretical analysis of such targets are discussed including the calculation of the hydrodynamic stability, the hydrodynamic efficiency, and the gain. Various different target designs have been used, some of them new. In general these targets are driven by Bi + ions of energy 8--12 GeV, with an input energy of 4--6.5 MJ, with output energies in the range 600--900 MJ, and with gains in the range 120--180. The peak powers are in the range of 500--750 TW. We present detailed calculations of the ablation, compression, ignition, and burn phases. By the application of a new stability analysis which includes ablation and density-gradient effects we show that these targets appear to implode in a stable manner. Thus the targets designed offer working examples suited for use in a future inertial-confinement fusion reactor

  7. Proton and heavy ion beam (charged particle therapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2003-01-01

    There are distinguished therapeutic irradiation facilities of proton and heavy ion beam in Japan. The beam, due to its physical properties, is advantageous for focusing on the lesion in the body and for reducing the exposure dose to normal tissues, relative to X-ray. This makes it possible to irradiate the target lesion with the higher dose. The present review describes physical properties of the beam, equipments for the therapeutic irradiation, the respiratory-gated irradiation system, the layer-stacking irradiation system, therapy planning, and future prospect of the therapy. More than 1,400 patients have received the therapy in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) and given a good clinical outcome. The targets are cancers of the head and neck, lung, liver, uterine and prostate, and osteosarcoma. The therapy of osteosarcoma is particularly important, which bringing about the high cure rate. Severe adverse effects are not seen with exception for the digestive tract ulcer. Many attempts like the respiratory-gated and layer-stacking systems and to shorten the therapy period to within 1 week are in progress. (N.I.)

  8. Heavy-ion driver design and scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, R.; Monsler, M.; Meier, W.; Stewart, L.

    1992-01-01

    Parametric models for scaling heavy-ion driver designs are described. Scaling of target performance and driver cost is done for driver parameters including driver energy, number of beams, type of superconductor used in focusing magnets, maximum magnetic field allowed at the superconducting windings, linear quadrupole array packing fraction mass, and ion charge state. The cumulative accelerator voltage and beam currents are determined from the Maschke limits on beam current for each choice of driver energy and post-acceleration pulse duration. The heavy-ion driver is optimized over the large available driver parameter space. Parametric studies and the choice of a base driver model are described in a companion paper

  9. Physical aspects of heavy charged particle beams for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuhiro

    1989-01-01

    Physical properties of heavy ion beams are discussed to improve the physical dose distributions in view of radiotherapy. Preservation of the structural and functional integrity of adjacent normal tissue is required to achieve great probability of tumor control. This will be accomplished with the reduction of irradiated volume of normal tissues and with greater relative biological effectiveness (RBE) on tumor cells than that on surrounding normal cells. This suggests the use of heavy ion beams as new source of radiation that increases the therapeutic ratio. The basis of the improvement in the physical dose distribution by use of heavy charged particles is due to the finite range of the beams and to the less multiple coulomb scattering of the particles having a heavier atomic mass than proton. The depth dose distributions and dose profiles of heavy particle beams are discussed in this article. The lateral sharpness of heavy charged particles is comparable to the penumbra of high energy photon and electron beams and is not of clinical concern due to less coulomb scattering of heavy ions to lateral direction in traversing a medium. The dose gradient at the end of range of primary beam is dependent upon the energy spread and range straggling of the particles. The magnitude of range straggling is nearly proportional to the range and inversely proportional to the inverse square root of the particle mass. Heavy ion beams also undergo nuclear interactions, in which the primary beam may produce lower atomic number particles. Therefore, the dose beyond the Bragg peak is due to those fragments. Fragmentation increases as a function of the atomic mass to the 2/3 power and with the energy of the particles. Thus, the production of fragments diminishes the depth dose advantages of heavy ions. The choice of ion for radiotherapy may depend on evaluation of important parameter for tumor control. (J.P.N.)

  10. Heavy Ion Current Transients in SiGe HBTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, Robert A.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; McMorrow, Dale; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Baggio, Jacques; Paillet, Philipe; Duhanel, Olivier; Phillips, Stanley D.; Sutton, Akil K.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved ion beam induced charge reveals heavy ion response of IBM 5AM SiGe HBT: a) Position correlation[ b) Unique response for different bias schemes; c) Similarities to TPA pulsed-laser data. Heavy ion broad-beam transients provide more realistic device response: a) Feedback using microbeam data; b) Overcome issues of LET and ion range with microbeam. Both micro- and broad-beam data sets yield valuable input for TCAD simulations. Uncover detailed mechanisms for SiGe HBTs and other devices fabricated on lightly-doped substrates.

  11. Developing models for simulation of pinched-beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Mark, J.W.K.; Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    For heavy-ion fusion energy applications, Mark and Yu have derived hydrodynamic models for numerical simulation of energetic pinched-beams including self-pinches and external-current pinches. These pinched-beams are applicable to beam propagation in fusion chambers and to the US High Temperature Experiment. The closure of the Mark-Yu model is obtained with adiabatic assumptions mathematically analogous to those of Chew, Goldberger, and Low for MHD. Features of this hydrodynamic beam model are compared with a kinetic treatment

  12. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertazzi, B., E-mail: bruno.albertazzi@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); D' Humières, E. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lancia, L.; Antici, P. [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: Julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Böcker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O. [Institut für Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Bonlie, J.; Cauble, B.; Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Chen, S. N. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sentoku, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  13. Transport of heavy ions in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvazian, A.; Shahbandari Gouchani, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we have investigated the interaction of heavy ions (U) with a target (Au). In inertial confinement fusion method Interaction between heavy ion beam and target was simulated, Numerical analysis of the Boltzmann Fokker Planck equation used in order to optimize the material of the target and Energy deposition of ion beam to electrons and ions of target and The thickness of the target were calculated.

  14. Intense beams of light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, Noel

    1985-01-01

    Results of experiments performed in order to accelerate intense beams of light and heavier ions are presented. The accelerating diodes are driven by existing pulsed power generators. Optimization of the generator structure is described in chapter I. Nuclear diagnostics of the accelerated light ion beams are presented in chapter II. Chapter III deals with the physics of intense charged particle beams. The models developed are applied to the calculation of the performances of the ion diodes described in the previous chapters. Chapter IV reports preliminary results on a multiply ionized carbon source driven by a 0.1 TW pulsed power generator. (author) [fr

  15. Heavy ion storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented. 35 refs

  16. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  17. Numerical simulation studies of the LBNL heavy-ion beam combiner experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawley, W.M.; Seidl, P.; Haber, I.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy drivers. A major area of interest, both theoretically and experimentally, is the resultant transverse phase space dilution during the beam merging process. Currently, a prototype combining experiment is underway at LBNL and we have employed a variety of numerical descriptions to aid in both the initial design of the experiment data. These range from simple envelope codes to detailed 2- and 3-D PIC simulations. We compare the predictions of the different numerical models to each other and to experimental data at different longitudinal positions

  18. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-01-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams

  19. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C., E-mail: rodriguez@ganil.fr [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Caamaño, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Farget, F.; Grinyer, G.F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Ramos, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Suzuki, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2014-12-21

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a {sup 136}Xe beam are presented.

  20. Reduction of deposition asymmetries in directly driven ion-beam and laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have developed a procedure for reducing energy-dependent asymmetry in spherical targets driven directly by ion or laser beams. This work is part of a strategy for achieving illumination symmetry in such targets, which they propose as an alternative to those in the literature. This strategy allows an axially symmetric placement of beamlets, which would be convenient for some driver or reactor scenarios. It also allows the use of beam currents or energy fluxes to help reduce deposition asymmetry

  1. HISTRAP proposal: heavy-ion storage ring for atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D K; Alton, G D; Datz, S; Dittner, P F; Dowling, D T; Haynes, D L; Hudson, E D; Johnson, J W; Lee, I Y; Lord, R S

    1987-04-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy-Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed 46.8-m-circumference synchrotron-cooling-storage ring optimized to accelerate, decelerate, and store beams of highly charge very-heavy ions at energies appropriate for advanced atomic physics research. The ring is designed to allow studies of electron-ion, photon-ion, ion-atom, and ion-ion interactions. An electron cooling system will provide ion beams with small angular divergence and energy spread for precision spectroscopic studies and also is necessary to allow the deceleration of heavy ions to low energies. HISTRAP will have a maximum bending power of 2.0 T m and will be injected with ions from either the existing Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility 25-MV tandem accelerator or from a dedicated ECR source and 250 keV/nucleon RFQ linac.

  2. The case for exotic beams at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The case is presented for modifying the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide beams of proton-rich exotic isotopes, that do not occur terrestrially. A program of nuclear structure studies for light- and medium-mass, nearly self-conjugate nuclei and for heavy, proton-rich, quasibound nuclei is outlined, as are studies of hydrogen-burning reactions that occur in nucleosynthetic processes. Such a scientific program will provide a unique future for nuclear physics research at ORNL consistent with the long standing tradition of this laboratory

  3. Laser-driven ion acceleration: methods, challenges and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badziak, J.

    2018-01-01

    The recent development of laser technology has resulted in the construction of short-pulse lasers capable of generating fs light pulses with PW powers and intensities exceeding 1021 W/cm2, and has laid the basis for the multi-PW lasers, just being built in Europe, that will produce fs pulses of ultra-relativistic intensities ~ 1023 - 1024 W/cm2. The interaction of such an intense laser pulse with a dense target can result in the generation of collimated beams of ions of multi-MeV to GeV energies of sub-ps time durations and of extremely high beam intensities and ion fluencies, barely attainable with conventional RF-driven accelerators. Ion beams with such unique features have the potential for application in various fields of scientific research as well as in medical and technological developments. This paper provides a brief review of state-of-the art in laser-driven ion acceleration, with a focus on basic ion acceleration mechanisms and the production of ultra-intense ion beams. The challenges facing laser-driven ion acceleration studies, in particular those connected with potential applications of laser-accelerated ion beams, are also discussed.

  4. Is laser cooling for heavy-ion fusion feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.-M.; Brandon, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams, each with current in the kiloampere range and particle energy in the giga-electronvolt range, must be focused onto a millimetre-size spot to provide the power required for ignition of high-gain targets for inertial confinement fusion. However, the focal spot size is always enlarged by chromatic aberration generated by the thermal spread of the beam ions in the direction of beam propagation. Enlarged focal spot degrades the target performance. For high-current beams, the conventional remedy for chromatic aberration using sextupole magnets has been shown to be ineffective. If novel correction schemes can be found, then the spot size can be reduced to below that previously believed possible. Smaller spots can mean lower energy targets so that the heavy-ion fusion (HIF) scenario can look more attractive. Success in laser cooling of ion beams in storage rings has inspired us to explore the feasibility of applying laser cooling for HIF, and the recirculator configuration proposed for HIF appears to be well suited for this purpose. However, using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical arguments, we demonstrate in this paper that although laser cooling of heavy-ion beams is feasible in principle, the rapid velocity-space diffusion of ions in the bump-in-tail distribution, set up by the cooling lasers, limits the velocity-space compressibility of the thermal spread along the beam. Consequently, laser cooling is impractical for high-current, heavy-ion beams for the proposed recirculator configuration. Nevertheless, if the recirculator architecture or the target requirement can reduce the beam current, then the cooling scheme described here would be useful. This scheme may also be applicable to the RF linac and storage ring approach to HIF.

  5. Dosimetry in radiobiological studies with the heavy ion beam of the Warsaw cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaźmierczak, U.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Czub, J.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kruszewski, M.; Lankoff, A.; Lisowska, H.; Malinowska, A.; Stępkowski, T.; Szefliński, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify various dosimetry methods in the irradiation of biological materials with a 12 C ion beam at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw. To this end the number of ions hitting the cell nucleus, calculated on the basis of the Si-detector system used in the set-up, was compared with the number of ion tracks counted in irradiated Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors and with the number of ion tracks detected in irradiated Chinese Hamster Ovary cells processed for the γ-H2AX assay. Tests results were self-consistent and confirmed that the system serves its dosimetric purpose.

  6. Dosimetry in radiobiological studies with the heavy ion beam of the Warsaw cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaźmierczak, U. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świętokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Czub, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świętokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, ul. Andrzeja Sołtana 7, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Kruszewski, M. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Rural Health, ul. Jaczewskiego 2, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Lankoff, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świętokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Lisowska, H. [Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świętokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Malinowska, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, ul. Andrzeja Sołtana 7, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Stępkowski, T. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Szefliński, Z. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to verify various dosimetry methods in the irradiation of biological materials with a {sup 12}C ion beam at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw. To this end the number of ions hitting the cell nucleus, calculated on the basis of the Si-detector system used in the set-up, was compared with the number of ion tracks counted in irradiated Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors and with the number of ion tracks detected in irradiated Chinese Hamster Ovary cells processed for the γ-H2AX assay. Tests results were self-consistent and confirmed that the system serves its dosimetric purpose.

  7. Overview of Theory and Modeling in the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Lee, W.W.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Tzenov, S.; Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Celata, C.M.; De Hoon, M.; Henestroza, E.; Lee, E.P.; Yu, S.S.; Vay, J.-L.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents analytical and simulation studies of intense heavy ion beam propagation, including the injection, acceleration, transport and compression phases, and beam transport and focusing in background plasma in the target chamber. Analytical theory and simulations that support the High Current Experiment (HCX), the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and the advanced injector development program are being used to provide a basic understanding of the nonlinear beam dynamics and collective processes, and to develop design concepts for the next-step Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE), and a heavy ion fusion driver. Three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear perturbative simulations have been applied to collective instabilities driven by beam temperature anisotropy and to two-stream interactions between the beam ions and any unwanted background electrons. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the 2 MV Electrostatic Quadrupole (ESQ) injector have clarified the influence of pulse rise time. Analytical studies and simulations of the drift compression process have been carried out. Syntheses of a four-dimensional (4-D) particle distribution function from phase-space projections have been developed. And, studies of the generation and trapping of stray electrons in the beam self-fields have been performed. Particle-in-cell simulations, involving preformed plasma, are being used to study the influence of charge and current neutralization on the focusing of the ion beam in Neutralized Transport Experiment and in a fusion chamber

  8. Ion beam studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.H.; Chivers, D.J.; Gard, G.A.; Temple, W.

    1977-04-01

    A description of techniques for the production of intense beams of heavy ions is given. A table of recommended operational procedures for most elements is included. The ionisation of boron is considered in some detail because of its particular importance as a dopant for ion implantation. (author)

  9. Development of an IH-type linac for the acceleration of high current heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Jan Hendrik

    2017-07-20

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI Darmstadt will provide unprecedented intensities of protons and heavy ions up to uranium at energies of up to 29 GeV for protons and 2.7 GeV/u for U{sup 28+}. To achieve high intensities in the synchrotron accelerators, high beam currents have to be provided by the injector linear accelerators. High current heavy ion beams are provided by the Universal Linear Accelerator (UNILAC), which in its current state will not be able to provide the required FAIR beam currents. This thesis deals with the development of upgrades for the UNILAC to ensure its high current capability. The first improvement is a matching section (MEBT) for the interface between the RFQ and the IH-DTL of the existing high current injector HSI at the UNILAC. With this new MEBT section, particle losses are eliminated and the overall beam quality is improved. As a second improvement, a complete replacement of the existing Alvarez-DTL is presented. A combination of efficient IH-type cavities and KONUS beam dynamics results in a reduction of the linac length from about 60 m (Alvarez) to just 23 m (new IH-DTL) while providing the same energy and fulfilling FAIR requirements of a high beam current and beam quality. This thesis contains a detailed beam dynamics design of the new linac including some fundamental investigations of the KONUS beam dynamics concept. A cross-check of the beam dynamics design was performed with two independent multi-particle simulation codes. Detailed error studies were conducted to investigate the influence of manufacturing, alignment and operating errors on the beam dynamics performance. Additionally, all five linac cavities were designed, optimized, and their RF parameters including power requirements calculated to provide a comprehensive linac design.

  10. Development of an IH-type linac for the acceleration of high current heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, Jan Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI Darmstadt will provide unprecedented intensities of protons and heavy ions up to uranium at energies of up to 29 GeV for protons and 2.7 GeV/u for U 28+ . To achieve high intensities in the synchrotron accelerators, high beam currents have to be provided by the injector linear accelerators. High current heavy ion beams are provided by the Universal Linear Accelerator (UNILAC), which in its current state will not be able to provide the required FAIR beam currents. This thesis deals with the development of upgrades for the UNILAC to ensure its high current capability. The first improvement is a matching section (MEBT) for the interface between the RFQ and the IH-DTL of the existing high current injector HSI at the UNILAC. With this new MEBT section, particle losses are eliminated and the overall beam quality is improved. As a second improvement, a complete replacement of the existing Alvarez-DTL is presented. A combination of efficient IH-type cavities and KONUS beam dynamics results in a reduction of the linac length from about 60 m (Alvarez) to just 23 m (new IH-DTL) while providing the same energy and fulfilling FAIR requirements of a high beam current and beam quality. This thesis contains a detailed beam dynamics design of the new linac including some fundamental investigations of the KONUS beam dynamics concept. A cross-check of the beam dynamics design was performed with two independent multi-particle simulation codes. Detailed error studies were conducted to investigate the influence of manufacturing, alignment and operating errors on the beam dynamics performance. Additionally, all five linac cavities were designed, optimized, and their RF parameters including power requirements calculated to provide a comprehensive linac design.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory heavy ion beam transport experiments with a 2 mA 80 keV Xe+1 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.; Price, D.; Watson, J.

    1978-01-01

    The critical dimensions of the Argonne heavy ion beam transmission experiments and the experimental set-up are considered. Experimental results of beam transmission and emittance measurements are discussed

  12. Active trajectory control for a heavy ion beam probe on the compact helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.; Lee, S.; Crowley, T.P.; Hamada, Y.; Hidekuma, S.; Kojima, M.

    1996-05-01

    A 200 keV heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) on the Compact Helical System torsatron/heliotron uses a newly proposed method in order to control complicated beam trajectories in non-axisymmetrical devices. As a result, the HIBP has successfully measured potential profiles of the toroidal helical plasma. The article will describe the results of the potential profile measurements, together with the HIBP hardware system and procedures to realize the method. (author)

  13. Report of the heavy-ion fusion task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, G.A.; Booth, L.A.; Henderson, D.B.; Jameson, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.; Knapp, E.A.; Pollock, R.; Talbert, W.L.; Thode, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of heavy-ion fusion has been completed. Energetic heavy ions, for example 10-GeV uranium, provided by an rf linac or an induction linac, are used as alternatives to laser light to drive inertial confinement fusion pellets. The assessment has covered accelerator technology, transport of heavy-ion beams, target interaction physics, civilian power issues, and military applications. It is concluded that particle accelerators promise to be efficient pellet drivers, but that there are formidable technical problems to be solved. It is recommended that a moderate level research program on heavy-ion fusion be pursued and that LASL should continue to work on critical issues in accelerator development, beam transport, reactor systems studies, and target physics over the next few years

  14. Formation of a quasi-hollow beam of high-energy heavy ions using a multicell resonance RF deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, S. A.; Sitnikov, A. L.; Golubev, A. A.; Kulevoy, T. V.

    2012-09-01

    The generation of matter in an extreme state with precisely measurable parameters is of great interest for contemporary physics. One way of obtaining such a state is to irradiate the end of a hollow cylindrical shell at the center of which a test material is kept at a temperature of several Kelvin by an annular beam of high-energy heavy ions. Under the action of the beam, the shell starts explosively expanding both outwards and inwards, compressing the material to an extremely high pressure without subjecting it to direct heating. A method of producing a hollow cylindrical beam of high-energy heavy ions using a resonance rf deflector is described. The deflection of the beam in two transverse directions by means of an rf electric field allows it to rotate about the longitudinal axis and irradiate an annular domain on the end face of the target.

  15. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Varentsov, D; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Portugues, R F; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are consider...

  16. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory heavy ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Monsler, M.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    Target design at LLL for heavy ion fusion power production is discussed, including target development and beam-target interaction. The energy conversion chamber design, which utilizes a liquid lithium blanket, is described. Ion beam transport theory is discussed

  17. ATLAS One of the first Heavy ions collisions with stable beams- Event Display - November 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    One of the first heavy ions collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as orange arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the Liquid Argon and Scintillating Tile calorimeters respectively. The beam pipe and the inner detectors are also shown.

  18. High current vacuum arc ion source for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, N.; Schein, J.; Gensler, S.; Prasad, R.R.; Krishnan, M.; Brown, I.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy Ion fusion (HIF) is one of the approaches for the controlled thermonuclear power production. A source of heavy ions with charge states 1+ to 2+, in ∼0.5 A current beams with ∼20 micros pulse widths and ∼10 Hz repetition rates are required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the HIF program to date, but suffer from sloe turn-on, heating problems for large areas, are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states, in short and long pulse bursts, with low emittance and high beam currents. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications is investigated. An existing ion source at LBNL was modified to produce ∼0.5 A, ∼60 keV Gd (A∼158) ion beams. The experimental effort concentrated on beam noise reduction, pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and achieving low beam emittance at 0.5 A ion current level. Details of the source development will be reported

  19. Recoil ion spectroscopy with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.F.; Mann, R.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines the production of very high charge state ions in single ion-atom collisions. Topics considered include some aspects of highly ionized atoms, experimental approaches, the production of highly charged target ions (monoatomic targets, recoil energy distribution, molecular fragmentation, outer-shell rearrangement, lifetime measurements, a comparison of projectile-, target-, and plasma-ion stripping), and secondary collision experiments (selective electron capture, potential applications). The heavy-ion beams for the described experiments were provided by accelerators such as tandem Van de Graaff facility and the UNILAC

  20. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-01-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986)

  1. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986)

  2. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ∼ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi 0.85 Co 0.15 O 2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  3. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use

  4. Biological basis of heavy ion beams for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1985-01-01

    Fast neutron therapy has started firstly and proton therapy has commenced secondly, fast neutron shows better biological effects compared to conventional radiations but its dose distribution is not good, and proton demonstrates excellent dose distribution but its biological effects are almost the same as that of conventional radiations. On the other hand, negative pi-mesons and heavy ions indicate high radiobiological effect and excellent dose distribution, therefore these particle radiations is considered to be more attractive for radiotherapeutic radiations to enhance cure rate of cancers. The biological strong points of these particles are as follows : 1) cells exposed to these particle radiations shows less recovery after irradiation compared to conventional radiations, 2) these radiations show high biological effects (high value of relative biological effectiveness = RBE) when the same dose is given, 3) big effects on hypoxic cells which exsist in tumor, i.e. the value of oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) is low, 4) the differences in radiosensitivity by stages of cell cycle are not so great (data was not shown in present paper), 5) biological effects at prepeak plateau region in depth dose curve formed by these particle radiations is less than that at peak region (therefore, if beam is modulated to cover tumor at spraed out broad peak, tumors is given more biological effect compared to normal tissues which is to be exposed to radiations at prepaeak region). Clinical trial using heavy ions are being performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which is only one facility to be able to try clinical trial. The results of clinical trials at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory suggest to be very prospective to enhance tumor cure rate, however it is too early to estimate the effect of heavy ion therapy. (J.P.N.)

  5. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  6. Cell killing and chromosomal aberration induced by heavy-ion beams in cultured human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, K.; Funada, A.; Mohri, M.; Lee, R.; Aoki, M.; Furusawa, Y.; Gotoh, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human tumor cells irradaited with heavy-ion beams. The analyses were carried out on the basis of the linear energy transfer (LET) values of heavy ion beams as radiation source. Exponentially growing human tumor cells, Human Salivary Gland Tumor cells (HSG cells), were irradiated with various high energy heavy ions, such as 13 keV/micrometer carbon (C) ions as low LET charged particle radiation source, 120 keV/ micrometer carbon (C) ions and 440 keV/micrometer iron (Fe) ions as high LET charged particle radiation sources.The cell death was analysed by the colony formation method, and the chromosomal aberration and its repairing kinetics was analysed by prematurely chromosome condensation method (PCC method) using calyculin A. Chromatid-type breaks, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were scored for the samples from the cells keeping with various incubation time after irradiation. The LET dependence of the cell death was similar to that of the chromosome exchange formation after 12 hours incubation. A maximum peak was around 120 keV/micrometer. However it was not similar to the LET dependence of isochromatid breaks or chromatid breaks after 12 hours incubation. These results suggest that the exchanges formed in chromosome after irradiation should be one of essential causes to lead the cell death. The different quality of induced chromosome damage between high-LET and low-LET radiation was also shown. About 89 % and 88 % chromatid breaks induced by X rays and 13 keV/micrometer C ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation, though only 71% and 58 % of chromatid breaks induced by 120 keV/micrometer C ions and 440 keV/micrometer Fe ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation

  7. Development of a multi-layer ion chamber for measurement of depth dose distributions of heavy-ion therapeutic beam for individual patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Munefumi; Futami, Yasuyuki; Yusa, Ken; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko; Yamashita, Haruo; Akagi, Takashi; Higashi, Akio

    2000-01-01

    In heavy-ion radiotherapy, an accelerated beam is modified to realize a desired dose distribution in patients. The set-up of the beam-modifying devices in the irradiation system is changed according to the patient, and it is important to check the depth dose distributions in the patient. In order to measure dose distributions realized by an irradiation system for heavy-ion radiotherapy, a multi-layer ionization chamber (MLIC) was developed. The MLIC consists of 64 ionization chambers, which are stacked mutually. The interval between each ionization chamber is about 4.1 mm water. There are signal and high voltage plates in the MLIC, which are used as electrodes of the ionization chambers and phantom. Depth dose distribution from 5.09 mm to 261.92 mm water can be measured in about 30 seconds using this MLIC. Thus, it is possible to check beam quality in a short amount of time. (author)

  8. Towards the final MRPC design. Performance test with heavy ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppner, Ingo; Herrmann, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut Uni. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter spectrometer (CBM) is a future heavy ion experiment located at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The key element in CBM providing hadron identification at incident energies between 2 and 35 AGeV will be a 120 m{sup 2} large Time-of-Flight (ToF) wall composed of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) with a system time resolution better than 80 ps. Aiming for an interaction rate of 10 MHz for Au+Au collisions the MRPCs have to cope with an incident particle flux between 0.1 kHz/cm{sup 2} and 25 kHz/cm{sup 2} depending on their location. Characterized by granularity and rate capability the actual conceptual design of the ToF-wall foresees 4 different counter types called MRPC1 - MRPC4. In order to elaborate the final MRPC design of these counters a heavy ion test beam time was performed at GSI. In this contribution we present performance test results of 2 different MRPC3 full size prototypes developed at Heidelberg University and Tsinghua University, Beijing.

  9. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    beam transport in the reactor chamber of a heavy-ion-driven inertial-confinement-fusion energy system will also be discussed

  10. Preliminary results from MBE-4: A four beam induction linac for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.I.; Warwick, P.b.A.I.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a scaled experimental multiple beam induction linac. This experiment is part of a program of accelerator research for heavy ion fusion. It is shown that multiple beams can be accelerated without significant mutual interaction. Measurements of the longitudinal dynamics of a current-amplifying induction linac are presented and compared to calculations. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal dynamics is discussed

  11. Preliminary results from MBE-4: a four beam induction linac for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.I.

    1986-05-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a scaled experimental multiple beam induction linac. This experiment is part of a program of accelerator research for heavy ion fusion. It is shown that multiple beams can be accelerated without significant mutual interaction. Measurements of the longitudinal dynamics of a current-amplifying induction linac are presented and compared to calculations. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal dynamics is discussed

  12. Heavy-ion radiography applied to charged particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; Tobias, C.A.; Castro, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the heavy-ion radiography research program applied to the clinical cancer research program of charged particle radiotherapy have a twofold purpose: (1) to explore the manner in which heavy-ion radiography and CT reconstruction can provide improved tumor localization, treatment planning, and beam delivery for radiotherapy with accelerated heavy charged particles; and (2) to explore the usefulness of heavy-ion radiography in detecting, localizing, and sizing soft tissue cancers in the human body. The techniques and procedures developed for heavy-ion radiography should prove successful in support of charged particle radiotherapy

  13. Heavy-ion-fusion-science: summary of US progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past two years noteworthy experimental and theoretical progress has been made towards the top-level scientific question for the US programme on heavy-ion-fusion-science and high energy density physics: 'How can heavy-ion beams be compressed to the high intensity required to create high energy density matter and fusion conditions?' New results in transverse and longitudinal beam compression, high-brightness transport and beam acceleration will be reported. Central to this campaign is final beam compression. With a neutralizing plasma, we demonstrated transverse beam compression by an areal factor of over 100 and longitudinal compression by a factor of > 50. We also report on the first demonstration of simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression in plasma. High beam brightness is key to high intensity on target, and detailed experimental and theoretical studies on the effect of secondary electrons on beam brightness degradation are reported. A new accelerator concept for near-term low-cost target heating experiments was invented, and the predicted beam dynamics validated experimentally. We show how these scientific campaigns have created new opportunities for interesting target experiments in the warm dense matter regime. Finally, we summarize progress towards heavy-ion fusion, including the demonstration of a compact driver-size high-brightness ion injector. For all components of our high intensity campaign, the new results have been obtained via tightly coupled efforts in experiments, simulations and theory

  14. Principles of non-Liouvillean pulse compression by photoionization for heavy ion fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, I.

    1990-05-01

    Photoionization of single charged heavy ions has been proposed recently by Rubbia as a non-Liouvillean injection scheme from the linac into the storage rings of a driver accelerator for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The main idea of this scheme is the accumulation of high currents of heavy ions without the usually inevitable increase of phase space. Here we suggest to use the photoionization idea in an alternative scheme: if it is applied at the final stage of pulse compression (replacing the conventional bunch compression by an rf voltage, which always increases the momentum spread) there is a significant advantage in the performance of the accelerator. We show, in particular, that this new compression scheme has the potential to relax the tough stability limitations, which were identified in the heavy ion fusion reactor study HIBALL. Moreover, it is promising for achieving the higher beam power, which is suitable for indirectly driven fusion targets (10 16 Watts/gram in contrast with the 10 14 for the directly driven targets in HIBALL). The idea of non-Liouvillean bunch compression is to stack a large number of bunches (typically 50-100) in the same phase space volume during a change of charge state of the ion. A particular feature of this scheme with regard to beam dynamics is its transient nature, since the time required is one revolution per bunch. After the stacking the intense bunch is ejected and directly guided to the target. The present study is a first step to explore the possibly limiting effect of space charge under the conditions of parameters of a full-size driver accelerator. Preliminary results indicate that there is a limit to the effective stacking number (non-Liouvillean 'compression-factor'), which is, however, not prohibitive. Requirements to the power of the photon beam from a free electron laser are also discussed. It is seen that resonant cross sections of the order of 10 -15 cm 2 lead to photon beam powers of a few Megawatt. (orig.)

  15. RHIC heavy ion operations performance

    CERN Document Server

    Satogata, T; Ferrone, R; Pilat, F

    2006-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) completed its fifth year of operation in 2005, colliding copper ion beams with ps=200 GeV/u and 62.4 GeV/u[1]. Previous heavy ion runs have collided gold ions at ps=130 GeV/u, 200 GeV/u, and 62.4 GeV/u[2], and deuterons and gold ions at ps=200 GeV/u[3]. This paper discusses operational performance statistics of this facility, including Cu- Cu delivered luminosity, availability, calendar time spent in physics stores, and time between physics stores. We summarize the major factors affecting operations efficiency, and characterize machine activities between physics stores.

  16. Studies on the feasibility of heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This annual report summarizes the scientific results of work carried out in 1981 in the framework of a feasibility study for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) with heavy ion beams. This program, established in autumn 1979 and funded by the German Ministry for Science and Technology, is devoted in a first period until 1984 to the study of fundamental aspects of the field. Its principal aims are the investigation of key problems and the identification of critical issues of the heavy ion ICF concept in the fields of accelerator research, pellet physics, atomic physics, and reactor design. The research is carried out by about ten working groups at various German research centers and universities. In addition, together with a group of the University of Wisconsin a conceptual design study for a reactor plant (HIBALL) has been started in 1980 and was continued 1981. (orig.) [de

  17. International school-seminar on heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.

    1990-01-01

    The reports of the International school-seminar on heavy ion physics are presented. Scientific program of the school-seminar covers a wide spectrum of the today trends of investigations conducted using heavy ion beams within the energy range from several MeV/nucleon up to several GeV/nucleon

  18. Experimental investigation of a coherent flute instability using a heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowienka, J.C.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    A coherent, low-frequency instability found in a cylindrical, hollow cathode arc plasma has been investigated by using a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). The energy density of the plasma was high enough to render it inaccessible to Langmuir probes, but the HIBP was able to provide measurements throughout the plasma cross section. The data clearly show that azimuthal symmetry does not exist. Radial profiles of steady-state density and space potential and of simultaneous n, phi amplitude and phase were obtained to allow detailed comparison between theory and experiment. Predictions from a cylindrically symmetric, small-perturbation theoretical model provide reasonably conclusive identification of the instability as a Kelvin--Helmholtz flute driven by and localized in a region of fluid shear. The most serious discrepancy was with regard to the oscillation frequency, which was consistently predicted to be three to four times lower than that observed experimentally. The reason for the discrepancy is not understood, but it is probably related to inadequacies in the theory caused by assumptions of azimuthal symmetry and of small linear perturbations

  19. Study of plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus with a heavy-ion beam probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is generally strongly dependent on an ambipolar electric field. Spatially resolved measurements of the resulting electric space potential phi/sub sp/ have been made in a single plasma cross section by the heavy-ion beam probe. This diagnostic injects a 4-60-keV beam of (usually) Cs/sup +/ ions into the plasma. Measurement of the energy of Cs/sup 2 +/ secondary ions leaving the plasma gives a continuous monitor of the local space potential. In addition, the total detected Cs/sup 2 +/ ion current is proportional to the product of the local electron density and the ionization rate, which, in turn, is a function of the electron temperature. This signal, nf(T/sub e/), is sensitive to all three electron distributions found in EBT - those of the cold surface plasma, the warm core plasma, and the hot electron ring.

  20. Study of plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus with a heavy-ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is generally strongly dependent on an ambipolar electric field. Spatially resolved measurements of the resulting electric space potential phi/sub sp/ have been made in a single plasma cross section by the heavy-ion beam probe. This diagnostic injects a 4-60-keV beam of (usually) Cs + ions into the plasma. Measurement of the energy of Cs 2+ secondary ions leaving the plasma gives a continuous monitor of the local space potential. In addition, the total detected Cs 2+ ion current is proportional to the product of the local electron density and the ionization rate, which, in turn, is a function of the electron temperature. This signal, nf(T/sub e/), is sensitive to all three electron distributions found in EBT - those of the cold surface plasma, the warm core plasma, and the hot electron ring

  1. Design of power supply system for the prototype RF-driven negative ion source for neutral beam injection application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Caichao; Hu, Chundong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate school, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wei, Jianglong, E-mail: jlwei@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xie, Yahong; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Chen, Shiyong; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Yuanlai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A supporting power supply system was designed in details for a RF-driven prototype negative ion source at ASIPP. • The RF power supply for plasma generation adopts an all-solid-state power supply structure. • The extraction grid power supply adopts the pulse step modulator (PSM) technology. - Abstract: In order to study the generation and extraction of negative ions for neutral beam injection application, a prototype RF-driven negative ion source and the corresponding test bed are under construction at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The target of the negative ion source is extracting a negation ion beam of 350 A/m{sup 2} for 3600 s plasma duration and 100 s beam duration. According to the required parameters of test bed, the design of power supply system is put forward for earlier study. In this paper, the performance requirements and design schemes of RF power supply for plasma generation, impedance matching network, bias voltage power supply, and extraction voltage power supply for negative beam extraction are introduced in details. The schemes provide a reference for the construction of power supply system and lay a foundation for the next phase of experimental operation.

  2. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: emittance variations in current-amplifying ion induction lina; transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions; drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance; low emittance uniform- density C s + sources for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies; survey of alignment of MBE-4; time-of-flight dependence on the MBE-4 quadrupole voltage; high order calculation of the multiple content of three dimensional electrostatic geometries; an induction linac injector for scaled experiments; induction accelerator test module for HIF; longitudinal instability in HIF beams; and analysis of resonant longitudinal instability in a heavy ion induction linac

  3. Accelerator aspects of heavy ion induced inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, D

    1983-01-01

    Besides the possibilities of the magnetic fusion those of inertial fusion have increasingly found interest. Bundled photon and corpuscular beams shall be symetrically focussed from the outside on a pellet with the fusion fuel being compressed far beyond the density of the ordinary solids. Laser, light ion and heavy ion beams can be used as driver beams. The GSI took over the project leadership for a five years' research programme with formulated questions on heavy ion fusion. The project is promoted by the BMFT. During the international symposium the opportunity of intensive discussions on research work in this field in different countries was made use of.

  4. Acceleration of heavy-ion beams at the SF cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Yuzo; Yamazaki, Tsutomu.

    1984-10-01

    With the development of the new arc-heated cathode PIG type source, heavy-ion acceleration in the SF cyclotron has been drastically augmented, which means that a stable routine operation is being realized as well as the number of ion species is increasing. Excellent performance is also being exhibited with the arc power supply and gas feeding system required for the operation of the heavy-ion source. At present, the gaseous ions which are being accelerated are as follows: He, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, S, Ar and Xe. In the meantime, the metallic ions which are being accelerated likewise are Li, Be, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, Fe and Cu. In this paper, results of mainly the research of heavy-ion acceleration conducted during the period from 1983 to July 1984 are described. (author)

  5. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  6. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ∼17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ∼200 g/cm 3 and ∼20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ∼350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios

  7. Characteristic effects of heavy ion irradiation on the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.Z.; Takahashi, S.; Kubota, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Takeda, H.; Zhang, R.; Fukui, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has the feature to administer a large radiation dose in the vicinity of the endpoint in the beam range, and its irradiation system and biophysical characteristics are different from ordinary irradiation instruments like X- or gamma-rays. Using this special feature, heavy ion irradiation has been applied for cancer treatment. The safety and efficacy of heavy ion irradiator have been demonstrated to a great extent. For instance, brain tumors treated by heavy-ion beams became smaller or disappearance. However, fundamental research related to such clinical phenotypes and their underlying mechanisms are little known. In order to clarify characteristic effects of heavy ion irradiation on the brain, we developed an experimental system for irradiating a restricted region of the rat brain using heavy ion beams. The characteristics of the heavy ion beams, histological, behavioral and elemental changes were studied in the rat following heavy ion irradiation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 12 weeks and weighing 260-340 g (Shizuoka Laboratory Animal Center, Hamamatsu, Japan) were used. Rats were deeply anesthetized 10-15 minutes before irradiation with ketamine (40 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg), immobilized in a specifically designed jig, and irradiated with 290 MeV/nucleon charged carbon beams in a dorsal-to ventral direction, The left cerebral hemispheres of the brain were irradiated at doses of 100 Gy charged carbon particles. The depth-dose distribution of the heavy ion beams was modified to make a spread-out bragg peak of 5 mm wide with a range modulator. The characteristics of the heavy-ion beams (field and depth of the heavy-ion beams) were examined by a measuring paraffin section of rat brain at different thickness. That extensive necrosis was observed between 2.5 mm and 7.5 mm depth from the surface of the rat head, suggesting a relatively high dose and uniform dose was delivered among designed depths and the spread-out bragg peak used here

  8. Diagnosis of high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam generated by a novel magnetically insulated diode with gas puff plasma gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, H; Miyake, H; Masugata, K

    2008-10-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beam is expected to be applied to materials processing including surface modification and ion implantation. For those applications, it is very important to generate high-purity ion beams with various ion species. For this purpose, we have developed a new type of a magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun. When the ion diode was operated at a diode voltage of about 190 kV, a diode current of about 15 kA, and a pulse duration of about 100 ns, the ion beam with an ion current density of 54 A/cm(2) was obtained at 50 mm downstream from the anode. By evaluating the ion species and the energy spectrum of the ion beam via a Thomson parabola spectrometer, it was confirmed that the ion beam consists of nitrogen ions (N(+) and N(2+)) of energy of 100-400 keV and the proton impurities of energy of 90-200 keV. The purity of the beam was evaluated to be 94%. The high-purity pulsed nitrogen ion beam was successfully obtained by the developed ion diode system.

  9. Effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis by heavy ion beam-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.Y.; Saito, H.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Yoshida, S.; Abe, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Arabidopsis researches frequently include the genetic approach, so efficient, convenient, and safe methods for mutagenesis are required. Currently, the most popular method for in house mutagenesis is application of EMS. Although this method is very effective, its base substitution-type mutations often gives leaky mutants with residual gene functions, leading some difficulty in understanding the corresponding gene functions. Heavy ion beam generated by accelerators gives highest energy transfer rates among known radiation-based mutagenesis methods including X ray, gamma ray, fast neutron, electron and proton irradiation. This feature is thought to give high frequency of the double strand break of genomic DNA and resultant short deletions, resulting frame shift-type mutations. At RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF, http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/index-e.html), we have optimized conditions for effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis regarding to ion species and irradiation dose, and achieved comparable mutation rates to the method with EMS. (author)

  10. Multi-wire chamber system for heavy ion beam monitoring at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuperus, J.; Morgado, R.

    1975-03-01

    Horizontal and vertical integrated beam-current profiles are generated by a system of multi-wire chambers (32 wires/profile) operating in either the ionization or proportional mode. Sixteen distinct displays (1024 words) are digitally stored and any four may be simultaneously displayed. A new display can be generated at 64 ms intervals. A central control unit selects the mode of operation, the amount of delay after an appropriate trigger, the chamber integration time, and the particular chambers to be displayed. Operating in the proportional mode, the system can detect relativistic heavy-ion beam intensities as low as 10 4 charges cm -2 sec -1 . (U.S.)

  11. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  12. RF Beam control system for the Brookhaven relativistic heavy ion collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; Delong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  13. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  14. Long plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Grant Logan, Larry B.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William

    2009-01-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage (∼8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO 3 source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5x10 10 cm -3 density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios ∼120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high-energy-density physics applications.

  15. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.O.

    1988-09-01

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  16. Fusion at counterstreaming ion beams - ion optic fusion (IOF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryzinski, M.

    1981-01-01

    The results of investigation are briefly reviewed in the field of ion optic fusion performed at the Institute of Nuclear Research in Swierk. The ion optic fusion concept is based on the possibility of obtaining fusion energy at highly ordered motion of ions in counterstreaming ion beams. For this purpose TW ion beams must be produced and focused. To produce dense and charge-neutralized ion beams the selective conductivity and ballistic focusing ideas were formulated and used in a series of RPI devices with low-pressure cylindrical discharge between grid-type electrodes. 100 kA, 30 keV deuteron beams were successfully produced and focused into the volume of 1 cm 3 , yielding 10 9 neutrons per 200 ns shot on a heavy ice target. Cylindrically convergent ion beams with magnetic anti-defocusing were proposed in order to reach a positive energy gain at reasonable energy level. (J.U.)

  17. Study of the interaction between heavy ions and integrated circuits using a pulsed laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Fouillat, P.; Pouget, V.; Lapuyade, H.

    2002-01-01

    A new pulsed laser beam equipment dedicated to the characterization of integrated circuit is presented. Using ultra-short laser pulses is a convenient way to simulate experimentally the spatial environment of integrated circuits when interactions with heavy ions occur. This experimental set-up can be considered as a complementary tool for particle accelerators to evaluate the hardness assurance of integrated circuits for space applications. These particles generate temporally electrical disturbance called Single Event Effect (SEE). The theoretical approach of an equivalence between heavy ions and a laser pulses is discussed. The experimental set-up and some relevant operational methodologies are presented. Experimental results demonstrate that the induced electrical responses due to an heavy ion or a laser pulse are quite similar. Some sensitivity mappings of integrated circuits provided by this test bench illustrate the capabilities and the limitations of this laser-based technique. Contrary to the particle accelerators, it provides useful information concerning the spatial and temporal dependences of SEE mechanisms. (authors)

  18. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)696614; Stahl, Achim; Jowett, John M

    2015-10-09

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton–proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term “heavy-ion collisions” refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter l...

  19. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion-source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at. (Auth.)

  20. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at

  1. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop's program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants

  2. A large-scale mutant panel in wheat developed using heavy-ion beam mutagenesis and its application to genetic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Koji, E-mail: murai@fpu.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Fukui Prefectural University, 4-1-1 Matsuoka-Kenjojima, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1195 (Japan); Nishiura, Aiko [Department of Bioscience, Fukui Prefectural University, 4-1-1 Matsuoka-Kenjojima, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1195 (Japan); Kazama, Yusuke [RIKEN, Innovation Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN, Innovation Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Mutation analysis is a powerful tool for studying gene function. Heavy-ion beam mutagenesis is a comparatively new approach to inducing mutations in plants and is particularly efficient because of its high linear energy transfer (LET). High LET radiation induces a higher rate of DNA double-strand breaks than other mutagenic methods. Over the last 12 years, we have constructed a large-scale mutant panel in diploid einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum) using heavy-ion beam mutagenesis. Einkorn wheat seeds were exposed to a heavy-ion beam and then sown in the field. Selfed seeds from each spike of M{sub 1} plants were used to generate M{sub 2} lines. Every year, we obtained approximately 1000 M{sub 2} lines and eventually developed a mutant panel with 10,000 M{sub 2} lines in total. This mutant panel is being systematically screened for mutations affecting reproductive growth, and especially for flowering-time mutants. To date, we have identified several flowering-time mutants of great interest: non-flowering mutants (mvp: maintained vegetative phase), late-flowering mutants, and early-flowering mutants. These novel mutations will be of value for investigations of the genetic mechanism of flowering in wheat.

  3. Microdosimetry for a carbon ion beam using track-etched detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozova, I.; Ploc, O.; Davidkova, M.; Vondracek, V.; Sefl, M.; Stepan, V.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K.; Incerti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Track-etched detectors (TED) have been used as linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometers in heavy ion beams for many years. LET spectra and depth -dose distribution of a carbon ion beam were measured behind polymethylmethacrylate degraders at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan. The measurements were performed along monoenergetic beam with energy 290 MeV u -1 in different positions: (1) at beam extraction area, (2) at beginning, (3) maximum and (4) behind the Bragg peak region (0, 117, 147 and 151 mm of water-equivalent depth, respectively). The LET spectra inside and outside of the primary ion beam have been evaluated. TED record only heavy charged particles with LET above 8 -10 keV μm -1 , while electrons and ions with lower LET are not detected. The Geant4 simulation toolkit version 4.9.6.P01 has been used to estimate the contribution of non-detected particles to absorbed dose. Presented results demonstrate the applicability of TED for microdosimetry measurements in therapeutic carbon ion beams. (authors)

  4. 3D simulations of axially confined heavy ion beams in round and square pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1990-01-01

    We have been using the 3d PIC code WARP6 to model the behavior of beams in a heavy ion induction accelerator; such linacs are candidates for an ICF driver. Improvements have been added to the code to model an axially confined beam using comoving axial electric fields to simulate the confining ''ears'' applied to the accelerating pulses in a real system. We have also added a facility for modeling a beam in a round pipe, applying a capacity matrix to each axial Fourier mode in turn. These additions are described along with results, such as the effect of pipe shape on the beam quality degradation from quadrupole misalignments. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. 3D simulations of axially confined heavy ion beams in round and square pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1991-01-01

    We have been using the 3d PIC code WARP6 to model the behavior of beams in a heavy ion induction accelerator; such linacs are candidates for an ICF driver. Improvements have been added to the code to model an axially confined beam using comoving axial electric fields to simulate the confining ''ears'' applied to the accelerating pulses in a real system. We have also added a facility for modeling a beam in a round pipe, applying a capacity matrix to each axial Fourier mode in turn. These additions are described along with results, such as the effect of pipe shape on the beam quality degradation from quadrupole misalignments. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. BNL heavy ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschke, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    A principal attraction of heavy ion fusion is that existing accelerator technology and theory are sufficiently advanced to allow one to commence the design of a machine capable of igniting thermonuclear explosions. There are, however, a number of features which are not found in existing accelerators built for other purposes. The main thrust of the BNL Heavy Ion Fusion program has been to explore these features. Longitudinal beam bunching, very low velocity acceleration, and space charge neutralization are briefly discussed

  7. Effectiveness of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with audio-visual biofeedback for synchrotron-based scanned heavy-ion beam delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pengbo; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Ma, Yuanyuan

    2016-12-01

    A synchrotron-based heavy-ion accelerator operates in pulse mode at a low repetition rate that is comparable to a patient’s breathing rate. To overcome inefficiencies and interplay effects between the residual motion of the target and the scanned heavy-ion beam delivery process for conventional free breathing (FB)-based gating therapy, a novel respiratory guidance method was developed to help patients synchronize their breathing patterns with the synchrotron excitation patterns by performing short breath holds with the aid of personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment precision, efficiency and reproducibility of the respiratory guidance method in scanned heavy-ion beam delivery mode. Using 96 breathing traces from eight healthy volunteers who were asked to breathe freely and guided to perform short breath holds with the aid of BFB, a series of dedicated four-dimensional dose calculations (4DDC) were performed on a geometric model which was developed assuming a linear relationship between external surrogate and internal tumor motions. The outcome of the 4DDCs was quantified in terms of the treatment time, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose homogeneity index. Our results show that with the respiratory guidance method the treatment efficiency increased by a factor of 2.23-3.94 compared with FB gating, depending on the duty cycle settings. The magnitude of dose inhomogeneity for the respiratory guidance methods was 7.5 times less than that of the non-gated irradiation, and good reproducibility of breathing guidance among different fractions was achieved. Thus, our study indicates that the respiratory guidance method not only improved the overall treatment efficiency of respiratory-gated scanned heavy-ion beam delivery, but also had the advantages of lower dose uncertainty and better reproducibility among fractions.

  8. Mutation effect of streptomyces kitasatoensis after exposure to heavy ions radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Chen Jihong; Wang Shuyang; Li Wenjian

    2011-01-01

    To define the optimum dose of heavy ion beams for selecting high productive strains, we should study mortality and mutation effects of Streptomyces kitasatoensis irradiated by heavy ion beams in different doses. In this research, spores of Streptomyces kitasatoensis were irradiated by heavy ion beams with different doses. And survival rate, mortality rate, positive mutation and negative mutation were analyzed statistically. The results showed that high mortality rate appeared from 5 Gy and then the mortality rate curve became gently. Compared the positive and negative mutations in different doses, highest positive mutation was obtained in 40 Gy, while the negative mutation was lower in this dose, and the survival rate was 0.92%. So we defined that optimum dose of heavy ions radiation for Streptomyces kitasatoensis selection was 40 Gy in this experiment. (authors)

  9. Heavy ion fusion notes 94-1 through 94-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, D.; Rintamaki, J.; Lund, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains information on the following topics dealing with heavy ion fusion accelerators: steering errors and corrections in a small recirculator; evaluation of a capacitive beam position monitor diagnostic for use on the heavy ion recirculator; beam steering with dipole biased electrostatic quadrupoles; estimate of emittance growth; c-probes for the recirculator; analysis of the dipole plate shape and location; and generation of electric dipole waveforms

  10. Heavy ion fusion notes 94-1 through 94-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, D.; Rintamaki, J.; Lund, S. [and others

    1995-03-13

    This report contains information on the following topics dealing with heavy ion fusion accelerators: steering errors and corrections in a small recirculator; evaluation of a capacitive beam position monitor diagnostic for use on the heavy ion recirculator; beam steering with dipole biased electrostatic quadrupoles; estimate of emittance growth; c-probes for the recirculator; analysis of the dipole plate shape and location; and generation of electric dipole waveforms.

  11. Ion-beam texturing of uniaxially textured Ni films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.J.; Norton, D.P.; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    The formation of biaxial texture in uniaxially textured Ni thin films via Ar-ion irradiation is reported. The ion-beam irradiation was not simultaneous with deposition. Instead, the ion beam irradiates the uniaxially textured film surface with no impinging deposition flux, which differs from conventional ion-beam-assisted deposition. The uniaxial texture is established via a nonion beam process, with the in-plane texture imposed on the uniaxial film via ion beam bombardment. Within this sequential ion beam texturing method, grain alignment is driven by selective etching and grain overgrowth

  12. Heavy ion beam probe development for the plasma potential measurement on the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askinazi, L.G.; Kornev, V.A.; Lebedev, S.V.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Zhubr, N.A.; Dreval, N.B.; Krupnik, L.I.

    2004-01-01

    The peculiarities of the heavy ion beam probe implementation on the small aspect ratio tokamak TUMAN-3M are analyzed. The toroidal displacement of beam trajectory due to the high I pl /B tor ratio is taken into account when designing the layout of the diagnostic. Numerical calculation of beam trajectories using realistic configuration of TUMAN-3M magnetic fields and parabolic plasma current profile resulted in proper adjustment of probing and detection parameters (probing ion material, energy, entrance angles, detector location, and orientation). Secondary ion energy analyzer gain functions G and F were measured in situ using neutral hydrogen puffed in the tokamak vessel as a target for secondary ions production. The detector unit featured split-plate design and had additional electrodes for secondary electron emission suppression. As a result, the diagnostic is now capable of plasma potential evolution measurement and is sensitive enough to trace the potential profile evolution at the L-H mode transition

  13. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two accelerator scenarios for heavy ion fusion are considered as driver candidates for an ICF power plant: the RF linac with storage rings and the induction linac. The necessary beam intensity and beam quality requirements are already believed to be achievable in the long run; repetition rate and accelerator efficiency are not critical issues. Conceptual design studies have indicated that the technical problems of the ICF concept with a heavy ion driver can be solved and that the economical aspects are not prohibitive as compared to other ICF concepts. Nevertheless, many open problems still exist, and some new ones have exhibited themselves, and it has become evident that most of them cannot be investigated with existing facilities and at the present level of effort. The first section of this paper deals with current conceptual design studies and focuses on the interface between the accelerator and the reactor. The second section summarizes the present research programs and recommends that their scope should be expanded and intensified in the areas of accelerator physics and beam-target interaction and target physics. In the third section the author calls for a dedicated facility and reports on the plans and ideas for such a facility. Schematics of two proposed accelerator driver systems--the driver for HIBALL (5 MJ/pulse) and a single-pass four-beam induction linac (3 MJ/pulse)--are provided

  14. Respectives of heavy ion physics in JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flerov, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Perspectives of heavy ion physics in JINR are discussed. The main attention is paid to directions that are connected with the application of intensive beams of U-400 cyclotron. Experiments into studying stability limits of heavy atomic nuclei are considered. The possibility of using beams of heavy ions in applied fields, particularly for the production of very thin nuclear filters is noted. Prospects of synthesis of superheavy elements (SHE) and SHE search in nature are also considered. The data on the events of spontaneous fission found in meteorite and hydrotherms and the data on lengths of tracks in olivines from meteorite prove the possibility of obtaining evidences of SHE existence in nature

  15. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.H., E-mail: zhangxiaohu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yuan, Y.J.; Yin, X.J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du, H.; Li, Z.S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W.; Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-11

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  16. Can one crystallize a heavy ion beam?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.

    1990-05-01

    We study the possibility of obtaining liquid or crystalline ordered structures in a cooled heavy ion beam in a storage ring. First the structure of very cold ions confined in a cylindrically symmetric static potential is explored by means of molecular dynamics calculations. Liquid like structures are obtained for the ratio of average Coulomb to thermal energies and Γ ≅ 10 and crystalline structures like strings, zigzags, helices, tetrehedra, intertwined helices, polygons, etc. emerge for Γ > 25. For larger densities, the particles arrange in cylindrical shells and form equilateral triangles on their surfaces arranged in hexagons which are characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb solids. The molecular dynamics results are compared to results of energy minimization of these structures or of geometrical models. Realistic molecular dynamics calculations in the lattice of the Experimental Storage Ring at GSI Darmstadt including the effects of the bending, focussing and defocussing magnets, of the free sections and of the electron cooler revealed that such structures at higher densities are easily destroyed by heating through shearing forces. Therefore the dynamics of the simple Coulomb string is explored in more detail. The potential energy for large amplitude longitudinal and transverse vibrations is calculated and the dispersion relations and response functions in the harmonic limit are given and possible excitation mechanisms are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  18. Transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, T.; Eylon, S.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.

    1991-01-01

    Current amplification of heavy ion beams is an integral feature of the induction linac approach to heavy ion fusion. As part of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research program at LBL the authors have been studying the evolution of the transverse emittance of ion beams while they are undergoing current amplification, achieved by longitudinal bunch compression and acceleration. Experiments are conducted on MBE-4, a four beam Cs + induction linac. The space-charge dominated beams of MBE-4 are focused by electrostatic quadrupoles while they are accelerated from nominally 200 keV up to ∼ 1 MEV by 24 accelerating gaps. Initially the beams have currents of typically 4 mA to 10 mA per beam. Early experimental results showed a growth of the normalized emittance by a factor of 2 while the beam current was amplified by up to 9 times its initial value. The authors will discuss the results of recent experiments in which a mild bunch length compression rate, more typical of that required by a fusion driver, has shown that the normalized emittance can be maintained at its injection value (0.03 mm-mr) during acceleration

  19. Prototype inverted sputter source for negative heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kikuchi, Shiroh

    1977-10-01

    A sputter source from which negative heavy ion beam is extracted through a tungsten wire and disc ionizer was built and tested. An alkali metal surface ionization gun with the ionizer is described, and also performance of the surface ionization gun and of the sputter source for negative heavy ions using the gun is reported. The gun was tested for three alkali metals, i.e. sodium, potassium and cesium. Total potassium beam current of 1-2mA was obtained at entrance aperture of the magnet. Sputtering materials and gases for producing negative heavy ions are carbon, copper, aluminium, molybdenum, oxygen and air. With carbon and leakage air, the beam intensities analyzed are: 2-5μA (at Faraday cup) and 4.6-11μA (at exit slit) for C - , 3-5μA (at Faraday cup) and 6.8-11μA (at exit slit) for 2C - , and 11-15μA (at Faraday cup) and 25-34μA (at exit slit) for O - . Total beam current at the entrance aperture was 200-400μA. (auth.)

  20. Cyclotron method for heavy ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gikal, B.N.; Gul'bekyan, G.G.; Kutner, V.B.; Oganesyan, R.Ts.

    1984-01-01

    Studies on heavy ion beams in a wide range of masses (up to uranium) and energies disclose essential potential opportunities for solution of both fundamental scientific and significant economical problems. A cyclotron method for heavy ion acceleration is considered. Development of low and medium energy heavy ion accelerators is revealed. The design of a complex comprising two isochronous cyclotrons which is planned to be constrdcted 1n the JINR is described. The cyclotron complex includes the U-400 and the U-400 M cyclotrons and it is intended for acceleration of both 35-20 MeV/nucleon superheavy ions such as Xe-U and 120 MeV/nucleon light ions. Certain systems of the accelerators are described. Prospects of the U-400 and the U-400 M development are displayed

  1. Calculation of ion storage in electron beams with account of ion-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Shirkov, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    Ion storage in relativistic electron beams was calculated taking account of ion-ion charge exchange and ionization. The calculations were made for nitrogen ion storage from residual gas during the compression of electron rings in the adhezator of the JINR heavy ion accelerator. The calculations were made for rings of various parameters and for various pressures of the residual gas. The results are compared with analogous calculations made without account of ion-ion processes. It is shown that at heavy loading of a ring by ions ion-ion collisions play a significant part, and they should be taken into account while calculating ion storage

  2. Review of target studies for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.D.; Mark, J.W.K.; Pan, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    We present an updated set of gain curves for radiation driven ion beam targets. The improved target performance calculated with nuclear spin polarized fuel will also be discussed. We discuss the conditions required for efficient conversion to x-rays of ion beam energy. These requirements are compared with those obtained for lasers. Recent results on symmetry requirements for direct drive ion beam targets are presented

  3. Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 (micro)s pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV

  4. New heavy-ion accelerator facility at Oak Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelson, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    Funds were obtained to establish a new national heavy-ion facility to be located at Oak Ridge. The principal component of this facility is a 25-MW tandem designed specifically for good heavy-ion acceleration, which will provide high quality beams of medium weight ions for nuclear research by itself. The tandem beams will also be injected into ORIC for additional energy gain, so that usable beams for nuclear physics research can be extended to about A = 160. A notable feature of the tandem is that it will be of the ''folded'' type, in which both the negative and positive accelerating tubes are contained in the same column. The accelerator system, the experimental lay-out, and the time schedule for the project are discussed

  5. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  6. Lifetimes of relativistic heavy-ion beams in the High Energy Storage Ring of FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelko, V. P.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Stöhlker, Th.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.

    2018-04-01

    The High Energy Storage Ring, HESR, will be constructed at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, Darmstadt. For the first time, it will be possible to perform experiments with cooled high-intensity stable and radioactive heavy ions at highly relativistic energies. To design experiments at the HESR, realistic estimations of beam lifetimes are indispensable. Here we report calculated cross sections and lifetimes for typical U88+ , U90+ , U92+ , Sn49+ and Sn50+ ions in the energy range E = 400 MeV/u-5 GeV/u, relevant for the HESR. Interactions with the residual gas and with internal gas-jet targets are also considered.

  7. Double-differential heavy-ion production cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T. M.; Townsend, L. W.

    2004-01-01

    Current computational tools used for space or accelerator shielding studies transport energetic heavy ions either using a one-dimensional straight-ahead approximation or by dissociating the nuclei into protons and neutrons and then performing neutron and proton transport using Monte Carlo techniques. Although the heavy secondary particles generally travel close to the beam direction, a proper treatment of the light ions produced in these reactions requires that double-differential cross sections should be utilised. Unfortunately, no fundamental nuclear model capable of serving as an event generator to provide these cross sections for all ions and energies of interest exists currently. Herein, we present a model for producing double-differential heavy-ion production cross sections that uses heavy-ion fragmentation yields produced by the NUCFRG2 fragmentation code coupled with a model of energy degradation in nucleus-nucleus collisions and systematics of momentum distributions to provide energy and angular dependences of the heavy-ion production. (authors)

  8. Prospects for high energy heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, C.

    1979-03-01

    The acceleration of heavy ions to relativistic energies (T greater than or equal to 1 GeV/amu) at the beam intensities required for fundamental research falls clearly in the domain of synchrotons. Up to date, such beams have been obtained from machines originally designed as proton acccelerators by means of modified RF-programs, improved vacuum and, most importantly, altered or entirely new injector systems. Similarly, for the future, substantial changes in synchrotron design itself are not foreseen, but rather the judicious application and development of presently known principles and technologies and a choice of parameters optimized with respect to the peculiarities of heavy ions. The low charge to mass ratio, q/A, of very heavy ions demands that superconducting magnets be considered in the interest of the highest energies for a given machine size. Injector brightness will continue to be of highest importance, and although space charge effects such as tune shifts will be increased by a factor q 2 /A compared with protons, advances in linac current and brightness, rather than substantially higher energies are required to best utilize a given synchrotron acceptance. However, high yeilds of fully stripped, very heavy ions demand energies of a few hundred MeV/amu, thus indicating the need for a booster synchrotron, although for entirely different reasons than in proton facilities. Finally, should we consider colliding beams, the high charge of heavy ions will impose severe current limitations and put high demands on system design with regard to such quantities as e.g., wall impedances or the ion induced gas desorption rate, and advanced concepts such as low β insertions with suppressed dispersion and very small crossing angles will be essential to the achievement of useful luminosities

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor

  10. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on heavy-ion fusion accelerator research: MBE-4: the induction-linac approach; transverse beam dynamics and current amplification; scaling up the results; through ILSE to a driver; ion-source and injector development; and accelerator component research and development

  11. A concept for emittance reduction of DC radioactive heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.; Dooling, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that it should be possible to use an electron beam to strip 1+ DC radioactive ion beams to 2+ or higher charge states with on the order of 50% efficiency. The device, which the authors call an Electron-Beam Charge-State Amplifier, is similar to an Electron Beam Ion Source, except that it is not pulsed, the beams are continuous. The 2+ beams are obtained in a single pass through a magnetic solenoid while higher charge states may be reached via multiple passes. An unexpected result of the ion optics simulations is that the normalized transverse emittance of the ion beam is reduced in proportion to the charge-state gain. Ion beams with realistic emittances and zero angular momentum relative to the optic axis before entering the solenoid will travel though the solenoid on helical orbits which intercept the axis once per cycle. With an ion beam about 2 mm in diameter and an electron beam about 0.2 mm in diameter, the ion stripping only occurs very near the optic axis, resulting in the emittance reduction

  12. On-line monitoring of heavy-ion therapy using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present results of on-line monitoring of heavy-ion therapy using PET. It is concluded that in-beam positron emission tomography is a feasible and valuable method for in-situ and non-invasive monitoring of heavy-ion therapy

  13. Multispecies Weibel Instability for Intense Ion Beam Propagation Through Background Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Ronald C; Kaganovich, Igor D; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    In application of heavy ion beams to high energy density physics and fusion, background plasma is utilized to neutralize the beam space charge during drift compression and/or final focus of the ion beam. It is important to minimize the deleterious effects of collective instabilities on beam quality associated with beam-plasma interactions. Plasma electrons tend to neutralize both the space charge and current of the beam ions. It is shown that the presence of the return current greatly modifies the electromagnetic Weibel instability (also called the filamentation instability), i.e., the growth rate of the filamentation instability greatly increases if the background ions are much lighter than the beam ions and the plasma density is comparable to the ion beam density. This may preclude using underdense plasma of light gases in heavy ion beam applications. It is also shown that the return current may be subject to the fast electrostatic two-stream instability.

  14. A heavy ion pre-injector for the ICT-ion implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, P.K.; Gaonkar, S.; Wagh, A.G.; Hattangadi, V.A.; Sarma, N.

    1976-01-01

    A cheap and versatile hollow cathode electron bombardment ion source system including its ion extraction-cum-focussing assembly for obtaining intense heavy ion beams of solids and gases is described. The extractor region is designed to include more than 15deg total beam angle of extracted beam for producing focused ion current densities upto 60mA/cm 2 to serve as a pre-injector for the ICT(insulated core transformer) type ion implanter. The extraction-cum-focussing lens is a low aberration strong Einzel lens system of all araldite and metal construction with optical elements of proper quality and location to suit low voltage injection and subsequent ion analysis. The injection can be selected anywhere between 2 to 10 keV for singly charged ions with typical extraction currents of 500/μ, using a ring anode and a source aperture of 20 mil. Einzel lens focussing assembly allows continuous adjustment of the beam convergence to about 5deg and the beam size to approximately 5mm in diameter with about 10 KV central electrode potential. Test results of source characteristics for both the accelerating and decelerating model of beam formation have been made. (author)

  15. Ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.

    1995-09-01

    The development of ion sources for heavy ion fusion will be reported with particular emphasis on a recently built 2 MV injector. The new injector is based on an electrostatic quadrupole configuration, and has produced pulsed K + ions of 950 mA peak from a 6.7 inch curved alumino silicate source. The ion beam has reached 2.3 MV with an energy flatness of ±0.2% over 1 micros. The measured normalized edge emittance of less than 1 π mm-mr is close to the source temperature limit. The design, construction, performance, and comparisons with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations will be described

  16. HIAF: New opportunities for atomic physics with highly charged heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Wen, W. Q.; Zhang, S. F.; Yu, D. Y.; Cheng, R.; Yang, J.; Huang, Z. K.; Wang, H. B.; Zhu, X. L.; Cai, X.; Zhao, Y. T.; Mao, L. J.; Yang, J. C.; Zhou, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Zhao, H. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Zhan, W. L.

    2017-10-01

    A new project, High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF), is currently being under design and construction in China. HIAF will provide beams of stable and unstable heavy ions with high energies, high intensities and high quality. An overview of new opportunities for atomic physics using highly charged ions and radioactive heavy ions at HIAF is given.

  17. Ion beam inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1995-01-01

    About twenty years ago, A. W. Maschke of Brookhaven National Laboratory and R. L. Martin of Argonne National Laboratory recognized that the accelerators that have been developed for high energy and nuclear physics are, in many ways, ideally suited to the requirements of inertial fusion power production. These accelerators are reliable, they have a long operating life, and they can be efficient. Maschke and Martin noted that they can focus ion beams to small focal spots over distances of many meters and that they can readily operate at the high pulse repetition rates needed for commercial power production. Fusion, however, does impose some important new constraints that are not important for high energy or nuclear physics applications. The most challenging new constraint from a scientific standpoint is the requirement that the accelerator deliver more than 10 14 W of beam power to a small quantity (less than 100 mg) of matter. The most challenging constraint from an engineering standpoint is accelerator cost. Maschke showed theoretically that accelerators could produce adequate work. Heavy-ion fusion is widely recognized to be a promising approach to inertial fusion power production. It provides an excellent opportunity to apply methods and technology developed for basic science to an important societal need. The pulsed-power community has developed a complementary, parallel approach to ion beam fusion known as light-ion fusion. The talk will discuss both heavy-ion and light-ion fusion. It will explain target physics requirements and show how they lead to constraints on the usual accelerator parameters such as kinetic energy, current, and emittance. The talk will discuss experiments that are presently underway, specifically experiments on high-current ion sources and injectors, pulsed-power machines recirculating induction accelerators, and transverse beam combining. The talk will give a brief description of a proposed new accelerator called Elise

  18. 0,01-5 MeV heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, V.P.; Ivanov, A.S.; Nikiforov, S.A.; Svin'in, M.P.; Tarvid, G.V.; Troshikhin, A.G.; Fedotov, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The results of development of an accelerating complex on the base of the UP-2-1 heavy ion charge exchange accelerator and IMPLANT-500 high-voltage heavy ion accelerator are given. The accelerating complex provides overlapping of the 0.01 MeV to 5 MeV energy range at accelerated beam currents of 10 -3 -10 -6 A order. The structural features of accelerators and their basic units and systems are considered. The UP-2-1 accelerator is designed for researches in the field of experimental physics and applied problem solutions. The IMPLANT-500 accelerator is designed for commercial ion-beam facilities with closed loop of silicon plate treatment

  19. Chamber propagation physics for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Chamber transport is an important area of study for heavy ion fusion. Final focus and chamber-transport are high leverage areas providing opportunities to significantly decrease the cost of electricity from a heavy ion fusion power plant. Chamber transport in two basic regimes is under consideration. In the low chamber density regime (approx-lt 0.003 torr), ballistic or nearly-ballistic transport is used. Partial beam neutralization has been studied to offset the effects of beam stripping. In the high chamber density regime (approx-gt.1 torr), two transport modes (pinched transport and channel transport) are under investigation. Both involve focusing the beam outside the chamber then transporting it at small radius (∼ 2 mm). Both high chamber density modes relax the constraints on the beam quality needed from the accelerator which will reduce the driver cost and the cost of electricity

  20. The technology of heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1980-09-01

    The concept of inertial confinement fusion using heavy ion beams as a driver is surveyed, with reference to parameters which might ultimately be suitable for a commercial power station. Particular attention is drawn to the parameters associated with the final focusing of the beam on the target. (author)

  1. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, Michaela

    2015-04-29

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton-proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term ''heavy-ion collisions'' refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter luminosity lifetimes. As the production cross-sections for various physics processes under study of the experiments are still small at energies reachable with the LHC and because the heavy-ion run time is limited to a few days per year, it is essential to obtain the highest possible collision rate, i.e. maximise the instantaneous luminosity, in order to obtain enough events and therefore low statistical errors. Within this thesis, the past performance of the LHC in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair, is analysed and potential luminosity limitations are identified. Tools are developed to predict future performance and techniques are presented to further increase the luminosity. Finally, a perspective on the future of high energy heavy-ion colliders is given.

  2. Medical heavy ion accelerator proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, R.A.

    1985-05-01

    For several decades, accelerators designed primarily for research in nuclear and high energy physics have been adapted for biomedical research including radiotherapeutic treatment of human diseases such as pituitary disorders, cancer, and more recently, arteriovascular malformations. The particles used in these treatments include pions, protons and heavier ions such as carbon, neon, silicon and argon. Maximum beam energies must be available to penetrate into an equivalent of about 30 cm of water, requiring treatment beams of 250 to 1000 MeV/nucleon. Certain special treatments of superficial melanoma, however, require that beam energies as low as 70 MeV/nucleon also be available. Intensities must be adequate to complete a 100 rad treatment fraction in about 1 minute. For most heavy ion treatments, this corresponds to 10 7 -10 9 ions/second at the patient. Because this research is best conducted in a dedicated, hospital-based facility, and because of the clinical need for ultra-high reliability, the construction of new and dedicated facilities has been proposed. Heavy ion accelerators can provide a variety of ions and energies, permitting treatment plans that exploit the properties of the ion best suited to each individual treatment, and that employ radioactive beams (such as 11 C and 19 Ne) to precisely confirm the dose localization. The favored technical approach in these proposals utilizes a conventional, strong-focusing synchrotron capable of fast switching between ions and energies, and servicing multiple treatment rooms. Specialized techniques for shaping the dose to conform to irregularly-shaped target volumes, while simultaneously sparing surrounding, healthy tissue and critical structures, are employed in each treatment room, together with the sophisticated dosimetry necessary for verification, monitoring, and patient safety. 3 refs., 8 figs

  3. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators

  4. High-energy elastic recoil detection heavy ions for light element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goppelt-Langer, P.; Yamamoto, S.; Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Naramoto, H.

    1994-01-01

    The detection of light and medium heavy elements in not homogeneous solids is a severe problem in ion beam analysis. Heavy elements can be detected by the well established Rutherford backscattering technique (RBS). In a homogeneous host material most impurities can be easily analyzed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Some isotopes ( 3 He, 6 Li, 10 B) can be measured by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using thermal neutrons inducing (n, p) or (n, α) reactions. Others can be detected by energetic ion beams by nuclear reactions (e.g. 15 N( 1 H, αγ) 12 C for analysis of hydrogen). A high content of H, D or T can be also determined by elastic recoil detection using an energetic He beam. The latter technique has been developed to a universal method for detection of light and heavy elements in any target, using a high energetic heavy ion beam and a detector system, which is able to identify the recoils and delivers energy and position of the particles. (author)

  5. The present state and perspectives of low-energy heavy ion biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chengling; Yu Zengliang

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between low-energy ions and matter has been concerned rarely comparing to that of high-energy ions. It is even more unusual to find studies of the interaction of low-energy ions and complicated organisms. However, the discovery of bioeffects induced by ion beam implantation has opened a new branch in the field of ion beam applications in the life science--Low-energy Heavy Ion Biology. The mutagenic effect of low energy heavy ions was firstly reported in 1986 in rice. Since then, a damage mechanism involved in energy absorption, mass deposition, and charge exchange has been proposed. Accumulating evidence has indicated that these three factors are key determinants in the bioeffects induced by low energy heavy ions, which has opened new opportunities for mutational breeding, gene transferring, cell modification, and cell fusion. In recent years, the ion beam implantation technique has been widely applied in many fields, and increasing research interest in the field has been seen. The authors summarize recent advances in research on the role of low-energy ions in terms of the mechanisms and applications

  6. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility's radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date

  7. Heavy Ion Injection Into Synchrotrons, Based On Electron String Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Donets, E E; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    A possibility of heavy ions injection into synchrotrons is discussed on the base of two novel ion sources, which are under development JINR during last decade: 1) the electron string ion source (ESIS), which is a modified version of a conventional electron beam ion source (EBIS), working in a reflex mode of operation, and 2) the tubular electron string ion source (TESIS). The Electron String Ion Source "Krion-2" (VBLHE, JINR, Dubna) with an applied confining magnetic field of 3 T was used for injection into the superconducting JINR synchrotron - Nuclotron and during this runs the source provided a high pulse intensity of the highly charged ion beams: Ar16+

  8. Development of heavy ion linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomko, V.A.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the known heavy ion accelerators is given. It is stated that cyclic and linear accelerators are the most perspective ones in the energy range up to 10 MeV/nucleon according to universality in respect with the possibility of ion acceleration of the wide mass range. However, according to the accelerated beam intensity of the heavier ions the linear accelerators have considerable advantages over any other types of accelerators. The review of the known heavy ion linac structures permits to make the conclusion that a new modification of an accelerating structure of opposite pins excited on a H-wave is the most perspective one [ru

  9. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, K W D; Galster, W

    2010-01-01

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 10 12 V m -1 with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  10. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledingham, K W D; Galster, W, E-mail: K.Ledingham@phys.strath.ac.u [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 10{sup 12} V m{sup -1} with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  11. Developments in accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term goal of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is the development of an accelerator with the large beam power, large beam stored-energy, and high brightness needed to implode small deuterium-tritium capsules for fusion power. While studies of an RF linac/storage ring combination as an intertial fusion driver continue in Japan and Europe, the US program in recent times has concentrated on the study of the suitability of linear induction acceleration of ions for this purpose. Novel features required include use of multiple beams, beam current amplification in the linac, and manipulation of long beam bunches with a large velocity difference between head and tail. Recent experiments with an intense bright beam of cesium ions have established that much higher currents can be transported in a long quadrupole system than was believed possible a few years ago. A proof-of-principle ion induction linac to demonstrate beam current amplification with multiple beams is at present being fabricated at LBL

  12. Developments in accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1985-05-01

    The long term goal of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is the development of an accelerator with the large beam power, large beam stored-energy, and high brightness needed to implode small deuterium-tritium capsules for fusion power. While studies of an rf linac/storage ring combination as an inertial fusion driver continue in Japan and Europe, the US program in recent times has concentrated on the study of the suitability of linear induction acceleration of ions for this purpose. Novel features required include use of multiple beams, beam current amplification in the linac, and manipulation of long beam bunches with a large velocity difference between head and tail. Recent experiments with an intense bright beam of cesium ions have established that much higher currents can be transported in a long quadrupole system than was believed possible a few years ago. A proof-of-principle ion induction linac to demonstrate beam current amplification with multiple beams is at present being fabricated at LBL. 28 refs., 4 figs

  13. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Terato, Hiroaki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm -1 , respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. (author)

  14. Heavy ion medical accelerator in chiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Yamada, S.

    1992-12-01

    The HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) construction project has been promoted by NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences) as one of the projects of 'Comprehensive 10 year Strategy for Cancer Control' HIMAC is the first heavy-ion accelerator dedicated to medicine in the world, and its design parameters are based on the radiological requirements. It consists of two types of ion sources, an RFQ and an Alvarez linacs, dual synchrotron rings, high energy beam transport lines, and irradiation facilities for treatment and experiments. This report mainly describes the outline of the structure and performance of each HIMAC subsystem. (J.P.N.)

  15. Heavy ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1983-01-01

    The advantages of heavy ion beams as a way of delivering the needed energy and power to an inertial fusion target are surveyed. The existing broad technology base of particle accelerators provides an important foundation for designing, costing, and evaluating proposed systems. The sequence of steps needed for the verification of the heavy ion approach is described; recent research results are even more encouraging than had been assumed hitherto

  16. Heavy ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1983-12-01

    The advantages of heavy ion beams as a way of delivering the needed energy and power to an inertial fusion target are surveyed. The existing broad technology base of particle accelerators provides an important foundation for designing, costing, and evaluating proposed systems. The sequence of steps needed for the verification of the heavy ion approach is described; recent research results are even more encouraging than had been assumed hitherto

  17. Recent advances of microbial breeding via heavy-ion mutagenesis at IMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, W; Li, W; Chen, J

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the value of heavy-ion mutagenesis has been accepted as a novel powerful mutagen technique to generate new microbial mutants due to its high linear energy transfer and high relative biological effectiveness. This paper briefly reviews recent progress in developing a more efficient mutagenesis technique for microbial breeding using heavy-ion mutagenesis, and also presents the outline of the beam line for microbial breeding in Heavy Ion Research Facility of Lanzhou. Then, new insights into microbial biotechnology via heavy-ion mutagenesis are also further explored. We hope that our concerns will give deep insight into microbial breeding biotechnology via heavy-ion mutagenesis. We also believe that heavy-ion mutagenesis breeding will greatly contribute to the progress of a comprehensive study industrial strain engineering for bioindustry in the future. There is currently a great interest in developing rapid and diverse microbial mutation tool for strain modification. Heavy-ion mutagenesis has been proved as a powerful technology for microbial breeding due to its broad spectrum of mutation phenotypes with high efficiency. In order to deeply understand heavy-ion mutagenesis technology, this paper briefly reviews recent progress in microbial breeding using heavy-ion mutagenesis at IMP, and also presents the outline of the beam line for microbial breeding in Heavy Ion Research Facility of Lanzhou (HIRFL) as well as new insights into microbial biotechnology via heavy-ion mutagenesis. Thus, this work can provide the guidelines to promote the development of novel microbial biotechnology cross-linking heavy-ion mutagenesis breeding that could make breeding process more efficiently in the future. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. One of the first heavy-ion collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    One of the first heavy-ion collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as orange arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the Liquid Argon and Scintillating Tile calorimeters respectively.

  19. Biophysical calculations of cell killing probability by the amorphous track structure model for heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Yuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2007-01-01

    In a treatment planning of heavy-ion radiotherapy, it is necessary to estimate the biological effect of the heavy-ion beams. Physical dose should be associated with the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at each point. Presently, carbon ion radiotherapy has been carried out at the National Institute Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Germany. Both facilities take individual approach for the calculation of the RBE value. At NIRS, the classical LQ model has been used while the local effect model (LEM) has been incorporated into the treatment planning system at GSI. The first aim of this study is to explain the RBE model of NIRS by the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM). In addition, the clarification of similarities and differences between the MKM and the LEM was also investigated. (author)

  20. Chamber propagation physics for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Chamber transport is a key area of study for heavy ion fusion. Final focus and chamber transport are high leverage areas providing opportunities to decrease significantly the cost of electricity from a heavy ion fusion power plant. Chamber transport in two basic regimes is under consideration. In the low chamber density regime (below about 0.003 Torr), ballistic or nearly ballistic transport is used. Partial beam neutralization has been studied to offset the effects of beam stripping. In the high chamber density regime (above about 0.1 Torr), two transport modes (pinched transport and channel transport) are under investigation. Both involve focusing the beam outside the chamber and then transporting it at small radius (about 2 mm). Both high chamber density modes relax the constraints on the beam quality needed from the accelerator which will reduce the driver cost and the cost of electricity. (orig.)

  1. 3-megajoule heavy-ion fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Hoyer, E.; Keefe, D.

    1981-06-01

    The initiation of inertial confinement fusion reactions with a heavy ion particle beam has been under intensive study since 1976, and the progress of this study is principally documented in the proceedings of annual workshops held by US National Laboratories. At this time a 3MJ, 150 TW, ion beam is a good choice to initiate microexplosions with energy gain of 100. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has made systems studies based on a Linear Induction Accelerator to meet the beam requirements. The accelerator system, expected performance and cost, and technical problems to be addressed in the near future are discussed

  2. Design of the compact ECR ion source for heavy-ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.; Sato, Y.; Yamada, S.; Hattori, T.; Shibuya, S.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy ion cancer treatment is successfully being done at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Design philosophy for the ion sources for medical facilities are as follows: sufficient beam intensity, a few hundred eμA; long lifetime with good stability; easy operation and easy maintenance; and compactness. In order to develop such source for future heavy-ion facilities, we have tested compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources using permanent magnets both for axial and radial confinement of hot electrons. Since the yield of C 2+ ion in the firstly-developed source (2.45 GHz ECR) was 15 eμA and far below the medical requirement (-150 eμA for the HIMAC), a new source has been proposed, having the frequency of 10 GHz. The extracted intensity of C 4+ (and C 2+ ) ions is expected to be higher than 200 eμA. (author)

  3. Improvement in beam quality of the JAEA AVF cyclotron for focusing heavy-ion beams with energies of hundreds of MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Okumura, Susumu; Oikawa, Masakazu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Satoh, Takahiro; Nara, Takayuki; Agematsu, Takashi; Ishibori, Ikuo; Yokota, Watalu; Nakamura, Yoshiteru

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a heavy-ion microbeam with an energy of hundreds of MeV applied to the research fields of biotechnology and materials science, the JAEA AVF cyclotron (K = 110) has been upgraded to provide a high quality beam with a smaller energy spread and a higher current stability. A flat-top (FT) acceleration system of the cyclotron, designed to produce ion beams with an energy spread of ΔE/E ≤ 0.02%, has been developed to reduce chromatic aberrations in the lenses of the focusing microbeam system. The FT acceleration system provides uniform energy gain of the beam by superimposing a fifth-harmonic voltage on the fundamental one. In addition, stabilization of the acceleration rf voltage and the phase were achieved to accelerate the high quality beam and to provide it stably to the microbeam system connected to a cyclotron beam line. In the latest experiment, we have succeeded to accelerate 260 MeV 20 Ne 7+ with an energy spread of 0.05% in FWHM using the FT acceleration system

  4. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm

  5. Realistic modeling of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of intense heavy-ion beams to an inertial-fusion target after final focus is simulated here using a realistic computer model. It is found that passing the beam through a rarefied plasma layer before it enters the fusion chamber can largely neutralize the beam space charge and lead to a usable focal spot for a range of ion species and input conditions

  6. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Johnson, J.W.; Martin, J.A.; McNeilly, G.S.; Milner, W.T.; Mosko, S.W.; Sayer, R.O.; Robinson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, with the completion of Phase I in late 1979, will include the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) and associated research areas, the new 25 MV tandem accelerator with new research areas for tandem beams, and modifications to utilize the ORIC as a booster accelerator. The combination of the tandem and ORIC will provide beam energies of 25 MeV/A for light heavy ions and 6 MeV/A up to A = 160. This paper discusses plans for a Phase II expansion of the facility to include an isochronous cyclotron with superconducting magnet and reconfiguration of the existing research areas and the ORIC vault to handle the higher energy beams from the new cyclotron. The new booster cyclotron is a low-flutter high-spiral design patterned after the MSU K = 800 design, with a central magnetic field of about 5 tesla and an extraction radius of 1 meter. The new beam transport system will incorporate an rf beam-splitter system that will be able to deliver successive beam pulses to two or three experiment areas

  7. Cellular and molecular radiobiology of heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Roots, R.J.; Yang, T.C.H.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Craise, L.M.; Yezzi, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Accelerated heavy particles are candidates for use in cancer radiotherapy, and the major goal of our program has been to characterize the biological potential of Bevalac beams for this purpose. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values and oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) properties of monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams with initial energies of several hundred MeV/u have been measured as a function of residual range. Bevalac beams with Bragg peaks modified to encompass tumors of various sizes have also been studied using cultured cells in vitro

  8. Transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertson, G.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of using intense bursts of heavy ions to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated interest in the transport of intense unneutralized heavy ion beams by quadrupole or solenoid systems. This problem was examined in some detail, using numerical integration of the coupled envelope equations for the quadrupole case. The general relations which emerge are used to develop examples of high energy transport systems and as a basis for discussing the limitations imposed by a transport system on achievable intensities for initial acceleration

  9. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy,and Related Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons - can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion - ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  10. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions (1)could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion-ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component--positive ions, negative ions, and electrons--can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed

  11. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yun; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-01

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C(5+) ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was got when work gas was CH4 while about 262 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was obtained when work gas was C2H2 gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  12. Validating PHITS for heavy ion fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy-ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy-ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u "4"8Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably. (authors)

  13. Heavy ion facility for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, C.; Alonso, J.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Hoyer, E.; Lou, K.; Staples, J.; Voelker, F.

    1977-03-01

    The accelerator requirements of particle radiation therapy are reviewed and a preliminary design of a heavy ion synchrotron for hospital installation is presented. Beam delivery systems and multi-treatment room arrangements are outlined

  14. Structure of very heavy few-electron ions - new results from the heavy ion storage ring, ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.; Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Moshammer, R.; Rymuza, P.; Bosch, F.; Kandler, T.

    1993-08-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron/storage ring facility at GSI, SIS/ESR, provides intense beams of cooled, highly-charged ions up to naked uranium (U 92+ ). By electron capture during ion-atom collisions in the gas target of the ESR or by recombination at ion-electron encounters in the ''electron cooler'' excited states are populated. The detailed structure of very heavy one-, two- and three-electron ions is studied. The different mechanisms leading to the excited states are described, as well as the new experimental tools now available for a detailed spectroscopy of these interesting systems. Special emphasis is given to X-ray transitions to the groundstates in H- and He-like systems. For the heaviest species the groundstate Lambshift can now be probed on an accuracy level of better than 10% using solid-state X-ray detectors. Applying dispersive X-ray analyzing techniques, this accuracy will certainly be improved in future. However, utilizing the dielectronic resonances for a spectroscopy, the structure in Li-like heavy ions can already be probed now on the sub eV level. (orig.)

  15. Diffuse ions produced by electromagnetic ion beam instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Leroy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the electromagnetic ions beam instability driven by the reflected ion component backstreaming away from the earth's how shock into the foreshock region is studied by means computer simulation. The linear the quasi-linear states of the instability are found to be in good agreement with known results for the resonant model propagating parallel to the beam along the magnetic field and with theory developed in this paper for the nonresonant mode, which propagates antiparallel to the beam direction. The quasi-linear stage, which produces large amplitude 8Bapprox.B, sinusoidal transverse waves and ''intermediate'' ion distribution, is terminated by a nonlinear phase in which strongly nonlinear, compressive waves and ''diffuse'' ion distributions are produced. Additional processes by which the diffuse ions are accelerated to observed high energies are not addressed. The results are discussed in terms of the ion distributions and hydromagnetic waves observed in the foreshock of the earth's bow shock and of interplanetary shocks

  16. Installation of the advanced heavy ion beam probing diagnostic on the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, I.S.; Chmyga, A.A.; Dreval, N.B.

    2000-01-01

    An advanced heavy ion beam diagnostic has been developed for the TJ-II stellarator based on the simultaneous utilisation of two different detection systems for the secondary ions: a multiple cell array detector and a 30 deg Proca-Green electrostatic energy analyser. This innovative design aims at enlarging the HIBD capabilities to allow the instantaneous measurements of electron density and plasma potential profiles together with their respective fluctuations. This paper presents the detailed description of the main parts of HIBD and their characteristics obtained during the first operation on TJ-II. Special attention is paid to the control and data acquisition system built on two VME controllers. The results of the diagnostic beam propagating through the magnetic structure of TJ-II into electrostatic energy analyser are presented and compared with the trajectory calculations. The operation and calibration of a 30 deg electrostatic energy analyser free of guard rings and with a new biased split detector are described. High intensities of the caesium and thallium ions were obtained from thermionic source using new stable and long-time special operation regimes. (author)

  17. Status of the RHIC and BNL/CERN heavy ion programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, S.

    1993-01-01

    With the gold beam operation at the Brookhaven AGS started in 1992, and with the lead beam operation at the CERN SPS planned for 1994--1995, investigation of high nucleon density states through high energy heavy ion collisions is becoming a reality. In addition, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, which is dedicated to the study of ultra-high energy heavy ion collisions, is under construction with a target completion date in 1997. There also is a plan to run the proposed CERN LHC for a few months a year for the heavy ion program. These colliders should provide opportunities to extend our knowledge of nuclear matter to the extraordinary states of extreme high temperature and high density, thus opening the way to the creation and study of quark-gluon plasma. The lattice gauge calculation based on the theory of strong interactions (QCD) predicts that, at such states, quarks and gluons are deconfined from individual nucleons and form a hot plasma. In this paper, the status of heavy ion stationary target programs at the BNL AGS and the CERN SPS, the progress of RHIC construction, and heavy ion research potential at LHC will be presented. The status of the CERN LHC will be covered elsewhere in these Proceedings

  18. Ferroelectric plasma source for heavy ion beam space charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Grisham, Larry; Grant Logan, B.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon S.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size and compress their axial pulse length. The plasma source should be able to operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally applied electric or magnetic fields. To produce 1 m-long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients are being developed. The sources utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic material, and high voltage (∼7 kV) will be applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A prototype ferroelectric source, 20 cm in length, has produced plasma densities of 5x10 11 cm -3 . It was integrated into the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K + ion beam. A 1 m-long source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested. Simply connecting the five sources in parallel to a single pulse forming network power supply yielded non-uniform performance due to the time-dependent nature of the load that each of the five plasma sources experiences. Other circuit combinations have been considered, including powering each source by its own supply. The 1-m-long source has now been successfully characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma over the 1 m length of the source in the mid-10 10 cm -3 density range. This source will be integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments

  19. Plasma lens focusing and plasma channel transport for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauschwitz, A.; Yu, S.S.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    The final focus lens in an ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion reactor is important since it sets limiting requirements for the quality of the driver beam. Improvements of the focusing capabilities can facilitate the construction of the driver significantly. A focusing system that is of interest both for heavy ion and for light ion drivers is an adiabatic, current carrying plasma lens. This lens is characterized by the fact that it can slowly (adiabatically) reduce the envelope radius of a beam over several betatron oscillations by increasing the focusing magnetic field along a tapered high current discharge. A reduction of the beam diameter by a factor of 3 to 5 seems feasible with this focusing scheme. Such a lens can be used for an ignition test facility where it can be directly coupled to the fusion target. For use in a repetitively working reactor chamber the lens has to be located outside of the reactor and the tightly focused but strongly divergent beam must be confined in a high current transport channel from the end of the lens into the immediate vicinity of the target. Laser preionization of a background gas is an efficient means to direct and stabilize such a channel. Experiments have been started to test both, the principle of adiabatic focusing, and the stability of laser preionized high current discharge channels. (author). 4 figs., 7 refs

  20. Plasma lens focusing and plasma channel transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauschwitz, A; Yu, S S; Bangerter, R O [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    The final focus lens in an ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion reactor is important since it sets limiting requirements for the quality of the driver beam. Improvements of the focusing capabilities can facilitate the construction of the driver significantly. A focusing system that is of interest both for heavy ion and for light ion drivers is an adiabatic, current carrying plasma lens. This lens is characterized by the fact that it can slowly (adiabatically) reduce the envelope radius of a beam over several betatron oscillations by increasing the focusing magnetic field along a tapered high current discharge. A reduction of the beam diameter by a factor of 3 to 5 seems feasible with this focusing scheme. Such a lens can be used for an ignition test facility where it can be directly coupled to the fusion target. For use in a repetitively working reactor chamber the lens has to be located outside of the reactor and the tightly focused but strongly divergent beam must be confined in a high current transport channel from the end of the lens into the immediate vicinity of the target. Laser preionization of a background gas is an efficient means to direct and stabilize such a channel. Experiments have been started to test both, the principle of adiabatic focusing, and the stability of laser preionized high current discharge channels. (author). 4 figs., 7 refs.

  1. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  2. Measurements of beam-ion confinement during tangential beam-driven instabilities in PBX [Princeton Beta Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Kaita, R.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaye, S.

    1987-01-01

    During tangential injection of neutral beams into low density tokamak plasmas with β > 1% in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), instabilities are observed that degrade the confinement of beam ions. Neutron, charge-exchange, and diamagnetic loop measurements are examined in order to identify the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the beam-ion transport. The data suggest a resonant interaction between the instabilities and the parallel energetic beam ions. Evidence for some nonresonant transport also exists

  3. Experiments with stored heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fick, D.; Habs, D.; Jaeschke, E.

    1985-02-01

    The success of newly-developed methods of phase space cooling in proton and antiproton storage rings was sufficient for an examination of whether these methods could also be applied in storage rings for heavy ions. An expansion of these methods to heavy ion beams seems attractive for all sorts of reasons. Recently, this area was extensively discussed in a series of working meetings with the result that heavy ion storage rings are to be built for use in atomic and nuclear physics, with integrated radiation cooling and stochastic cooling, but primarily electron cooling. The current state of research and planning for the storage experiment is described. It is not intended to be a structural specification worked out in detail. The general design of the ring, however, has been established, and experimental details have deliberately been kept flexible, to thereby allow very different sorts of experiments to be conducted. The ring described with a maximum magnetic rigidity of Bp = 1.5 Tm, is designed in quadripartite symmetry. The total circumference is approximately 35 m, and there are four straight sections each 3.5 m long for the electron cooling sections, the experimental equipment, as well as HF system and injection. One of the most desirable properties of the reservoir is the multi-charge mode, which will significantly improve the operation which heavy ion beams, which reverse charge in electron cooling sections, target and residual vacuum. Initial considerations are presented with regard to stochastic and electron cooling. A review of possible classes of experiments is given and the schedule and financing of the project is outlined. 46 refs

  4. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Riepe, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL). The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10 -7 torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column

  5. A 3-year plan for beam science in the heavy-ion fusion virtual national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B. Grant

    2001-01-01

    In December 1998, LBNL Director Charles Shank and LLNL Director Bruce Tarter signed a Memorandum of Agreement to create the Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) with the purpose of improving the efficiency and productivity of heavy ion research through coordination of the two laboratories' efforts under one technical director. In 1999, PPPL Director Robert Goldston signed the VNL MOA for PPPL's heavy-ion fusion group to join the VNL. LBNL and LLNL each contribute about 45% of the $10.6 M/yr trilab VNL effort, and PPPL contributes currently about 10% of the VNL effort. The three labs carry out collaborative experiments, theory and simulations of a variety of intense beam scientific issues described below. The tri-lab HIF VNL program is part of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) fusion program. A short description of the four major tasks areas of HIF-VNL research is given in the next section. The task areas are: High Current Experiment, Final Focus/Chamber Transport, Source/Injector/Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), and Theory/Simulation. As a result of the internal review, more detailed reviews of the designs, costs and schedules for some of the tasks have been completed, which will provide more precision in the scheduled completion dates of tasks. The process for the ongoing engineering reviews and governance for the future management of tasks is described in section 3. A description of the major milestones and scientific deliverables for flat guidance budgets are given in section 4. Section 5 describes needs for enabling technology development for future experiments that require incremental funding

  6. Neurosurgical applications of ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.; Levy, Richard P.; Phillips, Mark H.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Lyman, John T.

    1989-04-01

    The program at Donner Pavilion has applied nuclear medicine research to the diagnosis and radiosurgical treatment of life-threatening intracranial vascular disorders that affect more than half a million Americans. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery, using narrow beams of heavy ions, demonstrates superior biological and physical characteristics in brain over X-and γ-rays, viz., improved dose distribution in the Bragg peak and sharp lateral and distal borders and less scattering of the beam. Examination of CNS tissue response and alteration of cerebral blood-flow dynamics related to heavy-ion Bragg peak radiosurgery is carried out using three-dimensional treatment planning and quantitative imaging utilizing cerebral angiography, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cine-CT, xenon X-ray CT and positron emission tomography (PET). Also under examination are the physical properties of narrow heavy-ion beams for improving methods of dose delivery and dose distribution and for establishing clinical RBE/LET and dose-response relationships for human CNS tissues. Based on the evaluation and treatment with stereotactically directed narrow beams of heavy charged particles of over 300 patients, with cerebral angiography, CT scanning and MRI and PET scanning of selected patients, plus extensive clinical and neuroradiological followup, it appears that Stereotactic charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery obliterates intracranial arteriovenous malformations or protects against rebleeding with reduced morbidity and no mortality. Discussion will include the method of evaluation, the clinical research protocol, the Stereotactic neuroradiological preparation, treatment planning, the radiosurgery procedure and the protocol for followup. Emphasis will be placed on the neurological results, including the neuroradiological and clinical response and early and late delayed injury in brain leading to complications (including vasogenic edema

  7. Longitudinal compression of heavy-ion beams with minimum requirements on final focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Mark, J.W.K.; Brandon, S.T.; Lee, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed to compress a heavy-ion beam longitudinally in such a way that the compressed pulse has a constant line-charge density profile and uniform longitudinal momentum. These conditions may be important from the standpoint of final focusing. By realizing the similarity of the equations that describe the 1-D charged-particle motion to the equations that describe 1-D ideal gas flow, the evolution of lambda and the velocity tilt can be calculated using the method of characteristics developed for unsteady supersonic gasdynamics. Particle simulations confirm the theory. Various schemes for pulse shaping have been investigated

  8. Status report on the heavy ion accelerator facility at TIFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, B.

    2006-01-01

    The 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator has been delivering heavy ion beams for experimental programs in Nuclear Physics and other fields. During the year beam was delivered for 72% of the time remaining after completion of certain infrastructural activities. Various developmental activities were also taken up in the laboratories associated with the Pelletron. The Superconducting Linac being constructed as a booster for the heavy ion beams from the Pelletron is in an advanced state of completion. Five of the seven cryostat modules have been assembled and tested with beam from the Pelletron. The last two remaining modules are being assembled. A new experimental beam hall has been constructed for utilization of the accelerated beam from the Linac and beam transport to one of the target areas has been carried out. (author)

  9. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  10. A self-calibrating ionisation chamber for the precise intensity calibration of high-energy heavy-ion beam monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junghans, A.

    1996-01-01

    The intensity of a 136 Xe(600 A MeV) beam has been determined by simultaneously measuring the particle rate and the corresponding ionisation current with an ionisation chamber. The ionisation current of this self-calibrating device was compared at higher intensities with the current of a secondary-electron monitor and a calibration of the secondary-electron current was achieved with a precision of 2%. This method can be applied to all high-energy heavy-ion beams. (orig.)

  11. Development of heavy-ion irradiation technique for single-event in semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Norio; Akutsu, Takao; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Naitoh, Ichiro; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Agematsu, Takashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    Heavy-ion irradiation technique has been developed for the evaluation of single-event effects on semiconductor devices. For the uniform irradiation of high energy heavy ions to device samples, we have designed and installed a magnetic beam-scanning system in a JAERI cyclotron beam course. It was found that scanned area was approximately 4 x 2 centimeters and that the deviation of ion fluence from the average value was less than 7%. (author)

  12. Preliminary Study on 50MHz Heavy Ion RFQ without Pre-Bunchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Jang, Ji Ho; Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung

    2009-01-01

    We are studying a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) as a lower energy part for a 200-MeV/u heavy ion linear accelerator of the International Business and Science Belt Project. The RFQ accelerates the 10- keV/u heavy ion beams from ion source (hydrogen molecules to uranium) and injects the 300-keV/u beam to the superconducting linac. Table I shows the basic parameters for the RFQ accelerator. In this study, we assumed that pre-bunchers to accelerate two charge state is not required

  13. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  14. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in high energy heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, Anton

    2014-10-20

    Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research are becoming more and more significant with the increase of beam intensity due to upgrades. Moreover a new accelerator is being constructed on the basis of GSI within the project of facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). Beam intensities will be increased by factor of 100 and energies by factor of 10. Radiation fields in the vicinity of beam lines will increase more than 2 orders of magnitude and so will the effects on semiconductor devices. It is necessary to carry out a study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices considering specific properties of radiation typical for high energy heavy ion accelerators. Radiation effects on electronics in accelerator environment may be divided into two categories: short-term temporary effects and long-term permanent degradation. Both may become critical for proper operation of some electronic devices. This study is focused on radiation damage to CCD cameras in radiation environment of heavy ion accelerator. Series of experiments with irradiation of devices under test (DUTs) by secondary particles produced during ion beam losses were done for this study. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the experiment conditions and conditions expected in future accelerator. Corresponding comparisons and conclusions were done. Another device typical for accelerator facilities - industrial Ethernet switch was tested in similar conditions during this study. Series of direct irradiations of CCD and MOS transistors with heavy ion beams were done as well. Typical energies of the primary ion beams were 0.5-1 GeV/u. Ion species: from Na to U. Intensities of the beam up to 10{sup 9} ions/spill with spill length of 200-300 ns. Criteria of reliability and lifetime of DUTs in specific radiation conditions were formulated, basing on experimental results of the study. Predictions of electronic device reliability and lifetime were

  15. Heavy ion induction linacs for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Ho, D.D.M.

    1991-01-01

    In 1976 Denis Keefe proposed the heavy ion induction linac as a driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants. Subsequent research has established that heavy ion fusion (HIF) is potentially an attractive energy source and has identified the issues that must be resolved to make HIF a reality. The principal accelerator issues are achieving adequately low transverse and longitudinal emittance and acceptable cost. Results from the single and multiple beam experiments at LBL on transverse emittance are encouraging. A predicted high current longitudinal instability that can affect longitudinal emittance is currently being studied. This paper presents an overview of economics and ICF target requirements and their relationship to accelerator design. It also presents a summary of the status of heavy ion induction linac research. It concludes with a discussion of research plans, including plans for the proposed Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE)

  16. Next generation of relativistic heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.; Leemann, C.; Selph, F.

    1978-06-01

    Results are presented of exploratory and preliminary studies of a next generation of heavy ion accelerators. The conclusion is reached that useful luminosities are feasible in a colliding beam facility for relativistic heavy ions. Such an accelerator complex may be laid out in such a way as to provide extractebeams for fixed target operation, therefore allowing experimentation in an energy region overlapping with that presently available. These dual goals seem achievable without undue complications, or penalties with respect to cost and/or performance

  17. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yun, E-mail: caoyun@impcas.ac.cn; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  18. Performance of the K+ ion diode in the 2 MV injector for heavy ion fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.

    2002-02-01

    Heavy ion beam inertial fusion driver concepts depend on the availability and performance of high-brightness high-current ion sources. Surface ionization sources have relatively low current density but high brightness because of the low temperature of the emitted ions. We have measured the beam profiles at the exit of the injector diode, and compared the measured profiles with EGUN and WARP-3D predictions. Spherical aberrations are significant in this large aspect ratio diode. We discuss the measured and calculated beam size and beam profiles, the effect of aberrations, quality of vacuum, and secondary electron distributions on the beam profile.

  19. Experimental approaches to heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obayashi, H.; Fujii-e, Y.; Yamaki, T.

    1986-01-01

    As a feasibility study on heavy-ion-beam induced inertial fusion (HIF) approach, a conceptual plant design called HIBLIC-I has been worked out since 1982. The characteristic features of this design are summarized. To experimentally confirm them and prove them at least in principle, considerations are made on possible experimental programs to give substantial information on these critical phenomena. In HIBLIC-I, an accelerator complex is adopted as driver system to provide 6 beams of 208 Pb +1 ions at 15 GeV, which will be simultaneously focussed on a single shell, three layered target. The target is designed to give an energy gain of 100, so that the total beam energy of 4 MJ with 160 TW power may release 400 MJ fusion energy. A reactor chamber is cylindrical with double-walled structure made of HT-9. There are three layers of liquid Li flow inside the reactor. The innermost layer forms a Li curtain which is effective to recover the residual cavity pressure. A thick upward flow serves as coolant and tritium breeder. Tritium will be recovered by yttrium gettering system. A driver system is operated at the repetition rate of 10 Hz and supplies beams for 10 reactor chambers. Then the plant yield of fusion power becomes 4000 MWt, corresponding a net electric output of 1.5 GW. Experimental programs related to HIBLIC-I is described and discussed, including those for heavy-ion-beam experiments and proposals for lithium curtain by electron beam to clarify the key phenomena in HIBLIC-I cavity. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Polyatomic ions from a high current ion implanter driven by a liquid metal ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, W.; Laufer, P.; Tajmar, M.; Böttger, R.; Bischoff, L.

    2017-12-01

    High current liquid metal ion sources are well known and found their first application as field emission electric propulsion thrusters in space technology. The aim of this work is the adaption of such kind of sources in broad ion beam technology. Surface patterning based on self-organized nano-structures on, e.g., semiconductor materials formed by heavy mono- or polyatomic ion irradiation from liquid metal (alloy) ion sources (LMAISs) is a very promising technique. LMAISs are nearly the only type of sources delivering polyatomic ions from about half of the periodic table elements. To overcome the lack of only very small treated areas by applying a focused ion beam equipped with such sources, the technology taken from space propulsion systems was transferred into a large single-end ion implanter. The main component is an ion beam injector based on high current LMAISs combined with suited ion optics allocating ion currents in the μA range in a nearly parallel beam of a few mm in diameter. Different types of LMAIS (needle, porous emitter, and capillary) are presented and characterized. The ion beam injector design is specified as well as the implementation of this module into a 200 kV high current ion implanter operating at the HZDR Ion Beam Center. Finally, the obtained results of large area surface modification of Ge using polyatomic Bi2+ ions at room temperature from a GaBi capillary LMAIS will be presented and discussed.

  1. Present and future sources of protons and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Leemann, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    A brief outline of existing medical heavy-ion facilities is given. The beam specifications for future dedicated medical ion accelerators are discussed. Machines capable of delivering dose rates of approximately 1 krad/min in volumes of a few liters are shown to represent existing technology. A cost and performance analysis shows the synchrotrons to be the most economical source for the heavier ions while conventional cyclotrons seem optimal for an exclusive proton facility. It is seen that the incorporation of additional capabilities such as neutron generation or radioisotope production can be achieved at modest incremental costs. In addition to the accelerators, feasible layouts of hypothetical facilities are discussed, and three-dimensional beam scanning is shown to allow the irradiation of large volumes without sacrificing the precise dose localization capabilities of heavy-ion beams. Concepts of quality-controlled engineering and modern computer technology are introduced as a means to obtain the desired high degree of reliability and ease of operation and maintenance

  2. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon films bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Costa Pinto, P; Yin Vallgren, C; Bender, M

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2 Me...

  3. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis

  4. Heavy-Ion Fusion System Assessment Project quarterly status report, January-March 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Hovingh, J.; Faltens, A.

    1985-06-01

    A computer model of an accelerator system is a necessary ingredient in estimating the cost of construction and operation of an ion-driven ICF power plant. The LBL computer program LIACEP (Linear Induction Accelerator Cost Evaluation Program) is used to estimate the cost and efficiency of a heavy ion induction linear accelerator as a function of the ion mass, charge and energy for a specified beam output energy, power and pulse repetition frequency. In addition to estimating the accelerator system cost and efficiency, LIACEP can be used to identify the components and materials that have a high leverage on the cost and efficiency of the accelerator system. These high leverage items are logical areas for research and technology development to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of the accelerator system

  5. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, S.

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery

  6. rf linac approach to heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The necessary properties of funneling particle beams from multiple accelerators into combined beams having higher current are outlined, and methods are proposed which maximize the efficiency of this process. A heavy ion fusion driver system example is presented which shows the large advantages in system efficiency to be gained by proper funneling

  7. A Single Pulse Beam Emittance Measurement for the CERN Heavy Ion Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Crescenti, M

    1995-01-01

    A new device for transverse emittance measurement has been installed in the 4.2 MeV/u filter region of the CERN Heavy Ion Linac (Linac 3). It allows to obtain pulse-to-pulse (every 1.2 sec) visualisation of the Linac 3 beam parameters in order to tune the machine and to match the beam for injection into the first circular accelerator, the PS Booster. The system is based on the "multi-slit" technique similar to the well-known "pepper pot" method. A plate with a series of horizontal or vertical slits is placed in the beam, defining positions in the phase plane. Particles pass through the slits and drift to a scintillator screen where they produce light. The screen is looked at by an externally triggered high resolution CCD camera. For each slit position the light intensity distribution, in the limit of infinitesimal slit aperture, is proportional to the angle distribution of the particles and therefore, provides the angular distribution in the phase plane. The video signal from the camera is digitised and the r...

  8. Studies on heavy ion losses from collimation cleaning at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, P D; Jowett, J M; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B M; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2015-01-01

    The LHC collimation system protects superconducting magnets from beam losses. By design, it was optimized for the high-intensity proton challenges but so far provided adequate protection also during the LHC heavy-ion runs with 208Pb82+ ions up to a beam energy of 4 Z TeV. Ion beam cleaning brings specific challenges due to different physical interactions with the collimator materials and might require further improvements for operation at 7 Z TeV. In this article, we study heavy-ion beam losses leaking out of the LHC collimation system, both in measurement and simulations. The simulations are carried out using both ICOSIM, with a simplified ion physics model implemented, and SixTrack, including more detailed starting conditions from FLUKA but without including online scattering in subsequent collimator hits. The results agree well with measurements overall, although some discrepancies are present. The reasons for the discrepancies are investigated and, on this basis, the requirements for an improved simulatio...

  9. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24–28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of ^{40}Ar^{12+} and ^{129}Xe^{26+} have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL, China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24+18  GHz heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  10. Dosimetry and radiobiology of negative pions and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1978-01-01

    The depth dose distribution of pion beams has not been found superior to protons. Pion radiation quality at the plateau region is comparable to conventional low-LET radiations, and radiobiology results also indicate RBE values close to unity. In the pion stopping region, the radiation quality increases considerably. Radiobiology data for negative pions at the Bragg peak position clearly indicate the increase in RBE and the reduction in OER. Even at the Bragg peak position, compared to fast neutrons, the average LET of negative pions is lower. Pion radiobiology data have indicated lower RBE values and higher OER values compared to fast neutrons. The radiation quality of fast neutrons is in between that of carbon and neon ions at the peak region and that of neon ions at the plateau is lower than for fast neutrons. The mean LET value for helium ions, even at the distal end of the peak, is lower than for fast neutrons. Dose localization of heavy ions has been found to decrease slowly with increasing charge of the heavy ion. The intercellular contact that protects cells after exposure to low-LET radiations is not detected after exposure to heavy ions. Single and fractionated doses of heavy ions produce dose-response curves for heavy ions having reduced shoulders but similar slopes when compared to gamma rays. Fractionated treatments of heavy ions produce an enhanced effect in the peak region compared to the plateau region and could lead to a substantial gain in therapeutic ratio. The OER for protons was similar to that for x rays. The OER values for negative pions, helium ions, and carbon ions were larger, for neon ions similar, and for argon ions smaller when compared to fast neutrons.Negative pions, helium ions, and carbon ions may be very effective clinically because the radiation quality of these beams is similar to that of the mixed scheme of neutrons and x rays

  11. Status of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility presently operates the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This accelerator provides heavy ions up to argon with energies useful for nuclear physics. The Phase I expansion of this facility, now a year away from completion, includes a 25-MV vertical folded tandem accelerator, beam transport and injection systems to use the ORIC as an energy booster, and additional experiment areas for the beams directly from the tandem. The tandem--cyclotron combination will provide heavy ions with energies up to 25 MeV/A for A 11 particles/sec. Building construction for the project is essentially complete. The accelerator manufacturer, National Electrostatics Corporation, has completed installation and testing of the 10-m-diam by 30-m-high accelerator pressure vessel and has begun installation of the accelerator systems. The accelerator has previously been assembled at the NEC plant and the digital control system operated without voltage on the column. Voltage tests are expected to begin in Oak Ridge in January 1979 with beam tests to begin in March. Completion of the project, including acceptance tests of the tandem and the beam injection system for ORIC is presently scheduled for November 15, 1979. Construction of Phase II for the facility wich will include a much larger booster cyclotron and additional research areas is expected to begin in 1982

  12. Gas Transport and Density Control in the HYLIFE Heavy-Ion Beam Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debonnel, Christophe S.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Lawrence, Simon S.Yu; Peterson, Per F.

    2003-01-01

    The effective propagation and focusing of heavy-ion beams in the final-focus magnet region of inertial fusion target chambers require controlling the background gas density and pressure in the beam tubes. Liquid vortexes will coat the inside of the tubes next to the beam ports and will help eliminate the need for mechanical shutters to mitigate the venting of target chamber background gas into the final-focus magnet region. Before the neutralizing region, the beam space charge is high, and ablation and target debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region may cause voltage breakdown. Previous studies focused on evaluating the amount of target chamber debris reaching the entrance of the beam ports. The TSUNAMI code has now been used to assess the density, temperature, and velocity of the vortex debris transported ∼3 m up the beam tubes and reaching the final-focus magnet region, assuming that the liquid vortexes are perfectly absorbing surfaces. To further mitigate debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region, and prevent voltage breakdown, a 'magnetic shutter' has been envisaged to divert the debris out of the final-focus region. This shutter will prevent the hot ablation debris from reaching the magnet region and, coupled to some ionizing scheme, will conveniently suppress early ingression of debris into the final-focus magnet region

  13. Hyperion II: a heavy ion pre-injector for Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, M.; Auclair, J.P.; Courtois, A.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1978, the 3GeV synchrotron Saturne is routinely operated with proton, deuteron, helium beams and, since 1981 with polarized protons and deuterons. Heavy ions are expected in 1983 by using a new pre-injector presently under construction. The marriage of an EBIS and an RFQ can be looked upon generally as a very good means of production of heavy ion beams at low energy. In the first paragraph, the cryogenic version of EBIS, called CRYEBIS, is described, while the RFQ design is studied in detail in paragraph two. The construction status is given in a third paragraph

  14. Heavy ion accelerator and associated development activities at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjilal, D.

    2011-01-01

    A vertical 15UD Pelletron electrostatic tandem accelerator having highest terminal voltage tested up to 16 MV has been in regular operation at Inter-University Accelerator Center (IUAC) for more than two decades. It has been providing consistently various ion beams in the energy range from a few tens of MeV to 270 MeV for scheduled experiments. A superconducting linear accelerator (LINAC) booster module having eight niobium quarter wave resonators has been designed, fabricated and installed successfully. It is fully operational for scheduled experiments. The LINAC module has been tested and used to accelerate energetic heavy ion beams from 15 UD Pelletron. A new type of high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (HTS-ECRIS) has been designed, fabricated and installed successfully. It has been in regular operation as future source of highly charged ions having higher beam current for the alternate high current injector (HCI) system for the superconducting LINAC. A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator is being developed to accelerate highly charged particles (A/Q ∼ 6) from HTS-ECRIS to energy of 180 keV/u. The beam will then be accelerated further by drift tube linacs (DTL) to the required velocity for injection of the ion beams in to the existing superconducting LINAC booster. A low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) having permanent magnet ECRIS on high voltage platform and a 1.7 MV Pelletron are being used for regular experiments. Details of various developmental activities related to the heavy ion accelerator and associated systems at Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) are presented. (author)

  15. Heavy ion accelerator and associated development activities at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjilal, D.

    2011-01-01

    A vertical 15UD Pelletron electrostatic tandem accelerator having highest terminal voltage tested up to 16 MV has been in regular operation at Inter-University Accelerator Center (IUAC) for more than two decades. It has been providing consistently various ion beams in the energy range from a few tens of MeV to 270MeV for scheduled experiments. A superconducting linear accelerator (LINAC) booster module having eight niobium quarter wave resonators has been designed, fabricated and installed successfully. It is fully operational for scheduled experiments. The LINAC module has been tested and used to accelerate energetic heavy ion beams from 15 UD Pelletron. A new type of high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (HTS-ECRlS) has been designed, fabricated and installed successfully. lt has been in regular operation as future source of highly charged ions having higher beam current for the alternate high current injector (HCI) system for the superconducting LINAC. A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator is being developed to accelerate highly charged particles (A/Q ∼ 6) from HTS-ECRIS to energy of 180 keV/u. The beam will then be accelerated further by drift tube linacs (DTL) to the required velocity for injection of the ion beams in to the existing superconducting LINAC booster. A low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) having permanent magnet ECRIS on high voltage platform and a 1.7 MV Pelletron are being used for regular experiments. Details of various developmental activities related to the heavy ion accelerator and associated systems at Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) are presented. (author)

  16. The heavy ion fusion program in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Davidson, R.C.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Lindl, J.; Meier, W.R.; Logan, B.G.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial fusion energy research has enjoyed increased interest and funding. This has allowed expanded programs in target design, target fabrication, fusion chamber research, target injection and tracking, and accelerator research. The target design effort examines ways to minimize the beam power and energy and increase the allowable focal spot size while preserving target gain. Chamber research for heavy ion fusion emphasizes the use of thick liquid walls to serve as the coolant, breed tritium, and protect the structural wall from neutrons, photons, and other target products. Several small facilities are now operating to model fluid chamber dynamics. A facility to study target injection and tracking has been built and a second facility is being designed. Improved economics is an important goal of the accelerator research. The accelerator research is also directed toward the design of an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE is being designed to accelerate ions to >100 MeV, enabling experiments in beam dynamics, focusing, and target physics. Activities leading to the IRE include ion source development and a High Current Experiment (HCX) designed to transport and accelerate a single beam of ions with a beam current of approximately 1 A, the initial current required for each beam of a fusion driver. In terms of theory, the program is developing a source-to-target numerical simulation capability. The goal of the entire program is to enable an informed decision about the promise of heavy ion fusion in about a decade. (author)

  17. New experimental initiatives using very highly charged ions from an 'electron beam ion trap'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1996-01-01

    A short review of the experimental program in highly-charged heavy ion physics conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility is presented. The heavy-ion research, involving ions up to fully stripped U 92+ , includes precision x-ray spectroscopy and lifetime studies, electron impact ionization and excitation cross section measurements. The investigations of ion-surface interactions following the impact of high-Z highly charged ions on surfaces are aimed to study the neutralization dynamics effecting the ion and the response of the surface as well. (author)

  18. Feasibility of a Heavy Ion Beam Probe for W7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J.; Grulke, O.; Laube, R.

    2017-10-01

    A feasibility study of a Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic for the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) superconducting stellarator, incorporating the accelerator and energy analyzer (currently in Greifswald) from the 2 MeV TEXT-U HIBP, is being carried out. The study's results are positive: beam trajectory simulations in the W7-X standard magnetic configuration, with central densities up to 1020 m-3, predict that it will be possible to measure the equilibrium plasma potential and Er at all radii, and simultaneously measure temporally and spatially resolved fluctuations of ne and potential for r / a >0.5. This will provide a unique capability to advance understanding of neoclassical and turbulent particle and energy transport in W7-X. Within this feasibility study, the beam is injected and detected through the K11 and N11 ports respectively, and the toroidal magnetic field is in the ` + φ ' direction. Additional beam simulations reveal that most radii can be accessed in 7 other paradigm magnetic configurations. It's anticipated that electrostatic beam steering suitable for studying all these configurations is plausible; it will have plate dimensions comparable to TEXT-U's with smaller electric fields and higher voltages. Initial estimates of anticipated heat load from the W7-X plasma on the steering systems indicate it will be significant, but tractable. Our conclusion from these studies is that an HIBP diagnostic for W7-X is feasible. This work is supported by US DoE Award DE-SC0013918.

  19. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. RIKEN; radioactive ion beams; magic numbers. PACS No. 21.10.-k. 1. Introduction. In RIKEN, there are several heavy ion accelerators. Main accelerator is the RIKEN ring cyclotron (RRC) with K = 540, that has been operated from 1986. The RRC has two injectors; one is heavy ion linear accelerator that has been ...

  20. Heavy ion irradiation effects of polymer film on absorption of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Noboru; Seguchi, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Arakawa, Tetsuhito

    1997-03-01

    Ion irradiation effects on the absorption of light for three types of polymer films; polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN), and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) were investigated by irradiation of heavy ions with Ni{sup 4+}(15MeV), O{sup 6+}(160MeV), and Ar{sup 8+}(175MeV), and compared with electron beams(EB) irradiation. The change of absorption at 400nm by a photometer was almost proportional to total dose for ions and EB. The absorption per absorbed dose was much high in Ni{sup 4+}, but rather small in O{sup 6+} and Ar{sup 8+} irradiation, and the absorption by EB irradiation was accelerated by the temperature of polymer film during irradiation. The beam heating of materials during ion irradiation was assumed, especially for Ni ion irradiation. The heavy ion irradiation effect of polymers was thought to be much affected by the ion beam heating than the linear energy transfer(LET) of radiation source. (author)

  1. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1997-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O 7+ and 1.15 emA of O 6+ , more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar 13+ , Ca 13+ , Fe 13+ , Co 14+ and Kr 18+ , and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr 26+ , Xe 28+ , Au 35+ , Bi 34+ and U 34+ have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe 36+ , Au 46+ , Bi 47+ and U 48+ . An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I ≥ 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams

  2. Heavy Ion Acceleration at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    SATO, Susumu

    2018-02-01

    J-PARC, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, is an accelerator, which provides a high-intensity proton beam. Recently as a very attractive project, the acceleration of heavy ions produced by supplementary ion sources, called J-PARC-HI, is seriously contemplated by domestic as well as international communities. The planned facility would accelerate heavy ions up to U92+ with a beam energy 20 AGeV ( of 6.2 AGeV). The highlight of the J-PARC-HI project is its very high beam rate up to 1011 Hz, which will enable the study of very rare events. Taking advantage of this high intensity, J-PARC-HI will carry out frontier studies of new and rare observables in this energy region: (i) nuclear medium modification of chiral property of vector mesons through low-mass di-lepton signal, (ii) QCD critical pointcharacterization through event-by-event fluctuation signals of particle production, (iii) systematic measurements related to the equation of state through collective flow signal or two-particle momentum correlation signal, or (iv) the search of hyper nuclei with multi strangeness including or exceeding S = 3. The current plan of J-PARC-HI aims to carrying out the first experimental measurements in 2025.

  3. Performance test of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources for the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, K.; Sawada, J.; Sakata, T.; Uno, K.; Okanishi, K.; Harada, H.; Itano, A.; Higashi, A.; Akagi, T.; Yamada, S.; Noda, K.; Torikoshi, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2000-02-01

    Two electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources were manufactured for the accelerator facility at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. H2+, He2+, and C4+ were chosen as the accelerating ions because they have the highest charge to mass ratio among ion states which satisfy the required intensity and quality. The sources have the same structure as the 10 GHz ECR source at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba except for a few improvements in the magnetic structure. Their performance was investigated at the Sumitomo Heavy Industries factory before shipment. The maximum intensity was 1500 μA for H2+, 1320 μA for He2+, and 580 μA for C4+ at the end of the ion source beam transport line. These are several times higher than required. Sufficient performance was also observed in the flatness and long-term stability of the pulsed beams. These test results satisfy the requirements for medical use.

  4. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Avery, R.T.; Brady, V.; Bisognano, J.; Celata, C.; Chupp, W.W.; Faltens, A.; Hartwig, E.C.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.H.; Laslett, L.J.; Lee, E.P.; Rosenblum, S.S.; Smith, L.; Warwick, A.

    1984-01-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams. (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to proportional70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units. (orig.)

  5. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  6. submitter Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}$ of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the $\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{\\alpha}}={{\\alpha}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\alpha}_{\\text{ph}}}$ and ${{\\text{R}}_{\\beta}}={{\\beta}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\beta}_{\\text{ph}}}$ ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival ($\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{10}}$ ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlati...

  7. Development of a nuclear data base for relativistic ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L.W.; Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The primary limitation on the development of heavy ion beam transport methods is the lack of an accurate nuclear data base. Because of the large number of ion/target combinations, the complexity of the reaction products, and the broad range of energies required, it is unlikely that the data base will ever be compiled from experiments alone. For the last 15 years, relativistic heavy-ion accelerators have been available, but the experimental data base remains inadequate. However, theoretical models of heavy-ion reactions are being derived to provide cross section data for beam transport problems. A concurrent experimental program to provide sufficient experimental data to validate the model is also in progress. Model development and experimental results for model validation are discussed. The need for additional nuclear fragmentation data is identified

  8. Thermodynamic properties of heavy ion heated refractory metals; Thermodynamische Eigenschaften von schwerionengeheizten hochschmelzenden Metallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, Alexander

    2011-05-04

    Knowledge of basic physical properties of matter in high-energy-density (HED) states such as the equation-of-state (EOS) is of fundamental importance for various branches of basic and applied physics. However, such matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure - also called ''warm dense matter'' (WDM) - can only be generated in dynamic experiments employing the most powerful drivers. At the high temperature experimental area HHT of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany), intense beams of energetic heavy ions are used for this purpose. The aim of this work is to study thermophysical properties of refractory metals in hot solid and liquid states by precise temperature measurements. In order to identify the melting plateau and to limit the maximum target temperature to the region of interest, relatively long (one microsecond) bunches of uranium and xenon ions have been used to heat initially solid samples. The intense ion beams were focused on a millimetre spot at the target in order to achieve uniform conditions. The temperature on the target surface was determined by analysing thermal radiation emitted from a 0.03 mm{sup 2} area at five different wavelengths. In order to obtain the physical temperature, one has to measure not only the thermal radiation but also the emissivity, ε(T,λ) of the target surface which is not known ab initio. For this purpose, a set-up for direct target reflection measurement was designed and embedded into the fast multichannel pyrometer system. The reflection signal provides the necessary information about modifications of the target surface properties during the interaction with the ion beam. Beside the pyrometric and reflection measurement set-ups, various hardware and software components of the data acquisition system for the heavy-ion beam driven experiments were substantially enhanced. The emissivity was also obtained by identifying the melting plateau and using the

  9. Heavy particle beam cancer treatment apparatus, HIMAC, and clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Fuminori

    1994-01-01

    The clinical trial was begun in June, 1994, on the treatment of cancer patients using heavy particle beam for the first time in Japan in National Institute of Radiological Sciences. It is the result of promoting the construction of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with the first period construction cost of 32.6 billion yen as a part of the 10 year general strategy against cancer. This is only one facility of this kind in the world. The features of heavy particle beam as radiation therapy are the excellent concentration of dose distribution, biological effect and so on. The nuclides to be used are those having the atomic number from helium to argon. The acceleration energy of ions was set at 800 MeV per nucleon so as to reach 30 cm in human bodies. The beam intensity is 5 Gy/min to finish irradiation within 1 min. The maximum irradiation field is 22 cm in diameter. The specification of the HIMAC accelerator is summarized. The Penning Ionization Gauge and the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources were installed for the reliability. The radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator is suitable to accelerate low velocity, high intensity beam. Two synchrotrons of 41 m mean diameter are installed. High energy beam transport system, irradiation equipment, and the clinical trial are reported. (K.I.)

  10. A method for the energy calibration of a heavy ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.; Michaelsen, R.; Sethi, R.C.; Ziegler, K.

    1985-01-01

    A method for the absolute energy calibration of a heavy ion accelerator was developed at VICKSI. The method is based on the use of a suitably selected heavy ion beam to calibrate an analysing magnet. In front of the entrance slit of the analysing system the beam is stripped with a thin carbon foil. The charge states of the resulting ions cover the whole range from the charge state of the injected ions to the charge state of the fully stripped ions. Ion and energy of the beam have been selected in such a way that the rigidities corresponding to the different charge states cover the full rigidity range of the analysing magnet. The field of the analysing magnet is varied and the NMR-frequency corresponding to each transmitted charge state is obtained. For the absolute calibration a standard α-source is used. The functional dependence of the rigidity versus NMR-frequency can be used to compute the energy of any beam. At present this method gives an absolute accuracy of +-0.15%. The various sources of erros are described. (orig.)

  11. Application of heavy-ion microbeam system at Kyoto University: Energy response for imaging plate by single ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Hirose, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    2011-01-01

    A heavy-ion microbeam system for cell irradiation has been developed using an accelerator at Kyoto University. We have successfully developed proton-, carbon-, fluorine- and silicon-beams in order to irradiate a micro-meter sized area with ion counting, especially single ion irradiation. In the heavy-ion microbeam system, an imaging plate (IP) was utilized for beam diagnostics on the irradiation. The IP is widely used for radiography studies in biology. However, there are a few studies on the low linear energy transfer (LET) by single ions, i.e., low-intensity exposure. Thus we have investigated the energy response for the IP, which can be utilized for microbeam diagnostics.

  12. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Godlove, T.D.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Keefe, D.

    1985-01-01

    In October 1983, a Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research programme (HIFAR) was established under the Office of Energy Research of the United States Department of Energy. The programme goal over the next several years is to establish a data base in accelerator physics and technology that can allow the potential of heavy ion fusion to be accurately assessed. Three new developments have taken place in the HIFAR programme. First, a decision has been made to concentrate the experimental programme on the development of multiple-beam induction linacs. Second, new beam transport experiments over a large number of quadrupole elements show that stable beam propagation occurs for significantly higher beam currents than had been believed possible a few years ago. Third, design calculations now show that a test accelerator of modest size and cost can come within a factor of three of testing almost all of the physics and technical issues appropriate to a power plant driver. (author)

  13. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon-Golcher, Edwin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter ~ few mm), high current density (J ~ several tens of mA/cm2) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield () at different operating conditions are presented for K+ and Cs+ contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K+ beam of ~90 mA/cm2 were observed in 2.3 μs pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times (~ 1 μs), high current densities (~ 100 mA/cm+) and low operating pressures (< 2 mtorr) were verified. For the latter, high but acceptable levels of beam emittance were measured (εn ≤ 0.006 π· mm · mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I ~ 5mA) by about a factor of 10.

  14. A Preliminary Version of Heavy Ion Treatment Planning System at IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinguo; Dai Zhongying; Ye Fei; Wu Qingfeng; Li Ping; Li Qiang; Jin Xiaodong; Du Xiaogang; WangYangping; Dang Jianwu

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL/HIRFL-CSR), clinical trials of heavy ion radiotherapy are being conducted at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, where two-dimensional(2D) layer-stacking conformal irradiation method in a passive beam delivery system was applied. To make better use of the biophysical advantages of heavy ion beams and ensure success of the clinical trials, a preliminary version of heavy ion treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed at IMP. The TPS was designed in a manner to adapt to the 2D layer-stacking conformal irradiation method. The architecture and function of the TPS software and the implementation of dose calculation algorithm in the TPS were introduced in this paper.The deviation between the doses planned by the TPS and measured through an anthropomorphous phantom was verified to be less than 5%. Finally,the pending issues for developing a sophisticated treatment planning system at IMP were discussed. (authors)

  15. Heavy ion accelerator GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    This article presents GANIL, a large national heavy ion accelerator. The broad problems of nuclear physics, atomic physics, astrophysics and physics of condensed media which can be approached and studied with this machine are discussed first, after which the final construction project is described. The project comprises a circular injector, a separated sector cyclotron up beam stripper, and a second separated cyclotron downstream [fr

  16. High baryon density from relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Y.; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Schlagel, T.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1993-10-01

    A quantitative model, based on hadronic physics, is developed and applied to heavy ion collisions at BNL-AGS energies. This model is in excellent agreement with observed particle spectra in heavy ion collisions using Si beams, where baryon densities of three and four times the normal nuclear matter density ({rho}{sub 0}) are reached. For Au on Au collisions, the authors predict the formation of matter at very high densities (up to 10 {rho}{sub 0}).

  17. Thermomechanical response of Large Hadron Collider collimators to proton and ion beam impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to accelerate and bring into collision high-energy protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving direct beam impacts on collimators can happen in both cases. The LHC collimation system is designed to handle the demanding requirements of high-intensity proton beams. Although proton beams have 100 times higher beam power than the nominal LHC lead ion beams, specific problems might arise in case of ion losses due to different particle-collimator interaction mechanisms when compared to protons. This paper investigates and compares direct ion and proton beam impacts on collimators, in particular tertiary collimators (TCTs, made of the tungsten heavy alloy INERMET® 180. Recent measurements of the mechanical behavior of this alloy under static and dynamic loading conditions at different temperatures have been done and used for realistic estimates of the collimator response to beam impact. Using these new measurements, a numerical finite element method (FEM approach is presented in this paper. Sequential fast-transient thermostructural analyses are performed in the elastic-plastic domain in order to evaluate and compare the thermomechanical response of TCTs in case of critical beam load cases involving proton and heavy ion beam impacts.

  18. Experiments at The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Kwan, J.W.; MacLaren, S.A.; Ponce, D.; Shuman, D.; Yu, S.; Ahle, L.; Lund, S.; Molvik, A.; Sangster, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of experiments is presented, in which the physical dimensions, emittance and perveance are scaled to explore driver-relevant beam dynamics. Among these are beam merging, focusing to a small spot, and bending and recirculating beams. The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion (VNL) is also developing two driver-scale beam experiments involving heavy-ion beams with I(sub beam) about 1 Ampere to provide guidance for the design of an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE) for driver system studies within the next 5 years. Multiple-beam sources and injectors are being designed and a one-beam module will be built and tested. Another experimental effort will be the transport of such a beam through about 100 magnetic quadrupoles. The experiment will determine transport limits at high aperture fill factors, beam halo formation, and the influence on beam properties of secondary electron Research into driver technology will be briefly presented, including the development of ferromagnetic core materials, induction core pulsers, multiple-beam quadrupole arrays and plasma channel formation experiments for pinched transport in reactor chambers

  19. Simulation of a relativistic heavy ions beam transport in the matter: contribution of the fragmentation process and biological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibnouzahir, M.

    1995-03-01

    The study of relativistic heavy ion collisions permit an approach of the properties of dense and not hadronic matter, and an analysis of the reaction mechanisms. Such studies are also interesting on the biological point of view, since there exist now well defined projects concerning the radiotherapy with high LET particles as neutrons, protons, heavy ions. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the processes which occur in the propagation of a relativistic heavy ion beam (E≥ 100 A.MeV) in matter. We have elaborated a three dimensional transport code, using a Monte Carlo method, in order to describe the propagation of Ne and Ar ions in water. Violent nuclear collisions giving fragmentation process have been taken into account by use of the FREESCO program. We have tested the validity of our transport model and we show an important change of the energy deposition at the vicinity of the Bragg peak; such a distortion, due mainly to fragmentation reactions, is of a great interest for biological applications. (author)

  20. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Postfach 11 19 32, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A R [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Shutov, A [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation); Varentsov, D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Udrea, S [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D H H [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Juranek, H [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Redmer, R [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Portugues, R F [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lomonosov, I [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation); Fortov, V E [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation)

    2003-06-06

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are considered to be the same as expected at the future SIS100 facility. The simulations show that due to multiple shock reflection between the cylinder axis and the lead-hydrogen boundary, one can achieve up to 20 times solid density in hydrogen while keeping the temperature as low as a few thousand K. The corresponding pressure is of the order of 10 Mbar. These values of the physical parameters lie within the range of theoretically predicted values for hydrogen metallization. We have also carried out a parameter study of this problem by varying the target and beam parameters over a wide range. It has been found that the results are very insensitive to such changes in the input parameters.

  1. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N A; Piriz, A R; Shutov, A; Varentsov, D; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, D H H; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Portugues, R F; Lomonosov, I; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are considered to be the same as expected at the future SIS100 facility. The simulations show that due to multiple shock reflection between the cylinder axis and the lead-hydrogen boundary, one can achieve up to 20 times solid density in hydrogen while keeping the temperature as low as a few thousand K. The corresponding pressure is of the order of 10 Mbar. These values of the physical parameters lie within the range of theoretically predicted values for hydrogen metallization. We have also carried out a parameter study of this problem by varying the target and beam parameters over a wide range. It has been found that the results are very insensitive to such changes in the input parameters

  2. Heavy-ion collimation at the Large Hadron Collider. Simulations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermes, Pascal Dominik

    2016-12-19

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) stores and collides proton and {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} beams of unprecedented energy and intensity. Thousands of superconducting magnets, operated at 1.9 K, guide the very intense and energetic particle beams, which have a large potential for destruction. This implies the demand for a multi-stage collimation system to provide protection from beam-induced quenches or even hardware damage. In heavy-ion operation, ion fragments with significant rigidity offsets can still scatter out of the collimation system. When they irradiate the superconducting LHC magnets, the latter risk to quench (lose their superconducting property). These secondary collimation losses can potentially impose a limitation for the stored heavy-ion beam energy. Therefore, their distribution in the LHC needs to be understood by sophisticated simulations. Such simulation tools must accurately simulate the particle motion of many different nuclides in the magnetic LHC lattice and simulate their interaction with the collimators. Previous simulation tools used simplified models for the simulation of particle-matter interaction and showed discrepancies compared to the measured loss patterns. This thesis describes the development and application of improved heavy-ion collimation simulation tools. Two different approaches are presented to provide these functionalities. In the first presented tool, called STIER, fragmentation at the primary collimator is simulated with the Monte-Carlo event generator FLUKA. The ion fragments scattered out of the primary collimator are subsequently tracked as protons with ion-equivalent rigidities in the existing proton tracking tool SixTrack. This approach was used to prepare the collimator settings for the 2015 LHC heavy-ion run and its predictions allowed reducing undesired losses. More accurate simulation results are obtained with the second presented simulation tool, in which SixTrack is extended to track arbitrary heavy ions. This new

  3. Heavy-ion collimation at the Large Hadron Collider. Simulations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermes, Pascal Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) stores and collides proton and 208 Pb 82+ beams of unprecedented energy and intensity. Thousands of superconducting magnets, operated at 1.9 K, guide the very intense and energetic particle beams, which have a large potential for destruction. This implies the demand for a multi-stage collimation system to provide protection from beam-induced quenches or even hardware damage. In heavy-ion operation, ion fragments with significant rigidity offsets can still scatter out of the collimation system. When they irradiate the superconducting LHC magnets, the latter risk to quench (lose their superconducting property). These secondary collimation losses can potentially impose a limitation for the stored heavy-ion beam energy. Therefore, their distribution in the LHC needs to be understood by sophisticated simulations. Such simulation tools must accurately simulate the particle motion of many different nuclides in the magnetic LHC lattice and simulate their interaction with the collimators. Previous simulation tools used simplified models for the simulation of particle-matter interaction and showed discrepancies compared to the measured loss patterns. This thesis describes the development and application of improved heavy-ion collimation simulation tools. Two different approaches are presented to provide these functionalities. In the first presented tool, called STIER, fragmentation at the primary collimator is simulated with the Monte-Carlo event generator FLUKA. The ion fragments scattered out of the primary collimator are subsequently tracked as protons with ion-equivalent rigidities in the existing proton tracking tool SixTrack. This approach was used to prepare the collimator settings for the 2015 LHC heavy-ion run and its predictions allowed reducing undesired losses. More accurate simulation results are obtained with the second presented simulation tool, in which SixTrack is extended to track arbitrary heavy ions. This new tracking

  4. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Henestroza

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final-focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit spots on the target with radii of about 2 mm. For the heavy-ion-fusion power-plant scenarios presently favored in the U.S., a substantial fraction of the ion-beam space charge must be neutralized during this final transport. The most effective neutralization technique found in numerical simulations is to pass each beam through a low-density plasma after the final focusing. To provide quantitative comparisons of these theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the neutralized-transport experiment. The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam, while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed quadrupoles, permits the study of magnet tuning, as well as the effects of phase-space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, the converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present initial results from the experiment.

  5. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon-Golcher, E.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter ∼ few mm), high current density (J ∼ several tens of mA/cm 2 ) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield ( ) at different operating conditions are presented for K + and Cs + contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K + beam of ∼90 mA/cm 2 were observed in 2.3 (micro)s pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times (∼ 1 (micro)s), high current densities (∼ 100 mA/cm 2 ) and low operating pressures ( e psilon) n (le) 0.006 π mm · mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I ∼ 5mA) by about a factor of 10

  6. Bulk properties of the medium produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the beam energy scan program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We present measurements of bulk properties of the matter produced in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=7.7 ,11.5 ,19.6 ,27 , and 39 GeV using identified hadrons (π±, K±, p , and p ¯) from the STAR experiment in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) Program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Midrapidity (|y |<0.1 ) results for multiplicity densities d N /d y , average transverse momenta 〈pT〉 , and particle ratios are presented. The chemical and kinetic freeze-out dynamics at these energies are discussed and presented as a function of collision centrality and energy. These results constitute the systematic measurements of bulk properties of matter formed in heavy-ion collisions over a broad range of energy (or baryon chemical potential) at RHIC.

  7. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  8. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Okamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  9. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  10. Plan of measurement experiment of correlation between ion beam and plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Satoru; Sakumi, Akira; Okazaki, Hisashi; Watanabe, Takeshi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1996-12-01

    The Research Laboratory, for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology has conducted experimental study on accelerating structure and beam behavior of high intensity heavy ion accelerator for a beam driver and its computer simulation study as a circle of fundamental study of the heavy ion inertial nuclear fusion. From last fiscal year, a preliminary study for measuring the correlation between beam and plasma using low speed heavy ion beam from 1.7 MV tandem accelerator was begun. As a result, a possibility of forming a plasma target with above 10 (exp 17)/cu cm in free electron density and about 100 ns in life possible to supply to measurement of the correlation between beam and plasma was obtained by formation of laser plasma target and development of diagnostic measurement system. According to the preliminary calculation, it is expected to be larger charging state of ion passing through plasma than that in normal temperature target, and stoppability is presumed to increase largely and to apply to electron stopper for accelerator. And, a plan of time resolution measurement of energy loss of beam passed through plasma target using magnetic field type spectrometer and high speed plastic scintillator is also preceeding. (G.K.)

  11. Negative-ion-beam generation with the ORNL SITEX source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.; Kim, J.

    1982-05-01

    Parametric studies were made on a hot cathode reflex discharge H - Surface Ionization source with Transverse Extraction (SITEX) in both the pure hydrogen and the mixed hydrogen-cesium mode. Extraction current density, beam current, gas efficiency, extracted electron-to-H - current ratio, heavy negative ion impurities, optics, and long pulse operation were investigated as a function of time, arc voltage, arc current, converter voltage, H 2 gas flow, cesium feed rate, and plasma generator geometries. Initial results of the research were an extracted H - beam current density of 56 mA/cm 2 at 23 mA for 5 s pulses and, gas efficiency of 3%, theta/sub perpendicular/ (1/e) approx. 2 +- 1 0 , theta/sub parallel/ (1/e) approx. 1 +- 1 0 , at a beam energy of 25 keV. Negative heavy ion beam impurities were reduced to - ions are produced prinicpally by positive ion surface conversion using elemental cesium fractional monolayer coverage on a molybdenum converter substrate, which is biased negatively with respect to the anode

  12. Formation and reactions of free radicals in the radiolysis of organic materials by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, H.

    2000-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions deposit energy along ion tracks with high density. Chemical effects of the heavy ions may hence differ from that of γ-rays and fast electrons. We can utilize these effects for material modification and fabrication of microstructure. It is necessary to know the dependence of the effects on ion beams and the variation of the effects on materials for developing new application of ion beams. We then studied radical formation in organic solids of alanine and of adipic acid by ion beams irradiation. (author)

  13. Degradation of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Structures through Light and Electron Beam Driven Ion Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Organometal halide perovskites show promising features for cost-effective application in photovoltaics. The material instability remains a major obstacle to broad application because of the poorly understood degradation pathways. Here, we apply simultaneous luminescence and electron microscopy on perovskites for the first time, allowing us to monitor in situ morphology evolution and optical properties upon perovskite degradation. Interestingly, morphology, photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence of perovskite samples evolve differently upon degradation driven by electron beam (e-beam) or by light. A transversal electric current generated by a scanning electron beam leads to dramatic changes in PL and tunes the energy band gaps continuously alongside film thinning. In contrast, light-induced degradation results in material decomposition to scattered particles and shows little PL spectral shifts. The differences in degradation can be ascribed to different electric currents that drive ion migration. Moreover, solution-processed perovskite cuboids show heterogeneity in stability which is likely related to crystallinity and morphology. Our results reveal the essential role of ion migration in perovskite degradation and provide potential avenues to rationally enhance the stability of perovskite materials by reducing ion migration while improving morphology and crystallinity. It is worth noting that even moderate e-beam currents (86 pA) and acceleration voltages (10 kV) readily induce significant perovskite degradation and alter their optical properties. Therefore, attention has to be paid while characterizing such materials using scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy techniques. PMID:26804213

  14. Production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhao, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Li, X. X.; Jin, T.; Xie, D. Z.; Lu, W.; Cao, Y.; Shang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an all-superconducting-magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged ion beams to meet the requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, an aluminum chamber has been installed inside a 1.5 mm thick Ta liner used for the reduction of x-ray irradiation at the high voltage insulator. With double-frequency (18+14.5 GHz) heating and at maximum total microwave power of 2.0 kW, SECRAL has successfully produced quite a few very highly charged Xe ion beams, such as 10 e μA of Xe 37+ , 1 e μA of Xe 43+ , and 0.16 e μA of Ne-like Xe 44+ . To further explore the capability of the SECRAL in the production of highly charged heavy metal ion beams, a first test run on bismuth has been carried out recently. The main goal is to produce an intense Bi 31+ beam for HIRFL accelerator and to have a feel how well the SECRAL can do in the production of very highly charged Bi beams. During the test, though at microwave power less than 3 kW, more than 150 e μA of Bi 31+ , 22 e μA of Bi 41+ , and 1.5 e μA of Bi 50+ have been produced. All of these results have again demonstrated the great capability of the SECRAL source. This article will present the detailed results and brief discussions to the production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL.

  15. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  16. Excitation of Ion Cyclotron Waves by Ion and Electron Beams in Compensated-current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, L.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.

    2018-04-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) can play important roles in the energization of plasma particles. Charged particle beams are ubiquitous in space, and astrophysical plasmas and can effectively lead to the generation of ICWs. Based on linear kinetic theory, we consider the excitation of ICWs by ion and electron beams in a compensated-current system. We also investigate the competition between reactive and kinetic instabilities. The results show that ion and electron beams both are capable of generating ICWs. For ICWs driven by ion beams, there is a critical beam velocity, v bi c , and critical wavenumber, k z c , for a fixed beam density; the reactive instability dominates the growth of ICWs when the ion-beam velocity {v}{bi}> {v}{bi}c and the wavenumber {k}zz≃ 2{k}zc/3 for a given {v}{bi}> {v}{bi}c. For the slow ion beams with {v}{bi}< {v}{bi}c, the kinetic instability can provide important growth rates of ICWs. On the other hand, ICWs driven by electron beams are excited only by the reactive instability, but require a critical velocity, {v}{be}c\\gg {v}{{A}} (the Alfvén velocity). In addition, the comparison between the approximate analytical results based on the kinetic theory and the exact numerical calculation based on the fluid model demonstrates that the reactive instabilities can well agree quantitatively with the numerical results by the fluid model. Finally, some possible applications of the present results to ICWs observed in the solar wind are briefly discussed.

  17. Two-dimensional PIC simulations of ion beam instabilities in Supernova-driven plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckmann, M E; Shukla, P K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Meli, A; Mastichiadis, A [Department of Physics, National University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 15783 (Greece); Drury, L O C [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: markd@tp4.rub.de

    2008-06-15

    Supernova remnant blast shells can reach the flow speed v{sub s} = 0.1c and shocks form at its front. Instabilities driven by shock-reflected ion beams heat the plasma in the foreshock, which may inject particles into diffusive acceleration. The ion beams can have the speed v{sub b} {approx} v{sub s}. For v{sub b} << v{sub s} the Buneman or upper-hybrid instabilities dominate, while for v{sub b} >> v{sub s} the filamentation and mixed modes grow faster. Here the relevant waves for v{sub b} {approx} v{sub s} are examined and how they interact nonlinearly with the particles. The collision of two plasma clouds at the speed v{sub s} is modelled with particle-in-cell simulations, which convect with them magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to their flow velocity vector. One simulation models equally dense clouds and the other one uses a density ratio of 2. Both simulations show upper-hybrid waves that are planar over large spatial intervals and that accelerate electrons to {approx}10 keV. The symmetric collision yields only short oscillatory wave pulses, while the asymmetric collision also produces large-scale electric fields, probably through a magnetic pressure gradient. The large-scale fields destroy the electron phase space holes and they accelerate the ions, which facilitates the formation of a precursor shock.

  18. Evaluation of beam wobbling methods for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Takei, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Koikegami, Hajime; Tomita, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has extensively studied carbon-ion radiotherapy at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with some positive outcomes, and has established its efficacy. Therefore, efforts to distribute the therapy to the general public should be made, for which it is essential to enable direct application of clinical and technological experiences obtained at NIRS. For widespread use, it is very important to reduce the cost through facility downsizing with minimal acceleration energy to deliver the HIMAC-equivalent clinical beams. For the beam delivery system, the requirement of miniaturization is translated to reduction in length while maintaining the clinically available field size and penetration range for range-modulated uniform broad beams of regular fields that are either circular or square for simplicity. In this paper, we evaluate the various wobbling methods including original improvements, especially for application to the compact facilities through the experimental and computational studies. The single-ring wobbling method used at HIMAC is the best one including a lot of experience at HIMAC but the residual range is a fatal problem in the case of a compact facility. On the other hand, uniform wobbling methods such as the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods are effective and suitable for a compact facility. Furthermore, these methods can be applied for treatment with passive range modulation including respiratory gated irradiation. In theory, the choice between the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods depends on the shape of the required irradiation field. However, we found that it is better to use the zigzag wobbling method with transformation of the wobbling pattern even when a circular uniform irradiation field is required, because it is difficult to maintain the stability of the wobbler magnet due to the rapid change of the wobbler current in the spiral wobbling method. The regulated wobbling method

  19. Capture from pair production as a beam loss mechanism for heavy ions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Belkacem, A.; Claytor, N.; Dinneen, T.; Gould, H.

    1997-05-01

    Electron capture from electron-positron pair production is predicted to be a major source of beam loss for the heaviest ions at RHIC. Achieving the highest luminosity thus requires an understanding of the capture process. The authors report measurements of this process at Brookhaven National Laboratory's AGS using 10.8 GeV/nucleon Au 79+ projectiles on Au targets. Capture from pair production is a process in which the very high electromagnetic field involved in the collision of two relativistic heavy ions results in the production of an electron-positron pair with the capture of the electron by one of the ions. There are many theoretical papers published on capture from pair production with discrepancies between predicted cross sections. The experimental results are compared to theory and to previous experiments at 1 GeV/nucleon. The implications of extrapolations to RHIC energies are presented

  20. Research on mutation generation in higher plants with heavy ions at NIRS-HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, M.; Watanabe, S.; Watanabe, M.; Toguri, T.; Furusawa, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Plants are closely related to medical treatment in medicine, foods, herbs and medical care by gardening. Ion beams have much higher linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness than those of gamma rays and X-rays. Ion beams are supposed to be useful as new mutagen to obtain novel mutants with superior characteristics in higher plants. In this study, the influence of heavy ions irradiation on bud growth was examined in carnation and the mutation generation was inspected in babies' breath. The growth of carnation buds began to decrease at 10 Gy and the median growth dose was estimated at 35 Gy for 290 Mev/u carbon ion beams. Mutants with petaloid leaves were observed in babies' breath by the irradiation of 290 Mev/u carbon ion beams at 20Gy. We will examine the mutation rates and spectrum for 290 MeV/u carbon, 400 MeV/u neon and 500 MeV/u argon ion beams to find optimum use of the beams in plant breeding. The efficient system to generate useful mutants using heavy ions at NIRS-HIMAC will be developed in higher plants. (author)

  1. Magnetic spectrograph for the Holifield heavy ion research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.L.C. Jr.; Enge, H.A.; Erskine, J.R.; Hendrie, D.L.; LeVine, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    The need for a new generation magnetic spectrograph for the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility is discussed. The advantages of a magnetic spectrograph for heavy ion research are discussed, as well as some of the types of experiments for which such an instrument is suited. The limitations which the quality of the incident beam, target and spectrograph itself impose on high resolution heavy ion measurements are discussed. Desired features of an ideal new spectrograph are: (1) intrinsic resolving power E/ΔE greater than or equal to 3000; (2) maximum solid angle greater than or equal to 20 msr; (3) dispersion approx. 4-8m; (4) maximum energy interval approx. 30%; and (5) mass-energy product greater than or equal to 200. Various existing and proposed spectrographs are compared with the specifications for a new heavy ion magnet design

  2. Development and application of ion beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    At GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt/Germany the HITRAP project is in the commissioning phase. This world-wide unique facility consists of a linear decelerator for heavy, highly charged ions including atomic physics precision experiments. During commissioning of the cavities, transverse emittances were measured using the single-shot pepperpot method as well as the multi-gradient method. The extraction emittance of the experimental storage ring (ESR) was determined. Furthermore, the phase space distribution of an decelerated beam at an intermediate energy of 500keV/u was measured behind the IH-structure. New algorithms have been integrated into the analysis of digital images. The longitudinal bunch structure measurements of the ion beam at the entry point into the decelerator and the operation of the Double-drift Buncher is shown. The design, development and the first commissioning of a new single-shot pepperpot emittance meter for very low beam currents and beam energies in the order of some hundred nA is described, making it possible to measure the beam behind the deceleration cavities. In addition, transverse beam dynamics calculations were performed, which supported the hands-on commissioning of the accelerator. It is described how the entire beam line from the ESR to the radio-frequency quadrupole can be optimized using the new routine for transverse effects of the bunching and deceleration, which was successfully integrated into the software COSY Infinity. (orig.)

  3. Beam-line considerations for experiments with highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The APS offers exciting possibilities for a bright future in x-ray research. For example, measurements on the inner-shell photoionization of ions will be feasible using stored ions in ions traps or ion beams from an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source, or perhaps even a heavy-ion storage ring. Such experiments with ionic targets are the focus for the discussion given here on the optimization of photon flux on a generic beamline at the APS. The performance of beam lines X26C, X26A, and X17 on the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will be discussed as specific examples of beam-line design considerations

  4. Beam-line considerations for experiments with highly-charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The APS offers exciting possibilities for a bright future in x-ray research. For example, measurements on the inner-shell photoionization of ions will be feasible using stored ions in ions traps or ion beams from an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source, or perhaps even a heavy-ion storage ring. Such experiments with ionic targets are the focus for the discussion given here on the optimization of photon flux on a generic beamline at the APS. The performance of beam lines X26C, X26A, and X17 on the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source will be discussed as specific examples of beam-line design considerations.

  5. Measurement of charge of heavy ions in emulsion using a CCD camera

    CERN Document Server

    Kudzia, D; Dabrowska, A; Deines-Jones, P; Holynski, R; Olszewski, A; Nilsen, B S; Sen-Gupta, K; Szarska, M; Trzupek, A; Waddington, C J; Wefel, J P; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; Wolter, W; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K

    1999-01-01

    A system has been developed for semi-automated determination of the charges of heavy ions recorded in nuclear emulsions. The profiles of various heavy ion tracks in emulsion, both accelerator beam ions and fragments of heavy projectiles, were obtained with a CCD camera mounted on a microscope. The dependence of track profiles on illumination, emulsion grain size and density, background in emulsion, and track geometry was analyzed. Charges of the fragments of heavy projectiles were estimated independently by the delta ray counting method. A calibration of both width and height of track profiles against ion charges was made with ions of known charges ranging from helium to gold nuclei. (author)

  6. Accelerator-based atomic physics experiments with photon and ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerator-based atomic physics experiments at Brookhaven presently use heavy-ion beams from the Dual MP Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator Facility for atomic physics experiments of several types. Work is presently in progress to develop experiments which will use the intense photon beams which will be available in the near future from the ultraviolet (uv) and x-ray rings of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Plans are described for experiments at the NSLS and an exciting development in instrumentation for heavy-ion experiments is summarized

  7. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, induction acceleration, is being studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: (1) beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; (2) development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; (3) acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; (4) final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  8. A study for the installation of the TEXT heavy-ion beam probe on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, P. H.; Solano, E. R.; Bravenec, R. V.; Wootton, A. J.; Schoch, P. M.; Crowley, T. P.; Hickok, R. L.; West, W. P.; Leuer, J.; Anderson, P.

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of the feasibility of installing the TEXT 2 MeV heavy-ion beam probe on the DIII-D tokamak has been completed. Detailed drawings of the machine cross section were imported into the CAD application AutoCAD. A set of programs written in AutoLisp were used to generate trajectories. Displays of the accessible cross section of the plasma, scan lines for the entire range of primary beam energy and injection angle ranges, and sample-volume dimensions can be rapidly generated. Because of the large deflection between the primary input beam and the emergent secondary beam, either the analyzer needs to be tracked over a ±20° angle or secondary poloidal deflector plates need to be installed at the exit port. Toroidal deflector plates will be installed at both the injection and exit ports to compensate for toroidal displacements and deflections. The sample volumes generated by this procedure are within a few centimeters of the locations derived from a full three-dimensional calculation.

  9. Manipulation of high-current pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Griedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    For efficient induction-driven heavy-ion fusion, the current profile along a pulse must be modified in a non-selfsimilar manner between the accelerator and the target. In the accelerator, the pulse should have a duration of at least 50 ns in order to make efficient use of the induction cores, and the current should by nearly uniform along the pulse to minimize the aperture. In contrast, the optimal current profile on target consists of a main pulse of about 10 ns preceded by a longer low-current 'foot.' This pulse-shape manipulation must be carried out at the final pulse energy (5-10 GeV for 200 amu ions) in the presence of a large nonlinear longitudinal space-charge field. A straightforward method is presented here for doing the required pulse shaping. Induction-ceU voltages are generated using idealized beam profiles both in the accelerator and on target, and they are verified and checked for error sensitivity using the fluid/envelope code CIRCE

  10. Simulating electron clouds in heavy-ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-01-01

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positively charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly magnetized, weakly magnetized, and unmagnetized. The approach to such self-consistency is described, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyroperiod in the magnets. Tests and applications are presented: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the high-current experiment [L. R. Prost, P. A. Seidl, F. M. Bieniosek, C. M. Celata, A. Faltens, D. Baca, E. Henestroza, J. W. Kwan, M. Leitner, W. L. Waldron, R. Cohen, A. Friedman, D. Grote, S. M. Lund, A. W. Molvik, and E. Morse, 'High current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion', Physical Review Special Topics, Accelerators and Beams 8, 020101 (2005)], at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam on an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-time-step mover to accurately calculate the instability

  11. Ion acceleration in non-equilibrium plasmas driven by fast drifting electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F., E-mail: fdibartolo@unime.it [Università di Messina, V.le F. Stagno D’Alcontres 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per L’ingegneria, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Giugno, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanaia, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We hereby present results on ion acceleration mechanisms in non equilibrium plasmas generated by microwaves or high intensity laser pulses. Experiments point out that in magnetized plasmas X–B conversion takes place for under resonance values of the magnetic field, i.e. an electromagnetic mode is converted into an electrostatic wave. The strong self-generated electric field, of the order of 10{sup 7} V/m, causes a E × B drift which accelerates both ions and electrons, as it is evident by localized sputtering in the plasma chamber. These fields are similar (in magnitude) to the ones obtainable in laser generated plasmas at intensity of 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. In this latter case, we observe that the acceleration mechanism is driven by electrons drifting much faster than plasma bulk, thus generating an extremely strong electric field ∼10{sup 7} V/m. The two experiments confirm that ions acceleration at low energy is possible with table-top devices and following complementary techniques: i.e. by using microwave-driven (producing CW beams) plasmas, or non-equilibrium laser-driven plasmas (producing pulsed beams). Possible applications involve ion implantation, materials surface modifications, ion beam assisted lithography, etc.

  12. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component fo