WorldWideScience

Sample records for heavy energetic ions

  1. Evolution of clusters in energetic heavy ion bombarded amorphous graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, M N; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Carbon clusters have been generated by a novel technique of energetic heavy ion bombardment of amorphous graphite. The evolution of clusters and their subsequent fragmentation under continuing ion bombardment is revealed by detecting various clusters in the energy spectra of the direct recoils emitted as a result of collision between ions and the surface constituents.

  2. Mutation induction in human lymphoid cells by energetic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-10-01

    One of the concerns for extended space flight outside the magnetosphere is exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. In the series of studies presented herein, the mutagenic effectiveness of high energy heavy ions is examined using human B-lymphoblastoid cells across an LET range from 32keV/μm to 190 keV/μm. Mutations were scored for an autosomal locus, thymidine kinase (tk), and for an X-linked locus, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt). For each of the radiations studied, the autosomal locus is more sensitive to mutation induction than is the X-linked locus. When mutational yields are expressed in terms of particle fluence, the two loci respond quite differently across the range of LET. The action cross section for mutation induction peaks at 61 keV/μm for the tk locus and then declines for particles of higher LET, including Fe ions. For the hprt locus, the action cross section for mutation is maximal at 95 keV/μm but is relatively constant across the range from 61 keV/μm to 190 keV/gmm. The yields of hprt-deficient mutants obtained after HZE exposure to TK6 lymphoblasts may be compared directly with published data on the induction of hprt-deficient mutants in human neonatal fibroblasts exposed to similar ions. The action cross section for induction of hprt-deficient mutants by energetic Fe ions is more than 10-fold lower for lymphoblastoid cells than for fibroblasts.

  3. Effects of irradiation of energetic heavy ions on digital pulse shape analysis with silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Bardelli, L.; Le Neindre, N.; Bini, M.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Casini, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Rivet, M. F.; Stefanini, A. A.; Baiocco, G.; Berjillos, R.; Bonnet, E.; Bruno, M.; Chbihi, A.; Cruceru, I.; Degerlier, M.; Dueñas, J. A.; Galichet, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lopez, O.; Marchi, T.; Martel, I.; Morelli, L.; Parlog, M.; Piantelli, S.; Petrascu, H.; Rosato, E.; Seredov, V.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Fazia Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The next generation of 4π detector arrays for heavy ion studies will largely use Pulse Shape Analysis to push the performance of silicon detectors with respect to ion identification. Energy resolution and pulse shape identification capabilities of silicon detectors under prolonged irradiation by energetic heavy ions have thus become a major issue. In this framework, we have studied the effects of irradiation by energetic heavy ions on the response of neutron transmutation doped (nTD) silicon detectors. Sizeable effects on the amplitude and the risetime of the charge signal have been found for detectors irradiated with large fluences of stopped heavy ions, while much weaker effects were observed by punching-through ions. The robustness of ion identification based on digital pulse shape techniques has been evaluated.

  4. Formation of energetic heavy ion tracks in polyimide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, Alec, E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC 2234, NSW (Australia); Murugaraj, Pandiyan; Mainwaring, David E. [Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn 3122, VIC (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail; Cohen, David D.; Siegele, Rainer [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC 2234, NSW (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Ion tracks formed in polyimide via irradiation with high energy heavy ions. •Complementary techniques track the changes in composition of polyimide during irradiation. •Ion beam analysis aids the identification of signals from residual gas analysis. •A multi-step process of polyimide modification is observed and modelled. •The multi-step process is related to ion track density and overlap. -- Abstract: Polyimide thin films have been irradiated with a high energy beam of heavy ions to a fluence of approximately 4 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Proton backscattering spectroscopy was used to measure the composition of the films, which showed that oxygen was the element that exhibited the most rapid loss from the film. The gases evolved from the film during polymer modification were monitored using a quadrupole mass spectrometer for residual gas analysis (RGA). The fluence dependence of RGA signals were indicative of multi-step processes of gas release, whereby the passage of an ion through a region of pristine film changes the local molecular structure to one that will more readily form volatile species when subsequent ions pass.

  5. A detection system for energetic light heavy ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, C.P.M. van; Jelmersma, R.; Brink, A. van den; Kamermans, R.

    1984-01-01

    A light heavy ion detection system which consists of a gas-filled ionization chamber (IC) connected to a scattering chamber via a time-of-flight (TOF) system has been constructed. The entrance window of the IC has an area of 14 × 40 cm2, the active depth is 115 cm. Filled with CF4 at a pressure of 3

  6. Formation of energetic heavy ion tracks in polyimide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Alec; Murugaraj, Pandiyan; Mainwaring, David E.; Ionescu, Mihail; Cohen, David D.; Siegele, Rainer

    2013-11-01

    Polyimide thin films have been irradiated with a high energy beam of heavy ions to a fluence of approximately 4 × 1013 ions/cm2. Proton backscattering spectroscopy was used to measure the composition of the films, which showed that oxygen was the element that exhibited the most rapid loss from the film. The gases evolved from the film during polymer modification were monitored using a quadrupole mass spectrometer for residual gas analysis (RGA). The fluence dependence of RGA signals were indicative of multi-step processes of gas release, whereby the passage of an ion through a region of pristine film changes the local molecular structure to one that will more readily form volatile species when subsequent ions pass.

  7. On contribution of energetic and heavy ions to the plasma pressure: Storm Sept 27 - Oct 4, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, E. A.; Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Dandouras, I. S.; Daly, P. W.; Welling, D. T.; Grigorenko, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Contribution of the energetic ions (>> 40 keV) and of heavy ions into the total plasma pressure is often neglected. In this study we evaluate the contribution of these components for the storm observed from September 27 to October 4 in 2002. The thermal component of the pressure for the protons, helium and oxygen at 0--40 keV/q is measured by the Cluster/CIS/CODIF sensor. The contribution of the energetic ions at energies >> 40 keV is calculated from the Cluster/RAPID/IIMS observations. The results show that before the storm has initiated, the contribution of the energetic ions in to the total pressure is indeed negligible in the tail plasma sheet, less than ˜1%. However, with the storm development contribution of the energetic part becomes significant, up to ˜30%, towards the recovery phase and cannot be neglected. Heavy ions contribute to the 27% of the total pressure and half of them are energetic. The contribution of energetic ions to the pressure of the ring current (L≃5) is significant. The heavy ions play a dominant role in the plasma pressure, about 62% during the main phase of the magnetic storm. Half of them are energetic ions. The SWMF/BATS-R-US MHD model underestimates the contribution of the energetic and heavy ions in to the ion distribution in the magnetotail plasma sheet and the ring current. The ring current plasma pressure distorts the terrestrial internal magnetic field and defines magnetic storm. Therefore, it is essential to take in to account the contribution of the energetic and heavy ions.

  8. Radiolysis of ammonia-containing ices by energetic, heavy and highly charged ions inside dense astrophysical environments

    CERN Document Server

    Pilling, S; da Silveira, E F; Balanzat, E; Rothard, H; Domaracka, A; Boduch, P

    2009-01-01

    Deeply inside dense molecular clouds and protostellar disks, the interstellar ices are protected from stellar energetic UV photons. However, X-rays and energetic cosmic rays can penetrate inside these regions triggering chemical reactions, molecular dissociation and evaporation processes. We present experimental studies on the interaction of heavy, highly charged and energetic ions (46 MeV Ni^13+) with ammonia-containing ices in an attempt to simulate the physical chemistry induced by heavy ion cosmic rays inside dense astrophysical environments. The measurements were performed inside a high vacuum chamber coupled to the heavy ion accelerator GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen, France.\\textit{In-situ} analysis is performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) at different fluences. The averaged values for the dissociation cross section of water, ammonia and carbon monoxide due to heavy cosmic ray ion analogs are ~2x10^{-13}, 1.4x10^{-13} and 1.9x10^{-13} cm$^2$, respectiv...

  9. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.

    1998-02-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered 93Nb, 100Mo, 116Sn, 120Sn and 129Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature.

  10. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Saint-Laurent, F. [DRFC/STEP, CEN Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Steckmeyer, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpuscolaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    1998-03-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered {sup 93}Nb, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Sn, {sup 120}Sn and {sup 129}Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature. (orig.). 14 refs.

  11. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  12. Radial dose distribution around an energetic heavy ion and an ion track structure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Ritsuko

    1997-03-01

    Ionization currents produced in a small wall-less ionization chamber located at varying distance from the 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion`path traversing Ar gas were measured and utilized to construct a track structure model. Using the LET value of 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} and G(Fe{sup 3+}) in Fricke solutions (= 15.4) for fast electrons, we estimate G(Fe{sup 3+}) for this ion to be 5.0. (author)

  13. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  14. Swelling of SiO{sub 2} quartz induced by energetic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/PMC; Meftah, A. [ENSET, Skikda (Algeria); Stoquert, J.P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 67 - Strasbourg (France). Lab. PHASE; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1997-12-01

    A pronounced swelling effect occurs when irradiating SiO{sub 2} quartz with heavy ions (F, S, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, and Pb) in the electronic energy loss regime. Using a profilometer, the out-of-plane swelling was measured by scanning over the border line between an irradiated and a virgin area of the sample surface. The step height varied between 20 and 300 nm depending on the fluence, the electronic energy loss and the total range of the ions. From complementary Rutherford backscattering experiments under channelling condition (RBS-C), the damage fraction and corresponding track radii were extracted. Normalising the step height per incoming ion and by the projected range, a critical energy loss of 1.8{+-}0.5 keV/nm was found which is in good agreement with the threshold observed by RBS-C. Swelling can be explained by the amorphisation induced along the ion trajectories. The experimental results in quartz are compared to swelling data obtained under similar irradiation conditions in LiNbO{sub 3}. (orig.)

  15. Investigations on imaging properties of inorganic scintillation screens under irradiation with high energetic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberwirth, Alice

    2016-09-15

    This work represents the investigations in imagine properties of inorganic scintillation screens as diagnostic elements in heavy ion accelerator facilities, that were performed at GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research (Darmstadt, Germany) and TU Darmstadt. The screen materials can be classified in groups of phosphor screens (P43 and P46 phosphor), single crystals (cerium-doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and polycrystalline aluminum oxides (pure and chromium-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Out of these groups, a selection of seven screens were irradiated by five different projectiles (proton, nitrogen, nickel, xenon and uranium), that were extracted from SIS18 in fast (1 μs) and slow (300-400 ms) extraction mode at a specific energy of E{sub spec}=300 MeV/u. The number of irradiating particles per pulse was varied between 10{sup 7} and 2.10{sup 10} ppp and the scintillation response was recorded by a complex optical system. The records served on the one hand for investigations in the two-dimensional response to the irradiating beam, namely the light output L, the light yield Y and the characteristics of the beam profiles in horizontal and vertical direction. On the other hand the wavelength spectrum of the scintillation was recorded for investigations in variations of the material structure. A data analysis was performed based on a dedicated Python script. Additionally three conventional methods (UV/Vis transmission spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Raman fluorescence spectroscopy) were performed after the beam times for investigations in the material structure. Nevertheless, neither structural variations nor material defects, induced by the ion irradiation, were proven within the accuracy range of the used instrumentation and the given ion fluences. Besides the irradiation under varying beam intensity, radiation hardness tests with fast and slow extracted Nickel pulses at 2.10{sup 9} ppp and a specific energy around E{sub spec}∼300 MeV/u were performed and the

  16. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  17. Heavy coronal ions in the heliosphere. II. Expected fluxes of energetic neutral He atoms from the heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Grzedzielski, S; Bzowski, M

    2012-01-01

    Aims. A model of heliosheath density and energy spectra of alpha-particles and He+ ions carried by the solar wind is developed. Neutralization of heliosheath He+ ions, mainly by charge exchange (CX) with neutral interstellar H and He atoms, gives rise to ~0.2 - ~100 keV fluxes of energetic neutral He atoms (He ENA). Such fluxes, if observed, would give information about plasmas in the heliosheath and heliospheric tail. Methods. Helium ions crossing the termination shock (TS) constitute suprathermal (test) particles convected by (locally also diffusing through) hydrodynamically calculated background plasma flows (three versions of flows are employed). The He ions proceed from the TS towards heliopause (HP) and finally to the heliospheric tail (HT). Calculations of the evolution of alpha- and He+ particle densities and energy spectra include binary interactions with background plasma and interstellar atoms, adiabatic heating (cooling) resulting from flow compression (rarefaction), and Coulomb scattering on back...

  18. Energetic heavy ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4 in the equatorial radiation belts of the earth - Magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Direct in situ observations of trapped energetic heavy ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4 at energies in the lower MeV range made with Explorer 45 during the period June-December 1972 are presented. It is noted that all measurements were carried out in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equatorial plane and that the data show the varying effects of four major magnetic storm periods. Orders of magnitude increases in the trapped heavy ion population are seen deep within the radiation belts following the August 1972 solar flare and magnetic storm events. Fluxes of the Z greater than or equal to 4 ions are found to decay faster than those of helium ions of comparable energies; typical decay times for these ions are found to be 24-40 days at L less than or equal to 4 and shorter at higher L shells. The observations are compared with the expected post-injection long-term behavior of atomic oxygen ions deduced from charge exhange, radial diffusive transport, and Coulomb collisions. Good agreement is found between theory and observations.

  19. Truly incomplete and complex exchanges in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to energetic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon silicon ions, or iron ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. To verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole-chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after irradiation with the heavy ions of high LET, and consequently the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/microm, the highest LET included in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon iron ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique, which allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy iron ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges; these ratios were higher than those obtained after exposure to 6 Gy gamma rays. After 0.7 Gy of iron ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single iron-ion track.

  20. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for low-energetic heavy ions and their application in accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S; Andrianov, V A; Bleile, A; Echler, A; Egelhof, P; Kiseleva, A; Kiselev, O; Meier, H J; Meier, J P; Shrivastava, A; Weber, M; Golser, R; Kutschera, W; Priller, A; Steier, P; Vockenhuber, C

    2009-10-01

    The energy-sensitive detection of heavy ions with calorimetric low temperature detectors was investigated in the energy range of E=0.1-1 MeV/amu, commonly used for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The detectors used consist of sapphire absorbers and superconducting aluminum transition edge thermometers operated at T approximately 1.5 K. They were irradiated with various ion beams (13C, 197Au, 238U) provided by the VERA tandem accelerator in Vienna, Austria. The relative energy resolution obtained was DeltaE/E=(5-9) x 10(-3), even for the heaviest ions such as 238U. In addition, no evidence for a pulse height defect was observed. This performance allowed for the first time to apply a calorimetric low temperature detector in an AMS experiment. The aim was to precisely determine the isotope ratio of 236U/238U for several samples of natural uranium, 236U being known as a sensitive monitor for neutron fluxes. Replacing a conventionally used detection system at VERA by the calorimetric detector enabled to substantially reduce background from neighboring isotopes and to increase the detection efficiency. Due to the high sensitivity achieved, a value of 236U/238U=6.1 x 10(-12) could be obtained, representing the smallest 236U/238U ratio measured at the time. In addition, we contributed to establishing an improved material standard of 236U/238U, which can be used as a reference for future AMS measurements.

  1. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for low-energetic heavy ions and their application in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V. A.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Kiseleva, A.; Kiselev, O.; Meier, H. J.; Meier, J. P.; Shrivastava, A.; Weber, M.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-10-01

    The energy-sensitive detection of heavy ions with calorimetric low temperature detectors was investigated in the energy range of E =0.1-1 MeV/amu, commonly used for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The detectors used consist of sapphire absorbers and superconducting aluminum transition edge thermometers operated at T ˜1.5 K. They were irradiated with various ion beams (C13,A197u,U238) provided by the VERA tandem accelerator in Vienna, Austria. The relative energy resolution obtained was ΔE /E=(5-9)×10-3, even for the heaviest ions such as U238. In addition, no evidence for a pulse height defect was observed. This performance allowed for the first time to apply a calorimetric low temperature detector in an AMS experiment. The aim was to precisely determine the isotope ratio of U236/U238 for several samples of natural uranium, U236 being known as a sensitive monitor for neutron fluxes. Replacing a conventionally used detection system at VERA by the calorimetric detector enabled to substantially reduce background from neighboring isotopes and to increase the detection efficiency. Due to the high sensitivity achieved, a value of U236/U238=6.1×10-12 could be obtained, representing the smallest U236/U238 ratio measured at the time. In addition, we contributed to establishing an improved material standard of U236/U238, which can be used as a reference for future AMS measurements.

  2. Geomagnetic transmission disturbances and heavy-ion fluences observed in low Earth orbit during the solar energetic particle events of October 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, P R; Tylka, A J; Adams, J H; Beahm, L P; Fluckiger, E O; Kleis, T; Kobel, E

    1996-01-01

    The large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and simultaneous large geomagnetic disturbances observed during October 1989 posed a significant, rapidly evolving space radiation hazard. Using data from the GOES-7, NOAA-10, IMP-8 and LDEF satellites, we determined the geomagnetic transmission, heavy ion fluences, mean Fe ionic charge state, and effective radiation hazard observed in low Earth orbit (LEO) for these SEPs. We modeled the geomagnetic transmission by tracing particles through the combination of the internal International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and the Tsyganenko (1989) magnetospheric field models, extending the modeling to large geomagnetic disturbances. We used our results to assess the radiation hazard such very large SEP events would pose in the anticipated 52 degrees inclination space station orbit.

  3. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinches, S. D. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lauber, Ph. W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Boltzmanstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Oliver, H. J. C. [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Shinohara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tani, K. [Nippon Advanced Technology Co., Ltd, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  4. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma ( r / a > 0.5 ) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  5. INTERPLANETARY PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE HEAVY IONS OBSERVED AT 1 AU AND THE ROLE OF ENERGY SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Li, G.; Zank, G. P. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Desai, M. I., E-mail: glenn.mason@jhuapl.edu [Department of Space Science, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We have studied {approx}0.3 to >100 MeV nucleon{sup -1} H, He, O, and Fe in 17 large western hemisphere solar energetic particle events (SEP) to examine whether the often observed decrease of Fe/O during the rise phase is due to mixing of separate SEP particle populations, or is an interplanetary transport effect. Our earlier study showed that the decrease in Fe/O nearly disappeared if Fe and O were compared at energies where the two species interplanetary diffusion coefficient were equal, and therefore their kinetic energy nucleon{sup -1} was different by typically a factor {approx}2 ({sup e}nergy scaling{sup )}. Using an interplanetary transport model that includes effects of focusing, convection, adiabatic deceleration, and pitch angle scattering we have fit the particle spectral forms and intensity profiles over a broad range of conditions where the 1 AU intensities were reasonably well connected to the source and not obviously dominated by local shock effects. The transport parameters we derive are similar to earlier studies. Our model follows individual particles with a Monte Carlo calculation, making it possible to determine many properties and effects of the transport. We find that the energy scaling feature is preserved, and that the model is reasonably successful at fitting the magnitude and duration of the Fe/O ratio decrease. This along with successfully fitting the observed decrease of the O/He ratio leads us to conclude that this feature is best understood as a transport effect. Although the effects of transport, in particular adiabatic deceleration, are very significant below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}, the spectral break observed in these events at 1 AU is only somewhat modified by transport, and so the commonly observed spectral breaks must be present at injection. For scattering mean free paths of the order of 0.1 AU adiabatic deceleration is so large below {approx}200 keV nucleon{sup -1} that ions starting with such energies at injection are

  6. Heavy Ion Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2002-01-01

    The abundance enhancements of heavy ions Ne, Mg, Si and Fe in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) eventsare explained by a plasma acceleration mechanism. In consideration of the fact that the coronal plasma is mainlycomposed of hydrogen and helium ions, we think that theion-ion hybrid wave and quasi-perpendicular wave can.be excited by the energetic electron beam in impulsive solar flares. These waves may resonantly be absorbed byheavy ions when the frequencies of these waves are close to the second-harmonic gyrofrequencies of these heavyions. This requires the coronal plasma temperature to be located in the range ofT ~ (5 - 9) × 106 K in impulsivesolar flares and makes the average ionic charge state of these heavy ions in impulsive SEP events higher than theaverage ionic charge state of these heavy ions in gradual SEP events. These pre-heated and enhanced heavy ionsin impulsive SEP events.

  7. Secondary ion emission from CO2-H2O ice irradiated by energetic heavy ions: Part II: Analysis-search for organic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponciano, C. R.; Farenzena, L. S.; Collado, V. M.; da Silveira, E. F.; Wien, K.

    2005-06-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to investigate ion emission from a frozen-gas mixture of CO2 and H2O (T = 80-90 K) bombarded by MeV nitrogen ions and by 252Cf fission fragments. The aim of the experiment is to detect organic molecules, produced in the highly excited material around the nuclear track, which appear as ions in the flux of sputtered particles. Part I of the present work [L.S. Farenzena, V.M. Collado, C.R Ponciano, E.F. da Silveira, K. Wien. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 243 (2005) 85-93] described the method and presented the time-of-flight mass spectra; a list of the CO2 specific and H2O specific reaction products was provided. In Part II, the peaks of the TOF mass spectra are analyzed. Projectile-ice direct coulomb interaction leads to the production in the track of the H+, C+, O+, O2+, CO+ and CO2+ primarily ions, which react in the highly energized nuclear track plasma mainly with CO2 and H2O or H2CO3. The positive molecular hybrid ions formed are identified as organic species like COH+, COOH+, CHn = 1-3+, Hn = 1,2COOH+ and cluster ions. Similarly, the negative primarily ions O- and OH- formed by electron capture produce negative hybrid ions such as (CO2)nOH-, the four ions (CO4Hm = 0-3)- and the corresponding cluster ions. By far, most of the molecular ions have been formed by one-step reactions; exceptions are eventually the CO4Hm- ions created by a reaction between CO3- and water molecules. An intense mass line corresponding to HCO3+ has been observed, but not the one due to formaldehyde ion. Weak signals of ionic ketene, hydrogen peroxide and carbonic acid were seen.

  8. Kinetic study of the effects of energetic fluence, the fluence flow, and the induced fading by heavy ions and. gamma. photons in cellulose triacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moliton, J.P. (Laboratoire des Radiations Ionisantes, Limoges, France); Boutinaud, C.; Vareille, J.C.; Decossas, J.L.; Teyssier, J.L.; Delaunay, B.

    1982-07-01

    The kinetic interpretation of the damage produced by heavy ions (/sup 84/Kr and /sup 35/Cl from 1 MeV/amu) and ..gamma.. radiation in cellulose triacetate leads to an exponential dependence on the ion fluence. A comparison of the fading effect produced by heavy ions and ..gamma.. rays shows that the heavy ions, unlike ..gamma.. rays, cause irreversible damage. Finally, a nonlinear dependence on the flux of ions and ..gamma.. rays is found in the kinetics of radiation damage. This result is contrary to the usual assumption that heavy-ion flux, like ..gamma..-ray flux, is additive, at least for the fluxes of 10/sup 9/ to 2 x 10/sup 10/ ions/cm/sup 2/ s and dose rates of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ Gy/h used in this work.

  9. Ionization of Sodium Cluster by Heavy Ion Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Energetic ions have recently been used as an efficient means to produce highly charged cold clusters~[1]. There are two ways to obtain highly-charged clusters: low-fluence nano-second lasers irradiation and energetic highly charged ions impact. Compared to the low-density laser, heavy ions, e.g. delivered by ECR sources, have the

  10. Charge-to-mass dependence of heavy ion spectral breaks in large gradual solar energetic particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.; Li, G.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    We fit the ∼0.1-500 MeV/nucleon H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by [1] with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy parameters γa and γb ; and break energy EB . We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ1. We find that: 1) γa , γ1, and γb are species-independent within a given SEP event, and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) EB ’s are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)α with α varying between ∼0.2-3 3) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ∼0.16-0.23 MeV/nucleon and CME speed; 4) In most events: α 3 and 5) Seven out of nine extreme SEP events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and have α >1.4 with flat spectra at low and high energies yielding γb -γa high- and low-energy and stronger Q/M-dependence of EB (larger α values) occur due to enhanced wave power, which also enables the faster CME shocks to accelerate flare suprathermals more efficiently than ambient coronal ions.

  11. Systematic Charge-to-Mass-Dependence of Heavy Ion Spectral Breaks in Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir; Mason, Glenn; McComas, David; Cohen, Christina; Smith, Charles; Ebert, Robert; Schwadron, Nathan; Li, Gang; Mewaldt, Richard; Dayeh, Maher A.

    2016-07-01

    We fit the ˜0.1-500 MeV/nucleon H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by Desai et al. (2015) with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy Band parameters γ_a and γ_b; and spectral break energy E_B. We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ_1. Our results are: 1) γ_a, γ_1, and γ_b are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) the low-energy power-law spectral slopes γ_1 are consistent with diffusive acceleration at shocks with compression ratios between ˜2-4 as predicted by Schwadron et al. (2015); 3) the spectral breaks E_B's are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)^α with α in most events varying between ˜0.2-2, as predicted by Li et al (2009); 4) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ˜0.16-0.23 MeV/nucleon, but not with the ˜15-21 MeV/nucleon Fe/O and the ˜0.5-2.0 MeV/nucleon ^3He/^4He ratios; 5) In most events: α3, and O E_B increases with γ_b - γ_a; and 6) Many extreme events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and ^3He-rich, have α≳1.4, flatter spectra at low and high energies with γ_b - γ_a high and low energy occur because enhanced wave power enables faster CME shocks to accelerate flare suprathermals more efficiently than ambient coronal ions.

  12. Heavy ion storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  13. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  14. Secondary ion emission from CO2-H2O ice irradiated by energetic heavy ions: Part I. Measurement of the mass spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenzena, L. S.; Collado, V. M.; Ponciano, C. R.; da Silveira, E. F.; Wien, K.

    2005-05-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to investigate ion emission from a frozen-gas mixture (T = 80-90 K) of CO2 and H2O bombarded by MeV nitrogen ions and by 252Cf fission fragments (FF). The aim of the experiments is to produce organic molecules in the highly excited material around the nuclear track and to detect them in the flux of sputtered particles. Such sputter processes are known to occur at the icy surfaces of planetary or interstellar objects. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry is employed to identify the desorbed ions. Mass spectra of positive and negative ions were taken for several molecular H2O/CO2 ratios. In special, positive ions induced by MeV nitrogen beam were analyzed for 9 and 18% H2O concentrations of the CO2-H2O ice and negative ions for ~5% H2O. The ion peaks are separated to generate exclusive the spectra of CO2 specific ions, H2O specific ions and hybrid molecular ions, the latter ones corresponding to ions that contain mostly H and C atoms. In the mass range from 10 to 320 u, the latter exhibits 35 positive and 58 negative ions. The total yield of the positive ions is 0.35 and 0.57 ions/impact, respectively, and of negative ions 0.066 ions/impact. Unexpected effects of secondary ion sputtering yields on H2O/CO2 ratio are attributed to the influence of water molecules concentration on the ionization process.

  15. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs.

  16. A heavy load for heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 25 September, the two large coils for the dipole magnet of ALICE, the LHC experiment dedicated to heavy ions, arrived at Point 2 on two heavy load trucks after a 1200 km journey from their assembly in Vannes, France.

  17. Bucharest heavy ion accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceausescu, V.; Dobrescu, S.; Duma, M.; Indreas, G.; Ivascu, M.; Papureanu, S.; Pascovici, G.; Semenescu, G.

    1986-02-15

    The heavy ion accelerator facility of the Heavy Ion Physics Department at the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest is described. The Tandem accelerator development and the operation of the first stage of the heavy ion postaccelerating system are discussed. Details are given concerning the resonance cavities, the pulsing system matching the dc beam to the RF cavities and the computer control system.

  18. Emission of low-energetic electrons in collisions of heavy ions with solid targets; Emission niederenergetischer Elektronen in Stoessen von schweren Ionen mit Festkoerpertargets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineva, Natallia

    2008-07-15

    At the UNILAC accelerator, we have initiated a project with the objective to investigate lowenergy electrons, emitted from solid, electrically conductive targets after the impact of swift light and heavy ions. For this purposes, we have installed, optimized, and put into operation an electrostatic toroidal electron spectrometer. First, investigations of electrons, emitted from solid-state targets after the bombardment with a monochromatic electron beam from an electron gun, has been carried out. The proposed method combines the results of the measurements with the results of dedicated Monte Carlo simulations. The method has been elaborated in a case study for carbon targets. The findings have been instrumental for the interpretation of our measurements of electrons emitted in collisions of swift ions with the same carbon targets. Our investigations focused on following ion beams: protons and (H{sup +}{sub 3})-molecules of the same energy, as well as on carbon ions with two different energies. Thin carbon, nickel, argon and gold foils has been used as targets. Electrons in the energy range between 50 eV and 1 keV have been investigated. The measured electron distributions, both integral as well as differential with respect to the polar angle, have been compared to simple standard theories for gases as well as to the results of TRAX simulations, the latter being based on data from gaseous targets. Dedicated TRAX simulations have been performed only for the carbon targets, applying the method mentioned above. Within our experimental uncertainties, we observe a good agreement of the measured and TRAX simulated data. That leads us to the conclusion that - as a first order approximation - the electron emission pattern from ion-atom collisions in solid-state targets and the one from single collisions in gases are similar. (orig.)

  19. THE ENERGETIC AGGREGATION AND RELEASE IN THE HEAVY RAIN REGION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-guang; LIU Hai-tao; LIU Yan-ying

    2006-01-01

    Using the new formula of moist available energy (MAE), the value of the MAE's key terms of three heavy rainfall cases in Guangdong province in 1998 was calculated. The energetic aggregation and energetic discharge are analyzed. It shows that the value of the key terms in the formula appears different feature clearly in the different precipitation period, as well as the function of each term presents in the heavy rain region.

  20. Modeling Emission of Heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms from the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaczyna, Paweł; Bzowski, Maciej

    2017-09-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) are a fruitful tool for remote diagnosis of the plasma in the heliosphere and its vicinity. So far, instruments detecting ENAs from the heliosphere were configured for observations of hydrogen atoms. Here, we estimate emissions of ENAs of the heavy chemical elements helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and neon. A large portion of the heliospheric ENAs is created in the inner heliosheath from neutralized interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs). We modeled this process and calculated full-sky intensities of ENAs for energies 0.2–130 keV/nuc. We found that the largest fluxes among considered species are expected for helium, smaller for oxygen and nitrogen, and smallest for neon. The obtained intensities are 50–106 times smaller than the hydrogen ENA intensities observed by IBEX. The detection of heavy ENAs will be possible if a future ENA detector is equipped with the capability to measure the masses of observed atoms. Because of different reaction cross-sections among the different species, observations of heavy ENAs can allow for a better understanding of global structure of the heliosphere as well as the transport and energization of PUIs in the heliosphere.

  1. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered. (GHH)

  2. Swift heavy ions for materials engineering and nanostructuring

    CERN Document Server

    Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Ion beams have been used for decades for characterizing and analyzing materials. Now energetic ion beams are providing ways to modify the materials in unprecedented ways. This book highlights the emergence of high-energy swift heavy ions as a tool for tailoring the properties of materials with nanoscale structures. Swift heavy ions interact with materials by exciting/ionizing electrons without directly moving the atoms. This opens a new horizon towards the 'so-called' soft engineering. The book discusses the ion beam technology emerging from the non-equilibrium conditions and emphasizes the power of controlled irradiation to tailor the properties of various types of materials for specific needs.

  3. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists.

  4. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiri, Agnes

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop the already existing, but far not complete Multi Module Model, specially focusing on the last module which describes the final stages of a heavy ion collision, as this module was still missing. The major original achievements summarized in this thesis correspond to the freeze out problem and calculation of an important measurable, the anisotropic flow. Summary of results: Freeze out: The importance of freeze out models is that they allow the evaluation of observables, which then can be compared to the experimental results. Therefore, it is crucial to find a realistic freeze out description, which is proved to be a non-trivial task. Recently, several kinetic freeze out models have been developed. Based on the earlier results, we have introduced new ideas and improved models, which may contribute to a more realistic description of the freeze out process. We have investigated the applicability of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to describe dynamical freeze out. We have introduced the so-called Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation, which has a form very similar to that of the BTE, but takes into account those characteristics of the FO process which the BTE can not handle, e.g. the rapid change of the phase-space distribution function in the direction normal to the finite FO layer. We have shown that the main features of earlier ad hoc kinetic FO models can be obtained from BTE and MBTE. We have discussed the qualitative differences between the two approaches and presented some quantitative comparison as well. Since the introduced modification of the BTE makes it very difficult to solve the FO problem from the first principles, it is important to work out simplified phenomenological models, which can explain the basic features of the FO process. We have built and discussed such a model. Flow analysis: The other main subject of this thesis has been the collective flow in heavy ion collisions. Collective flow from ultra

  5. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiri, Agnes

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop the already existing, but far not complete Multi Module Model, specially focusing on the last module which describes the final stages of a heavy ion collision, as this module was still missing. The major original achievements summarized in this thesis correspond to the freeze out problem and calculation of an important measurable, the anisotropic flow. Summary of results: Freeze out: The importance of freeze out models is that they allow the evaluation of observables, which then can be compared to the experimental results. Therefore, it is crucial to find a realistic freeze out description, which is proved to be a non-trivial task. Recently, several kinetic freeze out models have been developed. Based on the earlier results, we have introduced new ideas and improved models, which may contribute to a more realistic description of the freeze out process. We have investigated the applicability of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to describe dynamical freeze out. We have introduced the so-called Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation, which has a form very similar to that of the BTE, but takes into account those characteristics of the FO process which the BTE can not handle, e.g. the rapid change of the phase-space distribution function in the direction normal to the finite FO layer. We have shown that the main features of earlier ad hoc kinetic FO models can be obtained from BTE and MBTE. We have discussed the qualitative differences between the two approaches and presented some quantitative comparison as well. Since the introduced modification of the BTE makes it very difficult to solve the FO problem from the first principles, it is important to work out simplified phenomenological models, which can explain the basic features of the FO process. We have built and discussed such a model. Flow analysis: The other main subject of this thesis has been the collective flow in heavy ion collisions. Collective flow from ultra

  6. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  7. RHIC heavy ion operations performance

    CERN Document Server

    Satogata, T; Ferrone, R; Pilat, F

    2006-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) completed its fifth year of operation in 2005, colliding copper ion beams with ps=200 GeV/u and 62.4 GeV/u[1]. Previous heavy ion runs have collided gold ions at ps=130 GeV/u, 200 GeV/u, and 62.4 GeV/u[2], and deuterons and gold ions at ps=200 GeV/u[3]. This paper discusses operational performance statistics of this facility, including Cu- Cu delivered luminosity, availability, calendar time spent in physics stores, and time between physics stores. We summarize the major factors affecting operations efficiency, and characterize machine activities between physics stores.

  8. Subthreshold photons in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, G

    1998-01-01

    In the present talk, I discuss about the properties of the energetic photons produced in heavy-ion reactions. I show that they are sensitive to the maximum density reached in the first stage of the nuclear reaction. Then, the existence of a thermal contribution to the photon differential cross-secti

  9. The Toledo heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haar, R.R. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Beideck, D.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Curtis, L.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Kvale, T.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Sen, A. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Schectman, R.M. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Stevens, H.W. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The recently installed 330 kV electrostatic positive ion accelerator at the University of Toledo is described. Experiments have been performed using ions ranging from H[sup +] to Hg[sup 2+] and exotic molecules such as HeH[sup +]. Most of these experiments involve the beam-foil studies of the lifetimes of excited atomic states and the apparatus used for these experiments is also described. Another beamline is available for ion-implantation. The Toledo heavy ion accelerator facility welcomes outside users. (orig.)

  10. Heavy ion tracks in polycarbonate. Comparison with a heavy ion irradiated model compound (diphenyl carbonate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferain, E.; Legras, R.

    1993-09-01

    The chemical modifications induced by energetic heavy ion irradiation of polycarbonate (PC) film are determined by GPC, HPLC, ESR, TGA, IR and UV spectrophotometry. The main results of the irradiation are creation of radicals, chain scission, cross-linking and appearance of new chemical groups in the main polymer chain. As far as the creation of new groups is concerned, they are determined by means of a model compound of PC: the diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The following compounds are identified after energetic heavy ion irradiation of DPC: salicylic acid, phenol, 4,4'-biphenol, 2,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol, 2-phenoxyphenol, phenyl ether, phenyl benzoate, phenyl salicylate, 2-phenylphenol and 2-phenoxyphenyl benzoate. A similarity between the heavy ion irradiation and a heat treatment has also been established with DPC. On the basis of these results, we try to give an explanation of the preferential attack along the tracks of the irradiated film. Also, an explanation of the well-known beneficial effect of an UV exposition of the irradiated film on the selectivity of this preferential chemical attack is suggested.

  11. Report of the heavy-ion fusion task group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, G.A.; Booth, L.A.; Henderson, D.B.; Jameson, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.; Knapp, E.A.; Pollock, R.; Talbert, W.L.; Thode, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of heavy-ion fusion has been completed. Energetic heavy ions, for example 10-GeV uranium, provided by an rf linac or an induction linac, are used as alternatives to laser light to drive inertial confinement fusion pellets. The assessment has covered accelerator technology, transport of heavy-ion beams, target interaction physics, civilian power issues, and military applications. It is concluded that particle accelerators promise to be efficient pellet drivers, but that there are formidable technical problems to be solved. It is recommended that a moderate level research program on heavy-ion fusion be pursued and that LASL should continue to work on critical issues in accelerator development, beam transport, reactor systems studies, and target physics over the next few years.

  12. Relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, Rajeev S

    2014-01-01

    The field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is introduced to the high-energy physics students with no prior knowledge in this area. The emphasis is on the two most important observables, namely the azimuthal collective flow and jet quenching, and on the role fluid dynamics plays in the interpretation of the data. Other important observables described briefly are constituent quark number scaling, ratios of particle abundances, strangeness enhancement, and sequential melting of heavy quarkonia. Comparison is made of some of the basic heavy-ion results obtained at LHC with those obtained at RHIC. Initial findings at LHC which seem to be in apparent conflict with the accumulated RHIC data are highlighted.

  13. Timescales in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lisa, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The study of high energy collisions between heavy nuclei is a field unto itself, distinct from nuclear and particle physics. A defining aspect of heavy ion physics is the importance of a bulk, self-interacting system with a rich space-time substructure. I focus on the issue of timescales in heavy ion collisions, starting with proof from low-energy collisions that femtoscopy can, indeed, measure very long timescales. I then discuss the relativistic case, where detailed measurements over three orders of magnitude in energy reveal a timescale increase that might be due to a first-order phase transition. I discuss also consistency in evolution timescales as determined from traditional longitudinal sizes and a novel analysis using shape information.

  14. Ion sources for heavy ion fusion (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Simon S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Tauschwitz, A.; Grote, D.; Deadrick, F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of ion sources for heavy ion fusion will be reported with particular emphasis on a recently built 2 MV injector. The new injector is based on an electrostatic quadrupole configuration, and has produced pulsed K+ ions of 950 mA peak from a 6.7 in. curved alumino silicate source. The ion beam has reached 2.3 MV with an energy flatness of ±0.2% over 1 μs. The measured normalized edge emittance of less than 1 π mm mrad is close to the source temperature limit. The design, construction, performance, and comparisons with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations will be described.

  15. Recent progress in heavy ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.J.

    1977-03-01

    A summary is given of the progress during the last several years in the technology of sources of high charge state positive heavy ions and negative heavy ions. Subjects covered include recent results in ECR and EBIS source development and comparison of various source types for high charge state heavy ions.

  16. Heavy ions: Report from Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sonia Kabana

    2012-10-01

    We review selected highlights from the experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) exploring the QCD phase diagram. A wealth of new results appeared recently from RHIC due to major recent upgrades, like for example the $\\Upsilon$ suppression in central nucleus-nucleus collisions which has been discovered recently in both RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, we discuss RHIC results from the beam energy scan (BES) program aiming to search for a possible critical point and to map out the QCD phase diagram.

  17. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Preis, Florian

    2017-03-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  18. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-01-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  19. Heavy Ion Physics in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G; Chatrchyan, Serguei; Contardo, Didier; Damgov, Jordan; De Min, Alberto; Denegri, Daniel; Drapier, Olivier; Geist, Walter; Genchev, Vladimir; Haroutunian, Roger; Hayrapetyan, M G; Hencken, K; Jenkovszky, L L; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Kharlov, Yuri; Kodolova, Olga; Kotlinski, Danek; Kruglov, Nikolai A; Kva, R

    2000-01-01

    This note summarizes the CMS potential for Heavy Ions Collisions studies. The main physics topic is the study of Y to muon pair decays in view of Y family supression studies, with a detailed discussion of muon reconstruction efficiencies and purities in conditions of central Pb-Pb collisions. We also discuss energy flow and impact parameter measurements, the observability of continuum muon pairs and of Z to mu + mu decays, and of jets and hard direct photons as a means to study jet quenching. We also discuss pA interactions as well as gamma-gamma physics. The instrumental specificities of CMS for heavy ion running are discussed, including trigger and data acquisition aspects.

  20. Central collisions of heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  1. Phenomenology of Heavy Flavors in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Isayev, A A

    2010-01-01

    Some recent experimental results obtained in collisions of heavy nuclei ($\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV) at BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are discussed. The probes of dense matter created in heavy-ion collision by quarkonia, $D$ and $B$ mesons containing heavy charm and beauty quarks are considered. The centrality, rapidity and transverse momentum dependences of the nuclear modification factor and elliptic flow coefficient are presented and their possible theoretical interpretation is provided.

  2. Progress Toward Heavy Ion IFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R; Logan, B G; Waldron, W L; Sabbi, G L; Callahan-Miller, D A; Peterson, P F; Goodin, D T

    2002-01-17

    Successful development of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) will require scientific and technology advances in areas of targets, drivers and chambers. Design work on heavy ion targets indicates that high gain (60-130) may be possible with a -3-6 MJ driver depending on the ability to focus the beams to small spot sizes. Significant improvements have been made on key components of heavy ion drivers, including sources, injectors, insulators and ferromagnetic materials for long-pulse induction accelerator cells, solid-state pulsers, and superconducting quadrupole magnets. The leading chamber concept for HIF is the thick-liquid-wall HYLEE-II design, which uses an array of flibe jets to protect chamber structures from x-ray, debris, and neutron damage. Significant progress has been made in demonstrating the ability to create and control the types of flow needed to form the protective liquid blanket. Progress has also been made on neutron shielding for the final focus magnet arrays with predicted lifetimes now exceeding the life of the power plant. Safety analyses have been completed for the HYLEE-II design using state-of-the-art codes. Work also continues on target fabrication and injection for HE. A target injector experiment capable of > 5 Hz operation has been designed and construction will start in 2002. Methods for mass production of hohlraum targets are being evaluated with small-scale experiments and analyses. Progress in these areas will be reviewed.

  3. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for heavy ion physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2005-05-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics at present and at the next generation heavy ion facilities is given with a special emphasis on the conditions for heavy ion detection and the potential advantage of cryogenic detectors for applications in heavy ion physics. Two types of calorimetric low temperature detectors for the detection of energetic heavy ions have been developed and their response to the impact of heavy ions was investigated systematically for a wide range of energies (E=0.1-360 MeV/amu) and ion species ({sup 4}He.. {sup 238}U). Excellent results with respect to energy resolution, {delta}E/E ranging from 1 to 5 x 10{sup -3} even for the heaviest ions, and other basic detector properties such as energy linearity with no indication of a pulse height defect, energy threshold, detection efficiency and radiation hardness have been obtained, representing a considerable improvement as compared to conventional heavy ion detectors based on ionization. With the achieved performance, calorimetric low temperature detectors bear a large potential for applications in various fields of basic and applied heavy ion research. A brief overview of a few prominent examples, such as high resolution nuclear spectroscopy, high resolution nuclear mass determination, which may be favourably used for identification of superheavy elements or in direct reaction experiments with radioactive beams, as well as background discrimination in accelerator mass spectrometry, is given, and first results are presented. For instance, the use of cryogenic detectors allowed to improve the sensitivity in trace analysis of {sup 236}U by one order of magnitude and to determine the up to date smallest isotope ratio of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U = 6.1 x 10{sup -12} in a sample of natural uranium. Besides the detection of heavy ions, the concept of cryogenic detectors also

  4. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  5. Recent enhancements in MCNPX: Heavy-ion transport and the LAQGSM physics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: mrjames@lanl.gov; McKinney, G.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Moyers, Michael [Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson St., PO Box 2000, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)

    2006-06-23

    Calculations involving the transport of energetic heavy ions have recently received more attention from projects such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) and from areas such as space radiation shielding. In these areas, the transport and reactions must be calculated for heavy ions such as {sup 56}Fe or {sup 238}U traveling at energies of {>=}1 GeV/nucleon. To serve these needs, recent upgrades to the particle transport code MCNPX have expanded the previously useful ion transport capability from a small suite of light ions (deuterons, tritons, {sup 3}He, and alpha particles) to a nearly complete list of those heavy and light ions that span the Table of Isotopes. To enable nuclear spallation from energetic collisions of these ions and targets, the LAQGSM physics model has been integrated into the MCNPX code. This physics model supplements the existing physics models already contained in the code, only one of which, ISABEL, could handle heavy-ion collisions (and then only over a limited range of masses and energies). The implementation of these new features now greatly expands the usefulness of MCNPX in energetic ion transport. The heavy-ion transport feature also allows the transport of residuals from all nuclear reactions that occur in the physics model regime, even when initiated by non-heavy ions. The implementation and use of heavy ions in MCNPX is explained. Also, computations with MCNPX are compared with benchmark experiments to show agreement with results.

  6. Effect of Energetic Ion on Spatial Distribution of Recombining Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A.; Daibo, A.; Kitajima, S.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.

    Spatial distribution of electron density is considered. By using a one-dimensional recombining plasma model, effects of transient energetic ion flux are investigated. The time response of the system against the transient flux is dominated by the recombination frequency. The magnitude of modification of the spatial distribution is determined by the ratio between the ionization due to the energetic ion and the recombination of the bulk plasma.

  7. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  8. Heavy Ion Physics at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Veres, Gabor

    2017-01-01

    In the present proceedings recent heavy ion results from the Compact Muon Solenoid collaboration at the LHC are presented. These contain comparisons between small and large collision systems, as well as studies of energy evolution, thus include data collected in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV (2015 and 2016), proton-proton and lead-lead collisions at 5 TeV (2015), and proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV and 8 TeV (2016) center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair. They provide new insights into the properties of the extremely high density and high temperature matter created in heavy ion collisions, while pointing out similarities and differences in comparison to smaller collision systems. These include gluon distribution functions in the lead nucleus; the azimuthal anisotropy of final state particle distributions in all the three different collision systems; charge separation signals from proton-lead collisions and consequences for the Chiral Magnetic Effect; new studies of parton energy loss and its dependence on...

  9. Beam losses in heavy ion drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafin, E R; Hofmann, I; Spiller, P J

    2002-01-01

    While beam loss issues have hardly been considered in detail for heavy ion fusion scenarios, recent heavy ion machine developments in different labs (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC)) have shown the great importance of beam current limitations due to ion losses. Two aspects of beam losses in heavy ion accelerators are theoretically considered: (1) secondary neutron production due to lost ions, and (2) vacuum pressure instability due to charge exchange losses. Calculations are compared and found to be in good agreement with measured data. The application to a Heavy-Ion Driven Inertial Fusion (HIDIF) scenario is discussed. 12 Refs.

  10. Heavy ion physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schükraft, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    The field of ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics, which started some 15 years ago at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS with fixed target experiments, is entering today a new era with the recent start-up of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC and preparations well under way for a new large heavy ion experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At this crossroads, the article will give a summary of the experimental program and our current view of heavy ion physics at the LHC, concentrating in particular on physics topics that are different or unique compared to current facilities.

  11. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  12. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  13. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  14. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  15. QCD in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Iancu, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    These lectures provide a modern introduction to selected topics in the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions which shed light on the fundamental theory of strong interactions, the Quantum Chromodynamics. The emphasis is on the partonic forms of QCD matter which exist in the early and intermediate stages of a collision -- the colour glass condensate, the glasma, and the quark-gluon plasma -- and on the effective theories that are used for their description. These theories provide qualitative and even quantitative insight into a wealth of remarkable phenomena observed in nucleus-nucleus or deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and/or the LHC, like the suppression of particle production and of azimuthal correlations at forward rapidities, the energy and centrality dependence of the multiplicities, the ridge effect, the limiting fragmentation, the jet quenching, or the dijet asymmetry.

  16. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics FOCUS ON HEAVY IONS IN BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Interest in energetic heavy ions is rapidly increasing in the field of biomedicine. Heavy ions are normally excluded from radiation protection, because they are not normally experienced by humans on Earth. However, knowledge of heavy ion biophysics is necessary in two fields: charged particle cancer therapy (hadrontherapy), and radiation protection in space missions. The possibility to cure tumours using accelerated heavy charged particles was first tested in Berkeley in the sixties, but results were not satisfactory. However, about 15 years ago therapy with carbon ions was resumed first in Japan and then in Europe. Heavy ions are preferable to photons for both physical and biological characteristics: the Bragg peak and limited lateral diffusion ensure a conformal dose distribution, while the high relative biological effectiveness and low oxygen enhancement ration in the Bragg peak region make the beam very effective in treating radioresistant and hypoxic tumours. Recent results coming from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba (see the paper by Dr Tsujii and co-workers in this issue) and GSI (Germany) provide strong clinical evidence that heavy ions are indeed an extremely effective weapon in the fight against cancer. However, more research is needed in the field, especially on optimization of the treatment planning and risk of late effects in normal tissue, including secondary cancers. On the other hand, high-energy heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic radiation and, although they are rare as compared to protons, they give a major contribution in terms of equivalent dose to the crews of manned space exploratory-class missions. Exploration of the Solar System is now the main goal of the space program, and the risk caused by exposure to galactic cosmic radiation is considered a serious hindrance toward this goal, because of the high uncertainty on late effects of energetic heavy nuclei, and the lack of effective countermeasures. Risks

  18. Relativistic heavy-ion physics: Experimental overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Itzhak Tserruya

    2003-04-01

    The field of relativistic heavy-ion physics is reviewed with emphasis on new results and highlights from the first run of the relativistic heavy-ion collider at BNL and the 15 year research programme at the super proton synchrotron (SPS) at CERN and the AGS at BNL.

  19. Probing QED Vacuum with Heavy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann; Müller, Berndt; Reinhardt, Joachim; Greiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We recall how nearly half a century ago the proposal was made to explore the structure of the quantum vacuum using slow heavy-ion collisions. Pursuing this topic we review the foundational concept of spontaneous vacuum decay accompanied by observable positron emission in heavy-ion collisions and describe the related theoretical developments in strong fields QED.

  20. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  1. Voyager 1: energetic ions and electrons in the jovian magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, R E; Cook, W R; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Gehrels, N; Stone, E C; Trainor, J H; Schardt, A W; Conlon, T; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1979-06-01

    The observations of the cosmic-ray subsystem have added significantly to our knowledge of Jupiter's magnetosphere. The most surprising result is the existence of energetic sulfur, sodium, and oxygen nuclei with energies above 7 megaelectron volts per nucleon which were found inside of Io's orbit. Also, significant fluxes of similarly energetic ions reflecting solar cosmic-ray composition were observed throughout the magnetosphere beyond 11 times the radius of Jupiter. It was also found that energetic protons are enhanced by 30 to 70 percent in the active hemisphere. Finally, the first observations were made of the magnetospheric tail in the dawn direction out to 160 Jupiter radii.

  2. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  3. Benchmarking of Heavy Ion Transport Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Ronningen, Reginald M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Heilbronn, Lawrence [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in designing and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  4. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  5. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  6. A heavy ion and proton radiation belt inside of Jupiter's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Haggerty, D. K.; Rymer, A. M.; Santos-Costa, D.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Allegrini, F.; Valek, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Levin, S.; Bolton, S.

    2017-06-01

    Energetic charged particle measurements by the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) on board Juno have revealed a radiation belt of hundreds of keV ions up to the atomic mass of sulfur, located between Jupiter's rings and atmosphere. Proton energy spectra display an unusual intensity increase above 300 keV. We suggest that this is because charge exchange in Jupiter's neutral environment does not efficiently remove ions at such high energies. Since this innermost belt includes heavy ions, it cannot be exclusively supplied by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay, which is an important source at Earth and Saturn but only supplies protons and electrons. We find indications that the stripping of energetic neutral atoms in Jupiter's high atmosphere might be the ion source. Since the stripped off electrons are of low energy, this hypothesis is consistent with observations of the ratio of energetic electrons to ions being much less than 1.

  7. Proceedings of the heavy ion fusion workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R C [ed.

    1978-01-01

    These proceedings contain reviews of current laboratory programs dealing with inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions, as well as several individually abstracted invited talks, workshop reports and contributed papers.

  8. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  9. Heavy ion isotope resolution with polymer detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal-Quadras Roca, Alejo; Ortega Girón, Manuel; Fernández Moreno, Francisco; Font Garcia, Josep Lluís; Casas Ametller, Montserrat; Baixeras Divar, Carmen; Gonzalo Cestero, Miguel

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion mass resolution power of polymer detectors Lexan and cellulose nitrate is systematically studied both for accelerator and for cosmic ions. It is concluded that a satisfactory isotopic discrimination, better than 1 u, is hardly attainable with these detectors. Peer Reviewed

  10. Energetics of lithium ion battery failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard E; Walters, Richard N

    2016-11-15

    The energy released by failure of rechargeable 18-mm diameter by 65-mm long cylindrical (18650) lithium ion cells/batteries was measured in a bomb calorimeter for 4 different commercial cathode chemistries over the full range of charge using a method developed for this purpose. Thermal runaway was induced by electrical resistance (Joule) heating of the cell in the nitrogen-filled pressure vessel (bomb) to preclude combustion. The total energy released by cell failure, ΔHf, was assumed to be comprised of the stored electrical energy E (cell potential×charge) and the chemical energy of mixing, reaction and thermal decomposition of the cell components, ΔUrxn. The contribution of E and ΔUrxn to ΔHf was determined and the mass of volatile, combustible thermal decomposition products was measured in an effort to characterize the fire safety hazard of rechargeable lithium ion cells.

  11. Propagation of heavy baryons in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santosh K.; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Tolos, Laura; Minissale, Vincenzo; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of heavy baryons (Λc and Λb ) in the hadronic phase created in the latter stage of the heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies have been evaluated recently. In this work we compute some experimental observables, such as the nuclear suppression factor RA A and the elliptic flow v2 of heavy baryons at RHIC and LHC energies, highlighting the role of the hadronic phase contribution to these observables, which are going to be measured at Run 3 of LHC. For the time evolution of the heavy quarks in the quark and gluon plasma (QGP) and heavy baryons in the hadronic phase, we use the Langevin dynamics. For the hadronization of the heavy quarks to heavy baryons we employ Peterson fragmentation functions. We observe a strong suppression of both the Λc and Λb . We find that the hadronic medium has a sizable impact on the heavy-baryon elliptic flow whereas the impact of hadronic medium rescattering is almost unnoticeable on the nuclear suppression factor. We evaluate the Λc/D ratio at RHIC and LHC. We find that the Λc/D ratio remains unaffected due to the hadronic phase rescattering which enables it as a nobel probe of QGP phase dynamics along with its hadronization.

  12. Energetics of lithium ion battery failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, Richard E., E-mail: richard.e.lyon@faa.gov; Walters, Richard N.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • First measure of anaerobic failure energy of lithium ion batteries. • Novel and simple bomb calorimeter method developed and demonstrated. • Four different cathode chemistries examined. • Full range of charged capacity used as independent variable. • Failure energy identified as primary safety hazard. - Abstract: The energy released by failure of rechargeable 18-mm diameter by 65-mm long cylindrical (18650) lithium ion cells/batteries was measured in a bomb calorimeter for 4 different commercial cathode chemistries over the full range of charge using a method developed for this purpose. Thermal runaway was induced by electrical resistance (Joule) heating of the cell in the nitrogen-filled pressure vessel (bomb) to preclude combustion. The total energy released by cell failure, ΔH{sub f}, was assumed to be comprised of the stored electrical energy E (cell potential × charge) and the chemical energy of mixing, reaction and thermal decomposition of the cell components, ΔU{sub rxn}. The contribution of E and ΔU{sub rxn} to ΔH{sub f} was determined and the mass of volatile, combustible thermal decomposition products was measured in an effort to characterize the fire safety hazard of rechargeable lithium ion cells.

  13. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  14. Ion energetics at Saturn's magnetosphere using Cassini/MIMI measurements: A simple model for the energetic ion integral moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, K.; Paranicas, C.; Roussos, E.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present a composite analysis (H+ and O+) of energetic ion spectra and kappa distribution fits, using combined ion measurements from Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS, 3 to 236 keV/e), Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurements System (LEMMS, 0.024 220 keV for H+). The modeled expressions of these energetic ion distributions are then used to obtain the four integral particle moments (from zeroth to 3rd moment: n, In, P, IE, i.e. Density, Integral number intensity, Pressure, Integral energy intensity) as well as the characteristic energy (EC=IE/In) of these ions as a function of Local Time and L-Shell. We find that a) protons dominate the energetic ion (>30 keV) integral number and energy intensity at all radial distances (L>5 Rs) and local times, while the H+ and O+ partial pressures and densities are comparable; b) the 12Skinner [2000] model in both local time and L-shell. Roelof, E. C., and A. J. Skinner (2000), Space Sci. Rev., 91, 437-459.

  15. Mechanisms of Stochastic Diffusion of Energetic Ions in Spherical Tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; R.B. White; Yu.V. Yakovenko

    2001-01-18

    Stochastic diffusion of the energetic ions in spherical tori is considered. The following issues are addressed: (I) Goldston-White-Boozer diffusion in a rippled field; (ii) cyclotron-resonance-induced diffusion caused by the ripple; (iii) effects of non-conservation of the magnetic moment in an axisymmetric field. It is found that the stochastic diffusion in spherical tori with a weak magnetic field has a number of peculiarities in comparison with conventional tokamaks; in particular, it is characterized by an increased role of mechanisms associated with non-conservation of the particle magnetic moment. It is concluded that in current experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) the stochastic diffusion does not have a considerable influence on the confinement of energetic ions.

  16. Heavy ions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Dainese, A; Armesto, N; d'Enterria, D; Jowett, J M; Lansberg, J -P; Milhano, J G; Salgado, C A; Schaumann, M; van Leeuwen, M; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonioli, P; Apolinario, L; Bass, S; Beraudo, A; Bilandzic, A; Borsanyi, S; Braun-Munzinger, P; Chen, Z; Mendez, L Cunqueiro; Denicol, G S; Eskola, K J; Floerchinger, S; Fujii, H; Giubellino, P; Greiner, C; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Ko, C -M; Kotko, P; Krajczar, K; Kutak, K; Laine, M; Liu, Y; Lombardo, M P; Luzum, M; Marquet, C; Masciocchi, S; Okorokov, V; Paquet, J -F; Paukkunen, H; Petreska, E; Pierog, T; Ploskon, M; Ratti, C; Rezaeian, A H; Riegler, W; Rojo, J; Roland, C; Rossi, A; Salam, G P; Sapeta, S; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Stachel, J; Uphoff, J; van Hameren, A; Watanabe, K; Xiao, B -W; Yuan, F; Zaslavsky, D; Zhou, K; Zhuang, P

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study is aimed at assessing the physics potential and the technical feasibility of a new collider with centre-of-mass energies, in the hadron-hadron collision mode, seven times larger than the nominal LHC energies. Operating such machine with heavy ions is an option that is being considered in the accelerator design studies. It would provide, for example, Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 39 and 63 TeV, respectively, per nucleon-nucleon collision, with integrated luminosities above 30 nb^-1 per month for Pb-Pb. This is a report by the working group on heavy-ion physics of the FCC Study. First ideas on the physics opportunities with heavy ions at the FCC are presented, covering the physics of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, of gluon saturation, of photon-induced collisions, as well as connections with other fields of high-energy physics.

  17. MHD MODES DESTABILIZED BY ENERGETIC IONS ON LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    nergetic ion driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as Alfven eigenmodes (AEs), energetic particle modes (EPMs), and their impacts on energetic ion confinement are being studied on the Large Helical Device (LHD). The magnetic configuration of this device is three dimensional and has negative magnetic shear over a whole radial region in the low-beta regime. Two types of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) are typically observed in LHD plasmas that are heated by tangential neutral beam injection: One is localized in the plasma core region near a central TAE gap and the other is a global TAE having a radially extended eigenfunction. Core-localized TAEs with even and odd radial mode parities are often observed. The global TAE is usually observed in medium- to high-beta plasmas where broad regions with low magnetic shear are present. Helicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (HAEs), which exist in gaps unique to three-dimensional plasmas that have both toroidal and poloidal mode couplings, were detected for the first time. Recently, reversed magnetic shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) having characteristic frequency sweeping were discovered in reversed magnetic shear (RS) plasmas produced by intense counter-neutral beam current drive. In the RS plasma, the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) excited by energetic ions, which is a global-type mode different from localized GAM excited by drift waves, was also detected for the first time in a helical plasma. Nonlinear couplings between RSAE and GAM modes and also between two TAEs were observed. Bursts of TAEs and EPMs often enhance radial transport and loss of energetic ions at low toroidal magnetic field (<0.75 T).

  18. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Belov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron–positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  19. HIGH DENSITY QCD WITH HEAVY-IONS

    CERN Multimedia

    The Addendum 1 to Volume 2 of the CMS Physics TDR has been published The Heavy-Ion analysis group completed the writing of a TDR summarizing the CMS plans in using heavy ion collisions to study high density QCD. The document was submitted to the LHCC in March and presented in the Open Session of the LHCC on May 9th. The study of heavy-ion physics at the LHC is promising to be very exciting. LHC will open a new energy frontier in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The collision energy of heavy nuclei at sNN = 5.5 TeV will be thirty times larger than what is presently available at RHIC. We will certainly probe quark and gluon matter at unprecedented values of energy density. The prime goal of this research programme is to study the fundamental theory of the strong interaction - Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) - in extreme conditions of temperature, density and parton momentum fraction (low-x). Such studies, with impressive experimental and theoretical advances in recent years thanks to the wealth of high-qua...

  20. Experimental Verification of Heavy Ion Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe investigation of radiation damage induced by high dose neutrons and/or protons is a currently interesting topic in nuclear power, ADS etc., The lack of high dose neutron and proton sources hampers this investigation. The advent of heavy ion accelerators opens up a way to study radiation damage caused by high dose neutron and/or proton irradiation[1]. The displacement rate of heavy ions is much higher than that of neutrons and protons. Higher displacement rate leads to short irradiation time. An irradiation dose of -20 dpa takes about a year in a reactor, while only a few minutes or hours by

  1. Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  2. European heavy ion ICF driver development

    CERN Document Server

    Plass, Günther

    1996-01-01

    Approaches in Europe to heavy ion induced Inertial Confinement Fusion are oriented toward the linac-plus- storage ring technique. Despite the very limited support of this work, technical pro gress was achieved in some important areas. For the immediate future, a substantial intensity upgrade of the GSI accelerator facilities at Darmstadt is being implemented, leading to specific energy depositions of the order of 100 kJ/g and plasma temperatures of 10 to 20 eV. For the longer term, a conceptual design study of a heavy ion based Ignition Facility is being initiated.

  3. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15\\%. %The rapidity profile of the charge is wider than the profile of the local energy density. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  4. Heavy Flavor Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Heavy flavor production are of great interest in heavy ion collisions. In the produced medium, the binding potential between a quark and antiquark in quarkonium is screened by surrounding light quarks and antiquarks. Thus, the various quarkonium states are expected to be melt at different temperatures depending on their binding energies, which allows us to characterize the QCD phase transition. In addition, open heavy flavor production are relevant for flavor-dependence of the in-medium parton energy loss. In QCD, gluons are expected to lose more energy compared to quarks when passing through the QGP due to the larger color charge. Compared to light quarks, heavy quarks are expected to lose less radiative energy because gluon radiation is suppressed at angles smaller than the ratio of the quark mass to its energy. This dead cone effect (and its disappearance at high transverse momentum) can be studied using open heavy flavor mesons and heavy flavor tagged jets. With CMS detector, quarkonia, open he...

  5. Dynamics Explorer 1: Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer (EICS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.; Peterson, W. K.; Collin, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer (EICS) experiment was selected as part of the Dynamics Explorer (DE) Program. One of the primary goals of the DE program was to investigate in detail the plasma physics processes responsible for energizing thermal (approximately 1 eV) ionospheric ions and transporting them to the earth's plasma sheet and distant polar cap. The results of the EICS data analysis (including support of other investigators) and of the archiving efforts supported by this contract are summarized in this document. Also reported are some aspects of our operational support activities.

  6. Computing for Heavy Ion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, G.; Schiff, D.; Hristov, P.; Menaud, J.M.; Hrivnacova, I.; Poizat, P.; Chabratova, G.; Albin-Amiot, H.; Carminati, F.; Peters, A.; Schutz, Y.; Safarik, K.; Ollitrault, J.Y.; Hrivnacova, I.; Morsch, A.; Gheata, A.; Morsch, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Lauret, J.; Nief, J.Y.; Pereira, H.; Kaczmarek, O.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Guernane, R.; Stocco, D.; Gruwe, M.; Betev, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Vilakazi, Z.; Rapp, B.; Masoni, A.; Stoicea, G.; Brun, R

    2005-07-01

    This workshop was devoted to the computational technologies needed for the heavy quarkonia and open flavor production study at LHC (large hadron collider) experiments. These requirements are huge: peta-bytes of data will be generated each year. Analysing this will require the equivalent of a few thousands of today's fastest PC processors. The new developments in terms of dedicated software has been addressed. This document gathers the transparencies that were presented at the workshop.

  7. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Riepe, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL). The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10/sup -7/ torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column.

  8. Heavy quarkonium photoproduction in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gong-Ming; Cai, Yang-Bing; Li, Yun-De; Wang, Jian-Song

    2017-01-01

    Based on the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD), we calculate the production cross section for the charmonium [J /ψ , ψ (2 S ) , χc J, ηc, and hc] and the bottomonium [Υ (n S ) , χb J, ηb, and hb] produced by the hard photoproduction processes and fragmentation processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions. It is shown that the existing experimental data on heavy quarkonium production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be described in the framework of the NRQCD formalism, and the phenomenological values of matrix elements for color-singlet and color-octet components give the main contribution. The numerical results of photoproduction processes and fragmentation processes for the heavy quarkonium production become prominent in p -p collisions and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies.

  9. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkarev, A.I., E-mail: aipush@mail.ru; Isakova, Y.I.; Khaylov, I.P.

    2015-01-15

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250–300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300–500 ns, 100–150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250–300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50–100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20–30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  10. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  11. The quarkonium saga in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tserruya, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    J/psi suppression was proposed more than 25 years ago as an unambiguous signature for the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma in relativistic heavy ion collisions. After intensive efforts, both experimental and theoretical, the quarkonium saga remains exciting, producing surprising results and not fully understood. This talk focuses on recent results on quarkonium production at RHIC and the LHC.

  12. "Super" Cocktails for Heavy Ion Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael B; Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Galloway, Michelle; Leitner, Daniela; Morel, James R.; Gimpel, ThomasL.; Ninemire, Brien F.; Siero, Reba; Thatcher, Raymond K.

    2007-07-21

    The 4.5 MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail at the 88-Inch Cyclotron has been expanded by incorporating beams from solid material to fill in the linear energy transfer curve. This supercocktail is available by special request and is useful when only normal incidence between the beam and the device under test is possible or desirable.

  13. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  14. Heavy-Ion Physics in a Nutshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Tetsufumi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The physics of quark gluon plasma (QGP and heavy ion collisions at the collider energies is briefly reviewed. We first discuss about the discovery of a nearly perfect fluidity of the QGP. We also highlights recent topics on responses of the QGP to initial deformation and propagation of a jet.

  15. Quarkonium production in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of quarkonium states plays a crucial role among the probes to investigate the formation of the plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP in heavy-ion collisions. A review of the charmonium and bottomonium production, mainly focussing on the latest results from the LHC experiments, is presented.

  16. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS: A THEORETICAL OVERVIEW.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2004-03-28

    This is a mini-review of recent theoretical work in the field of relativistic heavy ion physics. The following topics are discussed initial conditions and the Color Glass Condensate; approach to thermalization and the hydrodynamic evolution; hard probes and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Some of the unsolved problems and potentially promising directions for future research are listed as well.

  17. 2 pi-Steradian, Energetic-Ion Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Because energetic particles populate both planetary magnetospheres and interplanetary space in significant quantities, energetic-ion sensors have been flown since the beginning of the space age. Early sensors were solid-state detector (SSD) telescopes, with conical fields of view, often swept through a circle by virtue of the spin motion of the spacecraft (e.g., IMP 7 and 8, ISEE 1 and 2). In the 1980s and 1990s, foil/microchannel plate (MCP) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements were added to the energy measurement provided by the SSD (eg, AMPTE/CCE MEPA, Geotail EPIC/ICS, Galileo EPD). The resulting energy and velocity uniquely identified ion mass. More recently, we have developed a 2-D fan acceptance angle sensor that includes both energy and TOF. When mounted on a spinning spacecraft, this 160^\\circ x 12^\\circ FOV sweeps out nearly 4\\pi steradians in one spin. This sensor, dubbed the "hockey puck" for its shape, is currently in flight on MESSENGER (EPS) and New Horizons Pluto (PEPPSI).Increasingly, energetic-...

  18. Study of the degradation process of polyimide induced by high energetic ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severin, Daniel

    2008-09-19

    The dissertation focuses on the radiation hardness of Kapton under extreme radiation environment conditions. To study ion-beam induced modifications, Kapton foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (e.g. Ti, Mo, Au, and U) within a large fluence regime (1 x 10{sup 10}-5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}). The irradiated Kapton foils were analysed by means of infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy, tensile strength measurement, mass loss analysis, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. For testing the radiation stability of Kapton at the cryogenic operation temperature (5-10 K) of the superconducting magnets, additional irradiation experiments were performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL, France) focusing on the online analysis of the outgassing process of small volatile degradation fragments. The investigations of the electrical properties analysed by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy exhibit a different trend: high fluence irradiations with light ions (e.g. Ti) lead to a slight increase of the conductivity, whereas heavy ions (e.g. Sm, Au) cause a drastic change already in the fluence regime of nonoverlapping tracks (5 x 10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2}). Online analysis of the outgassing process during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures shows the release of a variety of small gaseous molecules (e.g. CO, CO{sub 2}, and short hydro carbons). Also a small amount of large polymer fragments is identified. The results allow the following conclusions which are of special interest for the application of Kapton as insulating material in a high-energetic particle radiation environment. a) The material degradation measured with the optical spectroscopy and tensile strength tests are scalable with the dose deposited by the ions. The high correlation of the results allows the prediction of the mechanical degradation with the simple and non-destructive infrared spectroscopy. The degradation curve points to a

  19. Effect of Energetic-Ion-Driven MHD Instabilities on Energetic-Ion-Transport in Compact Helical System and Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nagaoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Okumura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and 2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma.

  20. Effect of energetic-ion-driven MHD instabilities on energetic-ion-transport in compact helical system and large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shimizu, A.; Okamura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Ogawa, K. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-08-15

    This paper describes (1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and (2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Diffraction radiation from relativistic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyna, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the relativistic heavy ion beams at new accelerator facilities are allowed to obtain some new interesting results (see, for instance, Datz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (18) (1997) 3355; Ladyrin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 404 (1998) 129). The problem of non-destructive heavy ion beam diagnostics at these accelerators is highly pressing. The authors of the papers (Rule et al., Proceedings of the Seventh Beam Instrumentation Workshop, Argonne IL, AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 390, NY, 1997; Castellano, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 394 (1997) 275) suggested to use diffraction radiation (DR) appearing when a charge moves close to a conducting surface (Bolotovskii and Voskresenskii, Sov. Phys. Usp. 9 (1966) 73) for non-destructive electron beam diagnostics. The DR characteristics are defined by both Lorentz-factor and the particle charge, and do not depend on its mass. The estimation of feasibility of using DR for relativistic ion beam diagnostics is undoubtedly interesting.

  2. Controlled nanopatterning & modifications of materials by energetic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    Compound semiconductors (InP, InAs and GaSb) has been exposed to energetic 3kev Ar+ ions for a varying fluence range of 1013 ions/cm2 to 1018 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Morphological modifications of the irradiated surfaces have been investigated by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) in UHV conditions. It is observed that InP and GaSb have fluence dependent nanopattering e.g. nanoneedle, aligned nanodots, superimposed nanodots ripple like structures while InAs has little fluence dependent behaviour indicating materials dependent growth of features on irradiated surfaces. Moreover, surface roughness and wavelength of the features are also depending on the materials and fluences. The RMS surface roughness has been found to be increased rapidly in the early stage of irradiation followed by slower escalate rate and later tends to saturate indicating influence of the nonlinear processes.

  3. On the origins of energetic ions in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    Energetic ion events in the earth's dayside subsolar magnetosheath (0900 - 1300 Local Time) are surveyed using data from the AMPTE/CCE Hot Plasma Composition Experiment. Ion species carrying the signature of their origin O(+) and energetic He(2+) are used to distinguish between magnetospheric and solar wind origins for the energetic ion events. The results of this survey indicate that the majority of energetic (10-17 keV/e) H(+) and He(2+) ions observed in the dayside magnetosheath are accelerated from the solar wind population. The energetic He(2+) to H(+) density ratio in the magnetosheath is consistent with that predicted from first-order Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions in the turbulent regions upstream and downstream from the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. The simultaneous occurrence of both energetic He(2+) and magnetospheric O(+) indicates that, on occasion, both Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions and leakage of magnetospheric ions occurs in the dayside magnetosheath.

  4. Heavy flavour production at CMS in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We review recent results relating to beauty production in heavy-ion collisions, in both the closed and open heavy flavor sectors, from the CMS experiment at the LHC. The sequential suppression of the ° states in PbPb collisions is thought to be evidence of the dissociation of quarkonia bound states in deconfined matter. Data from pPb collisions demonstrate that while cold nuclear effects appear to be subdominant in minimum bias collisions, there exists a non-trivial dependence on collision multiplicity that remains to be understood. The suppression of high p T particles in heavy-ion collisions, relative to the expectation from pp collisions, is typically interpreted in terms of energy loss of hard scattered parton in the dense nuclear medium. The flavor dependence of the energy loss may be accessed via measurements of b hadrons and b-tagged jets. Measurement of B mesons, via non-prompt J = y , at relatively low p T indicate a smaller suppression factor than D meson or inclusive charged hadrons. Data on b jet...

  5. Some properties of the central heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wazir, Z; Khan, E U; Haseeb, Mahnaz Q; Ajaz, M; Khan, K H

    2009-01-01

    Some experimental results are discussed in connection with the properties of the central heavy ion collisions. These experiments indicate the regime changes and saturation at some values of the centrality. This phenomenon is considered to be a signal of the percolation cluster formation in heavy ion collisions at high energies. Keywords: heavy ion collisions, theoretical models, centrality, phase transition.

  6. Raman measurements in silica glasses irradiated with energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, R., E-mail: rafael.saavedra@ciemat.es; Martin, P.; Vila, R. [Materiales para Fusión, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); León, M. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université Jean Monnet, Bâtiment F 18 Rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras F43000 Saint-Étienne, France and Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay (ICMMO) (France); Jiménez-Rey, D. [Materiales para Fusión, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain and Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Girard, S.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université Jean Monnet, Bâtiment F 18 Rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras F43000 Saint-Étienne (France)

    2014-10-21

    Ion irradiation with energetic He{sup +} (2.5 MeV), O{sup 4+} (13.5 MeV), Si{sup 4+} (24.4 MeV) and Cu{sup 7+} (32.6 MeV) species at several fluences (from 5 × 10{sup 12} to 1.65 × 10{sup 15} ion/cm{sup 2}) were performed in three types of SiO{sub 2} glasses with different OH content (KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301). After ion implantation the Raman spectra were measured and compared with the spectra of unirradiated samples. Irradiated samples of the three fused silica grades exhibit changes in the broad and asymmetric R-band (ω{sub 1} around 445 cm{sup −1}), in D{sub 1} (490 cm−1) and D{sub 2} (605 cm{sup −1}) bands associated to small-membered rings. The D{sub 2} band shows an increase with increasing fluences for different ions, indicating structural changes. Raman spectra of ion-irradiated samples were compared with the spectra of neutron irradiated samples at fluences 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} and 1018 n/cm{sup 2}. Macroscopic surface cracking was detected, mainly at fluences corresponding to deposited energies between 10{sup 23} eV/cm{sup 3} and 10{sup 24} eV/cm{sup 3} (after ion beam shutdown)

  7. Open Heavy Flavor Measurements in Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian

    2016-12-01

    The measurement of heavy flavor production is a powerful tool to study the properties of the high-density QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions as heavy quarks are sensitive to the transport properties of the medium and may interact with the matter differently than light quarks. Heavy flavor jets, non-prompt J / ψ (J / ψ from B-hadron decay) and fully reconstructed B mesons have been studied in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV and pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV with CMS. Recently, the nuclear modification factor of prompt D0 mesons has been measured in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV with CMS as a function of both transverse momentum and collision centrality. These studies show that prompt D0 production is suppressed in semi-central to central PbPb collisions and the suppression is smaller at high pT. A comparison with the RAA of charged particle and non-prompt J / ψ hints a hierarchy of suppression as a function of flavor.

  8. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  9. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  10. Working group report: Heavy ion physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jan-E Alam; K Assamagan; S Chattopadhyay; R Gavai; Sourendu Gupta; B Layek; S Mukherjee; R Ray; Pradip K Roy; A Srivastava

    2004-12-01

    The 8th workshop on high energy physics phenomenology (WHEPP-8) was held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India during January 5–16, 2004. One of the four working groups, group III was dedicated to QCD and heavy ion physics (HIC). The present manuscript gives a summary of the activities of group III during the workshop (see also [1] for completeness). The activities of group III were focused to understand the collective behaviours of the system formed after the collisions of two nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies from the interactions of the elementary degrees of freedom, i.e. quarks and gluons, governed by non-abelian gauge theory, i.e. QCD. This was initiated by two plenary talks on experimental overview of heavy ion collisions and lattice QCD and several working group talks and discussions.

  11. Recent results on relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munhoz, Marcelo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The study of relativistic heavy ion collisions is a very important tool in order to understand the strong interaction described by QCD. The formation of the Quark-Gluon Plasma and the study of its properties is a very challenging quest. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) generates ultra-relativistic Pb + Pb collisions at the TeV scale inaugurating a new era for such studies. Three experiments, ATLAS, CMS and ALICE are able to measure the products of such collisions. In special, the ALICE experiment was designed specifically for the study of heavy ion collisions. In this presentation, I'll discuss the latest results that shed light in the QGP understanding. (author)

  12. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan Hvidkjær

    2010-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by relativistic bare heavy ions penetrating ordinary matter is investigated. Our main aim is to determine the bremsstrahlung which we define as the radiation emitted when the projectile does not break up. It pertains to collisions without nuclear contact...... ("ultraperipheral collisions"). Requirement of coherent action of the nucleons in order to keep the penetrating projectile intact limits bremsstrahlung to relatively soft photons. The spectrum shows a resonance structure with peak position near 2γ times the position of the giant dipole resonance, that is, near 25γ....... As a result of its relative softness, bremsstrahlung never dominates the energy-loss process for heavy ions. As to the emission of electromagnetic radiation in collisions with nuclear break-up, it appears modest when pertaining to incoherent action of the projectile nucleons in noncontact collisions...

  13. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is a remarkable phenomenon that stems from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. It is of fundamental importance to search for the CME in experiments. The heavy ion collisions provide a unique environment where a hot chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma is created, gluonic topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields $|\\vec{\\bf B}|\\sim m_\\pi^2$ are present during the early stage of such collisions. Significant efforts have been made to look for CME signals in heavy ion collision experiments. In this contribution we give a brief overview on the status of such efforts.

  14. Dynamical processes in heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-07-25

    In this report I review the physical assumptions of the Boltzmann Master Equation (BME). Comparisons of the model with experimental neutron spectra gated on evaporation residues for a range of incident projectile energies and masses are presented; next, I compare n spectra gated on projectile-like fragments, followed by comparisons with ungated, inclusive proton spectra. I will then consider secondary effects from the nucleon-nucleon processes involved in the heavy ion relaxation processes, specifically the high energy ..gamma..-rays which have been observed at energies up to 140 MeV in collisions of heavy ions of 20/endash/84 MeV/..mu... Another secondary effect, subthreshold pion production, was covered in the XVII School and will not be repeated. 39 refs., 16 figs.

  15. Optical Faraday Cup for Heavy Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, Frank; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-06-25

    We have been using alumina scintillators for imaging beams in heavy-ion beam fusion experiments in 2 to 4 transverse dimensions [1]. The scintillator has a limited lifetime under bombardment by the heavy ion beams. As a possible replacement for the scintillator, we are studying the technique of imaging the beam on a gas cloud. A gas cloud for imaging the beam may be created on a solid hole plate placed in the path of the beam, or by a localized gas jet. It is possible to image the beam using certain fast-quenching optical lines that closely follow beam current density and are independent of gas density. We describe this technique and show preliminary experimental data. This approach has promise to be a new fast beam current diagnostic on a nanosecond time scale.

  16. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  17. Size Effects in Heavy Ions Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Barrañon, A; Dorso, C O

    2003-01-01

    Rise-Plateau Caloric curves for different Heavy Ion collisions have been obtained, in the range of experimental observations. Limit temperature decreases when the residual size is increased, in agreement with recent theoretical analysis of experimental results reported by other Collaborations. Besides, promptly emitted particles influence on temperature plateau is shown. LATINO binary interaction semiclassical model is used to reproduce the inter-nucleonic forces via Pandharipande Potential and fragments are detected with an Early Cluster Recognition Algorithm.

  18. Surface spectroscopy using high energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, B.L.; Cocke, C.L.; Gray, T.J.; Justiniano, E.; Peercy, P.S.

    1983-04-01

    Surface atoms ionized by high energy heavy ions have been detected by time-of-flight and quadrupole mass spectroscopic techniques. The experimental arrangements are described and potential applications are suggested. Both techniques are demonstrated to produce significant improvements in the detection of atomic hydrogen, with the TOF method producing a nine order of magnitude increase in the sensitivity of atomic hydrogen compared to standard nuclear analysis methods.

  19. Heavy ion fusion 2 MV injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.] [and others

    1995-04-01

    A heavy-ion-fusion driver-scale injector has been constructed and operated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector has produced 2.3 MV and 950 mA of K{sup +}, 15% above original design goals in energy and current. Normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr was measured over a broad range of parameters. The head-to-tail energy flatness is less than {+-} 0.2% over the 1 {micro}s pulse.

  20. Energetic Particle Diagnostics for Transport Analysis 3.Escaping Fast Ion Diagnostics for the Fast Particle Transport Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Mitsutaka; Shinohara, Kouji

    Escaping energetic ion diagnostics in magnetically confined plasma experiments are described in this lecture note. Experimental results from escaping energetic ion diagnostics in TFTR, JFT-2M, CHS and W7-AS are shown. In addition to mechanism of energetic ion loss from a viewpoint of particle orbit, effect of MHD activity on energetic particle transport is reviewed.

  1. Heavy Ion Physics with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Takai, H

    2003-01-01

    I guess the first thing that comes to people's mind is why is an experiment such as ATLAS interested in heavy ion physics. What is heavy ion physics anyway? The term heavy ion physics refers to the study of collisions between large nuclei such as lead, atomic number 208. But why would someone collide something as large and extensive as lead nuclei? When two nuclei collide there is a unique opportunity to study QCD at extreme energy densities. This said why do we think ATLAS is a good detector to study this particular physics? Among many of the simultaneous collisions that takes place when two nuclei encouter, hard scattering takes place. The unique situation now is that before hadronization partons from hard scattering may feel the surrounding media serving as an ideal probe for the matter formed in these collisions. As a consequence of this, jets may be quenched and their properties, e.g. fragmentation function or cone radius, modified when compared to proton-proton collisions. This is precisely where ATL...

  2. Suppression and Two-Particle Correlations of Heavy Mesons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the medium modification of heavy quarks produced in heavy-ion collisions. The evolution of heavy quarks inside the QGP is described using a modified Langevin framework that simultaneously incorporates their collisional and radiative energy loss. Within this framework, we provide good descriptions of the heavy meson suppression and predictions for the two-particle correlation functions of heavy meson pairs.

  3. Heavy ion compositional signature in /sup 3/He-rich solar particle events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, G.M.; Reames, D.V.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Vonrosenvinge, T.T.

    1985-10-01

    A survey of the approx. 1 MeV/nucleon heavy ion abundances in 66 He/sup 3/-rich solar particle events was performed using the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland and Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observations were carried out in interplanetary space over the period 1978 October through 1982 June. Earlier observations were confirmed which show an enrichment of heavy ions in HE3-rich events, relative to the average solar energetic particle composition in large particle events. For the survey near 1.5 MeV/nucleon the enrichments compared to large solar particle events are approximately He4:C:O:Ne:Mg:Si:Fe = 0.44:0.66:1.:3.4:3.5:4.1:9.6. Surprising new results emerging from the present broad survey are that the heavy ion enrichment pattern is the same within a factor of approx. 2 for almost all cases, and the degree of heavy ion enrichment is uncorrelated with the He/sup 3/ enrichment. Overall, the features established appear to be best explained by an acceleration mechanism in which the He/sup 3/ enrichment process is not responsible for the heavy ion enrichment, but rather the heavy ion enrichment is a measure of the ambient coronal composition at the sites where the He/sup 3/-rich events occur.

  4. Heavy-ion compositional signature in 3He-rich solar particle events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, G.M.; Reames, D.V.; Von Rosenvinge, T.T.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1986-04-01

    A survey of the approx. 1 MeV/nucleon heavy ion abundances in 66 He3-rich solar particle events was performed using the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland and Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observations were carried out in interplanetary space over the period 1978 October through 1982 June. Earlier observations were confirmed which show an enrichment of heavy ions in HE3-rich events, relative to the average solar energetic particle composition in large particle events. For the survey near 1.5 MeV/nucleon the enrichments compared to large solar particle events are approximately He4:C:O:Ne:Mg:Si:Fe = 0.44:0.66:1.:3.4:3.5:4.1:9.6. Surprising new results emerging from the present broad survey are that the heavy ion enrichment pattern is the same within a factor of approx. 2 for almost all cases, and the degree of heavy ion enrichment is uncorrelated with the He3 enrichment. Overall, the features established appear to be best explained by an acceleraiation mechanism in which the He3 enrichment process is not responsible for the heavy ion enrichment, but rather the heavy ion enrichment is a measure of the ambient coronal composition at the sites where the He3-rich events occur. 63 references

  5. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  6. Heavy ion acceleration using femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (<200 nm) gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the time history of the laser bullet is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 mkm and energy 27 Joules the calculated reflection, transmission and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80 %, 5 % and 15 %, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8 %. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon and flux . Analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the Radiation Pressure Acceleration regime and the onset of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleratio...

  7. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  8. Resonance propagation in heavy-ion scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bijoy Kundu; B K Jain

    2001-06-01

    The formalism developed earlier by us for the propagation of a resonance in the nuclear medium in proton–nucleus collisions has been modified to the case of vector boson production in heavy-ion collisions. The formalism includes coherently the contribution to the observed di-lepton production from the decay of a vector boson inside as well as outside the nuclear medium. The medium modification of the boson is incorporated through an energy dependent optical potential. The calculated invariant mass distributions are presented for the -meson production using optical potentials estimated within the VDM and the resonance model. The shift in the invariant mass distribution is found to be small. To achieve the mass shift (of about 200 MeV towards lower mass) as indicated in the high energy heavy-ion collision experiments, an unusually strong optical potential of about -120 MeV is required. We also observe that, for not so heavy nuclear systems and/or for fast moving resonances, the shape, magnitude and peak position of the invariant mass distribution is substantially different if the contributions from the resonance decay inside and outside are summedup at the amplitude level (coherently) or at the cross section level (incoherently).

  9. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  10. Quantification of Lithium-ion Cell Thermal Runaway Energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orendorff, Christopher; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2016-01-01

    Much of what is known about lithium-ion cell thermal runaway energetics has been measured and extrapolated from data acquired on relatively small cells (< 3 Ah). This work is aimed at understanding the effects of cell size on thermal runaway energetics on cells from 3 to 50 Ah of both LiFePO4 (LFP) and LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) chemistries. Results show that for both LFP and NCA cells, the normalized heating rate (W/Ah) increases roughly linearly for cells from 3-38 Ah while the normalized total heat released (kJ/Ah) is relatively constant over that cell size range. The magnitude of the normalized heating rate is on the order of 2x greater for NCA relative to LFP chemistries for 2-3 Ah cells, while that difference is on the order of 10x for 30-40 Ah cells. The total normalized heat release is ~ 15-20% greater for NCA relative to LFP cells across the entire size range studied 3-38 Ah.

  11. QCD and Heavy Ions RHIC Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the most violent heavy ion collisions available to experimental study occur at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. There, gold ions collide at psNN = 200 GeV. The early and most striking RHIC results were summarised in 2005 by its four experiments, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR, in their so-called white papers [1, 2, 3, 4] that will be largely referenced thereafter. Beyond and after this, a wealth of data has been collected and analysed, providing additional information about the properties of the matter created at RHIC. It is categorically impossible to give a comprehensive review of these results in a 20 minutes talk or a 7 pages report. Here, I have made a selection of some of the most striking or intriguing signatures: jet quenching in Section 2, quarkonia suppressions in Section 3 and thermal photons in Section 4. A slightly longer and older version of this review can be found in [5]. Some updates are given here, as well as emphasis on new probes ...

  12. Heavy Ion results from RHIC-BNL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esumi Shinlchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from heavy ion collision experiments from RHIC at BNL are presented and discussed in terms of Quark Gluon Plasm properties, such as partonic collectivity and partonic energy loss. The experimental results with direct photons and heavy quarks have given important additional insights of the plasma on top of what has been known with light hadrons. Higher order event anisotropies and the related results have provided the geometrical, temporal and dynamical information of the plasma. The beam energy dependence of the various measurements could reveal the structure of QCD phase diagram and possibly the critical point in the diagram, where the properties of phase transition are expected to change drastically.

  13. Identifying multiquark hadrons from heavy ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  14. Direct photons in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeuchle, Bjoern

    2010-12-13

    Direct photon emission from heavy-ion collisions has been calculated and compared to available experimental data. Three different models have been combined to extract direct photons from different environments in a heavy-ion collision: Thermal photons from partonic and hadronic matter have been extracted from relativistic, non-viscous 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations. Thermal and non-thermal photons from hadronic interactions have been calculated from relativistic transport theory. The impact of different physics assumptions about the thermalized matter has been studied. The models used for the determination of photons from both hydrodynamic and transport calculations have been elucidated and their numerical properties tested. The origin of direct photons, itemised by emission stage, emission time, channel and baryon number density, has been investigated for various systems, as have the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow patterns of direct photons. Taking into account the full (vacuum) spectral function of the rho-meson decreases the direct photon emission by approximately 10% at low photon transverse momentum. In all systems that have been considered -- heavy-ion collisions at E{sub lab}=35 AGeV and 158 AGeV, (s{sub NN}){sup 1/2}=62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV -- thermal emission from a system with partonic degrees of freedom is greatly enhanced over that from hadronic systems, while the difference between the direct photon yields from a viscous and a non-viscous hadronic system (transport vs. hydrodynamics) is found to be very small. Predictions for direct photon emission in central U+U-collisions at 35 AGeV have been made. (orig.)

  15. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul's data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  16. Multifragmentation and dynamics in heavy ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Roy

    2001-07-01

    A midrapidity zone formed in heavy-ion collisions has been investigated through special selections of light particles and intermediate mass fragments detected in the reaction 35Cl on 12C at 43 MeV/nucleon and the reactions 58Ni on 12C, 24Mg, and 197Au at 34.5 MeV/nucleon, and of neutron energy spectra measured in the reaction 35Cl on natTa. Properties of the observables have been examined to characterize the neck-like structure formed between the two reaction partners.

  17. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzetta, E. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  18. Thermodynamical Aspects in Heavy Ion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; D'Agostino, M.; de Sanctis, J.; Fabbri, S.; Fuschini, E.; Geraci, E.; Guiot, B.; Vannini, G.; Verondini, E.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Barlini, S.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.; Lanchais, A.; Vannucci, L.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Margagliotti, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    The excited nuclear systems formed in heavy ion collisions can be studied from a thermodynamical point of view. Charged finite systems have different behaviors with respect to infinite ones. After experimental selection of such equilibrated systems the extraction of thermodynamic coordinates is performed. Different signals compatible with a liquid-gas phase transition have been obtained. In particular a bimodal distribution of the asymmetry between the first two heaviest fragments is presented. Abnormally large fluctuations, which in thermodynamic equilibrium are associated to a negative branch of the heat capacity give indications of a first order phase transition. Perspectives for new generation experiments are indicated.

  19. Charmonium physics with heavy ions: experimental results

    CERN Document Server

    Scomparin, E

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the suppression of charmonium production in heavy-ion collisions was first proposed as an unambiguous signature for the formation of a Quark-Gluon Plasma. Since then, experiments at fixed-target accelerators (SPS) and hadronic colliders (RHIC, LHC) have investigated this observable and discovered a wide range of effects, that have been related to the original proposal but at the same time have also prompted a strong development in the underlying theory concepts. In this contribution, I will review the main achievements of this field, with emphasis on recent results obtained by LHC experiments.

  20. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  1. Linear induction accelerator for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, D.

    1976-09-01

    There is considerable recent interest in the use of high energy (..gamma.. = 1.1), heavy (A greater than or equal to 100) ions to irradiate deuterium--tritium pellets in a reactor vessel to constitute a power source at the level of 1 GW or more. Various accelerator configurations involving storage rings have been suggested. A discussion is given of how the technology of Linear Induction Accelerators--well known to be matched to high current and short pulse length--may offer significant advantages for this application.

  2. Helicity separation in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Baznat, Mircea; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    We study the P-odd effects related to the vorticity of the medium formed in noncentral heavy ion collisions. Using the kinetic Quark-Gluon Strings Model we perform the numerical simulations of the vorticity and hydrodynamical helicity for the various atomic numbers, energies and centralities. We observed the vortical structures typically occupying the relatively small fraction of the fireball volume. In the course of numerical simulations the noticeable hydrodanamical helicity was observed manifesting the specific mirror behaviour with respect to the reaction plane. The effect is maximal at the NICA and FAIR energy range.

  3. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  4. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  5. Heavy Inertial Confinement Energy: Interactions Involoving Low charge State Heavy Ion Injection Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Robert D

    2006-04-14

    During the contract period, absolute cross sections for projectile ionization, and in some cases for target ionization, were measured for energetic (MeV/u) low-charge-state heavy ions interacting with gases typically found in high and ultra-high vacuum environments. This information is of interest to high-energy-density research projects as inelastic interactions with background gases can lead to serious detrimental effects when intense ion beams are accelerated to high energies, transported and possibly confined in storage rings. Thus this research impacts research and design parameters associated with projects such as the Heavy Ion Fusion Project, the High Current and Integrated Beam Experiments in the USA and the accelerator upgrade at GSI-Darmstadt, Germany. Via collaborative studies performed at GSI-Darmstadt, at the University of East Carolina, and Texas A&M University, absolute cross sections were measured for a series of collision systems using MeV/u heavy ions possessing most, or nearly all, of their bound electrons, e.g., 1.4 MeV/u Ar{sup +}, Xe{sup 3+}, and U{sup 4,6,10+}. Interactions involving such low-charge-state heavy ions at such high energies had never been previously explored. Using these, and data taken from the literature, an empirical model was developed for extrapolation to much higher energies. In order to extend our measurements to much higher energies, the gas target at the Experimental Storage Ring in GSI-Darmstadt was used. Cross sections were measured between 20 and 50 MeV/u for U{sup 28+}- H{sub 2} and - N{sub 2}, the primary components found in high and ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage lifetime measurements, information inversely proportional to the cross section, were performed up to 180 MeV/u. The lifetime and cross section data test various theoretical approaches used to calculate cross sections for many-electron systems. Various high energy density research projects directly benefit by this information. As a result, the general

  6. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  7. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.

    1994-10-01

    Various mutagenic effects by heavy ions were studied in bacteria, irradiated at accelerators in Dubna, Prague, Berkeley or Darmstadt. Endpoints investigated are histidine reversion (B. subtilis, S. typhimurium), azide resistance (B. subtilis), mutation in the lactose operon (E. coli), SOS chromotest (E. coli) and λ-prophage induction (E. coli). It was found that the cross sections of the different endpoints show a similar dependence on energy. For light ions (Z = 26) it increases with energy up to a maximum or saturation. The increment becomes steeper with increasing Z. This dependence on energy suggests a ``mutagenic belt'' inside the track that is restricted to an area where the density of departed energy is low enough not to kill the cell, but high enough to induce mutations.

  8. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  9. Towards the heavy-ion program at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chujo, T. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Gunji, T. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Harada, H. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kaneta, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kinsho, M. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Liu, Y. [J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nagamiya, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nishio, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ozawa, K. [J-PARC Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Saha, P.K. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakaguchi, T. [Broohaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sato, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tamura, J. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokay, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A future heavy-ion program at J-PARC has been discussed. The QCD phase structure in high baryon density regime will be explored with heavy ions at the beam momenta of around 10 A GeV/c at the beam rate of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} Hz. For this quest, a large acceptance spectrometer is designed to measure electrons and muons, and rare probes such as multi-strangeness and charmed hadrons/nuclei. A heavy-ion acceleration scheme is under study with a new heavy-ion linac and a new booster ring, which accelerate and inject beams into the existing Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron and Main Ring synchrotron. An overview of the heavy-ion program and an accelerator design, as well as physics goals and a conceptual design of the heavy-ion experiment are discussed.

  10. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  11. Early results on energetic particle dynamics and structure from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B.; Westlake, J. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Pollock, C. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Blake, J. B.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The cluster of four, formation-flying spacecraft, comprising the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched on 13 March 2015 into near equatorial 1.2 x 12 RE orbits, provides an important new asset for assessing the transport of energy and matter from the distant regions of Earth's magnetosphere into the inner regions. Here we report on early results from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instrument on each of the MMS Spacecraft. EIS provides nearly all-sky energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions for 1 MeV. It also measures energetic electrons from 25 keV to > 0.5 MeV in support and coordination with the electron-focused Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS). During the early phase of the MMS mission, while the full complement of instruments was being commissioned prior to the prime mission phase beginning 1 September 2015, EIS observed dynamic energetic particle injections at the root of the magnetotail between the post-midnight regions and dawn in association with numerous dipolarization fronts and related processes. Here we report on coordinated measurements between MMS's EIS instrument and EIS's sister instrument on the Van Allen Probes, RBSPICE, to further address the relationship between dynamic injections and depolarization fronts in the magnetotail and injections observed deep within the magnetosphere's ring current regions. We also report preliminary result on using energetic particle gradients and anistotropies to diagnose magnetopause structures near mission-identified reconnection sites.

  12. Multiplicity and theremalization time in heavy-ions collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'eva, Irina

    2016-10-01

    We present a concise review of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ions collisions within the holographic approach. In particular, we discuss how to get the total multiplicity in heavy ions collision to fit the recent experimental data. We also discuss theoretical estimations of time formation of QGP in heavy ions collision and show that different observables can give the different times of QGP formation.

  13. Multiplicity and theremalization time in heavy-ions collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref’eva Irina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a concise review of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ions collisions within the holographic approach. In particular, we discuss how to get the total multiplicity in heavy ions collision to fit the recent experimental data. We also discuss theoretical estimations of time formation of QGP in heavy ions collision and show that different observables can give the different times of QGP formation.

  14. Heavy Ion Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Morsch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for HEP99, Tampere, Finland, 15-21 July 1999The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN is also planned as a heavy ion collider with lead ions colliding at an energy of 5.5 TeV. This corresponds to collisions of matter with cosmic rays of the highest energies observed so far promising the study of new and exciting aspects of physics. In addition to the heaviest system (Pb--Pb), collisions of lower mass ions are foreseen as a means to study collisions at different energy density and proton-nucleus (p--A) collisions provide indispensable reference data for the A--A collisions.ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only detector fully dedicated to the physics of nuclear collisions. It is designed to cover the full richness of hadronic and leptonic signals expected at the LHC allowing to establish and to study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter, the quark gluon plasma (QGP). The CMS experiment is optimised for the study of hard proce...

  15. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Craig L., E-mail: clolson66@msn.com

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  16. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  17. Overview of the Heavy Ion Fusion Program

    CERN Document Server

    Celata, C M

    2000-01-01

    The world Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program for inertial fusion energy is looking toward the development and commissioning of several new experiments. Recent and planned upgrades of the facilities at GSI, in Russia, and in Japan greatly enhance the ability to study energy deposition in hot dense matter. Worldwide target design developments have focused on non-ignition targets for nearterm experiments and designs which, while lowering the energy required for ignition, tighten accelerator requirements. The U.S program is transitioning between scaled beam dynamics experiments and high current experiments with power-plant-driver-scale beams. Current effort is aimed at preparation for the next-step large facility, the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)-- an induction linac accelerating multiple beams to a few hundred MeV, then focusing to deliver tens of kilojoules to a target. The goal is to study heavy ion energy deposition, and to test all of the components and physics needed for an engineering test of a power p...

  18. Future of the ATLAS heavy ion program

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS-Collaboration, The; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of the heavy ion program at the LHC is to study the properties of deconfined strongly interacting matter, often referred to as ``quark-gluon plasma'' (QGP), created in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. That matter is found to be strongly coupled with a viscosity to entropy ratio near a conjectured quantum lower bound. ATLAS foresees a rich program of studies using jets, Upsilons, measurements of global event properties and measurements in proton-nucleus collisions that will measure fundamental transport properties of the QGP, probe the nature of the interactions between constituents of the QGP, elucidate the origin of the strong coupling, and provide insight on the initial state of nuclear collisions. The heavy ion program through the third long shutdown should provide one inverse nb of 5.5~TeV Pb+Pb data. That data will provide more than an order of magnitude increase in statistics over currently available data for high-pT observables such as gamma-jet and Z-jet pairs. However, potentia...

  19. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  20. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE).The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development. The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  1. Diagnosis of energetic ions and ion composition in fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering of mm-waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, Henrik; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Leipold, Frank;

    2012-01-01

    In fusion plasmas, the dominant heating source will be fusion generated energetic ions slowing down in the plasma. The same ions can also drive waves and instabilities in the plasma. Their distribution in velocity and in space has major impact on plasma dynamics, and plasma dynamics in turn affects...... the energetic ion distributions. The dynamics of energetic ions is thus important to measure in order to understand fusion plasmas, and important to monitor as part of input to plasma control. The collective Thomson scattering of millimeter waves has proven to be a valuable means of diagnosing energetic ion...... distributions in fusion plasmas1,2. A beam of mm-waves with a diameter of 5–10 cm and a power of 150–600 kW is sent through the plasma, and radiation scattered from this probe beam by the microscopic fluctuations in the plasma is detected. These microscopic fluctuations are in part induced by the ion motion...

  2. Recent progress in molecule modification with heavy ion beam irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The research into heavy ion beam biology started in the 1960s, and so far it has become an important interdisciplinary study. Heavy ion beam is more suitable for molecule modification than other sorts of radiation, for it has many superiorities such as the energy transfer effect and the mass deposition effect. Molecule modification with heavy ion beam irradiation can be applied to developing new medicines and their precursors, genetic engineering, protein engi neering, outer space radiobiology, etc. Retrospect and prospect of the research and development of molecule modifica tion with heavy ion beam irradiation are given.

  3. On the origins of energetic ions in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuselier, S.A.; Klumpar, D.M.; Shelley, E.G. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Energetic ion events in the Earth's dayside subsolar magnetosheath (0900 - 1300 Local Time) are surveyed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) Hot Plasma Composition Experiment. Ion species carrying the signature of their origin (O{sup +} and energetic He{sup 2+}) are used to distinguish between magnetospheric and solar wind orgins for the energetic ion events. The results of this survey indicate that the majority of energetic (10-17 keV/e) H{sup +} and He{sup 2+} ions observed in the dayside magnetosheath are accelerated from the solar wind population. The energetic He{sup 2+} to H{sup +} density ratio in the magnetosheath is consistent with that predicted from first-order Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions in the turbulent regions upstream and downstream from the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. Although the majority of the energetic ions appear to be of solar wind origin, magnetospheric O{sup +} is also occasionally present in the magnetosheath. The simultaneous occurence of both energetic He{sup 2+} and magnetospheric O{sup +} indicates that, on occasion, both Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions and leakage of magnetospheric ions occurs in the dayside magnetosheath.

  4. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H.; Kronberg, E. A.; Nykyri, K.; Trattner, K. J.; Daly, P. W.; Chen, G. X.; Du, A. M.; Ge, Y. S.

    2017-05-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 274 keV) from Cluster/Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detectors were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. The enhancement of ion intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. The results imply that substorm-related acceleration processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth magnetosphere. Energetic ions delivered through reconnection at the magnetopause significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  5. Open heavy-flavor production and suppression in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Nahrgang, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-flavor observables are valuable probes of the quark-gluon plasma, which is expected to be produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. These experiments offer the unique opportunity to study strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities in the laboratory. In this overview talk I will summarize the current theoretical status of heavy-flavor production and suppression in heavy-ion collisions and discuss open challenges.

  6. Average energetic ion flux variations associated with geomagnetic activity from EPIC/STICS on Geotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Eastman, T. E.; McEntire, R. W.; Roelef, E. C.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kokubun, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetotail ion flux measurements from the Geotail spacecraft are analyzed both with and without the application of selection criteria that identify the plasma regime in which an observation is obtained. The different results are compared with each other. The initial results on the changes of energetic ion flux and composition correlated to average substorm activity in different magnetotail plasma regimes are discussed. The energetic ions are measured using the energetic particles and ion composition (EPIC) experiment and the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS). The plasma, wave and field instruments of the Geotail satellite were used to identify the principle magnetotail plasma regimes of plasma sheet, lobe, and magnetospheric boundary layer, as well as the magnetosheath and solar wind. Energetic O and H ions were observed in all the plasma regimes.

  7. Heavy ion radiobiology for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Research in the field of biological effects of heavy charged particles is needed for both heavy-ion therapy (hadrontherapy) and protection from the exposure to galactic cosmic radiation in long-term manned space missions. Although the exposure conditions (e.g. high- vs. low-dose rate) and relevant endpoints (e.g. cell killing vs. neoplastic transformation) are different in the two fields, it is clear that a substantial overlap exists in several research topics. Three such topics are discussed in this short review: individual radiosensitivity, mixed radiation fields, and late stochastic effects of heavy ions. In addition, researchers involved either in experimental studies on space radiation protection or heavy-ion therapy will basically use the same accelerator facilities. It seems to be important that novel accelerator facilities planned (or under construction) for heavy-ion therapy reserve a substantial amount of beamtime to basic studies of heavy-ion radiobiology and its applications in space radiation research.

  8. The Origin and Acceleration of 3He and Heavy Ions in the 2000 July 14 Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ping Wu; Guang-Li Huang; Yu-Hua Tang; Yu Dai

    2007-01-01

    According to the evolutionary properties of the flare, halo coronal mass ejection (CME), enrichments of 3He ions in the energy range of 3.5-26 MeV nucl-1 and Ne, Mg, Si and Fe ions in the energy range of 8.5-15 MeV nucl-1, we argue that the 3He and heavy ions originate in the middle corona (~0.1-1 R⊙) with well-connected open field lines to the Earth,where the magnetic reconnection leads to acceleration of the electrons and the production of type-Ⅲ burst during the decay phase of the soft X-ray emission. The acceleration of 3He and heavy ions may have been accomplished in two stages: first H-He ion-ion hybrid waves may be easily excited by the energetic electron beams produced in the middle corona, and these waves are preferentially absorbed by 3He and heavy ions due to their frequency being near the fundamental gyro frequency of the 3He ions and harmonic gyro frequency of Ne, Mg, Si and Fe ions. These preheated ions escape into interplanetary space along the open field lines and may be further accelerated to tens of MeV nucl-1 by CME-driven shock. The theoretical calculations show that the 3He and heavy ions may be accelerated to the energy of ~ MeV nucl-1 by the ion-ion hybrid waves and be further accelerated to the energy of ~ 100 MeV nucl- 1 by the shock wave: these are basically consistent with the observations.

  9. CERN achievements in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Giuseppe Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years after a Letter of Intent by the GSI and LBL groups for the “Study of particle production and target fragmentation in central 20Ne on Pb reactions, at 12 GeV per nucleon energy of the CERN PS external beam" [1], based on the results found by the NA45/CERES, NA49, NA50, and WA97/NA57 experiments at the SPS, CERN announced compelling evidence for the formation of a new state of matter in heavyion collisions at CERN-SPS energies [2]. Some of the experiments were indeed the 2nd or 3rd generation successors of the apparatuses originally proposed by the GSI-LBL collaboration. Actually, the CERN ion program initiated at the SPS with the acceleration of oxygen ions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon only in 1986, and continued with sulphur ions at 200 GeV/nucleon up to 1993. The rest is history: lead-ion beams at 160 GeV/nucleon became available at the SPS in 1994; the LHC accelerated and collided lead beams at a center of mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 2.76 TeV in 2010. Heavy ion physics is definitely in the future program of CERN: ALICE will operate a major upgrade of its detectors during the second long shutdown of the LHC, in 2018-2019, and the associated physics program will span the third and fourth LHC runs, till late 2020s.

  10. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  11. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  12. Envelope Soliton in Multi-ion Plasma and Ion-Ion Hybrid Wave Excited by Energetic Electron Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Yu; HUANG Guang-Li

    2001-01-01

    Another envelope soliton event below the H+ gyrofrequency and localized density depletion has been discoveredin the low auroral region (~1760 kin) by the Freja satellite. This envelope soliton has a characteristic frequencyat ~190 Hz, which is also close to the resonance frequency of hydrogen ion-oxygen ion hybrid wave. This event iscorrelated in time with the observations of the sharp increase of the ratio of oxygen ion density to hydrogen andwith the electron energization along the magnetic field. A theoretical model on the ion-ion hybrid wave excitedby an energetic electron beam has also been presented. It is found that the ion-ion hybrid wave is mainly excitedby the Cherenkov instability in the auroral region.

  13. Heavy ion beams from an Alphatross source for use in calibration and testing of diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. J.; Brown, G. M.; Ho, D.; Stockler, B. F. O. F.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Ion beams from the 1.7 MV Pelletron Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo have been used to test and calibrate many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) diagnostics and high energy density physics (HEDP) diagnostics used at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The ion source on this accelerator, a radio-frequency (RF) alkali-metal charge exchange source called an Alphatross, is designed to produce beams of hydrogen and helium isotopes. There is interest in accelerating beams of carbon, oxygen, argon, and other heavy ions for use in testing several diagnostics, including the Time Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup (TRTF). The feasibility of generating these heavy ion beams using the Alphatross source will be reported. Small amounts of various gases are mixed into the helium plasma in the ion source bottle. A velocity selector is used to allow the desired ions to pass into the accelerator. As the heavy ions pass through the stripper canal of the accelerator, they emerge in a variety of charge states. The energy of the ion beam at the high-energy end of the accelerator will vary as a function of the charge state, however the maximum energy deliverable to target is limited by the maximum achievable magnetic field produced by the accelerator's steering magnet. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  15. Electromagnetic probes in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Hees H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their penetrating nature, electromagnetic probes, i.e., lepton-antilepton pairs (dileptons and photons are unique tools to gain insight into the nature of the hot and dense medium of strongly-interacting particles created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, including hints to the nature of the restoration of chiral symmetry of QCD. Of particular interest are the spectral properties of the electromagnetic current-correlation function of these particles within the dense and/or hot medium. The related theoretical investigations of the in-medium properties of the involved particles in both the partonic and hadronic part of the QCD phase diagram underline the importance of a proper understanding of the properties of various hadron resonances in the medium.

  16. Dilepton Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, R

    2013-01-01

    The properties of electromagnetic radiation from hot fireballs as created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. We first outline how the medium effects in the electromagnetic spectral function, which governs thermal production rates, relate to the (partial) restoration of chiral symmetry. In particular, we show how chiral and QCD sum rules, together with constraints from lattice QCD, can render these relations quantitative. Turning to dilepton data, we elaborate on updates in the space-time evolution and quark-gluon plasma emission rates from lattice-QCD calculations. With a now available excitation function in dilepton spectra from the RHIC beam-energy scan connecting down to SPS energies, we argue that a consistent interpretation of dilepton data emerges. Combining well-constrained space-time evolutions with state-of-the-art emission rates identifies most of the radiation to emanate from around the pseudo-critical temperature, and thus confirms resonance melting as the prevalent mechanism...

  17. System size in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yang-Yang; ZHAO Lin-Jie; YUAN Zhong-Sheng; ZHANG Dan-Dan; FANG Wei; XU Ming-Mei

    2011-01-01

    System size is more than a geometrical quantity in relativistic heavy ion collisions; it is closely related to evolution process,i.e.a different system size corresponds to a different evolution process,and whether QGP is produced depends on the system size.We propose that the system size should be under the same level when comparing the measurements from different colliding nuclei.The equivalence of the peripheral collisions of Au-Au and the central collisions of smaller nuclei is studied using the Monte Carlo method.Comparing the transverse overlapping area of the colliding nuclei,the number of participant nucleons and the number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions in various colliding nuclei,we give an estimate of the correspondence in system size.This is helpful in the experimental comparison of the measurements from different colliding nuclei.

  18. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards

  19. Theory overview of Heavy Ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, T

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses some recently active topics in the theoretical interpretation of high energy heavy ion collisions at the LHC and at RHIC. We argue that the standard paradigm for understanding the spacetime evolution of the bulk of the matter produced in the collision is provided by viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, which can be used to systematically extract properties of the QCD medium from experimental results. The initial conditions of this hydrodynamical evolution are increasingly well understood in terms of gluon saturation, and can be quantified using Classical Yang-Mills fields and QCD effective kinetic theory. Hard and electromagnetic probes of the plasma provide additional constraints. A particularly fascinating subject are high multiplicity proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, where some of the characteristics previously attributed to only nucleus-nucleus collisions have been observed.

  20. Hydrodynamic Approaches in Relativistic Heavy Ion Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza, Rafael Derradi; Kodama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation with the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to...

  1. Application of hydrodynamics to heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felsberger, Lukas

    2014-12-02

    The Bjorken model is a simple tool for making rough predictions of the hydrodynamic evolution of the thermalized matter created in a heavy ion collision. The advantage of the model clearly lies in its simplicity, rather than accuracy. As it is still used for making rough estimations 'by hand', in this thesis, I investigate in which cases the Bjorken model gives useful results and in which it is not recommended. For central collisions, I show which critical size the nuclei should have so that the Bjorken model can be applied. For non-central collisions, I demonstrate that using Glauber initial conditions combined with the Bjorken evolution, leads to reasonable results up to large impact parameters. Finally, I study the case of a non-ideal (viscous) description of the thermalized matter which leads to strongly differing results if first- or second-order hydrodynamics is applied.

  2. Production of Charge in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, Scott; Ratti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    By analyzing preliminary experimental measurements of charge-balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic-Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), it is found that pictures where balancing charges are produced in a single surge, and therefore separated by a single length scale, are inconsistent with data. In contrast, a model that assumes two surges, one associated with the formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma and a second associated with hadronization, provides a far superior reproduction of the data. A statistical analysis of the model comparison finds that the two-surge model best reproduces the data if the charge production from the first surge is similar to expectations for equilibrated matter taken from lattice gauge theory. The charges created in the first surge appear to separate by approximately one unit of spatial rapidity before emission, while charges from the second wave appear to have separated by approximately a half unit or less.

  3. Holography, Hydrodynamization and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michal P

    2016-01-01

    In the course of the past several years holography has emerged as an ab initio tool in exploring strongly-time-dependent phenomena in gauge theories. These lecture notes overview recent developments in this area driven by phenomenological questions concerning applicability of hydrodynamics under extreme conditions occurring in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. The topics include equilibration time scales, holographic collisions and hydrodynamization from the point of view of the asymptotic character of the hydrodynamic gradient expansion. The emphasis is put on concepts rather than calculational techniques and particular attention is devoted to present these developments in the context of the most recent advances and some of the open problems.

  4. Particle Interferometry in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W

    1997-01-01

    By measuring hadronic single-particle spectra and two-particle correlations in heavy-ion collisions, the size and dynamical state of the collision fireball at freeze-out can be reconstructed. I discuss the relevant theoretical methods and their limitations. By applying the formalism to recent pion correlation data from Pb+Pb collisions at CERN we demonstrate that the collision zone has undergone strong transverse growth before freeze-out (by a factor 2-3 in each direction), and that it expands both longitudinally and transversally. From the thermal and flow energy density at freeze-out the energy density at the onset of transverse expansion can be estimated from conservation laws. It comfortably exceeds the critical value for the transition to color deconfined matter.

  5. Prompt processes in heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann Master Equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons partition the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho and from reactions of /sup 40/Ar or /sup 40/Ca. We point out ambiguities in deducing angle-integrated energy spectra from double differential spectra. With no additional free parameters, our model successfully reproduces a large body of high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra by assuming an incoherent n-p-bremsstrahlung mechanism. 45 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-11-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 239/Np and /sup 240/Pu are /sup 100/Zr, /sup 104/Mo, /sup 106/Mo and /sup 106/Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for /sup 234/U - the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  7. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  8. High energy heavy ion tracks in bubble detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, S L; Guo, H Y; Tu, C Q; Wang, Y L; Doke, T; Kato, T; Ozaki, K; Kyan, A; Piao, Y; Murakami, T

    1999-01-01

    Bubble detectors which are commonly used as neutron detectors have been demonstrated through this study to be good detectors for registration of high energy heavy ion tracks. Large size bubble detectors made in China Institute of Atomic Energy were irradiated to heavy ions Ar and C up to 650 MeV/u and 400 MeV/u, respectively. Very clear features of stringy tracks of high energy heavy ions and their fragmentations are manifested and distinguishable. A single track created by a specific high energy heavy ion is composed of a line of bubbles, which is visible by naked eyes and retained for months without reduction in size. The creation of heavy ion tracks in bubble detectors is governed by a threshold whose essence is approximately a critical value of energy loss rate (dE/dX) sub c similar to that of etch track detectors. Ranges of heavy ions in bubble detectors are apparent and predictable by existing formulas. Identification of high energy heavy ions and the applications to heavy ion physics, cosmic rays, exot...

  9. PRISMA - a magnetic spectrometer for heavy ions at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latina, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Beghini, S.; Behera, B.R.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; De Rosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Gulmini, M.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Maron, G.; Menegazzo, R.; Marginean, N.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D.R.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Scarlassara, F.; Szilner, S.; Toniolo, N.; Trotta, M.; Wu, Y.W

    2004-04-05

    The heavy-ion magnetic spectrometer PRISMA was recently installed at Laboratori Naz. di Legnaro, in order to exploit the heavy-ion beams of the XTU Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex, with masses up to A{approx_equal}200 at energies {approx_equal}5-10 MeV MeV A.

  10. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    McLerran, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark Gluon Plasma, the Color Glass Condensate, the Glasma and Quarkyonic Matter. A novel effect that may be associated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts and explain how they may be seen in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  11. Quarkonia at finite temperature in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saumen Datta

    2015-05-01

    The behaviour of quarkonia in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. After a detailed discussion of the current theoretical understanding of quarkonia in a static equilibriated plasma, we discuss quarkonia yield from the fireball created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision experiments. We end with a brief discussion of the experimental results and outlook.

  12. Observations of Heavy Element Abundances over a Broad Energy Range in 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Mason, G. M.; Cohen, C. M.; Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mazur, J. E.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2006-05-01

    During the maximum of solar cycle 23 a number of 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events with measurable intensities of heavy elements (Z≥6) at energies >10 MeV/nuc were observed with instrumentation on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. This represents a relatively small fraction of all the 3He-rich SEP events that were detected since heavy-ion intensities at these energies were frequently too low to be measured. Using data from two ACE instruments (SIS covering ~10--60 MeV/nuc and ULEIS ~0.2--1 MeV/nuc) we have investigated heavy element abundances over a broad energy range in this special set of events. We report the average abundance ratios and the correlations between different ratios in the two energy intervals. Furthermore we compare the results from the two different energy ranges, both statistically and on an event-by-event basis. In addition, we compare the statistical properties observed in the SIS and ULEIS data sets with previously-published results obtained at intermediate energies (~1--3 MeV/nuc) from instruments on ISEE-3 during the maximum of solar cycle 21 (Mason et al. 1986, Reames et al. 1994).

  13. Heavy ion acceleration at parallel shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Galinsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of alpha particle acceleration at parallel shock due to an interaction with Alfvén waves self-consistently excited in both upstream and downstream regions was conducted using a scale-separation model (Galinsky and Shevchenko, 2000, 2007. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped and hence where particles will be pitch-angle scattered. It considers the total distribution function (for the bulk plasma and high energy tail, so no standard assumptions (e.g. seed populations, or some ad-hoc escape rate of accelerated particles are required. The heavy ion scattering on hydromagnetic turbulence generated by both protons and ions themselves is considered. The contribution of alpha particles to turbulence generation is important because of their relatively large mass-loading parameter Pα=nαmα/npmp (mp, np and mα, nα are proton and alpha particle mass and density that defines efficiency of wave excitation. The energy spectra of alpha particles are found and compared with those obtained in test particle approximation.

  14. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Riepe, K.B.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.

    1985-10-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10 X torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column. The column consists of two 28-inch diameter insulator modules made of 85 percent Al2O3 ceramic rings brazed to niobium feedthrough rings to which the electrodes are mechanically attached. Field shaping is used to minimize electron avalanche induced flashover along the inside surface of the ceramic rings. The column is self-supporting and is cantilevered from one end of the containment vessel. A brazed assembly was chosen to provide the required bond strength and high vacuum capability. The HV pulsed power supply is a 2MV Marx generator cantilevered from the opposite end of the containment vessel. The stainless steel pressure vessel (PV) contains a 65 psig mixture of SF6(30%) and nitrogen (70%) to provide the electrical insulation.

  15. Heavy-Ion Collimation at the Large Hadron Collider Simulations and Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083002; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Bruce, Roderik; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Bruce, Roderik

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) stores and collides proton and $^{208}$Pb$^{82+}$ beams of unprecedented energy and intensity. Thousands of superconducting magnets, operated at 1.9 K, guide the very intense and energetic particle beams, which have a large potential for destruction. This implies the demand for a multi-stage collimation system to provide protection from beam-induced quenches or even hardware damage. In heavy-ion operation, ion fragments with significant rigidity offsets can still scatter out of the collimation system. When they irradiate the superconducting LHC magnets, the latter risk to quench (lose their superconducting property). These secondary collimation losses can potentially impose a limitation for the stored heavy-ion beam energy. Therefore, their distribution in the LHC needs to be understood by sophisticated simulations. Such simulation tools must accurately simulate the particle motion of many different nuclides in the magnetic LHC lattice and simulate their interaction with t...

  16. Heavy ion fusion experiments at LBNL and LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahle, L

    1998-08-19

    The long-range goal of the US Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program is to develop heavy ion accelerators capable of igniting inertial fusion targets to generate fusion energy for electrical power production. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion consist of several subsystems: ion sources, injectors, matching sections, combiners, induction acceleration sections with electric and magnetic focusing, beam compression and bending sections, and a final-focus system to focus the beams onto the target. We are currently assembling or performing experiments to address the physics of all these subsystems. This paper will discuss some of these experiments.

  17. An EBIS-based heavy ion injector for the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.; Raparia, D.

    1994-09-01

    An electron beam ion source (EBIS), followed by a heavy ion RFQ and superconducting linac, can be considered as a heavy ion injector for high energy accelerators, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A test EBIS, on long term loan from Sandia National Laboratory, is presently being commissioned at BNL. Experiments on this source will be used in evaluating the parameters for an EBIS-based RHIC injector. Some results of this commissioning, as well as the conceptual designs of the RFQ and linac, are presented.

  18. Radiolysis of astrophysical ice analogs by energetic ions: the effect of projectile mass and ice temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Sergio; Duarte, Eduardo Seperuelo; Domaracka, Alicja; Rothard, Hermann; Boduch, Philippe; da Silveira, Enio F

    2011-09-21

    An experimental study of the interaction of highly charged, energetic ions (52 MeV (58)Ni(13+) and 15.7 MeV (16)O(5+)) with mixed H(2)O : C(18)O(2) astrophysical ice analogs at two different temperatures is presented. This analysis aims to simulate the chemical and the physicochemical interactions induced by cosmic rays inside dense, cold astrophysical environments, such as molecular clouds or protostellar clouds as well at the surface of outer solar system bodies. The measurements were performed at the heavy ion accelerator GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen, France. The gas samples were deposited onto a CsI substrate at 13 K and 80 K. In situ analysis was performed by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at different fluences. Radiolysis yields of the produced species were quantified. The dissociation cross section at 13 K of both H(2)O and CO(2) is about 3-4 times smaller when O ions are employed. The ice temperature seems to affect differently each species when the same projectile was employed. The formation cross section at 13 K of molecules such as C(18)O, CO (with oxygen from water), and H(2)O(2) increases when Ni ions are employed. The formation of organic compounds seems to be enhanced by the oxygen projectiles and at lower temperatures. In addition, because the organic production at 13 K is at least 4 times higher than the value at 80 K, we also expect that interstellar ices are more organic-rich than the surfaces of outer solar system bodies.

  19. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-06-01

    ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using the results based on Monte Carlo simulations. The global energy confinement time including energetic ion effect can be expressed in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density, and magnetic field strength in heliotrons. Our results in the CHS plasma show the systematic decrement of the global energy confinement time due to the energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. Also we apply our model to the ICRF minority heating in the LHD plasma in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. The clear increment of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the `orbit improved` configuration, while the decrement is observed in the `standard` configuration. (author)

  20. Energetic Ion Mitigation Methodology for High Power Plasma Thruster Cathodes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The presence of energetic ions, that appear under high cathode current operation, stand as a showstopper to the realization of high power electric propulsion....

  1. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abe, M; Moore, T. E; Collier, M. R; Taguchi, S

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere...

  2. Heavy-ion microbeams and bystander effect studies at JAEA-Takasaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Funayama, T.; Sakashita, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Wada, S.; Yokota, Y.; Kakizaki, T.; Hamada, N.; Ni, M.

    During a long-term space mission astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation especially of various kinds of heavy charged particles energetic heavy ions at low dose and low dose rate Heavy charged particles transfer their energy to biological organisms through high-density ionization along the particle trajectories The population of cells exposed to a very low dose of high-LET heavy particles contains a few cells hit by a particle while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage At somewhat higher doses some of the cells receive two or more events according to the Poisson distribution of ion injections This fluctuation of particle trajectories through individual cells makes interpretation of radiological effects of heavy ions difficult Therefore we have established a single cell irradiation system which allows selected cells to be individually hit with defined number of heavy charged particles using a collimated heavy-ion microbeam apparatus at JAEA-Takasaki This system has been developed to study radiobiological processes in hit cells and bystander cells exposed to low dose and low dose-rate high-LET radiations in ways that cannot be achieved using conventional broad-field exposures Individual cultured cells grown in special dishes were irradiated in the atmosphere with a single or defined numbers of 18 3 MeV amu 12 C 13 0 or 17 5 MeV amu 20 Ne and 11 5 MeV amu 40 Ar ions Targeting and irradiation of the cells were performed automatically according to the positional data of the target cells

  3. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  4. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  5. Review on heavy ion radiotherapy facilities and related ion sources (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    Heavy ion radiotherapy awakens worldwide interest recently. The clinical results obtained by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan have clearly demonstrated the advantages of carbon ion radiotherapy. Presently, there are four

  6. Interphase Death of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Exposed to Accelerated Heavy Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mehnati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy ions are nucleus of elements of iron, argon, carbon and neon that all carry positive electrical charges. For these particles to be useful in radiotherapy they need to accelerated to high energy by more than thousand mega volts. Also the cosmic environment is considered to be a complicated mixture of highly energetic photons and heavy ions such as iron. Therefore, the health risks to astronauts during long mission should be considered.  Materials and Methods: The induction of interphase death was tested on Chinese hamster ovary cells by exposing them to accelerated heavy ions (carbon, neon, argon and iron of 10-2000 linear energy transfers (LETs. The fraction of cells that underwent interphase death was determined by observing individual cells with time-lapse photography (direct method as well as by the indirect method of counting cells undergoing interphase death made visible by the addition of caffeine (indirect method. Results: The interphase death due to the exposure to X- rays is increased linearly as the dose exceeds the threshold dose of 10 Gy. Whereas the interphase death increases at a higher rate due to the exposure to high LET heavy ions and no threshold dose was observed. The range of LET values corresponding to the maximum RBE for the interphase death is 120-230 keV/µm. The probability of inducing the interphase death by a single heavy ion traversing through the nucleus is about 0.04-0.08. Discussion and Conclusion: The relative biological effectiveness (RBE of heavy ions as compared to X- rays as determined at the 50% level of induction is increased with LET. It reached a maximum value at a LET of approximately 230 keV/µm and then decreased with further increase in LET. The range of LET values corresponding to the maximum RBE appears to be narrower for interphase death than for reproductive death.

  7. Effects of energetic electrons on ion acceleration in a quasi-static model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahache, Abdelkadrer; Bennaceur-Doumaz, Djamila; Djebli, Mourad

    2017-08-01

    Based on the Passoni-Lontano model [M. Lontano and M. Passoni, Phys. Plasmas 13(4), 042102 (2006)], the expansion of an intense laser produced plasma into vacuum is analyzed, assuming that hot and energetic electrons responsible for ion acceleration, in the framework of a TNSA mechanism, are nonthermal and modelled by the Cairns distribution function. Due to the presence of energetic nonthermal electron population, the electric potential, electrical field, ion maximum energy, and ion spectrum energy are enhanced during the ion acceleration process.

  8. Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Benaroya, R.; Clifft, B.E.; Jaffey, A.H.; Johnson, K.W.; Khoe, T.K.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, Y.Z.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the status of a project to develop and build a small superconducting linac to boost the energy of heavy ions from an existing tandem electrostatic accelerator. The design of the system is well advanced, and construction of major components is expected to start in late 1976. The linac will consist of independently-phased resonators of the split-ring type made of niobium and operating at a temperature of 4.2/sup 0/K. The resonance frequency is 97 MHz. Tests on full-scale resonators lead one to expect accelerating fields of approximately 4 MV/m within the resonators. The linac will be long enough to provide a voltage gain of at least 13.5 MV, which will allow ions with A less than or approximately 80 to be accelerated above the Coulomb barrier of any target. The modular nature of the system will make future additions to the length relatively easy. A major design objective is to preserve the good quality of the tandem beam. This requires an exceedingly narrow beam pulse, which is achieved by bunching both before and after the tandem. Focusing by means of superconducting solenoids within the linac limit the radial size of the beam. An accelerating structure some 15 meters downstream from the linac will manipulate the longitudinal phase ellipse so as to provide the experimenter with either very good energy resolution (..delta..E/E approximately equal to 2 x 10/sup -4/) or very good time resolution (..delta.. t approximately equal to 30 psec).

  9. A model of the effects of heavy ion radiation on human tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, A.L.; Guida, P.; Ponomarev, A.L.; Sundaresan, A.; Vazquez, M.E.; Guida, P.; Kim, A.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2010-08-09

    In heavy ion radiotherapy and space travel humans are exposed to energetic heavy ions (C, Si, Fe and others). This type of irradiation often produces more severe biological effects per unit dose than more common X-rays. A new Monte Carlo model generates a physical space with the complex geometry of human tissue or a cell culture based model of tissue, which is affected by the passage of ionizing radiation. For irradiation, the model relies on a physical code for the ion track structure; for tissues, cellular maps are derived from two- or three-dimensional confocal microscopy images using image segmentation algorithm, which defines cells as pixilated volumes. The model is used to study tissue-specific statistics of direct ion hits and the remote ion action on cells. As an application of the technique, we considered the spatial pattern of apoptotic cells after heavy ion irradiation. The pattern of apoptosis is modeled as a stochastic process, which is defined by the action cross section taken from available experimental data. To characterize the degree of apoptosis, an autocorrelation function that describes the spatial correlation of apoptotic cells is introduced. The values of the autocorrelation function demonstrate the effect of the directionality of the radiation track on the spatial arrangements of inactivated cells in tissue. This effect is intrinsic only to high linear-energy-transfer radiation.

  10. Heavy-flavour and quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The comparison of heavy-flavour hadron production in proton-proton, proton-Pb and Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC offers the opportunity to investigate the properties of the high-density colour-deconfined state of strongly-interacting matter (Quark Gluon Plasma, QGP that is expected to be formed in high-energy collisions of heavy nuclei. A review of the main quarkonium and open heavy-flavour results obtained by the ALICE, ATLAS and CMS experiments is presented.

  11. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor

  12. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC(1638N/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC(1638N/+)) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(1638N/+) mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50cGy of (28)Si (energy: 300MeV/n; LET: 70keV/μm) or (56)Fe (energy: 1000MeV/n; LET: 148keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n=20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to (56)Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after (28)Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic

  13. CHICO, a heavy ion detector for Gammasphere

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, M W; Wu, C Y; Gray, R W; Teng, R; Long, C

    2000-01-01

    A 4 pi position-sensitive heavy-ion detector system, CHICO, has been developed primarily for use in conjunction with the 4 pi gamma-ray facility, Gammasphere. The CHICO detector comprises an array of 20 Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs) covering 12 deg.

  14. Strange Particles and Heavy Ion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassalleck, Bernd [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Fields, Douglas [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-04-28

    This very long-running grant has supported many experiments in nuclear and particle physics by a group from the University of New Mexico. The gamut of these experiments runs from many aspects of Strangeness Nuclear Physics, to rare Kaon decays, to searches for exotic Hadrons such as Pentaquark or H-Dibaryon, and finally to Spin Physics within the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC. These experiments were performed at a number of laboratories worldwide: first and foremost at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), but also at CERN, KEK, and most recently at J-PARC. In this Final Technical Report we summarize progress and achievements for this award since our last Progress Report, i.e. for the period of fall 2013 until the award’s termination on November 30, 2015. The report consists of two parts, representing our two most recent experimental efforts, participation in the Nucleon Spin Physics program of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL – Task 1, led by Douglas Fields; and participation in several Strangeness Nuclear Physics experiments at J-PARC, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Center in Tokai-mura, Japan – Task 2, led by Bernd Bassalleck.

  15. Reaction mechanisms in heavy ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubian J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the reaction mechanisms involved in heavy ion fusion. We begin with collisions of tightly bound systems, considering three energy regimes: energies above the Coulomb barrier, energies just below the barrier and deep sub-barrier energies. We show that channel coupling effects may influence the fusion process at above-barrier energies, increasing or reducing the cross section predicted by single barrier penetration model. Below the Coulomb barrier, it enhances the cross section, and this effect increases with the system’s size. It is argued that this behavior can be traced back to the increasing importance of Coulomb coupling with the charge of the collision partners. The sharp drop of the fusion cross section observed at deep sub-barrier energies is addressed and the theoretical approaches to this phenomenon are discussed. We then consider the reaction mechanisms involved in fusion reactions of weakly bound systems, paying particular attention to the calculations of complete and incomplete fusion available in the literature.

  16. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Bangerter, R.O. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Bock, R. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  17. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bangerter, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bock, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  18. Electromagnetic Radiations from Heavy Ion Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we have discussed the different sources of photons and dileptons produced in heavy ion collision (HIC. The transverse momentum (pT spectra of photons for different collision energies are analyzed with a view of extracting the thermal properties of the system formed in HIC. We showed the effect of viscosity on pT spectra of produced thermal photons. The dilepton productions from hot hadrons are considered including the spectral change of light vector mesons in the thermal bath. We have analyzed the pT and invariant mass (M spectra of dileptons for different collision energies too. As the individual spectra are constrained by certain unambiguous hydrodynamical inputs, so we evaluated the ratio of photon to dilepton spectra, Rem, to overcome those quantities. We argue that the variation of the radial velocity extracted from Rem with M is indicative of a phase transition from the initially produced partons to hadrons. In the calculations of interferometry involving dilepton pairs, it is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of HBT radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in HIC. Elliptic flow (v2 of dilepton is also studied at sNN=2.76 TeV for 30–40% centrality using the (2+1d hydrodynamical model.

  19. High Gluon Densities in Heavy Ions Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of heavy ion collisions are dominated by high density systems of gluons that carry each a small fraction $x$ of the momenta of the colliding nucleons. A distinguishing feature of such systems is the phenomenon of "saturation" which tames the expected growth of the gluon density as the energy of the collision increases. The onset of saturation occurs at a particular transverse momentum scale, the "saturation momentum", that emerges dynamically and that marks the onset of non-linear gluon interactions. At high energy, and for large nuclei, the saturation momentum is large compared to the typical hadronic scale, making high density gluons amenable to a description with weak coupling techniques. This paper reviews some of the challenges faced in the study of such dense systems of small $x$ gluons, and of the progress made in addressing them. The focus is on conceptual issues, and the presentation is both pedagogical, and critical. Examples where high gluon density could play a visible role in hea...

  20. A radial TPC for heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Garabatos, C

    2000-01-01

    The CERES experiment at the CERN SPS has been recently upgraded with a TPC with radial drift field, the first one of its sort. Constructed during 1998, it has been successfully operated in commissioning and physics runs, with muon, proton, and heavy-ion beams. A high voltage electrode of about 0.5 m radius is surrounded by sixteen 2 m long readout chambers, placed at a radius of 1.3 m, with chevron-shaped readout pads. The field cage is enclosed by two low-mass voltage degraders at each end of the cylindrical structure. A Ne-CO/sub 2/ [80-20] gas mixture allows for a safe operation and good transport properties under drift fields ranging from 200 to 600 V/cm. A spatial resolution better than 700 microns and 350 microns in r and rdelta (phi), respectively, has been achieved in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field. Details of its construction as well as results of the operation and performance in a high multiplicity environment are presented. (0 refs).

  1. A short introduction to heavy-ion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sourendu

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions provide the only laboratory tests of relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature. Understanding these is a necessary step in understanding the origins of our universe. These lectures introduce the subject to experimental particle physicists, in the hope that they will be useful to others as well. The phase diagram of QCD is briefly touched upon. Kinematic variables which arise in the collisions of heavy-ions beyond those in the collisions of protons or electrons are introduced. Finally, a few of the signals studied in heavy-ion collisions, and the kind of physics questions which they open up are discussed.

  2. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Almási, Gábor András

    2014-01-01

    We have considered the equilibration in a relativistic heavy ion collision using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c which time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have also shown that the mass spectra of broad resonances immediately follows their in-medium spectral functions.

  3. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  4. LEEM investigations of clean surfaces driven by energetic ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbamonte, Peter M. [University of Illinois

    2013-04-24

    The original purpose of this award was to use low‐energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to explore the dynamics of surfaces of clean single crystal surfaces when driven by a beam of energetic ions. The goal was to understand the nanoscience of hyperthermal growth, surface erosion by sublimation and irradiation, operation of surface sinks in irradiated materials, diffusion on driven surfaces, and the creation of structural patterns. This project was based on a novel LEEM system constructed by C. P. Flynn, which provided real‐time imaging of surface dynamics by scattering low energy electrons. With the passing of Prof. Flynn in late 2011, this project was completed under a slightly different scope by constructing a low‐energy, inelastic electron scattering (EELS) instrument. Consistent with Flynn's original objectives for his LEEM system, this device probes the dynamics of crystal surfaces. However the measurements are not carried out in real time, but instead are done in the frequency domain, through the energy lost from the probe electrons. The purpose of this device is to study the collective bosonic excitations in a variety of materials, including high temperature superconductors, topological insulators, carbon allotropes including (but not limited to) graphene, etc. The ultimate goal here is to identify the bosons that mediate interactions in these and other materials, with hopes of shedding light on the origin of many exotic phenomena including high temperature superconductivity. We completed the construction of a low‐energy EELS system that operates with an electron kinetic energy of 7 - 10 eV. With this instrument now running, we hope to identify, among other things, the bosons that mediate pairing in high temperature superconductors. Using this instrument, we have already made our first discovery. Studying freshly cleaved single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is a topological insulator, we have observed a surface excitation at an energy loss

  5. Heavy ion acceleration in the Breakout Afterburner regime

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from an ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by sub-picosecond lasers is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations we identified two highly efficient ion acceleration schemes. By varying the laser pulse duration we observed a transition from Radiation Pressure Acceleration to the Breakout Afterburner regime akin to light ions. The underlying physics and ion acceleration regimes are similar to that of light ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the acceleration of heavy ions more challenging. Two laser systems are studied in detail: the Texas Petawatt Laser and the Trident laser, the former having pulse duration 180 fs, intermediate between very short femtosecond pulses and picosecond pulses. Both laser systems generated directional gold ions beams (~10 degrees half-angle) with fluxes in excess of 1011 ion/sr and normalized energy >10 MeV/nucleon.

  6. Nanolesions induced by heavy ions in human tissues: Experimental and theoretical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Bleicher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of energetic heavy ions are attracting increasing interest for their applications in cancer therapy and protection against space radiation. The cascade of events leading to cell death or late effects starts from stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale and the corresponding lesions in biological molecules, primarily DNA. We have developed experimental techniques to visualize DNA nanolesions induced by heavy ions. Nanolesions appear in cells as “streaks” which can be visualized by using different DNA repair markers. We have studied the kinetics of repair of these “streaks” also with respect to the chromatin conformation. Initial steps in the modeling of the energy deposition patterns at the micrometer and nanometer scale were made with MCHIT and TRAX models, respectively.

  7. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samit Mandal; J Gerl; H Geissel; K Hauschild; M Hellström; Z Janas; I Kojouharov; Y Kopatch; R C Lemmon; P Mayet; Z Podolyak; P H Regan; H Schaffner; C Schlegel; J Simpson; H J Wollersheim

    2001-07-01

    Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  8. Heavy ion physics with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zampolli, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    ALICE is the experiment at the LHC collider at CERN dedicated to heavy ion physics. In this report, the ALICE detector will be presented, together with its expected performance as far as some selected physics topics are concerned.

  9. Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)...

  10. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  11. Failure Analysis of Heavy-Ion-Irradiated Schottky Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Megan C.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Campola, Michael J.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we use high- and low-magnitude optical microscope images, infrared camera images, and scanning electron microscope images to identify and describe the failure locations in heavy-ion-irradiated Schottky diodes.

  12. Status of Chemical Equilibrium in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Cleymans, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Recent work on chemical equilibrium in heavy ion collisions is reviewed. The energy dependence of thermal parameters is discussed. The centrality dependence of thermal parameters at SPS energies is presented.

  13. Two alpha, three alpha and multiple heavy-ion radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M. (Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania))

    1985-07-01

    New decay modes by spontaneous emission of two and three ..cap alpha.. particles and two identical or different heavy ions, are predicted. The analytical variant of the superasymmetric fission model is used to estimate the half lives.

  14. Two alpha, three alpha and multiple heavy-ion radioactivities

    OpenAIRE

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.

    1985-01-01

    New decay modes by spontaneous emission of two and three α particles and two identical or different heavy ions, are predicted. The analytical variant of the superasymmetric fission model is used to estimate the half lives.

  15. Silicon Carbide Power Device Performance Under Heavy-Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Topper, Alyson; Wilcox, Edward; Phan, Anthony; Ikpe, Stanley; LaBel, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion induced degradation and catastrophic failure data for SiC power MOSFETs and Schottky diodes are examined to provide insight into the challenge of single-event effect hardening of SiC power devices.

  16. Status of chemical equilibrium in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Cleymans

    2003-04-01

    Recent work on chemical equilibrium in heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. The energy dependence of thermal parameters is discussed. The centrality dependence of thermal parameters at SPS energies is presented.

  17. Sample Management System for Heavy Ion Irradiation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A robotic sample management device and system for the exposure of biological and material specimens to heavy ion beams of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)...

  18. Laser-driven multicharged heavy ion beam acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Y.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. The laser pulse of ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated. This is achieved by the high intensity laser field of ˜ 1021Wcm-2 interacting with the solid density target. The demonstrated iron ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M) is difficult to be achieved by the conventional heavy ion source technique in the accelerators.

  19. Physical Modelling of Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation using Geant4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglass M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Protons and heavy ion particles are considered to be ideal particles for use in external beam radiotherapy due to superior properties of the dose distribution that results when these particles are incident externally and due to their relative biological effectiveness. While significant research has been performed into the properties and physical dose characteristics of heavy ions, the nuclear reactions (direct and fragmentation undergone by He4, C12 and Ne20 nuclei used in radiotherapy in materials other than water is still largely unexplored. In the current project, input code was developed for the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant 4 version 9.3 to simulate the transport of several mono-energetic heavy ions through water. The relative dose contributions from secondary particles and nuclear fragments originating from the primary particles were investigated for each ion in both water and dense bone (ICRU media. The results indicated that the relative contribution to the total physical dose from nuclear fragments increased with both increasing particle mass and with increasing medium density. In the case of 150 MeV protons, secondary particles were shown to contribute less than 0.5% of the peak dose and as high as 25% when using 10570 MeV neon ions in bone. When water was substituted for a bone medium, the contributions from fragments increased by more than 6% for C12 and Ne20.

  20. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  1. String theory and relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Joshua J.

    It has long been known that string theory describes not only quantum gravity, but also gauge theories with a high degree of supersymmetry. Said gauge theories also have a large number of colors in a regime with a large effective coupling constant that does not depend on energy scale. Supersymmetry is broken in nature, if it is present at all, however the gauge theory described by string theory shares many common features with QCD at temperatures above the quark deconfinement transition. It is generally though not entirely accepted that collisions of gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) produce a thermalized Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) at temperatures distinctly above the transition temperature as determined from lattice simulations. Hence, we might hope that a string theoretic description of gauge dynamics can elucidate some otherwise intractable physics of the strongly coupled plasma. Here we use string theory to calculate the outgoing energy flux from a RHIC process called "jet quenching", in which a high-momentum quark or gluon traverses a large distance in the QGP. Our setup is in the context of the highly supersymmetric string dual gauge theory, but we nevertheless find that the gross features of the resulting stress-energy tensor match reasonably well with experimental data. We will furthermore discuss the technology behind computations of the leading-order corrections to gauge theory observables that are uniquely string-induced, and we will describe a potential solution to string theory that could resolve a number of discrepancies between the traditional highly supersymmetric setup and QCD---in particular, a significant reduction in the amount of supersymmetry, and a finite effective coupling that is still greater than unity but does depend on energy scale.

  2. Spiraling Beam Illumination Uniformity on Heavy Ion Fusion Target

    OpenAIRE

    Kurosaki, T; Kawata, S.; Noguchi, K.; Koseki, S; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.; Barnard, J. J.; Logan, B. G.

    2012-01-01

    A few percent wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF) by a spiraling beam axis motion in the paper. So far the wobbling heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and s...

  3. Experimental results on charge fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K; Pant, L M; Mohanty, A K

    2016-01-01

    We present a subset of experimental results on charge fluctuation from the heavy-ion collisions to search for phase transition and location of critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Measurements from the heavy-ion experiments at the SPS and RHIC energies observe that total charge fluctuations increase from central to peripheral collisions. The net-charge fluctuations in terms of dynamical fluctuation measure $\

  4. Current experimental situation in heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, D.K.

    1978-06-01

    A detailed survey of the present experimental situation in heavy-ion physics is presented. The discussion begins by considering the simple excitation of discrete states in elastic scattering, transfer, and compound-nucleus reactions; it then turns to more drastic perturbations of the nucleus high in the continuum through fusion, fission, and deeply inelastic scattering, and concludes with the (possibly) limiting asymptotic phenomena of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. 138 figures, 5 tables, 451 references. (RWR)

  5. Classical gluon production amplitude in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirilli Giovanni Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of quarks and gluons produced in the initial stages of nuclear collisions, known as the initial condition of the Quark-Gluon Plasma formation, is the fundamental building block of heavy-ion theory. I will present the scattering amplitude, beyond the leading order, of the classical gluon produced in heavy-ion collisions. The result is obtained in the framework of saturation physics and Wilson lines formalism.

  6. FAIR—Status and relevance for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiller, P., E-mail: P.Spiller@gsi.de; Barth, W.

    2014-01-01

    The chosen design concepts and technical approaches as described in the Heavy Ion Driver Ignition Facility (HIDIF) study are compared with the present status of accelerator technologies and the experiences gained in the operation of the heavy ion accelerator facilities at GSI. Novel advanced technologies, as developed e.g. for the FAIR Project, may be used for a more compact and realistic driver layout. Major differences between a single shot and a high repetition rate facility will be discussed.

  7. Heavy ions at the LHC: Physics perspectives and experimental program

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Schukraft

    2001-08-01

    Ultrarelativistic heavy ion physics is entering the new era of collider experiments with the start-up of RHIC at BNL and construction for detectors at LHC well under way. At this crossroads, the article will give a summary of the experimental program and our current view of heavy ion physics at the LHC, concentrating in particular on physics topics that are different or unique compared to current facilities.

  8. A new identification method for energetic ion {delta}E-E telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Cesar [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts, Universitaet zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Bronchalo, Enrique [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Avda. Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche, Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: ebronchalo@umh.es; Medina, Jose [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-11-21

    A new ion identification method for {delta}E-E telescopes is presented. The method works by counting data points under {delta}E(E) curves on {delta}E-E diagrams. These curves are obtained by simulating the telescope response to a flux of energetic ions. The method is checked against three published methods applied to several experimental data sets.

  9. Scintillator based energetic ion loss diagnostic for the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, D S

    2008-02-01

    A scintillator based energetic ion loss detector has been built and installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Synakowski et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1653 (2000)] to measure the loss of neutral beam ions. The detector is able to resolve the pitch angle and gyroradius of the lost energetic ions. It has a wide acceptance range in pitch angle and energy, and is able to resolve the full, one-half, and one-third energy components of the 80 keV D neutral beams up to the maximum toroidal magnetic field of NSTX. Multiple Faraday cups have been embedded behind the scintillator to allow easy absolute calibration of the diagnostic and to measure the energetic ion loss in several ranges of pitch angle with good time resolution. Several small, vacuum compatible lamps allow simple calibration of the scintillator position within the field of view of the diagnostic's video camera.

  10. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  11. Theory for charge states of energetic oxygen ions in the earth's radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of geomagnetically trapped energetic oxygen ions have been studied in detail. Ion distributions in radial locations below the geostationary orbit, energy spectra between 1 keV and 100 MeV, and the distribution over charge states have been computed for equatorially mirroring ions. Both ionospheric and solar wind oxygen ion sources have been considered, and it is found that the charge state distributions in the interior of the radiation belts are largely independent of the charge state characteristics of the sources. In the MeV range, oxygen ions prove to be a more sensitive probe for radiation belt dynamics than helium ions and protons.

  12. Preparation of Dithizone Functionalized Polystyrene for Detecting Heavy Metal Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeon Ho; Kim, Younghun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Colorimetric sensors were usually used to detect specific metal ions using selective color change of solutions. While almost organic dye in colorimetric sensors detected single molecule, dithizone (DTZ) solution could be separately detected above 5 kinds of heavy metal ions by the change of clear color. Namely, DTZ could be used as multicolorimetric sensors. However, DTZ was generally used as aqueous type and paper/pellet-type DTZ was not reported yet. Therefore, in this work, polystyrene (PS) was prepared to composite with DTZ and then DTZ/PS pellet was obtained, which was used to selectively detect 10 kinds of heavy metal ions. When 10 ppm of Hg and Co ions was exposed in DTZ/PS pellets, clear color change was revealed. It is noted that DTZ/PS pellet could be used in detecting of heavy metal ion as dry type.

  13. Energetics of ion conduction through the K+ channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernèche, Simon; Roux, Benoît

    2001-11-01

    K+ channels are transmembrane proteins that are essential for the transmission of nerve impulses. The ability of these proteins to conduct K+ ions at levels near the limit of diffusion is traditionally described in terms of concerted mechanisms in which ion-channel attraction and ion-ion repulsion have compensating effects, as several ions are moving simultaneously in single file through the narrow pore. The efficiency of such a mechanism, however, relies on a delicate energy balance-the strong ion-channel attraction must be perfectly counterbalanced by the electrostatic ion-ion repulsion. To elucidate the mechanism of ion conduction at the atomic level, we performed molecular dynamics free energy simulations on the basis of the X-ray structure of the KcsA K+ channel. Here we find that ion conduction involves transitions between two main states, with two and three K+ ions occupying the selectivity filter, respectively; this process is reminiscent of the `knock-on' mechanism proposed by Hodgkin and Keynes in 1955. The largest free energy barrier is on the order of 2-3kcalmol-1, implying that the process of ion conduction is limited by diffusion. Ion-ion repulsion, although essential for rapid conduction, is shown to act only at very short distances. The calculations show also that the rapidly conducting pore is selective.

  14. Energetic-ion-driven global instabilities in stellarator/helical plasmas and comparison with tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Todo, Yasushi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of energetic-ion-driven global instabilities such as Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) and their impact on energetic ions and bulk plasma is crucially important for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas and in the future for deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma experiments. Various types of global modes and their associated enhanced energetic ion transport are commonly observed in toroidal plasmas. Toroidicity-induced AEs and ellipticity-induced AEs, whose gaps are generated through poloidal mode coupling, are observed in both tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas. Global AEs and reversed shear AEs, where toroidal couplings are not as dominant were also observed in those plasmas. Helicity induced AEs that exist only in 3D plasmas are observed in the large helical device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7 Advanced Stellarator plasmas. In addition, the geodesic acoustic mode that comes from plasma compressibility is destabilized by energetic ions in both tokamak and LHD plasmas. Nonlinear interaction of these modes and their influence on the confinement of the bulk plasma as well as energetic ions are observed in both plasmas. In this paper, the similarities and differences in these instabilities and their consequences for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas are summarized through comparison with the data sets obtained in LHD. In particular, this paper focuses on the differences caused by the rotational transform profile and the 2D or 3D geometrical structure of the plasma equilibrium. Important issues left for future study are listed.

  15. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  16. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Kronenberg, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  17. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few {mu}m. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials. 86 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs.

  18. Energetic neutral atoms emitted from ice by ion bombardment under Ganymede surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Magnetospheric or solar wind ions directly interacting with a planetary surface result in backscattering or sputtering of energetic neutral atoms. One example is the solar wind interaction with the surface of the Moon, where the produced energetic neutral atoms were observed by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer instrument (SARA) on Chandrayaan-1. At Jupiter, magnetospheric plasma interacts in a similar way with the surface of the Galilean moons. However, the emission of energetic neutral atoms from "dirty" ices as found e.g. on Ganymede's surface is poorly understood. We set up an experiment to study the ion to surface interaction under Ganymede surface environment conditions using the unique capabilities of the MEFISTO test facility at University of Bern. Ions of various species and energies up to 33 keV/q were impacted on a block of ice made from a mixture of water, NaCl and dry ice. The energetic neutral atoms produced by the interaction were detected with the prototype of the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer instrument (JNA.) JNA is proposed as part of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for ESA's JUICE mission to Jupiter and instrument is based on the Energetic Energetic Neutral Atom instrument (ENA) built for the BepiColombo Magnetospheric Orbiter. We present energy spectra for different ion beam species and energetic neutral atom species combinations. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms up to the upper end of the instrument energy range of 3.3 keV. The energy spectra of the neutral atom flux emitted from the ice could only partially be fitted by the Sigmund-Thompson formula. In some cases, but not all, a Maxwellian distribution provides a reasonable description of the data.

  19. Short-term forecasting of solar energetic ions on board LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (PU) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy); Araujo, H M; Shaul, D N A; Sumner, T J [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Fabi, M [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' (Italy); Finetti, N [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Gruppo collegato dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Lobo, A; Mateos, I, E-mail: catia.grimani@uniurb.i [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) free-falling test-masses are charged by galactic and solar energetic particles. This process generates spurious forces on the test masses which appear as noise in the experiments. It was shown that relativistic solar electron detection can be used for up-to-one-hour forecasting of incoming energetic ions at 1 AU. Warning of incoming solar energetic particle events could allow us to optimize the test-mass discharging. The current LISA-PF radiation monitor design needs to be upgraded if solar electron detection is to be implemented in LISA.

  20. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W. Udo [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-28

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the “boiling” and “vaporization” of atomic nuclei, but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, “head-on” collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (“neck”) between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  1. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W. Udo [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-28

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the “boiling” and “vaporization” of atomic nuclei but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, “head-on” collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (“neck”) between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  2. High-Intensity, High Charge-State Heavy Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Alessi, J

    2004-01-01

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions will be reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. The benefits and limitations for these type sources will be described, for both dc and pulsed applications. Possible future improvements in these type sources will also be discussed.

  3. Control of magnetohydrodynamic stability by phase space engineering of energetic ions in tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J P; Chapman, I T; Coda, S; Lennholm, M; Albergante, M; Jucker, M

    2012-01-10

    Virtually collisionless magnetic mirror-trapped energetic ion populations often partially stabilize internally driven magnetohydrodynamic disturbances in the magnetosphere and in toroidal laboratory plasma devices such as the tokamak. This results in less frequent but dangerously enlarged plasma reorganization. Unique to the toroidal magnetic configuration are confined 'circulating' energetic particles that are not mirror trapped. Here we show that a newly discovered effect from hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic theory has been exploited in sophisticated phase space engineering techniques for controlling stability in the tokamak. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed, and the technique successfully applied in the Joint European Torus. Manipulation of auxiliary ion heating systems can create an asymmetry in the distribution of energetic circulating ions in the velocity orientated along magnetic field lines. We show the first experiments in which large sawtooth collapses have been controlled by this technique, and neoclassical tearing modes avoided, in high-performance reactor-relevant plasmas.

  4. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  5. Pion correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Heavy Ion Spectrometer Systems (HISS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, W.B. Jr.

    1990-05-01

    This thesis contains the setup, analysis and results of experiment E684H Multi-Pion Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions''. The goals of the original proposal were: (1) To initiate the use of the HISS facility in the study of central Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions (RHIC). (2) To perform a second generation experiment for the detailed study of the pion source in RHIC. The first generation experiments, implied by the second goal above, refer to pion correlation studies which the Riverside group had performed at the LBL streamer chamber. The major advantage offered by moving the pion correlation studies to HISS is that, being an electronic detector system, as opposed to the Streamer Chamber which is a visual detector, one can greatly increase the statistics for a study of this sort. An additional advantage is that once one has written the necessary detector and physics analysis code to do a particular type of study, the study may be extended to investigate the systematics, with much less effort and in a relatively short time. This paper discusses the Physics motivation for this experiment, the experimental setup and detectors used, the pion correlation analysis, the results, and the conclusions possible future directions for pion studies at HISS. If one is not interested in all the details of the experiment, I believe that by reading the sections on intensity interferometry, the section the fitting of the correlation function and the systematic corrections applied, and the results section, one will get a fairly complete synopsis of the experiment.

  6. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banaś, D., E-mail: d.banas@ujk.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Fijał-Kirejczyk, I. [The Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A. [The National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kretschmer, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Mukoyama, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Trautmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Universität Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster–Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L{sub 2}-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  7. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  8. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  9. Anti-biofilm activity of Fe heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R. P.; Hareesh, K.; Bankar, A.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-10-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) polymers were investigated before and after high energy heavy ion irradiation for anti-bacterial properties. These PC films were irradiated by Fe heavy ions with two energies, viz, 60 and 120 MeV, at different fluences in the range from 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. UV-Visible spectroscopic results showed optical band gap decreased with increase in ion fluences due to chain scission mainly at carbonyl group of PC which is also corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results. X-ray diffractogram results showed decrease in crystallinity of PC after irradiation which leads to decrease in molecular weight. This is confirmed by rheological studies and also by differential scanning calorimetric results. The irradiated PC samples showed modification in their surfaces prevents biofilm formation of human pathogen, Salmonella typhi.

  10. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strašík, I.; Prokhorov, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., 238U92+ ) and partially stripped (e.g., 238U28+ ) ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil) and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers). Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions) was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad-x.

  11. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  12. Morphology of High-Multiplicity Events in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Naselsky, P; Christensen, P R; Damgaard, P H; Frejsel, A; Gaardhøje, J J; Hansen, A; Hansen, M; Kim, J; Verkhodanov, O; Wiedemann, U A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss opportunities that may arise from subjecting high-multiplicity events in relativistic heavy ion collisions to an analysis similar to the one used in cosmology for the study of fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). To this end, we discuss examples of how pertinent features of heavy ion collisions including global characteristics, signatures of collective flow and event-wise fluctuations are visually represented in a Mollweide projection commonly used in CMB analysis, and how they are statistically analyzed in an expansion over spherical harmonic functions. If applied to the characterization of purely azimuthal dependent phenomena such as collective flow, the expansion coefficients of spherical harmonics are seen to contain redundancies compared to the set of harmonic flow coefficients commonly used in heavy ion collisions. Our exploratory study indicates, however, that these redundancies may offer novel opportunities for a detailed characterization of those event-wise fluctuations t...

  13. Synthesis and Characteristics of A Novel Heavy Metal Ions Chelator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhuannian; SONG Yejing; HAN Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    Polyacrylamide-urea-sulfanilamide(PUS) was prepared as a novel heavy metal ions chelator and successfully used to simultaneously remove heavy metals from wastewater effluents.The effects of reaction parameters (sodium hydroxide,material ratio,temprature and contact time) were monitored to specify the best synthesis conditions.PUS was chemically characterized by means of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis).The simultaneous chelation performance of PUS towards selected heavy metals ions,Ni2+,Cu2+,Pb2+,Zn2+,Cd2+ was discussed,showing that Ni2+,Cu2+,Pb2+,Zn2+ could be better chelated.It is indicated that the synthesized PUS is a potential remediation material when used for the treatment of wastewater containing metal ions.

  14. Ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions: the first billion seconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baym, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    I first review the early history of the ultrarelativistic heavy ion program, starting with the 1974 Bear Mountain Workshop, and the 1983 Aurora meeting of the U.S. Nuclear Science Committtee, just one billion seconds ago, which laid out the initial science goals of an ultrarelativistic collider. The primary goal, to discover the properties of nuclear matter at the highest energy densities, included finding new states of matter - the quark-gluon plasma primarily - and to use collisions to open a new window on related problems of matter in cosmology, neutron stars, supernovae, and elsewhere. To bring out how the study of heavy ions and hot, dense matter in QCD has been fulfilling these goals, I concentrate on a few topics, the phase diagram of matter in QCD, and connections of heavy ion physics to cold atoms, cosmology, and neutron stars.

  15. Study of the heavy ion bunch compression in CSRm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Da-Yu; LIU Yong; YUAN You-Jing; YANG Jian-Cheng; LI Peng; LI Jie; CHAI Wei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of attaining nanosecond pulse length heavy ion beam is studied in the main ring (CSRm)of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou.Such heavy ion beam can be produced by non-adiabatic compression,and it is implemented by a fast rotation in the longitudinal phase space.In this paper,the possible beam parameters during longitudinal bunch compression are studied with the envelope model and Particle in Cell simulation,and the results are compared.The result shows that the short bunch 238U28+ with the pulse duration of about 50 ns at the energy of 200 MeV/u can be obtained which can satisfy the research of high density plasma physics experiment.

  16. Benchmarking of neutron production of heavy-ion transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, I. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Ronningen, R. M. [Michigan State Univ., National Superconductiong Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Heilbronn, L. [Univ. of Tennessee, 1004 Estabrook Rd., Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required. (authors)

  17. <span class="hlt">Heavy-Ion</span> Imaging Applied To Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J. I.; Tobias, C. A.; Capp, M. P.; Benton, E. V.; Holley, W. R.; Gray, Joel E.; Hendee, William R.; Haus, Andrew G.; Properzio, William S.

    1980-08-18

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  18. An Experimental Review on Heavy-Flavor v2 in Heavy-Ion Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For over a decade now, the primary purpose of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has been to study the properties of QCD matter under extreme conditions—high temperature and high density. The heavy-ion experiments at both RHIC and LHC have recorded a wealth of data in p+p, p+Pb, d+Au, Cu+Cu, Cu+Au, Au+Au, Pb+Pb, and U+U collisions at energies ranging from sNN=7.7 GeV to 7 TeV. Heavy quarks are considered good probe to study the QCD matter created in relativistic collisions due to their very large mass and other unique properties. A precise measurement of various properties of heavy-flavor hadrons provides an insight into the fundamental properties of the hot and dense medium created in these nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as transport coefficient and thermalization and hadronization mechanisms. The main focus of this paper is to present a review on the measurements of azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavor hadrons and to outline the scientific opportunities in this sector due to future detector upgrade. We will mainly discuss the elliptic flow of open charmed meson (D-meson, J/ψ, and leptons from heavy-flavor decay at RHIC and LHC energy.

  19. Charge Transfer and Ionization by Intermediate-Energy Heavy Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L. H. [East Carolina University; McLawhorn, S. L. [East Carolina University; McLawhorn, R. A. [East Carolina University; Evans, N. L. [East Carolina University; Justiniano, E. L. B. [East Carolina University; Shinpaugh, J. L. [East Carolina University; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Reinhold, Carlos O [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u-1 or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7+, 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approx. 11+, and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C+ ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u-1 are described.

  20. Charge transfer and ionisation by intermediate-energy heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L H; McLawhorn, S L; McLawhorn, R A; Evans, N L; Justiniano, E L B; Shinpaugh, J L; Schultz, D R; Reinhold, C O

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u(-1) or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7(+), 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approximately 11(+), and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C(+) ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u(-1) are described.

  1. Quantum Electrodynamical Shifts in Multivalent Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupitsyn, I. I.; Kozlov, M. G.; Safronova, M. S.; Shabaev, V. M.; Dzuba, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections are directly incorporated into the most accurate treatment of the correlation corrections for ions with complex electronic structure of interest to metrology and tests of fundamental physics. We compared the performance of four different QED potentials for various systems to access the accuracy of QED calculations and to make a prediction of highly charged ion properties urgently needed for planning future experiments. We find that all four potentials give consistent and reliable results for ions of interest. For the strongly bound electrons, the nonlocal potentials are more accurate than the local potential.

  2. Quantum Electrodynamical Shifts in Multivalent Heavy Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupitsyn, I I; Kozlov, M G; Safronova, M S; Shabaev, V M; Dzuba, V A

    2016-12-16

    The quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections are directly incorporated into the most accurate treatment of the correlation corrections for ions with complex electronic structure of interest to metrology and tests of fundamental physics. We compared the performance of four different QED potentials for various systems to access the accuracy of QED calculations and to make a prediction of highly charged ion properties urgently needed for planning future experiments. We find that all four potentials give consistent and reliable results for ions of interest. For the strongly bound electrons, the nonlocal potentials are more accurate than the local potential.

  3. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  4. Reducing hazardous heavy metal ions using mangium bark waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibi, Jauhar; Syafii, Wasrin; Sari, Rita Kartika

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of mangium bark and its biosorbent ability to reduce heavy metal ions in standard solutions and wastewater and to assess changes in bark characteristics after heavy metal absorption. The experiments were conducted to determine heavy metal absorption from solutions of heavy metals alone and in mixtures as well as from wastewater. The results show that mangium bark can absorb heavy metals. Absorption percentages and capacities from single heavy metal solutions showed that Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Pb(2+) > Hg(2+), while those from mixture solutions showed that Hg(2+) > Cu(2+) > Pb(2+) > Ni(2+). Wastewater from gold mining only contained Cu, with an absorption percentage and capacity of 42.87 % and 0.75 mg/g, respectively. The highest absorption percentage and capacity of 92.77 % and 5.18 mg/g, respectively, were found for Hg(2+) in a mixture solution and Cu(2+) in single-metal solution. The Cu(2+) absorption process in a single-metal solution changed the biosorbent characteristics of the mangium bark, yielding a decreased crystalline fraction; changed transmittance on hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl groups; and increased the presence of Cu. In conclusion, mangium bark biosorbent can reduce hazardous heavy metal ions in both standard solutions and wastewater.

  5. Development of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for Heavy Ion Drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Manahan, R; Lietzke, A F

    2001-09-10

    Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is exploring a promising path to a practical inertial-confinement fusion reactor. The associated heavy ion driver will require a large number of focusing quadrupole magnets. A concept for a superconducting quadrupole array, using many simple racetrack coils, was developed at LLNL. Two, single-bore quadrupole prototypes of the same design, with distinctly different conductor, were designed, built, and tested. Both prototypes reached their short sample currents with little or no training. Magnet design, and test results, are presented and discussed.

  6. Complexified boost invariance and holographic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S

    2015-01-01

    At strong coupling holographic studies have shown that heavy ion collisions do not obey normal boost invariance. Here we study a modified boost invariance through a complex shift in time, and show that this leads to surprisingly good agreement with numerical holographic computations. When including perturbations the agreement becomes even better, both in the hydrodynamic and the far-from-equilibrium regime. One of the main advantages is an analytic formulation of the stress-energy tensor of the longitudinal dynamics of holographic heavy ion collisions.

  7. Search for Exotic Strange Dibaryon in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOChong-Shou

    2003-01-01

    The exotic strange dibaryon particle (ΩΩ)0+ with S = -6 can be produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The yields of this kind of exotic strange dibaryon particles can increase signitlcantly soon as the formation of QGP does exhibit after the collision. If there is no phase transition after the collision, the upper bound of the production of this diomega can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclear matter. The relative yield ratio of diomega to deuteron is less than 0.000205, this means that if there is no QGP creation it is difficult to observe the production of diomega in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  8. Hydrodynamics in heavy-ion collisions: recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Amaresh

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics has been quite successful in explaining the collective behaviour of the QCD matter produced in high energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We briefly review the latest developments in the hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Essential ingredients of the model such as the hydrodynamic evolution equations, dissipation, initial conditions, equation of state, and freeze-out process are reviewed. We discuss observable quantities such as particle spectra and anisotropic flow as well as the event-by-event fluctuations of these quantities. We also discuss the extraction of transport coefficients of the hot and dense QCD matter from the experimental data of collective flow.

  9. Quark vs Gluon jets in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Drauksas, Simonas

    2017-01-01

    The project concerned quark and gluon jets which are often used as probes of Quantum Chromodynamics(QCD) matter created in nuclear collisions at collider energies. The goal is to look for differences between quark and gluon jets, study their substructure, look for distinguishing features in unquenched (pp collisions) and quenched (heavy ion collisions) jets by using multi-variate analysis which was carried out with the help of ROOT's \\href{https://root.cern.ch/tmva}{TMVA} tool. Mapping out the modification of jets due to medium interactions could give valuable input to constraining the time evolution of the Quark Gluon Plasma created in heavy ion collisions.

  10. Elevated CO2 increases energetic cost and ion movement in the marine fish intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rachael M.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Energetic costs associated with ion and acid-base regulation in response to ocean acidification have been predicted to decrease the energy available to fish for basic life processes. However, the low cost of ion regulation (6–15% of standard metabolic rate) and inherent variation associated with whole-animal metabolic rate measurements have made it difficult to consistently demonstrate such a cost. Here we aimed to gain resolution in assessing the energetic demand associated with acid-base regulation by examining ion movement and O2 consumption rates of isolated intestinal tissue from Gulf toadfish acclimated to control or 1900 μatm CO2 (projected for year 2300). The active marine fish intestine absorbs ions from ingested seawater in exchange for HCO3− to maintain water balance. We demonstrate that CO2 exposure causes a 13% increase of intestinal HCO3− secretion that the animal does not appear to regulate. Isolated tissue from CO2-exposed toadfish also exhibited an 8% higher O2 consumption rate than tissue from controls. These findings show that compensation for CO2 leads to a seemingly maladaptive persistent base (HCO3−) loss that incurs an energetic expense at the tissue level. Sustained increases to baseline metabolic rate could lead to energetic reallocations away from other life processes at the whole-animal level. PMID:27682149

  11. Elevated CO2 increases energetic cost and ion movement in the marine fish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rachael M; Grosell, Martin

    2016-09-29

    Energetic costs associated with ion and acid-base regulation in response to ocean acidification have been predicted to decrease the energy available to fish for basic life processes. However, the low cost of ion regulation (6-15% of standard metabolic rate) and inherent variation associated with whole-animal metabolic rate measurements have made it difficult to consistently demonstrate such a cost. Here we aimed to gain resolution in assessing the energetic demand associated with acid-base regulation by examining ion movement and O2 consumption rates of isolated intestinal tissue from Gulf toadfish acclimated to control or 1900 μatm CO2 (projected for year 2300). The active marine fish intestine absorbs ions from ingested seawater in exchange for HCO3(-) to maintain water balance. We demonstrate that CO2 exposure causes a 13% increase of intestinal HCO3(-) secretion that the animal does not appear to regulate. Isolated tissue from CO2-exposed toadfish also exhibited an 8% higher O2 consumption rate than tissue from controls. These findings show that compensation for CO2 leads to a seemingly maladaptive persistent base (HCO3(-)) loss that incurs an energetic expense at the tissue level. Sustained increases to baseline metabolic rate could lead to energetic reallocations away from other life processes at the whole-animal level.

  12. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, Michaela

    2015-04-29

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton-proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term ''heavy-ion collisions'' refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter luminosity lifetimes. As the production cross-sections for various physics processes under study of the experiments are still small at energies reachable with the LHC and because the heavy-ion run time is limited to a few days per year, it is essential to obtain the highest possible collision rate, i.e. maximise the instantaneous luminosity, in order to obtain enough events and therefore low statistical errors. Within this thesis, the past performance of the LHC in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair, is analysed and potential luminosity limitations are identified. Tools are developed to predict future performance and techniques are presented to further increase the luminosity. Finally, a perspective on the future of high energy heavy-ion colliders is given.

  13. Electron cloud studies for heavy-ion and proton machines

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, F; Weiland, Th

    2013-01-01

    Electron cloud effects are a known problem in various accelerator facilities around the world. Electron clouds cause instabilities and emittance growth in positron and proton beams as well as in heavy ion beams. Most of the hadron machines experience the build-up of EC due to the multipacting. In LHC and in positron machines production of electrons due to the synchrotron radiation becomes as important as the build-up due to the secondary emission. The main source of seed electrons in heavy ion machines is the residual gas ionization. FAIR facility in Darmstadt will operate with heavy-ion and proton beams. However, the beam parameters are such that the multipacting will start to play a role only for the unconditioned wall with the secondary emission yieldmore than 1.8. In this paperwe study the electron cloud build-up and its effect on the beam stability for FAIR heavy-ion coasting beams. These beams will be used during slow extraction. Electron scattering on the beam ions and its effect on the final neutraliz...

  14. Heavy Ion Injection Into Synchrotrons, Based On Electron String Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Donets, E E; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    A possibility of heavy ions injection into synchrotrons is discussed on the base of two novel ion sources, which are under development JINR during last decade: 1) the electron string ion source (ESIS), which is a modified version of a conventional electron beam ion source (EBIS), working in a reflex mode of operation, and 2) the tubular electron string ion source (TESIS). The Electron String Ion Source "Krion-2" (VBLHE, JINR, Dubna) with an applied confining magnetic field of 3 T was used for injection into the superconducting JINR synchrotron - Nuclotron and during this runs the source provided a high pulse intensity of the highly charged ion beams: Ar16+

  15. Heavy Quarkonium Dissociation Cross Sections in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.-Y. Wong; Eric Swanson; Ted Barnes

    2001-12-01

    Many of the hadron-hadron cross sections required for the study of the dynamics of matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions can be calculated using the quark-interchange model. Here we evaluate the low-energy dissociation cross sections of J/{psi}, {psi}', {chi}, {Upsilon}, and {Upsilon}' in collision with {pi}, {rho}, and K, which are important for the interpretation of heavy-quarkonium suppression as a signature for the quark gluon plasma. These comover dissociation processes also contribute to heavy-quarkonium suppression, and must be understood and incorporated in simulations of heavy-ion collisions before QGP formation can be established through this signature.

  16. Dynamics of light, intermediate, heavy and superheavy nuclear systems formed in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj K Sharma; Gurvinder Kaur

    2014-05-01

    The dynamical description of light, intermediate, heavy and superheavy nuclei formed in heavy-ion collisions is worked out using the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), with reference to various effects such as deformation and orientation, temperature, angular momentum etc. Based on the quantum mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT), DCM has been applied to understand the decay mechanism of a large number of nuclei formed in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Various features related to the dynamics of competing decay modes of nuclear systems are explored by addressing the experimental data of a number of reactions in light, intermediate, heavy and superheavy mass regions. The DCM, being a non-statistical description for the decay of a compound nucleus, treats light particles (LPs) or equivalently evaporation residues (ERs), intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) and fission fragments on equal footing and hence, provides an alternative to the available statistical model approaches to address fusion–fission and related phenomena.

  17. Gas-phase energetics of thorium fluorides and their ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-02-14

    Gas-phase thermochemistry for neutral ThF(n) and cations ThF(n)(+) (n = 1-4) is obtained from large-basis CCSD(T) calculations, with a small-core pseudopotential on thorium. Electronic partition functions are computed with the help of relativistic MRCI calculations. Geometries, vibrational spectra, electronic fine structure, and ion appearance energies are tabulated. These results support the experimental results by Lau, Brittain, and Hildenbrand for the neutral species, except for ThF. The ion thermochemistry is presented here for the first time.

  18. Recent results on heavy quark quenching in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Bluhm, Marcus; Gousset, Thierry; Nahrgang, Marlene; Vogel, Sascha; Werner, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution, we present some predictions for the production of D and B mesons in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies and confront them with experimental results obtained so far by the STAR, PHENIX, ALICE and CMS collaborations. We next discuss some preliminary results obtained with an improved description of the medium based on EPOS initial conditions, and its possible implications on the nuclear modification factor and on the elliptic flow of heavy quarks.

  19. Heavy ion beam transmission in the AGOR cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, Ayanangsha

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the TRImP program initiated at the KVI in 2002, the AGOR cyclotron was used to accelerate low energy heavy ion beams up to a beam intensity (>=10^12 particles per second). Typical beam ions are: 206Pb accelerated to 8 MeV/amu and 20Ne accelerated to 25 MeV/amu. In the course of b

  20. Neutron dose equivalent rate for heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiGui-Sheng; ZhangTian-Mei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The fluence rate distribution of neutrons in the reactionsof 50MeV/u 18O-ion on thick Be,Cu and Au targets have been measured with an activation method of threshold detectors andthe neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1m from the tqrgets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area are obtained by using the conversion factors from neutron fluence rate to neutron doseequivalent rate.

  1. Range and etching behaviour of swift heavy ions in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Samra, Kawaljeet Singh; Singh, Ravinder

    Aliphatic (CR-39) and aromatic (Lexan polycarbonate) polymers have been irradiated with a variety of heavy ions such as 58Ni, 93Nb, 132Xe, 139La, 197Au, 208Pb, 209Bi, and 238U having energy ranges of 5.60-8.00 MeV/n in order to study the range and etching kinetics of heavy ion tracksE The ion fluence (range ˜104-105 ions/cm2) was kept low to avoid the overlapping of etched tracks. The measured values of maximum etched track length were corrected due to bulk etching and over etching to obtain the actual range. The experimental results of range profiles were compared with those obtained by the most used procedures employed in obtaining range and stopping power. The range values of present ions have been computed using the semiempirical codes (SRIM-98, SRIM-2003.26, and LISE++:0-[Hub90]) in order to check their accuracy. The merits and demerits of the adopted formulations have been highlighted in the present work. It is observed that the range of heavy ions is greater in aromatic polymers (Lexan polycarbonate) as compared to the aliphatic polymers (CR-39) irradiated with similar ions having same incident energies. The SRIM-98 and SRIM2003.26 codes don't show any significant trend in deviations, however, LISE++:0-[Hub90] code provides overall good agreement with the experimental values. The ratio of track etch rate (along projectile trajectory) to the bulk etch rate has also been studied as a function of energy loss of heavy ions in these polymers.

  2. Stopping of relativistic hydrogen- and heliumlike heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Soerensen, A H

    2002-01-01

    The stopping power for hydrogen- and heliumlike heavy ions penetrating matter at energies of 100-1000 MeV/u is calculated. For hydrogenlike ions the difference in dE/dx for an extended and a collapsed electron distribution is at the level of 1% and nonperturbative effects easily account for half of the difference. Differences of this magnitude have drastic effects on charge-exchange straggling. The theoretical results lead to good agreement with experimental values when applied in simulations.

  3. Fragmentation mechanism and energetics of some alkyl halide ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenstock, H.M.; Buff, R.; Ferreira, M.A.; Lias, S.G.; Parr, A.C.; Stockbauer, R.L.; Holmes, J.L.

    1982-05-05

    Halogen loss from iodoethane, 1-bromopropane, 2-bromopropane, 1-iodopropane, and 2-iodopropane has been studied by means of electron-ion coincidence techniques and by observation of metastable transition. Analysis of the breakdown curves and the study of residence times gave the zero-kelvin thresholds for halogen loss and indicated the size of the kinetic shift. The fragmentation onset for iodoethane was located in a Franck-Condon gap. The zero-kelvin thresholds for the propyl halides were found to lie at or just above the upper spin-orbit level of the parent ion. All of the propyl halides exhibited a unimolecular metastable transition. At fragmentation onset the 2-halopropane ions have negligible fragment kinetic energy while the 1-halopropane produce secondary propyl ions wih 100-200 meV of kinetic energy. It was established that a potential barrier must be surmounted in this fragmentation-isomerization process and analysis suggests a dynamic mechanism other than conventional QET, for example, weak couplings of vibrational modes. Analysis of the 2-halopropane fragmentation thresholds leads to an accurate, absolute value for the proton affinity of propylene, 751.4 +/- 2.9 kJ/mol at room temperature. This value reconciles some differences inherent in the proton affinity scale based on various relative measurements.

  4. Statistical analysis of the energetic ion and ENA data for the Titan environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, P.; Dandouras, I.; Toublanc, D.; Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Hamilton, D. C.; Wahlund, J.-E.

    2010-12-01

    The MIMI experiment (Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument) onboard Cassini is dedicated to the study of energetic particles, with in particular LEMMS analyzing charged particles, or the INCA detector which can image the Energetic Neutral Atoms produced by charge exchange collisions between cold neutrals and energetic ions. The MIMI experiment is thus well adapted to the study of the interaction between the Titan nitrogen rich atmosphere and the energetic Saturnian magnetospheric plasma. We analyze here the energetic protons at the Titan orbit crossings before January 2008 (MIMI-LEMMS data; 27-255 keV), which are very dynamic, with tri-modal flux spectra and probably quasi-isotropic pitch angle distributions. We provide statistical parameters for the proton fluxes, leading to estimates of the average energy deposition into Titan's atmosphere, before we discuss the possible influence of Titan on the magnetopause. We then analyze the H ENA images (24-55 keV) during the Titan flybys before June 2006 to obtain a better diagnostic of the Titan interaction: the ENAs variability is mostly related to the magnetospheric variability (the exosphere being roughly stable) or the distance from the moon, the ENAs halo around Titan is very stable (corresponding to a lower limit for ENAs emission at the exobase), and strong asymmetries are observed, due to finite gyroradii effects for the parent ions.

  5. Enabling High Fidelity Measurements of Energy and Pitch Angle for Escaping Energetic Ions with a Fast Ion Loss Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, R.; Pace, D. C.; Marcy, G. R.; Taussig, D.

    2016-10-01

    Energetic ion losses must be minimized in burning plasmas to maintain fusion power, and existing tokamaks provide access to energetic ion parameter regimes that are relevant to burning machines. A new Fast Ion Loss Detector (FILD) probe on the DIII-D tokamak has been optimized to resolve beam ion losses across a range of 30 - 90 keV in energy and 40° to 80° in pitch angle, thereby providing valuable measurements during many different experiments. The FILD is a magnetic spectrometer; once inserted into the tokamak, the magnetic field allows energetic ions to pass through a collimating aperture and strike a scintillator plate that is imaged by a wide view camera and narrow view photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The design involves calculating scintillator strike patterns while varying probe geometry. Calculated scintillator patterns are then used to design an optical system that allows adjustment of the focus regions for the 1 MS/s resolved PMTs. A synthetic diagnostic will be used to determine the energy and pitch angle resolution that can be attained in DIII-D experiments. Work supported in part by US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  6. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions.

  7. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  8. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F. (Argonne National Lab. (USA)); Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)); Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-10-09

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.).

  9. Acceleration of 3HE and heavy ions at interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, C. W.; Koug, R. M.

    2001-08-01

    We have surveyed the 0.5-2.0 MeV nucleon-1 ion composition of 56 interplanetary shocks (IP) observed with the Ultra-Low-Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) from 1997 October 1 through 2000 November 30. Our results show the first ever measurement (25 cases) of 3 He ions being accelerated at IP shocks. The 3 He/4 He ratio at the 25 shocks exhibited a wide range of values between 0.00140.24; the ratios were enhanced between factors of ~3-600 over the solar wind value. During the survey period, the occurrence probability of 3 He-rich shocks increased with rising solar activity as measured in terms of the daily occurrence rates of sunspots and X-ray flares. The 3 He enhancements at IP shocks cannot be attributed to rigidity dependent acceleration of solar wind ions and are better explained if the shocks accelerate ions from multiple sources, one being remnant impulsive solar flare material enriched in 3 He ions. Our results also indicate that the contribution of impulsive flares to the seed population for IP shocks varies from event to event, and that the interplanetary medium is being replenished with impulsive material more frequently during periods of increased solar activity. 1. Introduction Enhancements in the intensities of energetic ions associated with transient interplanetary (IP) shocks have been observed routinely at 1 AU since the 1960's (e.g., Reames 1999). It is presently believed that the majority of such IP shocks are driven by fast coronal mass ejections or CMEs as they propagate through interplanetary space (e.g., Gosling 1993), and that the associated ion intensity enhancements are due to diffusive shock acceleration of solar wind ions (Lee 1983; Jones and Ellison 1991; Reames 1999). However, the putative solar wind origin of the IP-shock accelerated ions is based on composition measurements associated with a very limited number of individual IP shocks (Klecker et al. 1981; Hovestadt et al. 1982; Tan et

  10. Gauge/String Duality, Hot QCD and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Liu, Hong; Mateos, David; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2014-06-01

    1. Opening remarks; 2. A heavy ion phenomenology primer; 3. Results from lattice QCD at nonzero temperature; 4. Introducing the gauge/string duality; 5. A duality toolbox; 6. Bulk properties of strongly coupled plasma; 7. From hydrodynamics for far-from-equilibrium dynamics; 8. Probing strongly coupled plasma; 9. Quarkonium mesons in strongly coupled plasma; 10. Concluding remarks and outlook; Appendixes; References; Index.

  11. Charm resonance production in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of charmonium states plays an important role among the probes to investigate the formation of a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP in heavy-ion collisions. A review of the main J/ψ and ψ(2S results is presented, focussing on the most recent achievements from the LHC experiments.

  12. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-01-01

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  13. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-10-01

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  14. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-10-15

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  15. A short course on relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01

    Some ideas/concepts in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. To a large extent, the discussions are non-comprehensive and non-rigorous. It is intended for fresh graduate students of Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kolkata Centre, who are intending to pursue career in theoretical /experimental high energy nuclear physics. Comments and criticisms will be appreciated.

  16. Correlations and fluctuations in high energy heavy ion collision experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dai-Mei; WANG Ya-Ping; WEI Li-Hua; CAI Xu

    2008-01-01

    An overview of research status of soft physics in high energy heavy-ion collision experiments and recent experimental results are presented.The experimental status on fluctuations and correlations has been reviewed and the outlook for research status of soft physics in LHC/ALICE has been introduced in this paper.

  17. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, J.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Currie, P.J. [Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, Alberta T0J 0Y0 (Canada); Davies, J.A. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Siegele, R. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Wallace, S.G. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Zelenitsky, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    1996-06-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as {sup 209}Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass {<=}100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors. (orig.).

  18. Collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Bhalerao

    2003-11-01

    A brief introduction is given to the field of collective flow, currently being investigated experimentally at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is followed by an outline of the work that I have been doing in this field, in collaboration with Nicolas Borghini and Jean-Yves Ollitrault.

  19. Experimental Investigation of DNA Damage Induced by Heavy Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    DNA is considered the critical target for radiobiological effects. It is highly important to study DNAdamage induced by ionizing radiation. Especially DNA double strand breaks have been identified as themost initial damage. In this experiment, DNA double strand breaks induced by heavy ions wereinvestigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  20. Theory of heavy ion collision physics in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.

  1. Proton and heavy ion acceleration by stochastic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetotail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, Filomena; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia; Greco, Antonella [Calabria Univ., Rende (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Artemyev, Anton V. [Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). Space Research Inst.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Planetary, and Space Science and Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations show that energetic ions are found in the Earth's magnetotail, with energies ranging from tens of keV to a few hundreds of keV. In this paper we carry out test particle simulations in which protons and other ion species are injected in the Vlasov magnetic field configurations obtained by Catapano et al. (2015). These configurations represent solutions of a generalized Harris model, which well describes the observed profiles in the magnetotail. In addition, three-dimensional time-dependent stochastic electromagnetic perturbations are included in the simulation box, so that the ion acceleration process is studied while varying the equilibrium magnetic field profile and the ion species. We find that proton energies of the order of 100 keV are reached with simulation parameters typical of the Earth's magnetotail. By changing the ion mass and charge, we can study the acceleration of heavy ions such as He{sup ++} and O{sup +}, and it is found that energies of the order of 100-200 keV are reached in a few seconds for He{sup ++}, and about 100 keV for O{sup +}.

  2. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams.

  3. Ion Optics of the HESR storage ring at FAIR for operation with heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Dolinskyy, Oleksiy; Litvinov, Yuri; Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR project is primarily designed for internal target experiments with stored and cooled antiprotons, which is the main objective of the PANDA collaboration. However, the HESR storage ring also appears to have remarkable properties to carry out physics experiments with heavy ions. This paper proposes a new ion optical design allowing for the heavy ion operation mode of the HESR. The main goal was to provide an optics which meets the requirements of the future experiments with heavy ion beams. In connection, issues like closed orbit correction, dynamic aperture as well as other characteristics of beam dynamics of the new ion optical setup are under analysis in this study.

  4. Response of Alanine Dosemeter to Heavy Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenjian; SuXu; YangYingjie; YuanJianlei; DangBingrong; WangXiao; MaQiufeng; ZhouLibin; HaoJifang; MaoShuhong

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid L-α-alanine has been investigated for use as a radiation detector in low and high LET radiation fields[1]. The radiatioa detector is cheap and easy to handle. The radiation inducing free radicals are stable at normal laboratory conditions for doses below 104 Gy over a long period of time, which makes the detector useful for intercomparison and documentation purposes. The dosimetric features of alanine-based electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors in high energy electron beams used in radiotherapy were considered[2]. The 5 mm long alanine detectors were found to be the most suitable for carrying out in vivo dosimetry on patients undergoing electron beam radiotherapy. However, data concerning dosimetry of the alanine dosemeter to heavy charged particles are lacking, especially in China.

  5. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  6. Energy loss, hadronization and hadronic interactions of heavy flavors in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen A

    2015-01-01

    We construct a theoretical framework to describe the evolution of heavy flavors produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin equation that incorporates both quasi-elastic scatterings and the medium-induced gluon radiation. The space-time profiles of the fireball is described by a (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is utilized for heavy quark hadronization, after which the produced heavy mesons together with the soft hadrons produced from the bulk QGP are fed into the hadron cascade UrQMD model to simulate the subsequent hadronic interactions. We find that the medium-induced gluon radiation contributes significantly to heavy quark energy loss at high $p_\\mathrm{T}$; heavy-light quark coalescence enhances heavy meson production at intermediate $p_\\mathrm{T}$; and scatterings inside the hadron gas further suppress the $D$ meson $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ at large $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and e...

  7. Open charm physics with Heavy Ions: theoretical overview

    CERN Document Server

    Beraudo, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The peculiar role of heavy-flavour observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Produced in the early stage, $c$ and $b$ quarks cross the hot medium arising from the collision, interacting strongly with the latter, until they hadronize. Depending on the strength of the interaction heavy quarks may or not approach kinetic equilibrium with the plasma, tending in the first case to follow the collective flow of the expanding fireball. The presence of a hot deconfined medium may also affect heavy-quark hadronization, being possible for them to recombine with the surrounding light thermal partons, so that the final heavy-flavour hadrons inherit part of the flow of the medium. Here we show how it is possible to develop a complete transport setup allowing one to describe heavy-flavour production in high-energy nuclear collisions, displaying some major results one can obtain. Information coming from recent lattice-QCD simulations concerning both the heavy-flavour transport coefficients in the hot QCD...

  8. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)696614; Stahl, Achim; Jowett, John M

    2015-10-09

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton–proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term “heavy-ion collisions” refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter l...

  9. Systematics of heavy-ion charge-exchange straggling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-10-01

    The dependence of heavy-ion charge-exchange straggling on the beam energy has been studied theoretically for several ion-target combinations. Our previous work addressed ions up to krypton, while the present study focuses on heavier ions, especially uranium. Particular attention has been paid to a multiple-peak structure which has been predicted theoretically in our previous work. For high-Z1 and high-Z2 systems, exemplified by U in Au, we identify three maxima in the energy dependence of charge-exchange straggling, while the overall magnitude is comparable with that of collisional straggling. Conversely, for U in C, charge-exchange straggling dominates, but only two peaks lie in the energy range where we presently are able to produce credible predictions. For U-Al we find good agreement with experiment in the energy range around the high-energy maximum. The position of the high-energy peak - which is related to processes in the projectile K shell - is found to scale as Z12 , in contrast to the semi-empirical Z13/2 dependence proposed by Yang et al. Measurements for heavy ions in heavy targets are suggested in order to reconcile a major discrepancy between the present calculations and the frequently-used formula by Yang et al.

  10. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  11. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablinsky, Clarissa; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, T. R.

    2015-05-14

    We have examined microstructural evolution in irradiated ceria (CeO2) using swift heavy ion irradiation, electron microscopy, and atomistic simulation. CeO2, a UO2 fuel surrogate, was irradiated with gold ions at an energy of 1 GeV to fluences up to 1x1014 ions/cm2. Transmission electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that the ion tracks were of similar size at all fluences, and that there was no chemical change in the ion track core. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at the lower energy and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  12. Development of heavy-ion radiotherapy technology with HIMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Since 1994, HIMAC has carried out clinical studies and treatments for more than 9000 cancer patients with carbon-ion beams. During the first decade of the HIMAC study, a single beam-wobbling method, adopted as the HIMAC beam-delivery technique, was improved for treatments of moving tumors and for obtaining more conformal dose distribution. During the second decade, a pencil-beam 3D scanning method has been developed toward an “adaptive cancer treatment” for treatments of both static and moving tumors. A new treatment research facility was constructed with HIMAC in order to verify the developed 3D scanning technology through a clinical study that has been successfully conducted since 2011. As the next stage, a compact heavy-ion rotating gantry with a superconducting technology has been developed for the more accurate and shorter-course treatments. The twenty-year development of the heavy-ion radiotherapy technologies including accelerator technologies with HIMAC is reviewed.

  13. Low- to medium-β cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Acceleration of low- and medium-β heavy ions by means of superconducting (SC) linear accelerators (linacs) was made possible by the development, during four decades, of a particular class of cavities characterized by low operation frequency, several different shapes and different electromagnetic modes of operation. Their performance, initially rather poor in operating accelerators, have steadily increased along with the technological progress and nowadays the gap with the high-β, elliptical cavities is close to be filled. Initially confined to a very small number of applications, this family of cavities evolved in many directions becoming one of the most widespread in linacs. Nowadays it is present in the majority of superconducting radio-frequency ion linac projects worldwide. An overview of low- and medium-β SC cavities for heavy ions, focused on their recent evolution and achievements, will be given.

  14. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Freire Soler, Victor M. [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Brökers, Lara [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ban-d' Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCBN), 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Schleberger, Marika, E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS{sub 2} and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS{sub 2} does not.

  15. Energetic and frictional effects in the transport of ions in a cyclic peptide nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yongil; Song, Yeon Ho; Hwang, Hyeon Seok [Dept. of Chemistry and Institute for Molecular Science and Fusion Technology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Schatz, George C. [Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The effects of geometric restraints and frictional parameters on the energetics and dynamics of ion transport through a synthetic ion channel are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several different ions. To do so, potential of mean force profiles and position-dependent diffusion coefficients for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Cl{sup −} transport through a simple cyclic peptide nanotube, which is composed of 4× cyclo[−(D-Ala-Glu-D-Ala-Gln){sub 2−}] rings, are calculated via an adaptive biasing force MD simulation method and a Baysian inference/Monte Carlo algorithm. Among the restraints and parameters examined in this work, the radius parameter used in the flat-bottom half-harmonic restraint at the entrance and exit to channel has a great effect on the energetics of ion transport through the variation of entropy in the outside of the channel. The diffusivity profiles for the ions show a strong dependence on the damping coefficient, but the dependence on the coefficient becomes minimal inside the channel, indicating that the most important factor which affects the diffusivity of ions inside the channel is local interactions of ions with the structured channel water molecules through confinement.

  16. Heavy ion fusion program. Half-year report, October 1978--March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Research activities in heavy ion fusion from October 1978 to March 1979 are reported. Primary areas covered include: induction linac systems; R.F. linac/storage ring systems; theory; and heavy ion fusion notes. (GHT)

  17. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d' Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise

  18. Processing of formic acid-containing ice by heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Bergantini, A; Rothard, H; Boduch, P; Andrade, D P P

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) has been extensively detected in space environments, including interstellar medium (gas and grains), comets and meteorites. Such environments are often subjected to the action of ionizing agents, which may cause changes in the molecular structure, thus leading to formation of new species. Formic acid is a possible precursor of pre-biotic species, such as Glycine (NH2CH2COOH). This work investigates experimentally the physicochemical effects resulting from interaction of heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues (46MeV 58Ni11+) in H2O:HCOOH (1:1) ice, at 15 K, in ultrahigh vacuum regime, using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-600 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 microns). After the bombardment, the sample was slowly heated to room temperature. The results show the dissociation cross-section for the formic acid of 2.4x10^-13 cm2, and half-life due to galactic cosmic rays of 8x10^7 yr. The IR spectra show intense formation of CO and CO2, and small production of more com...

  19. Enhanced electron field emission from carbon nanotubes irradiated by energetic C ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng-Cheng; Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Guo-An; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Ping, Zhao-Xia

    2012-08-01

    The field emission performance and structure of the vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays irradiated by energetic C ion with average energy of 40 keV have been investigated. During energetic C ion irradiation, the curves of emission current density versus the applied field of samples shift firstly to low applied fields when the irradiation doses are less than 9.6 x 10(16) cm(-2), and further increase of dose makes the curves reversing to a high applied field, which shows that high dose irradiation in carbon nanotube arrays makes their field emission performance worse. After energetic ion irradiation with a dose of 9.6 x 1016 cm(-2), the turn-on electric field and the threshold electric field of samples decreased from 0.80 and 1.13 V/microm to 0.67 and 0.98 V/microm respectively. Structural analysis of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the amorphous carbon nanowire/carbon nanotube hetero nano-structures have been fabricated in the C ion irradiated carbon nanotubes. The enhancement of electron field emission is due to the formation of amorphous carbon nanowires at the tip of carbon nanotube arrays, which is an electron emitting material with low work function.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, O.

    2006-07-26

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio (s{sub w,air}) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe- Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. Optional MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data were included. The fragmentation model was verified using all available experimental data and some parameters were adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Additional to the calculations of stopping power ratios, s{sub w,air}, the influence of fragments and I-values on s{sub w,air} for carbon ion beams was investigated. The value of s{sub w,air} deviates as much as 2.3% at the Bragg peak from the recommended by TRS-398 constant value of 1.130 for an energy of 50 MeV/u. (orig.)

  1. Improved ion guide for heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P; Beraud, R; Chabanat, E; Emsallem, A; Honkanen, A; Huhta, M; Jokinen, A; Lhersonneau, G; Oinonen, M; Penttila, H; Perajarvi, K; Wang, JC; Aysto, J

    1998-01-01

    The ion guide for heavy-ion-induced reactions developed originally for the SARA facility in Grenoble has been implemented at the Jyvaskyla IGISOL facility. For the Cd-116(Ar-40, 6n)Dy-150 reaction an efficiency of 0.5% relative to the number of reaction products entering the stopping chamber was obt

  2. Heavy ions: Results from the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak

    2012-10-01

    On November 8, 2010 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN collided the first stable beams of heavy ions (Pb on Pb) at the centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. The LHC worked exceedingly well during its one month of operation with heavy ions, delivering about 10 −1 of data, with peak luminosity reaching to $L_{O} = 2 × 10^{25}$ cm-2 s-1 towards the end of the run. Three experiments, ALICE, ATLAS and CMS, recorded their first heavy-ion data, which were analysed in a record time. The results of the multiplicity, flow, fluctuations and Bose–Einstein correlations indicate that the fireball formed in nuclear collisions at the LHC is hotter, lives longer, and expands to a larger size at freeze-out as compared to lower energies. We give an overview of these as well as new results on quarkonia and heavy flavour suppression, and jet energy loss.

  3. Strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Edward

    2017-07-01

    A decade ago, a brief summary of the field of the relativistic heavy ion physics could be formulated as the discovery of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, sQGP for short, a near-perfect fluid with surprisingly large entropy-density-to-viscosity ratio. Since 2010, the LHC heavy ion program added excellent new data and discoveries. Significant theoretical efforts have been made to understand these phenomena. Now there is a need to consolidate what we have learned and formulate a list of issues to be studied next. Studies of angular correlations of two and more secondaries reveal higher harmonics of flow, identified as the sound waves induced by the initial state perturbations. As in cosmology, detailed measurements and calculations of these correlations helped to make our knowledge of the explosion much more quantitative. In particular, their damping had quantified the viscosity. Other kinetic coefficients—the heavy-quark diffusion constants and the jet quenching parameters—also show enhancements near the critical point T ≈Tc. Since densities of QGP quarks and gluons strongly decrease at this point, these facts indicate large role of nonperturbative mechanisms, e.g., scattering on monopoles. New studies of the p p and p A collisions at high multiplicities reveal collective explosions similar to those in heavy ion A A collisions. These "smallest drops of the sQGP" revived debates about the initial out-of-equilibrium stage of the collisions and mechanisms of subsequent equilibration.

  4. Pitch angle distributions of energetic ions in the lobes of the distant geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C.J.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Richardson, I.G.; Balogh, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK). Blackett Lab.)

    1990-07-01

    Analysis of energetic (> 35 keV) ion data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft obtained during 1982-1983, when the spacecraft made a series of traversals of the distant geomagnetic tail (X{sub GSE} > - 230 R{sub E}), indicates that the pitch angle distribution of energetic ions in the distant tail lobes is usually highly anisotropic, being peaked closely perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, but with a small net flow in the antisunward direction. In this paper we present a model, based on the motion of single particles into and within the tail lobes, which accounts for these observed distributions. This model assumes that the lobe ions originate in the magnetosheath, where the energetic ion population consists of two components; a spatially uniform ''solar'' population, and a population of ''terrestrial'' origin, which decreases in strength with downtail distance. The pitch angle distribution at any point within the lobe may be constructed, assuming that the value of the distribution function along the particle trajectory is conserved. In general, those ions with a large field-aligned component to their motion enter the lobes in the deep tail, where the ''terrestrial'' source is weak, whilst those moving closely perpendicular to the field enter the lobes at positions much closer to the Earth, where the source is strong. The fluxes of these latter ions are therefore much enhanced above the rest of the pitch angle distribution, and are shown to account for the form of the observed distributions. The model also accounts for the more isotropic ion population observed in the lobe during solar particle events, when the ''terrestrial'' component of the magnetosheath source may be considered negligible in comparison to the enhanced ''solar'' component. (author).

  5. Determination of Some Heavy-metal-ions Using a Sulfur Ion Modified BZ Oscillating System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua CHEN; Wu YANG; Hong Xia DAI; Xiao Xia WEI; Jie QU; Jin Zhang GAO

    2006-01-01

    A highly sensitive method is developed for the determination of trace amounts of some heavy metal ions in aqueous solution based on the classical Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) oscillating chemical system. Introducing of S2- ion makes the new oscillating system Ce(SO4)2 - KBrO3-CH2(COOH)2 - Na2S - H2SO4 have to a high sensitivity for some heavy metal ions such as Ag+,pb2+, Hg2+, Cd2+, Cu2+and Bi3+ with detection limits down to 10-12 mol. L-1.

  6. Juno/JEDI observations of 0.01 to >10 MeV energetic ions in the Jovian auroral regions: Anticipating a source for polar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, D. K.; Mauk, B. H.; Paranicas, C. P.; Clark, G.; Kollmann, P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    After a successful orbit insertion, the Juno spacecraft completed its first 53.5 day orbit and entered a very low altitude perijove with the full scientific payload operational for the first time on 27 August 2016. The Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument measured ions and electrons over the auroral regions and through closest approach, with ions measured from 0.01 to >10 MeV, depending on species. This report focuses on the composition of the energetic ions observed during the first perijove of the Juno mission. Of particular interest are the ions that precipitate from the magnetosphere onto the polar atmosphere and ions that are accelerated locally by Jupiter's powerful auroral processes. We report preliminary findings on the spatial variations, species, including energy and pitch angle distributions throughout the prime science region during the first orbit of the Juno mission. The prime motivation for this work was to examine the heavy ions that are thought to be responsible for the observed polar X-rays. Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) did observe precipitating heavy ions with energies >10 MeV, but for this perijove the intensities were far below those needed to account for previously observed polar X-ray emissions. During this survey we also found an unusual signal of ions between oxygen and sulfur. We include here a report on what appears to be a transitory observation of magnesium, or possibly sodium, at MeV energies through closest approach.

  7. An Experimental Review on Elliptic Flow of Strange and Multistrange Hadrons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusu Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strange hadrons, especially multistrange hadrons, are good probes for the early partonic stage of heavy ion collisions due to their small hadronic cross sections. In this paper, I give a brief review on the elliptic flow measurements of strange and multistrange hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC and Large Hadron Collider (LHC.

  8. Track structure and energy deposition distribution of heavy ions in liquid water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 卫增泉

    1996-01-01

    Progress in theoretical research into track structure and energy deposition distribution of heavy ions in introduced,and some research results are given,such as a Monte Carlo model of heavy ion track structure calculation,frequency distribution of energy deposition inside a electron track and radial dose distribution around a heavy ion path.Moreover,research direction in future is also analysed.

  9. Hydrodynamic analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2008-01-01

    Current status of dynamical modeling of relativistic heavy ion collisions and hydrodynamic description of the quark gluon plasma is reported. We find the hadronic rescattering effect plays an important role in interpretation of mass splitting pattern in the differential elliptic flow data observed at RHIC. To demonstrate this, we predict the elliptic flow parameter for phi mesons to directly observe the flow just after hadronisation. We also discuss recent applications of outputs from hydrodynamic calculations to J/psi suppression, thermal photon radiation and heavy quark diffusion.

  10. High density QCD and entropy production at heavy ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kinder-Geiger, Klaus

    1994-01-01

    The role of entropy production in the context of probing QCD properties at high densities and finite temperatures in ultra-relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei is inspected. It is argued that the entropy generated in these reactions provides a powerful tool to investigate the space-time evolution and the question whether and how a deconfined plasma of quarks and gluons is formed. I will address the questions how entropy is produced, and how it is measurable. The uncertainties in predicting the different contributions to the total entropy and particle multiplicities during the course of heavy ion collisions are also discussed.

  11. Dynamical dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parascandolo, C., E-mail: concetta.parascandolo@na.infn.i [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pierroutsakou, D. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Martin, B. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Agodi, C.; Alba, R. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Boiano, A. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Coniglione, R. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); De Filippo, E. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, 95123, Catania (Italy); Del Zoppo, A. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Emanuele, U. [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dip. di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Messina (Italy); Farinon, F. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Guglielmetti, A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Inglima, G.; La Commara, M. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Maiolino, C. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Mazzocchi, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Mazzocco, M. [Dip. di Fisica and INFN, Universita di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Romoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sandoli, M. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Santonocito, D. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    The dynamical dipole mode, excited in charge asymmetric heavy-ion collisions, was investigated in the mass region of the {sup 192}Pb compound nucleus, formed by using the {sup 40,48}Ca + {sup 152,144}Sm reactions at approx11 MeV/nucleon. Preliminary results of this measurement, concerning both fusion-evaporation and fission events are presented. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the dynamical dipole mode could be useful for the synthesis of super heavy elements through 'hot' fusion reactions.

  12. Heavy-ion-acoustic solitary and shock waves in an adiabatic multi-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossen, M.A.; Rahman, M.M.; Mamun, A.A., E-mail: armanplasma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Hossen, M.R. [Department of Natural Sciences, Daffodil International University, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-08-15

    The standard reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-deVries (K-dV) and Burgers (BG) equations to investigate the basic properties of heavy-ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in a plasma system which is supposed to be composed of nonthermal electrons, Boltzmann distributed light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. The HIA solitary and shock structures are found to exist with either positive or negative potential. It is found that the effects of adiabaticity of inertial heavy ions, nonthermality of electrons, and number densities of plasma components significantly modify the basic properties of the HIA solitary and shock waves. The implications of our results may be helpful in understanding the electrostatic perturbations in various laboratory and astrophysical plasma environments. (author)

  13. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [Inst. for Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol, (Belgium); Gan, Jian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Severin, Daniel [GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Allen, Todd R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Energy Physics Dept.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  14. Anti-biofilm activity of Fe heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R.P. [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Hareesh, K., E-mail: appi.2907@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Bankar, A. [Department of Microbiology, Waghire College, Pune 412301 (India); Sanjeev, Ganesh [Microtron Centre, Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalore 574166 (India); Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Arun Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Dahiwale, S.S.; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Highlights: • PC films were irradiated by 60 and 120 MeV Fe ions. • Irradiated PC films showed changes in its physical and chemical properties. • Irradiated PC also showed more anti-biofilm activity compared to pristine PC. - Abstract: Polycarbonate (PC) polymers were investigated before and after high energy heavy ion irradiation for anti-bacterial properties. These PC films were irradiated by Fe heavy ions with two energies, viz, 60 and 120 MeV, at different fluences in the range from 1 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. UV-Visible spectroscopic results showed optical band gap decreased with increase in ion fluences due to chain scission mainly at carbonyl group of PC which is also corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results. X-ray diffractogram results showed decrease in crystallinity of PC after irradiation which leads to decrease in molecular weight. This is confirmed by rheological studies and also by differential scanning calorimetric results. The irradiated PC samples showed modification in their surfaces prevents biofilm formation of human pathogen, Salmonella typhi.

  15. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  16. Energetics of ion competition in the DEKA selectivity filter of neuronal sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Boda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The energetics of ionic selectivity in the neuronal sodium channels is studied. A simple model constructed for the selectivity filter of the channel is used. The selectivity filter of this channel type contains aspartate (D, glutamate (E, lysine (K, and alanine (A residues (the DEKA locus. We use Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations to compute equilibrium binding selectivity in the selectivity filter and to obtain various terms of the excess chemical potential from a particle insertion procedure based on Widom's method. We show that K+ ions in competition with Na+ are efficiently excluded from the selectivity filter due to entropic hard sphere exclusion. The dielectric constant of protein has no effect on this selectivity. Ca2+ ions, on the other hand, are excluded from the filter due to a free energetic penalty which is enhanced by the low dielectric constant of protein.

  17. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  18. Heavy ion storage ring without linear dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A possible method to realize a dispersion-free storage ring is described. The simultaneous use of a magnetic field B and an electric field E in bending regions, where the two fields are set perpendicular to each other, enables us to control the effect of momentum dispersion. When the relation (1+1/γ_{0}^{2}E(ρ=-v_{0}×B is satisfied for a beam with the velocity v_{0}, the linear dispersion can be completely eliminated all around the ring. It is shown that the acceleration and deceleration induced by the electrostatic deflector counteracts the heating mechanism due to the shearing force from dipole magnets. The dispersion-free system is thus beneficial to producing ultracold beams. It looks probable that the technique will allow one to achieve three-dimensional crystalline beams. At ICR Kyoto University, an ion cooler storage ring S-LSR oriented for various beam physics purposes is now under construction. The application of the present idea to S-LSR is discussed and the actual design of the dispersionless bend is given.

  19. Development of laser ion source for heavy ion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Shinji, E-mail: shibuya@aec-beam.co.jp [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, 3-8-5 Konakadai, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiyuki, E-mail: thattori@nr.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Hayashizaki, Noriyosu, E-mail: nhayashi@nr.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu, E-mail: hirotsugu.kashiwagi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Maruyama, Toshiyuki, E-mail: t-maruyama@toyama-jp.com [Toyama Co., Ltd., 4-13-16 Hibarigaoka, Zama-shi, Kanagawa 252-0003 (Japan); Mochizuki, Tetsuro, E-mail: Mochizuki@toyama-jp.com [Toyama Co., Ltd., 4-13-16 Hibarigaoka, Zama-shi, Kanagawa 252-0003 (Japan); Momota, Sadao, E-mail: momota.sadao@kochi-tech.ac.jp [Kochi University of Technology, 185 Tosa-yamada-cyo, Kami-shi, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Nakagawa, Jun, E-mail: nakagawa@toyama-jp.com [Toyama Co., Ltd., 4-13-16 Hibarigaoka, Zama-shi, Kanagawa 252-0003 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takeshi, E-mail: aec2g@nirs.go.jp [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, 3-8-5 Konakadai, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    We have been developing a high-performance laser ion source (LIS) for practical applications since 2009. Ideally, the LIS should generate a carbon beam with a peak current of 20 mA and a pulse duration of over 1 {mu}s. We selected a Nd:YAG laser with a Gaussian-coupled resonator as the laser source based on our experience of generating high-charge-state ion beams. This laser can produce fundamental pulses with a power of 650 mJ and durations of about 6 ns. The graphite target used is 10 cm high and 10 cm in diameter, as it can be irradiated with up to 10{sup 5} laser shots. The maximum extraction voltage was designed to be 50 kV. We have already finished designing the LIS and we commenced fabrication. We intend to measure the source performance by performing plasma and beam tests up to the end of March 2011.

  20. Light and heavy ion beam analysis of thin biological sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonsup; Siegele, Rainer; Pastuovic, Zeljko; Hackett, Mark J.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Grau, Georges E.; Cohen, David D.; Lay, Peter A.

    2013-07-01

    The application of ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques to thin biological sections (ThBS) presents unique challenges in sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis. These samples are often the end product of expensive, time-consuming experiments, which involve many steps that require careful attention. Analysis via several techniques can maximise the information that is collected from these samples. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectroscopy are two generally non-destructive IBA techniques that use the same MeV ions and can be performed simultaneously. The use of heavy ion PIXE applied to thick samples has, in the past, resulted in X-ray spectra of a poorer quality when compared to those obtained with proton beams. One of the reasons for this is the shorter probing depth of the heavy ions, which does not affect thin sample analysis. Therefore, we have investigated and compared 3-MeV proton and 36-MeV carbon ion beams on 7-μm thick mouse brain sections at the ANSTO Heavy ion microprobe (HIMP). The application of a 36-MeV C4+ ion beam for PIXE mapping of ThBS on thin Si3N4 substrate windows produced spectra of high quality that displayed close to a nine-times gain in signal yield (Z2/q) when compared to those obtained for 3-MeV protons for P, S, Cl and K but not for Fe, Cu and Zn. Image quality was overall similar; however, some elements showed better contrast and features with protons whilst others showed improved contrast with a carbon ion beam. RBS spectra with high enough counting statistics were easily obtained with 3-MeV proton beams resulting in high resolution carbon maps, however, the count rate for nitrogen and oxygen was too low. The results demonstrate that on thin samples, 36-MeV C4+ will produce good quality PIXE spectra in less time; therefore, carbon ions may be advantageous depending on which element is being studied. However, these advantages may be outweighed by the inherent disadvantages including

  1. Light and heavy ion beam analysis of thin biological sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joonsup, E-mail: joonsup.lee@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Siegele, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.siegele@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, NSW 2234 (Australia); Pastuovic, Zeljko, E-mail: zeljko.pastuovic@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, NSW 2234 (Australia); Hackett, Mark J., E-mail: mark.hackett@usask.ca [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hunt, Nicholas H., E-mail: nhunt@med.usyd.edu.au [Molecular Immunopathology Unit, Bosch Institute and School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Grau, Georges E., E-mail: georges.grau@sydney.edu.au [Vascular Immunology Unit, Bosch Institute and School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cohen, David D., E-mail: david.cohen@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, NSW 2234 (Australia); Lay, Peter A., E-mail: peter.lay@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    The application of ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques to thin biological sections (ThBS) presents unique challenges in sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis. These samples are often the end product of expensive, time-consuming experiments, which involve many steps that require careful attention. Analysis via several techniques can maximise the information that is collected from these samples. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectroscopy are two generally non-destructive IBA techniques that use the same MeV ions and can be performed simultaneously. The use of heavy ion PIXE applied to thick samples has, in the past, resulted in X-ray spectra of a poorer quality when compared to those obtained with proton beams. One of the reasons for this is the shorter probing depth of the heavy ions, which does not affect thin sample analysis. Therefore, we have investigated and compared 3-MeV proton and 36-MeV carbon ion beams on 7-μm thick mouse brain sections at the ANSTO Heavy ion microprobe (HIMP). The application of a 36-MeV C{sup 4+} ion beam for PIXE mapping of ThBS on thin Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate windows produced spectra of high quality that displayed close to a nine-times gain in signal yield (Z{sup 2}/q) when compared to those obtained for 3-MeV protons for P, S, Cl and K but not for Fe, Cu and Zn. Image quality was overall similar; however, some elements showed better contrast and features with protons whilst others showed improved contrast with a carbon ion beam. RBS spectra with high enough counting statistics were easily obtained with 3-MeV proton beams resulting in high resolution carbon maps, however, the count rate for nitrogen and oxygen was too low. The results demonstrate that on thin samples, 36-MeV C{sup 4+} will produce good quality PIXE spectra in less time; therefore, carbon ions may be advantageous depending on which element is being studied. However, these advantages may be outweighed by the

  2. Heavy quark production at an Electron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Chudakov, E; Hyde, Ch; Furletov, S; Furletova, Yu; Nguyen, D; Stratmann, M; Strikman, M; Weiss, C

    2016-01-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) with center-of-mass energies sqrt(s_{eN}) ~ 20-100 GeV and luminosity L ~ 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1} would offer new opportunities to study heavy quark production in high-energy electron or photon scattering on protons and nuclei. We report about an R&D project exploring the feasibility of direct measurements of nuclear gluon densities at large x (gluonic EMC effect, antishadowing) using open charm production at EIC. We describe the charm production rates and angle-momentum distributions at large x and discuss methods of charm reconstruction using next-generation detector capabilities (pi/K identification, vertex reconstruction). The results can be used also for other physics applications of heavy quark production at EIC (fragmentation functions, jets, heavy quark propagation in nuclei).

  3. Recent studies in heavy ion induced fission reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R. K.

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear fission process involves large scale shape changes of the nucleus, while it evolves from a nearly spherical configuration to two separated fission fragments. The dynamics of these shape changes in the nuclear many body system is governed by a strong interplay of the collective and single particle degrees of freedom. With the availability of heavy ion accelerators, there has been an impetus to study the nuclear dynamics through the investigations of nucleus--nucleus collisions involving fusion and fission process. From the various investigations carried out in the past years, it is now well recognized that there is large scale damping of collective modes in heavy ion induced fission reactions, which in other words implies that nuclear motion is highly viscous. In recent years, there have been many experimental observations in heavy ion induced fission reactions at medium bombarding energies, which suggest possible occurrence of various non-equilibrium modes of fission such as quasi-fission, fast fission and pre-equilibrium fission, where some of the internal degrees of freedom of the nucleus is not fully equilibrated. We have carried out extensive investigations on the fission fragment angular distributions at near barrier bombarding energies using heavy fissile targets. The measured fragment anisotropies when compared with the standard saddle point model (SSPM) calculations show that for projectile-target systems having zero or low ground state spins, the angular anisotropy exhibits a peak-like behaviour at the sub barrier energies, which cannot be explained by the SSPM calculations. For projectiles or targets with large ground state spins, the anomalous peaking gets washed out due to smearing of the K-distribution by the intrinsic entrance channel spins. Recently studies have been carried out on the spin distributions of fission fragments through the gamma ray multiplicity measurements. The fission fragments acquire spin mainly from two sources: (i) due to

  4. Spiraling Beam Illumination Uniformity on Heavy Ion Fusion Target

    CERN Document Server

    Kurosaki, T; Noguchi, K; Koseki, S; Barada, D; Ma, Y Y; Ogoyski, A I; Barnard, J J; Logan, B G

    2012-01-01

    A few percent wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF) by a spiraling beam axis motion in the paper. So far the wobbling heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may contribute to the reduction of the HIBs illumination nonuniformity. The wobbling HIBs can be generated in HIB accelerators and the oscillating frequency may be several 100MHz-1GHz. Three-dimensional HIBs illumination computations presented here show that the few percent wobbling HIBs illumination nonuniformity oscillates successfully with the same wobbling HIBs frequency.

  5. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filippo E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion collisions (HIC have been widely used to extract the parametrization of symmetry energy term of nuclear equation of state as a function of barionic density. HIC in fact are a unique tool in terrestrial laboratories to explore the symmetry energy around the saturation density (ρ0 = 0.16fm−3 from sub-saturation densities (Fermi energies towards compressed nuclear matter (ρ > 2 − 3ρ0 that can be reached at relativistic energies, as a function of different conditions of temperature, mass asymmetry and isospin. One of the main study at present is to reach a coherent description of EOS of asymmetric nuclear matter from heavy ion collisions of stable and exotic nuclei, nuclear structure studies and astrophysical observations. In this work an overview of the current status of the research is shortly reviewed together with new perspectives aimed to reduce the present experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  6. Heavy ion physics : Exhibition Lepton-Photon 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    High-energy Heavy Ion Physics studies strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities.QCD predicts that at such densities hadronic matter turns into a plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons,the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP).Matter in the Universe must have existed in this state up to about 10 ms after the Big Bang.Today QGP might exist in the c re of neutron stars.The study of the phase diagram of matter is a new approach to investigate QCD at its natural scale,L QCD ,and to address the fundamental questions of confinement and chiral-symmetry breaking.The combined results obtained by the SPS heavy ion experiments,in particular those obtained with the Pb beam,pr vide compelling evidence for the existence of a new state of matter featuring many of the characteristics predicted for the QGP.The ALICE experiment will carry this research into the LHC era.

  7. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, A.R., E-mail: Roberto.Piriz@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω.

  8. Jet studies in heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slovak, Radim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced. Jets are produced at the early stages of this collision and are known to become attenuated as they propagate through the hot matter. One manifestation of this energy loss is a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects. ATLAS has provided a quantification of this jet suppression by the jet Raa measurement in run 1 of LHC. A factor of two suppression was seen in central heavy ion collisions with respect to pp collisions. The Raa exhibited only a week, if any, rapidity dependence, and a slow rise with increasing jet momentum. This talk summarizes the run 1 results on the inclusive jet production and the new results on dijet measurements.

  9. Selected Experimental Results from Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranbir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energy sNN=2.76 TeV for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.

  10. Charged Hadron Multiplicity Distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews facts and problems concerning charge hadron production in high energy collisions. Main emphasis is laid on the qualitative and quantitative description of general characteristics and properties observed for charged hadrons produced in such high energy collisions. Various features of available experimental data, for example, the variations of charged hadron multiplicity and pseudorapidity density with the mass number of colliding nuclei, center-of-mass energies, and the collision centrality obtained from heavy-ion collider experiments, are interpreted in the context of various theoretical concepts and their implications. Finally, several important scaling features observed in the measurements mainly at RHIC and LHC experiments are highlighted in the view of these models to draw some insight regarding the particle production mechanism in heavy-ion collisions.

  11. COLLIMATORS AND MATERIALS FOR HIGH INTENSITY HEAVY ION SYNCHROTRONS

    CERN Document Server

    Stadlmann, J; Kollmus, H; Spiller, P; Strasik, I; Tahir, N A; Tomut, M; Trautmann, C

    2012-01-01

    The operation of high power high brightness accelerators requires huge efforts for beam cleaning and machine protection. Within the WP 8 (ColMat) of the EU research framework EuCARD[1] we investigate new materials and methods for beam collimation and machine protection. We present an overview of these activities at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f¨ur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. Simulations of accidental beam losses in LHC and SIS100 have been performed. Scenarios for halo collimation of heavy ions and protons in SIS100 routine operation have been investigated. A prototype of a cryogenic collimator for charge exchange losses during intermediate charge state heavy ion operation in SIS100 has been build and tested with beam. Several candidates of advanced composite materials for collimation system upgrades of present and future high power accelerators have been irradiated and their properties are being characterized. Most deliverables and milestones of the R&D programme were already reached before the end of...

  12. Probing transverse momentum broadening in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, A. H.; Wu, Bin; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-12-01

    We study the dijet azimuthal de-correlation in relativistic heavy ion collisions as an important probe of the transverse momentum broadening effects of a high energy jet traversing the quark-gluon plasma. We take into account both the soft gluon radiation in vacuum associated with the Sudakov logarithms and the jet PT-broadening effects in the QCD medium. We find that the Sudakov effects are dominant at the LHC, while the medium effects can play an important role at RHIC energies. This explains why the LHC experiments have not yet observed sizable PT-broadening effects in the measurement of dijet azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions. Future investigations at RHIC will provide a unique opportunity to study the PT-broadening effects and help to pin down the underlying mechanism for jet energy loss in a hot and dense medium.

  13. Scaled beam merging experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Seidl

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy ion fusion drivers. However, the resultant transverse phase space dilution must be minimized so as not to sacrifice focusability at the target. A prototype combining experiment has been completed employing four 3-mA Cs^{+} beams injected at 160 keV. The focusing elements upstream of the merge consist of four quadrupoles and a final combined-function element (quadrupole and dipole. Following the merge, the resultant single beam is transported in a single alternating gradient channel where the subsequent evolution of the distribution function is diagnosed. The results are in fair agreement with particle-in-cell simulations. They indicate that for some heavy ion fusion driver designs, the phase space dilution from merging is acceptable.

  14. RF characteristics of IHQ linac for heavy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, T.; Sasa, K.; Hayashizaki, N.; Isokawa, K.; Hattori, T. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Osvath, E. [Institute of Atomic Physics, Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania); Schubert, H. [HSI, Tuerkenstrasse 28, 80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    At Tokyo institute of technology (TIT), an interdigital-H type quadrupole (IHQ) linac has been constructed for application in high energy heavy ion implantation. The linac can accelerate particles with charge to mass ratio greater than 1/16 from 0.24 MeV up to 1.6 MeV (for {sup 16}O{sup +}). As a result of the low power test, the resonant frequency is 36.26 MHz, the shunt impedance is 252 M{Omega}/m and therefore, the required power to accelerate {sup 16}O{sup +} ion is 39.5 kW. (orig.) 8 refs.

  15. Low power test of IHQ linac for heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Takashi; Sasa, Kimikazu; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Isokawa, Katsushi; Hattori, Toshiyuki [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Osvath, E.; Schubert, H.

    1997-12-31

    At Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT), An Interdigital-H type Quadrupole (IHQ) linac has been constructed for application of high energy heavy ion implantation. The linac can accelerate the particles with charge to mass ratio grater than 1/16 from 0.48 MeV up to 1.6 MeV (for {sup 16}O{sup +}). As a result of the low power test, the resonant frequency is 36.26 MHz and the shunt impedance is 252 M{Omega}/m. Therefore, required power to accelerate {sup 16}O{sup +} ion is 39.5 kW. (author)

  16. RF characteristics of IHQ linac for heavy ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Osvath, E.; Sasa, Kimikazu; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Isokawa, Katsushi; Schubert, H.; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    1998-04-01

    At Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT), an Interdigital-H type Quadrupole (IHQ) linac has been constructed for application in high energy heavy ion implantation. The linac can accelerate particles with charge to mass ratio greater than 1/16 from 0.24 MeV up to 1.6 MeV (for 16O +). As a result of the low power test, the resonant frequency is 36.26 MHz, the shunt impedance is 252 MΩ/m and therefore, the required power to accelerate 16O + ion is 39.5 kW.

  17. Electrostatic quadrupole accelerator for the heavy ion fusion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.; Eylon, S.

    1994-07-01

    A full scale (2 MeV, 800 mA, K{sup +}), low emittance injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Project has been built at LBL It consists of a 750 key diode pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provide strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. The actual operation of this new machine has exceeded design parameters. Design of the accelerator, report on experiments performed in connection with the evaluation and characterization of the ESQ and corresponding 3D Particle in Cell simulations will be presented.

  18. Simulation of induced radioactivity for Heavy Ion Medical Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Jun-Kui, Xu; Wu-Yuan, Li; Wang, Mao; Jia-Wen, Xia; Xi-Meng, Chen; Wei-Wei, Yan; Chong, Xu

    2013-01-01

    For radiation protection and environmental impact assessment purpose, the radioactivity induced by carbon ion of Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) was studied. Radionuclides in accelerator component, cooling water and air at target area which are induced from primary beam and secondary particles are simulated by FLUKA Monte Carlo code. It is found that radioactivity in cooling water and air is not very important at the required beam intensity and energy which is needed for treatment, radionuclides in accelerator component may cause some problem for maintenance work, suitable cooling time is needed after the machine are shut down.

  19. Study of multiple scattering effects in heavy ion RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Multiple scattering effect is normally neglected in conventional Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis. The backscattered particle yield normally agrees well with the theory based on the single scattering model. However, when heavy incident ions are used such as in heavy ion Rutherford backscattering (HIRBS), or the incident ion energy is reduced, multiple scattering effect starts to play a role in the analysis. In this paper, the experimental data of 6MeV C ions backscattered from a Au target are presented. In measured time of flight spectrum a small step in front of the Au high energy edge is observed. The high energy edge of the step is about 3.4 ns ahead of the Au signal which corresponds to an energy {approx} 300 keV higher than the 135 degree single scattering energy. This value coincides with the double scattering energy of C ion undergoes two consecutive 67.5 degree scattering. Efforts made to investigate the origin of the high energy step observed lead to an Monte Carlo simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental spectrum on computer. As a large angle scattering event is a rare event, two consecutive large angle scattering is extremely hard to reproduce in a random simulation process. Thus, the simulation has not found a particle scattering into 130-140 deg with an energy higher than the single scattering energy. Obviously faster algorithms and a better physical model are necessary for a successful simulation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Equatorial distributions of energetic ion moments in Saturn's magnetosphere using Cassini/MIMI measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, K.; Roussos, E.; Regoli, L.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    We use kappa distribution fits to combined Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS, 3 to 236 keV/e), Low Energy Magnetosphere Measurements System (LEMMS, 0.024 INCA, 5.2 to >220 keV for H+) proton and singly ionized energetic ion spectra to calculate the >20 keV energetic ion moments inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Using a realistic magnetic field model (Khurana et al. 2007) and data from the entire Cassini mission to date (2004-2016), we map the ion measurements to the equatorial plane and via the modeled kappa distribution spectra we produce the equatorial distributions of all ion integral moments, focusing on partial density, integral intensity, partial pressure, integral energy intensity; as well as the characteristic energy (EC=IE/In), Temperature and κ-index of these ions as a function of Local Time (00:00 to 24:00 hrs) and L-Shell (5-20). A modified version of the semi-empirical Roelof and Skinner [2000] model is then utilized to retrieve the equatorial H+ and O+ pressure, density and temperature in Saturn's magnetosphere in both local time and L-shell. We find that a) although the H+ and O+ partial pressures and densities are nearly comparable, the >20 keV protons have higher number and energy intensities at all radial distances (L>5) and local times; b) the 12

  1. Shapes of Energetic Ion Spectra in Saturn's Magnetosphere Compared with those at Earth and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's magnetosphere contains suprathermal and energetic ions that originate from a number of plasma sources including Enceladus, Titan, Saturn's atmosphere and ionosphere and the solar wind, with internal sources dominating. Although different species originate at different locations, transport processes and acceleration during or after transport distribute the energetic ions throughout the magnetosphere out to the magnetopause. In principle, the shapes of the energy spectra of these ions contain information on acceleration processes. However, because outside of about 9 RS long-term average spectra of all species are quite good power laws, it is difficult to pick one energy parameter (e.g., energy/charge or energy/nucleon) as better organizing the spectra by, for example, maintaining constant abundance ratios from low to high energies. Inside of 9 RS there are energy-dependent losses that alter the spectra but aren't directly related to acceleration. Here, using data from the Cassini/CHEMS sensor, we investigate ion spectra over the energy per charge range 3-220 keV/e in more detail with better resolution in both space and time, looking for evidence of spectral differences among species based on charge (e.g., O+ vs. O++) or plasma source (e.g., O+ (Enceladus) vs. He++ (solar wind)). We will compare Saturn's ion spectra with those from the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter and discuss implications for acceleration processes.

  2. Simple estimates of excitation energy sharing between heavy and light fragments in heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasso, C.H.; Lozano, M.; Pollarolo, G.

    1985-12-01

    Qualitative arguments are used to estiamte the ratio of excitation energies between heavy and light fragments for asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. The value of this quantity is linked to the relative role played by inelastic and transfer degrees of freedom and thereby to an approximate function of the total kinetic energy loss. A numerical analysis that confirms the trends anticipated by the simple arguments is performed for the reactions /sup 56/Fe+ /sup 238/U and /sup 86/Kr+ /sup 208/Pb at bombarding energies in the laboratory of 476 and 1565 MeV, respectively.

  3. How (non-) linear is the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collisions?

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Beraudo, Andrea; Del Zanna, Luca; Inghirami, Gabriele; Rolando, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We provide evidence from full numerical solutions that the hydrodynamical evolution of initial density fluctuations in heavy ion collisions can be understood order-by-order in a perturbative series in deviations from a smooth and azimuthally symmetric background solution. To leading linear order, modes with different azimuthal wave numbers do not mix. Quadratic and higher order corrections are small and can be understood as overtones with corresponding wave numbers.

  4. Heavy-ion Results of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Boimska, B

    2016-01-01

    An overview of selected heavy-ion results of the CMS experiment is presented. Jet quenching, quarkonia suppression and two-particle angular correlation results are discussed. The measurements have been performed for lead–lead, proton–lead and proton–proton data samples recorded for Run 1 of the LHC accelerator. In the correlation analysis, low pile-up proton–proton collisions at an energy of 13 TeV (from Run 2) have been used as well

  5. Aspects of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolschin, G. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    Three aspects of relativistic heavy-ion collisions are considered in this article: (1) Stopping and baryon transport in a QCD-based approach, (2) charged-hadron production in a nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM), and (3) quarkonia suppression and in particular, Υ suppression in PbPb at the current LHC energy of √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76TeV.

  6. BRAHMS collaboration results for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsene, I.

    2008-12-01

    In this work we review very briefly a few of the most important results obtained by the BRAHMS Collaboration on the properties of the collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies. The discussion is general and aims to illustrate the most important achievements of our collaboration during the RHIC run period with short discussions and references to articles that treat the subjects in more detail.

  7. Search for Tetraquarks in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhong-Biao; GAO Chong-Shou

    2006-01-01

    Tetraquarks can be produced in relativistic heavy-ion collision. The yield of this kind of tetraquarks can increase significantly soon as the formation of QGP after the collision. If there is no phase transition after collision, the upper bound of the production of this four-quark states can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclearmatter. The relative yield ratio of tetraquark cs(s)(s) to Ω is less than 0.0164.

  8. Chimera microscopic approach to heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukasik, J.; Majka, Z. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland). Inst. Fizyki

    1993-12-01

    A microscopic model based on a molecular dynamics concept is presented. The model simulates some quantum effects and thus enables studies of large fermionic systems. It was devised to investigate the dynamics of heavy ion collision at intermediate energies. The model was applied to study an early phase of the {sup 84}Kr+{sup 159}Tb reaction at 45 MeV/nucleon. (author). 30 refs, 9 figs.

  9. Microscopic descriptions of high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    The essentials of the equation-of-motion (EOM) approach are given and some of its significant and interesting results are described. A framework for the theoretical description of high-energy heavy-ion (HE-HI) collisions is presented; specifically included are a critical assessment of various approaches--EOM calculations, Boltzmann equations/cascade calculations, and hydrodynamics--their relationships and their respective domains of applicability, if any, to HE-HI collisions. 11 figures, 3 tables. (RWR)

  10. QED Effects in Heavy Few-Electron Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Shabaev, V M; Artemiev, A N; Baturin, S S; Elizarov, A A; Kozhedub, Y S; Oreshkina, N S; Tupitsyn, I I; Yerokhin, V A; Zherebtsov, O M

    2006-01-01

    Accurate calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting, the bound-electron g-factor, and the parity nonconservation effects in heavy few-electron ions are considered. The calculations include the relativistic, quantum electrodynamic (QED), electron-correlation, and nuclear effects. The theoretical results are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of QED in a strong Coulomb field.

  11. Transverse Flow of Kaons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玉明; 储自力; FUCHS Christian; FAESSLER Amand; 肖武; 华大平; 阎玉鹏

    2002-01-01

    The transverse flow of positively charged kaons from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energy is investigatedwithin the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculated results show that the experi-mental data are only consistent with those including the kaon mean-field potential from the chiral Lagrangian.This indicates that the transverse flow pattern of kaons is a useful probe of the kaon potential in a nuclearmedium.

  12. Isotope analysis in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; D'Agostino, M.; de Sanctis, J.; Giussani, A.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Marini, P.; Moroni, A.; Nannini, A.; Olmi, A.; Ordine, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Nucl-Ex Collaboration

    2007-11-01

    Symmetry energy is a key quantity in the study of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies, performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, can be used to extract information on the symmetry energy coefficient Csym, which is currently poorly known but relevant both for astrophysics and for deeper knowledge of the structure of exotic nuclei.

  13. What have we learned from relativistic heavy-ion collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Larry McLerran

    2003-04-01

    In this talk, I present what I believe we have learned from the recent RHIC heavy ion experiments. The goal of these experiments is to make and study matter at very high energy densities, greater than an order of magnitude larger than that of nuclear matter. Have we made such matter? What have we learned about the properties of this matter? What do we hope and expect to learn in the future?

  14. Scaling of elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Torrieri, Giorgio; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2012-01-01

    The common interpretation of $v_2$ in heavy ion collisions is that it is produced by hydrodynamic flow at low transverse momentum and by parton energy loss at high transverse momentum. In this talk we discuss this interpretation in view of the dependence of $v_2$ with energy, rapidity and system size, and show that it might not be trivial to reconcile these models with the relatively simple scaling found in experiment

  15. An integrated systems model for heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangerter, R O; Faltens, A; Meier, W R

    1998-09-02

    A source-to-target computer model for an induction linac driver for heavy ion fusion has been developed and used to define a reference case driver that meets the requirements of one current target design. Key features of the model are discussed, and the design parameters of the reference case design are described. Examples of the systems analyses leading to the point design are given, and directions for future work are noted.

  16. Coherent rho(0) production in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-12-30

    The STAR Collaboration reports the first observation of exclusive rho(0) photoproduction, AuAu-->AuAurho(0), and rho(0) production accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation, AuAu-->Au*Au*rho(0), in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions. The rho(0) have low transverse momenta, consistent with coherent coupling to both nuclei. The cross sections at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV agree with theoretical predictions treating rho(0) production and Coulomb excitation as independent processes.

  17. Cooler storage ring accomplished at heavy ion facility in Lanzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFLCSR),a flagship facility of basic research in China,passed the acceptance check under auspices of the State Development and Reform Commission on 30 July in Lanzhou,capital of Gansu Province.The event was jointly presided over by the Commission's Vice Minister ZHANG Xiaoqian and CAS Executive Vice President BAI Chunli.

  18. Azimuthal Correlation of Collective Motion in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Lei; ZHANG Wei-Ning; CHEN Xiang-Jun; TANG Gui-Xin; ZHANG Jing-Bo

    2001-01-01

    The out-of-plane squeeze-out effect in relativistic heavy ion collisions is used to estimate the reaction plane by performing a modified transverse momentum analysis. A technique for investigating the azimuthal correlation between the out-of-plane squeeze-out and directed in-plane flow is described. A clear signature of the azimuthal correlation is evidenced in the 600 A MeV Au + Au reaction from the quantum molecular dynamic model calculations.

  19. Applications of heavy ion microprobe for single event effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Robert A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)]. E-mail: robert.reed@vanderbilt.edu; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Pellish, Jonathan A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Sierawski, Brian [Institute for Space and Defense Electronics, Vanderbilt University, Box 351821 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Warren, Kevin M. [Institute for Space and Defense Electronics, Vanderbilt University, Box 351821 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Porter, Mark [Medtronic Microelectronics Center, 2343 W. Medtronic Way, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Wilkinson, Jeff [Medtronic, CRDM Device Technology, 7000 Central Avenue NE, Minneapolis, MN 55432 (United States); Marshall, Paul W. [NASA consultant, Brookneal, VA 24528 (United States); Niu, Guofu [Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36894 (United States); Cressler, John D. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Schrimpf, Ronald D. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Tipton, Alan [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Weller, Robert A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, 5635 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The motion of ionizing-radiation-induced rogue charge carriers in a semiconductor can create unwanted voltage and current conditions within a microelectronic circuit. If sufficient unwanted charge or current occurs on a sensitive node, a variety of single event effects (SEEs) can occur with consequences ranging from trivial to catastrophic. This paper describes the application of heavy ion microprobes to assist with calibration and validation of SEE modeling approaches.

  20. Isotope analysis in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, E; Bardelli, L; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Bruno, M; Cannata, F; Casini, G; Chiari, M; D'Agostino, M; De Sanctis, J; Giussani, A; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Lanchais, A L; Marini, P; Moroni, A; Nannini, A; Olmi, A; Ordine, A; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Poggi, G; Vannini, G

    2006-01-01

    Symmetry energy is a key quantity in the study of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies, performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, can be used to extract information on the symmetry energy coefficient Csym, which is currently poorly known but relevant both for astrophysics and for structure of exotic nuclei.

  1. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Modular TPCs for relativistic heavy-ion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Lindenbaum, S.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA) City Coll., New York (USA)); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A. (City Coll., New York (USA)); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA)); Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Krishna, N.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Phillips, G.C.; Roberts, J.B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA))

    1989-11-10

    A description is given of a TPC system that operates in a relativistic heavy-ion beam and yields good track reconstruction efficiency in very-high-multiplicity events. The mechanical construction of the chamber is discussed. A set of custom hybrid circuits are used to build a very compact, cost-effective electronics system mounted directly on the chamber. Results from running in test beams and from preliminary experimental runs are given. (orig.).

  3. Impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry of direct photons and free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gui-Hua; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; SHEN Wen-Qing; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Kun

    2009-01-01

    Hard photon emitted from energetic heavy ion collisions is of very interesting since it does not experience the late-stage nuclear interaction, therefore it is useful to explore the early-stage information of matter phase. In this work, we have calculated the impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry, characterized by directed transverse flow parameter F and elliptic asymmetry coefficient v2, of direct photons and the corresponding free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. It is further shown the anti-correlated azimuthal asymmetry between direct photons and free protons.

  4. Observation of energetic-ion losses induced by various MHD instabilities in the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Watanabe, F. [Kyoto University, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sakakibara, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2010-01-01

    Energetic-ion losses induced by toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and resistive interchange modes (RICs) were observed in neutral-beam heated plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) at a relatively low toroidal magnetic field level (<= 0.75 T). The energy and pitch angle of the lost ions are detected using a scintillator-based lost-fast ion probe. Each instability increases the lost ions having a certain energy/pitch angle. TAE bursts preferentially induce energetic beam ions in co-passing orbits having energy from the injection energy E = 190keV down to 130 keV, while RICs expel energetic ions of E = 190 keV down to similar to 130 keV in passing-toroidally trapped boundary orbits. Loss fluxes induced by these instabilities increase with different dependences on the magnetic fluctuation amplitude: nonlinear and linear dependences for TAEs and RICs, respectively.

  5. Open heavy flavor and quarkonia measurements in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielcik Jaroslav

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the hot and dense nuclear matter produced at RHIC in heavy-ion collisions can be investigated in multiple ways by heavy flavor production. The STAR and PHENIX experiments have excellent capability to study both open heavy flavor and quarkonia. Heavy quarks are produced in early stage of the collisions and the mechanisms of their interaction with nuclear matter are not yet well understood. The open heavy flavor hadrons can be studied using electrons from their semileptonic decays or via direct reconstruction through their hadronic decay channels. The heavy quarkonia production is expected to be sequentially suppressed depending on the temperature of the produced nuclear matter. However, cold nuclear matter effects play an important role and have to be well understood. In this paper we report recent results from the RHIC heavyion program on non-photonic electrons, direct reconstruction of charm mesons, J/ψ as well as ϒ in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV.

  6. Gauge/String Duality, Hot QCD and Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, both experimental and theoretical advances have brought the need for strong coupling techniques in the analysis of deconfined QCD matter and heavy ion collisions to the forefront. As a consequence, a fruitful interplay has developed between analyses of strongly-coupled non-abelian plasmas via the gauge/string duality (also referred to as the AdS/CFT correspondence) and the phenomenology of heavy ion collisions. We review some of the main insights gained from this interplay to date. To establish a common language, we start with an introduction to heavy ion phenomenology and finite-temperature QCD, and a corresponding introduction to important concepts and techniques in the gauge/string duality. These introductory sections are written for nonspecialists, with the goal of bringing readers ranging from beginning graduate students to experienced practitioners of either QCD or gauge/string duality to the point that they understand enough about both fields that they can then appreciate their in...

  7. Results from the first heavy ion run at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schukraft, J

    2012-01-01

    Early November 2010, the LHC collided for the first time heavy ions, Pb on Pb, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. This date marked both the end of almost 20 years of preparing for nuclear collisions at the LHC, as well as the start of a new era in ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics at energies exceeding previous machines by more than an order of magnitude. This contribution summarizes some of the early results from all three experiments participating in the LHC heavy ion program (ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS), which show that the high density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like the very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid discovered at RHIC. Some surprising and even puzzling results are seen in particle ratios, jet-quenching, and Quarkonia suppression observables. The overall experimental conditions at the LHC, together with its set of powerful and state-of-the-art detectors, should allow for precision measurements of quark-gluon-plasma parameters like v...

  8. Breit interaction effect on dielectronic recombination of heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high temperature plasmas, including astrophysical plasmas such as solar corona and artificial plasmas such as fusion reactor plasmas. Therefore it has been well studied to date, both theoretically and experimentally, to accumulate the atomic data required for understanding or controlling such plasmas. However, there still remains interesting subjects that receive remarkable attention from the atomic physics point of view. One of them, which is the subject of this review, is substantially large Breit interaction effects on the resonance recombination process called dielectronic recombination. The Breit interaction is a relativistic effect in the electron-electron interaction potential; it is thus generally important for highly charged heavy ions. However, in the calculation of the energy levels for heavy ions, the Breit interaction is still a small perturbation compared with the main Coulomb term. On the other hand for the dielectronic recombination, it was found that the Breit interaction can enhance the cross sections significantly. It was also found that the Breit interaction can play not only an important, but even a dominant role in determining the angular distribution of x-rays emitted in the recombination processes. This topical review introduces the recent experimental and theoretical activities to clarify the essential origin of the strong effects.

  9. Two-Particle Correlations in Heavy-Light Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wertepny, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    We study the initial, high-energy scatterings in heavy ion collisions using the saturation/Color Glass Condensate framework. We focus on two-particle long-range rapidity correlations which are modeled as two-gluon correlations. We calculate the two-gluon production cross section using the saturation framework in the heavy-light ion regime, including all-order saturation effects in the heavy nucleus while considering only two-orders in the light ion. The two-gluon production cross section generates four types of long-range in rapidity correlations: (i) geometric correlations, (ii) Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) like correlations accompanied by a back-to-back maximum, (iii) near-side correlations, and (iv) away-side azimuthal correlations. The geometric correlations (i) are due to the fact that nucleons are correlated by simply being confined within the same nucleus. Correlations (iii) and (iv) have exactly the same amplitudes along with azimuthal and rapidity shapes: one centered around $\\Delta \\phi =0$ and the...

  10. Ion beam sputtering of Ag – Angular and energetic distributions of sputtered and scattered particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, René, E-mail: rene.feder@iom-leipzig.de; Bundesmann, Carsten; Neumann, Horst; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) provides intrinsic features which influence the properties of the growing film, because ion properties and geometrical process conditions generate different energy and spatial distribution of the sputtered and scattered particles. A vacuum deposition chamber is set up to measure the energy and spatial distribution of secondary particles produced by ion beam sputtering of different target materials under variation of geometrical parameters (incidence angle of primary ions and emission angle of secondary particles) and of primary ion beam parameters (ion species and energies). A representative set of Ag thin films is deposited arranged on a substrate holder equatorial to the Ag target in steps of 10° and characterized concerning their film thickness by profilometry to determine the angular distribution of the sputtered particles. The film thickness distributions show a tilted, cosine-like shape and a shifting of the maximum position depending on the primary particle energy and incidence angle of the primary ions. The energy distributions of sputtered and scattered ions and of sputtered neutrals are measured with an energy-selective mass spectrometer. The average energy of the sputtered ions increases with increasing emission angle and also increases with increasing incidence angle of the primary ions. In contrast, the average energy of the sputtered ions is nearly unaffected by the primary particle energy and particle species. The energy distribution of the scattered Ar ions reveals high energetic maxima which shift with increasing emission angle to higher energies. These maxima are not observed for Xe bombardment. The total energies of sputtered and scattered ions show significant differences between the two bombarding species. The maximum of the energy distribution of sputtered Ag neutrals is used to conclude on the surface binding energy of Ag (2.72 eV). All experimental data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations done with

  11. The Relative Deep Penetrations of Energetic Electrons and Ions into the Slot Region and Inner Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere are distributed into two regions: the inner radiation belt and the outer radiation belt, with the slot region in between separating the two belts. Though many studies have focused on the outer belt dynamics, the energetic electrons in the slot region and especially inner belt did not receive much attention until recently. A number of new features regarding electrons in the low L region have been reported lately, including the abundance of 10s-100s of keV electrons in the inner belt, the frequent deep injections of 100s of keV electrons, and 90°-minimum pitch angle distributions of 100s of keV electrons in the inner belt and slot region. In this presentation, we focus on the relative deep injections into the slot region and inner belt of energetic electrons and ions using observations from HOPE and MagEIS instruments on the Van Allen Probes. It is shown that while 10s - 100s of keV electrons penetrate commonly deep into the low L region and are persistent in the inner belt, the deep injections of ions with similar energies occur rarely, possibly due to the fast loss of ions in the low L region. The energy spectra and pitch angle distributions of electrons and ions during injections are also very different, indicating the existence of different physical mechanisms acting on them. In addition, some intriguing similarities between lower energy ions and higher energy electrons will also be discussed.

  12. Energy And Centrality Dependence Of Mid-rapidity Charged- Particle Multiplicity In Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Decowski, M P

    2002-01-01

    The properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of the strong interaction, can be investigated through the study of relativistic nucleus- nucleus collisions. Recently, the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) was completed and started taking data at ten times higher center-of-mass energies than the previous most energetic heavy-ion collisions. This thesis presents some of the first measurements at RHIC from any experiment. The PHOBOS detector is used to measure the charged particle pseudo- rapidity density at mid-rapidity (i.e., in |η| < 1) as a function of collision energy and centrality. The multiplicity is measured by counting short tracks in the silicon spectrometer; the centrality measurement uses two scintillator detectors covering 3 < |η| < 4.5. The charged particle multiplicity at mid-rapidity for the 6% most central collisions is 379 ± 9(stat.) ± 42(syst.), 555 ± 3(stat.) ± 35(syst.) and 661 &plus...

  13. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  14. Chitosan Removes Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Cigarette Mainstream Smoke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wen; XU Ying; WANG Dongfeng; ZHOU Shilu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan.Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages.The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad,digested by a microwave digestor,and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions,including As(Ⅲ/Ⅴ),Pb(Ⅱ),Cd(Ⅱ),Cr(Ⅲ/Ⅵ) and Ni(Ⅱ),by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(Ⅱ),Cd(Ⅱ),Cr(Ⅲ/Ⅵ) and Ni(Ⅱ).Of these,the percent removal of Ni(Ⅱ) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan.Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(Ⅱ),Cr(Ⅲ/Ⅵ) and Ni(Ⅱ),though with poor efficiency for Pb(Ⅱ).Except As(Ⅲ/Ⅴ),all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight.Nonetheless,the percent removal of Cr(Ⅲ/Ⅵ) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa,followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight.Generally,chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions,and the percent removal of Cd(Ⅱ),Pb(Ⅱ),Cr(Ⅲ/Ⅵ) and Ni(Ⅱ) was approximately 55%,45%,50%,and 16%,respectively.In a word,chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke,improve cigarette safety,and reduce the harm to smokers.

  15. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  16. Effects of heavy ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    Using neonatal rats as a model system, we investigated the response of the brain vascular system to ionizing radiation and found that distinct petechial hemorrages developed in the cerebral cortex within a few hours after irradiation, reached a maximum about 13 to 24 hours, and decreased exponentially with time. No brain hemorrhage was found in neonatal rats 12 days after irradiation. Our experimental results indicate that a dose of a few hundred rad of X rays can induce a significant number of hemorrhages in the brain, and the number of lesions increases exponentially with dose. Heavy ions induce more hemorrhages than X rays for a given dose, and the RBE for 670 MeV/u neon particles ranges from about 2.0 for low doses to about 1.4 for high doses. A histological study on the hemorrhages indicates that a large number of red blood cells leak from the blood vessels. The radiation-induced hemorrhages may be a result of some capillary membrane damages or reproductive death of some blood vessel epithelial cells. The fast onset of hemorrhage after irradiation suggests that some membrane damage may be involved. The effect of heavy-ion radiation on the embryonic development was studied with energetic iron particles. Pregnant mice were whole-body irradiated with 600 MeV/u iron particles on day 6 of gestation and were sacrificed 12 days after irradiation. Various physical abnormalities were observed, and embryos irradiated with 1 rad iron particles showed retardation of body development.

  17. Ion heating during geomagnetic storms measured using energetic neutral atom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesee, Amy; Elfritz, Justin; Katus, Roxanne; Scime, Earl

    2015-11-01

    Energy from the solar wind is deposited into the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms. Much of this energy is deposited into the plasma sheet, driving phenomena that leads to heating. The plasma sheet ions are then injected to the inner magnetosphere, driving the ring current. While ions can undergo adiabatic heating during typical drift motion, collisional and wave-particle interactions can also lead to ion heating. A technique to measure ion temperatures using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data has been developed using ENA data from the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission global maps of ion temperature during the evolution of geomagnetic storms are made. These maps exhibit the location and characteristics of regions of ion heating and during which storm phase they occur. Superposed epoch analyses of such maps have demonstrated typical characteristics of ion heating during storms driven by coronal mass ejections as compared to those driven by high speed solar wind streams. The temperatures have been used to establish boundary conditions for modeling of the inner magnetosphere. We will give an overview of recent studies using TWINS ion temperature maps. Work supported by NNX10AN08A and AGS-1113478.

  18. Simulation of Heavy-Ion Beam Losses with the SixTrack-FLUKA Active Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal; Cerutti, Francesco; Ferrari, Alfredo; Jowett, John; Lechner, Anton; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Ortega, Pablo; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Skordis, Eleftherios; Valentino, Gianluca; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The LHC heavy-ion program aims to further increase the stored ion beam energy, putting high demands on the LHC collimation system. Accurate simulations of the ion collimation efficiency are crucial to validate the feasibility of new proposed configurations and beam parameters. In this paper we present a generalized framework of the SixTrack-FLUKA coupling to simulate the fragmentation of heavy-ions in the collimators and their motion in the LHC lattice. We compare heavy-ion loss maps simulated on the basis of this framework with the loss distributions measured during heavy-ion operation in 2011 and 2015.

  19. Turbulent transport and heating of trace heavy ions in hot, magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Dorland, W

    2012-01-01

    Scaling laws for the transport and heating of trace heavy ions in low-frequency, magnetized plasma turbulence are derived and compared with direct numerical simulations. The predicted dependences of turbulent fluxes and heating on ion charge and mass number are found to agree with numerical results for both stationary and differentially rotating plasmas. Heavy ion momentum transport is found to increase with mass, and heavy ions are found to be preferentially heated, implying a mass-dependent ion temperature for very weakly collisional plasmas and for partially-ionized heavy ions in strongly rotating plasmas.

  20. Microstructure evolution and hardness change in ordered Ni{sub 3}V intermetallic alloy by energetic ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, A.; Kaneno, Y. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Semboshi, S. [Kansai-Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Yoshizaki, H. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Saitoh, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Okamoto, Y. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A., E-mail: iwase@mtr.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Ni{sub 3}V bulk intermetallic compounds with ordered D0{sub 22} structure were irradiated with 16 MeV Au ions at room temperature. The irradiation induced phase transformation was examined by means of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement (EXAFS) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD). We also measured the Vickers hardness for unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The TEM observation shows that by the Au irradiation, the lamellar microstructures and the super lattice spot in diffraction pattern for the unirradiated specimen disappeared. This TEM result as well as the result of XRD and EXAFS measurements means that the intrinsic D0{sub 22} structure of Ni{sub 3}V changes into the A1 (fcc) structure which is the lattice structure just below the melting point in the thermal equilibrium phase diagram. The lattice structure change from D0{sub 22} to A1 (fcc) accompanies a remarkable decrease in Vickers microhardness. The change in crystal structure was discussed in terms of the thermal spike and the sequential atomic displacements induced by the energetic heavy ion irradiation.

  1. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Toshio, E-mail: seki@sakura.nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Aoki, Takaaki [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Life Science, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto Univ., Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsuo, Jiro [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi{sub 3}-keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi{sub 3} ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis.

  2. Electromagnetic heavy-lepton pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senguel, M.Y. [Atakent Mahallesi, 3. Etap, Halkali-Kuecuekcekmece, Istanbul (Turkey); Gueclue, M.C.; Mercan, Oe.; Karakus, N.G. [istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-08-15

    We calculate the cross sections of electromagnetic productions of muon- and tauon-pair productions from the ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Since the Compton wavelengths of muon and tauon are comparable to the radius of the colliding ions, nuclear form factors play important roles for calculating the cross sections. Recent measurement (Abrahamyan et al., Phys Rev Lett 108:112502, 2012) indicates that the neutrons are differently distributed from the protons; therefore this affects the cross section of the heavy-lepton pair production. In order to see the effects of the neutron distributions in the nucleus, we used analytical expression of the Fourier transforms of the Wood-Saxon distribution. Cross section calculations show that the Wood-Saxon distribution function is more sensitive to the parameter R compared to the parameter a. (orig.)

  3. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Pal

    2015-05-01

    We review the transport models that are widely used to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We show that transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression of hadron yields at high transverse momentum, provide exciting new information on the properties of the plasma formed.

  4. Review of Heavy-Ion Inertial Fusion Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata1, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2015-01-01

    In this review paper on heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), the state-of-the-art scientific results are presented and discussed on the HIF physics, including physics of the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, the HIBs-ion illumination on a direct-drive fuel target, the fuel target physics, the uniformity of the HIF target implosion, the smoothing mechanisms of the target implosion non- uniformity and the robust target implosion. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~ 30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50-70 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with the standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. The HIF reactor operation frequency would be ~10~15 Hz or so. Several- MJ HIBs illuminate a fusion fuel target, and the fuel target is imploded to about a...

  5. Late degeneration in rabbit tissues after irradiation by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.; Keng, P. C.; Lee, A. C.; Su, C. M.; Bergtold, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for investigations of the late effects of heavy-ion irradiation on rabbit tissues which were undertaken to assess the hazards associated with the long-term exposure of humans to heavy ions in space during such activities as the construction of solar power stations or voyages to Mars. White rabbits approximately six weeks old were exposed to various doses of collimated beams of 400-MeV/n Ne ions, 570 MeV/n Ar ions and Co-60 gamma rays directed through both eyes, and the responses of the various tissues (hair follicles, skin, cornea, lens, retina, Harderian glands, bone and forebrain) were examined. Proliferating tissues are found to exhibit high damage levels in the early and late periods following irradiation, while terminally differentiating tissues repond to radiation most intensely in the late period, years after irradiation, with no intermediate recovery. The results obtained from rabbits are used to predict the occurrence of late tissue degeneration in the central nervous system, terminally differentiating systems and stem cells of humans one or more decades following exposure to radiation levels anticipated during long-duration space flights. The studies also indicate that tissues may be prematurely aged in the sense that tissue life spans may be shortened without the development of malignancies.

  6. Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2002-08-02

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  7. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  8. Late degeneration in rabbit tissues after irradiation by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.; Keng, P. C.; Lee, A. C.; Su, C. M.; Bergtold, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for investigations of the late effects of heavy-ion irradiation on rabbit tissues which were undertaken to assess the hazards associated with the long-term exposure of humans to heavy ions in space during such activities as the construction of solar power stations or voyages to Mars. White rabbits approximately six weeks old were exposed to various doses of collimated beams of 400-MeV/n Ne ions, 570 MeV/n Ar ions and Co-60 gamma rays directed through both eyes, and the responses of the various tissues (hair follicles, skin, cornea, lens, retina, Harderian glands, bone and forebrain) were examined. Proliferating tissues are found to exhibit high damage levels in the early and late periods following irradiation, while terminally differentiating tissues repond to radiation most intensely in the late period, years after irradiation, with no intermediate recovery. The results obtained from rabbits are used to predict the occurrence of late tissue degeneration in the central nervous system, terminally differentiating systems and stem cells of humans one or more decades following exposure to radiation levels anticipated during long-duration space flights. The studies also indicate that tissues may be prematurely aged in the sense that tissue life spans may be shortened without the development of malignancies.

  9. A Compact High-Brightness Heavy-Ion Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Westenskow, Glen; Grote, D P; Halaxa, Erni; Kwan, Joe W

    2005-01-01

    To provide compact high-brightness heavy-ion beams for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerators, we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. In an 80-kV 20-microsecond experiment, the RF plasma source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar+ in a single beamlet. An extraction current density of 100 mA/cm2 was achieved, and the thermal temperature of the ions was below 1 eV. More than 90% of the ions were in the Ar+ state, and the energy spread from charge exchange was found to be small. We have tested at full voltage gradient the first 4 gaps of a 61-beamlet injector design. Einzel lens were used to focus the beamlets while reducing the beamlet to beamlet space charge interaction. We will report on a converging 119 multi-beamlet source. Although the source has the same optics as a full 1.6 MV injector system, the test will be carried out at 400 kV due to the test stand HV limit. We will measure the beam’s emittance after the beamlets are merged and have bee...

  10. Simulation of electron cloud effects to heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Fatih; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud (EC) driven instability can cause beam loss, emittance growth, trajectory change and wake fields. Mentioned crucial effects of EC motivated researchers to understand the EC build up mechanism and the effects of EC to the beam. This motivation also induced the progress of developing new simulation codes. EC simulations can roughly be divided into two classes such as, softwares whose goals are to simulate the build up of the EC during the passage of a bunch train and the codes which model the interaction of a bunch with an EC. The aim of this study is to simulate the effects of electron cloud (EC) on the dynamics of heavy ion beams which are used in heavy ion synchrotron (SIS-18) at GSI. To do this, a 3-D and self-consistent simulation program based on particle in cell (PIC) method is used. In the PIC cycle, accurate solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained by employing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. As a model, we assumed a perfectly conducting beam pipe which was uniformly (or randomly) loaded with the electrons. Then as parallel with the realistic cases in SIS-18, a single bunch consisting of U{sup +73} ions was extracted which could propagate in this pipe. Due to EC-ion bunch interaction, electrons gained energy and their displacements were observed. Electric and magnetic field components and EC charge density were calculated, numerically.

  11. Kinetic study of heavy metal ions removal by ion exchange in batch conical air spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Zewail

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouted bed contactor is a hybrid of fixed and fluidized bed contactors, which retains the advantages of each with good hydrodynamic conditions. The aim of the present study is to investigate the performance of a batch conical air spouted vessel for heavy metal removal by strong cation exchange resins (AMBERJET 1200 Na. The effect of various parameters such as type of heavy metal ions (Ni+2 and Pb+2, contact time, superficial air velocity and initial heavy metal ion concentration on % heavy metal ion removal has been investigated. It has been found that under optimum conditions 98% and 99% removal of Ni+2 and Pb+2 were achieved respectively. Several kinetic models were used to test the experimental data and to examine the controlling mechanism of the sorption process. The present results of Ni+2 and Pb+2 well fit pseudo second order kinetic model with a high correlation coefficient. Both film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion contribute to the ion exchange process. The present study revealed that spouted bed vessel may provide an effective alternative for conducting ion exchange reactions.

  12. Deposition of molecular probes in heavy ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Esser, M

    1999-01-01

    By using polarized fluorescence techniques the physical properties of heavy ion tracks such as the dielectric number, molecular alignment and track radius can be traced by molecular fluorescence probes. Foils of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were used as a matrix for the ion tracks wherein fluorescence probes such as aminostyryl-derivatives can be incorporated using a suitable solvent, e.g. N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) as transport medium. The high sensitivity of fluorescence methods allowed the comparison of the probe properties in ion tracks with the virgin material. From the fluorescence Stokes shift the dielectric constants could be calculated, describing the dielectric surroundings of the molecular probes. The lower dielectric constant in the tracks gives clear evidence that there is no higher accommodation of the highly polar solvent DMF in the tracks compared with the virgin material. Otherwise the dielectric constant in the tracks should be higher than in the virgin material. The orientation of t...

  13. Nuclear Fragmentation in Clinical Heavy Ion Beams, Should We Worry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Toftegaard, Jakob

    fragmentation of the primary ions. Even if patient treatment with heavy ions has been established, the influence of nuclear fragmentation is yet to be fully quantified. The fragmentation spectrum of ions is relevant for particle therapy in numerous ways: 1. Dose distribution: A distinct tail of secondary...... on the secondary particle spectrum from fragmentation. b. In addition hereto, fluence correction factors can be calculated which take this effect into account, which are directly a result of nuclear fragmentation in the medium. 3. Radiobiology: Physical dose is not sufficient to describe the outcome of a treatment...... the sensitivity on the three fields mentioned above, including: turning off nuclear fragmentation entirely, changing all ineleastic cross sections +/- 20%, changing key parameters in the Fermi-Breakup (FB) model. Results show nuclear effects have their largest impact on the dose distribution. Stopping power...

  14. Multiple-electron losses in uranium ion beams in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozyk, L.; Chill, F.; Litsarev, M. S.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Charge changing processes as the result of collisions with residual gas particles are the main cause of beam loss in high energy medium charge state heavy ion beams. To investigate the magnitude of this effect for heavy ion synchrotrons like the planned SIS100 at GSI, the multiple-electron and the total electron-loss cross sections are calculated for Uq+ ions, q = 10, 28, 40, 73, colliding with typical gas components H2, He, C, N2, O2, and Ar at ion energies E = 1 MeV/u-10 GeV/u. The total electron-capture cross sections for U28+ and U73+ ions interacting with these gases are also calculated. Most of these cross sections are new and presented for the first time. Calculated charge-changing cross sections are used to determine the ion-beam lifetimes τ for U28+ ions which agree well with the recently measured values at SIS18/GSI in the energy range E = 10-200 MeV/u. Using simulations made by the StrahlSim code with the reference ion U28+, it is found that in SIS100 the beam loss caused by single and multiple electron losses has only little impact on the residual gas density due to the high efficiency of the ion catcher system.

  15. Investigation of multi-charged heavy ion production in an electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, R.W.

    1977-12-01

    Measurements of multi-charged heavy ions produced in an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) were carried out with a test model ion source 20 cm in length. This test model utilized an electron gun placed external to the bore of the focusing solenoid in order to achieve electrostatically focussed electron beams and isolation of the vacuum surrounding the electron gun from the vacuum in the ionization region within the solenoid bore. An ultrahigh vacuum system utilizing liquid nitrogen (77/sup 0/K) cryopumping was used to achieve the low pressures needed in the ionization region for the operation of this ion source. Several technical problems limited the operation of this test model and prevented a thorough investigation of the ionization processes in the ion source, but the experimental results have shown qualitative agreement with the theoretical calculations for the operation of this type of ion source. Even with the problems of an insufficient vacuum and electron beam focussing field, measurable currents of C/sup +5/ and A/sup +8/ ions were produced. The present experimental results suggest that the approach taken in this work of using an external electron gun and cryopumping in the EBIS to achieve the large electron beam current density and low vacuum necessary for successful operation is a viable one. Such an ion source can be used to create highly-charged heavy ions for injection into a cyclotron or other type of particle accelerator.

  16. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ting [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu Qingfang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Bian Po, E-mail: bianpo@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Jufang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Wenjian [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  17. What causes the variations of the peak intensity of CIR accelerated energetic ion fluxes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keppler

    Full Text Available The variation of the peak intensity of energetic ions accelerated at CIR related shocks in the interplanetary medium as observed by instruments on board of ULYSSES during its pass towards the south polar region and from the north polar region back to its aphelium is discussed. From ULYSSES measurements alone it cannot be decided whether the observed variation is a function of latitude or of radial distance, as its orbit changes distance and latitude at the same time. Therefore ULYSSES data is compared with earlier observations by the PIONEER and VOYAGER spacecraft and concluded that the major part of the observed variation of the peak intensity seems to be due to a radial distance change, on to which, however, at higher latitudes a latitude dependent feature is superimposed.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (Energetic particles; interplanetary shocks; general

  18. Heavy ion beam test results of the silicon charge detector for the CREAM cosmic ray balloon mission

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I H; Bok, J B; Ganel, O; Hahn, J H; Han, W; Hyun, H J; Kim, H J; Kim, M Y; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lutz, L; Malinine, A; Min, K W; Nam, S W; Nam, W; Park, H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Seon, K I; Sone, J H; Yang, J; Zinn, S Y

    2004-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to measure cosmic ray elemental spectra to help understand the source and acceleration mechanisms of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The payload is planned to launch in December 2004 from McMurdo Station, Antarctica as a balloon mission. A Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) was designed and constructed for the CREAM experiment to provide precision charge measurements of incident cosmic rays with a resolution of 0.2 charge unit or better. The SCD was exposed to heavy ion beams at CERN's H2 beam line in November 2003. The results reported here show the SCD performs as designed.

  19. Ion beam induced charge characterisation of a silicon microdosimeter using a heavy ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Iwan; Siegele, Rainer; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    An ion beam induced charge (IBIC) facility has been added to the existing capabilities of the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe and the results of the first measurements are presented. Silicon on insulator (SOI) diode arrays with microscopic junction sizes have recently been proposed as microdosimeters for hadron therapy. A 20 MeV carbon beam was used to perform IBIC imaging of a 10 μm thick SOI device.

  20. Novel forward osmosis process to effectively remove heavy metal ions

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Yue

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a novel forward osmosis (FO) process for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater was demonstrated for the first time. The proposed FO process consists of a thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane made from interfacial polymerization on a macrovoid-free polyimide support and a novel bulky hydroacid complex Na4[Co(C6H4O7)2]·r2H2O (Na-Co-CA) as the draw solute to minimize the reverse solute flux. The removal of six heavy metal solutions, i.e., Na2Cr2O7, Na2HAsO4, Pb(NO3)2, CdCl2, CuSO4, Hg(NO3)2, were successfully demonstrated. Water fluxes around 11L/m2/h (LMH) were harvested with heavy metals rejections of more than 99.5% when employing 1M Na-Co-CA as the draw solution to process 2000ppm(1 ppm=1 mg/L) heavy metal solutions at room temperature. This FO performance outperforms most nanofiltration (NF) processes. In addition, the high rejections were maintained at 99.5% when a more concentrated draw solution (1.5M) or feed solution (5000ppm) was utilized. Furthermore, rejections greater than 99.7% were still achieved with an enhanced water flux of 16.5LMH by operating the FO process at 60°C. The impressive heavy metal rejections and satisfactory water flux under various conditions suggest great potential of the newly developed FO system for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Effects of Charge in Heavy Ions on Solitary Kinetic Alfvén Waves in Double-Ion Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lei; WU De-Jin

    2006-01-01

    @@ After the charge of heavy ions is considered, a Sagdeev equation is obtained for the solitary kinetic Alfvén waves (SKAWs) in a low-β(me/mp<<β<<1 or mp/me>>α>>1), three-component (electrons, protons, and highly charged heavy ions) plasma. Numerical results show that the charge number q of heavy ions can cause the width of the solitary structure to decrease, but increase for the maximum of electron density nem≤1.2 and the initial abundance of heavy ions Cb0 ≤ 0.1. The parallel phase speed of the waves increases with larger q.

  2. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  3. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bang, W; Quevedo, H J; Bernstein, A C; Gaul, E; Rougk, J; Aymond, F; Donovan, M; Ditmire, T

    2013-01-01

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1-10 mm^3) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2x10^6 and 1.6x10^7 neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  4. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  5. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  6. Heavy-flavor production in heavy-ion collisions and implications for the properties of hot QCD matter

    CERN Document Server

    Averbeck, R

    2015-01-01

    Hadrons carrying open heavy flavor, i.e. single charm or bottom quarks, are among the key diagnostic tools available today for the hot and dense state of strongly interacting matter which is produced in collisions of heavy atomic nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies. First systematic heavy-flavor measurements in nucleus-nucleus collisions and the reference proton-proton system at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have led to tantalizing results. These studies are now continued and extended at RHIC and at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where considerably higher collision energies are available. This review focuses on experimental results on open heavy-flavor observables at RHIC and the LHC published until July 2012. Yields of heavy-flavor hadrons and their decay products, their transverse momentum and rapidity distributions, as well as their azimuthal distributions with respect to the reaction plane in heavy-ion collisions are investigated. Various theoretical ...

  7. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  8. Heavy-ion LINAC development for the US RIA project

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Ostroumov

    2002-12-01

    The Nuclear Science Community in the Unites States has unanimously concluded that developments in both nuclear science and its supporting technologies make building a world-leading Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility for production of radioactive beams the top priority. The RIA development effort involves several US Laboratories (ANL, JLAB, LBNL, MSU, ORNL). The RIA facility includes a CW 1.4 GeV driver LINAC and a 100 MV post-accelerator both based on superconducting (SC) cavities operating at frequencies from 48 MHz to 805 MHz. An initial acceleration in both LINACs is provided by room temperature RFQs. The driver LINAC is designed for acceleration of any ion species; from protons up to 900 MeV to uranium up to 400 MeV/u. The novel feature of the driver LINAC is an acceleration of multiple charge-state heavy-ion beams in order to achieve 400 kW beam power. Basic design concepts of the driver LINAC are given. Several new conceptual solutions in beam dynamics, room temperature and SC accelerating structures for heavy ion accelerator applications are discussed.

  9. Search for Nuclei in Heavy Ion Collisions at Ultrarelativistic Energies

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We would like to know if nuclei are still present after a collision of two heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies. If one can detect some of them at large angle ($>$10-15|0) they very likely come from a multifragmentation of the excited target spectators. Such a multifragmentation in several nuclei has been in proton induced reactions at Fermilab and it was interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition in nuclei matter near the critical point. With heavy ions the energy deposited in the target spectators will be much higher than in the case of protons and a different mechanism should be involved if nuclei are still observed. \\\\ \\\\ We propose to detect nuclei using 1-2 silicon telescopes and a 1-2mg/cm|2 Au target bombarded by an |1|6O or |3|2S beam at 226 GeV/u. The set-up will be installed in a small cube located just before the NA38 experiment and should not perturb it.\\\\ \\\\ Data from |1|6O incident on Au have been taken last year. The experiment is presently taking data with |3|2S ions.

  10. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  11. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS : RESULTS FROM AGS TO RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEINBERG,P.

    2002-06-20

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions provide a means to study QCD in a regime of high parton density, and may provide insight into its phme structure. Results from the four experiments at RHIC (BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR) are presented, and placed in context with the lower energy data from the AGS and SPS accelerators. The focus is on the insights these measurements provide into the time history of the collision process. Taken together, the data point to the creation of a deconfined state of matter that forms quickly, expands rapidly and freezes out suddenly. With the new RHIC data, systematic data now exists for heavy ion collisions as a function of {radical}s over several orders of magnitude and as a function of impact parameter. These data test the interplay between hard and soft processes in a large-volume system where nucleons are struck multiple times. The data is consistent with creating a deconfined state (jet quenching) that forms quickly (saturation models), expands rapidly (radial and elliptic flow) and freezes out suddenly (single freezeout and blast wave fits). There are also intriguing connections with particle production in elementary systems, which point to the role of the energy available for particle production on the features of the final state. Many in this field are optimistic that the careful understanding of this experimental data may lead t o the theoretical breakthroughs that will connect these complex systems to the fundamental lattice predict ions.

  12. Two-gluon correlations in heavy-light ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertepny, Douglas E.

    2014-11-01

    We derive the cross-section for two-gluon production in heavy-light ion collisions in the saturation/Color Glass Condensate framework. This calculation includes saturation effects to all orders in one of the nuclei (heavy ion) along with a single saturation correction in the projectile (light ion). The calculation of the correlation function predicts (qualitatively) two identical ridge-like correlations, near- and away-side. This prediction was later supported by experimental findings in p + A collisions at the LHC. Concentrating on the energy and geometry dependence of the correlation functions we find that the correlation function is nearly center-of-mass energy independent. The geometry dependence of the correlation function leads to an enhancement of near- and away-side correlations for the tip-on-tip U + U collisions when compared with side-on-side U + U collisions, an exactly opposite behavior from the correlations generated by the elliptic flow of the quark-gluon plasma.

  13. Glenn T. Seaborg and heavy ion nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, W. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Radiochemistry has played a limited but important role in the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Many of the important radiochemical studies have taken place in Seaborg's laboratory or in the laboratories of others who have spent time in Berkeley working with Glenn T. Seaborg. I will discuss studies of low energy deep inelastic reactions with special emphasis on charge equilibration, studies of the properties of heavy residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions and studies of target fragmentation in relativistic and ultrarelativistic reactions. The emphasis will be on the unique information afforded by radiochemistry and the physical insight derived from radiochemical studies. Future roles of radiochemistry in heavy ion nuclear science also will be discussed.

  14. Glenn T. Seaborg and heavy ion nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, W. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Radiochemistry has played a limited but important role in the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Many of the important radiochemical studies have taken place in Seaborg`s laboratory or in the laboratories of others who have spent time in Berkeley working with Glenn T. Seaborg. I will discuss studies of low energy deep inelastic reactions with special emphasis on charge equilibration, studies of the properties of heavy residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions and studies of target fragmentation in relativistic and ultrarelativistic reactions. The emphasis will be on the unique information afforded by radiochemistry and the physical insight derived from radiochemical studies. Future roles of radiochemistry in heavy ion nuclear science also will be discussed.

  15. High resolution charge spectroscopy of heavy ions with FNTD technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, J. A.; Kodaira, S.; Kurano, M.; Yasuda, N.; Akselrod, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    This paper is focused on the improvement of the heavy charge particle charge resolution of Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detector (FNTD) technology. Fluorescent intensity of individual heavy charge particle tracks is used to construct the spectrum. Sources of spectroscopic line broadening were investigated and several fluorescent intensity correction procedures were introduced to improve the charge resolution down to δZ = 0.25 c.u. and enable FNTD technology to distinguish between all projectile fragments of 290 MeV carbon ions. The benefits of using FNTD technology for fragmentation study include large dynamic range and wide angular acceptance. While we describe these developments in the context of fragmentation studies, the same techniques are readily extended to FNTD LET spectroscopy in general.

  16. HILT - A heavy ion large area proportional counter telescope for solar and anomalous cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecker, Berndt; Hovestadt, Dietrich; Scholer, M.; Arbinger, H.; Ertl, M.; Kaestle, H.; Kuenneth, E.; Laeverenz, P.; Seidenschwang, E.; Blake, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    The HILT sensor has been designed to measure heavy ion elemental abundances, energy spectra, and direction of incidence in the mass range from He to Fe and in the energy range 4 to 250 MeV/nucleon. With its large geometric factor of 60 sq cm sr the sensor is optimized to provide compositional and spectral measurements for low intensity cosmic rays (i.e. for small solar energetic particle events and for the anomalous component of cosmic rays). The instrument combines a large area ion drift chamber-proportional counter system with two arrays of 16 Li-drift solid state detectors and 16 CsI crystals. The multi dE/dx-E technique provides a low background mass and energy determination. The sensor also measures particle direction. Combining these measurements with the information on the spacecraft position and attitude in the low-altitude polar orbit, it will be possible to infer the ionic charge of the ions from the local cutoff of the Earth's magnetic field. The ionic charge in this energy range is of particular interest because it provides unique clues to the origin of these particles and has not been investigated systematically so far. Together with the other instruments on board SAMPEX (LEICA, MAST, and PET), a comprehensive measurement of the entire solar and anomalous particle population will be achieved.

  17. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, S M; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Chen, M; Yu, L L; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 1022 W/cm2. The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition ...

  18. Generation of energetic negative ions from clusters using intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Narayanan, V.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2013-04-01

    Intense laser fields are known to induce strong ionization in atoms. In nanoclusters, ionization is only stronger, resulting in very high charge densities that lead to Coulomb explosion and emission of accelerated highly charged ions. In such a strongly ionized system, it is neither conceivable nor intuitive that energetic negative ions can originate. Here we demonstrate that in a dense cluster ensemble, where atomic species of positive electron affinity are used, it is indeed possible to generate negative ions with energy and ion yield approaching that of positive ions. It is shown that the process behind such a strong charge reduction is extraneous to the ionization dynamics of single clusters within the focal volume. Normal and well-known charge transfer reactions are insufficient to explain the observations. Our analysis reveals the formation of a manifold of Rydberg excited clusters around the focal volume that facilitate orders of magnitudes more efficient electron transfer. This phenomenon, which involves an active role of laser-heated electrons, comprehensively explains the formation of copious accelerated negative ions from the nano-cluster plasma.

  19. Progress on the Los Alamos heavy-ion injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.C.; Riepe, K.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Humphries S. Jr.

    1986-01-21

    Heavy-ion fusion using an induction linac requires injection of multiple high-current beams from a pulsed electrostatic accelerator at as high a voltage as practical. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a 16-beam, 2-MeV, pulsed electrostatic accelerator for Al/sup +/ ions. The ion source will use a pulsed metal vapor arc plasma. A biased grid wil control plasma flux into the ion extraction region. This source has achieved a normalized emittance of epsilon/sub n/<3x10/sup -7/..pi..-m-rad with Al/sup +/ ions. An 800 kV Marx prototype with a laser fired diverter is being assembled. The ceramic accelerating column sections have been brazed and leak tested. Voltage hold off on a brazed sample was more than doubled by selective removal of the Ticusil braze fillet extending along the ceramic. A scaled test module held 250 kV for 50 ..mu..s, giving confidence that the full module can hold 175 kV per section. The pressure vessel should be received in June 1986. High-voltage testing of a 1 MV column will begin by early 1987.

  20. Progress on the Los Alamos heavy-ion injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.C.; Riepe, K.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy-ion fusion using an induction linac requires injection of multiple high-current beams from a pulsed electrostatic accelerator at as high a voltage as practical. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a 16-beam, 2-MeV, pulsed electrostatic accelerator for Al/sup +/ ions. The ion source will use a pulsed metal vapor arc plasma. A biased grid will control plasma flux into the ion extraction region. This source has achieved a normalized emittance of epsilon/sub n/ < 3.10/sup -7/..pi..-m-rad with Al/sup +/ ions. An 800 kV Marx prototype with a laser fired diverter is being assembled. The ceramic accelerating column sections have been brazed and leak tested. Voltage hold off on a brazed sample was more than doubled by selective removal of the Ticusil braze fillet extending along the ceramic. A scaled test module held 250 kV for 50 ..mu..s, giving confidence that the full module can hold 175 kV per section. The pressure vessel should be received in June 1986. High-voltage testing of a 1 MV column will begin by early 1987.

  1. Heavy ion upgrade of the Bevatron local injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, J.; Gough, R.; Abbott, S.; Dwinell, R.; Halliwell, J.; Howard, D.; Richter, R.; Stover, G.; Tanabe, J.; Zajec, E.

    1984-05-01

    A new heavy ion injector system for the Bevatron, consisting of a PIG ion source, an RFQ linac, and two Alvarez linacs, is nearing completion. It will make available to the Bevatron a source of ions up to mass 40 independent of the SuperHILAC, enhancing the operational flexibility of the Bevalac complex. The RFQ accelerator, made operational in mid 1983, accelerates ions with q/A greater than or equal to 0.14 to 200 keV/n. The RFQ is followed by a new 200 MHz Alvarez linac operating in the 2..beta..lambda mode which further accelerates the ions to 800 keV/n. This linac is followed by a foil stripper and a portion of the old injector linac, rebuilt to accelerate beams with q/A greater than or equal to 0.35 to 5 MeV/n in the 2..beta..lambda mode. Details are given of the configuration, equipment modifications, and project status.

  2. High Energy Density Physics Research Using Intense Heavy Ion Beam at FAIR: The HEDgeHOB Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.; Deutsch, C.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-03-01

    International project, Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), has entered in its construction phase at Darmstadt. It is expected that the new powerful heavy ion synchrotron, SIS100 will deliver a strongly bunched intense beam of energetic uranium ions that will provide the scientists with an efficient and novel tool to research High Energy Density (HED) Physics in the laboratory. Over the past 15 years, substantial theoretical work has been done to design numerous experiments that can be done at this facility in this field. This work has resulted in an extensive scientific proposal named HEDgeHOB, that includes experiment proposals addressing various aspects of HED matter, for example, planetary physics, equation of state, hydrodynamic instabilities and others. In this paper we present a summary of this work.

  3. The Mesozoic Era of relativistic heavy ion physics and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.W.

    1994-03-01

    In order to understand how matter 15 billion years ago in the form of quarks, gluons and leptons at a temperature of 2 {times} 10{sup 12} {degrees}K evolved to become today`s Universe, the goal of relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics is to understand the equation of state of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. This quest is of cross-disciplinary interest. The phase transition from partonic matter to hadronic matter tens of micro-seconds after the beginning of the universe is of interest to cosmology. Fluctuations during this phase transition would influence nucleosynthesis and the understanding of baryonic inhomogeneities in the universe. The nuclear matter equation of state, which describes the incompressibility of nuclear matter, governs neutron star stability. It determines the possible existence of strange quark matter stars and the dynamics of supernova expansion in astrophysics. The existence of collective nuclear phenomena in nuclear physics is also determined by the nuclear equation of state. In relativistic heavy ion collisions collective nuclear flow has been observed and is being studied extensively to obtain a better understanding of the incompressibility of nuclear matter. In high energy nuclear and particle physics, production and excitations of hadronic final states have been studied in detail and are important to an overall understanding of the equation of state of nuclear matter at finite temperature. The possibility in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions to create and study highly excited hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom provides a unique opportunity for understanding the behavior of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. Study of the QCD vacuum, of particular interest in particle physics, would provide a better understanding of symmetry-breaking mechanisms and the origins of the masses of the various quarks and particles.

  4. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET g or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ‘‘biological Bragg curve’’ is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called “overkill”. F. A. Cucinotta, I. Plante, A. L. Ponomarev, and M. Y. Kim, Nuclear Interactions in Heavy Ion Transport and Event

  5. Zirconium oxidation under high energy heavy ion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bérerd, N; Moncoffre, N; Jaffrezic, H; Balanzat, E; democrite-00023380, ccsd

    2004-01-01

    This paper concerns the study of zirconium oxidation under irradiation with high energetic Xe ions. The irradiations were performed on the IRRSUD beam line at GANIL (Caen). The oxygen partial pressure was fixed at 10$^{-3}$ Pa and two temperature conditions were used, either 480$\\circ$C reached by Joule effect heating or 280$\\circ$C due to Xe energy deposition. Zirconia was fully characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Grazing Angle X-ray Diffraction. Apparent diffusion coefficients of oxygen in ZrO2 were determined from these experiments by using a model which takes into account a surface exchange between oxygen gas and the ZrO2 surface. These results are compared with thermal oxidation data.

  6. Negative ion production in energetic O- and C- ions scattering on HOPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Pinyang; Xiao, Yunqing; Gao, Lei; Liu, Yuefeng; Qiu, Shunli; Xiong, Feifei; Lu, Jianjie; Guo, Yanling; Chen, Ximeng

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we present negative-ion fractions as a function of exit velocity and angle after keV-energy negative oxygen and carbon ions scattering on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, at a scattering angle of 38°. The negative-ion fractions increase monotonously with the increase of exit velocity for specular scattering, while negative-ion fractions present a bell-shaped dependence on exit angle. In order to gain further insight into the nature of charge transfer on HOPG, a modified charge transfer model involving the contribution of positive ions has been proposed and roughly reproduced the velocity and angle dependences of negative-ion fractions.

  7. Towards Reconstructing the Final Stage of Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    1997-01-01

    A Fourier inversion problem lies at the heart of determining spatio-temporal characteristica of the final stage of a heavy ion collision: From the measured two-particle momentum correlations C(p_1,p_2) of identical particles, pions say, a Hanbury-Brown /Twiss (HBT) interferometric analysis aims at extracting as much information as possible about the Wigner phase space density S(x,p) of pion emitting sources in the collision region. Here, we discuss how this analysis allows to separate the effects of temperature and transverse flow which cannot be disentangled completely on the basis of single-particle spectra.

  8. Coupling constant corrections in holographic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Grozdanov, Sašo

    2016-01-01

    We initiate a holographic study of coupling-dependent heavy ion collisions by analysing for the first time the effects of leading-order, inverse coupling constant corrections. In the dual description, this amounts to colliding gravitational shock waves in a theory with curvature-squared terms. We find that at intermediate coupling, nuclei experience less stopping and have more energy deposited near the lightcone. When the decreased coupling results in an 80% larger shear viscosity, the time at which hydrodynamics becomes a good description of the plasma created from high energy collisions increases by 25%. The hydrodynamic phase of the evolution starts with a wider rapidity profile and smaller entropy.

  9. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, G.L.; Faltens, A.; Leitner, M.; Lietzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Lund, S.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Radovinsky, A.; Schultz, J.; Meinke, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is developing superconducting focusing magnets for both near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. In particular, single bore quadrupoles have been fabricated and tested for use in the High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The next steps involve the development of magnets for the planned Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the fabrication of the first prototype multi-beam focusing arrays for fusion driver accelerators. The status of the magnet R&D program is reported, including experimental requirements, design issues and test results.

  10. A new prompt heavy-ion-induced fission mode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Udo Schröder

    2015-08-01

    Fission instabilities induced by mechanical and thermal stresses on intermediate nuclear systems in heavy-ion reactions are poorly understood but should reveal independent evidence for the nuclear equation of state (EoS), notably the tensile strength of finite nuclei. Experimental evidence is presented in support of a new mode of prompt fission of the composite nucleus formed in central 78Kr+40Ca collisions at only a few MeV per nucleon above the interaction barrier. The new process recalls the ‘L-window for fusion’ phenomenon, which was predicted by the early reaction theory and reappears in modern DFT model calculations.

  11. A Search for Quarks Produced in Heavy-Ion Interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to search for free fractional charges produced in 225~GeV/A heavy-ion collisions at the SPS. A tank of mercury placed in the NA38 beam stop will serve both as a production target and as an absorber to stop reaction products. Mercury from the tank will subsequently be distilled.\\\\ \\\\ This process will decrease the amount of mercury that has to be processed by a factor of about 10|5. The concentrate will be searched for quarks using the proven SFSU automated Millikan apparatus.\\\\ \\\\ This experiment will be sensitive to about one quark produced per 2x10|8 beam particles.

  12. Isotropization and hydrodynamization in weakly coupled heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi

    2015-01-01

    We numerically solve 2+1D effective kinetic theory of weak coupling QCD under longitudinal expansion relevant for early stages of heavy-ion collisions. We find agreement with viscous hydrodynamics and classical Yang-Mills simulations in the regimes where they are applicable. By choosing initial conditions that are motivated by color-glass-condensate framework we find that for Q=2GeV and $\\alpha_s$=0.3 the system is approximately described by viscous hydrodynamics well before $\\tau \\lesssim 1.0$ fm/c.

  13. Search for Exotic Strange Dibaryon in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Shou

    2003-01-01

    The exotic strange dibaryon particle (ΩΩ)0+ with S = -6 can be produced in relativistic heavyioncollisions. The yields of this kind of exotic strange dibaryon particles can increase significantly soon as the formation ofQGP does exhibit after the collision. If there is no phase transition after the collision, the upper bound of the productionof this diomega can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclear matter. The relative yield ratio of diomegato deuteron is less than 0.000205, this means that if there is no QGP creation it is difficult to observe the production ofdiomega in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  14. Workshop on Quark-Gluon Plasma and Relativistic Heavy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, Maria Paola; Nardi, Marzia; GISELDA 2002; QGP 2002

    2002-01-01

    This book offers the unique possibility of tackling the problem of hadronic deconfinement from different perspectives. After general introductions to the physical issues, from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view, the book presents the most recent expertise on field theory approaches to the QCD phase diagram, many-body techniques and applications, the dynamics of phase transitions, and phenomenological analysis of relativistic heavy ion collisions. One of the major goals of this book is to promote interchange among those fields of research, which have traditionally been cult

  15. Particle orbit simulation for high energy heavy ion implanter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Sasa, Kimikazu; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Osvath, E.

    1995-10-01

    We have studied an Interdigital-H type Quadrupole (IHQ) linac structure for application to heavy ion implanter. It is possible to vary the output energy by changing the voltage between gaps only. Operating frequency of this IHQ linac is 30 MHz and the synchronous phase is -30deg{r_brace} with the exception of -90deg{r_brace} at the first gap that works as a bunching section. The calculated results show that the output energy can be varied from 0.48 MeV (30 keV/u) to 1.6 MeV (100 keV/u) for {sup 16}O{sup +}. (author).

  16. Thermalization and isotropization in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Strickland

    2015-05-01

    Our current understanding of the processes driving the thermalization and isotropization of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions (URHICs) is reviewed. Initially, the phenomenological evidence in favour of the creation of a thermal but momentum–space anisotropic QGP in URHICs is discussed. Further, the degree of isotropization using viscous (dissipative) hydrodynamics, weak-coupling approaches to QGP dynamics, and strong-coupling approaches to QGP dynamics are discussed. Finally, recent progress in the area of real-time non-Abelian gauge field simulations and non-Abelian Boltzmann–Vlasov-based hard-loop simulations are reported.

  17. Search for heavy-ion emission in 249Cf decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson, G.; Barci, V.; Le Du, J. F.; Trubert, D.; Bonetti, R.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gupta, R. K.

    1999-09-01

    Using phosphate glass detectors PKS-50, we have searched for possible emission of heavy clusters in the decay of 249Cf with the aim of confirming the result obtained from a recent γ ray spectrometry experiment. After a 20-day exposure to a 7.4 MBq activity 249Cf source of 37.5 cm2 PKS-50 glasses covered with polymide foils to stop fission fragments, no ions with 17=7.4×1021 s. According to calculations performed on the basis of the preformed cluster model there seems to be very little chance that such an exotic decay might be detected, at least in the next few years.

  18. Initial operation of the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    Initial operation and recent development of the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac are discussed. The linac has been developed in order to demonstrate a cost-effective means of extending the performance of electrostatic tandem accelerators. The results of beam acceleration tests which began in June 1978 are described. At present 7 of a planned array of 22 resonators are operating on-line, and the linac system provides an effective accelerating potential of 7.5 MV. Although some technical problems remain, the level of performance and reliability is sufficient that appreciable beam time is becoming available to users.

  19. Studies of multiplicity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo,a, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cical, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino,c, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hokobyan, R; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos,a, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu, T

    2005-01-01

    In this talk I'll review the present status of charged particle multiplicity measurements from heavy-ion collisions. The characteristic features of multiplicity distributions obtained in Au+Au collisions will be discussed in terms of collision centrality and energy and compared to those of p+p collisions. Multiplicity measurements of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy will also be discussed. The results will be compared to various theoretical models and simple scaling properties of the data will be identified.

  20. Recent results from the ATLAS heavy ion program

    CERN Document Server

    Slovak, Radim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The heavy ion program in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider aims to probe and characterize the hot, dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions, in the context of smaller collision systems involving nuclei and hadrons. This talk presents recent results based on LHC Run 1 and Run 2 data, including measurements of bulk collectivity, electroweak bosons, jet modifications, and quarkonium suppression. Results will also be presented on electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, including forward dilepton production and light-by-light scattering.