WorldWideScience

Sample records for heavy chain composition

  1. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy chain ... disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy chain ...

  2. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of young sedentary men (28 +/- 0.4 years, mean +/- SE, n = 4) and male body builders (25 +/- 2.0 years, n = 4) was analysed with a sensitive one-dimensional electrophoretic technique. Compared with sedentary men...

  3. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  5. Myosin heavy chain composition of skeletal muscles in young rats growing under hypobaric hypoxia conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigard, A X; Sanchez, H; Birot, O; Serrurier, B

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of the soleus (Sol) and plantaris muscles (Pla) in rats developing under hypobaric choronic hypoxia (CH) conditions during 4 wk in comparison with those of control rats maintained under local barometric pressure conditions (C) or rats pair-fed an equivalent quantity of food to that consumed by CH animals (PF). Compared with C animals, sedentary rats subjected to CH conditions showed a significant decrease in type I MHC in Sol (-12%, P difference in the MHC profile of Sol was shown between CH active and C active rats. The MHC distribution in Sol of PF rats was not significantly different from that found in C animals. CH resulted in a significant decrease in type I (P fast shift in the MHC profile was unaffected by spontaneous running activity. These results suggest that running exercise suppresses the hypoxia-induced slow-to-fast transition in the MHC expression in Sol muscles only. The hypoxia-induced decrease in food intake has no major influence on MHC expression in developing rats.

  6. Myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution, fibre-type composition and fibre size in skeletal muscle of patients on haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Eidemak, Inge; Sorensen, Helle Tauby

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Chronic uraemia is associated with abnormalities in skeletal muscles, which can affect their working capacity. It is also well known that the fibre-type composition of skeletal muscles influences endurance, muscle strength and power. In this study we therefore determined the size...... and distribution of muscle fibres and the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform composition in patiens on haemodialysis (HD) in order to establish any differences with values for untrained control subjects. Material and methods. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of 14 non-diabetic patients...... determined fibre-type composition of the vastus lateralis muscle. The mean fibre area of type 1 and 2 fibres was 3283±873 and 3594±1483 µm2, respectively. The MHC composition and the size of the type 1 fibres of the patients on HD were significantly different from those of the control subjects. Conclusions...

  7. Two Cases of Heavy Chain MGUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van Keer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy chain diseases are rare variants of B-cell lymphomas that produce one of three classes of immunoglobulin heavy chains, without corresponding light chains. We describe two patients with asymptomatic heavy chain monoclonal gammopathy. The first patient is a 51-year-old woman with alpha paraprotein on serum immunofixation. The second case is a 46-year-old woman with gamma paraprotein on urine immunofixation. Neither patient had corresponding monoclonal light chains. Workup for multiple myeloma and lymphoma was negative in both patients. These two cases illustrate that heavy chain monoclonal gammopathy can exist in the absence of clinically apparent malignancy. Only a few reports of “heavy chain MGUS” have been described before. In the absence of specialized guidelines, we suggest a similar follow-up as for MGUS, while taking into account the higher probability of progression to lymphoma than to myeloma.

  8. Transchromosomally derived Ig heavy chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K.L.; Kingzette, M.; Crane, M.A. [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    During an immune response, activated B cells undergo isotype switching and begin to express isotypes other than IgM and IgD. Isotype switching occurs when downstream C{gamma}, C{alpha}, or C{epsilon} genes are rearranged into the S{mu} chromosomal region, resulting in the deletion of the region in between. These rearrangements usually occur in cis, i.e., intrachromosomally. In previous studies, we analyzed allotypic specificities of rabbit secretory IgA and identified a substantial number of IgA heavy chains with V{sub h} and C{alpha} allotypes that were encoded by V{sub h} and C{alpha} genes in trans. In those studies, however, we could not determine whether the trans association of V{sub H} and C{alpha} occurred during VDJ gene rearrangement or during isotype switching. Here, we cloned rabbit cDNA which encodes these trans IgA heavy chains and determined the chromosomal origin of the V{sub H}, J{sub H}, and C{alpha} regions. To determine whether the trans association occurred during VDJ gene rearrangement, we analyzed the nucleotide polymorphism of the J{sub H} region and the V{sub H} allotype encoded by the cDNA. We found that the V{sub H} and J{sub H} genes used in the VDJ gene rearrangements were from the same chromosome, indicating that the V{sub H}, D, and J{sub H} gene rearrangements occurred in cis. Furthermore, we analyzed the DNA polymorphisms of J{sub H} and C{alpha} and showed that the VDJ and C{alpha} genes encoding the trans IgA molecules were derived from different parental chromosomes. We suggest that the trans association occurred during isotype switching. This study shows that V{sub H} and C{sub H} can associate transchromosomally as part of a normal immune response. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  10. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

  11. Diversity Analysis of the Immunoglobulin M Heavy Chain Gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A full-length cDNA encoding the immunoglobulin (IgM) heavy chain gene of Nile tilapia was successfully cloned using the 5' and 3' RACE techniques. The complete cDNA of the Nile tilapia IgM heavy chain gene is 1,921 bp in length and has an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,740 bp, which corresponds to 580 amino acid ...

  12. Stability of llama heavy chain antibody fragments under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Camelids have next to their normal antibodies, a unique subset of antibodies lacking light chains. The resulting single binding domain, VHH, of these heavy chain antibodies consequently have unique properties. A high stability is one of these properties, which was investigated in this thesis. The

  13. Nutritional Composition, Vitamins, Minerals And Toxic Heavy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TONUKARI

    This study aimed at analyzing the nutritional potential of a wild edible plant, Trianthema portulacastrum. L. widely used in Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The nutritional composition, vitamins, minerals and heavy elements were analyzed following the standard methods of Association of Official. Analytical ...

  14. Purification and quantification of heavy-chain antibodies from the milk of bactrian camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongqiang; Zhang, Min; Li, Yi; Yao, Jirimutu; Meng, He; Yu, Siriguleng

    2017-09-01

    Camel milk has a unique composition with naturally occurring heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs), which exert rehabilitating potencies in infection and immunity. To characterize HCAb in camel milk, immunoglobulin G (IgG) was isolated from the milk of Camelus bactrianus by a combination of affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to purify and size-fractionate protein A and protein G, which were further identified by Western blotting, and were quantified by bicinchoninic acid (BCA) and ELISA. The results indicated that IgG1 fraction contains molecules of 50 kDa heavy chains and 36 kDa light chains. The HCAbs (IgG2 and IgG3 fractions) devoid of light chains, contain heavy chains of 45 kDa and 43 kDa, respectively, the amounts of which were significantly higher than that of the IgG1 in the milk of bactrian camels. Above all, we revealed the considerable amounts of HCAbs in the milk of bactrian camels, and developed a novel method for their purification and quantification. These findings provide the basis for developing potential effects of camel milk and its interface with the dairy industry, as well as future investigations of HCAb and its roles in human health and diseases. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Expression of heavy chain-only antibodies can support B-cell development in light chain knockout chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schusser, Benjamin; Collarini, Ellen J; Pedersen, Darlene; Yi, Henry; Ching, Kathryn; Izquierdo, Shelley; Thoma, Theresa; Lettmann, Sarah; Kaspers, Bernd; Etches, Robert J; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Harriman, William; Leighton, Philip A

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery of antibody-producing B cells in chickens six decades ago, chickens have been a model for B-cell development in gut-associated lymphoid tissue species. Here we describe targeting of the immunoglobulin light chain locus by homologous recombination in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) and generation of VJCL knockout chickens. In contrast to immunoglobulin heavy chain knockout chickens, which completely lack mature B cells, homozygous light chain knockout (IgL(-/-) ) chickens have a small population of B lineage cells that develop in the bursa and migrate to the periphery. This population of B cells expresses the immunoglobulin heavy chain molecule on the cell surface. Soluble heavy-chain-only IgM and IgY proteins of reduced molecular weight were detectable in plasma in 4-week-old IgL(-/-) chickens, and antigen-specific IgM and IgY heavy chain proteins were produced in response to immunization. Circulating heavy-chain-only IgM showed a deletion of the CH1 domain of the constant region enabling the immunoglobulin heavy chain to be secreted in the absence of the light chain. Our data suggest that the heavy chain by itself is enough to support all the important steps in B-cell development in a gut-associated lymphoid tissue species. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3' enhancer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Collins, John T; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-23

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3' enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3' heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3' enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3' enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to approximately 1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3' enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene.

  17. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3′ enhancer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John T.; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3′ enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3′ heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3′ enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3′ enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to ∼1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3′ enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene. PMID:19887393

  18. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  19. Impact of substrate contamination with mycotoxins, heavy metals and pesticides on the growth performance and composition of black soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens) for use in the feed and food value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purschke, Benedict; Scheibelberger, Rafaela; Axmann, Sonja; Adler, Andreas; Jäger, Henry

    2017-08-01

    Edible insects have emerged as an alternative and sustainable source of high-quality, animal-derived protein and fat for livestock production or direct human nutrition. During the production of insects, substrate quality is a key parameter to assure optimal insect biomass gain as well as the safety of feed and food derived from commercially reared insects. Therefore, the influence of a realistic substrate contamination scenario on growth performance and accumulation behaviour of black soldier fly larvae (BSFL; Hermetia illucens L.) was investigated. Newly hatched larvae were fed on a corn-based substrate spiked with heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb), mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1/B2/G2, deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A, zearalenone) and pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, pirimiphos-methyl) under defined breeding conditions (10 days, 28°C, 67% relative humidity). The extent of contaminants' bioaccumulation in the larval tissue as well as the effect on growing determinants were examined. The applied heavy metal substrate contamination was shown to impair larval growing indicated by significantly lower post-trial larval mass and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Cd and Pb accumulation factors of 9 and 2, respectively, were determined, while the concentrations of other heavy metals in the larvae remained below the initial substrate concentration. In contrast, mycotoxins and pesticides have neither been accumulated in the larval tissue nor significantly affected the growing determinants in comparison with the control. The use of BSFL as livestock feed requires contaminant monitoring - especially for Cd and Pb - in the substrates as well as in feedstuff containing BSFL to ensure feed and food safety along the value chain.

  20. Regional Myosin heavy chain distribution in selected paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Gilad J; Kim, Choll W; Thacker, Bryan E; Tomiya, Akihito; Garfin, Steven R; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2010-06-01

    Cross-sectional study with repeated measures design. To compare the myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution within and between paraspinal muscles and to test the theory that fiber-type gradients exist as a function of paraspinal muscle depth. There is still uncertainty regarding the fiber-type distributions within different paraspinal muscles. It has been previously proposed that deep fibers of the multifidus muscle may contain a higher ratio of type I to type II fibers, because, unlike superficial fibers, they primarily stabilize the spine, and may therefore have relatively higher endurance. Using a minimally invasive surgical approach, using tubular retractors that are placed within anatomic intermuscular planes, it was feasible to obtain biopsies from the multifidus, longissimus, iliocostalis, and psoas muscles at specific predefined depths. Under an institutional review board-approved protocol, muscle biopsies were obtained from 15 patients who underwent minimally invasive spinal surgery, using the posterior paramedian (Wiltse) approach or the minimally invasive lateral approach. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform distribution was analyzed using SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) electrophoresis. Because multiple biopsies were obtained from each patient, MyHC distribution was compared using both within- and between-muscle repeated measures analyses. The fiber-type distribution was similar among the posterior paraspinal muscles and was composed of relatively high percentage of type I (63%), compared to type IIA (19%) and type IIX (18%) fibers. In contrast, the psoas muscle was found to contain a lower percentage of type I fibers (42%) and a higher percentage of type IIA (33%) and IIX fibers (26%; Pmuscles. Fiber-type distribution between the posterior paraspinal muscles is consistent and is composed of relatively high percentage of type I fibers, consistent with a postural function. The psoas muscle, on the other hand, is

  1. Variable fragments of heavy chain antibodies (VHHs): a new magic bullet molecule of medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Dorota; Bertrand, Olivier; Czerwinski, Marcin

    2012-06-14

     Serum of animals belonging to the Camelidae family (camels and llamas) contains fully active antibodies that are naturally devoid of light chains. Variable domains derived from heavy chain antibodies (hcAb) called VHHs or nanobodies™ can bind antigens as effectively as full-length antibodies and are easy to clone and express. Because of their potential, VHHs are being intensively studied as potential therapeutic, diagnostic and imaging tools. The paper reviews the molecular background of heavy chain antibodies and describes methods of obtaining recombinant fragments of heavy chain antibodies as well as their therapeutic, diagnostic and other applications.

  2.  Variable fragments of heavy chain antibodies (VHHs: a new magic bullet molecule of medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Smolarek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Serum of animals belonging to the Camelidae family (camels and llamas contains fully active antibodies that are naturally devoid of light chains. Variable domains derived from heavy chain antibodies (hcAb called VHHs or nanobodies™ can bind antigens as effectively as full-length antibodies and are easy to clone and express. Because of their potential, VHHs are being intensively studied as potential therapeutic, diagnostic and imaging tools. The paper reviews the molecular background of heavy chain antibodies and describes methods of obtaining recombinant fragments of heavy chain antibodies as well as their therapeutic, diagnostic and other applications.

  3. Accounting, charging and billing for dynamic service composition chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumph, F.J.; Kruithof, G.H.; Huitema, G.B.

    2010-01-01

    Services delivered to an end user can be composed of numerous subservices and form chains of composed services. These service composition chains traditionally consist of a static set of business entities. However, in order to increase business agility, dynamic service composition chains can be used

  4. Serial cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament heavy chain levels in severe Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dujmovic, I.; Lunn, M.P.; Reilly, M.M.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal axonotmesis results in the release of neurofilament (Nf) proteins into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). High CSF levels of the phosphorylated form of Nf-heavy chain (NfH

  5. Myosin heavy chain isoforms in single fibres from m. vastus lateralis of sprinters: influence of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J L; Klitgaard, H; Saltin, B

    1994-06-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. vastus lateralis of a group of male sprint athletes (n = 6) was analysed, before and after a three months period of intensive strength- and interval-training, using a sensitive gel electrophoretic technique. Significant improvements were observed after training in almost all of a series of performance tests. After training the sprinters revealed a decrease in fibres containing only MHC isoform I (52.0 +/- 3.0% vs. 41.2 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- SE) (P training (12.9 +/- 5.0% vs. 5.1 +/- 3.1% (P sprinters seems therefore to contain both MHC isoforms IIA and IIB. Sprint-training appears to induce an increased expression of MHC isoform IIA in skeletal muscles. This seems related to a bi-directional transformation from both MHC isoforms I and IIB towards MHC isoform IIA.

  6. Sulfation of the bikunin chondroitin sulfate chain determines heavy chain·hyaluronan complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Day, Anthony J; Youssef, Peter; Zhuo, Lisheng; Watanabe, Hideto; Caterson, Bruce; Whitelock, John M

    2013-08-09

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI) is a complex comprising two heavy chains (HCs) that are covalently bound by an ester bond to chondroitin sulfate (CS), which itself is attached to Ser-10 of bikunin. IαI is essential for the trans-esterification of HCs onto hyaluronan (HA). This process is important for the stabilization of HA-rich matrices during ovulation and some inflammatory processes. Bikunin has been isolated previously by anion exchange chromatography with a salt gradient up to 0.5 M NaCl and found to contain unsulfated and 4-sulfated CS disaccharides. In this study, bikunin-containing fractions in plasma and urine were separated by anion exchange chromatography with a salt gradient of 0.1-1.0 M NaCl, and fractions were analyzed for their reactivity with the 4-sulfated CS linkage region antibody (2B6). The fractions that reacted with the 2B6 antibody (0.5-0.8 M NaCl) were found to predominantly contain sulfated CS disaccharides, including disulfated disaccharides, whereas the fractions that did not react with this antibody (0.1-0.5 M NaCl) contained unsulfated and 4-sulfated CS disaccharides. IαI in the 0.5-0.8 M NaCl plasma fraction was able to promote the trans-esterification of HCs to HA in the presence of TSG-6, whereas the 0.1-0.5 M NaCl fraction had a much reduced ability to transfer HC proteins to HA, suggesting that the CS containing 4-sulfated linkage region structures and disulfated disaccharides are involved in the HC transfer. Furthermore, these data highlight that the structure of the CS attached to bikunin is important for the transfer of HC onto HA and emphasize a specific role of CS chain sulfation.

  7. Excessive amounts of mu heavy chain block B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingqiao; Chang, Cheong-Hee; Dunnick, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    Antigen-independent B-cell development occurs in several stages that depend on the expression of Ig heavy and light chain. We identified a line of mice that lacked mature B cells in the spleen. This mouse line carried approximately 11 copies of a transgene of the murine heavy chain constant region locus, and B-lineage cells expressed excessive amounts of the intracellular μ heavy chain. B-cell development failed in the bone marrow at the pro/pre B-cell transition, and examination of other lines with various copy numbers of the same transgene suggested that deficiencies in B-cell development increased with increased transgene copy number. Expression of a transgenic (Tg) light chain along with the Tg μ heavy chain led to minimal rescue of B-cell development in the bone marrow and B cells in the spleen. There are several potential mechanisms for the death of pro/pre B cells as a consequence of excess heavy chain expression.

  8. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  9. Heavy subgraph pairs for traceability of block-chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Binlong; Li, Binlong; Broersma, Haitze J.; Zhang, Shenggui

    2014-01-01

    A graph is called traceable if it contains a Hamilton path, i.e., a path containing all its vertices. Let G be a graph on n vertices. We say that an induced subgraph of G is o-1-heavy if it contains two nonadjacent vertices which satisfy an Ore-type degree condition for traceability, i.e., with

  10. Large Scale Composite Manufacturing for Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavana, Jacob; Cohen, Leslie J.; Houseal, Keth; Pelham, Larry; Lort, Richard; Zimmerman, Thomas; Sutter, James; Western, Mike; Harper, Robert; Stuart, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Risk reduction for the large scale composite manufacturing is an important goal to produce light weight components for heavy lift launch vehicles. NASA and an industry team successfully employed a building block approach using low-cost Automated Tape Layup (ATL) of autoclave and Out-of-Autoclave (OoA) prepregs. Several large, curved sandwich panels were fabricated at HITCO Carbon Composites. The aluminum honeycomb core sandwich panels are segments of a 1/16th arc from a 10 meter cylindrical barrel. Lessons learned highlight the manufacturing challenges required to produce light weight composite structures such as fairings for heavy lift launch vehicles.

  11. Noninvasive Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Trained and Untrained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Andrew C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel B; Weir, Joseph P; Beck, Travis W; Schilling, Brian K; Miller, Jonathan D; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-09-01

    Fry, AC, Housh, TJ, Cramer, JB, Weir, JP, Beck, TW, Schilling, BK, Miller, JD, and Nicoll, JX. Noninvasive assessment of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain expression in trained and untrained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2355-2362, 2017-Numerous conditions and types of physical activity (e.g., exercise, aging, and muscle-related diseases) can influence muscle fiber types and the proteins expressed. To date, muscle fibers can only be characterized by actually obtaining a tissue sample using the invasive muscle biopsy procedure. Mechanomyography (MMG) is the assessment of the vibration properties of contracting skeletal muscle and has been proposed as a possible noninvasive method for muscle fiber analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of using MMG and muscle performance measures to noninvasively assess muscle fiber characteristics. Fifteen men (5 endurance-trained, 5 weight-trained, and 5 sedentary) provided muscle samples from their vastus lateralis muscle. These samples were analyzed for relative myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein expression, which is highly correlated with % muscle fiber type areas. Additionally, each subject performed several muscle performance tests, and MMG of the quadriceps was assessed during a knee extension exercise. Multiple regression was used to develop prediction equations for determining relative muscle content of MHC types I, IIa, and IIx. A combination of MMG and knee extension performance variables estimated types I, IIa, and IIx MHCs with approximately 80% accuracy. Although preliminary, these data suggest that muscle performance tests in addition to MMG assessments during a simple muscle performance task (knee extension) can be used to estimate muscle fiber type composition in a healthy male population. Such methods could ultimately be used to noninvasively monitor muscle health and fitness.

  12. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  13. Biosynthesis and characterization of a non-repetitive polypeptide derived from silk fibroin heavy chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gaoqiang; Wu, Mingyang; Yi, Honggen; Wang, Jiannan, E-mail: wangjn@suda.edu.cn

    2016-02-01

    Silk fibroin heavy chain is the major protein component of Bombyx mori silk fibroin and is composed of 12 repetitive and 11 non-repetitive regions, with the non-repetitive domain consisting of a hydrophilic polypeptide chain. In order to determine the biomedical function of the non-repetitive domain or potentially use it to modify hydrophobic biomaterials, high-purity isolation is necessary. Previously, we cloned and extended a gene motif (f(1)) encoding the non-repetitive domain. Here, this motif and its multimers are inserted into a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion-protein expression vector. Motif f(1) and multimers f(4) and f(8) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells following isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction, purified by GST-affinity chromatography, and single bands of purified fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8), were visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Target polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8), were cleaved clearly from the GST-fusion tag following thrombin digestion. Mass spectrometry results indicate that the molecular weights associated with fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8) are 31.5, 43.8, and 59.0 kDa, respectively, and with the cleaved polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8) are 4.8, 16.8, and 32.8 kDa, respectively. The F(1), F(4), and F(8) polypeptide chains are negatively charged with isoelectric points (pI) of 3.3, 3.2, and 3.0, respectively. The molecular weight and pI values of the polypeptide chains are consistent with the predicted values and the amino acid compositions similar to predicted sequences. FTIR and CD results show the molecular conformation of F(1) was mainly random coil, and more stable α-helix structure formed in longer molecular chain. - Highlights: • A non-repetitive domain and its multimers of silk fibroin were expressed by E. coli. • The corresponding target polypeptides F(1), F(4) and F(8) were cleaved clearly. • Their

  14. Heavy subgraph pairs for traceability of block-chains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Binlong; Broersma, Haitze J; Zhang, Shenggui

    2014-01-01

    ...., with degree sum at least n−1 in G. A block-chain is a graph whose block graph is a path, i.e., it is either a P1, P2, or a 2-connected graph, or a graph with at least one cut vertex and exactly two end-blocks...

  15. The catabolism of human γG immunoglobulins of different heavy chain subclasses. III. The catabolism of heavy chain disease proteins and of Fc fragments of myeloma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, H. L.; Fishkin, B. G.

    1972-01-01

    The catabolism of 131I and 125I paired labelled Fc fragments of myeloma proteins and of H chain disease proteins of different heavy chain subclasses was studied in men and monkeys. In contrast to the previously demonstrated catabolic heterogeneity of intact γG immunoglobulins, the Fc fragments and H chain disease proteins of all subclasses tested were catabolized at a similar rate. These data suggest that structures not present on the Fc fragments are responsible for the faster turnover rate of γG3 immunoglobulins and for the differences in half-lives of myeloma proteins within a given subclass. The catabolic features of the H chain disease proteins differed from those of intact γG. Although the whole body half-lives of the two proteins were similar, the fractional turnover rate of the H chain disease proteins was higher than that of γG, on the average 8% of the intravascular pool/day as compared to 4% for γG. One-half to 1% of the intravascular pool of the H chain disease protein and less than 0·1% of the γG was excreted into the urine. An average of 24% of the H chain disease proteins and 44% of the γG equilibrated into the intravascular compartment. PMID:4624553

  16. FibreChain: characterization and modeling of thermoplastic composites processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, Bert; Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Akkerman, Remko; Lomov, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermoplastic composites feature the advantage of melting and shaping. The material properties during processing and the final product properties are to a large extent determined by the thermal history of the material. The approach in the FP7-project FibreChain for process chain modeling of

  17. HEAVY-CHAIN DISEASES AND MYELOMA-ASSOCIATED FANCONI SYNDROME: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The heavy chain diseases (HCDs are rare B-cell malignancies characterized by the production of a monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain without an associated light chain. There are three types of HCD, defined by the class of immunoglobulin heavy chain produced: IgA (α-HCD, IgG (γ-HCD, and IgM (μ-HCD. Alpha-HCD is the most common and usually occurs as intestinal malabsorption in a young adult from a country of the Mediterranean area. Gamma- and μ-HCDs are more rare and associated to a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that produces an abnormal Ig heavy chain. These patients may occasionally be diagnosed with a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. Fanconi syndrome, on the other hand, can be primary (inherited or secondary (acquired. The only exception to this rule is the idiopathic form. Adult acquired Fanconi syndrome can be a rare complication of a monoclonal gammopathy. At diagnosis, most patients have a MGUS or smoldering multiple myeloma, with renal failure and evidence of osteomalacia. During follow-up, patients can develop end-stage renal disease. Chemotherapy provides little benefit on renal function.

  18. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  19. Variations in the mineral composition and heavy metals content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parts of Moringa oleifera were assessed for mineral composition and some heavy metal contents in this study, which included Ca, Mg, K, Na, Mn, Fe, Zn, Co, Se, Pb and Cd. Parts of the plant were obtained from Badagry in Lagos State, Nigeria. The samples were digested with HNO3 and analysed for the mineral ...

  20. Heavy metal analyses and nutritional composition of raw and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In view of this study and the importance of fish in human diet, it is recommended that biological monitoring of fishes meant for consumption from these two water bodies be carried out regularly to ensure human safety. Keywords: Nutritional composition, heavy metals, fresh water fishes, marine water fishes, lagoons ...

  1. Heavy metal and proximate composition associated with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2014-05-08

    May 8, 2014 ... Changes in the heavy metal content and proximate composition during the 28 day composting of cassava peels used in the cultivation of the oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus strain EM-1 was studied. Significant dry weight variations of cellulose, hemicellulose and fat contents were observed from day ...

  2. Nutritional composition, vitamins, minerals and toxic heavy metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at analyzing the nutritional potential of a wild edible plant, Trianthema portulacastrum L. widely used in Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The nutritional composition, vitamins, minerals and heavy elements were analyzed following the standard methods of Association of Official Analytical ...

  3. Heavy metal and proximate composition associated with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in the heavy metal content and proximate composition during the 28 day composting of cassava peels used in the cultivation of the oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus strain EM-1 was studied. Significant dry weight variations of cellulose, hemicellulose and fat contents were observed from day 0 to 12.

  4. The composite supply chain efficiency model: A case study of the Sishen-Saldanha supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila L. Goedhals-Gerber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As South Africa strives to be a major force in global markets, it is essential that South African supply chains achieve and maintain a competitive advantage. One approach to achieving this is to ensure that South African supply chains maximise their levels of efficiency. Consequently, the efficiency levels of South Africa’s supply chains must be evaluated. The objective of this article is to propose a model that can assist South African industries in becoming internationally competitive by providing them with a tool for evaluating their levels of efficiency both as individual firms and as a component in an overall supply chain. The Composite Supply Chain Efficiency Model (CSCEM was developed to measure supply chain efficiency across supply chains using variables identified as problem areas experienced by South African supply chains. The CSCEM is tested in this article using the Sishen-Saldanda iron ore supply chain as a case study. The results indicate that all three links or nodes along the Sishen-Saldanha iron ore supply chain performed well. The average efficiency of the rail leg was 97.34%, while the average efficiency of the mine and the port were 97% and 95.44%, respectively. The results also show that the CSCEM can be used by South African firms to measure their levels of supply chain efficiency. This article concludes with the benefits of the CSCEM.

  5. Novel mutations in beta-myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin-I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 3. Novel mutations in beta-myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin-I genes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Indian population. Ushasree Boda Shivani Vadapalli Narsimhan Calambur Pratibha Nallari. Research Note Volume 88 Issue 3 December 2009 pp ...

  6. Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins with a high pH24 value. Jin Hun Kang, Woo Young Bang, Eun Jung Kwon, Yong Hwa Lee, Da Hye Park, Eun Seok Cho, Min Ji Kim, Jong-Soon Choi, Hwa Chun Park, Beom Young Park, Chul Wook Kim ...

  7. Improving properties of llama heavy chain antibodies using in silico analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutje Hulsik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311457517

    2009-01-01

    Microbicides offer a promising way to prevent HIV infection in developing countries. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHHs) that neutralize HIV are an ideal candidate for usage as active microbicide component. A VHH is the smallest intact antigen binding domain which allows it to reach for

  8. Expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (VHHs) by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Gouka, R.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Verrips, C.T.; Lokman, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (VHHs) by Aspergillus awamori. Fragments encoding VHHs were cloned in a suitable Aspergillus expression vector and transformants secreting VHH fragments were analysed for integrated gene copy-numbers, mRNA

  9. The motion planning problem and exponential stabilization of a heavy chain. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Grabowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of paper [P. Grabowski, The motion planning problem and exponential stabilization of a heavy chain. Part I, to appear in International Journal of Control], where a model of a heavy chain system with a punctual load (tip mass in the form of a system of partial differential equations was interpreted as an abstract semigroup system and then analysed on a Hilbert state space. In particular, in [P. Grabowski, The motion planning problem and exponential stabilization of a heavy chain. Part I, to appear in International Journal of Control] we have formulated the problem of exponential stabilizability of a heavy chain in a given position. It was also shown that the exponential stability can be achieved by applying a stabilizer of the colocated-type. The proof used the method of Lyapunov functionals. In the present paper, we give other two proofs of the exponential stability, which provides an additional intrinsic insight into the exponential stabilizability mechanism. The first proof makes use of some spectral properties of the system. In the second proof, we employ some relationships between exponential stability and exact observability.

  10. Improved production and function of llama heavy chain antibody fragments by molecular evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der R.H.; Geus, de B.; Frenken, G.J.; Peters, H.; Verrips, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve production level of llama heavy chain antibody fragments (V (HH)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae while retaining functional characteristics. For this purpose, the DNA shuffling technique was used on llama V (HH) fragments specific for the azo-dye reactive red-6. In

  11. Llama heavy-chain V regions consist of at least four distinct subfamilies revealing novel sequence features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuls, R.C.; Nijman, I.J.; Niewold, T.A.; Frenken, L.G.J.; Geus, de B.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies (Abs), camelids possess Abs consisting of only heavy chains. The variable domain of such a heavy-chain Ab (VHH) is fully capable of antigen (Ag) binding. Earlier analysis of 47 VHHs showed sequence features unique to VHH domains. These include the presence of

  12. Heavy and Light chain amyloidosois presenting as complete heart block: A rare presentation of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Priyamvada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is an uncommon disease characterized by deposition of proteinaceous material in the extracellular matrix, which results from abnormal protein folding. Even though more than 25 precursor proteins are identified, majority of systemic amyloidosis results from deposition of abnormal immunoglobulin (Ig light chains. In heavy chain amyloidosis (AH, deposits are derived from both heavy chain alone, whereas in heavy and light chain amyloidosis (AHL, the deposits are derived from Ig heavy chains and light chains. Both AH and AHL are extremely rare diseases. Here, we report an unusual presentation of IgG (lambda AHL amyloidosis in the background of multiple myeloma, where the initial clinical presentation was complete heart block, which preceded the definitive diagnosis by 18 months.

  13. Heavy and Light chain amyloidosois presenting as complete heart block: A rare presentation of a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, P S; Morkhandikar, S; Srinivas, B H; Parameswaran, S

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon disease characterized by deposition of proteinaceous material in the extracellular matrix, which results from abnormal protein folding. Even though more than 25 precursor proteins are identified, majority of systemic amyloidosis results from deposition of abnormal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains. In heavy chain amyloidosis (AH), deposits are derived from both heavy chain alone, whereas in heavy and light chain amyloidosis (AHL), the deposits are derived from Ig heavy chains and light chains. Both AH and AHL are extremely rare diseases. Here, we report an unusual presentation of IgG (lambda) AHL amyloidosis in the background of multiple myeloma, where the initial clinical presentation was complete heart block, which preceded the definitive diagnosis by 18 months.

  14. Nanobodies and Nanobody-Based Human Heavy Chain Antibodies As Antitumor Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bannas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized cancer therapy. However, delivery to tumor cells in vivo is hampered by the large size (150 kDa of conventional antibodies. The minimal target recognition module of a conventional antibody is composed of two non-covalently associated variable domains (VH and VL. The proper orientation of these domains is mediated by their hydrophobic interface and is stabilized by their linkage to disulfide-linked constant domains (CH1 and CL. VH and VL domains can be fused via a genetic linker into a single-chain variable fragment (scFv. scFv modules in turn can be fused to one another, e.g., to generate a bispecific T-cell engager, or they can be fused in various orientations to antibody hinge and Fc domains to generate bi- and multispecific antibodies. However, the inherent hydrophobic interaction of VH and VL domains limits the stability and solubility of engineered antibodies, often causing aggregation and/or mispairing of V-domains. Nanobodies (15 kDa and nanobody-based human heavy chain antibodies (75 kDa can overcome these limitations. Camelids naturally produce antibodies composed only of heavy chains in which the target recognition module is composed of a single variable domain (VHH or Nb. Advantageous features of nanobodies include their small size, high solubility, high stability, and excellent tissue penetration in vivo. Nanobodies can readily be linked genetically to Fc-domains, other nanobodies, peptide tags, or toxins and can be conjugated chemically at a specific site to drugs, radionuclides, photosensitizers, and nanoparticles. These properties make them particularly suited for specific and efficient targeting of tumors in vivo. Chimeric nanobody-heavy chain antibodies combine advantageous features of nanobodies and human Fc domains in about half the size of a conventional antibody. In this review, we discuss recent developments and perspectives for applications of nanobodies and nanobody

  15. Early Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Diagnosed with Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Molecular Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT, a low grade B-cell lymphoma, arises in the lung it is referred to as bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT lymphoma. We describe a patient with a history of Sjögren’s syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis with dyspnea and imaging consistent with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP. However, while histology and immunohistochemistry lacked definitive features of a lymphoma, immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH polymerase chain reaction testing demonstrated B-cell monoclonality, consistent with an early BALT lymphoma.

  16. Clathrin heavy chain is important for viability, oviposition, embryogenesis and, possibly, systemic RNAi response in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    Full Text Available Clathrin heavy chain has been shown to be important for viability, embryogenesis, and RNA interference (RNAi in arthropods such as Drosophila melanogaster. However, the functional roles of clathrin heavy chain in chelicerate arthropods, such as the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis, remain unknown. We previously showed that dsRNA ingestion, followed by feeding on spider mites, induced systemic and robust RNAi in M. occidentalis females. In the current study, we performed a loss-of-function analysis of the clathrin heavy chain gene in M. occidentalis using RNAi. We showed that ingestion of clathrin heavy chain dsRNA by M. occidentalis females resulted in gene knockdown and reduced longevity. In addition, clathrin heavy chain dsRNA treatment almost completely abolished oviposition by M. occidentalis females and the few eggs produced did not hatch. Finally, we demonstrated that clathrin heavy chain gene knockdown in M. occidentalis females significantly reduced a subsequent RNAi response induced by ingestion of cathepsin L dsRNA. The last finding suggests that clathrin heavy chain may be involved in systemic RNAi responses mediated by orally delivered dsRNAs in M. occidentalis.

  17. Leptogenesis and composite heavy neutrinos with gauge-mediated interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondini, S. [University of Bern, AEC, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Panella, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    Leptogenesis is an appealing framework to account for the baryon asymmetry in the universe. To this end physics beyond the standard model is demanded. In this paper we investigate the possibility to attain successful leptogenesis with composite Majorana neutrinos. We work in the framework of effective gauge-mediated and contact interactions without any reference to an underlying compositeness theory. This approach is the one adopted in all current experimental searches for composite fermions at colliders. In the case of gauge-mediated interactions, we calculate the CP asymmetry in heavy composite neutrino decays. Both the direct and the indirect CP asymmetry are derived and resonant leptogenesis is also discussed. We find that the Sakharov conditions can be met and, for some choice of the parameters, the correct order of magnitude of the baryon asymmetry is reproduced. (orig.)

  18. Coulomb explosion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induced by heavy cosmic rays: carbon chains production rates

    OpenAIRE

    Chabot, Marin; Béroff, Karine; Dartois, Emmanuel; Pino, Thomas; Godard, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic Rays (CR) process the matter of the Interstellar Medium. Such energetic processing not only modifies the interstellar matter but also injects chemical species in the gas phase. In this work, we study the effect of the CR on the astrophysical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). For events in which many electrons are stripped out from the PAH by interaction with a heavy cosmic ray particle, coulomb explosion takes place and carbon chains are produced. The fragments production rates o...

  19. Differential susceptibility on myosin heavy chain isoform following eccentric-induced muscle damage

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-01-01

    Based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, human skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into three fiber types, type I, IIa, IIx fibers, and each fiber type has different characteristics. Typical characteristics are difference in force production, shortening velocity, and fatigue resistance. When the muscle is contract and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle, contraction-induced muscle damage frequently occurs. Several experimental models involving b...

  20. Broad phylogenetic expression of heavy-chain determinants detected by rabbit antisera to VHa allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenshein, I L; Marchalonis, J J

    1985-10-01

    Immunoglobulin molecules from diverse vertebrate species were examined, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for the expression of determinants detectable by rabbit antisera to VHa allotypes. The data indicate that immunoglobulins of elasmobranchs, teleosts, amphibians and birds express determinants cross-reactive with those specified by the a1, a2 and a3 alleles in the domestic rabbit. We localize VHa cross-reactive specificity to the denatured heavy chain of a primitive vertebrate, the Galapagos shark (Carcharhinus galapagensis). Furthermore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the shark heavy chain shows significant homology with rabbit heavy chains of known VHa type at positions where allotype-correlated differences have been implicated. VHa-related determinants are shared by immunoglobulins of a wide range of vertebrates from sharks to man and thus seem to be epitopes which have been conserved during vertebrate evolution. The determinants detected on immunoglobulins of lower vertebrates by rabbit anti-VHa allotype sera most probably are VH-subgroup rather than allotypic markers. Their distribution demonstrates a strong phylogenetic conservation of VH-regions.

  1. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  2. Expression of heavy chain‐only antibodies can support B‐cell development in light chain knockout chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schusser, Benjamin; Collarini, Ellen J.; Pedersen, Darlene; Yi, Henry; Ching, Kathryn; Izquierdo, Shelley; Thoma, Theresa; Lettmann, Sarah; Kaspers, Bernd; Etches, Robert J.; van de Lavoir, Marie‐Cecile; Harriman, William

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of antibody‐producing B cells in chickens six decades ago, chickens have been a model for B‐cell development in gut‐associated lymphoid tissue species. Here we describe targeting of the immunoglobulin light chain locus by homologous recombination in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) and generation of VJCL knockout chickens. In contrast to immunoglobulin heavy chain knockout chickens, which completely lack mature B cells, homozygous light chain knockout (IgL−/−) chickens have a small population of B lineage cells that develop in the bursa and migrate to the periphery. This population of B cells expresses the immunoglobulin heavy chain molecule on the cell surface. Soluble heavy‐chain‐only IgM and IgY proteins of reduced molecular weight were detectable in plasma in 4‐week‐old IgL−/− chickens, and antigen‐specific IgM and IgY heavy chain proteins were produced in response to immunization. Circulating heavy‐chain‐only IgM showed a deletion of the CH1 domain of the constant region enabling the immunoglobulin heavy chain to be secreted in the absence of the light chain. Our data suggest that the heavy chain by itself is enough to support all the important steps in B‐cell development in a gut‐associated lymphoid tissue species. PMID:27392810

  3. Hunting for heavy composite Majorana neutrinos at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardi, R.; Alunni, L.; Fano, L. [Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Perugia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Romeo, F. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Panella, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    We investigate the search for heavy Majorana neutrinos stemming from a composite model scenario at the upcoming LHC Run II at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV. While previous studies of the composite Majorana neutrino were focussed on gauge interactions via magnetic type transition coupling between ordinary and heavy fermions (with mass m*) here we complement the composite model with contact interactions at the energy scale Λ and we find that the production cross sections are dominated by such contact interactions by roughly two/three orders of magnitude. This mechanism provides therefore very interesting rates at the prospected luminosities. We study the same-sign di-lepton and di-jet signature (pp → lljj) and perform a fast detector simulation based on Delphes. We compute 3σ and 5σ contour plots of the statistical significance in the parameter space (Λ,m*). We find that the potentially excluded regions at √(s) =13 TeV are quite larger than those excluded so far at Run I considering searches with other signatures. (orig.)

  4. The influence of soil heavy metals pollution on soil microbial biomass, enzyme activity, and community composition near a copper smelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YuanPeng; Shi, JiYan; Wang, Hui; Lin, Qi; Chen, XinCai; Chen, YingXu

    2007-05-01

    The environmental risk of heavy metal pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to large industrial complexes. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by heavy metals. We studied the potential effects of heavy metals on microbial biomass, activity, and community composition in soil near a copper smelter in China. The results showed that microbial biomass C was negatively affected by the elevated metal levels and was closely correlated with heavy metal stress. Enzyme activity was greatly depressed by conditions in the heavy metal-contaminated sites. Good correlation was observed between enzyme activity and the distance from the smelter. Elevated metal loadings resulted in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by changes in their metabolic profiles from correlation analysis. Significant decrease of soil phosphatase activities was found in the soils 200 m away from the smelter. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis demonstrated that heavy metals pollution had a significant impact on bacterial and actinomycetic community structure. There were negative correlations between soil microbial biomass, phosphatase activity, and NH(4)NO(3) extractable heavy metals. The soil microorganism activity and community composition could be predicted significantly using the availability of Cu and Zn. By combining different monitoring approaches from different viewpoints, the set of methods applied in this study were sensitive to site differences and contributed to a better understanding of heavy metals effects on the structure, size and activity of microbial communities in soils. The data presented demonstrate the role of heavy metals pollution in understanding the heavy metal toxicity to soil microorganism near a copper smelter in China.

  5. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Haryadi

    Full Text Available Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig heavy chain (HC and kappa light chain (LC was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells.

  6. A comprehensive analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuoxiang LIANG,Tao WANG,Yi SUN,Wenlong YANG,Zhihong LIU,Jing FEI,Ying GUO,Qingwei MA,Qingjie PAN,Liming REN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heavy chain only antibodies (HCAbs represent a rare type of antibody that is devoid of light chains and the CH1 domain that have been reported in cartilaginous fish and camelids. By analyzing transcript data and genome sequences, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of Bactrian camel immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. Based on the transcript data, one μ gene, five γ genes, one α gene and one ε gene were found. Additionally, the variable region of HCAbs (VHH and the conventional antibodies (VH sequences associated with the γ3, γ1a/b and μ genes were amplified. Based on these genome sequences, seven DH, six JH, μ, γ2a, γ2c, α, and ε genes and a portion of a γ3 gene were observed. Different Kozak sequences within different VH families were found in our analysis, and the variability index differed between the VHH3 and VH3 families. Phylogenetic analysis of the constant regions of the camelid immunoglobulin genes indicates that these genes appeared before the evolutionary divergence of Bactrian camels and dromedaries.

  7. W-Cu composites subjected to heavy hot deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yang; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Wencong [Harbin Institute of Technology-Weihai (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-04-15

    The effect of plastic deformation on the properties and microstructure of W-Cu composites produced by multi-pass hot extrusion with steel cup was investigated. W-Cu composites were sintered at 1 100 C and then the sintered billets were firstly extruded at 900 C with different extrusion ratios. The second hot extrusion was performed at 900 C. The plastic deformation of copper phase plays a dominant part during the whole extrusion process. The microstructural evolution of W phase during the whole processing of heavy hot deformation can be divided into different stages. Experimental results indicate that the W agglomeration will be broken into fine particles effectively when the accumulated plastic deformation amounts to 97.6 % after the second extrusion.

  8. Growth and Muscle Defects in Mice Lacking Adult Myosin Heavy Chain Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Acakpo-Satchivi, Leslie J.R.; Edelmann, Winfried; Sartorius, Carol; Lu, Brian D.; Wahr, Philip A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Metzger, Joseph M.; Leinwand, Leslie; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1997-01-01

    The three adult fast myosin heavy chains (MyHCs) constitute the vast majority of the myosin in adult skeletal musculature, and are >92% identical. We describe mice carrying null mutations in each of two predominant adult fast MyHC genes, IIb and IId/x. Both null strains exhibit growth and muscle defects, but the defects are different between the two strains and do not correlate with the abundance or distribution of each gene product. For example, despite the fact that MyHC-IIb accounts for >7...

  9. Influence of the Lurcher mutation on myosin heavy chain expression in skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, N; Martrette, J M; Westphal, A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of Lurcher mutation, characterized by degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, granule cells, and inferior olive neurons, on cardiac and skeletal muscles: one respiratory (diaphragm, Dia), three masticatory (anterior temporalis, AT; masseter superficialis, MS and anterior digastric, AD), one hind limb (soleus, S), entire tongue (T), and one cardiac (ventricle, V) muscles. Body and muscle weight, muscle protein content, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms relative expression were then compared in Lurcher mutant mice vs. normal, according to sex. Male body weight was always greater than female one, but there was no specific muscle difference in females, except for T relative weight which was greater in normal females. Muscle protein concentration was greater in normal males except for AD and T in which it was lower. Lurcher mutant mice showed a reduced whole body growth but no specific muscle atrophy (except in male AT), and a global decrease in muscle protein content which made muscles more fragile (except in female Dia and male T, in which it was greater). Lurcher mutation induced a global reduction of muscle protein concentration whereas a general influence of sex could not be disclosed. Concerning MHC relative composition, all the muscles were fast-twitch: Dia, AT, MS, AD, S, and T predominantly expressed the fast type 2 MHC isoforms, except female S, whereas V contained only MHC alpha, also a fast MHC. Female muscles were slower than male ones and classification of muscles in terms of shortening velocity was comparable in normal male and female. In other respects, male Lurcher mutant muscles were slower and consequently more fatigue resistant than normal, except T which became faster and less fatigue resistant. On the contrary, in female mutants, only the Dia was slower than normal one, MS and AD were comparable to normal ones and finally, AT, S, and T were faster than normal ones. It should be noted that a developmental

  10. Antibody Heavy Chain Variable Domains of Different Germline Gene Origins Diversify through Different Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Kirik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available B cells produce antibodies, key effector molecules in health and disease. They mature their properties, including their affinity for antigen, through hypermutation events; processes that involve, e.g., base substitution, codon insertion and deletion, often in association with an isotype switch. Investigations of antibody evolution define modes whereby particular antibody responses are able to form, and such studies provide insight important for instance for development of efficient vaccines. Antibody evolution is also used in vitro for the design of antibodies with improved properties. To better understand the basic concepts of antibody evolution, we analyzed the mutational paths, both in terms of amino acid substitution and insertions and deletions, taken by antibodies of the IgG isotype. The analysis focused on the evolution of the heavy chain variable domain of sets of antibodies, each with an origin in 1 of 11 different germline genes representing six human heavy chain germline gene subgroups. Investigated genes were isolated from cells of human bone marrow, a major site of antibody production, and characterized by next-generation sequencing and an in-house bioinformatics pipeline. Apart from substitutions within the complementarity determining regions, multiple framework residues including those in protein cores were targets of extensive diversification. Diversity, both in terms of substitutions, and insertions and deletions, in antibodies is focused to different positions in the sequence in a germline gene-unique manner. Altogether, our findings create a framework for understanding patterns of evolution of antibodies from defined germline genes.

  11. High-resolution description of antibody heavy-chain repertoires in humans.

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    Ramy Arnaout

    Full Text Available Antibodies' protective, pathological, and therapeutic properties result from their considerable diversity. This diversity is almost limitless in potential, but actual diversity is still poorly understood. Here we use deep sequencing to characterize the diversity of the heavy-chain CDR3 region, the most important contributor to antibody binding specificity, and the constituent V, D, and J segments that comprise it. We find that, during the stepwise D-J and then V-DJ recombination events, the choice of D and J segments exert some bias on each other; however, we find the choice of the V segment is essentially independent of both. V, D, and J segments are utilized with different frequencies, resulting in a highly skewed representation of VDJ combinations in the repertoire. Nevertheless, the pattern of segment usage was almost identical between two different individuals. The pattern of V, D, and J segment usage and recombination was insufficient to explain overlap that was observed between the two individuals' CDR3 repertoires. Finally, we find that while there are a near-infinite number of heavy-chain CDR3s in principle, there are about 3-9 million in the blood of an adult human being.

  12. High-Resolution Description of Antibody Heavy-Chain Repertoires in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Ramy; Lee, William; Cahill, Patrick; Honan, Tracey; Sparrow, Todd; Weiand, Michael; Nusbaum, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies' protective, pathological, and therapeutic properties result from their considerable diversity. This diversity is almost limitless in potential, but actual diversity is still poorly understood. Here we use deep sequencing to characterize the diversity of the heavy-chain CDR3 region, the most important contributor to antibody binding specificity, and the constituent V, D, and J segments that comprise it. We find that, during the stepwise D-J and then V-DJ recombination events, the choice of D and J segments exert some bias on each other; however, we find the choice of the V segment is essentially independent of both. V, D, and J segments are utilized with different frequencies, resulting in a highly skewed representation of VDJ combinations in the repertoire. Nevertheless, the pattern of segment usage was almost identical between two different individuals. The pattern of V, D, and J segment usage and recombination was insufficient to explain overlap that was observed between the two individuals' CDR3 repertoires. Finally, we find that while there are a near-infinite number of heavy-chain CDR3s in principle, there are about 3–9 million in the blood of an adult human being. PMID:21829618

  13. Expression cloning and production of Human Heavy Chain Only antibodies from murine transgenic plasma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Drabek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several technologies have been developed to isolate human antibodies against different target antigens as a source of potential therapeutics, including hybridoma technology, phage and yeast display systems. For conventional antibodies this involves either random pairing of VH and VL domains in combinatorial display libraries, or isolation of cognate pairs of VH and VL domains from human B cells or from transgenic mice carrying human immunoglobulin loci followed by single cell sorting, single cell RT-PCR and bulk cloning of isolated natural VH-VL pairs. Heavy chain only antibodies (HCAbs that naturally occur in camelids require only heavy immunoglobulin chain cloning. Here, we present an automatable novel, high-throughput technology, for rapid direct cloning and production of fully human HCAbs from sorted population of transgenic mouse plasma cells carrying a human HCAb locus. Utility of the technique is demonstrated by isolation of diverse sets of sequence unique, soluble, high affinity influenza A strain X-31 hemagglutinin (HA specific HCAbs

  14. Antibody Heavy Chain Variable Domains of Different Germline Gene Origins Diversify through Different Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirik, Ufuk; Persson, Helena; Levander, Fredrik; Greiff, Lennart; Ohlin, Mats

    2017-01-01

    B cells produce antibodies, key effector molecules in health and disease. They mature their properties, including their affinity for antigen, through hypermutation events; processes that involve, e.g., base substitution, codon insertion and deletion, often in association with an isotype switch. Investigations of antibody evolution define modes whereby particular antibody responses are able to form, and such studies provide insight important for instance for development of efficient vaccines. Antibody evolution is also used in vitro for the design of antibodies with improved properties. To better understand the basic concepts of antibody evolution, we analyzed the mutational paths, both in terms of amino acid substitution and insertions and deletions, taken by antibodies of the IgG isotype. The analysis focused on the evolution of the heavy chain variable domain of sets of antibodies, each with an origin in 1 of 11 different germline genes representing six human heavy chain germline gene subgroups. Investigated genes were isolated from cells of human bone marrow, a major site of antibody production, and characterized by next-generation sequencing and an in-house bioinformatics pipeline. Apart from substitutions within the complementarity determining regions, multiple framework residues including those in protein cores were targets of extensive diversification. Diversity, both in terms of substitutions, and insertions and deletions, in antibodies is focused to different positions in the sequence in a germline gene-unique manner. Altogether, our findings create a framework for understanding patterns of evolution of antibodies from defined germline genes. PMID:29180996

  15. Immunoglobulin analysis tool: a novel tool for the analysis of human and mouse heavy and light chain transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogosch, Tobias; Kerzel, Sebastian; Hoi, Kam Hon; Zhang, Zhixin; Maier, Rolf F; Ippolito, Gregory C; Zemlin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Sequence analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy and light chain transcripts can refine categorization of B cell subpopulations and can shed light on the selective forces that act during immune responses or immune dysregulation, such as autoimmunity, allergy, and B cell malignancy. High-throughput sequencing yields Ig transcript collections of unprecedented size. The authoritative web-based IMGT/HighV-QUEST program is capable of analyzing large collections of transcripts and provides annotated output files to describe many key properties of Ig transcripts. However, additional processing of these flat files is required to create figures, or to facilitate analysis of additional features and comparisons between sequence sets. We present an easy-to-use Microsoft(®) Excel(®) based software, named Immunoglobulin Analysis Tool (IgAT), for the summary, interrogation, and further processing of IMGT/HighV-QUEST output files. IgAT generates descriptive statistics and high-quality figures for collections of murine or human Ig heavy or light chain transcripts ranging from 1 to 150,000 sequences. In addition to traditionally studied properties of Ig transcripts - such as the usage of germline gene segments, or the length and composition of the CDR-3 region - IgAT also uses published algorithms to calculate the probability of antigen selection based on somatic mutational patterns, the average hydrophobicity of the antigen-binding sites, and predictable structural properties of the CDR-H3 loop according to Shirai's H3-rules. These refined analyses provide in-depth information about the selective forces acting upon Ig repertoires and allow the statistical and graphical comparison of two or more sequence sets. IgAT is easy to use on any computer running Excel(®) 2003 or higher. Thus, IgAT is a useful tool to gain insights into the selective forces and functional properties of small to extremely large collections of Ig transcripts, thereby assisting a researcher to mine a data set

  16. Knockdown of embryonic myosin heavy chain reveals an essential role in the morphology and function of the developing heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Catrin Sian; Polo-Parada, Luis; Ehler, Elisabeth; Alibhai, Aziza; Thorpe, Aaran; Suren, Suganthi; Emes, Richard D.; Patel, Bhakti; Loughna, Siobhan

    2011-01-01

    The expression and function of embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMYH) has not been investigated within the early developing heart. This is despite the knowledge that other structural proteins, such as alpha and beta myosin heavy chains and cardiac alpha actin, play crucial roles in atrial septal development and cardiac function. Most cases of atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy are not associated with a known causative gene, suggesting that further analysis into candidate genes is required. Expression studies localised eMYH in the developing chick heart. eMYH knockdown was achieved using morpholinos in a temporal manner and functional studies were carried out using electrical and calcium signalling methodologies. Knockdown in the early embryo led to abnormal atrial septal development and heart enlargement. Intriguingly, action potentials of the eMYH knockdown hearts were abnormal in comparison with the alpha and beta myosin heavy chain knockdowns and controls. Although myofibrillogenesis appeared normal, in knockdown hearts the tissue integrity was affected owing to apparent focal points of myocyte loss and an increase in cell death. An expression profile of human skeletal myosin heavy chain genes suggests that human myosin heavy chain 3 is the functional homologue of the chick eMYH gene. These data provide compelling evidence that eMYH plays a crucial role in important processes in the early developing heart and, hence, is a candidate causative gene for atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy. PMID:21862559

  17. Directed evolution of human heavy chain variable domain (VH using in vivo protein fitness filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sik Kim

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable domains (VH are promising scaffolds for antigen binding. However, VH is an unstable and aggregation-prone protein, hindering its use for therapeutic purposes. To evolve the VH domain, we performed in vivo protein solubility selection that linked antibiotic resistance to the protein folding quality control mechanism of the twin-arginine translocation pathway of E. coli. After screening a human germ-line VH library, 95% of the VH proteins obtained were identified as VH3 family members; one VH protein, MG2x1, stood out among separate clones expressing individual VH variants. With further screening of combinatorial framework mutation library of MG2x1, we found a consistent bias toward substitution with tryptophan at the position of 50 and 58 in VH. Comparison of the crystal structures of the VH variants revealed that those substitutions with bulky side chain amino acids filled the cavity in the VH interface between heavy and light chains of the Fab arrangement along with the increased number of hydrogen bonds, decreased solvation energy, and increased negative charge. Accordingly, the engineered VH acquires an increased level of thermodynamic stability, reversible folding, and soluble expression. The library built with the VH variant as a scaffold was qualified as most of VH clones selected randomly were expressed as soluble form in E. coli regardless length of the combinatorial CDR. Furthermore, a non-aggregation feature of the selected VH conferred a free of humoral response in mice, even when administered together with adjuvant. As a result, this selection provides an alternative directed evolution pathway for unstable proteins, which are distinct from conventional methods based on the phage display.

  18. Bioaccumulative and conchological assessment of heavy metal transfer in a soil-plant-snail food chain

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    Nica Dragos V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper (Cu, zinc (Zn, cadmium (Cd, and lead (Pb can pose serious threats to environmental health because they tend to bioaccumulate in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated under field conditions the transfer of these heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain in Banat area, Romania. The main goal of this paper was to assess the Roman snail (Helix pomatia usefulness in environmental monitoring as bioindicator of heavy metal accumulation. Eight sampling sites, selected by different history of heavy metal (HM exposure, were chosen to be sampled for soil, nettle leaves, and newly matured snails. This study also aimed to identify the putative effects of HM accumulation in the environment on phenotypic variability in selected shell features, which included shell height (SH, relative shell height (RSH, and whorl number (WN. Results Significantly higher amounts of HMs were accumulated in snail hepatopancreas and not in foot. Cu, Zn, and Cd have biomagnified in the snail body, particularly in the hepatopancreas. In contrast, Pb decreased when going up into the food chain. Zn, Cd, and Pb correlated highly with each other at all levels of the investigated food chain. Zn and Pb exhibited an effective soil–plant transfer, whereas in the snail body only foot Cu concentration was correlated with that in soil. There were significant differences among sampling sites for WN, SH, and RSH when compared with reference snails. WN was strongly correlated with Cd and Pb concentrations in nettle leaves but not with Cu and Zn. SH was independent of HM concentrations in soil, snail hepatopancreas, and foot. However, SH correlated negatively with nettle leaves concentrations for each HM except Cu. In contrast, RSH correlated significantly only with Pb concentration in hepatopancreas. Conclusions The snail hepatopancreas accumulates high amounts of HMs, and therefore, this organ can function as a reliable biomarker for tracking HM bioavailability

  19. P53 Mutations Change Phosphatidylinositol Acyl Chain Composition

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    Adam Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP second messengers relay extracellular growth cues through the phosphorylation status of the inositol sugar, a signal transduction system that is deregulated in cancer. In stark contrast to PIP inositol head-group phosphorylation, changes in phosphatidylinositol (PI lipid acyl chains in cancer have remained ill-defined. Here, we apply a mass-spectrometry-based method capable of unbiased high-throughput identification and quantification of cellular PI acyl chain composition. Using this approach, we find that PI lipid chains represent a cell-specific fingerprint and are unperturbed by serum-mediated signaling in contrast to the inositol head group. We find that mutation of Trp53 results in PIs containing reduced-length fatty acid moieties. Our results suggest that the anchoring tails of lipid second messengers form an additional layer of PIP signaling in cancer that operates independently of PTEN/PI3-kinase activity but is instead linked to p53.

  20. Developmental expression and cardiac transcriptional regulation of Myh7b, a third myosin heavy chain in the vertebrate heart

    OpenAIRE

    Warkman, Andrew S.; Whitman, Samantha A; Miller, Melanie K.; Garriock, Robert J.; Schwach, Catherine M.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Krieg, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian heart expresses two myosin heavy chain genes (Myh6 and Myh7), which are major components of the thick filaments of the sarcomere. We have determined that a third myosin heavy chain, MYH7B, is also expressed in the myocardium. Developmental analysis shows Myh7b expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle of Xenopus, chick and mouse embryos, and in smooth muscle tissues during later stages of mouse embryogenesis. Myh7b is also expressed in the adult human heart. The promoter region ...

  1. Myosin heavy chain expression in rodent skeletal muscle: effects of exposure to zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Herrick, R. E.; Adams, G. R.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study ascertained the effects of 9 days of zero gravity on the relative (percentage of total) and calculated absolute (mg/muscle) content of isomyosin expressed in both antigravity and locomotor skeletal muscle of ground control (CON) and flight-exposed (FL) rats. Results showed that although there were no differences in body weight between FL and CON animals, a significant reduction in muscle mass occurred in the vastus intermedius (VI) (P muscle protein and myofibril protein content were not different between the muscle regions examined in the FL and CON groups. In the VI, there were trends for reductions in the relative content of type I and IIa myosin heavy chains (MHCs) that were offset by increases in the relative content of both type IIb and possibly type IIx MHC protein (P > 0.05). mRNA levels were consistent with this pattern (P antigravity skeletal muscle during exposure to zero gravity that could affect muscle function.

  2. Trans-chromosomal recombination within the Ig heavy chain switch region in B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingzette, Mae; Spieker-Polet, Helga; Yam, Pi-Chen; Zhai, Shi-Kang; Knight, Katherine L.

    1998-01-01

    Somatic DNA rearrangements in B lymphocytes, including V(D)J gene rearrangements and isotype switching, generally occur in cis, i. e., intrachromosomally. We showed previously, however, that 3 to 7% of IgA heavy chains have the VH and Cα regions encoded in trans. To determine whether the trans-association of VH and Cα occurred by trans-chromosomal recombination, by trans-splicing, or by trans-chromosomal gene conversion, we generated and analyzed eight IgA-secreting rabbit hybridomas with trans-associated VH and Cα heavy chains. By ELISA and by nucleotide sequence analysis we found that the VH and Cα regions were encoded by genes that were in trans in the germline. We cloned the rearranged VDJ-Cα gene from a fosmid library of one hybridoma and found that the expressed VH and Cα genes were juxtaposed. Moreover, the juxtaposed VH and Cα genes originated from different IgH alleles. From the same hybridoma, we also identified a fosmid clone with the other expected product of a trans-chromosomal recombination. The recombination breakpoint occurred within the Sμ/Sα region, indicating that the trans-association of VH and Cα genes occurred by trans-chromosomal recombination during isotype switching. We conclude that trans-chromosomal recombination occurs at an unexpectedly high frequency (7%) within the IgH locus of B lymphocytes in normal animals, which may explain the high incidence of B-cell tumors that arise from oncogene translocation into the IgH locus. PMID:9751752

  3. Aedes aegypti ferritin heavy chain homologue: feeding of iron or blood influences message levels, lengths and subunit abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris C. Dunkov

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Secreted ferritin in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, has several subunits that are the products of at least two genes, one encoding a homologue of the vertebrate heavy chain (HCH and the other the light chain homologue (LCH. Here we report the developmental and organ specific pattern of expression of the ferritin HCH messages and of both subunit types in control sugar-fed mosquitoes, in those exposed to high levels of dietary iron, and after blood feeding.

  4. Lampreys Have a Single Gene Cluster for the Fast Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5′-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny. PMID:24376886

  5. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ikeda

    Full Text Available Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod, a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans. We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  6. Alpaca (Lama pacos) as a convenient source of recombinant camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHHs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, David R.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Pernthaner, Anton; Shoemaker, Charles B.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that derive from the unusual camelid heavy chain only IgG class (HCAbs) have many favourable properties compared with single-chain antibodies prepared from conventional IgG. As a result, VHHs have become widely used as binding reagents and are beginning to show potential as therapeutic agents. To date, the source of VHH genetic material has been camels and llamas despite their large size and limited availability. Here we demonstrate that the smaller, more tractable and widely available alpaca is an excellent source of VHH coding DNA. Alpaca sera IgG consists of about 50% HCAbs, mostly of the short-hinge variety. Sequencing of DNA encoding more than 50 random VHH and hinge domains permitted the design of PCR primers that will amplify virtually all alpaca VHH coding DNAs for phage display library construction. Alpacas were immunized with ovine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and a VHH phage display library was prepared from a lymph node that drains the sites of immunizations and successfully employed in the isolation of VHHs that bind and neutralize ovine TNFα. PMID:17568607

  7. Immunoglobulin light and heavy chain amyloidosis AL/AH: renal pathology and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picken, Maria M

    2007-01-01

    Among the varied and biochemically diverse group of protein folding disorders that are collectively known as the amyloidoses, AL-amyloidosis where deposits are derived from the immunoglobulin light chain fragments, is the most prevalent systemic form of the disease found in the western world. In contrast, AH-amyloidosis, resulting from the deposition of immunoglobulin heavy chains, is a rare disease with very few cases thus far reported. Both diseases primarily affect older individuals and are always associated with some form of plasma cell/B cell lymphoproliferative process. The overwhelming majority of monoclonal light chains are nephrotoxic leading to frequent renal involvement, although a wide variety of other organ systems may be involved. The most common clinical presentation is proteinuria and the disease is often diagnosed by renal biopsy. The kidneys are the most frequent site of amyloid fibril deposition in AL and light microscopic examination of Congo red stained sections is the prime means of detection. Electron microscopy may be helpful in the detection of small deposits and in the differentiation of amyloid from other types of renal fibrillar deposits. Current treatment of systemic amyloidoses depends upon the type of amyloid deposits; thus, accurate typing, using a panel of antibodies, is of paramount importance. While the differential diagnosis of amyloidoses continues to expand with increased awareness of hereditary types, currently, the main challenge is diagnosis of AL/AH with confidence. Future goals include the development of more precise and sensitive diagnostic tools. This chapter presents the pathology of AL/AH, current standards of diagnosis and the differential diagnosis. Whenever possible, the most recent references, considered as being particularly useful to clinicians and pathologists serving patients with renal amyloidosis, have been selected.

  8. Enhanced factor VIII heavy chain for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingxia; Lu, Hui; Wang, Jinhui; Sarkar, Rita; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Hongli; High, Katherine A; Xiao, Weidong

    2009-03-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy using recombinant adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been hampered by the size of the factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA. Previously, splitting the FVIII coding sequence into a heavy-chain (HC) fragment and a light-chain (LC) fragment for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery has been successfully explored. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is a "chain imbalance" problem in which LC secretion is approximately 1-2 logs higher than that of HC, and therefore, the majority of protein synthesized is nonfunctional. To improve HC secretion, we constructed alternate FVIII HCs based on our observation that LC facilitates HC secretion. To our surprise, most of the new HC molecules exhibited enhanced expression over the traditional HC molecule (HC(745)). The optimized HC mutein, HC(HL), including additional acidic-region-3 (ar3) sequences, exhibited three- to fivefold higher activity in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assay in in vitro testing. Further characterization suggested ar3 sequences increased HC secretion, rather than promoting HC synthesis. Intravenous delivery of AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC or AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC achieved phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Mice receiving AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC achieved three- to fourfold higher HC expression than AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC, consistent with the FVIII functional assays. HC(HL) should be substituted for HC(745) in a dual AAV vector strategy due to its enhanced expression.

  9. Preparation of Desirable Porous Cell Structure Polylactide/Wood Flour Composite Foams Assisted by Chain Extender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youyong Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Polylactide (PLA/wood flour composite foam were prepared through a batch foaming process. The effect of the chain extender on the crystallization behavior and dynamic rheological properties of the PLA/wood flour composites were investigated as well as the crystal structure and cell morphology of the composite foams. The incorporation of the chain extender enhanced the complex viscosity and storage modulus of PLA/wood flour composites, indicating the improved melt elasticity. The chain extender also led to a decreased crystallization rate and final crystallinity of PLA/wood flour composites. With an increasing chain extender content, a finer and more uniform cell structure was formed, and the expansion ratio of PLA/wood flour composite foams was much higher than without the chain extender. Compared to the unfoamed composites, the crystallinity of the foamed PLA/wood flour composites was improved and the crystal was loosely packed. However, the new crystalline form was not evident.

  10. Preparation of Desirable Porous Cell Structure Polylactide/Wood Flour Composite Foams Assisted by Chain Extender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youyong; Song, Yongming; Du, Jun; Xi, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingwen

    2017-08-26

    Polylactide (PLA)/wood flour composite foam were prepared through a batch foaming process. The effect of the chain extender on the crystallization behavior and dynamic rheological properties of the PLA/wood flour composites were investigated as well as the crystal structure and cell morphology of the composite foams. The incorporation of the chain extender enhanced the complex viscosity and storage modulus of PLA/wood flour composites, indicating the improved melt elasticity. The chain extender also led to a decreased crystallization rate and final crystallinity of PLA/wood flour composites. With an increasing chain extender content, a finer and more uniform cell structure was formed, and the expansion ratio of PLA/wood flour composite foams was much higher than without the chain extender. Compared to the unfoamed composites, the crystallinity of the foamed PLA/wood flour composites was improved and the crystal was loosely packed. However, the new crystalline form was not evident.

  11. Heavy Vector Partners of the Light Composite Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    If the Higgs boson $H(125)$ is a composite due to new strong interactions at high energy, it has spin-one partners, $\\rho_H$ and $a_H$, analogous to the $\\rho$ and $a_1$ mesons of QCD. These bosons are heavy, their mass determined by the strong interaction scale. The strongly interacting particles light enough for $\\rho_H$ and $a_H$ to decay to are the longitudinal weak bosons $V_L = W_L,\\, Z_L$ and the Higgs boson $H$. These decay signatures are consistent with resonant diboson excesses recently reported near 2 TeV by ATLAS and CMS. We calculate $\\sigma\\times BR(\\rho_H \\to VV) =$ few fb and $\\sigma\\times BR(a_H \\to VH) =$ 0.5-1 fb at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV, increasing by a factor of 5-7 at 13 TeV. Other tests of the hypothesis of the strong-interaction nature of the diboson resonances are suggested.

  12. The 3D-structure of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus: implications for long-range genomic interactions [supplemental data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Jhunjhunwala (Suchit); M.C. van Zelm (Menno); M.M. Peak (Mandy); S. Cutchin (Steve); R. Riblet (Roy); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Murre (Cornelis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus is organized into distinct regions that contain multiple variable (VH), diversity (DH), joining (JH) and constant (CH) coding elements. How the Igh locus is structured in 3D space is unknown. To probe the topography of the Igh locus,

  13. Improving the accuracy of the structure prediction of the third hypervariable loop of the heavy chains of antibodies.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2014-06-13

    MOTIVATION: Antibodies are able to recognize a wide range of antigens through their complementary determining regions formed by six hypervariable loops. Predicting the 3D structure of these loops is essential for the analysis and reengineering of novel antibodies with enhanced affinity and specificity. The canonical structure model allows high accuracy prediction for five of the loops. The third loop of the heavy chain, H3, is the hardest to predict because of its diversity in structure, length and sequence composition. RESULTS: We describe a method, based on the Random Forest automatic learning technique, to select structural templates for H3 loops among a dataset of candidates. These can be used to predict the structure of the loop with a higher accuracy than that achieved by any of the presently available methods. The method also has the advantage of being extremely fast and returning a reliable estimate of the model quality. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The source code is freely available at http://www.biocomputing.it/H3Loopred/ .

  14. Humanization of Antibodies Using Heavy Chain Complementarity-determining Region 3 Grafting Coupled with in Vitro Somatic Hypermutation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Peter M.; Neben, Tamlyn Y.; Tomlinson, Geoffery L.; Dalton, Jennifer L.; Altobell, Larry; Zhang, Xue; Macomber, John L.; Wu, Betty F.; Toobian, Rachelle M.; McConnell, Audrey D.; Verdino, Petra; Chau, Betty; Horlick, Robert A.; King, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A method for simultaneous humanization and affinity maturation of monoclonal antibodies has been developed using heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3 grafting combined with somatic hypermutation in vitro. To minimize the amount of murine antibody-derived antibody sequence used during humanization, only the CDR3 region from a murine antibody that recognizes the cytokine hβNGF was grafted into a nonhomologous human germ line V region. The resulting CDR3-grafted HC was paired with a CDR-grafted light chain, displayed on the surface of HEK293 cells, and matured using in vitro somatic hypermutation. A high affinity humanized antibody was derived that was considerably more potent than the parental antibody, possessed a low pm dissociation constant, and demonstrated potent inhibition of hβNGF activity in vitro. The resulting antibody contained half the heavy chain murine donor sequence compared with the same antibody humanized using traditional methods. PMID:23355464

  15. Humanization of antibodies using heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 grafting coupled with in vitro somatic hypermutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Peter M; Neben, Tamlyn Y; Tomlinson, Geoffery L; Dalton, Jennifer L; Altobell, Larry; Zhang, Xue; Macomber, John L; Wu, Betty F; Toobian, Rachelle M; McConnell, Audrey D; Verdino, Petra; Chau, Betty; Horlick, Robert A; King, David J

    2013-03-15

    A method for simultaneous humanization and affinity maturation of monoclonal antibodies has been developed using heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3 grafting combined with somatic hypermutation in vitro. To minimize the amount of murine antibody-derived antibody sequence used during humanization, only the CDR3 region from a murine antibody that recognizes the cytokine hβNGF was grafted into a nonhomologous human germ line V region. The resulting CDR3-grafted HC was paired with a CDR-grafted light chain, displayed on the surface of HEK293 cells, and matured using in vitro somatic hypermutation. A high affinity humanized antibody was derived that was considerably more potent than the parental antibody, possessed a low pm dissociation constant, and demonstrated potent inhibition of hβNGF activity in vitro. The resulting antibody contained half the heavy chain murine donor sequence compared with the same antibody humanized using traditional methods.

  16. Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Heavy Metal-Induced Neurotoxicity: Effects of Cadmium, Mercury, and Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Belyaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the role of mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC in heavy-metal-induced neurotoxicity, we studied action of Cd2+, Hg2+, and Cu2+ on cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, respiratory function, and mitochondrial membrane potential of rat cell line PC12. As found, the metals produced, although in a different way, dose- and time-dependent changes of all these parameters. Importantly, Cd2+ beginning from 10 [mu]M and already at short incubation time (3 h significantly inhibited the FCCP-uncoupled cell respiration; besides, practically the complete inhibition of the respiration was reached after 3 h incubation with 50 [mu]M Hg2+ or 500 [mu]M Cd2+, whereas even after 48 h exposure with 500 [mu]M Cu2+, only a 50% inhibition of the respiration occurred. Against the Cd2+-induced cell injury, not only different antioxidants and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors were protective but also such mtETC effectors as FCCP and stigmatellin (complex III inhibitor. However, all mtETC effectors used did not protect against the Hg2+- or Cu2+-induced cell damage. Notably, stigmatellin was shown to be one of the strongest protectors against the Cd2+-induced cell damage, producing a 15–20% increase in the cell viability. The mechanisms of the mtETC involvement in the heavy-metal-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death are discussed.

  17. Studies of heavy metal contents and microbial composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FLEXI-DONEST

    Waste engine oil in soil creates unsatisfactory conditions for plant growth ranging from heavy metal toxicity to ... perennial which grows best in warm frost-free areas. Guinea grass can withstood continuous heavy grazing .... These identified as active members ofbioremediation microbial consortia by Ekundayo and Obuekwe.

  18. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3’ immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Birshtein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination. Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully-differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ~1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5′ constant region gene, Cμ; and an ~40 kb 3′ regulatory region (3′ RR that is located downstream of the most 3′ CH gene, Cα. The 3′ RR is a candidate for an end of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3′ RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4, which are essential for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3′ RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3’ RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3’ RR with its CTCF binding region interacts with target sequences in the VH, Eμ and CH regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh

  19. Catabolism of human γG-immunoglobulins of different heavy chain subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Hans L.; Fishkin, Ben G.; Grey, Howard M.

    1968-01-01

    The rates of catabolism of human γG-immunoglobulins of subclasses γG1, γG2, γG3, and γG4 were studied by determining the rates of elimination from the circulation of pairs of 131I-and 125I-labeled γG-myeloma proteins in 57 patients suffering from cancer other than multiple myeloma. On the average, γG1-, γG2-, and γG4-myeloma proteins were catabolized at a rate similar to that of normal γG-immunoglobulin, whereas γG3-myeloma proteins were catabolized more rapidly than normal γG-immunoglobulin. The average half-lives for the myeloma proteins were 12.3 days for normal γG, 11.6 days for γG1, 12.4 days for γG2, 8.2 days for γG3, and 11.3 days for γG4. However, significant differences in catabolic rates were observed when individual myeloma proteins of a single subclass were compared. These individual variations were present within all four heavy chain subclasses. The extent of differences ranged from 10 to 47%. The catabolic rate of normal γG was in an intermediate range when compared with myeloma proteins of relatively long and short half-lives. The rate of catabolism of an individual myeloma protein did not correlate with its light chain type, Gm factor, carbohydrate content, or electrophoretic mobility. These findings indicate that the structure(s) related to the catabolism of γG-immunoglobulins are complex and differ from one immunoglobulin molecule to another. Images PMID:4175542

  20. Size and myosin heavy chain profiles of rat hindlimb extensor muscle fibers after 2 weeks at 2G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R R; Roy, M E; Talmadge, R J; Mendoza, R; Grindeland, R E; Vasques, M

    1996-09-01

    The effects of 14 d of continuous centrifugation at approximately 2G on the hindlimb extensor musculature of male rats were studied. The mean body mass of centrifuged rats was 17% smaller than age-matched controls. In centrifuged rats, the mean absolute masses of the soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were similar to control, while the mean relative masses (expressed as milligram muscle mass/gram of body mass) were larger than control. Based on a battery of monoclonal antibodies for specific myosin heavy chains (MHC), the soleus of centrifuged rats had a lower percentage (68 vs. 74%) of fibers expressing type I MHC only and a higher percentage (15 vs. 10%) that co-expressed type I and IIa MHC's. The MHC composition of fibers from the deep portion of the MG was unaffected by centrifugation. The MHC compositions based on SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis for each muscle were similar in the two groups. Mean fiber size of each fiber type in the soleus was unaffected by centrifugation. In the MG, the fibers, expressing only type IIb MHC were smaller in the centrifuge compared to control rats. Although 2 weeks of chronic centrifugation at 2G resulted in a cessation of body growth, there was essentially no effect on the muscle masses or fiber size in either a slow or fast extensor muscle. These data suggest that periods of centrifugation may be beneficial in maintaining extensor muscle mass in an animal that is not growing at a normal rate e.g., during chronic unloading.

  1. Heavy nickel isotope compositions in rivers and the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, V.; Vance, D.

    2014-03-01

    in the surface ocean suggests that the cycling of nickel between the surface and deep ocean is not associated with a pronounced isotopic fractionation. The isotopic data also present a mass balance problem. The main output of nickel from the oceans (sorption to Fe-Mn oxides) appears to be similar in isotopic composition to the dissolved phase, yet the riverine input is lighter than the dissolved pool. This observation either requires other inputs that are isotopically heavy, or an output that is isotopically light. Further large inputs, over and above the dissolved riverine source, appear to be required by what we know of the elemental budget, but the isotopic mass balance suggests that such an input needs to be isotopically much heavier than both the riverine dissolved load and the lithogenic isotopic composition of nickel. Ni isotopes in the dissolved phase of rivers (discharge- and concentration-weighted δ60Ni = +0.8 ‰) are heavier than the average of the small dataset for silicate rocks and sediments on the continent (at around 0‰ to +0.3‰; Cameron et al., 2009). This feature is common to other transition metal isotope systems such as Mo and Cu (Archer and Vance, 2008; Vance et al., 2008), and likely reflects isotope fractionation in the weathering environment or during transport in rivers. Ni isotopes in the dissolved phase of the ocean are significantly heavier than this dissolved riverine source, at δ60Ni = +1.44 ± 0.15‰ (2SD, n = 29 from the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern Oceans), necessitating either another input that is heavier than rivers, or an isotopically light output. Oceanic dissolved Ni isotopes are strikingly homogeneous, with little significant difference between the surface ocean where Ni concentrations drop as low as 1.5-2 nM and the deep ocean where they are as high as 10-11 nM. Thus, the drawdown of Ni in the surface ocean must occur via a process that does not involve a significant enough isotopic fractionation to yield residual

  2. Electrophoretic Mobility of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Revisited: Application of MALDI TOF/TOF Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Arnostova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of two cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in response to the thyroid status was studied in left ventricles (LVs of Lewis rats. Major MyHC isoform in euthyroid and hyperthyroid LVs had a higher mobility on SDS-PAGE, whereas hypothyroid LVs predominantly contained a MyHC isoform with a lower mobility corresponding to that of the control soleus muscle. By comparing the MyHC profiles obtained under altered thyroid states together with the control soleus, we concluded that MyHCα was represented by the lower band with higher mobility and MyHCβ by the upper band. The identity of these two bands in SDS-PAGE gels was confirmed by western blot and mass spectrometry. Thus, in contrast to the literature data, we found that the MyHCα possessed a higher mobility rate than the MyHCβ isoform. Our data highlighted the importance of the careful identification of the MyHCα and MyHCβ isoforms analyzed by the SDS-PAGE.

  3. A Mouse Neurodegenerative Dynein Heavy Chain Mutation Alters Dynein Motility and Localization in Neurospora crassa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is responsible for the transport and delivery of cargoes in organisms ranging from humans to fungi. Dysfunction of dynein motor machinery due to mutations in dynein or its activating complex dynactin can result in one of several neurological diseases in mammals. The mouse Legs at odd angles (Loa) mutation in the tail domain of the dynein heavy chain has been shown to lead to progressive neurodegeneration in mice. The mechanism by which the Loa mutation affects dynein function is just beginning to be understood. In this work, we generated the dynein tail mutation observed in Loa mice into the Neurospora crassa genome and utilized cell biological and complementing biochemical approaches to characterize how that tail mutation affected dynein function. We determined that the Loa mutation exhibits several subtle defects upon dynein function in N. crassa that were not seen in mice, including alterations in dynein localization, impaired velocity of vesicle transport, and in the biochemical properties of purified motors. Our work provides new information on the role of the tail domain on dynein function and points out areas of future research that will be of interest to pursue in mammalian systems. PMID:22991199

  4. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  5. Iron Deposition and Ferritin Heavy Chain (Fth Localization in Rodent Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An iron rich layer on the labial surface is characteristic of the enamel of rodent incisors. In order to address a role for iron content in continuously growing incisors during odontogenesis, we studied iron deposition patterns in enamel and dentine using Perls’ blue staining and ferritin heavy chain (Fth immunolocalization. Fth expression is regulated by iron level; therefore its localization can be used as a sensitive indicator for iron deposition. Results Sagittal sections of 4-week old rat incisors showed a gradual increase in iron level in the enamel organ from secretory to maturation stages. In addition, iron was detected in ameloblasts of erupting third molars of 4-week old rats, suggesting iron plays a role in both incisor and molar development. In odontoblasts, the presence of iron was demonstrated, and this is consistent with iron’s role in collagen synthesis. Using postnatal 3-, 6-, 9-day old mice, the spatial and temporal expression of Fth in tooth development again indicated the presence of iron in mature ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Conclusions While these data do not explain what functional role iron has in tooth formation, it does highlight a significant molecular activity associated with the formation of the rodent dentition.

  6. Ozz-E3 ubiquitin ligase targets sarcomeric embryonic myosin heavy chain during muscle development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Campos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contractile proteins are expressed as a series of developmental isoforms that are in constant dynamic remodeling during embryogenesis, but how obsolete molecules are recognized and removed is not known. Ozz is a developmentally regulated protein that functions as the adaptor component of a RING-type ubiquitin ligase complex specific to striated muscle. Ozz(-/- mutants exhibit defects in myofibrillogenesis and myofiber differentiation. Here we show that Ozz targets the rod portion of embryonic myosin heavy chain and preferentially recognizes the sarcomeric rather than the soluble pool of myosin. We present evidence that Ozz binding to the embryonic myosin isoform within sarcomeric thick filaments marks it for ubiquitination and proteolytic degradation, allowing its replacement with neonatal or adult isoforms. This unique function positions Ozz within a system that facilitates sarcomeric myosin remodeling during muscle maturation and regeneration. Our findings identify Ozz-E3 as the ubiquitin ligase complex that interacts with and regulates myosin within its fully assembled cytoskeletal structure.

  7. Association between a common immunoglobulin heavy chain allele and rheumatic heart disease risk in Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Tom; Mirabel, Mariana M; Kado, Joseph; Auckland, Kathryn; Nowak, Jaroslaw; Rautanen, Anna; Mentzer, Alexander J; Marijon, Eloi; Jouven, Xavier; Perman, Mai Ling; Cua, Tuliana; Kauwe, John K; Allen, John B; Taylor, Henry; Robson, Kathryn J; Deane, Charlotte M; Steer, Andrew C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2017-05-11

    The indigenous populations of the South Pacific experience a high burden of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of RHD susceptibility in 2,852 individuals recruited in eight Oceanian countries. Stratifying by ancestry, we analysed genotyped and imputed variants in Melanesians (607 cases and 1,229 controls) before follow-up of suggestive loci in three further ancestral groups: Polynesians, South Asians and Mixed or other populations (totalling 399 cases and 617 controls). We identify a novel susceptibility signal in the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) locus centring on a haplotype of nonsynonymous variants in the IGHV4-61 gene segment corresponding to the IGHV4-61*02 allele. We show each copy of IGHV4-61*02 is associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of RHD (odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence intervals 1.27-1.61, P=4.1 × 10(-9)). These findings provide new insight into the role of germline variation in the IGH locus in disease susceptibility.

  8. Requirement for enhancer specificity in immunoglobulin heavy chain locus regulation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Igor I.; Bagaeva, Ludmila; Young, Faith M.; Bottaro, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The intronic Eμ enhancer has been implicated in immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus transcription, VDJ recombination, class switch recombination (CSR)2 and somatic hypermutation (SHM). How Eμ controls these diverse mechanisms is still largely unclear, but transcriptional enhancer activity is thought to play a central role. Here we compare the phenotype of mice lacking the Eμ element (ΔEμ) with that of mice in which Eμ was replaced with the ubiquitous SV40 transcriptional enhancer (SV40eR mutation), and show that SV40e cannot functionally complement Eμ loss in pro-B cells. Surprisingly, in fact, the SV40eR mutation yields a more profound defect than ΔEμ, with an almost complete block in μ0 germline transcription in pro-B cells. This active transcriptional suppression caused by enhancer replacement appears to be specific to the early stages of B cell development, as mature SV40eR B cells express μ0 transcripts at higher levels than ΔEμ mice, and undergo complete DNA demethylation at the IgH locus. These results indicate an unexpectedly stringent, developmentally-restricted requirement for enhancer specificity in regulating IgH function during the early phases of B cell differentiation, consistent with the view that coordination of multiple independent regulatory mechanisms and elements is essential for locus activation and VDJ recombination. PMID:18490744

  9. Cross Talk between Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Transcription and RNA Surveillance during B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Aurélien; Chemin, Guillaume; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes naturally acquire frequent premature termination codons during the error-prone V(D)J recombination process. Although B cell differentiation is linked to the expression of productive Ig alleles, the transcriptional status of nonfunctionally recombined alleles remains unclear. Here, we tracked transcription and posttranscriptional regulation for both Ig heavy-chain (IgH) alleles in mice carrying a nonfunctional knock-in allele. We show that productively and nonproductively VDJ-rearranged alleles are transcribed throughout B cell development, carry similar active chromatin marks, and even display equivalent RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) loading after B cell stimulation. Hence, these results challenge the idea that the repositioning of one allele to heterochromatin could promote the silencing of nonproductive alleles. Interestingly, the efficiency of downstream RNA surveillance mechanisms fluctuates according to B cell activation and terminal differentiation: unspliced nonfunctional transcripts accumulate in primary B cells, while B cell activation promotes IgH transcription, RNA splicing, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Altogether, IgH transcription and RNA splicing rates determine by which RNA surveillance mechanisms a B cell can get rid of nonproductive IgH mRNAs. PMID:22037763

  10. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Nasibeh; Jeddi, Sajad; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH) in rats has not been elucidated thus far. The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and β-MHC isoforms. Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201%) and α- MHC expression was lower (47%) than control. Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  11. Hypoxia favors myosin heavy chain beta gene expression in an Hif-1alpha-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binó, Lucia; Procházková, Jiřina; Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Kučera, Jan; Kudová, Jana; Pacherník, Jiří; Kubala, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    The potentiation of the naturally limited regenerative capacity of the heart is dependent on an understanding of the mechanisms that are activated in response to pathological conditions such as hypoxia. Under these conditions, the expression of genes suggested to support cardiomyocyte survival and heart adaptation is triggered. Particularly important are changes in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. We propose here that alterations in the expression profiles of MHC genes are induced in response to hypoxia and are primarily mediated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). In in vitro models of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, we showed that hypoxia (1% O2) or the pharmacological stabilization of HIFs significantly increased MHCbeta (Myh7) gene expression. The key role of HIF-1alpha is supported by the absence of these effects in HIF-1alpha-deficient cells, even in the presence of HIF-2alpha. Interestingly, ChIP analysis did not confirm the direct interaction of HIF-1alpha with putative HIF response elements predicted in the MHCalpha and beta encoding DNA region. Further analyses showed the significant effect of the mTOR signaling inhibitor rapamycin in inducing Myh7 expression and a hypoxia-triggered reduction in the levels of antisense RNA transcripts associated with the Myh7 gene locus. Overall, the recognized and important role of HIF in the regulation of heart regenerative processes could be highly significant for the development of novel therapeutic interventions in heart failure. PMID:29137374

  12. Combination of neurofilament heavy chain and complement c3 as CSF biomarkers for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; An, Jiyan; Shaw, Christopher E; Shaw, Gerry; Lacomis, David; Bowser, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease with an average survival of 3 years from symptom onset. Rapid and conclusive early diagnosis is essential if interventions with disease-modifying therapies are to be successful. Cytoskeletal modification and inflammation are known to occur during the pathogenesis of ALS. We measured levels of cytoskeletal proteins and inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of ALS, disease controls and healthy subjects. We determined threshold values for each protein that provided the optimal sensitivity and specificity for ALS within a training set, as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Interestingly, the optimal assay was a ratio of the levels for phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain and complement C3 (pNFH/C3). We next applied this assay to a separate test set of CSF samples to verify our results. Overall, the predictive pNFH/C3 ratio identified ALS with 87.3% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity in a total of 71 ALS subjects, 52 disease control subjects and 40 healthy subjects. In addition, the level of CSF pNFH correlated with survival of ALS patients. We also detected increased pNFH in the plasma of ALS patients and observed a correlation between CSF and plasma pNFH levels within the same subjects. These findings support large-scale prospective biomarker studies to determine the clinical utility of diagnostic and prognostic signatures in ALS. PMID:21418221

  13. Phosphorylated Neurofilament Heavy Chain Correlations to Visual Function, Optical Coherence Tomography, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasol, Joshua; Feuer, William; Yang, Cui; Shaw, Gerry; Kardon, Randy; Guy, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To correlate visual and neurologic clinical scores and treatment of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with assays of serum phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of axonal loss. Design/Methods. The Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial (ONTT) randomized 457 patients with acute optic neuritis to intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) followed by oral prednisone, oral prednisone or placebo treatment arms. We quantified serum pNF-H levels in 175 ONTT patients 5 years after study entry. We performed OCT measurements of macular volume and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in a subset of 51 patients at year 15. Results. Elevated pNF-H levels at year 5 correlated to poorer visual function at study entry. Lower 15 year macular volumes and RNFL thickness correlated better with follow-up than with baseline visual function measures. With IVMP treatment, 15 year RNFL differences of the fellow eye (FE) minus the affected eye (SE) RNFLFEmSE correlated with five-year pNF-H levels. PNF-H was reduced by half with IVMP relative to placebo or by 40% relative to prednisone. Conclusions/Relevance. Acute optic neuritis patients who have more severe visual loss during initial presentation have a higher incidence of axonal loss that was slightly suppressed with IVMP treatment. PMID:22096624

  14. Differential binding of heavy chain variable domain 3 antigen binding fragments to protein A chromatography resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Julia; Lewis, Nathaniel; Maggiora, Kathy; Gillespie, Alison J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-08-28

    This work examines the binding of 15 different VH3 IgGs and their corresponding F(ab')2 fragments to two different protein A chromatography resins: MabSelect(®), which utilizes a recombinant protein A ligand, and MabSelect SuRe(®) (SuRe), which utilizes a tetrameric Z domain ligand. The results show that VH3 F(ab')2 fragments can exhibit a variety of binding behaviours for the two resins. Contrary to previously published data, a subset of these molecules show strong interaction with the Z domain of SuRe(®). Furthermore, the results show that sequence variability of residue 57 in the VH3 heavy chain CDR2 domain correlates with binding behaviour on MabSelect(®) and SuRe(®). Site-directed mutagenesis of this residue confers gain or loss of VH3 F(ab')2 binding to these resins in 3 mAbs, demonstrating that it plays a key role in both recombinant protein A and Z domain interaction. A fourth mAb with a longer CDR2 loop was not affected by mutation of residue 57, indicating that CDR2 domain length may alter the binding interface and lead to the involvement of other residues in protein A binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hierarchical composite polyaniline-(electrospun polystyrene) fibers applied to heavy metal remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Espinoza, José J; Chávez-Guajardo, Alicia E; Medina-Llamas, Juan C; Andrade, César A S; de Melo, Celso P

    2015-04-08

    We describe the in situ preparation of a multipurpose hierarchical polyaniline-polystyrene (PANI-PS) composite based in the chemical polymerization of PANI on nonwoven (NW) electrospun PS mats. We performed a detailed study of the properties of these materials to select the best strategies to incorporate PANI chains into pristine NW PS mats without compromising the original porosity and mechanical flexibility of the matrices. The resulting composites presented nanostructured PANI chains highly dispersed in the interior of the NW PS mat and showed good electrical properties and surface-wetting characteristics that could be easily controlled. In particular, we show that these NW PANI-PS mats exhibit interesting properties in their interaction with heavy metal ions. For instance, their high adsorption capacities toward dispersed Hg(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(VI), and Cu(II) ions make them promising materials for water remediation, by providing a simple manner of collecting and removing these metals from aqueous systems. In fact, the NW electrospun mats here presented do not suffer from the usual limitations found in materials commonly employed as adsorbents, such as a tendency to agglomerate or accumulate in the environment because of difficulties of properly recovering them after use. To better understand the nature of each pairwise metal-PANI interaction, we performed a thorough investigation of the optical and electrical changes induced by the metal adsorption in the NW PANI-PS mats. As a consequence of their interaction with the metal ions, the visual aspect of the mats change, a fact more evident in the case of Cr(VI) removal, when the matrices vary their color from green to purple. These changes are related to the variation of the oxidation state of the PANI chains: as the ion metals are progressively adsorbed into the mat, they promote the conversion in varying degrees of the PANI chains from salt emeraldine to the pernigraniline form, and the mats become more

  16. The repertoire of heavy chain immunoglobulin genes in B‑cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Russia and Belarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Biderman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutation status of the heavy chain variable region genes has long been known as an important factor in long‑term prognosis in B‑cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B‑CLL. A more detailed study of the gene sequences of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgVH led to the discovery of stereotyped antigen receptors (SAR — receptors that have the same set of VH‑, D‑ and JH‑genes used. Cells with SARs have been found almost in a quarter of all B‑CLL cases. This phenomenon is not observed in other lymphatic tumors. In our study, we confirmed and extended the basic observations concerning the repertoire of IgVH in B‑CLL. Differences in the B‑CLL IgVH gene repertoirs between Russia, Вelarus and other countries are also analysed and discussed.

  17. Effects of voluntary wheel running on cardiac function and myosin heavy chain in chemically gonadectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydock, David S; Lien, Chia-Ying; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2007-12-01

    Reducing testosterone and estrogen levels with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist such as Zoladex (i.e., chemical gonadectomy) is a common treatment for many prostate and breast cancer patients, respectively. There are reports of surgical gonadectomy inducing cardiac dysfunction, and exercise has been shown to be cardioprotective under these circumstances. Minimal research has been done investigating the effects of chemical gonadectomy and increased physical activity on cardiac function. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of chemical gonadectomy and physical activity on cardiac function. Male (M) and female (F) Sprague-Dawley rats received either Zoladex treatment (Zol) that suppressed gonadal function for 8 wk or control implants (Con) and either were allowed unlimited access to voluntary running wheels (WR) or remained sedentary (Sed) throughout the treatment period. In vivo and ex vivo left ventricle (LV) function were then assessed, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was analyzed to help explain LV functional differences. Hearts from M Sed+Zol exhibited significantly lower aortic blood flow velocity, developed pressure, and maximal rate of pressure development and higher beta-MHC expression than M Sed+Con. Hearts from F Sed+Zol exhibited significantly lower LV wall thicknesses, fractional shortening, and developed pressure and higher beta-MHC expression than F Sed+Con. This cardiac dysfunction was not evident in hearts from M or F WR+Zol, and this was associated with a preservation of the MHC isoform distribution. Thus an 8-wk chemical gonadectomy with Zoladex promoted cardiac dysfunction in male and female rats, and voluntary wheel running protected against this cardiac dysfunction.

  18. The Ig heavy chain switch region is a hotspot for insertion of transfected DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baar, J.; Shulman, M.J. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-08-15

    The Ig heavy chain switch usually occurs by breaking and rejoining DNA in the switch (S) regions, which consist of tandemly repeated sequences 5{prime} of the constant region exons. Various studies have suggested that S DNA can also recombine with non-S sequences. To measure the frequency of such recombination events, the hybridoma cell line igm692, a deletion mutant that lacks the C{mu}1 and C{mu}2 exons and the 3{prime} end of the S{mu} region, was transfected with a fragment bearing the C{mu}1-2 exons, but no S{mu} DNA. Insertion of this fragment into the residual VDJ-C{mu} intron of igm692 can restore a functional {mu} gene, yielding a transformant that is detected as a plaque-forming cell (PFC). PFCs comprise {approximately}8 x 10{sup -7} of the surviving transfected cells. In 10 of 12 PFCs, the C{mu}1-2 fragment inserted into the 2.5-kb residual S{mu} region, whereas insertion in two cases occurred in the 3.5-kb segment 5{prime} of S{mu}. Using a PCR assay to measure the frequency of insertion of the tranferred fragment elsewhere in the hybridoma genome, we found that {approximately}9% of the surviving tranfected cells had stably acquired the C{mu}1-2 fragment. These results indicate that the S{mu} region is {approximately}100-fold more recombinogenic than the average genomic site, and {approximately}7-fold more recombinogenic than the non-S{mu} segment of the residual VDJ-C{mu}, i.e., the S{mu} region is a hotspot for insertion of transfected DNA.

  19. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasibeh Yousefzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH in rats has not been elucidated thus far. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC and β-MHC isoforms. Methods: Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Results: Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p < 0.05 and heart rate (217 ± 11 vs. 273 ± 6 beat/min, p < 0.05 were lower in the FH rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201% and α- MHC expression was lower (47% than control. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  20. Epitope mapping of antibodies against ferritin heavy chain in giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große, K; Schmidt, R E; Witte, T; Baerlecken, N T

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study we found an association between antibodies against the human ferritin heavy chain (HFC) protein and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and/or polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), especially in GCA/PMR patients prior to glucocorticoid treatment. Antibodies against the N-terminal part of ferritin were present in 92% of untreated patients, 69% of patients with disease flare, and 13% of patients in remission. These antibodies appeared to be markers for the early detection of a disease complex usually diagnosed with considerable delay. Our aim in this study was to optimize the diagnostic test by epitope mapping of antibodies against HFC using peptide antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). We evaluated serum samples from a selected group of GCA/PMR patients in whom the sensitivity of antibodies against the N-terminal ferritin peptide was only 35%. Patients with late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA), patients with fever, patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), patients without any autoimmune disease at age > 65 years, and blood donors served as controls. By combining different ELISAs we were able to increase the frequency of human ferritin peptide antibodies in GCA/PMR (p < 0.0001) without significantly altering the false-positive rate (FPR) of the diagnostic test. The frequency of antibodies against human ferritin peptide increased from 53% to 74% in GCA/PMR patients with disease flare, from 29% to 40% in GCA/PMR patients in partial remission, and from 8% to 45% in GCA/PMR patients in complete remission. The potential diagnostic test for GCA/PMR can be improved by combining three human ferritin peptide antibodies.

  1. Role of kinesin heavy chain in Crumbs localization along the rhabdomere elongation in Drosophila photoreceptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett P League

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crumbs (Crb, a cell polarity gene, has been shown to provide a positional cue for the extension of the apical membrane domain, adherens junction (AJ, and rhabdomere along the growing proximal-distal axis during Drosophila photoreceptor morphogenesis. In developing Drosophila photoreceptors, a stabilized microtubule structure was discovered and its presence was linked to polarity protein localization. It was therefore hypothesized that the microtubules may provide trafficking routes for the polarity proteins during photoreceptor morphogenesis. This study has examined whether Kinesin heavy chain (Khc, a subunit of the microtubule-based motor Kinesin-1, is essential in polarity protein localization in developing photoreceptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because a genetic interaction was found between crb and khc, Crb localization was examined in the developing photoreceptors of khc mutants. khc was dispensable during early eye differentiation and development. However, khc mutant photoreceptors showed a range of abnormalities in the apical membrane domain depending on the position along the proximal-distal axis in pupal photoreceptors. The khc mutant showed a progressive mislocalization in the apical domain along the distal-proximal axis during rhabdomere elongation. The khc mutation also led to a similar progressive defect in the stabilized microtubule structures, strongly suggesting that Khc is essential for microtubule structure and Crb localization during distal to proximal rhabdomere elongation in pupal morphogenesis. This role of Khc in apical domain control was further supported by khc's gain-of-function phenotype. Khc overexpression in photoreceptors caused disruption of the apical membrane domain and the stabilized microtubules in the developing photoreceptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we examined the role of khc in the regulation of the apical Crb domain in developing photoreceptors. Since the rhabdomeres in

  2. Analysis of Heavy-Chain Antibody Responses and Resistance to Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in Experimentally Infected Alpacas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, S. R.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Lefman, S.; Hamel, P. J. S.; Ku, S.; Mainini, T.; Hoyt, G.; Justus, K.; Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Duffy, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Parelaphostrongylus tenuis is an important cause of neurologic disease of camelids in central and eastern North America. The aim of this study was to determine whether alpacas develop resistance to disease caused by P. tenuis in response to a previous infection or a combination of controlled infection and immunization. Alpacas were immunized with a homogenate of third-stage larvae (L3) and simultaneously implanted subcutaneously with diffusion chambers containing 20 live L3. Sham-treated animals received adjuvant alone and empty chambers. The protocol was not effective in inducing resistance to oral challenge with 10 L3, and disease developed between 60 and 71 days following infection. Immediately following the onset of neurologic disease, affected animals were treated with a regimen of anthelmintic and anti-inflammatory drugs, and all recovered. One year later, a subset of alpacas from this experiment was challenged with 20 L3 and the results showed that prior infection induced resistance to disease. Primary and secondary infections induced production of conventional and heavy-chain IgGs that reacted with soluble antigens in L3 homogenates but did not consistently recognize a recombinant form of a parasite-derived aspartyl protease inhibitor. Thus, the latter antigen may not be a good candidate for serology-based diagnostic tests. Antibody responses to parasite antigens occurred in the absence of overt disease, demonstrating that P. tenuis infection can be subclinical in a host that has been considered to be highly susceptible to disease. The potential for immunoprophylaxis to be effective in preventing disease caused by P. tenuis was supported by evidence of resistance to reinfection. PMID:22593238

  3. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  4. Postnatal development of cerebellar zones revealed by neurofilament heavy chain protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J White

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is organized into parasagittal zones that control sensory-motor behavior. Although the architecture of adult zones is well understood, very little is known about how zones emerge during development. Understanding the process of zone formation is an essential step towards unraveling how circuits are constructed to support specific behaviors. Therefore, we focused this study on postnatal development to determine the spatial and temporal changes that establish zonal patterns during circuit formation. We used a combination of wholemount and tissue section immunohistochemistry in mice to show that the cytoskeletal protein neurofilament heavy chain (NFH is a robust marker for postnatal cerebellar zonal patterning. The patterned expression of NFH is initiated shortly after birth, and compared to the domains of several known zonal markers such as zebrin II, HSP25, neurogranin, and phospholipase Cβ4 (PLCβ4, NFH does not exhibit transient expression patterns that are typically remodeled between stages, and the adult zones do not emerge after a period of uniform expression in all lobules. Instead, we found that throughout postnatal development NFH gradually reveals distinct zones in each cerebellar lobule. The boundaries of individual NFH zones sharpen over time, as zones are refined during the second and third weeks after birth. Double labeling with neurogranin and PLCβ4 further revealed that although the postnatal expression of NFH is spatially and temporally unique, its pattern of zones respects a fundamental and well-known molecular topography in the cerebellum. The dynamics of NFH expression support the hypothesis that adult circuits are derived from an embryonic map that is refined into zones during the first three-weeks of life.

  5. Serum phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain levels in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresle, M M; Liu, Y; Dagley, L F; Haartsen, J; Pearson, F; Purcell, A W; Laverick, L; Petzold, A; Lucas, R M; Van der Walt, A; Prime, H; Morris, D R; Taylor, B V; Shaw, G; Butzkueven, H

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated whether the measurement of serum phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) titre is likely to be a valid biomarker of axonal injury in multiple sclerosis (MS). Serum pNF-H concentrations were measured by ELISA in cases with relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS (n=81), secondary progressive (SP) MS (n=13) and primary progressive (PP)-MS; n=6) MS; first demyelinating event (FDE; n=82); and unaffected controls (n=135). A subset of MS cases (n=45) were re-sampled on one or multiple occasions. The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) and MRI measures were used to evaluate associations between serum pNF-H status, disease severity and cerebral lesion load and activity. We confirmed the presence of pNF-H peptides in serum by ELISA. We showed that a high serum pNF-H titre was detectable in 9% of RR-MS and FDE cases, and 38.5% of SP-MS cases. Patients with a high serum pNF-H titre had higher average MSSS scores and T2 lesion volumes than patients with a low serum pNF-H titre. Repeated sampling of a subset of MS cases showed that pNF-H levels can fluctuate over time, likely reflecting temporal dynamics of axonal injury in MS. A subset of FDE/MS cases was found to have a high serum pNF-H titre, and this was associated with changes in clinical outcome measures. We propose that routine measurement of serum pNF-H should be further investigated for monitoring axonal injury in MS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Effects of low-level α-myosin heavy chain expression on contractile kinetics in porcine myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Maria V.; Stelzer, Julian E.; Norman, Holly S.; Moss, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are principal determinants of work capacity in mammalian ventricular myocardium. The ventricles of large mammals including humans normally express ∼10% α-MHC on a predominantly β-MHC background, while in failing human ventricles α-MHC is virtually eliminated, suggesting that low-level α-MHC expression in normal myocardium can accelerate the kinetics of contraction and augment systolic function. To test this hypothesis in a model similar to human myocardium we determined composite rate constants of cross-bridge attachment (fapp) and detachment (gapp) in porcine myocardium expressing either 100% α-MHC or 100% β-MHC in order to predict the MHC isoform-specific effect on twitch kinetics. Right atrial (∼100% α-MHC) and left ventricular (∼100% β-MHC) tissue was used to measure myosin ATPase activity, isometric force, and the rate constant of force redevelopment (ktr) in solutions of varying Ca2+ concentration. The rate of ATP utilization and ktr were approximately ninefold higher in atrial compared with ventricular myocardium, while tension cost was approximately eightfold greater in atrial myocardium. From these values, we calculated fapp to be ∼10-fold higher in α- compared with β-MHC, while gapp was 8-fold higher in α-MHC. Mathematical modeling of an isometric twitch using these rate constants predicts that the expression of 10% α-MHC increases the maximal rate of rise of force (dF/dtmax) by 92% compared with 0% α-MHC. These results suggest that low-level expression of α-MHC significantly accelerates myocardial twitch kinetics, thereby enhancing systolic function in large mammalian myocardium. PMID:21217059

  7. Polyethylene composites containing a phase change material having a C14 straight chain hydrocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1987-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyethylene matrix having a straight chain alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyethylene being crosslinked to such a degree that said polyethylene matrix is form stable and said polyethylene matrix is capable of absorbing at least 10% by weight of said straight chain alkyl hydrocarbon; the composite is useful in forming pellets or sheets having thermal energy storage characteristics.

  8. Mutations in the Slow Skeletal Muscle Fiber Myosin Heavy Chain Gene ( MYH7) Cause Laing Early-Onset Distal Myopathy (MPD1)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meredith, Christopher; Herrmann, Ralf; Parry, Cheryl; Liyanage, Khema; Dye, Danielle E; Durling, Hayley J; Duff, Rachael M; Beckman, Kaye; de Visser, Marianne; van der Graaff, Maaike M; Hedera, Peter; Fink, John K; Petty, Elizabeth M; Lamont, Phillipa; Fabian, Vicki; Bridges, Leslie; Voit, Thomas; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laing, Nigel G

    2004-01-01

    .... One candidate gene in the region, MYH7, which is mutated in cardiomyopathy and myosin storage myopathy, codes for the myosin heavy chain of type I skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac ventricles...

  9. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujit Das, Josh Warren, Devin West, Susan M. Schexnayder

    2016-05-01

    This analysis identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas — wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels — that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components.

  10. Frequency patterns of T-cell exposed motifs in immunoglobulin heavy chain peptides presented by MHCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Bremel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEM. TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM. Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of T-cell exposed motif re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by clonal expansion that develop along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  11. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  12. Phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain is a marker of neurodegeneration in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, John; Shaw, Gerry; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Quiros, Peter; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Carelli, Valerio; Feuer, William J; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2008-01-01

    To determine the profile of neurodegeneration in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We quantitated serum levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) in a Brazilian pedigree of 16 affected patients and 59 carriers with LHON, both molecularly characterized as harboring the G to A mutation at nucleotide 11,778 of the mitochondrial genome. The association of subject characteristics to pNF-H levels was studied with multiple regression; pNF-H data were square-root transformed to effect normality of distribution of residuals. Relationships between the square-root of pNF-H and age and sex were investigated within groups with Pearson correlation and the two-sample t-test. Linear regression was used to assess the difference between groups and to determine if the relationship of age was different between affected individuals and carriers. Results of plotting pNF-H levels by age suggested a nonlinear, quadratic association so age squared was used in the statistical analysis. ANCOVA was used to assess the influence of age and group on pNF-H levels. In the carrier group, there was a significant correlation of square-root pNF-H (mean=0.24 ng/ml(2)) with age (r=0.30, p=0.022) and a stronger correlation with quadratic age (r=0.37, p=0.003). With a higher mean pNF-H (0.33 ng/ml(2)) for the affected group, correlations were of similar magnitude, although they were not statistically significant: age (r=0.22, p=0.42), quadratic age (r=0.22, p=0.45). There was no correlation between age and pNF-H levels (mean=0.34 ng/ml(2)) in the off-pedigree group: age (r=0.03, p=0.87), quadratic age (r=0.04, p=0.84). There was no difference between sexes and pNF-H levels in any of the groups (affected, p=0.65; carriers, p=0.19; off-pedigree, p=0.93). Elevated pNF-H released into the serum of some affected LHON patients may suggest that axonal degeneration occurs at some point after loss of visual function. Increases in pNF-H levels of carriers with increasing age, not seen in

  13. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Powers

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  14. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Ji, Qiuhe; Lin, Ying; Fu, Meng; Gao, Jixin; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Xingbin; Feng, Lei; Liu, Yufeng; Han, Hua; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H)3B4I) and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L)3B4) transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs) via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H)3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H)3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L)3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H)3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  15. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xing

    Full Text Available Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H3B4I and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L3B4 transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  16. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con......-chain of MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation.......Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native...... configuration of the MHC class I antigen, since heat denaturation of the HLA antigens reduce the cleavage. The proteolytic fragments following C1 cleavage were characterized by precipitation with Con A-Sepharose, anti-MHC class I and anti-beta 2-microglobulin antibodies. The proteolysis of the alpha...

  17. Global Carbon Fiber Composites. Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Joshua A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Devin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schexnayder, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify key opportunities in the carbon fiber (CF) supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas—wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels—that top the list of industries using CF and carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) and are particularly relevant to the mission of U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE). For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components.

  18. Transgenic rabbits with lymphocytic leukemia induced by the c-myc oncogene fused with the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, K L; Spieker-Polet, H; Kazdin, D S; Oi, V T

    1988-01-01

    Transgenic rabbits with the rabbit c-myc oncogene fused with the rabbit immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer region (E mu) DNA were developed by microinjecting pronuclei of single cell zygotes with the gene construct and implanting the microinjected eggs into pseudopregnant females. At age 17-20 days, 3 of 21 offspring born to seven females were found to have peripheral blood leukocyte counts of greater than 100,000 per mm3. Histology analyses showed extensive lymphocytic infiltration in the liver and kidney, indicating that these rabbits had a malignant lymphocytic leukemia. Genomic DNA analyses of thymus and peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that the leukemic rabbits were transgenic and that both immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light chain genes were rearranged in the leukemic cells; thus, the leukemic cells are of B-cell lineage. One to four heavy and light chain gene rearrangements were observed, suggesting that the B-cell tumors were oligoclonal. Stable tissue culture cell lines from the bone marrow and peripheral blood of one of the transgenic rabbits have been developed. The development of B-cell leukemias in rabbits with the E mu-myc transgene contrasts with the development of B-cell lymphomas in mice carrying a similar transgene. The lymphomas in mice develop in adults and are monoclonal in origin. The leukemias in rabbits develop in juveniles, less than 3 weeks after birth, and appear oligoclonal in origin. The leukemias seem to develop in rabbit at a specific stage of development, and we suggest that a normal developmental signal may be involved in the oncogenesis. Images PMID:2834733

  19. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, G; Ramasamy, V; Meenakshisundaram, V; Venkatachalapathy, R; Ponnusamy, V

    2011-10-01

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Post-mortem degradation of myosin heavy chain in intact fish muscle: Effects of pH and enzyme inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, P. A.; Vang, B.; Pedersen, A M; Martínez, Iciar; Olsen, R L

    2011-01-01

    Fish muscle is rapidly degraded during post-mortem storage, due to proteolytic enzymes acting probably both on muscle cells and connective tissue. In this work we have developed a model system which may be used to study the enzymatic degradation occurring in intact post-mortem fish muscle. Degradation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was monitored in muscle with pH adjusted to 6.05, 6.3 and 6.9 and in the presence of the enzyme inhibitors PMSF, EDTA, phenanthroline, pepstatin A, antipain, E-64 and...

  1. Isolation, purification, and characterization of fragment B, the NH2-terminal half of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, M; Lei, D L; N. Sugimoto; Ozutsumi, K; Okabe, T.

    1989-01-01

    Fragment B, the N-terminal half of the heavy chain, an important domain of the tetanus neurotoxin molecule, was isolated for the first time. Tetanus toxin (composed of three domains, A, B, and C) was prepared from culture filtrates. Fragment A-B, derived from the toxin treated mildly with papain, was used for the isolation of fragment B. Fragment A-B obtained was dissociated into fragments A and B by reduction with 100 mM dithiothreitol and treatment with 2 M urea. Fragment B was separated fr...

  2. Antibody diversity in trouts obtained by gynogenesis or self-fertilization. Comparative analysis of the heavy chain spectrotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvaux, F X; Cossarini-Dunier, M; Chilmonzcyk, S; Charlemagne, J

    1987-01-01

    Conventionnal (C) trouts and trouts obtained by gynogenesis (G) or self-fertilization (SF) were immunized with DNP-KLH and anti-DNP antibodies were individually purified by affinity chromatography. The isolated IgM-like antibodies were separated by an iso-electrofocusing technique in reducing conditions and electroblotted onto nitrocellulose. The transfers were probed with a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for trout heavy (H) antibody chain and revealed with a rabbit anti-mouse IgG horse-radish peroxydase conjugate. When comparing the IEF H chain spectrotypes of C, G and SF trouts, it was observed that individual C spectrotypes are more different between themselves than G and SF spectrotypes, and that individual SF spectrotypes were less heterogeneous than C or G ones. These results suggest that in trout, inbreeding induces a reduction of antibody diversity and heterogeneity. The inheritance of antibody repertoire might be taken in account in the inbreeding selection schedules for fish of economical interest.

  3. Expression profiles of myostatin, myogenin, and Myosin heavy chain in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds differing in growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Liangde; Xie, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lei, Min; Li, Congyan; Ren, Yongjun; Zheng, Jie; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cuixia; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare mRNA levels of myostatin (MSTN), myogenin (MyoG), and fiber type compositions in terms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds with different body sizes and growth rates. Longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles of 16 Californian rabbits (CW) and 16 Germany great line of ZIKA rabbits (GZ) were collected at the ages of 35d and 84d (slaughter age). The results showed that the live weights of GZ rabbits of 35d and 84d old were approximately 36% and 26% greater than those of CW rabbits, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that at the age of 84d GZ rabbits contained significantly lower MSTN mRNA level and higher MyoG mRNA level in both longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles than CW rabbits, and mRNA levels of MSTN and MyoG exhibited opposite changes from the age of 35d to 84d, suggesting that GZ rabbits were subjected to less growth inhibition from MSTN at slaughter age, which occurred most possibly in skeletal muscles. Four types of fiber were identified by real-time PCR in rabbit muscles, with MyHC-1 and MyHC-2D, MyHC-2B were the major types in biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi muscles, respectively. At the age of 84d, GZ rabbits contained greater proportion of MyHC-1 and decreased proportion of MyHC-2D and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity in biceps femoris than CW rabbits, and the results were exactly opposite in longissimus dorsi, suggesting that GZ rabbits show higher oxidative capacity in biceps femoris muscle than CW rabbits. In conclusion, the trends of mRNA levels of MSTN and fiber types in GZ rabbits' skeletal muscles might be consistent with the putative fast growth characteristic of GZ rabbits compared to CW rabbits.

  4. Spatial and temporal changes of density and chemical composition of heavy oils of Eurasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, Y.M.; Yashchenko, I.G. [Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 3 Akademichesky Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Paper is devoted to analytical review of regularities of spatial and temporal changes of chemical composition and density of heavy oils of Eurasia, which are envisaged as main reserve of world's oil production industry for future years. The contents of sulfur, paraffin, resin, asphaltene and light fraction in heavy oils and their density were analysed statistically with use the global database on petrochemistry created by Institute of petroleum chemistry. The database includes above 3,660 samples of heavy oils from 62 principal oil-bearing basins in Eurasia. The basic regularities of regional distribution of heavy oils are considered. It is shown that the heaviest oils of Eurasia are in oil-bearing basins of Southern Europe and Southern Asia. The regularities of heavy oil density changes depending on occurrence depth are given. It is shown oil density decreases with depth growth. Maximum values of density of heavy oils are observed in Cenozoic rocks and their minimum values are in Proterozoic rocks. In average, heavy oils are sulfur, high resin, high asphaltenes ones containing small paraffin and small light fractions.

  5. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Functional and Comparative Investigations of Heavy-Chain Immunoglobulins in New World Camelids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, L. P.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Duffy, M. S.; Smith, M. C.; Appleton, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Of the three immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotypes described to occur in camelids, IgG2 and IgG3 are distinct in that they do not incorporate light chains. These heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs) constitute approximately 50% of the IgG in llama serum and as much as 75% of the IgG in camel serum. We have produced isotype-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in order to investigate the roles of HCAbs in camelid immunity. Seventeen stable hybridomas were cloned, and three MAbs that were specific for epitopes on the γ chains of llama IgG1, IgG2, or IgG3 were characterized in detail. Affinity chromatography revealed that each MAb bound its isotype in solution in llama serum. The antibodies bound to the corresponding alpaca IgGs, to guanaco IgG1 and IgG2, and to camel IgG1. Interestingly, anti-IgG2 MAbs bound three heavy-chain species in llama serum, confirming the presence of three IgG2 subisotypes. Two IgG2 subisotypes were detected in alpaca and guanaco sera. The MAbs detected llama serum IgGs when they were bound to antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and were used to discern among isotypes induced during infection with a parasitic nematode. Diseased animals, infected with Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, did not produce antigen-specific HCAbs; rather, they produced the conventional isotype, IgG1, exclusively. Our data document the utility of these MAbs in functional and physiologic investigations of the immune systems of New World camelids. PMID:15753251

  6. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Josh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Devin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schexnayder, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This study identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where the United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy resources and investments can help the United States achieve or maintain a competitive advantage. The report focuses on four application areas--wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels--that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers and are also particularly relevant to EERE's mission. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components, all contributing to a competitiveness assessment that addresses the United States' role in future industry growth. This report was prepared by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center.

  7. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  8. Bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): A carrier of heavy metals in the marine food-chain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N

    The ecological implications of metal binding properties of bacterial EPS and its possible role in the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the marine food-chain was investigated using a partially purified and chemically characterized microbial EPS...

  9. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  10. Identification of an Arg403Gln beta myosin heavy chain gene mutation in a Portuguese family with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, L M; Vieira, M; Faro, C; Ventura, M; Pires, E; Providência, L A

    2000-04-01

    The etiology of Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is attributed to the mutation of genes that encode sarcomeric proteins in the heart. Until now no gene mutations had been identified in Portuguese families with HCM. The main objective of this study is to describe a Portuguese family with HCM carrying an Arg403Gln mutation in the beta myosin heavy chain gene. With the help of several Molecular Biology tools, 40 families with HCM were studied. In all these families, one member was identified as carrying an Arg403Gln mutation in the beta myosin heavy chain gene. All family members were submitted to a physical exam, EKG and echocardiography. Those carrying a gene mutation were also submitted to Holter monitoring and to magnetic ressonance imaging. Molecular biology techniques are extremely important for the diagnosis of HCM, particularly in healthy carriers. The use of molecular diagnostic tools in HCM is very useful because it allows us to identify the healthy carriers and establish earlier clinical and prevention programs for these individuals.

  11. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  12. Retargeted oncolytic adenovirus displaying a single variable domain of camelid heavy-chain-only antibody in a fiber protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A van Erp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditionally replicative adenoviruses are promising agents for oncolytic virotherapy. Various approaches have been attempted to retarget adenoviruses to tumor-specific antigens to circumvent deficiency of receptor for adenoviral binding and to provide an additional level of tumor specificity. Functional incorporation of highly specific targeting molecules into the viral capsid can potentially retarget adenoviral infection. However, conventional antibodies are not compatible with the cytoplasmic adenovirus capsid synthesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies for retargeting of adenovirus infection. We have combined transcriptional targeting using a tumor-specific promoter with transductional targeting through viral capsid incorporation of antihuman carcinoembryonic antigen single variable domains. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of a single variable domain genetically incorporated into an adenovirus fiber increased specificity of infection and efficacy of replication of single variable domain-targeted oncolytic adenovirus. The double targeting, both transcriptional through the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter and transductional using the single variable domain, is a promising means to improve the therapeutic index for these advanced generation conditionally replicative adenoviruses. A successful strategy to transductional retargeting of oncolytic adenovirus infection has not been shown before and therefore we believe this is the first employment of transductional targeting using single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies to enhance specificity of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

  13. SNPs within the beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7 and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PKM2 genes in horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two highly expressed skeletal muscle genes (the MYH7 gene encoding the myosin heavy chain slow/β-cardiac isoform and the PKM2 gene encoding the pyruvate kinase muscle isoforms were investigated with the objective to identify DNA markers in horses. A panel of DNA samples from different horse breeds was analysed using a PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP approach. Four and two alleles were identified for the MYH7 and PKM2 loci, respectively. Mendelian inheritance of alleles of the two investigated genes was confirmed analysing horse families. Sequencing of PCR products obtained from the MYH7 and PKM2 genes made it possible to characterise two SSCP alleles for each gene. The polymorphisms found in the MYH7 and PKM2 genes were further studied in 61 and 68 horses of three (Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Italian Saddler and Murgese and five (Franches-Montagnes, Haflinger, Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Murgese and Standardbred breeds, respectively. Allele frequencies of the two loci varied among the considered breeds. The SNPs discovery in MYH7 and PKM2 genes makes it possible to locate new molecular markers to ECA1. The identified markers could be used in association analysis with performance traits in horses.

  14. Production of anti TNF-α antibodies in eukaryotic cells using different combinations of vectors carrying heavy and light chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabashin, Dmitriy; Kovalenko, Elena; Toporova, Viktoria; Aliev, Teimur; Panina, Anna; Svirshchevskaya, Elena; Dolgikh, Dmitry; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a key role in rheumatoid arthritis and some other autoimmune diseases. Therapy with anti-TNF-α recombinant antibodies (Ab) appears to be highly effective. Production of new hyper-producing eukaryotic cell lines can decrease the treatment cost, which currently is very high. However, due to the complexity of protein transcription, translation, processing, and secretion in mammalian cells, the stages at which antibody expression is affected are still poorly determined. The aim of this work was to compare the productivity of two cell lines developed in CHO DG44 cells, deficient in dihydrofolate reductase, transfected with vectors carrying either heavy (H) or light (L) chains of chimeric antibody under different combinations of selective elements. Both H and L chains were cloned either in pOptiVEC or pcDNA3.3 vectors and different combinations were used to produce HL and LH cell lines. We have shown that Ab production has been low and comparable between HL and LH cells until selection on methotrexate (MTX) when LH but not HL cells have responded with 3.5 times increased productivity. Flow cytometry analysis has demonstrated that intracellular concentration of full size Abs in LH cells was 5.6 times higher than in HL ones due to higher amount of H chain synthesis. No differences in viability between HL and LH cells have been found. We have concluded that the expression of H chain in the pOptiVEC vector, which is responsible for MTX resistance, has led to the suppression of H chain synthesis and limitation in full Ab assembly.

  15. Depletion of conventional mature B cells and compromised specific antibody response in bovine immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min ZHANG,Xueqian CHENG,Dan CHU,Jingwen LIANG,Yi SUN,Li MA,Beilei XU,Min ZHENG,Meili WANG,Liming REN,Xiaoxiang HU,Qingyong MENG,Ran ZHANG,Ying GUO,Yunping DAI,Robert AITKEN,Ning LI,Yaofeng ZHAO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduced the bovine immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain gene (the orphaned gene on BTA11 into mouse germline cells. Bovine IgM was highly expressed in selected transgenic lines, and it largely inhibited rearrangements of the endogenous immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH genes in these lines. The forced expression of bovine IgM resulted in reduced numbers of pro- and pre-B cells but increased the number of immature B cells in the transgenic mice. Bovine IgM-expressing B cells can migrate from the bone marrow to the spleen, but most of the cells are arrested at the T1 transitional B cell stage, leading to a significantly lower number of T2 transitional and mature B cells in the spleen. Although the serum concentrations of endogenous IgM and IgG in the transgenic mice were significantly decreased, the IgA levels were slightly increased compared to the WT mice. The bovine IgM level in the serum was only one-tenth to one-fifth of that of endogenous mouse IgM, suggesting that most of the serum immunoglobulin were contributed by endogenous IgH gene-expressing B cells. These transgenic mice also exhibited a lower frequency of unique complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3 sequences in their VH repertoire and V&Kgr; repertoire but exhibited an increased frequency of unique CDR3 in their V&Lgr; repertoire. Compared to the WT mice, the transgenic mice had a significantly higher percentage of mouse IgM-expressing B cells that expressed &Lgr; chains. Finally, we showed that the transgenic mice were deficient in a specific antibody response to antigen stimulation.

  16. Segmental duplication as one of the driving forces underlying the diversity of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Richeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplication and deletion were implicated for a region containing the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV gene segments, 1.9III/hv3005 (possible allelic variants of IGHV3-30 and hv3019b9 (a possible allelic variant of IGHV3-33. However, very little is known about the ranges of the duplication and the polymorphic region. This is mainly because of the difficulty associated with distinguishing between allelic and paralogous sequences in the IGHV region containing extensive repetitive sequences. Inability to separate the two parental haploid genomes in the subjects is another serious barrier. To address these issues, unique DNA sequence tags evenly distributed within and flanking the duplicated region implicated by the previous studies were selected. The selected tags in single sperm from six unrelated healthy donors were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by microarray detection. In this way, individual haplotypes of different parental origins in the sperm donors could be analyzed separately and precisely. The identified polymorphic region was further analyzed at the nucleotide sequence level using sequences from the three human genomic sequence assemblies in the database. Results A large polymorphic region was identified using the selected sequence tags. Four of the 12 haplotypes were shown to contain consecutively undetectable tags spanning in a variable range. Detailed analysis of sequences from the genomic sequence assemblies revealed two large duplicate sequence blocks of 24,696 bp and 24,387 bp, respectively, and an incomplete copy of 961 bp in this region. It contains up to 13 IGHV gene segments depending on haplotypes. A polymorphic region was found to be located within the duplicated blocks. The variants of this polymorphism unusually diverged at the nucleotide sequence level and in IGHV gene segment number, composition and organization, indicating a limited selection pressure in general. However

  17. Flow cytometric analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain expression in B-cell lymphoma and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, David D; Al-Quran, Samer Z; Cardona, Diana M; Li, Ying; Braylan, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma (BCL) is often dependent on the detection of clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain expression. In some BCLs, the determination of clonality based on Ig light chain restriction may be difficult. The aim of our study was to assess the utility of flow cytometric analysis of surface Ig heavy chain (HC) expression in lymphoid tissues in distinguishing lymphoid hyperplasias from BCLs, and also differentiating various BCL subtypes. HC expression on B-cells varied among different types of hyperplasias. In follicular hyperplasia, IgM and IgD expression was high in mantle cells while germinal center cells showed poor HC expression. In other hyperplasias, B cell compartments were blurred but generally showed high IgD and IgM expression. Compared to hyperplasias, BCLs varied in IgM expression. Small lymphocytic lymphomas had lower IgM expression than mantle cell lymphomas. Of importance, IgD expression was significantly lower in BCLs than in hyperplasias, a finding that can be useful in differentiating lymphoma from reactive processes. PMID:22400070

  18. Seawater subduction controls the heavy noble gas composition of the mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Greg; Ballentine, Chris J

    2006-05-11

    The relationship between solar volatiles and those now in the Earth's atmosphere and mantle reservoirs provides insight into the processes controlling the acquisition of volatiles during planetary accretion and their subsequent evolution. Whereas the light noble gases (helium and neon) in the Earth's mantle preserve a solar-like isotopic composition, heavy noble gases (argon, krypton and xenon) have an isotopic composition very similar to that of the modern atmosphere, with radiogenic and (in the case of xenon) solar contributions. Mantle noble gases in a magmatic CO2 natural gas field have been previously corrected for shallow atmosphere/groundwater and crustal additions. Here we analyse new data from this field and show that the elemental composition of non-radiogenic heavy noble gases in the mantle is remarkably similar to that of sea water. We challenge the popular concept of a noble gas 'subduction barrier'--the convecting mantle noble gas isotopic and elemental composition is explained by subduction of sediment and seawater-dominated pore fluids. This accounts for approximately 100% of the non-radiogenic argon and krypton and 80% of the xenon. Approximately 50% of the convecting mantle water concentration can then be explained by this mechanism. Enhanced recycling of subducted material to the mantle plume source region then accounts for the lower ratio of radiogenic to non-radiogenic heavy noble gas isotopes and higher water content of plume-derived basalts.

  19. Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    An important factor in evaluating porcine meat quality is the pH at post-mortem 24 h (pH24). In the current work, we conducted a GeneFishing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–based screen to identify differentially expressed genes in Berkshire loins with high versus low pH24. Total RNAs were extracted from Berkshire ...

  20. Production of Recombinant Human scFv Against Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain by Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Ehsan; Lakzaei, Mostafa; Rasaee, Mohhamad Javad; Aminian, Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    Tetanus, as a major cause of death in developing countries, is caused by tetanus neurotoxin. Recombinant antibodies against tetanus neurotoxin can be useful in tetanus management. Phage display of antibody fragments from immune human antibody libraries with single chain constructs combining the variable fragments (scFv) has been one of the most prominent technologies in antibody engineering. The aim of this study was the generation of a single chain fragment of variable region (scFv) library and selection of specific antibodies with high affinity against tetanus toxin. Immune human single chain fragment variable (HuscFv) antibody phagemid library was displayed on pIII of filamentous bacteriophage. Selection of scFv clones was performed against tetanus toxin antigens after three rounds of panning. The selected scFv clones were analyzed for inhibition of tetanus toxin binding to ganglioside GT1b. After the third round of panning, over 35 HuscFv phages specific for tetanus toxin were isolated from this library of which 15 clones were found to bind specifically to tetanus toxin. The selected HuscFv phages expressed as a soluble HuscFv peptide and some clones showed positive signals against tetanus toxin. We found that six HuscFv clones inhibit toxin binding to ganglioside GT1b. These selected antibodies can be used in the management of tetanus.

  1. [Screening and analysis of the mutations on beta-myosin heavy chain gene in 3 Chinese families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiu-li; Fan, Xin-ping; Yang, Zhong-wei; Yang, Fu-hui

    2011-02-01

    To detect gene mutations on beta-myosin heavy chain gene MYH7 in 3 Chinese families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to analyze the correlation between genotype and phenotype. A denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing mutation screening of the exons (exon3-23) coding for MYH7 gene were performed in 3 Chinese families with HCM. In this study, we identified several mutations in MYH7. A mutation of Thr441Met previously reported in a patient with Laing distal myopathy was first identified in one Chinese pedigree. This study illustrated the high frequency of mutation in MYH7 gene in Chinese HCM families. Different mutations and carriers of the MYH7 gene present phenotypic heterogeneity. Mutation screening and analysis in HCM family could therefore facilitate the early HCM diagnosis and would be helpful for the prediction, prevention and early treatment of HCM linked with MYH7 gene mutation.

  2. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  3. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness......, presenile cataracts, and/or progressive nephritis leading to end-stage renal failure. No consistent correlations have been identified between the 27 different MYH9 mutations identified so far and the variable clinical evolution of the disease. We have evaluated 108 consecutive MYH9-RD patients belonging...... or 1841 result in intermediate clinical pictures. These findings are relevant not only to patients' clinical management but also to the elucidation of the pathogenesis of the disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  4. Study on Dynamic Characteristics of Heavy Machine Tool-Composite Pile Foundation-Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Li-Gang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Heavy duty computer numerical control machine tools have characteristics of large self-weight, load and. The insufficiency of foundation bearing capacity leads to deformation of lathe bed, which effects machining accuracy. A combined-layer foundation model is created to describe the pile group foundation of multi-soil layer in this paper. Considering piles and soil in pile group as transversely isotropic material, equivalent constitutive relationship of composite foundation is constructed. A mathematical model is established by the introduction of boundary conditions, which is based on heavy duty computer numerical control machine tools-composite pile foundation-soil interaction system. And then, the response of different soil and pile depth is studied by a case. The model improves motion accuracy of machine tools.

  5. Immunoglobulin Tau Heavy Chain (IgT in Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus: Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Du

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin tau (IgT is a new teleost immunoglobulin isotype, and its potential function in adaptive immunity is not very clear. In the present study, the membrane-bound and secreted IgT (mIgT and sIgT heavy chain genes were cloned for the first time and characterized in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus, and found the nucleic acid sequence were exactly same in the Cτ1–Cτ4 constant domains of mIgT and sIgT, but different in variable regions and the C-terminus. The amino acid sequence of mIgT shared higher similarity with Bovichtus diacanthus (51.2% and Dicentrarchus labrax (45.0%. Amino acid of flounder IgT, IgM, and IgD heavy chain was compared and the highest similarity was found between IgT Cτ1 and IgM Cμ1 (38%. In healthy flounder, the transcript levels of IgT mRNA were the highest in gill, spleen, and liver, and higher in peripheral blood leucocytes, skin, and hindgut. After infection and vaccination with Edwardsiella tarda via intraperitoneal injection and immersion, the qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the IgT mRNA level was significantly upregulated in all tested tissues, with similar dynamic tendency that increased firstly and then decreased, and higher in gill, skin, hindgut, liver, and stomach in immersion than in the injection group, but no significant difference existed in spleen and head kidney between immersion and injection groups. These results revealed that IgT responses could be simultaneously induced in both mucosal and systemic tissues after infection/vaccination via injection and immersion route, but IgT might play a more important role in mucosal immunity than in systemic immunity.

  6. Thrombin Cleavage of Inter-α-inhibitor Heavy Chain 1 Regulates Leukocyte Binding to an Inflammatory Hyaluronan Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrey, Aaron C; de la Motte, Carol A

    2016-11-18

    Dynamic alterations of the extracellular matrix in response to injury directly modulate inflammation and consequently the promotion and resolution of disease. During inflammation, hyaluronan (HA) is increased at sites of inflammation where it may be covalently modified with the heavy chains (HC) of inter-α-trypsin inhibitor. Deposition of this unique, pathological form of HA (HC-HA) leads to the formation of cable-like structures that promote adhesion of leukocytes. Naive mononuclear leukocytes bind specifically to inflammation-associated HA matrices but do not adhere to HA constitutively expressed under homeostatic conditions. In this study, we have directly investigated a role for the blood-coagulation protease thrombin in regulating the adhesion of monocytic cells to smooth muscle cells producing an inflammatory matrix. Our data demonstrate that the proteolytic activity of thrombin negatively regulates the adhesion of monocytes to an inflammatory HC-HA complex. This effect is independent of protease-activated receptor activation but requires proteolytic activity toward a novel substrate. Components of HC-HA complexes were predicted to contain conserved thrombin-susceptible cleavage sites based on sequence analysis, and heavy chain 1 (HC1) was confirmed to be a substrate of thrombin. Thrombin treatment is sufficient to cleave HC1 associated with either cell-surface HA or serum inter-α-trypsin inhibitor. Furthermore, thrombin treatment of the inflammatory matrix leads to dissolution of HC-HA cable structures and abolishes leukocyte adhesion. These data establish a novel mechanism whereby thrombin cleavage of HC1 regulates the adhesive properties of an inflammatory HA matrix. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Application of principal component analysis in the pollution assessment with heavy metals of vegetable food chain in the old mining areas

    OpenAIRE

    Gergen Iosif; Harmanescu Monica

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the paper is to assess by the principal components analysis (PCA) the heavy metal contamination of soil and vegetables widely used as food for people who live in areas contaminated by heavy metals (HMs) due to long-lasting mining activities. This chemometric technique allowed us to select the best model for determining the risk of HMs on the food chain as well as on people's health. Results Many PCA models were computed with different variables: heavy metals con...

  8. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Dean Jan

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins.

  9. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, dyes and proteins by chitosan composites and derivatives — A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingjie; Wang, Dongfeng; Yu, Guangli; Meng, Xianghong

    2013-09-01

    Chitosan composites and derivatives have gained wide attentions as effective biosorbents due to their low costs and high contents of amino and hydroxyl functional groups. They have showed significant potentials of removing metal ions, dyes and proteins from various media. Chemical modifications that lead to the formation of the chitosan derivatives and chitosan composites have been extensively studied and widely reported in literatures. The aims of this review were to summarize the important information of the bioactivities of chitosan, highlight the various preparation methods of chitosan-based active biosorbents, and outline its potential applications in the adsorption of heavy metal ions, dyes and proteins from wastewater and aqueous solutions.

  10. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms mRNA transcripts in the temporalis muscle of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurana, Neus; Artells, Rosa; Muñoz, Carmen; Arias-Martorell, Júlia; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Casado, Aroa; Cuesta, Elisabeth; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Pastor, Juan Francisco; Potau, Josep Maria

    2017-11-01

    The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is the primate that is phylogenetically most closely related to humans (Homo sapiens). In order to shed light on the anatomy and function of the temporalis muscle in the chimpanzee, we have analyzed the expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in different parts of the muscle. We dissected the superficial, deep and sphenomandibularis portions of the temporalis muscle in five adult P. troglodytes and quantified the expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in each portion using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed significant differences in the patterns of expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC-IIM isoform between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior superficial temporalis (33.6% vs 47.0%; P=0.032) and between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior deep temporalis (33.6% vs 43.0; P=0.016). We also observed non-significant differences between the patterns of expression in the anterior and posterior superficial temporalis. The differential expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in the temporalis muscle in P. troglodytes may be related to the functional differences that have been observed in electromyographic studies in other species of primates. Our findings can be applicable to the fields of comparative anatomy, evolutionary anatomy, and anthropology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    ) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed...... at baseline and after 12 wk. The final GH dose was 1.77 +/- 0.18 IU x d(-1) (approximately 7.2 +/- 0.8 microg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). GH alone had no effect on isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength, power, CSA, or fiber size. However, a substantial increase in MHC 2X isoform was observed with GH administration...... alone, and this may be regarded as a change into a more youthful MHC composition, possibly induced by the rejuvenating of systemic IGF-I levels. RT + placebo caused substantial increases in quadriceps isokinetic strength, power, and CSA; but these RT induced improvements were not further augmented...

  12. Pricing and ordering decisions of two competing supply chains with different composite policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taleizadeh, Ata Allah; Noori-Daryan, Mahsa; Govindan, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    raw materials from an outside supplier and transforms them into a finished product; then, the products are sold to the retailers to satisfy the demands of market. In the first chain, a composite (QFF) policy, which is the combination of quantity and freight discount, as well as free shipping quantity...

  13. Resistance of Cloned 1F5 Chimeric Anti-CD20 Antibody Heavy-Chain Gene to DNA Polymerase due to a Predicted Hairpin Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Khademi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Formation of secondary structure such as DNA hairpins or loops may influence molecular genetics methods and PCR based approaches necessary for genetic engineering, in addition to gene regulation. Materials and Methods: A polymerase chain reaction with splice overlap extension (SOE-PCR was used to create fully synthetic 1F5 chimeric anti-CD20 heavy- and light-chain genes. The chimeric genes were cloned into the pCR-Blunt II-TOPO vector following by cloning into the pBudCE4.1 expression vector. Prediction of secondary structure was performed with the Vienna RNAfold webserver. PCR and sequencing across the predicted secondary structure of chimeric 1F5 heavy-chain gene was performed with multiple protocols for standard and GC-rich templates. Results: In our attempt to design vectors aimed to generate mouse-human chimeric antibody against CD20 (1F5, we found that the coding sequence of 1F5 chimeric heavy-chain gene constructed by SOE-PCR was resistant to polymerase during both PCR and sequencing reactions. Furthermore, we were also unable to analysis some positive transformants by restriction enzyme digestion. Encountering such difficulties to identify the cloned anti-CD20 chimeric heavy-chain gene, we found that the chimeric heavy-chain sequence is highly GC-rich and predicted to form a stable secondary structure. Conclusion: In conclusion, for the first time, we reported several difficulties with production of therapeutic chimeric 1F5 anti-CD20 antibody due to a predicted hairpin cluster correlates with barriers to PCR, sequencing and possibly restriction analysis. Our findings provide a probable note for researchers experiencing technical difficulties with construction of chimeric anti-CD20 antibody 1F5 gene vectors and also with other genes and molecular biology techniques requiring PCR-based method or restriction enzyme analysis. 

  14. Effect of 48-h food deprivation on the expressions of myosin heavy-chain isoforms and fiber type-related factors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Sawano, Shoko; Iwamoto, Yohei; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 48-h food deprivation on rat skeletal muscle fiber type, according to myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform composition and some metabolism-related factors in both slow-type dominant and fast-type dominant muscle tissues. Male Wistar rats (7 wk old) were treated with 48-h food deprivation or ad libitum feeding as control. After the treatment, the soleus muscle (slow-type dominant) and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-type dominant) were excised. We found that 48-h food deprivation did not affect MyHC composition in either the soleus or EDL, compared with fed rats by electrophoretic separation of MyHC isoforms. However, 48-h food deprivation significantly increased the mRNA expression of fast-type MyHC2B in the EDL muscle. Moreover, food deprivation increased fatty acid metabolism, as shown by elevated levels of related serum energy substrates and mRNA expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) 3 and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in both the soleus and EDL. UCP3 and LPL are generally expressed at higher levels in slow-type fibers. Furthermore, we found that food deprivation significantly decreased the protein amounts of PGC1α and phosphorylated FOXO1, which are known as skeletal muscle fiber type regulators. In conclusion, 48-h food deprivation increased mRNA expression of fast-type MyHC isoform and oxidative metabolism-related factors in EDL, whereas MyHC composition at the protein level did not change in either the soleus or EDL.

  15. Measurements on Pb27+ Sources for the CERN Heavy Ion Injection Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Chamings, J A

    2004-01-01

    CERN, the world's largest particle physics laboratory near Geneva, is currently in the process of building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Lead-208 will be used in this accelerator and to meet the injection requirements much work is required to find a suitable and reliable heavy ion source. The work in this report covers two ion sources, the Laser Ion Source (LIS), and the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS). An emittance measurement, using a pepper pot and CCD camera, was completed on the recently re-installed LIS, measured and analysed to be 140mm.mrad un-normalised and 0.8mm.mrad normalised 4rms for the maximum intensity charge state, Pb27+. A Visual Basic Program was modified to allow Charge State Distribution (CSD) and other scans of the ECRIS at CERN to be taken. Chapter 5 presents the results of the CSD scans taken. This program provided a new method to take 1 dimensional transverse beam profiles. From this a direct emittance measurement was formed for the first time since the source was o...

  16. 3D Architecture, dynamics as well as functional implications of genome organization of the Prader-Willi/Angelmann syndrome region & the Immunoglobin Heavy-Chain locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe general 3D architecture of the immunoglobin heavy-chain (Igh) locus was determined by a novel interdisciplinary combination of high-resolution FISH and high-resolution epifluorescence spectral distance microscopy with analytical analysis, computer simulations, as well as

  17. Coexpression of the human HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 heavy chain gene and human beta 2-microglobulin gene in L cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernabeu, C.; Maziarz, R.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J.; Burakoff, S. J.; Terhorst, C.

    1984-01-01

    L cells expressing human HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 class I antigen heavy chains are not recognized by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes directed at HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 antigens. To test whether the absence of human beta 2-m was the cause of the lack of recognition by the human cytotoxic T lymphocytes, coexpression

  18. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    of Mts1. The short C-terminal fragment of the myosin heavy chain was totally soluble in the presence of an equimolar amount of Mts1 at low ionic conditions (50 mM NaCl). Depolymerization was found to be calcium-dependent and could be blocked by EGTA. Our data suggest that Mts1 can increase myosin...... a regulatory role in the myosin assembly. In the presence of calcium, Mts1 binds at the C-terminal end of the myosin heavy chain close to the site of phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2 (Ser1944). In the present study, we have shown that interaction of Mts1 with the human platelet myosin or C......-terminal fragment of the myosin heavy chain inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin heavy chain by protein kinase CK2 in vitro. Mts1 might also bind directly the beta subunit of protein kinase CK2, thereby modifying the enzyme activity. Our results indicate that myosin oligomers were disassembled in the presence...

  19. Production of bifunctional proteins by Aspergillus awamori: Llama variable heavy chain antibody fragment (VHH) R9 coupled to Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Roelofs, M.S.; Dries, N. van den; Goosen, T.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Lokman, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase gene (arp) was genetically fused to either the 5′- or 3′-terminal ends of the gene encoding llama variable heavy chain antibody fragment VHH R9, resulting in the fusion expression cassettes ARP-R9 or R9-ARP. Aspergillus awamori transformants were obtained which

  20. Purification of correctly oxidized MHC class I heavy-chain molecules under denaturing conditions: A novel strategy exploiting disulfide assisted protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Henrik; Ruffet, E.; Blicher, T.

    2003-01-01

    disulfide bonding are formed under non-reducing denaturing conditions and separated from scrambled disulfide bond forms by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. In the second step, rapid refolding of the oxidized heavy chains is afforded by disulfide bond-assisted folding in the presence of beta(2...

  1. Purification of correctly oxidized MHC class I heavy-chain molecules under denaturing conditions: a novel strategy exploiting disulfide assisted protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Henrik; Ruffet, Emmanuel; Blicher, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    with correct disulfide bonding are formed under non-reducing denaturing conditions and separated from scrambled disulfide bond forms by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. In the second step, rapid refolding of the oxidized heavy chains is afforded by disulfide bond-assisted folding in the presence of beta...

  2. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Kesemen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  3. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Kesemen; Kaan, Çalışkan N.; Emrah, Konokman H.; Nuri, Durlu

    2015-09-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe) at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  4. IgAT (Immunoglobulin Analysis Tool: A novel tool for the analysis of human and mouse heavy and light chain transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eRogosch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequence analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig heavy and light chain transcripts can refine categorization of B cell subpopulations and can shed light on the selective forces that act during immune responses or immune dysregulation, such as autoimmunity, allergy, and B cell malignancy. High-throughput sequencing yields Ig transcript collections of unprecedented size. The authoritative web-based IMGT/HighV-QUEST program is capable of analyzing large collections of transcripts and provides annotated output files to describe many key properties of Ig transcripts. However, additional processing of these flat files is required to create figures, or to facilitate analysis of additional features and comparisons between sequence sets. We present an easy-to-use Microsoft® Excel® based software, named Immunoglobulin Analysis Tool (IgAT, for the summary, interrogation, and further processing of IMGT/HighV-QUEST output files. IgAT generates descriptive statistics and high-quality figures for collections of murine or human Ig heavy or light chain transcripts ranging from 1 to 150,000 sequences. In addition to traditionally studied properties of Ig transcripts—such as the usage of germline gene segments, or the length and composition of the CDR-3 region—IgAT also uses published algorithms to calculate the probability of antigen selection based on somatic mutational patterns, the average hydrophobicity of the antigen-binding sites, and predictable structural properties of the CDR-H3 loop according to Shirai’s H3-rules. These refined analyses provide in-depth information about the selective forces acting upon Ig repertoires and allow the statistical and graphical comparison of two or more sequence sets. IgAT is easy to use on any computer running Excel® 2003 or higher. Thus, IgAT is a useful tool to gain insights into the selective forces and functional properties of small to extremely large collections of Ig transcripts, thereby assisting a researcher to

  5. Composition and adaptation of human myotendinous junction and neighboring muscle fibers to heavy resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johannes; Mackey, A L; Knudsen, A B

    2017-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a common site of strain injury and yet understanding of its composition and ability to adapt to loading is poor. The main aims of this study were to determine the profile of selected collagens and macrophage density in human MTJ and adjoining muscle fibers......, and to investigate whether heavy exercise loading would alter this profile. Fifteen individuals scheduled for anterior cruciate ligament repair surgery were randomized into three groups: control, acute or 4 weeks heavy resistance training. MTJ samples were collected from the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles...... and were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically for collagen types I, III, VI, XII, XIV, XXII, Tenascin-C and CD68. Macrophage density and distribution was evaluated and the amount of each collagen type in muscle and MTJ was graded. Collagen XXII was observed solely at the MTJ, while all other...

  6. Evaluation of long-chain alcohols as diet composition markers in goats grazing heathland areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L M M; Celaya, R; Santos, A S; Guedes, C M V; Rodrigues, M A M; Mayes, R W; Osoro, K

    2012-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess the potential of long-chain alcohols (LCOH), in alternative or combined with alkanes and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), as faecal markers to estimate the diet composition of goats grazing heathland vegetation with associated improved pastures. A total of seven diets were offered across the grazing season. The diets were composed of mixtures of herb species (Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) and woody species (Erica spp., Calluna vulgaris and Ulex gallii) in an attempt to simulate diet selection of goats on these complex vegetation areas. The diet composition was estimated using LCOH markers alone or combined with alkanes, LCFA and alkanes+LCFA, by least square optimization procedures. The data showed large differences between plant species in their LCOH profile. Generally, plant species showed higher LCOH concentrations than those of alkanes and lower than LCFA markers. Faecal recovery of LCOH was incomplete and increased in a linear manner (P diet composition and its digestibility. The diet composition estimates based on LCOH alone were more accurate (P diet composition, indicating that LCOH provided different discriminatory information to that of alkanes and LCFA, helping in the discrimination of the plant species used in this experiment. Results indicate that correction of faecal LCOH concentrations to incomplete faecal recovery is necessary to obtain more accurate estimates of diet composition. Nevertheless, it seemed that the use of a less accurate recovery correction on LCOH markers had a lower impact on the accuracy of estimates than that of alkanes and LCFA.

  7. Reduced expression of androgen receptor and myosin heavy chain mRNA in cremaster muscle of boys with nonsyndromic cryptorchidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthold, Julia Spencer; Wang, Yanping; Reilly, Anita; Robbins, Alan; Figueroa, T Ernesto; Banihani, Ahmad; Hagerty, Jennifer; Akins, Robert E

    2012-10-01

    To better define the developmental mechanisms of nonsyndromic cryptorchidism, we measured the expression of hormone receptor and muscle type specific mRNAs in target tissues of boys with and those without nonsyndromic cryptorchidism. Prospectively collected cremaster muscle and/or hernia sac tissues from boys with congenital (79) or acquired (66) nonsyndromic cryptorchidism and hernia/hydrocele (controls, 84) were analyzed for hormone receptor (RXFP2, AR, ESR1, ESR2) and myosin heavy chain specific (MYH1, MYH2, MYH7) mRNA expression using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Log transformed mRNA, phenotype and feeding history data were statistically analyzed using Pearson's correlation, ANOVA and 2-sample t tests. AR mRNA expression was higher in cremaster muscle than in sac tissue, and significantly lower in congenital and acquired nonsyndromic cryptorchidism cases vs controls (p MYH7 mRNA expression was also significantly reduced in both nonsyndromic cryptorchidism groups (p ≤ 0.002), while a reduction in type 2 (fast) MYH2 expression was more modest and significant only for the congenital cryptorchidism group (p MYH7 and AR levels were strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.751, p MYH7 and ESR1 mRNA levels were higher and lower, respectively, in boys with nonsyndromic cryptorchidism who were fed soy formula. Expression of other genes was not measurable. Our data suggest that boys with congenital and acquired nonsyndromic cryptorchidism differentially express AR and slow twitch specific MYH7 mRNA in the cremaster muscle, and that MYH7 expression is correlated with AR levels and soy formula use. These differences in gene expression may reflect aberrant hormonal signaling and/or innervation during development with the potential for secondary functional effects and failed testicular descent. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Contributions of Conventional and Heavy-Chain IgG to Immunity in Fetal, Neonatal, and Adult Alpacas▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Purdy, S. R.; Smith, M. C.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Davis, W. C.; Appleton, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to conventional immunoglobulins, camelids produce antibodies that do not incorporate light chains into their structures. These so-called heavy-chain (HC) antibodies have incited great interest in the biomedical community, as they have considerable potential for biotechnological and therapeutic application. Recently, we have begun to elucidate the immunological functions of HC antibodies, yet little is known about their significance in maternal immunity or about the B lymphocytes that produce them. This study describes the application of isotype-specific reagents toward physiological assessments of camelid IgGs and the B cells that produce them. We document the specificities of monoclonal antibodies that distinguish two conventional IgG1 isotypes and two HC IgG3 variants produced by alpacas. Next, we report that the relative concentrations of five isotypes are similar in serum, milk, and colostrum; however, following passive transfer, the concentrations of HC IgG2 and IgG3 declined more rapidly than the concentration of conventional IgG1 in the sera of neonates. Finally, we assessed the distribution of B cells of distinct isotypes within lymphoid tissues during fetal and adult life. We detected IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 in lymphocytes located in lymph node follicles, suggesting that HC B cells affinity mature and/or class switch. One IgG3 isotype was present in B cells located in ileal Peyer's patches, and one conventional IgG1 isotype was detected in splenic marginal zone B cells. Our findings contribute to the growing body of knowledge pertaining to HC antibodies and are compatible with functional specialization among conventional and HC IgGs in the alpaca. PMID:20926693

  9. Apatite and Portland/apatite composite cements obtained using a hydrothermal method for retaining heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M I; Carpena, J; Borschnek, D; Centeno, M A; Odriozola, J A; Rose, J

    2008-01-15

    Apatite and Portland/apatite composite cements containing steelwork dusts have been prepared using a low temperature hydrothermal method (200 degrees C, 48h). The produced solids were characterized by means of XRD, IR, and SEM-EDX, and the remaining liquid was analyzed by ICP. The results clearly show the capability of these cements to inertise the heavy metals contained in steelwork dusts, that is Fe, Pb, Mo, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Zn. In the case of apatitic cements, Fe, Mg, Cr, Mn, and Pb coming from steel dust replaced Ca in the divalent cation position of the apatite structure, while Si and Mo replaced P in tetrahedral position. The average crystal size of the apatite-containing dust is smaller than in pure apatite synthesized using the same procedure, which is related to the magnesium content of the dust, since magnesium seems to inhibit the crystal growth. XRD diagrams of composite cements show only peaks corresponding to phases observed in the single cements, and in that no new phases are found. However, EDX analysis reveals the introduction of cations coming from Portland cement into the apatite structure. From the results of water analysis it could be concluded that the capability of retention is higher in composite matrices than in the pure apatite one. In conclusion, the obtained data allow stating that the proposed method, the hydrothermal synthesis of steelwork dust containing cement, is a reliable one for immobilization of toxic residues containing heavy leachable cations.

  10. Composition, provenance and source weathering of Mesozoic sandstones from Western-Central Mediterranean Alpine Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, F.

    2014-03-01

    Forty-two Mesozoic sandstone samples from three different sedimentary successions of the Internal Domains along the Western-Central Mediterranean Alpine Chains (Betic Cordillera, Rif Chain and Calabria-Peloritani Arc) were chemically analyzed to characterize their composition and the degree of weathering in the source area(s). The Rif Chain sandstones have SiO2 contents higher than those of the Calabria-Peloritani Arc and Betic Cordillera sandstones, whereas Al2O3 contents are higher in the Calabria-Peloritani Arc sandstones rather than in the Rif Chain and Betic Cordillera sandstones. The indices of compositional variability (ICV) of the studied samples are generally less than 1, suggesting that the samples are compositionally mature and were likely dominated by recycling. Recycling processes are also shown by the Al-Zr-Ti diagram indicating zircon addition and, thus, recycling processes. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) values are quite homogeneous for the Calabria-Peloritani Arc (mean = 76) and Betic Cordillera sandstones (mean = 55), whereas the Rif Chain sandstones are characterized by CIA values ranging from 54 to 76. The CIW and PIA values are high for all the studied sandstones indicating intense weathering at the source areas. The different values of weathering rates among the studied sandstones may be related to variations of paleoclimatic conditions during the Mesozoic, that further favored recycling processes. Thus, these differences among the studied samples, may be related to an increase in continental palaeoweathering conditions and sediment recycling effects from the Middle Triassic to the earliest Jurassic due to rising humidity. In addition, regional tectonic movements promoted structural changes that allowed sedimentary recycling and subsidence, which in turn caused diagenetic K-metasomatism. These processes could significantly affect the CIW and PIA weathering indices, which likely monitor a cumulative effect, including several cycles of

  11. Distinct membrane properties are differentially influenced by cardiolipin content and acyl chain composition in biomimetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Edward Ross; Fix, Amy; Sullivan, E Madison; Brown, David A; Kennedy, Anthony; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2017-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) has a critical role in maintaining mitochondrial inner membrane structure. In several conditions such as heart failure and aging, there is loss of CL content and remodeling of CL acyl chains, which are hypothesized to impair mitochondrial inner membrane biophysical organization. Therefore, this study discriminated how CL content and acyl chain composition influenced select properties of simple and complex mitochondrial mimicking model membranes. We focused on monolayer excess area/molecule (a measure of lipid miscibility), bilayer phase transitions, and microdomain organization. In monolayer compression studies, loss of tetralinoleoyl [(18:2)4] CL content decreased the excess area/molecule. Replacement of (18:2)4CL acyl chains with tetraoleoyl [(18:1)4] CL or tetradocosahexaenoyl [(22:6)4] CL generally had little influence on monolayer excess area/molecule; in contrast, replacement of (18:2)4CL acyl chains with tetramyristoyl [(14:0)4] CL increased monolayer excess area/molecule. In bilayers, calorimetric studies showed that substitution of (18:2)4CL with (18:1)4CL or (22:6)4CL lowered the phase transition temperature of phosphatidylcholine vesicles whereas (14:0)4CL had no effect. Finally, quantitative imaging of giant unilamellar vesicles revealed differential effects of CL content and acyl chain composition on microdomain organization, visualized with the fluorescent probe Texas Red DHPE. Notably, microdomain areas were decreased by differing magnitudes upon lowering of (18:2)4CL content and substitution of (18:2)4CL with (14:0)4CL or (22:6)4CL. Conversely, exchanging (18:2)4CL with (18:1)4CL increased microdomain area. Altogether, these data demonstrate that CL content and fatty acyl composition differentially target membrane physical properties, which has implications for understanding how CL regulates mitochondrial activity and the design of CL-specific therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Method to Measure Glucose Uptake and Myosin Heavy Chain Isoform Expression of Single Fibers From Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKrell, James G.; Cartee, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle includes many individual fibers with diverse phenotypes. A barrier to understanding muscle glucose uptake at the cellular level has been the absence of a method to measure glucose uptake by single fibers from mammalian skeletal muscle. This study’s primary objective was to develop a procedure to measure glucose uptake by single fibers from rat skeletal muscle. Rat epitrochlearis muscles were incubated ex vivo with [3H]-2-deoxy-d-glucose, with or without insulin or AICAR, before isolation of ~10–30 single fibers from each muscle. Fiber type (myosin heavy chain [MHC] isoform) and glucose uptake were determined for each single fiber. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (which was cytochalasin B inhibitable) varied according to MHC isoform expression, with ~2-fold greater values for IIA versus IIB or IIX fibers and ~1.3-fold greater for hybrid (IIB/X) versus IIB fibers. In contrast, AICAR-stimulated glucose uptake was ~1.5-fold greater for IIB versus IIA fibers. A secondary objective was to assess insulin resistance of single fibers from obese versus lean Zucker rats. Genotype differences were observed for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and inhibitor κB (IκB)-β abundance in single fibers (obese less than lean), with decrements for glucose uptake (44–58%) and IκB-β (25–32%) in each fiber type. This novel method creates a unique opportunity for future research focused on understanding muscle glucose uptake at the cellular level. PMID:22396201

  13. Chronic oral administration of beta-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol affects myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in adult mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiyal, S N; Sharma, S

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of chronic administration of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 30 days) on the major contractile protein (myosin) in the left ventricular muscle of the adult mouse heart. Separation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on 7.5 % glycerol SDS-PAGE and subsequent quantification of the gels by laser densitometry showed a 6.5-fold increase in the beta-isoform of MHC in the clenbuterol-treated group. The alpha : beta ratio of these two isoforms in the control group was 98.16+/-0.14 %: 1.83+/-0.14 %, whereas in the treated group it was 88.05+/-1.15 % : 11.95+/-1.15 %. Actomyosin ATPase activity assay demonstrated a significant (20 %) decline in ATPase activity of the tissue in the beta-agonist-treated group. These results suggest that chronic clenbuterol treatment is capable to induced the transformation of MHC isoforms increasing the slow beta-MHC isoform, which may contribute to the altered contractile mechanics of clenbuterol-treated hearts.

  14. A catalytic antibody heavy chain HpU-2 degrading its epitope peptide and H. pylori urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifumi, Emi; Yamada, Yukiko; Uda, Taizo

    2006-02-28

    The HpU-2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against Helicobacter pylori urease mainly recognized the alpha-subunit of the urease. On the other hand, the heavy chain of HpU-2 mAb (HpU-2-H) isolated from the parent mAb recognized both the alpha- and beta-subunit, in which the beta-subunit was recognized more strongly than the beta-subunit. HpU-2-H cleaved a peptide, SVELIDIGGNRRIFGFNALVD, which is the epitope sequence recognized by HpU-2 mAb, showing a double-phase reaction profile at 25 degrees C in a phosphate buffer. After an induction time of 24h, the cleavage of the peptide was initiated by HpU-2-H at a high rate and it was completed at 80 h of incubation. By mass spectroscopy, two main fragmented peptides, SVELIDIGGNRR and SVELIDIGGNRRIFG, were identified. In addition, many small peptide fragments were produced by successive cleavage of the fragmented peptides. Cleavage tests for H. pylori urease by HpU-2-H revealed that the beta-subunit of the urease was cleaved first and completely decomposed at 20 h of incubation. Cleavage of the alpha-subunit started after the complete decomposition of the beta-subunit. These cleavage results were in good agreement with the immunological features of HpU-2-H. The irrelevant proteins, BSA and HSA, were hardly cleaved by HpU-2-H.

  15. The 3D structure of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus: implications for long-range genomic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; van Zelm, Menno C; Peak, Mandy M; Cutchin, Steve; Riblet, Roy; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Grosveld, Frank G; Knoch, Tobias A; Murre, Cornelis

    2008-04-18

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus is organized into distinct regions that contain multiple variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)), joining (J(H)) and constant (C(H)) coding elements. How the Igh locus is structured in 3D space is unknown. To probe the topography of the Igh locus, spatial distance distributions were determined between 12 genomic markers that span the entire Igh locus. Comparison of the distance distributions to computer simulations of alternative chromatin arrangements predicted that the Igh locus is organized into compartments containing clusters of loops separated by linkers. Trilateration and triple-point angle measurements indicated the mean relative 3D positions of the V(H), D(H), J(H), and C(H) elements, showed compartmentalization and striking conformational changes involving V(H) and D(H)-J(H) elements during early B cell development. In pro-B cells, the entire repertoire of V(H) regions (2 Mbp) appeared to have merged and juxtaposed to the D(H) elements, mechanistically permitting long-range genomic interactions to occur with relatively high frequency.

  16. Sulfasalazine Treatment Suppresses the Formation of HLA-B27 Heavy Chain Homodimer in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lu, Ming-Chi; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Su-Qin; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2015-12-29

    Human leukocytic antigen-B27 heavy chain (HLA-B27 HC) has the tendency to fold slowly, in turn gradually forming a homodimer, (B27-HC)₂ via a disulfide linkage to activate killer cells and T-helper 17 cells and inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to trigger the IL-23/IL-17 axis for pro-inflammatory reactions. All these consequences lead to the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Sulfasalazine (SSA) is a common medication used for treatment of patients with AS. However, the effects of SSA treatment on (B27-HC)₂ formation and on suppression of IL-23/IL-17 axis of AS patients remain to be determined. In the current study, we examine the (B27-HC)₂ of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the mean grade of sarcoiliitis and lumbar spine Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index (BASRI) scores of 23 AS patients. The results indicated that AS patients without (B27-HC)₂ on PBMC showed the lower levels of mean grade of sarcoiliitis and the lumbar spine BASRI scores. In addition, after treatment with SSA for four months, the levels of (B27-HC)₂ on PBMCs were significantly reduced. Cytokines mRNA levels, including TNFα, IL-17A, IL-17F and IFNγ, were also significantly down-regulated in PBMCs. However, SSA treatment did not affect the levels of IL-23 and IL-23R mRNAs.

  17. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) immunoglobulin heavy chain suggests the importance of clan III variable segments in repertoire diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaux, Breanna; Deiss, Thaddeus C.; Chen, Patricia L.; Cruz-Schneider, Maria Paula; Sena, Leonardo; Hunter, Margaret E.; Bonde, Robert K.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Manatees are a vulnerable, charismatic sentinel species from the evolutionarily divergent Afrotheria. Manatee health and resistance to infectious disease is of great concern to conservation groups, but little is known about their immune system. To develop manatee-specific tools for monitoring health, we first must have a general knowledge of how the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain locus is organized and transcriptionally expressed. Using the genomic scaffolds of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris), we characterized the potential IgH segmental diversity and constant region isotypic diversity and performed the first Afrotherian repertoire analysis. The Florida manatee has low V(D)J combinatorial diversity (3744 potential combinations) and few constant region isotypes. They also lack clan III V segments, which may have caused reduced VH segment numbers. However, we found productive somatic hypermutation concentrated in the complementarity determining regions. In conclusion, manatees have limited IGHV clan and combinatorial diversity. This suggests that clan III V segments are essential for maintaining IgH locus diversity.

  18. Pattern of myosin heavy chain isoforms in different fibre types of canine trunk and limb skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbenc, M; Smerdu, V; Zupanc, M; Tozon, N; Fazarinc, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expressions within the muscle fibres of functionally diverse trunk and limb dog muscles using monoclonal antibodies that are specific to MHC isoforms. We found that three MHC isoforms are expressed in dog skeletal muscles. The pattern of their expressions determined the existence of 'pure' fibres, i.e. I and IIa, both expressing only one MHC isoform, and 'hybrid' fibres, i.e. I/IIa and IIa/x, that co-expressed two MHC isoforms. While the MHCI, MHCIIa and MHCI/IIa fibres corresponded to the myofibrillar ATPase type fibres I, IIA and IIC, respectively, the hybrid MHCIIa/x fibres mostly behaved like the IIDog fibre type in myofibrillar ATPase reaction as described by Latorre et al. No pure MHCIIx fibres were found. Though MHCIIa/x fibres were quite numerous, their presence varied not only within different muscles but within the same muscle of different animals as well. We suggest that the discrepancies in the classification of fibre types according to their myofibrillar ATPase activity between different studies of dog skeletal muscles are probably a consequence of the variable content of the MHCIIa and MHCIIx isoforms in the MHCIIa/x hybrid fibres. Estimating the histochemical metabolic profile of fibres we found that in all fast fibres oxidative-glycolytic metabolism prevailed, whereas in slow fibres oxidative metabolism was more pronounced. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Intermediate filament-co-localized molecules with myosin heavy chain epitopes define distinct cellular domains in hair follicles and epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Simon M

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins linking intermediate filaments to other cytoskeletal components have important functions in maintaining tissue integrity and cell shape. Results We found a set of monoclonal antibodies raised against specific human sarcomeric myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms labels cells in distinct regions of the mammalian epidermis. The antigens co-localize with intermediate filament-containing structures. A slow MyHC-related antigen is punctate on the cell surface and co-localizes with desmoplakin at desmosomal junctions of all suprabasal epidermal layers from rat fœtal day 16 onwards, in the root sheath of the hair follicle and in intercalated disks of cardiomyocytes. A fast MyHC-related antigen occurs in cytoplasmic filaments in a subset of basal cells of skin epidermis and bulb, but not neck, of hair follicles. A fast IIA MyHC-related antigen labels filaments of a single layer of cells in hair bulb. This 230 000 Mr antigen co-purifies with keratin. No obvious candidate for any of the antigens appears in the literature. Conclusions We describe a set of molecules that co-localize with intermediate filament in specific cell subsets in epithelial tissues. These antigens presumably influence intermediate filament structure or function.

  20. MR molecular imaging of tumours using ferritin heavy chain reporter gene expression mediated by the hTERT promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of ChengDu Medical College, Department of Radiology, ChengDu (China); Gong, Ming-fu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Wang, Guang-xian; Su, Tong-sheng; Wen, Li; Zhang, Dong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter and the modified ferritin heavy chain (Fth) reporter gene, reporter gene expression for MRI was examined in telomerase positive and negative tumour cells and xenografts. Activity of the reporter gene expression vector Lenti-hTERT-Fth1-3FLAG-Puro was compared to constitutive CMV-driven expression and to the untransfected parental control in five tumour cell lines: A549, SKOV3, 293T, U2OS and HPDLF. In vitro, transfected cells were evaluated for FLAG-tagged protein expression, iron accumulation and transverse relaxation. In vivo, tumours transduced by lentiviral vector injection were imaged using T2*WI. Changes in tumour signal intensity were validated by histology. Only telomerase positive tumour cells expressed FLAG-tagged Fth and displayed an increase in R2* above the parental control, with a corresponding change in T2*WI. In addition, only telomerase positive tumours, transduced by injection of the reporter gene expression construct, exhibited a change in signal intensity on T2*WI. Tumour histology verified the expression of FLAG-tagged Fth and iron accumulation in telomerase positive tissue. Reporter gene expression for MRI, using the Fth reporter and the hTERT promoter, may be a useful strategy for the non-invasive diagnosis of many types of cancer. (orig.)

  1. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3......-5 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM)/session] + placebo (n = 8), RT + GH (n = 8), GH (n = 8), or placebo (n = 7) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded (RT + placebo and RT + GH) or single-blinded (GH or placebo) design. Measurements of: 1) isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength; 2......) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed...

  2. Origin of heavy Fe isotope compositions in high-silica igneous rocks: A rhyolite perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, De-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Tao; Chen, Xin; Li, Jun-Yong; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-12-01

    The origin of heavy Fe isotope compositions in high-silica (>70 wt% SiO2) igneous rocks remains a highly controversial topic. Considering that fluid exsolution in eruptive rocks is more straight-forward to constrain than in plutonic rocks, this study addresses the problem of Fe isotope fractionation in high-silica igneous rocks by measuring Fe isotope compositions of representative rhyolitic samples from the Neoproterozoic volcanic-sedimentary basins in southern China and the Triassic Tu Le Basin in northern Vietnam. The samples show remarkably varied δ56FeIRMM014 values ranging from 0.05 ± 0.05‰ to 0.55 ± 0.05‰, which is among the highest values reported from felsic rocks. The extensional tectonic setting and short melt residence time in magma chambers for the studied rhyolites rule out Soret diffusion and thermal migration processes as causes of the high δ56Fe values. Effects of volcanic degassing and fluid exsolution on bulk rock δ56Fe values for the rhyolites are also assessed using bulk rock geochemical indicators and Rayleigh fractionation models, and these processes are found to be insufficient to produce resolvable changes in Fe isotope compositions of the residual melt. The most probable mechanism accounting for heavy Fe isotope compositions in the high-silica rhyolites is narrowed down to fractional crystallization processes in the magma before rhyolite eruption. Removal of isotopically light Fe-bearing minerals (i.e. ulvöspinel-rich titanomagnetite, ilmenite and biotite) is proposed as the main cause of Fe isotope variation in silicic melts during magmatic evolution. This study implies that crystal fractionation is the dominant mechanism that controls Fe isotope fractionation in eruptive rocks and Fe isotopes could be used to study magmatic differentiation of high-silica magmas.

  3. Compositional analysis of heavy crude oil fractions by ultrahigh resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, R.; Marshall, A.G. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab; McKenna, A.M. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-07-01

    The need to characterize heavy, high sulphur crudes is essential as the global oil supply of light, sweet crudes is depleted. Due to the high sulphur content in bitumen and heavy crudes, detailed compositional characterization is needed to help develop recovery strategies in the refinery. This study characterized the middle distillate fractions of Athabasca bitumen to define the structural evolution of polycyclic aromatics that may also contain nitrogen, oxygen or sulphur atoms as a function of boiling point. The higher distillate fractions were then analyzed along with vacuum resids to prove that the structural distribution in petroleum is continuous. The basic differences in solution-phase behaviour between asphaltene and maltene fractions were discussed. An argument was presented for the structural evolution of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and the compositional boundary between asphaltene and maltene was defined. The study suggested that asphaltenes and maltenes share the same carbon number. The characterization was extended to vanadyl porphyrins by electrospray and atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). tabs., figs.

  4. Modular Construction of Large Non-Immune Human Antibody Phage-Display Libraries from Variable Heavy and Light Chain Gene Cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and antibody-derived therapeutics have emerged as a rapidly growing class of biological drugs for the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity, infection, and neurological diseases. To support the development of human antibodies, various display techniques based on antibody gene repertoires have been constructed over the last two decades. In particular, scFv-antibody phage display has been extensively utilized to select lead antibodies against a variety of target antigens. To construct a scFv phage display that enables efficient antibody discovery, and optimization, it is desirable to develop a system that allows modular assembly of highly diverse variable heavy chain and light chain (Vκ and Vλ) repertoires. Here, we describe modular construction of large non-immune human antibody phage-display libraries built on variable gene cassettes from heavy chain and light chain repertoires (Vκ- and Vλ-light can be made into independent cassettes). We describe utility of such libraries in antibody discovery and optimization through chain shuffling.

  5. Detection of monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement (FR3 in Thai malignant lymphoma by High Resolution Melting curve analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongpruttipan Tawatchai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction followed by heteroduplex has currently become standard whereas fluorescent fragment analysis (GeneScan has been used for confirmation test. In this study, three techniques had been compared: thermocycler polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by heteroduplex and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, GeneScan analysis, and real time PCR with High Resolution Melting curve analysis (HRM. The comparison was carried out with DNA extracted from paraffin embedded tissues diagnosed as B- cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Specific PCR primers sequences for IgH gene variable region 3, including fluorescence labeled IgH primers were used and results were compared with HRM. In conclusion, the detection IgH gene rearrangement by HRM in the LightCycler System showed potential for distinguishing monoclonality from polyclonality in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Introduction Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The incidence rate as reported by Ministry of Public Health is 3.1 per 100,000 population in female whereas the rate in male is 4.5 per 100,000 population 1. At Siriraj Hospital, the new cases diagnosed as malignant lymphoma were 214.6 cases/year 2. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Therefore, detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay has recently become a standard laboratory test for discrimination of reactive from malignant clonal

  6. Development of a Bioinformatics Framework for the Detection of Gene Conversion and the Analysis of Combinatorial Diversity in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains in Four Cattle Breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Stefanie; Tietze, Manfred; Czerny, Claus-Peter; König, Sven; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new bioinformatics framework for the analysis of rearranged bovine heavy chain immunoglobulin (Ig) variable regions by combining and refining widely used alignment algorithms. This bioinformatics framework allowed us to investigate alignments of heavy chain framework regions (FRHs) and the separate alignments of FRHs and heavy chain complementarity determining regions (CDRHs) to determine their germline origin in the four cattle breeds Aubrac, German Black Pied, German Simmental, and Holstein Friesian. Now it is also possible to specifically analyze Ig heavy chains possessing exceptionally long CDR3Hs. In order to gain more insight into breed specific differences in Ig combinatorial diversity, somatic hypermutations and putative gene conversions of IgG, we compared the dominantly transcribed variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), and joining (IGHJ) segments and their recombination in the four cattle breeds. The analysis revealed the use of 15 different IGHV segments, 21 IGHD segments, and two IGHJ segments with significant different transcription levels within the breeds. Furthermore, there are preferred rearrangements within the three groups of CDR3H lengths. In the sequences of group 2 (CDR3H lengths (L) of 11-47 amino acid residues (aa)) a higher number of recombination was observed than in sequences of group 1 (L≤10 aa) and 3 (L≥48 aa). The combinatorial diversity of germline IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ-segments revealed 162 rearrangements that were significantly different. The few preferably rearranged gene segments within group 3 CDR3H regions may indicate specialized antibodies because this length is unique in cattle. The most important finding of this study, which was enabled by using the bioinformatics framework, is the discovery of strong evidence for gene conversion as a rare event using pseudogenes fulfilling all definitions for this particular diversification mechanism.

  7. Developing Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Share Fast-Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain and Cardiac Troponin-I Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mary C.; Liu, Li J.; Huard, Johnny; Keller, Bradley B.; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC) and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I) positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13) and 20 (ED20), neonatal day 0 (ND0) and 4 (ND4), postnatal day 10 (PND10), and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:22808244

  8. Effects of creatine supplementation during resistance training on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Andreo F; Aguiar, Danilo H; Felisberto, Alan D S; Carani, Fernanda R; Milanezi, Rachel C; Padovani, Carlos R; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a rodent model to test the hypothesis that creatine (Cr) supplementation during resistance training would influence the pattern of slow-twitch muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms expression. Male Wistar rats (2-3 months old, 250-300 g) were divided into 4 groups: Nontrained without creatine supplementation (CO), nontrained with creatine supplementation (CR), trained without creatine supplementation (TR), and trained with creatine supplementation (TRCR). TR and TRCR groups were submitted to a resistance training program for 5 weeks (5 days/week) for morphological and biochemical analysis of the soleus muscle. Weightlifting exercise involved jump sessions into water, carrying progressive overload equivalent to percentage of body weight. CR and TRCR groups were given creatine at 0.5 g/kg(-1)/d(-1). Both Cr supplementation and resistance training alone or associated did not result in significant alterations (p > 0.05) in body weight gain, food intake, and muscle weight in the CR, TR and TRCR groups compared to the CO group. Also compared to the CO group, the CR group showed a significant (p 0.05) changes in MHC content of the TRCR group compared to the CO group. The data show that Cr supplementation provides a potential action to abolish the exercise-induced MHC isoform transitions from slow to fast in slow-twitch muscle. Thus, Cr supplementation might be a suitable strategy to maintaining a slow phenotype in slow muscle during resistance training, which may be favorable to maintenance of muscle oxidative capacity of endurance athletes.

  9. Thyroid hormone partially corrects the effect of diabetes on mysoin heavy chain RNAs in the rat ventricle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1986-05-01

    The relative abundance of the 2 cardiac myosin heavy chains (MHH-..cap alpha.. and MHC-..beta..) and their corresponding RNAs is similarly affected by hypothyroidism and diabetes in the rat ventricle. Since circulating levels of thyroid hormone (T/sub 3/) are significantly decreased in diabetes the decreased RNA-..cap alpha.. and increased RNA-..beta.. associated with diabetes may be related to T/sub 3/ deficiency. Chronically diabetic rats were injected with T/sub 3/, insulin (I), or both and sacrificed between 1 and 12 hrs after injection, MHC RNA was quantified by hybridization of total RNA to a (/sup 32/P)-cDNA MHC-..cap alpha.. probe. Total MHC RNA was measured by retention of S1-resistant label on DE-81 while RNA-..cap alpha.. and RNA-..beta.. were quantified by separation of intact (..cap alpha..) and partially digested (..beta..) probe by gel electrophoresis. Total MHC RNA was not changed by T/sub 3/ or I (.9-1.2 ng/..mu..g of cellular RNA). T/sub 3/ and I elicited a very rapid increase in RNA-..cap alpha.. (18% in untreated to 38% (I) and 47% (T/sub 3/ within 1 hr). I administered either 7 hr before or 1 hr after T/sub 3/ did not modify the RNA-..cap alpha.. increase observed after T/sub 3/ alone. However, the response of diabetic rats to T/sub 3/ was markedly different from that of hypothyroid rats. Conclusions: 1) T/sub 3/ in diabetic rats does not mimick the effect of T/sub 3/ in hypothyroid rats; it may simply impose a hyperthyroid state on the existing diabetes and 2) since neither T/sub 3/ nor I are able to increase RNA-..cap alpha.. to control levels within 12 hrs, neither hormone is sufficient to regulate the expression of MHC RNAs.

  10. Isolation, purification, and characterization of fragment B, the NH2-terminal half of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Lei, D L; Sugimoto, N; Ozutsumi, K; Okabe, T

    1989-11-01

    Fragment B, the N-terminal half of the heavy chain, an important domain of the tetanus neurotoxin molecule, was isolated for the first time. Tetanus toxin (composed of three domains, A, B, and C) was prepared from culture filtrates. Fragment A-B, derived from the toxin treated mildly with papain, was used for the isolation of fragment B. Fragment A-B obtained was dissociated into fragments A and B by reduction with 100 mM dithiothreitol and treatment with 2 M urea. Fragment B was separated from fragment A by ion-exchange column chromatography on a Mono Q column equilibrated with 20 mM Tris hydrochloride buffer (pH 7.6), containing 1 mM dithiothreitol and 2 M urea, in a fast-protein liquid chromatography system by elution with a linear gradient of 0 to 0.5 M NaCl. Fragment B was obtained in two forms having molecular weights of 48,000 +/- 2,000, which were indistinguishable by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis or antigenic specificity, but distinguishable on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis without sodium dodecyl sulfate and on isoelectric focusing (pI 6.7 and 7.3). The recovery of fragment B was 50 to 72% of that of fragment A-B on a molar basis. Purified fragment B was not toxic to mice on intravenous or intramuscular injection at doses of up to 100 micrograms, but was found to form channels (ca. 2.3 pS) in a lipid bilayer membrane by a patch clamp technique. The role of domain B of the tetanus toxin molecule in the mechanism of action of the toxin is discussed.

  11. Noncompaction of the Ventricular Myocardium Is Associated with a De Novo Mutation in the β-Myosin Heavy Chain Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Birgit S.; Binner, Priska; Waldmüller, Stephan; Höhne, Wolfgang; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Hassfeld, Sabine; Brömsen, Jürgen; Dermintzoglou, Anastassia; Wieczorek, Marcus; May, Erik; Kirst, Elisabeth; Selignow, Carmen; Rackebrandt, Kirsten; Müller, Melanie; Goody, Roger S.; Vosberg, Hans-Peter; Nürnberg, Peter; Scheffold, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM) is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the α- and β-myosin heavy chain, respectively) were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T). In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA) and atrial septal defect (ASD). A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium. PMID:18159245

  12. Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is associated with a de novo mutation in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit S Budde

    Full Text Available Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain, respectively were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T. In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA and atrial septal defect (ASD. A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium.

  13. Frequency Patterns of T-Cell Exposed Amino Acid Motifs in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Peptides Presented by MHCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremel, Robert D; Homan, E Jane

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV) to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs). TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide, which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM). Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of TCEM re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by T-cell clonal expansion that develops along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  14. Serum Phosphorylated Neurofilament-Heavy Chain, a Potential Biomarker, is Associated With Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiaona; Zhang, Shuo; Zhao, Weiwei; Ye, Hongying; Yang, Yehong; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Miao, Qing; Hu, Renming; Li, Yiming; Lu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Neurofilament (NF), one of the major axonal cytoskeletal proteins, plays a critical role in degenerative diseases in both the central and the peripheral nervous systems. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between serum phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes.Serum pNF-H concentrations were measured by ELISA in hospitalized patients with and without DPN (n = 118). DPN was assessed by clinical symptoms, signs, and electromyography.Compared with the non-DPN group (311.98 [189.59-634.12] pg/mL), the confirmed group (605.99 [281.17-1332.78] pg/mL) patients had the higher serum pNF-H levels (P = 0.007). DPN was significantly correlated with C-peptide (r = -0.269), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.185), and pNF-H (r = 0.258). Serum pNF-H levels were independently associated with DPN (P = 0.004), even after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, TC, C-peptide, urinary albuminto/creatinine ratio, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Compared with pNF-H quartile 1 (referent), patients in quartile 3 (odds ratio [OR], 3.977; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.243-12.728; P = 0.021) and quartile 4 (OR, 10.488; 95% CI, 3.020-34.429; P = 0.000) had the higher risk of DPN after adjusting for the confounders.Serum pNF-H levels might be associated with the DPN, and the correlationship between serum pNF-H and DPN should be further studied.

  15. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  16. COAXIAL DISK SHUNT FOR MEASURING IN THE HEAVY-CURRENT CHAIN OF HIGH-VOLTAGE GENERATOR OF STORM DISCHARGES OF IMPULSES OF CURRENT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHTNING WITH THE INTEGRAL OF ACTION TO 15•106 J/OHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2017-10-01

    *- component of current of artificial lightning in GCL it is expedient to utillize a numeral value SS for the examined shunt, equal 12,5·103 A/V. Practical approbation and verification of capacity of the improved measuring coaxial disk shunt of type of SC-300M2 is executed in the high-voltage heavy-current bit chain of powerful GCL, forming on the actively-inductive loading of A- and C*- the components of current of artificial lightning with rationed ATP. Originality. Developed and created new high-voltage heavy-current measuring shunt of type of SC-300M2, allowing reliably to register rationed ATP of attenuation sinewave and aperiodic impulses of current of artificial lightning in the bit chains of powerful GCL with amplitude to ±220 кА and integral them action to 13,5·106 J/Ohm. On the measuring coaxial disk shunt of type of SC-300M2 from government metrology service of Ukraine the certificate of accordance of the set form is got. Practical value. Application of the created shunt of type of SC-300M2 in composition the high-voltage heavy-current bit chains of powerful GCL will allow in a certain measure to improve the metrology providing of tests of aviation and space-rocket technique, and also objects of electroenergy on stability to lightning.

  17. Purification of chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody EG2-hFc using hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography: an alternative to protein-A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Spearman, Maureen; Okun, Natalie; Butler, Michael; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Heavy chain monoclonal antibodies are being considered as alternative to whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies for certain niche applications. Protein-A chromatography which is widely used for purifying IgG monoclonal antibodies is also used for purifying heavy chain monoclonal antibodies as these molecules possess fully functional Fc regions. However, the acidic conditions used to elute bound antibody may sometimes also leach protein-A, which is immunotoxic. Low pH conditions also tend to make the mAb molecules unstable and prone to aggregation. Moreover, protein-A affinity chromatography does not remove aggregates already present in the feed. Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (or HIMC) has already been studied as an alternative to protein-A chromatography for purifying whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies. This paper describes the use of HIMC for capturing a humanized chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody (EG2-hFC). Binding and eluting conditions were suitably optimized using pure EG2-hFC. Based on this, an HIMC method was developed for capture of EG2-hFC directly from cell culture supernatant. The EG2-hFc purity obtained in this single-step process was high. The glycan profiles of protein-A and HIMC purified monoclonal antibody samples were similar, clearly demonstrating that both techniques captured similarly glycosylated population of EG2-hFc. Moreover, this technique was able to resolve aggregates from monomeric form of the EG2-hFc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Differential muscular myosin heavy chain expression of the pectoral and pelvic girdles during early growth in the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbrech, Aude; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Guérin, Nathalie; Groscolas, René; Gilbert, Caroline; Martrette, Jean-Marc

    2011-06-01

    Continuous growth, associated with a steady parental food supply, is a general pattern in offspring development. So that young chicks can acquire their locomotor independence, this period is usually marked by a fast maturation of muscles, during which different myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms are expressed. However, parental food provisioning may fluctuate seasonally, and offspring therefore face a challenge to ensure the necessary maturation of their tissues when energy is limited. To address this trade-off we investigated muscle maturation in both the pectoral and pelvic girdles of king penguin chicks. This species has an exceptionally long rearing period (1 year), which is prolonged when parental food provisioning is drastically reduced during the sub-Antarctic winter. Approximately 1 month post hatching, chicks acquire a functional pedestrian locomotion, which uses pelvic muscles, whereas swimming, which uses the pectoral muscles, only occurs 1 year later. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the MyHC content of the leg muscles reaches a mature state before those of the pectoral muscles. We found that leg muscle MyHC composition changed with the progressive acquisition of pedestrian locomotion, whereas pectoral muscle fibres reached their mature MyHC profile as early as hatching. Contrary to our predictions, the acquisition of the adult profile in pectoral muscles could be related to an early maturation of the contractile muscular proteins, presumably associated with early thermoregulatory capacities of chicks, necessary for survival in their cold environment. This differential maturation appears to reconcile both the locomotor and environmental constraints of king penguin chicks during growth.

  19. VDJ-Seq: Deep Sequencing Analysis of Rearranged Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene to Reveal Clonal Evolution Patterns of B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Nie, Kui; Redmond, David; Melnick, Ari M; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-12-28

    Understanding tumor clonality is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis and disease progression. In addition, understanding the clonal composition changes that occur within a tumor in response to certain micro-environment or treatments may lead to the design of more sophisticated and effective approaches to eradicate tumor cells. However, tracking tumor clonal sub-populations has been challenging due to the lack of distinguishable markers. To address this problem, a VDJ-seq protocol was created to trace the clonal evolution patterns of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) relapse by exploiting VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM), two unique features of B cell lymphomas. In this protocol, Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) libraries with indexing potential were constructed from amplified rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) VDJ region from pairs of primary diagnosis and relapse DLBCL samples. On average more than half million VDJ sequences per sample were obtained after sequencing, which contain both VDJ rearrangement and SHM information. In addition, customized bioinformatics pipelines were developed to fully utilize sequence information for the characterization of IgH-VDJ repertoire within these samples. Furthermore, the pipeline allows the reconstruction and comparison of the clonal architecture of individual tumors, which enables the examination of the clonal heterogeneity within the diagnosis tumors and deduction of clonal evolution patterns between diagnosis and relapse tumor pairs. When applying this analysis to several diagnosis-relapse pairs, we uncovered key evidence that multiple distinctive tumor evolutionary patterns could lead to DLBCL relapse. Additionally, this approach can be expanded into other clinical aspects, such as identification of minimal residual disease, monitoring relapse progress and treatment response, and investigation of immune repertoires in non-lymphoma contexts.

  20. CONTRACTION CHARACTERISTICS AND MYOSIN HEAVY-CHAIN COMPOSITION OF RABBIT MASSETER MOTOR UNITS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KWA, SHS; WEIJS, WA; JUCH, PJW

    1. We studied isometric twitch peak force (TPF) and twitch contraction time (TCT) of 249 motor units of the masseter muscle in 41 rabbits after extracellular electrical stimulation of single trigeminal motoneurons in the brain stem. In 41 of these units we determined the amount of tension decrease

  1. An Evaluation of 3D Woven Orthogonal Composites' Potential in the Automotive Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Dalia

    The automotive supply chain and its management can be a very complex process and comprises a long dynamic and complex network that consists of four primary segments: original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), first tier suppliers, sub tiers suppliers, and infrastructure suppliers. During the analysis of the current automotive industry it was identified that textile industry importance is considerable increasing as a part of the global automotive supply chain, because textile products are used for interior, exterior and even suspension parts and components. Automotive industry has an increasing demand for higher quality exterior panels with better functional properties and reduced weight. One of the main potentials for this demand is based on the three-dimensional woven composites technology innovations which can replace an existing technology. The new role of the textile industry could make important changes in the automotive supply chain industry, such as: changes in the size of the supply chain, the time to the market and the position of textile industry in the automotive supply chain structure. 3D composite materials from high performance fibers, such as glass and carbon, have been used for automotive applications in a limited way due to the low production rate and the lack of research and development. This research will contribute to the understanding of textile composites in transportation and the textile parameters that affect the performance characteristics of these materials. The research examines the performance characteristics of lighter and stronger 3D woven fabric composites made from fiberglass with the aim to improve fuel efficiency by reducing the total vehicle weight while maintaining safety standards. The performance characteristics of the 3D woven fabric composite can be designed by changing different construction parameters, such as picks density, pick roving linear density, arrangements of warp and z-yarns, and the number of warp and picks layers

  2. Role of Acyl Chain Composition of Phosphatidylcholine in Tafazzin-Mediated Remodeling of Cardiolipin in Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masato; Sawada, Yoshiki; Uno, Shinpei; Chigasaki, Shuhei; Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2017-11-28

    Remodeling of the acyl chain compositions of cardiolipin (CL) species by the transacylase tafazzin is an important process for maintaining optimal mitochondrial functions. The results of mechanistic studies on the tafazzin-mediated transacylation from phosphatidylcholine (PC) to monolyso-CL (MLCL) in artificial lipid membranes are controversial. The present study investigated the role of the acyl chain composition of PC in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae tafazzin-mediated remodeling of CL by examining the structural factors responsible for the superior acyl donor ability of dipalmitoleoyl (16:1) PC over dipalmitoyl (16:0) PC. To this end, we synthesized systematic derivatives of dipalmitoleoyl PC; for example, the location of the cis double bond was migrated from the Δ9-position toward either end of the acyl chains (the Δ5- or Δ13-position), the cis double bond in the sn-1 or sn-2 position or both, was changed to a trans form, and palmitoleoyl and palmitoyl groups were exchanged in the sn-1 and sn-2 positions, maintaining similar PC fluidities. Analyses of the tafazzin-mediated transacylation from these PCs to sn-2'-MLCL(18:1-18:1/18:1-OH) in the liposomal membrane revealed that tafazzin strictly discriminates the molecular configuration of the acyl chains of PCs, including their glycerol positions (sn-1 or sn-2); however, the effects of PC fluidity on the reaction may not be neglected. On the basis of the findings described herein, we discuss the relevance of the so-called thermodynamic remodeling hypothesis that presumes no acyl selectivity of tafazzin.

  3. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  4. Evolutionary modifications of human milk composition: evidence from long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid composition of anthropoid milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Lauren A; Bazinet, Richard P

    2008-12-01

    Brain growth in mammals is associated with increased accretion of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in brain phospholipids. The period of maximum accumulation is during the brain growth spurt. Humans have a perinatal brain growth spurt, selectively accumulating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other LCPUFA from the third trimester through the second year of life. The emphasis on rapid postnatal brain growth and LCPUFA transfer during lactation has led to the suggestion that human milk LCPUFA composition may be unique. Our study tests this hypothesis by determining fatty acid composition for 11 species of captive anthropoids (n=53; Callithrix jacchus, Cebus apella, Gorilla gorilla, Hylobates lar, Leontopithecus rosalia, Macaca mulatta, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Pongo pygmaeus, Saimiri boliviensis, and Symphalangus syndactylus). Results are compared to previously published data on five species of wild anthropoids (n=28; Alouatta paliatta, Callithrix jacchus, Gorilla beringei, Leontopithecus rosalia, and Macaca sinica) and human milk fatty acid profiles. Milk LCPUFA profiles of captive anthropoids (consuming diets with a preformed source of DHA) are similar to milk from women on a Western diet, and those of wild anthropoids are similar to milk from vegan women. Collectively, the range of DHA percent composition values from nonhuman anthropoid milks (0.03-1.1) is nearly identical to that from a cross-cultural analysis of human milk (0.06-1.4). Humans do not appear to be unique in their ability to secrete LCPUFA in milk but may be unique in their access to dietary LCPUFA.

  5. Application of principal component analysis in the pollution assessment with heavy metals of vegetable food chain in the old mining areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Iosif; Harmanescu, Monica

    2012-12-13

    The aim of the paper is to assess by the principal components analysis (PCA) the heavy metal contamination of soil and vegetables widely used as food for people who live in areas contaminated by heavy metals (HMs) due to long-lasting mining activities. This chemometric technique allowed us to select the best model for determining the risk of HMs on the food chain as well as on people's health. Many PCA models were computed with different variables: heavy metals contents and some agro-chemical parameters which characterize the soil samples from contaminated and uncontaminated areas, HMs contents of different types of vegetables grown and consumed in these areas, and the complex parameter target hazard quotients (THQ). Results were discussed in terms of principal component analysis. There were two major benefits in processing the data PCA: firstly, it helped in optimizing the number and type of data that are best in rendering the HMs contamination of the soil and vegetables. Secondly, it was valuable for selecting the vegetable species which present the highest/minimum risk of a negative impact on the food chain and human health.

  6. Application of principal component analysis in the pollution assessment with heavy metals of vegetable food chain in the old mining areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergen Iosif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the paper is to assess by the principal components analysis (PCA the heavy metal contamination of soil and vegetables widely used as food for people who live in areas contaminated by heavy metals (HMs due to long-lasting mining activities. This chemometric technique allowed us to select the best model for determining the risk of HMs on the food chain as well as on people's health. Results Many PCA models were computed with different variables: heavy metals contents and some agro-chemical parameters which characterize the soil samples from contaminated and uncontaminated areas, HMs contents of different types of vegetables grown and consumed in these areas, and the complex parameter target hazard quotients (THQ. Results were discussed in terms of principal component analysis. Conclusion There were two major benefits in processing the data PCA: firstly, it helped in optimizing the number and type of data that are best in rendering the HMs contamination of the soil and vegetables. Secondly, it was valuable for selecting the vegetable species which present the highest/minimum risk of a negative impact on the food chain and human health.

  7. Synthesis and application of a ternary composite of clay, saw-dust and peanut husks in heavy metal adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungondori, Henry H; Mtetwa, Sandile; Tichagwa, Lilian; Katwire, David M; Nyamukamba, Pardon

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of a multi-component system of ferrous, chromium, copper, nickel and lead on single, binary and ternary composites was studied. The aim of the study was to investigate whether a ternary composite of clay, peanut husks (PH) and saw-dust (SD) exhibited a higher adsorption capacity than that of a binary system of clay and SD as well as a single component adsorbent of PH alone. The materials were used in their raw state without any chemical modifications. This was done to retain the cost effective aspect of the naturally occurring adsorbents. The adsorption capacities of the ternary composite for the heavy metals Fe 2+ , Cr 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and Pb 2+ were 41.7 mg/g, 40.0 mg/g, 25.5 mg/g, 41.5 mg/g and 39.0 mg/g, respectively. It was found that the ternary composite exhibited excellent and enhanced adsorption capacity compared with both a binary and single adsorbent for the heavy metals Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ and Cr 3+ . Characterization of the ternary composites was done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Kinetic models and adsorption isotherms were also studied. The pseudo second order kinetic model and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm best described the adsorption mechanisms for the ternary composite towards each of the heavy metal ions.

  8. Phosphorylated cellulose triacetate-silica composite adsorbent for recovery of heavy metal ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Niharika; Thakur, Amit K; Shahi, Vinod K

    2016-01-20

    Phosphorylated cellulose triacetate (CTA)/silica composite adsorbent was prepared by acid catalyzed sol-gel method using an inorganic precursor (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTEOS)). Reported composite adsorbent showed comparatively high adsorption capacity for Ni(II) in compare with different heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)). For Ni(II) adsorption, effect of time, temperature, pH, adsorbent dose and adsorbate concentration were investigated; different kinetic models were also evaluated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were also estimated and equilibrium adsorption obeyed Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Developed adsorbent exhibited about 78.8% Ni(II) adsorption at pH: 6 and a suitable candidate for the removal of Ni(II) ions from wastewater. Further, about 65.5% recovery of adsorbed Ni(II) using EDTA solution was demonstrated, which suggested effective recycling of the functionalized beads would enable it to be used in the treatment of contaminated water in industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Compositional analysis of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, F.L. [Departamento de Electronica y Tecnologia de Computadoras, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus Universitario Muralla del Mar, E-30202 Cartagena (Spain)]. E-mail: Felix.Martinez@upct.es; Toledano, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); San Andres, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Martil, I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Diaz, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Bohne, W. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Roehrich, J. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Strub, E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-10-25

    The composition of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films has been measured by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA). The films were deposited by high-pressure reactive sputtering (HPRS) on silicon wafers using an oxygen plasma at pressures between 0.8 and 1.6 mbar and during deposition times between 0.5 and 3.0 h. Hydrogen was found to be the main impurity and its concentration increased with deposition pressure. The composition was always slightly oxygen-rich, which is attributed to the oxygen plasma. Additionally, an interfacial silicon oxide thin layer was detected and taken into account. The thickness of the hafnium oxide film was found to increase linearly with deposition time and to decrease exponentially with deposition pressure, whereas the thickness of the silicon oxide interfacial layer has a minimum as a function of pressure at around 1.2 mbar and increases slightly as a function of time. The measurements confirmed that this interfacial layer is formed mainly during the early stages of the deposition process.

  10. Advanced Multilayer Composite Heavy-Oxide Scintillator Detectors for High Efficiency Fast Neutron Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryzhikov Vladimir D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and evaluated a new approach to fast neutron and neutron-gamma detection based on large-area multilayer composite heterogeneous detection media consisting of dispersed granules of small-crystalline scintillators contained in a transparent organic (plastic matrix. Layers of the composite material are alternated with layers of transparent plastic scintillator material serving as light guides. The resulting detection medium – designated as ZEBRA – serves as both an active neutron converter and a detection scintillator which is designed to detect both neutrons and gamma-quanta. The composite layers of the ZEBRA detector consist of small heavy-oxide scintillators in the form of granules of crystalline BGO, GSO, ZWO, PWO and other materials. We have produced and tested the ZEBRA detector of sizes 100x100x41 mm and greater, and determined that they have very high efficiency of fast neutron detection (up to 49% or greater, comparable to that which can be achieved by large sized heavy-oxide single crystals of about Ø40x80 cm3 volume. We have also studied the sensitivity variation to fast neutron detection by using different types of multilayer ZEBRA detectors of 100 cm2 surface area and 41 mm thickness (with a detector weight of about 1 kg and found it to be comparable to the sensitivity of a 3He-detector representing a total cross-section of about 2000 cm2 (with a weight of detector, including its plastic moderator, of about 120 kg. The measured count rate in response to a fast neutron source of 252Cf at 2 m for the ZEBRA-GSO detector of size 100x100x41 mm3 was 2.84 cps/ng, and this count rate can be doubled by increasing the detector height (and area up to 200x100 mm2. In summary, the ZEBRA detectors represent a new type of high efficiency and low cost solid-state neutron detector that can be used for stationary neutron/gamma portals. They may represent an interesting alternative to expensive, bulky gas counters based on 3He or

  11. Advanced Multilayer Composite Heavy-Oxide Scintillator Detectors for High Efficiency Fast Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Naydenov, Sergei V.; Pochet, Thierry; Onyshchenko, Gennadiy M.; Piven, Leonid A.; Smith, Craig F.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a new approach to fast neutron and neutron-gamma detection based on large-area multilayer composite heterogeneous detection media consisting of dispersed granules of small-crystalline scintillators contained in a transparent organic (plastic) matrix. Layers of the composite material are alternated with layers of transparent plastic scintillator material serving as light guides. The resulting detection medium - designated as ZEBRA - serves as both an active neutron converter and a detection scintillator which is designed to detect both neutrons and gamma-quanta. The composite layers of the ZEBRA detector consist of small heavy-oxide scintillators in the form of granules of crystalline BGO, GSO, ZWO, PWO and other materials. We have produced and tested the ZEBRA detector of sizes 100x100x41 mm and greater, and determined that they have very high efficiency of fast neutron detection (up to 49% or greater), comparable to that which can be achieved by large sized heavy-oxide single crystals of about Ø40x80 cm3 volume. We have also studied the sensitivity variation to fast neutron detection by using different types of multilayer ZEBRA detectors of 100 cm2 surface area and 41 mm thickness (with a detector weight of about 1 kg) and found it to be comparable to the sensitivity of a 3He-detector representing a total cross-section of about 2000 cm2 (with a weight of detector, including its plastic moderator, of about 120 kg). The measured count rate in response to a fast neutron source of 252Cf at 2 m for the ZEBRA-GSO detector of size 100x100x41 mm3 was 2.84 cps/ng, and this count rate can be doubled by increasing the detector height (and area) up to 200x100 mm2. In summary, the ZEBRA detectors represent a new type of high efficiency and low cost solid-state neutron detector that can be used for stationary neutron/gamma portals. They may represent an interesting alternative to expensive, bulky gas counters based on 3He or 10B neutron

  12. Recombination between an expressed immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene and a germline variable gene segment in a Ly 1+ B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfield, R; Hardy, R R; Tarlinton, D; Dangl, J; Herzenberg, L A; Weigert, M

    The early stages of murine B-cell differentiation are characterized by a series of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements which are required for the assembly of heavy(H) and light(L)-chain variable regions from germline gene segments. Rearrangement at the heavy-chain locus is initiated first and consists of the joining of a diversity (DH) gene segment to a joining (JH) gene segment. This forms a DJH intermediate to which a variable (VH) gene segment is subsequently added. Light-chain gene rearrangement follows and consists of the joining of a VL gene segment to a JL gene segment: once a productive light-chain gene has been formed the cell initiates synthesis of surface immunoglobulin M (sIgM) receptors (reviewed in ref. 1). These receptors are clonally distributed and may undergo further diversification either by somatic mutation or possibly by continued recombinational events. Such recombinational events have been detected in the Ly 1+ B-cell lymphoma NFS-5, which has been shown to rearrange both lambda and H-chain genes subsequent to the formation of sIgM (mu kappa) molecules. Here we have analysed a rearrangement of the productive allele of NFS-5 and found that it is due to a novel recombination event between VH genes which results in the replacement of most or all of the coding sequence of the initial VHQ52 rearrangement by a germline VH7183 gene. Embedded in the VH coding sequence close to the site of the cross-over is the sequence 5' TACTGTG 3', which is identical to the signal heptamer found 5' of many DH gene segments. This embedded heptamer is conserved in over 70% of known VH genes. We suggest that this heptamer mediates VH gene replacement and may play an important part in the development of the antibody repertoire.

  13. Modified human beta 2-microglobulin (desLys(58)) displays decreased affinity for the heavy chain of MHC class I and induces nitric oxide production and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Harhaji, L; Lamberth, K

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) is the light chain of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, and is a prerequisite for the binding of peptides to the heavy chain and their presentation to CD8+ T cells. beta2m can be modified in vivo and in vitro by proteolytic cleavage...... by complement C1 and subsequent carboxypeptidase B-like activity--processes that lead to the generation of desLys(58) beta2m (dbeta2m). This work aims to study the effect of dbeta2m on peptide binding to MHC-I, the influence of dbeta2m on the binding of beta2m to the MHC-I heavy chain and the biological...... activity of dbeta2m. Both beta2m and dbeta2m are able to support the generation of MHC-I/peptide complexes at 18 degrees C, but complexes formed in the presence of dbeta2m destabilize at 37 degrees C. Moreover, a 250 times higher concentration of dbeta2m than of beta2m is needed to displace MHC...

  14. Anion exchange chromatographic distribution of human monoclonal immunoglobulin G is determined by heavy chain subclass and level of sialic acid expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anion exchange chromatography is widely accepted method for purification of immunoglobulins. In this work, we used human monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG with structure and solubility of normal human IgG as a model for studying chromatographic behavior of particular molecular forms of IgG. Human sera with monoclonal IgG were fractionated on strong anion exchanger, Q Sepharose Fast Flow. With 20 mM Tris pH 7.5 as a start buffer, 42% of human monoclonal IgG passed through column, and 58% of them remained adsorbed. Bound monoclonal IgG were eluted from the exchanger by linear increasing of concentration of NaCl from 0 to 0.5 M. Chromatographic distribution of human monoclonal IgG correlated with their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gels, and it was dependent on γ heavy chain isotype. Light chain type, as well as serum concentration of monoclonal IgG did not influence their chromatographic behavior. The level of heavy chain sialic acid expression, but not of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, significantly determined chromatographic distribution of serum monoclonal IgG. Additionally to the information on the chromatographic behavior of human monoclonal IgG, we believe that presented data could provide useful information about the possible use of Q Sepharose Fast Flow matrix for the isolation of specific molecular forms of human IgG.

  15. Mapping of the chicken immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant region gene locus reveals an inverted α gene upstream of a condensed υ gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Rabbani, H; Shimizu, A; Hammarström, L

    2000-01-01

    Chicken antibodies are increasingly being used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. As only the genomic organization of the µ encoding gene was previously known, we analysed the chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY) and IgA (υ and α chain) immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant region (IGHC) genes and the organization of the chicken IGHC locus. The α gene is encoded by four separate exons, whereas, surprisingly, there is no intervening DNA sequence between the CH1 and CH2 domains of the IgY heavy chain, which is thus encoded by three exons separated by two introns. DNA sequence analysis shows that the exon boundaries of the chicken IGHC genes are not consistent with published domain borders. Furthermore, differences in DNA sequence confirm the existence of IgY, IgA and IgM allotypes in chickens. Finally, our results show that the IGHC genes of chicken (IgY, IgA and IgM) are all colocated on chromosome E18C15W15, where the α gene is located upstream of the υ gene in an inverted transcriptional orientation. The distances between the µ and α genes and the α and υ genes are about 18 and 15 kilobases, respectively, and thus, the size of the whole chicken IGHC locus is approximately 67 kilobases. PMID:11106938

  16. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  17. Designing Optimal LNG Station Network for U.S. Heavy-Duty Freight Trucks using Temporally and Spatially Explicit Supply Chain Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allen

    The recent natural gas boom has opened much discussion about the potential of natural gas and specifically Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in the United States transportation sector. The switch from diesel to natural gas vehicles would reduce foreign dependence on oil, spur domestic economic growth, and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. LNG provides the most potential for the medium to heavy-duty vehicle market partially due to unstable oil prices and stagnant natural gas prices. As long as the abundance of unconventional gas in the United States remains cheap, fuel switching to natural gas could provide significant cost savings for long haul freight industry. Amid a growing LNG station network and ever increasing demand for freight movement, LNG heavy-duty truck sales are less than anticipated and the industry as a whole is less economic than expected. In spite of much existing and mature natural gas infrastructure, the supply chain for LNG is different and requires explicit and careful planning. This thesis proposes research to explore the claim that the largest obstacle to widespread LNG market penetration is sub-optimal infrastructure planning. No other study we are aware of has explicitly explored the LNG transportation fuel supply chain for heavy-duty freight trucks. This thesis presents a novel methodology that links a network infrastructure optimization model (represents supply side) with a vehicle stock and economic payback model (represents demand side). The model characterizes both a temporal and spatial optimization model of future LNG transportation fuel supply chains in the United States. The principal research goal is to assess the economic feasibility of the current LNG transportation fuel industry and to determine an optimal pathway to achieve ubiquitous commercialization of LNG vehicles in the heavy-duty transport sector. The results indicate that LNG is not economic as a heavy-duty truck fuel until 2030 under current market conditions

  18. Heavy-chain isotype patterns of human antibody-secreting cells induced by Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in relation to age and preimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Juul, Lars; Gyhrs, A

    1994-01-01

    The influence of preexisting immunity on the heavy-chain isotypes of circulating antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) induced by vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and by vaccination with TT or DT...... of natural HibCP antibodies (r = 0.59; P = 0.00002). A possible role of natural exposure for Hib or cross-reactive bacteria on the mucosal surfaces in the shaping of the isotype response to HibCP conjugate vaccines is discussed....

  19. Overexpression of core-binding factor alpha (CBF alpha) reverses cellular transformation by the CBF beta-smooth muscle myosin heavy chain chimeric oncoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Hajra, A; Liu, P P; Speck, N A; Collins, F S

    1995-01-01

    A fusion between the transcription factor core-binding factor beta (CBF beta; also known as PEBP2 beta) and the tail region of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC) is generated by an inversion of chromosome 16 [inv(16) (p13q22)] associated with the M4Eo subtype of acute myeloid leukemia. We have previously shown that this CBF beta-SMMHC chimeric protein can transform NIH 3T3 cells and that this process requires regions of the chimeric protein necessary for association with the CBF alpha s...

  20. Non-muscle (NM) myosin heavy chain phosphorylation regulates the formation of NM myosin filaments, adhesome assembly and smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Gunst, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    Non-muscle (NM) and smooth muscle (SM) myosin II are both expressed in smooth muscle tissues, however the role of NM myosin in SM contraction is unknown. Contractile stimulation of tracheal smooth muscle tissues stimulates phosphorylation of the NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 and causes NM myosin filament assembly at the SM cell cortex. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable NM myosin mutant, NM myosin S1943A, in SM tissues inhibits ACh-induced NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction, and also inhibits the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes during contractile stimulation. NM myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation but not SM myosin RLC phosphorylation is regulated by RhoA GTPase during ACh stimulation, and NM RLC phosphorylation is required for NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction. NM myosin II plays a critical role in airway SM contraction that is independent and distinct from the function of SM myosin. The molecular function of non-muscle (NM) isoforms of myosin II in smooth muscle (SM) tissues and their possible role in contraction are largely unknown. We evaluated the function of NM myosin during contractile stimulation of canine tracheal SM tissues. Stimulation with ACh caused NM myosin filament assembly, as assessed by a Triton solubility assay and a proximity ligation assay aiming to measure interactions between NM myosin monomers. ACh stimulated the phosphorylation of NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 in tracheal SM tissues, which can regulate NM myosin IIA filament assembly in vitro. Expression of the non-phosphorylatable mutant NM myosin S1943A in SM tissues inhibited ACh-induced endogenous NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation, NM myosin filament formation, the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes and tension development. The NM myosin cross-bridge cycling inhibitor blebbistatin suppressed adhesome complex assembly and SM contraction without inhibiting NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation or NM myosin filament assembly. Rho

  1. TiO2/bone composite materials for the separation of heavy metal impurities from waste water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakroury, G.; Labib, Sh.; Abou El-Nour, F. H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure bone material obtained from cow meat, as apatite-rich material, and TiO2-bone composite materials are prepared and studied to be used for heavy metal ions separation from waste water solutions. Meat wastes are chemically and thermally treated to control their microstructure in order to prepare the composite materials that fulfill all the requirements to be used as selective membranes with high performance, stability and mechanical strength. The prepared materials are analyzed using Hg-porosimetry for surface characterization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) for elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for chemical composition investigation. Structural studies are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructural properties are studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and specific surface area studies are performed using Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. XRD studies show that multiphase structures are obtained as a result of 1h sintering at 700-1200 °C for both pure bone and TiO2-bone composite materials. The factors affecting the transport of different heavy metal ions through the selected membranes are determined from permeation flux measurements. It is found that membrane pore size, membrane surface roughness and membrane surface charge are the key parameters that control the transport or rejection of heavy metal ions through the selected membranes.

  2. Asphaltene laboratory assessment of a heavy onshore reservoir during pressure, temperature and composition variations to predict asphaltene onset pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Peyman; Ahmadi, Yaser [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kharrat, Riyaz [Petroleum University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Sedigheh; James, Lesley [Memorial University of Newfoundland, Saint John' s (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    An Iranian heavy oil reservoir recently encountered challenges in oil production rate, and further investigation has proven that asphaltene precipitation was the root cause of this problem. In addition, CO{sub 2} gas injection could be an appropriate remedy to enhance the production of heavy crudes. In this study, high pressure-high temperature asphaltene precipitation experiments were performed at different temperatures and pressures to investigate the asphaltene phase behavior during the natural depletion process and CO{sub 2} gas injection. Compositional modeling of experimental data predicted onset points at different temperatures which determine the zone of maximum probability of asphaltene precipitation for the studied heavy oil reservoir. Also, the effect of CO{sub 2} gas injection was investigated as a function of CO{sub 2} concentration and pressure. It was found that a CO{sub 2}-oil ratio of 40% is the optimum for limiting precipitation to have the least formation damage and surface instrument contamination.

  3. An Improved Homologous Recombination Method for Rapid Cloning of the Antibody Heavy Chain Gene and Its Comparison with the Homologous Recombination and Traditional Cloning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hajirezaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The homologous recombination (HR is one of the conventional cloning methods for the production of recombinant DNA. It is a quick method for in vivo DNA cloning without using the high cost restriction enzymes. A few modifications in the cloning procedure can increase the efficiency of this method.Materials and Methods: In this study, effect of heating on the rate of the IgG1 heavy chain gene cloning was investigated in the HR method and then it was compared with HR method without heating and traditional cloning method. For doing this comparison, three cloning methods including HR, HR with the heat treatment, and traditional cloning were used to clone the human IgG1 heavy chain into the pcDNA3.1(+ plasmid.Results: The results showed that adding heat in the HR method converts insert and vector from the double strand DNA to the single strand DNA. This allows them to copulate with each other better and faster than the two other methods. The heat addition also helps the cell enzyme system for a faster and easier recombination and moreover it increases the cloning efficiency of the HR method in case of in vitro processing.Conclusion: The results showed that giving heat in the HR method increases cloning rate 7.5% and this increase reaches 10% in comparison with the traditional method. 

  4. β-Myosin heavy chain variant Val606Met causes very mild hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice, but exacerbates HCM phenotypes in mice carrying other HCM mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenburg, Robert; Hackert, Katarzyna; Wurster, Sebastian; Deenen, René; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E; Lohse, Martin J; Schmitt, Joachim P

    2014-07-07

    Approximately 40% of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in β-cardiac myosin heavy chain (β-MHC). Associating disease phenotype with mutation is confounded by extensive background genetic and lifestyle/environmental differences between subjects even from the same family. To characterize disease caused by β-cardiac myosin heavy chain Val606Met substitution (VM) that has been identified in several HCM families with wide variation of clinical outcomes, in mice. Unlike 2 mouse lines bearing the malignant myosin mutations Arg453Cys (RC/+) or Arg719Trp (RW/+), VM/+ mice with an identical inbred genetic background lacked hallmarks of HCM such as left ventricular hypertrophy, disarray of myofibers, and interstitial fibrosis. Even homozygous VM/VM mice were indistinguishable from wild-type animals, whereas RC/RC- and RW/RW-mutant mice died within 9 days after birth. However, hypertrophic effects of the VM mutation were observed both in mice treated with cyclosporine, a known stimulator of the HCM response, and compound VM/RC heterozygous mice, which developed a severe HCM phenotype. In contrast to all heterozygous mutants, both systolic and diastolic function of VM/RC hearts was severely impaired already before the onset of cardiac remodeling. The VM mutation per se causes mild HCM-related phenotypes; however, in combination with other HCM activators it exacerbates the HCM phenotype. Double-mutant mice are suitable for assessing the severity of benign mutations. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. An interorganizational IT infrastructure for self-organization in logistics : situation awareness and real-time chain composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, W.J.; Punter, L.M.; Bastiaansen, H.J.M.; Cornelisse, E.; Dalmolen, S.; Palaskas, Z.; Karakostas, B.; Gato, J.; Garcia, J.; Herrero, G.; Gonzalez-Rodrigues, M.

    2016-01-01

    To meet the challenges for more sustainable, effective and efficient transport services in global logistics, a new IT-paradigm is needed to harvest the opportunities that capabilities for situation awareness and real-time chain composition provide. The iCargo project provides such an advanced,

  6. Joint replenishment and pricing decisions with different freight modes considerations for a supply chain under a composite incentive contract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noori-daryan, Mahsa; Taleizadeh, Ata Allah; Govindan, Kannan

    2018-01-01

    decisions of a single-manufacturer/multiple-retailer supply chain where a composite contract combines quantity and freight discounts, and a free shipping contract is incorporated into the model. Here, the transportation modes of raw materials and finished products are subject to a limited capacity...

  7. Heavy metal concentrations in a soil-plant-snail food chain along a terrestrial soil pollution gradient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, M.J.M.; Oosthoek, A.; Rozema, J.; Aerts, R.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated concentrations of Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb in the compartments of a soil-plant (Urtica dioica)-snail (Cepaea nemoralis) food chain in four polluted locations in the Biesbosch floodplains, the Netherlands, and two reference locations. Total soil metal concentrations in the polluted locations

  8. Long chain phenols: Part XI. Composition of natural cashew nutshell liquid (Anacardium occidentale) from various sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyman, J H; Kiong, L S

    1978-08-01

    The composition of cashew nutsAnacardium occidentale from different terrestrial sources has been studied. Samples from Brazil, Ceylon, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, and Tanzania have been solvent extracted to recover the phenolic shell liquid (natural CNSL) separate from the kernel oil. The recovered materials from the different sources were present from 23.6% to 27.7%. After hydrogenation of the side chains and methylation of the acidic groups, the component phenols anacardic acid (74.1% to 77.4%), cardol (15.0% to 20.1%), 2-methyl cardol (1.7% to 2.6%), and cardanol (1.2% to 9.2%) were determined by gas liquid chromatography on polyethyleneglycol adipate. The component phenols have been separated by adsorption thin layer chromatography, and their triene (AN-15∶3, 36.3% to 50.4%), diene (AN-15∶2, 17.8% to 32.1%), monoene (AN-15∶1, 25.0%, to 33.3%), and saturated (AN-15∶0, 2.2% to 3.0%) constituents determined by mass spectroscopy. The results of mass spectroscopic analysis have been confirmed by methylation of the separated component phenols and gas liquid chromatography. It is apparent that the largest variation is in the % cardanol (1.2% to 9.2%). While the total percentage of unsaturated constituents is quite similar, the distribution of triene, diene, and monoene varies widely.

  9. Efficient heterologous expression and secretion in Aspergillus oryzae of a llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragment V(HH) against EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Aoki, Jun-ichi; Tabuchi, Soichiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed a filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae that secretes a llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragment (V(HH)) that binds specifically to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a culture medium. A major improvement in yield was achieved by fusing the V(HH) with a Taka-amylase A signal sequence (sTAA) and a segment of 28 amino acids from the N-terminal region of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (N28). The yields of secreted, immunologically active anti-EGFR V(HH) reached 73.8 mg/1 in a Sakaguchi flask. The V(HH) fragments were released from the sTAA or N28 proteins by an indigenous A. oryzae protease during cultivation. The purified recombinant V(HH) fragment was specifically recognized and could bind to the EGFR with a high affinity.

  10. Mutations in the slow skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) cause laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Christopher; Herrmann, Ralf; Parry, Cheryl; Liyanage, Khema; Dye, Danielle E; Durling, Hayley J; Duff, Rachael M; Beckman, Kaye; de Visser, Marianne; van der Graaff, Maaike M; Hedera, Peter; Fink, John K; Petty, Elizabeth M; Lamont, Phillipa; Fabian, Vicki; Bridges, Leslie; Voit, Thomas; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laing, Nigel G

    2004-10-01

    We previously linked Laing-type early-onset autosomal dominant distal myopathy (MPD1) to a 22-cM region of chromosome 14. One candidate gene in the region, MYH7, which is mutated in cardiomyopathy and myosin storage myopathy, codes for the myosin heavy chain of type I skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac ventricles. We have identified five novel heterozygous mutations--Arg1500Pro, Lys1617del, Ala1663Pro, Leu1706Pro, and Lys1729del in exons 32, 34, 35, and 36 of MYH7--in six families with early-onset distal myopathy. All five mutations are predicted, by in silico analysis, to locally disrupt the ability of the myosin tail to form the coiled coil, which is its normal structure. These findings demonstrate that heterozygous mutations toward the 3' end of MYH7 cause Laing-type early-onset distal myopathy. MYH7 is the fourth distal-myopathy gene to have been identified.

  11. Gene duplication and conversion events shaped three homologous, differentially expressed myosin regulatory light chain (MLC2) genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, L.; Overheul, G.J.; Derks, R.C.; Wieringa, B.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Wansink, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin II is a hexameric protein complex consisting of two myosin heavy chains, two myosin essential light chains and two myosin regulatory light chains. Multiple subunit isoforms exist, allowing great diversity in myosin II composition which likely impacts on its contractile properties. Little is

  12. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yih-Dean; Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lin, Chun-Pin; Tseng, Wan-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the main causes of dental restoration failure. This study tried to conjugate two diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate resins in order to reduce polymerization shrinkage and increase the hardness of composite resins. Diisocyanate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and bisphenol A dimethacrylate were reacted in different ratios to form urethane-modified new resin matrices, and then mixed with 50 wt.% silica fillers. The viscosities of matrices, polymerization shrinkage, surface hardness, and degrees of conversion of experimental composite resins were then evaluated and compared with a non-modified control group. The viscosities of resin matrices increased with increasing diisocyanate side chain density. Polymerization shrinkage and degree of conversion, however, decreased with increasing diisocyanate side chain density. The surface hardness of all diisocyanate-modified groups was equal to or significantly higher than that of the control group. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The Chemical Composition and Physical Properties of the Light and Heavy Tar Resulted from Coconut Shell Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uswatun Hasanah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The tar resulted from pyrolysis of coconut shell is a waste. It is important to be clarified their chemical composition and physical properties in order to find out their feasibility as source of a fuel. This research was resulted two immiscible organic fractions, and these were further determined their physical properties such as water composition by using ASTM D-95 methods, ash composition (ASTM D-482, flash point C.O.C (ASTM D-92, kinematics of viscosity (ASTM D-445, and caloric valued using bomb calorimetric. In addition, tar composition was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS. The result provided oil which was categorized as light and heavy bio-oils. The light bio-oil has specific gravity 0.99, ash content 0.01%, kinematics viscosity 25.5 cSt, flash point <27 oC, pH 3 and heating value 10304 kcal/kg. On the other hand, heavy bio- oils gave specific gravity 1.13, ash 0.46%, kinematics viscosity 185 cSt, flash point 134 oC, pH 2.5 and heating value 6210 kcal/kg. Moreover, the light bio-oil contained 79 compounds which was composed of phenol 16.4%, hydrocarbon 12.4%, phenolic 27.6%, other oxygenated compounds 53.6%, and acetic acid 3%, meanwhile the heavy bio-oils contained of 18 compounds which was consisted of phenol 31.2%, lauric acid 6.0%, phenolic 27.6%, and other oxygenated compounds 35.3%, respectively. With this result, it was clarify that these bio-oils could not be used directly as a fuel for motor nor diesel machinery.

  14. Inventory of heavy metal content in organic waste applied as fertilizer in agriculture: evaluating the risk of transfer into the food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla; Herva, Marta; Franco-Uría, Amaya; Roca, Enrique

    2011-07-01

    In this work, an environmental risk assessment of reusing organic waste of differing origins and raw materials as agricultural fertilizers was carried out. An inventory of the heavy metal content in different organic wastes (i.e., compost, sludge, or manure) from more than 80 studies at different locations worldwide is presented. The risk analysis was developed by considering the heavy metal (primarily Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in different organic residues to assess their potential environmental accumulation and biotransfer to the food chain and humans. A multi-compartment model was used to estimate the fate and distribution of metals in different environmental compartments, and a multi-pathway model was used to predict human exposure. The obtained hazard index for each waste was concerning in many cases, especially in the sludge samples that yielded an average value of 0.64. Among the metals, Zn was the main contributor to total risk in all organic wastes due to its high concentration in the residues and high biotransfer potential. Other more toxic metals, like Cd or Pb, represented a negligible contribution. These results suggest that the Zn content in organic waste should be reduced or more heavily regulated to guarantee the safe management and reuse of waste residues according to the current policies promoted by the European Union.

  15. Synergistic adsorption of heavy metal ions and organic pollutants by supramolecular polysaccharide composite materials from cellulose, chitosan and crown ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Tran, Chieu D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a simple one-step method to synthesize novel supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS) and benzo-15-crown 5 (B15C5). Butylmethylimidazolium chloride [BMIm+Cl−], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a sole solvent for dissolution and preparation of the composites. Since majority of [BMIm+Cl−] used was recovered for reuse, the method is recyclable. The [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites obtained retain properties of their components, namely superior mechanical strength (from CEL), excellent adsorption capability for heavy metal ions and organic pollutants (from B15C5 and CS). More importantly, the [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites exhibit truly supramolecular properties. By itself CS, CEL and B15C5 can effectively adsorb Cd2+, Zn2+ and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. However, adsorption capability of the composite was substantially and synergistically enhanced by adding B15C5 to either CEL and/or CS. That is, the adsorption capacity (qe values) for Cd2+ and Zn2+ by [CS + B15C5], [CEL + B15C5] and [CEL + CS + B15C5] composites are much higher than combined qe values of individual CS, CEL and B15C5 composites. It seems that B15C5 synergistically interact with CS (or CEL) to form more stable complexes with Cd2+ (or Zn2+), and as a consequence, the [CS + B15C5] (or the [CEL + B15C5]) composite can adsorb relatively larger amount Cd2+ (or Zn2+). Moreover, the pollutants adsorbed on the composites can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the [CS + CEL + B15C5] composites to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency. PMID:24333678

  16. Urine of patients with early prostate cancer contains lower levels of light chain fragments of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor and saposin B but increased expression of an inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapalan, Jaime J; Ng, Keng L; Shuib, Adawiyah S; Razack, Azad H A; Hashim, Onn H

    2013-06-01

    The present study was aimed at the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in the urine of patients with prostate cancer (PCa), those with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and age-matched healthy male control subjects. Using a combination of 2DE and MS/MS, significantly lower expression of urinary saposin B and two different fragments of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor light chain (ITIL) was demonstrated in the PCa patients compared to the controls. However, only one of the ITIL fragments was significantly different between the PCa and BPH patients. When image analysis was performed on urinary proteins that were transferred onto NC membranes and detected using a lectin that binds to O-glycans, a truncated fragment of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 was the sole protein found to be significantly enhanced in the PCa patients compared to the controls. Together, these urinary peptide fragments might be useful complementary biomarkers to indicate PCa as well as to distinguish it from BPH, although further epidemiological evidence on the specificity and sensitivity of the protein candidates is required. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Identification of an altered immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene rearrangement in the central nervous system in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, R; Felix, C A; McKenzie, S E; Shane, S; Lange, B; Finger, L R

    1993-08-01

    In B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the nucleotide sequence of the complementarity determining region III (CDRIII) in the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) has been used as a molecular fingerprint to identify the leukemic cells. In a child with B-precursor ALL without central nervous system (CNS) disease at diagnosis and a subsequent isolated CNS relapse, we examined the stability of the rearranged IgH by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the CDRIII in the leukemic cells from the marrow at diagnosis to the sequences in the leukemic cells from the cerebrospinal fluid at relapse. Whereas two of the three IgH sequences isolated from the leukemic cells at CNS relapse were identical to sequences originally isolated from the marrow lymphoblasts at diagnosis, the third CNS sequence was similar but not identical to the third marrow sequence. The third IgH sequence identified in the CNS differed from the marrow sequence only at the variable gene segment adjoining the CDRIII. Using a detection method based on the polymerase chain reaction, the altered IgH sequence identified in the leukemic cells from the cerebrospinal fluid was noted to be present in the CNS at a higher frequency than the related diagnostic sequence and was not detected in the marrow either at diagnosis or at CNS relapse. These findings indicate that the clonal pattern of leukemia in the CNS may differ from that in the marrow.

  18. Adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet, Imtithal; Kabbani, Ahmad; Holail, Hanafy

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials have gained great attention because of their novel size- and shape-dependent properties, large specific surface area and high reaction activity. Moreover, nanomaterials have a wide range of applications, as in the technological and environmental challenges in the areas of solar energy conversion, catalysis, medicine, and water treatments. In the present study, nanostructured graphite oxide, silica/graphite oxide composites and silica nanoparticles were used for the removal of the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption method and the adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite was evaluated. The experimental results revealed a strong adsorption of the metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide, this is reflected in the shifts in wave numbers after adsorption with nanostructured graphite oxide and the big shift in wave numbers (Δv¯) for nickel ions reflects chemosorption type of adsorption. This is confirmed by the coherence between Δv¯, removal percentage and crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE). Silica/ GO (2:3) composite showed the greatest removal percentage at different concentrations compared to pure graphite oxide and silica nanoparticles. The higher removal percentage of nickel ions by silica /GO composite (2:3) was observed at 180 min contact time and basic pH. The kinetic studies showed that silica/ GO (2:3) composite had rapid adsorption rate and efficiency and it was found to follow first order rate expression or an exponential decay of the metal cations from water study.

  19. Heavy metals in the habitat and throughout the food chain of the Neotropical otter, Lontra longicaudis, in protected Mexican wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Rosas, Nadia N; Valdespino, Carolina; García-Hernández, Jaqueline; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P; Olguín, Eugenia J

    2013-02-01

    Top predators like the Neotropical otter, Lontra longicaudis annectens, are usually considered good bioindicators of habitat quality. In this study, we evaluated heavy metal contamination (Hg(tot), Pb, Cd) in the riverine habitat, prey (crustaceans and fish), and otter feces in two Ramsar wetlands with contrasting upstream contamination discharges: Río Blanco and Río Caño Grande in Veracruz, Mexico, during the dry, the wet, and the nortes seasons. Most comparisons revealed no differences between sites while seasonal differences were repeatedly detected for all of the compartments. Higher concentrations of Pb during the dry season and of Cd during the wet season in otter feces mirrored differences detected in the most seasonally consumed prey. Compared with fecal methylmercury values reported for the European otter (0.25-0.75 mg kg(-1)) in unprotected areas, the Hg(tot) levels that we measured were lower (0.02-0.17 mg kg(-1)). However, Pb (117.87 mg kg(-1)) and Cd (9.14 mg kg(-1)) concentrations were higher (Pb, 38.15 mg kg(-1) and Cd, 4.72 mg kg(-1)) in the two Ramsar wetlands. Protected areas may shelter species, but those with water-linked diets may suffer the effect of chemicals used upstream.

  20. Spatial distribution of "tissue-specific" antigens in the developing human heart and skeletal muscle. II. An immunohistochemical analysis of myosin heavy chain isoform expression patterns in the embryonic heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, A.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Virágh, S.; Kálmán, F.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHCs) was investigated immunohistochemically in the embryonic human heart between the 4th and the 8th week of development. The development of the overall MHC isoform expression pattern can be outlined as follows: (1) In all

  1. Heavy metal concentrations in a soil-plant-snail food chain along a terrestrial soil pollution gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notten, M.J.M. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: martje.notten@ecology.falw.vu.nl; Oosthoek, A.J.P. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rozema, J. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aerts, R. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-11-15

    We investigated concentrations of Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb in the compartments of a soil-plant (Urtica dioica)-snail (Cepaea nemoralis) food chain in four polluted locations in the Biesbosch floodplains, the Netherlands, and two reference locations. Total soil metal concentrations in the polluted locations were 4-20 times higher than those in the reference locations. Positive relationships between the generally low leaf concentrations and the soil concentrations were found for Zn only (r {sup 2} = 0.20). Bioaccumulation of Zn, Cu and Cd was observed in the snail tissues. We found positive relationships between the snail and leaf concentrations for all metals (range r {sup 2} = 0.19-0.46). The relationships between soil and snail concentrations were also positive, except for Cu (range r {sup 2} = 0.15-0.33). These results suggest transfer of metals to C. nemoralis snails from U. dioica leaves and from the soil. Metal transfer from polluted leaves to C. nemoralis is more important than transfer from the soil. - Bioaccumulation and positive snail-leaf relationships suggest metal transfer from Urtica dioica leaves to Cepaea nemoralis snails.

  2. Triticale (XTriticosecale W.) Heavy Metal Upptake as a Possibility of Food Chain Pollution in a Long-Term Field Experiment in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    mixes and crackers due to a savory, nutty flavor. Etanol plants will pay a premium for triticale over barley since it has more starch and no hull, making alcohol production more efficient. Germany, France, China, Poland and Hungary account for nearly 90 percent of world triticale production (Donald et al. 2001). Heavy metals are dangerous because they tend to bioaccumulate in food chain. Bioaccumulation means an increase in the concentration of a chemical in a biological organism over time, compared to the chemical`s concentration in they environment. Compounds accumulate in living things any time they are taken up and stored faster han they are broken down (metabolize) or extreted. Crops have ability to heavy metal accumulation from fertilizers such as Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn etc. to a different degree (Lee et al. 2001, Scholz and Ellerbrock 2004). The main purposes of this study was to determine the triticale toxic element upptake by the soil, triticale leaf+straw and grain element concentrations on acid sandy soil in a long-term field fertilization experiment at Nyirlugos, Hungary in 1998. Material and Methods: Field experiments were carried out on an acidic sandy brown forest soil at Nyírlugos in East-Hungary from 1962 to 2005. Soil geochemical parameters were as follow: humus 0.6%, pH (H2O) 5.8, pH (KCl) 4.6, total N 32.8 mg/kg, AL (ammonium lactate soluble)- P2O5 43 mg/kg, AL-K2O 52 mg/kg. The experiments involved 32 NPKCaMg treatments in 4 replications giving a total of 128 plots. N levels were 0, 50, 100, 150 kg/ha/yr, P2O5 and K2O 0, 60, 120, 180 kg/ha/yr, CaCO3 0, 250, 500, 1000 kg/ha/yr and MgCO3 doses were 0, 140, 280 kg/ha/yr. Plot brutto size was 50 m2. Composite soil samples consisting of 25 subsamples collected at before flowering time from the ploughed layer of each plot. The so-called "mobile" fraction was extracted by ammonium-acetate+EDTA (AAc+EDTA, Lakanen and Ervio 1971) and the heavy metal determination by ICP-AES technic. Plant leaf+straw and seed

  3. Regeneration of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain repertoire after transient B-cell depletion with an anti-CD20 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzière, Anne-Sophie; Kneitz, Christian; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Dörner, Thomas; Tony, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    B-cell depletive therapies have beneficial effects in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of the disease is not clear. In particular, it is not known how the regeneration of the B-cell repertoire takes place. Two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated with rituximab, and the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes (Ig-VH) were analysed to follow the B-cell regeneration. Patient A was treated with two courses of rituximab, and B-cell regeneration was followed over 27 months by analysing more than 680 Ig-VH sequences. Peripheral B-cell depletion lasted 7 months and 10 months, respectively, and each time was accompanied by a clinical improvement. Patient B received one treatment course. B-cell depletion lasted 5 months and was accompanied by a good clinical response. B cells regenerated well in both patients, and the repopulated B-cell repertoire was characterised by a polyclonal and diverse use of Ig-VH genes, as expected in adult individuals. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration we observed the expansion and recirculation of a highly mutated B-cell population. These cells expressed very different Ig-VH genes. They were class-switched and could be detected for a short period only. Patient A was followed long term, whereby some characteristic changes in the VH2 family as well as in specific mini-genes like VH3–23, VH 4–34 or VH 1–69 were observed. In addition, rituximab therapy resulted in the loss of clonal B cells for the whole period. Our data show that therapeutic transient B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibodies results in the regeneration of a diverse and polyclonal heavy-chain repertoire. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration, highly mutated B cells recirculate for a short time period in both the patients analysed. The longitudinal observation of a single patient up to 27 months shows subtle intraindividual changes, which may indicate repertoire

  4. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling and Neurotrophins Control Transformation of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Aerobic Treadmill Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Liu, Gan Chen, Fanling Li, Changfa Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study elucidated the role of CaN-NFAT signaling and neurotrophins on the transformation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber following aerobic exercise training. To do so, we examined the content and distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber, the activity of CaN and expression of NFATc1 in these fibers, and changes in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neutrophin-3 (NT-3 in the soleus and striatum following high-and medium-intensity aerobic treadmill training. Specific pathogen-free 2 month old male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control group (Con, n = 8, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise group (M-Ex, n = 8 and high-intensity aerobic exercise group (H-Ex, n = 8. We used ATPase staining to identify the muscle fiber type I and II, SDS-PAGE to separate and analyze the isoforms MyHCI, MyHCIIA, MyHCIIB and MyHCIIx, and performed western blots to determine the expression of NFATc1, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. CaN activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. In the soleus muscle, 8 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise can induce transformation of MyHC IIA and MyHC IIB to MyHC IIX and MyHC I (p < 0.01, while high-intensity treadmill exercise can induce transform MyHC IIx to MyHC IIB, MyHC IIA and MyHC I (p < 0.01. In comparison to the control group, CaN activity and NFATcl protein level were significantly increased in both the M-Ex and H-Ex groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, with a more pronounced upregulation in the M-Ex group (p < 0.05. Eight weeks of moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise induced the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in the soleus muscle and the striatum (p < 0.01, with the most significant increase in the H-Ex group (p < 0.01. In the rat soleus muscle, (1 CaN–NFATcl signaling contributes to the conversion of MyHC I isoform in response to moderate-intensity exercise; (2

  5. [Changes in quantity and species composition of streptomycetes associations in soil polluted by heavy metals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryshko, V M; Syshchykova, O V

    2010-01-01

    High content of Cu, Fe, Cd, Zn, Ni mobile forms in industrial platform technozems of ore-concentrating factory causes a 1.5-6.3-fold decrease of microorganisms total quantity and 3-4 fold decrease of streptomycetes amount. The obtained results are confirmed by the model experience information, in accordance to which the streptomycetes amount decreases 1.8-2.4 times on the 1st and 10th days when CdSO4, Fe2(SO4)3, Ni(NO3)2, CuSO4, ZnSO4, (CH3COO)2Pb.Pb(OH) are brought in chernozem at the maximal concentration of heavy metals. The renewal of common chernozem microbiocenosis quantity under the effect of maximum possible concentration of heavy metals salts (MPC) is observed already on the 30th day of research, while at 5 MPC it is observed--after 90 days, and at 15 MPC--the cenosis homeostasis is violated irreversibly. The dominants of technozems streptomycetes association are S. albocrustosus, S. sporostellatus, S. sporoherbeus, S aerionidulus and S. violobrunneus. The influence of heavy metals blend in the industrial platform technozem results in the decline of streptomycetes variety in the association.

  6. Prognostic Impact of Serum Heavy/Light Chain Pairs in Patients With Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance and Smoldering Myeloma: Long-Term Results From a Single Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Laura; Fernández de Larrea, Carlos; Elena, Montserrat; Cibeira, María Teresa; Tovar, Natalia; Aróstegui, Juan I; Pedrosa, Fabiola; Rosiñol, Laura; Filella, Xavier; Yagüe, Jordi; Bladé, Joan

    2016-06-01

    Asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies, such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering myeloma (SMM), are clinical conditions that usually precede symptomatic multiple myeloma. Therefore, risk stratification is crucial owing to the heterogeneous progression rate among these patients. In previous years, suppression of the uninvolved chain of specific heavy/light chain (HLC) pairs in serum has been identified as a new risk factor in MGUS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic effect of involved and uninvolved HLC pairs and HLC ratios on progression in a series of patients with MGUS and SMM. All specific serum HLC pairs were measured in 114 patients diagnosed with SMM (n = 27) and MGUS (n = 87) from 1983 to 2003. Also, the HLC ratios were calculated. Progression to symptomatic multiple myeloma was observed in 13 patients (8 with SMM and 5 with MGUS). The risk of progression was 6 times greater in those with SMM (P = .001) and 4 times greater for those with the IgA isotype (P = .01). The suppression of any IgM isotypes (IgMκ or IgMλ) in patients with IgA or IgG gammopathy or any IgA isotypes (IgAκ or IgAλ) in patients with IgG or IgM gammopathy was associated with a shorter time to progression to symptomatic gammopathy (P = .001 and P = .03, respectively). On multivariate analysis, the evolving pattern and suppression of any IgM HLC pair remained significant. HLC ratios could be a valuable tool in the risk stratification of patients with SMM and MGUS, especially patients with IgG isotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) from fast skeletal muscle of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wuying; Fu, Guihong; Bing, Shiyu; Meng, Tao; Zhou, Ruixue; Cheng, Jia; Zhao, Falan; Zhang, Hongfang; Zhang, Jianshe

    2010-03-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) is one of the major structural and contracting proteins of muscle. We have isolated the cDNA clone encoding MyHC of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. The sequence comprises 5 934 bp, including a 5 814 bp open reading frame encoding an amino acid sequence of 1 937 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69% homology to rabbit fast skeletal MyHC and 73%-76% homology to the MyHCs from the mandarin fish, walleye pollack, white croaker, chum salmon, and carp. The putative sequences of subfragment-1 and the light meromyosin region showed 61.4%-80% homology to the corresponding regions of other fish MyHCs. The tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific expressions of the MyHC gene were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The MyHC gene showed the highest expression in the muscles compared with the kidney, spleen and intestine. Developmentally, there was a gradual increase in MyHC mRNA expression from the neural formation stage to the tail bud stage. The highest expression was detected in hatching larva. Our work on the MyHC gene from the grass carp has provided useful information for fish molecular biology and fish genomics.

  8. Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two isopods (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissl, S.; Uber, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two isopods, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00427-008-0216-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18443823

  9. Somatic diversification in the heavy chain variable region genes expressed by human autoantibodies bearing a lupus-associated nephritogenic anti-DNA idiotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaison, C.; Chastagner, P.; Theze, J.; Zouali, M. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France))

    1994-01-18

    Monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies bearing a lupus nephritis-associated idiotype were derived from five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genes encoding their heavy (H)-chain variable (V[sub H]) regions were cloned and sequenced. When compared with their closest V[sub h] germ-line gene relatives, these sequences exhibit a number of silent (S) and replacement (R) substitutions. The ratios of R/S mutations were much higher in the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of the antibodies than in the framework regions. Molecular amplification of genomic V[sub H] genes and Southern hybridization with somatic CDR2-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that the configuration of the V[sub H] genes corresponding to V[sub H] sequences in the nephritogenic antibodies is not present in the patient's own germ-line DNA, implying that the B-cell clones underwent somatic mutation in vivo. These findings, together with the characteristics of the diversity and junctional gene elements utilized to form the antibody, indicate that these autoantibodies have been driven through somatic selection processes reminiscent of those that govern antibody responses triggered by exogenous stimuli.

  10. Evaluation of heavy chain C-terminal deletions on productivity and product quality of monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhilan; Tang, Danming; Misaghi, Shahram; Jiang, Guoying; Yu, Christopher; Yim, Mandy; Shaw, David; Snedecor, Brad; Laird, Michael W; Shen, Amy

    2017-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been well established as potent therapeutic agents and are used to treat many different diseases. During cell culture production, antibody charge variants can be generated by cleavage of heavy chain (HC) C-terminal lysine and proline amidation. Differences in levels of charge variants during manufacturing process changes make it challenging to demonstrate process comparability. In order to reduce heterogeneity and achieve consistent product quality, we generated and expressed antibodies with deletion of either HC C-terminal lysine (-K) or lysine and glycine (-GK). Interestingly, clones that express antibodies lacking HC C-terminal lysine (-K) had considerably lower specific productivities compared to clones that expressed either wild type antibodies (WT) or antibodies lacking HC glycine and lysine (-GK). While no measurable differences in antibody HC and LC mRNA levels, glycosylation and secretion were observed, our analysis suggests that the lower specific productivity of clones expressing antibody lacking HC C-terminal lysine was due to slower antibody HC synthesis and faster antibody degradation. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:786-794, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  12. Amphipathic variable region heavy chain peptides derived from monoclonal human Wegener's anti-PR3 antibodies stimulate lymphocytes from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peen, E; Malone, C; Myers, C; Williams, R C; Peck, A B; Csernok, E; Gross, W L; Staud, R

    2001-01-01

    Amphipathic variable-region heavy chain 11-mer peptides from monoclonal human IgM antiproteinase-3 antibodies were studied for peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation in 21 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), connective tissue disease controls and normal control subjects. Positive T-cell activation was observed in most experiments with WG patients' lymphocytes using amphipathic VH-region peptides from four different human monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies. Control peptides of the same length but without amphipathic characteristics along with other amphipathic peptides not derived from monoclonal anti-PR3 sequence were employed as controls. No significant lymphocyte stimulation was observed with normal controls, but positive stimulation with amphipathic VH peptides was also recorded in other connective tissue disease controls mainly patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Amphipathic peptides not derived from anti-PR3 sequence did not stimulate WG lymphocytes. Our findings indicate that lymphocyte reactivity as an element of cell-mediated immunity may be activated by amphipathic VH-region amino acid sequences of autoantibodies which are themselves associated with diseases such as WG. PMID:11529926

  13. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3' end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH-DH junction as a "footprint" of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH-DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse.

  14. Unexpectedly Low Mutation Rates in Beta-Myosin Heavy Chain and Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein Genes in Italian Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncarati, Roberta; Latronico, Michael VG; Musumeci, Beatrice; Aurino, Stefania; Torella, Annalaura; Bang, Marie-Louise; Jotti, Gloria Saccani; Puca, Annibale A; Volpe, Massimo; Nigro, Vincenzo; Autore, Camillo; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiac disease. Fourteen sarcomeric and sarcomere-related genes have been implicated in HCM etiology, those encoding β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) reported as the most frequently mutated: in fact, these account for around 50% of all cases related to sarcomeric gene mutations, which are collectively responsible for approximately 70% of all HCM cases. Here, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography followed by bidirectional sequencing to screen the coding regions of MYH7 and MYBPC3 in a cohort (n = 125) of Italian patients presenting with HCM. We found 6 MHY7 mutations in 9/125 patients and 18 MYBPC3 mutations in 19/125 patients. Of the three novel MYH7 mutations found, two were missense, and one was a silent mutation; of the eight novel MYBPC3 mutations, one was a substitution, three were stop codons, and four were missense mutations. Thus, our cohort of Italian HCM patients did not harbor the high frequency of mutations usually found in MYH7 and MYBPC3. This finding, coupled to the clinical diversity of our cohort, emphasizes the complexity of HCM and the need for more inclusive investigative approaches in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of this disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 2894–2900, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21302287

  15. Worse prognosis with gene mutations of beta-myosin heavy chain than myosin-binding protein C in Chinese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxia; Zou, Yubao; Fu, Chunyan; Xu, Xiqi; Wang, Jizheng; Song, Lei; Wang, Hu; Chen, Jingzhou; Wang, Jianwei; Huan, Tujun; Hui, Rutai

    2008-03-01

    No data are available on survival analysis and longitudinal evolution of patients with gene mutations of beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) in Chinese. To prospectively investigate whether different gene mutations confer distinct prognosis. We performed a prospective study in 70 HCM patients and 46 genetically affected family members without HCM-phenotype with direct DNA sequencing of MYH7 and MYBPC3, clinical assessments, and 5.8 +/- 1.8 years follow-up. After follow-up, more surgical intervention (8/52 versus 0/18, p MYH7 mutations than in patients with MYBPC3 mutations (45.1 +/- 14.0 versus 73.5 +/- 7.5 years, p = 0.03). Seven of the 27 mutation carriers of MYH7 had clinical presentations of HCM, but no carriers of MYBPC3 mutations developed to HCM during follow-up. Maximal wall thickness was thicker in the patients carrying mutations in the global region of MYH7 than in those carrying mutations in the rod region of MYH7 (21.5 +/- 6.6 versus 15 +/- 6.1 mm, p MYH7 than in patients with other mutations. MYH7 mutations, especially in the global region, cause malignant clinical phenotypes.

  16. Recovery of the soleus muscle after short- and long-term disuse induced by hindlimb unloading: effects on the electrical properties and myosin heavy chain profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; De Luca, Annamaria; Didonna, M Paola; Frigeri, Antonio; Nicchia, G Paola; Svelto, Maria; Camerino, Claudia; Zallone, Alberta; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2005-03-01

    The hindlimb unloading (HU) rat is a model of muscle disuse characterized by atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition of the postural muscles, such as the soleus. We previously found that the resting sarcolemmal chloride conductance (gCl) that is typically lower in slow-twitch myofibers than in fast ones increased in soleus fibers following 1 to 3 weeks of HU in accord with the slow-to-fast transition of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. Nevertheless, the gCl already raised after a 3-day HU, whereas no change in MHC expression was detected. The present work evaluates the ability of soleus muscle to recover on return to normal load after a short (3 days) or long (2 weeks) disuse period. The changes observed after a 2-week HU were slowly reversible, since 3-4 weeks of reloading were needed to completely recover gCl, fiber diameter, MHC expression pattern, as well as the mechanical threshold Rheobase, an index of calcium homeostasis. After 3-day HU, the gCl increased homogeneously in most of the soleus muscle fibers and gCl recovery was rapidly completed after 4-day reloading. These results suggest different induction mechanisms for gCl augmentation after the short and long HU periods, as well as a possible role for gCl in the slow muscle adaptation to disuse.

  17. Passive Repetitive Stretching for a Short Duration within a Week Increases Myogenic Regulatory Factors and Myosin Heavy Chain mRNA in Rats' Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Kamikawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stretching is a stimulation of muscle growth. Stretching for hours or days has an effect on muscle hypertrophy. However, differences of continuous stretching and repetitive stretching to affect muscle growth are not well known. To clarify the difference of continuous and repetitive stretching within a short duration, we investigated the gene expression of muscle-related genes on stretched skeletal muscles. We used 8-week-old male Wistar rats ( for this study. Animals medial gastrocnemius muscle was stretched continuously or repetitively for 15 min daily and 4 times/week under anesthesia. After stretching, muscles were removed and total RNA was extracted. Then, reverse transcriptional quantitative real-time PCR was done to evaluate the mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Muscles, either stretched continuously or repetitively, increased mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic MyHC more than unstretched muscles. Notably, repetitive stretching resulted in more substantial effects on embryonic MyHC gene expression than continuous stretching. In conclusion, passive stretching for a short duration within a week is effective in increasing myogenic factor expression, and repetitive stretching had more effects than continuous stretching for skeletal muscle on muscle growth. These findings are applicable in clinical muscle-strengthening therapy.

  18. Specific racemization of heavy-chain cysteine-220 in the hinge region of immunoglobulin gamma 1 as a possible cause of degradation during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masato; Hasegawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Naoki; Kishi, Naoyuki; Nakazawa, Takashi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2011-05-15

    Therapeutic antibodies often suffer from degradation due to various modifications during storage. We detected a degradation of immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG1) stored for 6 month at 40 °C, and identified the modification as the racemization of Cys220 in the hinge sequence S(219)CDKTHT(225) of the heavy chain by tryptic peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry. The rate of racemization at Cys220 was enhanced deliberately by incubating the protein at 50 °C and pH 9.0, while all the other cysteine residues were not affected. The racemization of Cys220 was confirmed by mass spectrometry in conjunction with extracted ion chromatography of the tryptic digest of IgG1 forced to degrade in D(2)O and a series of synthetic hinge fragments containing D-amino acid, as well as the detection of D-cysteine in the acid hydrolysate. To rationalize the possible relationship between the racemization of Cys220 and isopeptide formation at the neighboring residue of Asp221, we suggest a new reaction mechanism that assumes a base catalyst to initiate these reactions by activating the amide nitrogen of Lys222. Due to the highly flexible nature of the hinge region, Lys222 can participate in either the formation of a cyclic imidazoline intermediate involving the α-carbonyl carbon of Cys220 to facilitate the racemization of Cys220 or that of a succinimide structure leading to the isomerization of Asp221.

  19. Accelerated Systemic Autoimmunity in the Absence of Somatic Hypermutation in 564Igi: A Mouse Model of Systemic Lupus with Knocked-In Heavy and Light Chain Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle McDonald

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available 564Igi mice have knocked-in immunoglobulin (Ig heavy (H and light (L chain genes that encode an autoantibody recognizing RNA. Previously, we showed that these mice produce pathogenic IgG autoantibodies when activation-induced deaminase (AID is expressed in pre-B and immature B cells but not when it is expressed only in mature B cells. AID has two functions; it is necessary for somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. To determine the role of each of these functions in the generation of pathogenic autoantibodies, we generated 564Igi mice that carry a mutant AID-encoding gene, Aicda (AicdaG23S, which is capable of promoting CSR but not SHM. We found that 564Igi AicdaG23S mice secreted class-switched antibodies (Abs at levels approximately equal to 564Igi mice. However, compared to 564Igi mice, 564Igi AicdaG23S mice had increased pathogenic IgG Abs and severe systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease, including, glomerulonephritis, and early death. We suggest that in 564Igi mice SHM by AID changes Ig receptors away from self reactivity, thereby mitigating the production of autoantibody, providing a novel mechanism of tolerance.

  20. Higgs pair production in a composite Higgs model and the effects of heavy fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Jose R. [ICREA, Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Barcelona (Spain); IFAE, Univeritat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Groeber, Ramona; Muehlleitner, Margarete [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Grojean, Christophe [CERN, Theoretical Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Institut de Physique Theorique, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Salvioni, Ennio [CERN, Theoretical Physics, Geneva (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    In composite Higgs models the Higgs boson arises as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of an enlarged global symmetry. If the Higgs boson is a composite state of a strongly interacting sector, the large top mass can be explained by partial top compositeness which means that the top mass arises through an admixture of the top quark with states from the composite sector. For single Higgs production via gluon fusion it was shown in several papers that the masses of top partners have no effect on the cross section. We will show here that this does not hold true for Higgs pair production. There the cross section depends on the specific choice of the model parameters.

  1. Changes in fatty acid content and composition between wild type and CsHMA3 overexpressing Camelina sativa under heavy-metal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won; Feng, Yufeng; Kim, Hyojin; Suh, Mi Chung; Ahn, Sung-Ju

    2015-09-01

    Under heavy-metal stress, CsHMA3 overexpressing transgenic Camelina plants displayed not only a better quality, but also a higher quantity of unsaturated fatty acids in their seeds compared with wild type. Camelina sativa L. belongs to the Brassicaceae family and is frequently used as a natural vegetable oil source, as its seeds contain a high content of fatty acids. In this study, we observed that, when subjected to heavy metals (Cd, Co, Zn and Pb), the seeds of CsHMA3 (Heavy-Metal P1B-ATPase 3) transgenic lines retained their original golden yellow color and smooth outline, unlike wild-type seeds. Furthermore, we investigated the fatty acids content and composition of wild type and CsHMA3 transgenic lines after heavy metal treatments compared to the control. The results showed higher total fatty acid amounts in seeds of CsHMA3 transgenic lines compared with those in wild-type seeds under heavy-metal stresses. In addition, the compositions of unsaturated fatty acids-especially 18:1 (oleic acid), 18:2 (linoleic acid; only in case of Co treatment), 18:3 (linolenic acid) and 20:1 (eicosenoic acid)-in CsHMA3 overexpressing transgenic lines treated with heavy metals were higher than those of wild-type seeds under the same conditions. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents in wild-type leaves and roots when treated with heavy metal were higher than in CsHMA3 overexpressing transgenic lines. These results indicate that overexpression of CsHMA3 affects fatty acid composition and content-factors that are responsible for the fuel properties of biodiesel-and can alleviate ROS accumulation caused by heavy-metal stresses in Camelina. Due to these factors, we propose that CsHMA3 transgenic Camelina can be used for phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soil as well as for oil production.

  2. Changes in short-chain fatty acid plasma profile incurred by dietary fiber composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Jørgensen, Henry Johs. Høgh; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2016-01-01

    Pigs were used as model for humans to study the impact of dietary fiber (DF), the main substrate for microbial fermentation, on plasma profile of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; acetate, propionate, and butyrate). Six female pigs fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery...

  3. Changes in muscle size and MHC composition in response to resistance exercise with heavy and light loading intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, L; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T G

    2008-01-01

    Muscle mass accretion is accomplished by heavy-load resistance training. The effect of light-load resistance exercise has been far more sparsely investigated with regard to potential effect on muscle size and contractile strength. We applied a resistance exercise protocol in which the same indivi...... in healthy young men. However, LL resistance training was inferior to HL training in evoking adaptive changes in muscle size and contractile strength and was insufficient to induce changes in MHC composition.......Muscle mass accretion is accomplished by heavy-load resistance training. The effect of light-load resistance exercise has been far more sparsely investigated with regard to potential effect on muscle size and contractile strength. We applied a resistance exercise protocol in which the same.......05) in HL but remained unchanged in LL (4 +/- 5%, not significant). Finally, MHC IIX protein expression was decreased with HL but not LL, despite identical total workload in HL and LL. Our main finding was that LL resistance training was sufficient to induce a small but significant muscle hypertrophy...

  4. The effects of fuel characteristics and engine operating conditions on the elemental composition of emissions from heavy duty diesel buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.C.H. Lim; G.A. Ayoko; L. Morawska; Z.D. Ristovski; E.R. Jayaratne [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences

    2007-08-15

    The effects of fuel characteristics and engine operating conditions on elemental composition of emissions from twelve heavy duty diesel buses have been investigated. Two types of diesel fuels - low sulfur diesel (LSD) and ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels with 500 ppm and 50 ppm sulfur contents respectively and 3 driving modes corresponding to 25%, 50% and 100% power were used. Elements present in the tailpipe emissions were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and those found in measurable quantities included Mg, Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ti, Ni, Pb, Be, P, Se, Ti and Ge. Multivariate analyses using multi-criteria decision making methods (MCDM), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) facilitated the extraction of information about the structure of the data. MCDM showed that the emissions of the elements were strongly influenced by the engine driving conditions while the PCA loadings plots showed that the emission factors of the elements were correlated with those of other pollutants such as particle number, total suspended particles, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx. Partial least square analysis revealed that the emission factors of the elements were strongly dependent on the fuel parameters such as the fuel sulfur content, fuel density, distillation point and cetane index. Strong correlations were also observed between these pollutants and the engine power or exhaust temperature. The study provides insights into the possible role of fuel sulfur content in the emission of inorganic elements from heavy duty diesel vehicles. 39 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Transparent heavy minerals and magnetite geochemical composition of the Yangtze River sediments: Implication for provenance evolution of the Yangtze Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wei; Jin, Bingfu; Zhao, Baocheng

    2018-02-01

    Heavy mineral and detrital magnetite geochemistry were analyzed to extract sediment provenance indexes from different reaches of the modern Yangtze River which were used to trace sediment source of the Yangtze Delta and to speculate its geomorphology change since the Pliocene. Our results show that diagnostic heavy minerals of the upper Yangtze sediment are characterized by clinopyroxene (12% on average) and magnetite (7% on average); the middle reaches by ilmenite, zircon and tourmaline; and the local small rivers by fluorite. Detrital magnetite composition of Ti, Mg, V and Cr is high in the upper Yangtze from the underlying basalt. These diagnostic indexes are then used in the Pliocene sediment core to extract provenance signal of different Yangtze reaches. Analysis of core sediment of the Yangtze Delta reveals that sediment provenance of the Pliocene was from local small rivers. Since the beginning of the Pleistocene, core sediments provenance was similar to that of the middle Yangtze tributaries. After 1.2 Ma, high content of pyroxene and magnetite grains that are rich in Ti, Mg, V, Cr imply sediment provenance signals from the upper Yangtze. Sediment provenance shift from short-distance sources to more distant sources indicates that the geomorphology of the Yangtze Delta region has undergone a great transformation since the Pliocene. This dramatic landform change is likely in response to continuous uplift of the Tibetan plateau and accelerated subsidence of the east China coast since the Pliocene.

  6. Characteristics of heavy metals and Pb isotopic composition in sediments collected from the tributaries in three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Huaidong; Huang, Yong; Wang, Yuchun; Gao, Jijun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations, distribution, accumulation, and potential ecological risk of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni, As, Pb, Cd, and Hg) in sediments from the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) tributaries were determined and studied. Pb isotopic compositions in sediments were also measured to effectively identify the potential Pb sources. The results showed that the average concentrations of heavy metals in sediment of TGR tributaries were higher than the local background values of soils and sediments in China. The assessment by Geoaccumulation Index indicated that Cu, Ni, and Hg were at the "slightly polluted" level and Cd was ranked as the "moderately polluted" level in tributary sediments of TGR. The assessment by Potential Ecological Risk Index showed that Hg and Cd were the predominant elements in tributary sediments in TGR. The Pb isotopic ratios in sediments varied from 1.171 to 1.202 for (206)Pb/(207)Pb and from 2.459 to 2.482 for (208)Pb/(207)Pb in TGR. All Pb isotopic ratios in sediments were similar to those from coal combustion, lead ores (the mining activities and smelting process), and cement material, indicating that these anthropogenic inputs may be the main sources for Pb pollution in sediments of TGR tributaries.

  7. Influence of long-term nutrition with different dietary fats on fatty acid composition of heavy pigs backfat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Corino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of long-term fat supplementation on the fatty acid profile of heavy pig adipose tissue. Fifty-four Large White barrows, averaging 25 kg LW, were randomized (matched weights to one of three isoenergetic diets supplemented with either tallow (TA, maize oil (MO, or rapeseed oil (RO. The fats were supplement- ed at 3% as fed from 25 to 110 kg LW, and at 2.5 % from 110 kg to slaughtering. Following slaughter at about 160 kg LW, backfat samples were collected from ten animals per treatment and analyzed. Fatty acid composition of backfat close- ly reflected the fatty acid composition of the supplemented fats. The backfat of pigs fed TA had the highest saturated fatty acid content (SFA (P<0.01; those fed MO had the highest content in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA and the lowest in monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA content; those fed RO had the highest content of linolenic acid (C18:3 and cis 11- ecosenoic acid (C20:1. Only MO treatment had an effect on linoleic acid levels and the iodine value (IV of backfat, result- ing in levels higher than those (IV = 70; C18:2 = 15% accepted by the Parma Consortium for dry-cured ham. The IV and unsaturation index in both layers of subcutaneous backfat tissue differed significantly between treatments. These results show that long-term dietary supplementation with different fats changes the fatty acid profile of heavy pig adipose tissue. Supplementation with rapeseed oil increases the proportion of “healthy” fatty acids in pig fat, thereby improving the nutritional quality, however the effects on the technological quality of the fat must be carefully assessed.

  8. 3-D cohesive finite element model for application in structural analysis of heavy duty composite pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar, Asmus; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2015-01-01

    The problem of stiffness degradation in composite pavement systems from localised fracture damage in the quasibrittle cement bound granular mixture are today taken into account only by empirical formulas. These formulas deals with a limited number of materials in a restricted range of design...... this paper presents a numerical analysis of the fracture behaviour of cement bound granular mixtures in composite concrete block pavement systems applying a cohesive model. The functionality of the proposed model is compared to experimental investigations of beam bending tests. The pavement is modelled......, it can be shown that adequately good prediction of the structural response of composite pavements is obtained for monotonic loading without significant computational cost, making the model applicable for engineering design purpose. It is envisaged that the methodology implemented in this study can...

  9. Analysis, testing and verification of the behavior of composite pavements under Florida conditions using a heavy vehicle simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia Gutierrez, Patricio Enrique

    Whitetopping (WT) is a rehabilitation method to resurface deteriorated asphalt pavements. While some of these composite pavements have performed very well carrying heavy load, other have shown poor performance with early cracking. With the objective of analyzing the applicability of WT pavements under Florida conditions, a total of nine full-scale WT test sections were constructed and tested using a Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) in the APT facility at the FDOT Material Research Park. The test sections were instrumented to monitor both strain and temperature. A 3-D finite element model was developed to analyze the WT test sections. The model was calibrated and verified using measured FWD deflections and HVS load-induced strains from the test sections. The model was then used to evaluate the potential performance of these test sections under critical temperature-load condition in Florida. Six of the WT pavement test sections had a bonded concrete-asphalt interface by milling, cleaning and spraying with water the asphalt surface. This method produced excellent bonding at the interface, with shear strength of 195 to 220 psi. Three of the test sections were intended to have an unbonded concrete-asphalt interface by applying a debonding agent in the asphalt surface. However, shear strengths between 119 and 135 psi and a careful analysis of the strain and the temperature data indicated a partial bond condition. The computer model was able to satisfactorily model the behavior of the composite pavement by mainly considering material properties from standard laboratory tests and calibrating the spring elements used to model the interface. Reasonable matches between the measured and the calculated strains were achieved when a temperature-dependent AC elastic modulus was included in the analytical model. The expected numbers of repetitions of the 24-kip single axle loads at critical thermal condition were computed for the nine test sections based on maximum tensile stresses

  10. Myosin heavy chain expression pattern as a marker for anabolic potency: desoxymethyltestosterone (madol), norandrostenedione and testosterone repress MHC-IIb expression and stimulate MHC-IId/x expression in orchiectomized rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, S; Velders, M; Schleipen, B; Schänzer, W; Bloch, W; Diel, P

    2011-06-01

    Both 19-norandrostenedione (estr-4-ene-3,17-dione, NOR) and desoxymethyltestosterone (17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol, DMT or "madol") are 'designer steroids' misused for doping purposes in the bodybuilding scene. We have previously characterized the pharmacological profile of madol and identified potential adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anabolic potency of NOR, madol and the reference substance testosterone propionate (TP). Besides wet weight of the M.levator ani (LA), we examined the effects on muscle fiber type composition and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the M.gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle as additional markers for anabolic potency. A Hershberger assay was performed, where orchiectomized (orchi) male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with NOR, madol, TP or vehicle control (all 1 mg/kg BW/day) for 12 days. Wet weights of the Gas, LA, prostate and seminal vesicle were examined to determine anabolic and androgenic effects. Fiber type composition of the Gas muscle was analyzed using ATPase staining, and MHC protein profiles were determined by silver stain and Western blot analysis. NOR and madol exhibited strong anabolic and weak androgenic potency by stimulating growth of the LA but not the prostate and seminal vesicle. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition characterized by ATPase staining was not significantly altered between the treatment groups, although there was a tendency toward lower levels of type IIB and increased type IIA fibers in all treatment groups relative to orchi. MHC protein expression determined by Western blot and silver stain analysis revealed that MHC IId/x was significantly up-regulated, while MHC IIb was significantly down-regulated in NOR, madol and TP groups relative to orchi. There were no significant differences for MHC IIa and MHC I expression between groups. Results suggest that the observed MHC expression shift could serve as a molecular marker to determine anabolic

  11. Targeted kinetic strategy for improving the thermal conductivity of epoxy composite containing percolating multi-layer graphene oxide chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available By adding 2 wt% multi-layer graphene oxide (MGO to an epoxy resin, the thermal conductivity of the composite reached a maximum, 2.03 times that of the epoxy. The presence of 2 wt%MGO percolating chains leads to an unprecedentedly sharp rise in energy barrier at final curing stage, but an increased epoxy curing degree (αIR is observed; however, this αIR difference nearly disappears after aging or thermal annealing. These results suggest that the steep concentration gradient of –OH, originated from the 2 wt%MGO percolating chains, exerts the vital driving force on the residual isolated/trapped epoxy to conquer barrier for epoxy-MGO reaction. A modified Shrinking Core Model customized for the special layered-structure of MGO sheet was proposed to understand the resistance variation during the intercalative epoxy-MGO reaction. It shows that the promoted intercalative crosslinking is highly desirable for further improving the thermal conductivity of the composite, but it meets with increased resistance. Guided by the kinetic studies, targeted optimization on the cure processing strategy was accordingly proposed to promote the intercalative crosslinking, a thermal conductivity, 2.96 times that of the epoxy, was got with only a small amount (30°C increase of the post-heating temperature.

  12. Core Binding Factor β (CBFβ) and the Leukemogenic Fusion Protein CBFβ-Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain (SMMHC) Associate with Mitotic Chromosomes to Epigenetically Regulate Ribosomal Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic bookmarking is an epigenetic control mechanism that sustains gene expression in progeny cells; it is often found in genes related to the maintenance of cellular phenotype and growth control. RUNX transcription factors regulate a broad spectrum of RNA Polymerase (Pol II) transcribed genes important for lineage commitment but also regulate RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) driven ribosomal gene expression, thus coordinating control of cellular identity and proliferation. In this study, using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches we show that the principal RUNX co-factor, CBFβ, associates with nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) during mitosis to negatively regulate RUNX-dependent ribosomal gene expression. Of clinical relevance, we establish for the first time that the leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC (smooth muscle myosin heavy chain) also associates with ribosomal genes in interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes to promote and epigenetically sustain regulation of ribosomal genes through RUNX factor interactions. Our results demonstrate that CBFβ contributes to the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal gene expression and provide further understanding of the epigenetic role of CBFβ-SMMHC in proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. Background Runt-related transcription factors (RUNX) bookmark genes important for phenotype, but the mitotic behavior of RUNX cofactor, Core Binding Factor β (CBFβ) is unknown. Results CBFβ and leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC associate with chromosomes during mitosis and regulate ribosomal genes. Conclusion CBFβ and CBFβ-SMMHC contribute to epigenetic control of ribosomal genes. Significance CBFβ-SMMHC alters regulation linking phenotypic control with cell growth, thereby promoting cancer. PMID:25079347

  13. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  14. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  15. CD98 Heavy Chain Is a Potent Positive Regulator of CD4+ T Cell Proliferation and Interferon-γ Production In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeshi; Arimochi, Hideki; Bhuyan, Zaied Ahmed; Ishifune, Chieko; Tsumura, Hideki; Ito, Morihiro; Ito, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Akiko; Maekawa, Yoichi; Yasutomo, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Upon their recognition of antigens presented by the MHC, T cell proliferation is vital for clonal expansion and the acquisition of effector functions, which are essential for mounting adaptive immune responses. The CD98 heavy chain (CD98hc, Slc3a2) plays a crucial role in the proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, although it is unclear if CD98hc directly regulates the T cell effector functions that are not linked with T cell proliferation in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that CD98hc is required for both CD4+ T cell proliferation and Th1 functional differentiation. T cell-specific deletion of CD98hc did not affect T cell development in the thymus. CD98hc-deficient CD4+ T cells proliferated in vivo more slowly as compared with control T cells. C57BL/6 mice lacking CD98hc in their CD4+ T cells could not control Leishmania major infections due to lowered IFN-γ production, even with massive CD4+ T cell proliferation. CD98hc-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibited lower IFN-γ production compared with wild-type T cells, even when comparing IFN-γ expression in cells that underwent the same number of cell divisions. Therefore, these data indicate that CD98hc is required for CD4+ T cell expansion and functional Th1 differentiation in vivo, and suggest that CD98hc might be a good target for treating Th1-mediated immune disorders.

  16. Plasma neurofilament heavy chain levels correlate to markers of late stage disease progression and treatment response in SOD1(G93A mice that model ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hua Lu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to death, typically within 3-5 years of symptom onset. The diagnosis of ALS is largely reliant on clinical assessment and electrophysiological findings. Neither specific investigative tools nor reliable biomarkers are currently available to enable an early diagnosis or monitoring of disease progression, hindering the design of treatment trials.In this study, using the well-established SOD1(G93A mouse model of ALS and a new in-house ELISA method, we have validated that plasma neurofilament heavy chain protein (NfH levels correlate with both functional markers of late stage disease progression and treatment response. We detected a significant increase in plasma levels of phosphorylated NfH during disease progression in SOD1(G93A mice from 105 days onwards. Moreover, increased plasma NfH levels correlated with the decline in muscle force, motor unit survival and, more significantly, with the loss of spinal motor neurons in SOD1 mice during this critical period of decline. Importantly, mice treated with the disease modifying compound arimoclomol had lower plasma NfH levels, suggesting plasma NfH levels could be validated as an outcome measure for treatment trials.These results show that plasma NfH levels closely reflect later stages of disease progression and therapeutic response in the SOD1(G93A mouse model of ALS and may potentially be a valuable biomarker of later disease progression in ALS.

  17. The saponin D39 blocks dissociation of non-muscular myosin heavy chain IIA from TNF receptor 2, suppressing tissue factor expression and venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ke-Feng; Zheng, Jin-Rong; Tang, You-Mei; Li, Fang; Lv, Yan-Ni; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Gao, Zhen; Qi, Jin; Yu, Bo-Yang; Kou, Jun-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Non-muscular myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC IIA) plays a key role in tissue factor expression and venous thrombosis. Natural products might inhibit thrombosis through effects on NMMHC IIA. Here, we have shown that a natural saponin, D39, from Liriope muscari exerted anti-thrombotic activity in vivo, by targeting NMMHC IIA. Expression and activity of tissue factor in endothelial cells were analysed in vitro by Western blot and simplified chromogenic assays. Interactions between D39 and NMMHC IIA were assessed by serial affinity chromatography and molecular docking analysis. D39-dependent interactions between NMMHC IIA and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) were measured by immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays. Anti-thrombotic activity of D39 in vivo was evaluated with a model of inferior vena cava ligation injury in mice. D39 inhibited tissue factor expression and procoagulant activities in HUVECs and decreased thrombus weight in inferior vena cava-ligated mice dose-dependently. Serial affinity chromatography and molecular docking analysis suggested that D39 bound to NMMHC IIA. In HEK293T cells, D39 inhibited tissue factor expression evoked by NMMHC IIA overexpression. This effect was blocked by NMMHC IIA knockdown in HUVECs. D39 inhibited dissociation of NMMHC IIA from TNFR2, which subsequently modulated the Akt/GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathways. D39 inhibited tissue factor expression and thrombus formation by modulating the Akt/GSK3β and NF-κB signalling pathways through NMMHC IIA. We identified a new natural product that targeted NMMHC IIA, as a potential treatment for thrombotic disorders and other vasculopathies. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Discovery of a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgT) in rainbow trout: Implications for a distinctive B cell developmental pathway in teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.D.; Landis, E.D.; Phillips, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    During the analysis of Ig superfamily members within the available rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) EST gene index, we identified a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgH) isotype. cDNAs encoding this isotype are composed of a typical IgH leader sequence and a VDJ rearranged segment followed by four Ig superfamily C-1 domains represented as either membrane-bound or secretory versions. Because teleost fish were previously thought to encode and express only two IgH isotypes (IgM and IgD) for their humoral immune repertoire, we isolated all three cDNA isotypes from a single homozygous trout (OSU-142) to confirm that all three are indeed independent isotypes. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this previously undescribed divergent isotype is restricted to bony fish, thus we have named this isotype "IgT" (??) for teleost fish. Genomic sequence analysis of an OSU-142 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone positive for all three IgH isotypes revealed that IgT utilizes the standard rainbow trout VH families, but surprisingly, the IgT isotype possesses its own exclusive set of DH and JH elements for the generation of diversity. The IgT D and J segments and ?? constant (C) region genes are located upstream of the D and J elements for IgM, representing a genomic IgH architecture that has not been observed in any other vertebrate class. All three isotypes are primarily expressed in the spleen and pronephros (bone marrow equivalent), and ontogenically, expression of IgT is present 4 d before hatching in developing embryos. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  19. Heavy metals content, phytochemical composition, antimicrobial and insecticidal evaluation of Elaeagnus angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahid Ullah; Khan, Arif-ullah; Shah, Azhar-ul-Haq Ali; Shah, Syed Majid; Hussain, Sajid; Ayaz, Mohammad; Ayaz, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Elaeagnus angustifolia was analyzed for determination of metals, phytoconstituents, bactericidal, fungicidal and insecticidal effects and to explore its chemical and biological potential. The root, branches, leaves, stem bark and root bark parts of E. angustifolia were found to contain iron, lead, copper, cadmium, zinc, chromium, nickel and cobalt in different concentrations. Crude extract of Elaeagnus angustifolia (Ea.Cr) was tested positive for the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and tannins. Ea.Cr and its fractions, n-hexane (Ea.Hex), ethyl acetate (Ea.EtAc) and aqueous (Ea.Aq) showed bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, while against Pseudomonas aeruginosa only Ea.Hex and Ea.EtAc were effective. When tested for antifungal effect, Ea.Cr exhibited fungicidal action against Aspergillus fumagatus, Ea.EtAc and Ea.Aq against Aspergillus flavis and Ea.EtAc against Aspergillus niger. Ea.Hex was active against all three fungal strains. The chloroform fraction (Ea.CHCl3) was found inactive against the used microbes. Ea.Cr, Ea.Hex, Ea.CHCl3, Ea.EtAc and Ea.Aq caused mortality of Tribolium castaneum and Ephestia cautella insects observed after 24 and 48 h of treatment. These data indicate that E. angustifolia exhibits different heavy metals and compound groups. Methanolic extract of E. angustifolia and its various fractions possess antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal activities, which elucidate medicinal application of the plant. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Heavy metals and trace elements in atmospheric fall-out: Their relationship with topsoil and wheat element composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M.A., E-mail: gbermudez@com.uncor.edu [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Vegetal (IMBIV), CONICET (Argentina); Catedra de Quimica General, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Avda. Velez Sarsfield 1611, Ciudad Universitaria (X5016 GCA), Cordoba (Argentina); Jasan, Raquel; Pla, Rita [Tecnicas Analiticas Nucleares, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CAE), Presbitero Gonzalez y Aragon N Degree-Sign 15 (B1802AYA), Ezeiza (Argentina); Pignata, Maria L. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Vegetal (IMBIV), CONICET (Argentina); Catedra de Quimica General, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Avda. Velez Sarsfield 1611, Ciudad Universitaria (X5016 GCA), Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal and trace element deposition rates and concentrations in bulk samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anthropogenic vs. natural sources were identified using enrichment factors and PCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, U, Zn and lanthanides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main sources were a cement plant, chemical-mechanical industries, cities and mining. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metals in wheat grain were predicted by soil and bulk deposition composition. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to determine the average concentrations and deposition rates of 28 elements in atmospheric bulk deposition and to elucidate associations among topsoil, bulk deposition and wheat element composition. The fluxes of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) deposition in Cordoba were higher than in other agro-ecosystems, which reflects both natural (geochemistry and topsoil removal) and anthropogenic sources. High lanthanide, uranium (U) and thorium (Th) concentrations revealed the impact of an open cast uranium mine. The highest enrichment factors (EF) were those of Cu, Pb, Zn and nickel (Ni), with calcium (Ca) being the most prominent in the surroundings of a cement plant. Industries and the transport of airborne urban pollutants were the main anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and antimony (Sb). The concentrations of metals in wheat grain were predicted using the topsoil and atmospheric fall-out composition with R{sup 2} = 0.90, with the latter being the best explanatory variable. The present study highlights the potential health hazards of wheat consumption (Environmental Protection Agency) by the assessment of heavy metals in bulk atmospheric deposition.

  1. Search for a heavy composite Majorana neutrino in the final state with two leptons and two quarks at √{ s } = 13TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Yazgan, E.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mahrous, A.; Dewanjee, R. 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H.; Barney, D.; Bianco, M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; Chapon, E.; Chen, Y.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karacheban, O.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Selvaggi, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Verweij, M.; Wardle, N.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Berger, P.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Klijnsma, T.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Shchutska, L.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Vesterbacka Olsson, M. L.; Wallny, R.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zhu, D. H.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Tali, B.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E. A.; Agaras, M. N.; Atay, S.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Breeze, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Matsushita, T.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Shtipliyski, A.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Winterbottom, D.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Yu, D.; Band, R.; Brainerd, C.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Wang, Z.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Benaglia, A.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Belknap, D. A.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in the final state with two same-flavour leptons (electrons or muons) and two quarks produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s } = 13TeV is presented. The data were recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2.3fb-1. The observed data are in good agreement with the standard model background prediction. The results of the measurement are interpreted in the framework of a recently proposed model in which a heavy Majorana neutrino, Nℓ, stems from a composite-fermion scenario. Exclusion limits are set for the first time on the mass of the heavy composite Majorana neutrino, mNℓ, and the compositeness scale Λ. For the case mNℓ = Λ, the existence of Ne (Nμ) is excluded for masses up to 4.60 (4.70) TeV at 95% confidence level.

  2. Origin, transfer and effects of heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain in polluted ecosystems of Biesbosch National Park

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, M.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Emissions of heavy metals result in pollution of the soil, the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, and this pollution is a potential threat to the health of humans and ecosystems. Biesbosch National Park (the Netherlands) is exposed to chronic and diffuse pollution of heavy metals. The park is the

  3. Dystrophin deficiency in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ alters myosin heavy chain expression profiles in the diaphragm more markedly than in the tibialis cranialis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijikata Takao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous collections of muscle fiber types, the arrangement of which contributes to a variety of functional capabilities in many muscle types. Furthermore, skeletal muscles can adapt individual myofibers under various circumstances, such as disease and exercise, by changing fiber types. This study was performed to examine the influence of dystrophin deficiency on fiber type composition of skeletal muscles in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ, a large animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods We used tibialis cranialis (TC muscles and diaphragms of normal dogs and those with CXMDJ at various ages from 1 month to 3 years old. For classification of fiber types, muscle sections were immunostained with antibodies against fast, slow, or developmental myosin heavy chain (MHC, and the number and size of these fibers were analyzed. In addition, MHC isoforms were detected by gel electrophoresis. Results In comparison with TC muscles of CXMDJ, the number of fibers expressing slow MHC increased markedly and the number of fibers expressing fast MHC decreased with growth in the affected diaphragm. In populations of muscle fibers expressing fast and/or slow MHC(s but not developmental MHC of CXMDJ muscles, slow MHC fibers were predominant in number and showed selective enlargement. Especially, in CXMDJ diaphragms, the proportions of slow MHC fibers were significantly larger in populations of myofibers with non-expression of developmental MHC. Analyses of MHC isoforms also indicated a marked increase of type I and decrease of type IIA isoforms in the affected diaphragm at ages over 6 months. In addition, expression of developmental (embryonic and/or neonatal MHC decreased in the CXMDJ diaphragm in adults, in contrast to continuous high-level expression in affected TC muscle. Conclusion The CXMDJ diaphragm showed marked changes in fiber type composition unlike TC muscles

  4. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4: a novel biomarker for environmental exposure to particulate air pollution in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kang-Yun Lee,1–3 Po-Hao Feng,1,2 Shu-Chuan Ho,4 Kai-Jen Chuang,5,6 Tzu-Tao Chen,2,3 Chien-Ling Su,2,4 Wen-Te Liu,2,4 Hsiao-Chi Chuang2,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, 3Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 4School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 5Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 6School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a chronic inflammatory disease that is correlated with environmental stress. Particulate matter ≤10 µm (PM10 is considered to be a risk factor for COPD development; however, the effects of PM10 on the protein levels in COPD remain unclear. Fifty subjects with COPD and 15 healthy controls were recruited. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed proteins identified immune system process and binding as the most important biological process and molecular function, respectively, in the responses of PM10-exposed patients with COPD. Biomarkers for PM10 in COPD were identified and compared with the same in healthy controls and included proteoglycan 4 (PRG4, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4, and apolipoprotein F (APOF. PRG4 and ITIH4 were associated with a past 3-year PM10 exposure level. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that ITIH4 is a sensitive and specific biomarker for PM10 exposure (area under the curve [AUC] =0.690, P=0.015 compared with PRG4 (AUC =0.636, P=0.083, APOF (AUC =0.523, P=0.766, 8-isoprostane (AUC =0.563, P=0.405, and C-reactive protein (CRP; AUC =0.634, P=0.086. ITIH4 levels were correlated with CRP (r=0

  5. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  6. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  7. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: low frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) genes among Spanish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castro, Mónica; Reguero, Julián R; Batalla, Alberto; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz; González, Pelayo; Alvarez, Victoria; Cortina, Arturo; Cubero, Gustavo I; Coto, Eliecer

    2003-08-01

    Mutations in the cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) genes are reportedly responsible for up to 40% of familial cases with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Although there are no mutational hotspots, most of the mutations are located in specific exons of the MYH7 and TNNT2 genes. Currently it is not possible to predict the phenotype in carriers of mutations in these genes, although it is widely accepted that mutations in the MYH7 gene predispose to severe HC, whereas TNNT2 mutations are frequently linked to sudden cardiac death (SCD) in spite of minimal hypertrophy. We sequenced exons 8, 9, 13-16, 19, 20, 22-24, and 30 of the MYH7 gene and exons 8, 9, 11, and 14-16 of the TNNT2 gene in 30 HC patients (18-60 years of age) from the region of Asturias (Northern Spain); 25 cases (80%) had a family history of the disease. Genomic DNA was amplified, and fragments were directly sequenced. Each DNA variant found in the patients was also analyzed in 200 healthy controls through single-strand conformation analysis. Four of the probands had nucleotide changes absent in the healthy controls. Two cases had mutations previously described in the MYH7 gene (exon 14, Arg453Cys) or the TNNT2 gene (exon 16, Arg278Cys). Two cases had new mutations (MYH7 exon 22, Met822Val; TNNT2 exon 14, Lys247Arg) not found among the healthy controls. We found MYH7 Met822Val in a woman with a severe form of HC; the mutation was absent in her parents, indicating a de novo mutation. MYH7 R453C was present in a woman with mild HC, mother of a son who died from SCD. TNNT2 R278C was present in a woman with severe HC, but a sister and a daughter were mutation carriers and did not have hypertrophy. A patient with severe HC was carrier of TNNT2 247Arg. Mutations in the MYH7 and TNNT2 genes can be found in patients without a family history of HC. However, compared with other populations MYH7 or TNNT2 mutations were rare among our HC patients. This study illustrates the

  8. Thermoplastic Composites Reinforced with Textile Grids: Development of a Manufacturing Chain and Experimental Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, R.; Hufnagl, E.; Kupfer, R.; Engler, T.; Hausding, J.; Cherif, C.; Hufenbach, W.

    2013-12-01

    A significant improvement in the properties of plastic components can be achieved by introducing flexible multiaxial textile grids as reinforcement. This reinforcing concept is based on the layerwise bonding of biaxially or multiaxially oriented, completely stretched filaments of high-performance fibers, e.g. glass or carbon, and thermoplastic components, using modified warp knitting techniques. Such pre-consolidated grid-like textiles are particularly suitable for use in injection moulding, since the grid geometry is very robust with respect to flow pressure and temperature on the one hand and possesses an adjustable spacing to enable a complete filling of the mould cavity on the other hand. The development of pre-consolidated textile grids and their further processing into composites form the basis for providing tailored parts with a large number of additional integrated functions like fibrous sensors or electroconductive fibres. Composites reinforced in that way allow new product groups for promising lightweight structures to be opened up in future. The article describes the manufacturing process of this new composite class and their variability regarding reinforcement and function integration. An experimentally based study of the mechanical properties is performed. For this purpose, quasi-static and highly dynamic tensile tests have been carried out as well as impact penetration experiments. The reinforcing potential of the multiaxial grids is demonstrated by means of evaluating drop tower experiments on automotive components. It has been shown that the load-adapted reinforcement enables a significant local or global improvement of the properties of plastic components depending on industrial requirements.

  9. Structural transformations, composition anomalies and a dramatic collapse of linear polymer chains in dilute ethanol-water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ghosh, Rikhia; Bagchi, Biman

    2012-03-29

    Water-ethanol mixtures exhibit many interesting anomalies, such as negative excess partial molar volume of ethanol, excess sound absorption coefficient at low concentrations, and positive deviation from Raoult's law for vapor pressure, to mention a few. These anomalies have been attributed to different, often contradictory origins, but a quantitative understanding is still lacking. We show by computer simulation and theoretical analyses that these anomalies arise from the sudden emergence of a bicontinuous phase that occurs at a relatively low ethanol concentration of x(eth) ≈ 0.06-0.10 (that amounts to a volume fraction of 0.17-0.26, which is a significant range!). The bicontinuous phase is formed by aggregation of ethanol molecules, resulting in a weak phase transition whose nature is elucidated. We find that the microheterogeneous structure of the mixture gives rise to a pronounced nonmonotonic composition dependence of local compressibility and nonmonotonic dependence in the peak value of the radial distribution function of ethyl groups. A multidimensional free energy surface of pair association is shown to provide a molecular explanation of the known negative excess partial volume of ethanol in terms of parallel orientation and hence better packing of the ethyl groups in the mixture due to hydrophobic interactions. The energy distribution of the ethanol molecules indicates additional energy decay channels that explain the excess sound attenuation coefficient in aqueous alcohol mixtures. We studied the dependence of the solvation of a linear polymer chain on the composition of the water-ethanol solvent. We find that there is a sudden collapse of the polymer at x(eth) ≈ 0.05-a phenomenon which we attribute to the formation of the microheterogeneous structures in the binary mixture at low ethanol concentrations. Together with recent single molecule pulling experiments, these results provide new insight into the behavior of polymer chain and foreign solutes

  10. The potential use of n-alkanes, long-chain alcohols and long-chain fatty acids as diet composition markers: indoor validation with sheep and herbage species from the rangeland of Inner Mongolia of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L J; Zhu, X Y; Jiang, C; Luo, H L; Wang, H; Zhang, Y J; Hong, F Z

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the potential use of n-alkanes (alkanes), long-chain alcohols (alcohols) and long-chain fatty acids (acids) for estimating the diet composition of sheep, in a feeding trial. A total of 18 sheep were assigned randomly to three different diets (diet A, diet B and diet C) containing up to eight herbage species (Leymus chinensis, Leymus dasystachys, Elymus sibiricum, Chenopodium album, Puccinellia chinampoensis, Medicago sativa, Saussurea sinuata and Bromus inermis). Faecal recoveries of alkanes, alcohols and acids were determined, and diet compositions were estimated using different combinations of alkanes, alcohols and acids. The faecal concentrations of individual alkanes, alcohols and acids were corrected using the mean recovery of the dietary treatment that the respective animal belonged to (diet recovery), or the mean recovery across all dietary treatments (general recovery). In general, diets did not affect the faecal recovery values for alkanes, alcohols and acids, and no difference in accuracy was found between diet composition estimates based on dietary recovery and general recovery. The accuracy of diet composition estimates declined as the number of dietary components increased from four to eight herbage species (P diet composition were obtained with the combinations of two or three marker types instead of alkanes alone. Moreover, results showed that excluding minor diet components from the calculations decreased (P diet composition estimates, whereas including extra non-grazed herbage species did not reduce (P > 0.05) the quality of diet composition estimates. These results confirmed the usefulness of alkanes, alcohols and acids as markers for determining complex diet composition of sheep. However, a negative impact on the accuracy of diet composition estimates, caused by missing minor diet components from the calculation of diet composition, could happen when plant wax markers are used to estimate the diet composition of free

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and niobium doped titanium dioxide composite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Subodh K., E-mail: subodhkgtm@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Chettah, Abdelhak [LGMM Laboratory, Université 20 Août 1955-Skikda, BP 26, 21000 Skikda (Algeria); Singh, R.G. [Department of Physics, Bhagini Nivedita College, Delhi University, Delhi 110043 (India); Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Study reports the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and Niobium doped anatase TiO{sub 2} composite thin films. Investigations were carried out at different densities of electronic excitations (EEs) using 120 MeV Ag and 130 MeV Ni ions irradiations. Films were initially annealed at 900 °C and results revealed that undoped films were highly stable in anatase phase, while the Nb doped films showed the composite nature with the weak presence of Niobium penta-oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) phase. The effect at low density of EEs in undoped film show partial anatase to rutile phase transformation; however doped film shows only further growth of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase beside the anatase to rutile phase transformation. At higher density of EEs induced by Ag ions, registered continuous ion track of ∼3 nm in lattice which leads to nano-crystallization followed by decomposition/amorphization of rutile TiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} phases in undoped and doped films, respectively. However, Ni ions are only induced discontinuous sequence of ion tracks with creation of damage and disorder and do not show amorphization in the lattice. The in-elastic thermal spike calculations were carried out for anatase TiO{sub 2} phase to understand the effect of EEs on anatase to rutile phase transformation followed by amorphization in NTO films in terms of continuous and discontinuous track formation by SHI irradiation.

  12. Effect of biodiesel fuel on "real-world", nonroad heavy duty diesel engine particulate matter emissions, composition and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Lombard, Melissa; Jensen, Kirk R; Kelley, Patrick; Pratt, Tara; Traviss, Nora

    2017-05-15

    Biodiesel is regarded by many as a "greener" alternative fuel to petroleum diesel with potentially lower health risk. However, recent studies examining biodiesel particulate matter (PM) characteristics and health effects are contradictive, and typically utilize PM generated by passenger car engines in laboratory settings. There is a critical need to analyze diesel and biodiesel PM generated in a "real-world" setting where heavy duty-diesel (HDD) engines and commercially purchased fuel are utilized. This study compares the mass concentrations, chemical composition and cytotoxicity of real-world PM from combustion of both petroleum diesel and a waste grease 20% biodiesel blend (B20) at a community recycling center operating HDD nonroad equipment. PM was analyzed for metals, elemental/organic carbon (EC/OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (N-PAHs). Cytotoxicity in a human lung epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) following 24h exposure to the real-world particles was also evaluated. On average, higher concentrations for both EC and OC were measured in diesel PM. B20 PM contained significantly higher levels of Cu and Mo whereas diesel PM contained significantly higher concentrations of Pb. Principal component analysis determined Mo, Cu, and Ni were the metals with the greatest loading factor, suggesting a unique pattern related to the B20 fuel source. Total PAH concentration during diesel fuel use was 1.9 times higher than during B20 operations; however, total N-PAH concentration was 3.3 times higher during B20 use. Diesel PM cytotoxicity was 8.5 times higher than B20 PM (pdiesel in nonroad engines may be more harmful to human health, but the links between exposure, composition and toxicity are not straightforward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Level, composition and sources of medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in soils from Chongming Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang-Zhao; Wang, Xue-Tong; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Yan-Feng; Li, Mei; Ma, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the contents, spatial distribution and sources of medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (MCCPs) in the soils from Chongming Island, the concentrations of MCCPs in 27 soil samples were analyzed by GC-ECNI-MS. The total concentrations of MCCP8 (sigma MCCPs) in all samples ranged from 2.56-96.3 ng x g(-1), with a median of 7.32 ng x g(-1). All soil samples were classified into two categories by cluster analysis. C14-MCCPs and C15-MCCPs, and Cl5-MCCPs and Cl6-MCCPs were the most predominant carbon and chlorine congener groups in most of the samples, accounting for 29.8% and 28.9%, and 29.9% and 23.3%, respectively. C14-MCCPs were the most predominant carbon congener groups in some samples, accounting for 68.5%, which was similar to that of CP-52. Atmospheric deposition and soil-air exchange were the major sources of MCCPs for soils in Chongming. Soils at a few sites were probably contaminated by sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants (STPs) or other unidentified source. No significant correlations were observed between MCCPs and TOC. The correlation analysis also showed significant correlation among the carbon congener groups of MCCPs, which suggested that MCCP congener groups might have been derived from similar sources. Compared to other studies at home and abraod, the MCCPs concentrations in the present study were at a lower level.

  14. Effect of surfactant alkyl chain length on the dispersion, and thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of LDPE/organo-LDH composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxide (LDH composites were prepared via melt compounding using different kinds of organo-LDHs and polyethylene-grafted maleic anhydride as the compatibilizer. The organo-LDHs were successfully prepared by converting a commercial MgAl-carbonate LDH into a MgAl-nitrate LDH, which was later modified by anion exchange with linear and branched sodium alkyl sulfates having different alkyl chain lengths (nc = 6, 12 and 20. It was observed that, depending on the size of the surfactant alkyl chain, different degrees of polymer chain intercalation were achieved, which is a function of the interlayer distance of the organo-LDHs, of the packing level of the alkyl chains, and of the different interaction levels between the surfactant and the polymer chains. In particular, when the number of carbon atoms of the surfactant alkyl chain is larger than 12, the intercalation of polymer chains in the interlayer space and depression of the formation of large aggregates of organo-LDH platelets are favored. A remarkable improvement of the thermal-oxidative degradation was evidenced for all of the composites; whereas only a slight increase of the crystallization temperature and no significant changes of both melting temperature and degree of crystallinity were achieved. By thermodynamic mechanical analysis, it was evidenced that a softening of the matrix is may be due to the plasticizing effect of the surfactant.

  15. Carbonaceous composition changes of heavy-duty diesel engine particles in relation to biodiesels, aftertreatments and engine loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Man-Ting; Chen, Hsun-Jung; Young, Li-Hao; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Tsai, Ying I; Wang, Lin-Chi; Lu, Jau-Huai; Chen, Chung-Bang

    2015-10-30

    Three biodiesels and two aftertreatments were tested on a heavy-duty diesel engine under the US FTP transient cycle and additional four steady engine loads. The objective was to examine their effects on the gaseous and particulate emissions, with emphasis given to the organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) in the total particulate matter. Negligible differences were observed between the low-sulfur (B1S50) and ultralow-sulfur (B1S10) biodiesels, whereas small reductions of OC were identified with the 10% biodiesel blend (B10). The use of diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC1) showed moderate reductions of EC and particularly OC, resulting in the OC/EC ratio well below unity. The use of DOC plus diesel particulate filter (DOC2+DPF) yielded substantial reductions of OC and particularly EC, resulting in the OC/EC ratio well above unity. The OC/EC ratios were substantially above unity at idle and low load, whereas below unity at medium and high load. The above changes in particulate OC and EC are discussed with respect to the fuel content, pollutant removal mechanisms and engine combustion conditions. Overall, the present study shows that the carbonaceous composition of PM could change drastically with engine load and aftertreatments, and to a lesser extent with the biodiesels under study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Adsorption of Heavy Metal from Palm Oil Mill Effluent on the Mixed Media Used For the Preparation of Composite Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyekanmi Adeleke Abdulrahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of lead ion from palm oil mill effluent produced directly from the mill was investigated using mixed adsorbents that were used to prepare the composite. Experiments were carried out under predetermined conditions of pH, shaking speed, contact time and particle size. Equilibrium study was carried out to determine the adsorption capacity of the mixed media. The reduction of the lead ion was effective on the adsorbent materials. The Temkin and Freundlich models were applied to describe the adsorption pattern on the mixed media. The experimental data fitted well to the Temkin isotherm with a correlation coefficient of 1, this was used to indicate the level of interaction of the adsorbent-adsorbate and also the energy utilized in the adsorption process. The hydrophobic behaviour of the activated coconutshell and cow bone carbons was observed for average contact angle of 105° and 95° for the coconut shell and cow bone respectively. The influence of the hydrophobic materials in the mixed media and the zeolite assisted in the ion exchange and in the adsorption of the heavy metal.

  17. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P < 0.05). This novel resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  18. Modified composites based on mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and synthetic minerals: a potential material for the treatment of various toxic heavy metals and its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung-Gun; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Song, Mi-Kyung; An, Byungryul; Kim, Song-Bae; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2014-02-28

    The composites of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and/or commercial synthetic zeolite were investigated for use in the removal of toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead and arsenic, from aqueous solution. Four types of adsorbents, dried alginate beads (DABs), synthetic-zeolite impregnated beads (SZIBs), meso-iron-oxyhydroxide impregnated beads (MIOIBs) and synthetic-zeolite/meso-iron-oxyhydroxide composite beads (SZMIOIBs), were prepared for heavy metal adsorption tests. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of cations and anions of heavy metals and the possibility of regenerating the adsorbents. Among these adsorbents, the MIOIBs can simultaneously remove cations and anions of heavy metals; they have high adsorption capacities for lead (60.1mgg(-1)) and arsenic (71.9mgg(-1)) compared with other adsorbents, such as DABs (158.1 and 0.0mgg(-1)), SZIB (42.9 and 0.0mgg(-1)) and SZMIOIB (54.0 and 5.9mgg(-1)) for lead and arsenic, respectively. Additionally, the removal efficiency was consistent at approximately 90%, notwithstanding repetitive regeneration. The characteristics of meso-iron-oxyhydroxide powder were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and transmission electron microscopy. We also performed a comparative toxicity study that indicated that much lower concentrations of the powdered form of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide had stronger cytotoxicity than the granular form. These results suggest that the granular form of meso iron oxyhydroxide is a more useful and safer adsorbent for heavy metal treatment than the powdered form. This research provides promising results for the application of MIOIBs as an adsorbent for various heavy metals from wastewater and sewage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Altered fecal short chain fatty acid composition in children with a history of Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demehri, Farokh R; Frykman, Philip K; Cheng, Zhi; Ruan, Chunhai; Wester, Tomas; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Kawaguchi, Akemi; Hui, Thomas T; Granström, Anna L; Funari, Vince; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Children with Hirschsprung disease (HD) who have a history of enterocolitis (HAEC) have a shift in colonic microbiota, many of which are necessary for short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. As SCFAs play a critical role in colonic mucosal preservation, we hypothesized that fecal SCFA composition is altered in children with HAEC. A multicenter study enrolled 18 HD children, abstracting for history of feeding, antibiotic/probiotic use, and enterocolitis symptoms. HAEC status was determined per Pastor et al. criteria (12). Fresh feces were collected for microbial community analysis via 16S sequencing as well as SCFA analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nine patients had a history of HAEC, and nine had never had HAEC. Fecal samples from HAEC children showed a 4-fold decline in total SCFA concentration vs. non-HAEC HD patients. We then compared the relative composition of individual SCFAs and found reduced acetate and increased butyrate in HAEC children. Finally, we measured relative abundance of SCFA-producing fecal microbiota. Interestingly, 10 of 12 butyrate-producing genera as well as 3 of 4 acetate-producing genera demonstrated multi-fold expansion. Children with HAEC history have reduced fecal SCFAs and altered SCFA profile. These findings suggest a complex interplay between the colonic metabolome and changes in microbiota, which may influence the pathogenesis of HAEC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Effects of medium-chain triglycerides on weight loss and body composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Karen; Stonehouse, Welma

    2015-02-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) may result in negative energy balance and weight loss through increased energy expenditure and lipid oxidation. However, results from human intervention studies investigating the weight reducing potential of MCTs, have been mixed. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of MCTs, specifically C8:0 and C10:0, to long-chain triglycerides (LCTs) on weight loss and body composition in adults. Changes in blood lipid levels were secondary outcomes. Randomized controlled trials >3 weeks' duration conducted in healthy adults were identified searching Web of Knowledge, Discover, PubMed, Scopus, New Zealand Science, and Cochrane CENTRAL until March 2014 with no language restriction. Identified trials were assessed for bias. Mean differences were pooled and analyzed using inverse variance models with fixed effects. Heterogeneity between studies was calculated using I(2) statistic. An I(2)>50% or P<0.10 indicated heterogeneity. Thirteen trials (n=749) were identified. Compared with LCTs, MCTs decreased body weight (-0.51 kg [95% CI-0.80 to -0.23 kg]; P<0.001; I(2)=35%); waist circumference (-1.46 cm [95% CI -2.04 to -0.87 cm]; P<0.001; I(2)=0%), hip circumference (-0.79 cm [95% CI -1.27 to -0.30 cm]; P=0.002; I(2)=0%), total body fat (standard mean difference -0.39 [95% CI -0.57 to -0.22]; P<0.001; I(2)=0%), total subcutaneous fat (standard mean difference -0.46 [95% CI -0.64 to -0.27]; P<0.001; I(2)=20%), and visceral fat (standard mean difference -0.55 [95% CI -0.75 to -0.34]; P<0.001; I(2)=0%). No differences were seen in blood lipid levels. Many trials lacked sufficient information for a complete quality assessment, and commercial bias was detected. Although heterogeneity was absent, study designs varied with regard to duration, dose, and control of energy intake. Replacement of LCTs with MCTs in the diet could potentially induce modest reductions in body weight and composition

  1. Heavy Isotope Composition of Oxygen in Zircon from Soil Sample 14163: Lunar Perspective of an Early Ocean on the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty oxygen analyses of a large (sub-millimetre) zircon grain from the lunar soil sample 14163 have been determined using CAMECA 1270 ion microprobe. The sample 14163 was returned form the Fra Mauro region by Apollo 14 mission. Zircon grain of 0.6-0.8 mm in size extracted from the sample was imaged using CL detector fitted to the Philips Electron Microscope in order to reveal internal structure. Oxygen isotopes have been analysed during two sessions. The first set of data was collected using the original mount where the grain was set in the resin attached to the glass slide. This resulted in the two complications: (i) standard zircon has to be analysed from the separate mount and (ii) the lunar zircon grain was rased in the holder compared to the standard. In order to investigate, if the elevated oxygen compositions observed during this session could have resulted from this difference in geometric configuration during the standard and sample analyses, the lunar zircon was extracted from the original mount, remounted with the standard chip in the new resin disk and reanalysed during the second session. All analyses made during the first session show delta O-18 values heavier than 6.0%. The second set of data has a wider spread of delta O-18 values with some values as low as 5.6%. Nevertheless, a half of observed delta O-18 values in this set is also higher than 6.0%. Slightly lighter oxygen compositions observed during the second session indicate possible dependence of measured delta O-18 values on the geometry of analysed samples. Presence of zircons with similar heavy oxygen isotope compositions on the Moon, which neither had liquid water or felic crust similar to that on the Earth nor ever developed regime similar to plate tectonics, suggests that other mechanisms can be responsible for elevated delta O-18 values in zircons. This implies that there is no support for the presence of an ocean on the surface of the early Earth and as the ocean appears to be an

  2. [Synthesis of a nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl and its effect on dental resin composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Kaiyun, Zhou; Ting, Zhu; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to synthesize a novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl and to report the antibacterial property of dental resin composites. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl was synthesized based on previous research. The antibacterial property of the filler was measured. The surface of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler was modified by a coupling agent to achieve a good interfacial bonding between the filler and the resin matrix. Infrared spectrum analysis was carried out. The modified novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were then incorporated into the dental resin matrix. The dispersion of the fillers was observed and compared with those incorporated into Tetric N-Ceram, a commercial resin composite, under a scanning electron microscope. Streptococcus mutans was used in testing the antibacterial property of the dental resin composites. A quaternary ammonium salt with a long chain alkyl was successfully grafted onto the surface of nano-silica particles. The novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains quaternary ammonium salt with a long chain alkyl showed stronger antibacterial efficacy than the antibacterial inorganic filler that contains quaternary ammonium salt with a short chain alkyl. The modified novel antibacterial inorganic fillers displayed a homogeneous dispersion in the resin composite bulk and combined closely with the resin matrix, similar to the Tetric N-Ceram. The resin composites that contain novel antibacterial inorganic fillers showed stronger antibacterial effect on Streptococcus mutans compared with the control group. The novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl showed a strong antibacterial property. It also exhibited good compatibility with the dental resin matrix after undergoing coupling treatment.

  3. IgG subclass and heavy chain domains contribute to binding and protection by mAbs to the poly γ-D-glutamic acid capsular antigen of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hovenden

    Full Text Available Bacterial capsules are common targets for antibody-mediated immunity. The capsule of Bacillus anthracis is unusual among capsules because it is composed of a polymer of poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (γdPGA. We previously generated murine IgG3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to γdPGA that were protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. IgG3 antibodies are characteristic of the murine response to polysaccharide antigens. The goal of the present study was to produce subclass switch variants of the γdPGA mAbs (IgG3 → IgG1 → IgG2b → IgG2a and assess the contribution of subclass to antibody affinity and protection. Subclass switch antibodies had identical variable regions but differed in their heavy chains. The results showed that a switch from the protective IgG3 to IgG1, IgG2b or IgG2a was accompanied by i a loss of protective activity ii a change in mAb binding to the capsular matrix, and iii a loss of affinity. These results identify a role for the heavy chain constant region in mAb binding. Hybrid mAbs were constructed in which the CH1, CH2 or CH3 heavy chain constant domains from a non-protective, low binding IgG2b mAb were swapped into the protective IgG3 mAb. The IgG3 mAb that contained the CH1 domain from IgG2b showed no loss of affinity or protection. In contrast, swapping the CH2 or CH3 domains from IgG2b into IgG3 produced a reduction in affinity and a loss of protection. These studies identify a role for the constant region of IgG heavy chains in affinity and protection against an encapsulated bacterial pathogen.

  4. The straight-chain lipid biomarker composition of plant species responsible for the dominant biomass production along two altitudinal transects in the Ecuadorian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Hageman, J.A.; Cleef, A.M.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    For a detailed reconstruction of historic upper forest line (UFL) positions, new proxies in addition to traditional pollen and vegetation analyses are needed. If the straight-chain lipid composition in plant leaves and roots is specific enough to allow distinction, their records in soils and peat

  5. Clustering of GLUT4, TUG, and RUVBL2 protein levels correlate with myosin heavy chain isoform pattern in skeletal muscles, but AS160 and TBC1D1 levels do not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorena, Carlos M; Mackrell, James G; Bogan, Jonathan S; Kanzaki, Makoto; Cartee, Gregory D

    2011-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue. To further elucidate this heterogeneity, we probed relationships between myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition and abundance of GLUT4 and four other proteins that are established or putative GLUT4 regulators [Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc 16-domain member 1 (TBC1D1), Tethering protein containing an UBX-domain for GLUT4 (TUG), and RuvB-like protein two (RUVBL2)] in 12 skeletal muscles or muscle regions from Wistar rats [adductor longus, extensor digitorum longus, epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius (mixed, red, and white), plantaris, soleus, tibialis anterior (red and white), tensor fasciae latae, and white vastus lateralis]. Key results were 1) significant differences found among the muscles (range of muscle expression values) for GLUT4 (2.5-fold), TUG (1.7-fold), RUVBL2 (2.0-fold), and TBC1D1 (2.7-fold), but not AS160; 2) significant positive correlations for pairs of proteins: GLUT4 vs. TUG (R = 0.699), GLUT4 vs. RUVBL2 (R = 0.613), TUG vs. RUVBL2 (R = 0.564), AS160 vs. TBC1D1 (R = 0.293), and AS160 vs. TUG (R = 0.246); 3) significant positive correlations for %MHC-I: GLUT4 (R = 0.460), TUG (R = 0.538), and RUVBL2 (R = 0.511); 4) significant positive correlations for %MHC-IIa: GLUT4 (R = 0.293) and RUVBL2 (R = 0.204); 5) significant negative correlations for %MHC-IIb vs. GLUT4 (R = -0.642), TUG (R = -0.626), and RUVBL2 (R = -0.692); and 6) neither AS160 nor TBC1D1 significantly correlated with MHC isoforms. In 12 rat muscles, GLUT4 abundance tracked with TUG and RUVBL2 and correlated with MHC isoform expression, but was unrelated to AS160 or TBC1D1. Our working hypothesis is that some of the mechanisms that regulate GLUT4 abundance in rat skeletal muscle also influence TUG and RUVBL2 abundance.

  6. Carbonaceous composition changes of heavy-duty diesel engine particles in relation to biodiesels, aftertreatments and engine loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Man-Ting; Chen, Hsun-Jung [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40254, Taiwan (China); Young, Li-Hao, E-mail: lhy@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsi-Hsien [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, 168, Jifeng E. Road, Wufeng District, Taichung 41349, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ying I. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, 60, Sec. 1, Erren Rd., Rende District, Tainan 71710, Taiwan (China); Wang, Lin-Chi [Department of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Cheng Shiu University, 840, Chengcing Road, Niaosong District, Kaohsiung 83347, Taiwan (China); Lu, Jau-Huai [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40254, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chung-Bang [Fuel Quality and Engine Performance Research, Refining and Manufacturing Research Institute, Chinese Petroleum Corporation, 217, Minsheng S. Road, West District, Chiayi 60051, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • We study particulate OC and EC under 3 fuels, 2 aftertreatments and 4 engine loads. • Negligible to minor OC and EC changes with low, ultralow sulfur and 10% biodiesels. • Moderate reductions of EC and particularly OC from diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). • Large reductions of OC and particularly EC from DOC plus diesel particulate filter. • Highest at idle, whereas OC decreases but EC increases from low to high load. - Abstract: Three biodiesels and two aftertreatments were tested on a heavy-duty diesel engine under the US FTP transient cycle and additional four steady engine loads. The objective was to examine their effects on the gaseous and particulate emissions, with emphasis given to the organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) in the total particulate matter. Negligible differences were observed between the low-sulfur (B1S50) and ultralow-sulfur (B1S10) biodiesels, whereas small reductions of OC were identified with the 10% biodiesel blend (B10). The use of diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC1) showed moderate reductions of EC and particularly OC, resulting in the OC/EC ratio well below unity. The use of DOC plus diesel particulate filter (DOC2+DPF) yielded substantial reductions of OC and particularly EC, resulting in the OC/EC ratio well above unity. The OC/EC ratios were substantially above unity at idle and low load, whereas below unity at medium and high load. The above changes in particulate OC and EC are discussed with respect to the fuel content, pollutant removal mechanisms and engine combustion conditions. Overall, the present study shows that the carbonaceous composition of PM could change drastically with engine load and aftertreatments, and to a lesser extent with the biodiesels under study.

  7. Network formation in graphene oxide composites with surface grafted PNIPAM chains in aqueous solution characterized by rheological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GhavamiNejad, Amin; Hashmi, Saud; Joh, Han-Ik; Lee, Sungho; Lee, Youn-Sik; Vatankhah-Varnoosfaderani, Mohammad; Stadler, Florian J

    2014-05-14

    Poly N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNI) radically polymerized in aqueous solution in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) can significantly change the properties of the resulting solution from a regular polymer solution to a soft solid with a GO content of only 0.176 wt% (3 wt% with respect to PNI). However, these properties require the presence of both grafting and supramolecular interactions between polymer chains and hydrophilic groups on GO (-OH, -COOH), proven by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy (XRD) and Raman spectra. While very low GO-contents (below 0.05 wt%) only lead to a labile structure, which can be disassembled by shear, higher contents yield composites with solid-like characteristics. This is clearly evident from the rheological behaviour, which changes significantly at a GO content around 0.15 wt%. Intensive shearing destroys the weak network, which cannot reform quickly at lower GO-concentrations, while at intermediate concentrations, restructuring is fast. GO-contents of 0.176 wt% lead to a material behaviour, which almost perfectly recovers from small deformations (creep and creep recovery compliance almost match) but larger deformations lead to permanent damage to the sample.

  8. Investigation of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr) stabilization in river sediment by nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-fang; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaomao; Wang, Weiya; Li, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon (nZVI/AC) composite was evaluated for its effectiveness in the stabilization of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr in dredged river sediment. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were adopted to compare the effects of nZVI/AC dosage, particle size, time duration, and temperature on heavy metal leachability. The results show that leachability dropped considerably with the addition of nZVI/AC and powdered particles in the size of 0.075-0.18 mm was more effective in stabilization than granular ones. Stabilization effect was stable in long-term and robust against changes in temperature. Tessier sequential extraction revealed that heavy metals were associated with solid particle, inorganic or organic matters in sediment. The addition of nZVI/AC was able to convert relatively weakly bound heavy metals into more strongly bound species and thus reduce the bioavailability and toxicity. Also, the standard potential of heavy metals may decide the mechanism of stabilization process.

  9. Heavy metal composition in stormwater and retention in ponds dependent on pond age, design and catchment type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egemose, Sara; Sønderup, Melanie J.; Grudinina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals have toxic effects on flora and fauna in the aquatic environments and are of great concern in stormwater. Heavy metal runoff was studied in 37 stormwater ponds in Denmark with varying heavy metal load, catchment type and pond design. The studied metals were Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb, Ni and Zn....... The concentrations varied considerably depending on the catchment type, with the highest concentrations coming from industrial areas and the lowest from uncultivated and rural areas. Ponds can effectively remove heavy metals in particulate forms through sedimentation processes, but the dissolved forms are more...... difficult to retain. The removal efficiency in the ponds varied considerably, with the highest retention of Pb, Ni and Zn due to higher particulate fraction. The retention increased with increased pond volume-to-reduced catchment area ratio. In addition, the pond age affected the efficiency; whereas ponds...

  10. Effects of dietary excesses of branched-chain amino acids on the metabolism and tissue composition of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.G.; Rumsey, G.L.; Nesheim, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    1. Excesses of either leucine, isoleucine or valine were fed in separate experiments to determine if the branched-chain amino acid antagonism reported in other animals occur in trout (Salvelinus namaycush).2. Parameters measured include growth rate, feed utilization efficiency, plasma and muscle-free amino acids, carcass composition and branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase.3. Dietary excesses of leucine or isoleucine caused an increase in the valine requirement.4. The inability of leucine and isoleucine supplementations to ameliorate the effects of excess dietary valine are interpreted as a valine toxicity rather than an antagonism.

  11. Application of long-chain alcohols as faecal markers to estimate diet composition of horses and cattle fed with herbaceous and woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, C; Celaya, R; Santos, A S; Rodrigues, M A M; Osoro, K; Ferreira, L M M

    2015-11-01

    Utilization of long-chain alcohols (LCOH) as diet composition markers in horses and cattle was assessed in a study conducted with 12 mature crossbreed mares (385±47 kg BW) and six adult non-lactating cows (499±36 kg BW) of Asturiana de los Valles breed. The LCOH data were combined with alkane and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) data to test the applicability of combining these markers to estimate diet composition. Animals were randomly divided into groups of three animals and received a daily total amount of 1.0 kg dry matter/100 kg BW of diets composed of different proportions of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and woody species (Ulex gallii and heather). Diet composition was estimated from even-chain LCOH (C(20)-OH to C(30)-OH) combined or not with alkane (C(25)-C(31) and C(33)) and/or LCFA (C(22)-FA to C(28)-FA, C(30)-FA, C(32)-FA and C(34)-FA) concentrations in diet components and faeces by least-squares procedures, using marker faecal concentrations uncorrected for incomplete faecal recovery (FR0) or corrected using mean recoveries across diets within animal species (FR1). Results showed large differences between plant species in their LCOH profiles, and that these markers offered additional discriminatory information to that provided by alkanes and LCFA. The LCOH markers were incompletely recovered in the faeces of both animal species. In cattle, LCOH FR tended to increase with carbon-chain length in a linear manner in both diets (P diet estimates. Correction of faecal LCOH concentrations to incomplete FR led to more accurate diet composition estimates in both animal species. Results obtained in this study suggest the usefulness of LCOH markers combined with alkanes and LCFA to estimate diet composition of horses and cattle grazing mixed grassy-woody plant communities.

  12. Search for a heavy composite Majorana neutrino in the final state with two leptons and two quarks at s=13TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Sirunyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A search for physics beyond the standard model in the final state with two same-flavour leptons (electrons or muons and two quarks produced in proton–proton collisions at s=13TeV is presented. The data were recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2.3fb−1. The observed data are in good agreement with the standard model background prediction. The results of the measurement are interpreted in the framework of a recently proposed model in which a heavy Majorana neutrino, Nℓ, stems from a composite-fermion scenario. Exclusion limits are set for the first time on the mass of the heavy composite Majorana neutrino, mNℓ, and the compositeness scale Λ. For the case mNℓ=Λ, the existence of Ne (Nμ is excluded for masses up to 4.60 (4.70 TeV at 95% confidence level. Keywords: CMS, Exotica

  13. Elsevier Search for a heavy composite Majorana neutrino in the final state with two leptons and two quarks at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, A.M.; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Krammer, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Shopova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Assran, Yasser; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fantinel, Sergio; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Panella, Orlando; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Seitz, Claudia; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Benaglia, Andrea; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Zaleski, Shawn; Belknap, Donald; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-12-10

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in the final state with two same-flavour leptons (electrons or muons) and two quarks produced in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV is presented. The data were recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb$^{-1}$. The observed data are in good agreement with the standard model background prediction. The results of the measurement are interpreted in the framework of a recently proposed model in which a heavy Majorana neutrino, $\\textrm{N}_{\\ell}$, stems from a composite-fermion scenario. Exclusion limits are set for the first time on the mass of the heavy composite Majorana neutrino, $m_{\\textrm{N}_{\\ell}}$, and the compositeness scale $\\Lambda$. For the case $m_{\\textrm{N}_{\\ell}} = \\Lambda$, the existence of $\\textrm{N}_{\\textrm{e}}$ ($\\textrm{N}_{\\mu}$) is excluded for masses up to 4.60 (4.70) TeV at 95% confidence level.

  14. Search for a heavy composite Majorana neutrino in the final state with two leptons and two quarks at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-06-26

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in the final state with two same-flavour leptons (electrons or muons) and two quarks produced in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV is presented. The data were recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 inverse-femtobarns. The observed data are in good agreement with the standard model background prediction. The results of the measurement are interpreted in the framework of a recently proposed model in which a heavy Majorana neutrino, N(l), stems from a composite-fermion scenario. Exclusion limits are set for the first time on the mass of the heavy composite Majorana neutrino, m[N(l)], and the compositeness scale Lambda. For the case m[N(l)] = Lambda, the existence of N(e) (N(mu)) is excluded for masses up to 4.60 (4.70) TeV at 95% confidence level.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of titanium-matrix composite with 20 vol% hydroxyapatite for use as heavy load-bearing hard tissue replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chenglin; Xue, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Jingchuan; Yin, Zhongda

    2006-03-01

    Titanium-matrix composite with 20 vol% HA ceramic was fabricated by hot pressing technique and the microstructure of the composite was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The mechanical and biological properties of the composite were investigated by mechanical and in vivo studies. The experimental results by TEM observation show the bonding state of Ti/HA interface in Ti-20 vol% HA composite with the relative density of 97.86% is good, however, there exists an interfacial transition zone between Ti and HA. In Ti matrix of the composite and pure Ti metal, an interesting substructure comprised of screw dislocations with Burgers vectors b of 1/3 was found. Screw dislocations are straight and regularly distributed, and cross slip can be observed. The subgrain boundaries consist of dislocation network walls with equidistant dislocation lines in the same direction. Elastic modulus and Vicker's hardness of Ti-20 vol%HA composite are 102.6 GPa and 3.41 GPa respectively. Owing to the existence of 20 vol% HA ceramic, bending strength and fracture toughness of the composite decrease sharply to 170.1 MPa and 3.57 MPa.m(1/2) respectively, which are only about 17.5 and 12% of those of pure Ti metal. In vivo studies indicate Ti-20 vol% HA composite has good biocompatibility, and even better osteointegration ability than pure titanium, especially in the early stage after the implantation. In conclusion, Ti-20 vol% HA composite is suitable for heavy load-bearing hard tissue replacement from the point of view of both mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

  16. Heavy metal composition in stormwater and retention in ponds dependent on pond age, design and catchment type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egemose, Sara; Sønderup, Melanie J; Grudinina, Anna; Hansen, Anders S; Flindt, Mogens R

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals have toxic effects on flora and fauna in the aquatic environments and are of great concern in stormwater. Heavy metal runoff was studied in 37 stormwater ponds in Denmark with varying heavy metal load, catchment type and pond design. The studied metals were Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb, Ni and Zn. The concentrations varied considerably depending on the catchment type, with the highest concentrations coming from industrial areas and the lowest from uncultivated and rural areas. Ponds can effectively remove heavy metals in particulate forms through sedimentation processes, but the dissolved forms are more difficult to retain. The removal efficiency in the ponds varied considerably, with the highest retention of Pb, Ni and Zn due to higher particulate fraction. The retention increased with increased pond volume-to-reduced catchment area ratio. In addition, the pond age affected the efficiency; whereas ponds less than 1-2 years efficiently removed all metals, 30-40-year-old ponds only removed Pb, Ni and Zn, but steeply decreasing over the years. Physical parameters such as pond size, age and sedimentation patterns were found to play a more significant role in the removal compared with chemical parameters such as pH, oxygen and organic matter. Input of metals to the ponds was reflected in the sediment content, but not significantly for all heavy metals probably due to low or varying retention caused by mineralization and re-suspension. The heavy metal concentration in the outlets was reduced to non-toxic levels, except for Cu and Cr at a few study sites.

  17. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patient with the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Barratt Ross

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from the whole blood of a 43-year-old male with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM who carries the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7. Patient-derived PBMCs were reprogrammed using non-integrative episomal vectors containing reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, KLF4 and L-MYC. iPSCs were shown to express pluripotent markers, have trilineage differentiation potential, carry the pathogenic MYH7 variant p.Val698Ala, have a normal karyotype and no longer carry the episomal reprogramming vector. This line is useful for studying the link between variants in MYH7 and the pathogenesis of HCM.

  18. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patient with the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Samantha Barratt; Fraser, Stuart T; Nowak, Natalie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from the whole blood of a 43-year-old male with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who carries the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7). Patient-derived PBMCs were reprogrammed using non-integrative episomal vectors containing reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, KLF4 and L-MYC. iPSCs were shown to express pluripotent markers, have trilineage differentiation potential, carry the pathogenic MYH7 variant p.Val698Ala, have a normal karyotype and no longer carry the episomal reprogramming vector. This line is useful for studying the link between variants in MYH7 and the pathogenesis of HCM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Binding of human beta 2-microglobulin to murine EL4 thymoma cells upregulates MHC class I heavy-chain epitopes, inhibits IL-2 secretion and induces resistance to killing by natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1994-01-01

    A variety of murine tumor cell lines was studied for its binding of exogeneously added human beta 2-microglobulin (h beta 2m). Three T lymphomas and one IL-2-dependent T-cell line (HT-1) bound substantial amounts of h beta 2m, whereas P815 mastocytoma cells, an Abelson virus-infected pre-B cell....... EL4 cells which had bound h beta 2m decreased their rate of constitutive IL-2 secretion and became resistant to activated natural killer (NK) cell killing. The present data suggest the binding of h beta 2m to mouse T cells leads to conformational changes of MHC-I heavy chains which influence both...

  20. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to a de novo mutation Arg719Trp of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene and cardiac arrest in childhood. A case report and family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhlemann, C; Hebe, J; Meitinger, T; Vosberg, H P

    2000-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a myocardial disease with variable phenotpye and genotype. To demonstrate that the mutation Arg719Trp in the cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain (beta MHC) gene is a high risk factor for sudden death and can be associated with an unusual apical non-obstructive HCM, we report the case of a 6 1/2 year old boy, who suffered cardiac arrest. The proband had a de novo mutation of the beta MHC gene (Arg719Trp) on the paternal beta MHC allele and a second maternally transmitted mutation (Met349Thr), as was shown previously (Jeschke et al. 1998 (11)). Here we report the clinical phenotype of the proband and of his relatives in detail. The proband had a marked apical and midventricular hypertrophy of the left and right ventricle without obstruction. There was an abnormal relaxation of both ventricles. Holter monitoring detected no arrhythmia. Ventricular fibrillation was inducible only by aggressive programmed stimulation. The boy died 3 1/2 years later after another cardiac arrest due to arrhythmia. Five carriers of the Met349Thr mutation in the family were asymptomatic and had no echocardiographic changes in the heart, suggesting a neutral inherited polymorphism or a recessive mutation. It is concluded that there is an association of the mutation Arg719Trp in the beta-myosin heavy chain with sudden cardiac death in a young child. Disease history in conjunction with the genetic analysis suggests that the implantation of a defibrillator converter would have been a beneficial and probably life saving measure.

  1. Static stretch promotes MEF2A nuclear translocation and expression of neonatal myosin heavy chain in C2C12 myocytes in a calcineurin- and p38-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Cyril; Loughna, Paul T

    2005-03-01

    Although the effects of mechanical stimuli have been studied extensively in fully differentiated skeletal muscle and have been shown to promote changes in phenotype, including altered myosin heavy chain isoform expression, the effects of a change in mechanical environment have been poorly studied at earlier stages of skeletal muscle differentiation. In particular, the early events elicited by mechanical stimuli upon differentiating myocytes have not been investigated. In the present study, the effect of static stretch on the activation of transcriptional factors MEF2A and NFATc1, which have been shown to be involved in the differentiation and phenotype regulation of skeletal muscle, have been examined. Furthermore, putative second messenger signaling pathways that could be involved in the dephosphorylation and hence activation of these factors were also examined. We have demonstrated that static stretch application produces a robust increase in p38 phosphorylation preceding MEF2A, but not NFATc1, nuclear translocation as well as deactivation of GSK-3beta via its phosphorylation. Using SB-203580 and cyclosporine A drugs to inhibit both p38- or/and calcineurin-dependent signals, respectively, we have shown that MEF2A phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation are regulated by p38 and calcineurin in a biphasic, time-dependent manner. Moreover, we also present evidence for another kinase that is involved in the stretch-related signal triggering MEF2A hyperphosphorylation, impairing its nuclear translocation, and that is related to p38. Finally, we have shown that static stretch application overnight promotes neonatal myosin heavy chain expression, which is inhibited by an inactivation of both p38 and calcineurin.

  2. Plasma vitamin D-binding protein (GC) factors, immunoglobulin G heavy chain (GM) allotypes and immunoglobulin kappa light chain (KM1) allotype in patients with sarcoidosis and in healthy control subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Thymann, Mariann; Graudal, Niels

    2002-01-01

    and immunoglobulin kappa light chain (KM) allotype differed significantly from the distribution in healthy subjects. METHODS: GC 1S, 1F, 2 allotypes, GM 1, 2, 5 allotypes, and KM1 allotype were assessed in 44 patients with sarcoidosis and in healthy control subjects. RESULTS: There were no significant differences...... between the frequencies of the GC, GM and KM allotypes in sarcoidosis patients and in control subjects. Furthermore, there was no relationship between the presentation or course of the sarcoid disease and GC, GM or KM allotypes. CONCLUSIONS: GC, GM and KMI allotypes do not appear to play any major role...

  3. Effects of dietary level of pantothenic acid and sex on carcass, meat quality traits and fatty acid composition of thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue in Italian heavy pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Minelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Two trials were carried out to evaluate the effects of i supranutritional doses of pantothenic acid (PA and ii sex on carcass, meat quality and fatty acid (FA composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue in Italian heavy pig. In trial 1, 59 Duroc x (LxLW pigs were fed the same diet containing either 10 [in the control (C group] or 110 ppm [in the treatment (T group] PA, from 107 to 168 kg live weight. At slaughtering, forty carcasses were sampled randomly. The T carcasses had lower backfat thickness (P<0.05, lower incidence of adipose cuts (P<0.05, higher lean cuts percentage (63.09 vs 60.64%; P<0.01 and lean meat yield (P<0.07. In trial 2, 42 pigs [Dumeco Cofok x (LxLW], evenly divided into three groups, were fed the same feed containing respectively 10 (C, 60 (T1 and 110 ppm (T2 PA, from 95 to 165 kg live weight. The treatment lowered total adipose cuts yield (P<0.05 and increased lean/adipose cuts ratio (P<0.07. In the outer layer of thighs subcutaneous adipose tissue, the treatment raised polyunsaturated FA content (P<0.01, unsaturation coefficient (P<0.01 and polyunsaturated/saturated (P/S FA ratio (P<0.05. In the inner layer, the treatment led to a lower saturated FA (P<0.05 and higher polyunsaturated FA content (P<0.01. In both trials, females generally provided leaner carcasses. In neither trials, vitamin level affected meat quality. Thus, feeding high levels of PA to heavy pigs can yield more valuable carcasses without affecting meat quality. However, effects on FA composition suggest caution in adopting this practice in the Italian heavy pig production.

  4. Fatty acid profile and composition of milk protein fraction in dairy cows fed long-chain unsaturated fatty acids during the transition period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Palma Rennó

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the utilization of different sources of unsaturated long-chain fatty acids in diets for dairy cows during the transition period and early lactation on the milk fatty acid profile and composition of the protein fraction. Thirty-six Holstein cows were divided into three groups, fed the following diets: control (C; soybean oil (SO; and calcium salts of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids (CS. The milk samples utilized for analysis were obtained weekly from parturition to twelve weeks of lactation; each one of the samples originated from two daily milkings. Milk composition and total nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen and non-casein nitrogen levels were analyzed. The cows receiving the diet with calcium salts had lower concentrations of non-protein nitrogen (%CP in milk compared with the animals fed the diet with soybean oil. There was a decrease in concentration of medium-chain fatty acids C12-C16, and a concomitant increase in concentrations of long-chain fatty acids >C18 in milk fat for the animals fed the diets CS and SO when compared with diet C. Soybean oil and CS diets increased milk-fat concentrations of the acids C18: 1 trans-11, C18: 2 cis-9, trans-11 and C18: 2 trans-10 cis-12 in relation to diet C. The utilization of sources of long-chain fatty acids in the diet of dairy cows increases the biological value of milk in early lactation due to higher concentrations of specific fatty acids such as CLA C18: 2cis-9, trans-11.

  5. Facile analysis of contents and compositions of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate hybrid chain in shark and ray tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoko; Horai, Sawako; Tamura, Jun-ichi

    2016-04-07

    The chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) hybrid chain was extracted from specific tissues of several kinds of sharks and rays. The contents and sulfation patterns of the CS/DS hybrid chain were precisely analyzed by digestion with chondroitinases ABC and AC. All samples predominantly contained the A- and C-units. Furthermore, all samples characteristically contained the D-unit. Species-specific differences were observed in the contents of the CS/DS hybrid chain, which were the highest in Mako and Blue sharks and Sharpspine skates, but were lower in Hammerhead sharks. Marked differences were observed in the ratio of the C-unit/A-unit between sharks and rays. The contents of the CS/DS hybrid chain and the ratio of the C-unit/A-unit may be related to an oxidative stress-decreasing ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in muscle size and MHC composition in response to resistance exercise with heavy and light loading intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Reitelseder, Søren; Pedersen, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle mass accretion is accomplished by heavy-load resistance training. The effect of light-load resistance exercise has been far more sparsely investigated with regard to potential effect on muscle size and contractile strength. We applied a resistance exercise protocol in which the same.......05) 8 +/- 1% and 3 +/- 1% in HL and LL legs, respectively, with a greater gain in HL than LL (P muscle strength improved by 13 +/- 5% (P ... individual trained one leg at 70% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) (heavy load, HL) while training the other leg at 15.5% 1RM (light load, LL). Eleven sedentary men (age 25 +/- 1 yr) trained for 12 wk at three times/week. Before and after the intervention muscle hypertrophy was determined by magnetic...

  7. Factors influencing the composition of detrital heavy mineral suites in Holocene sands of the Apure River drainage basin, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Andrew C.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy mineral assemblages in rivers in the Apure River drainage basin of Venezuela and Colombia closely reflect the nature of the source regions, which lie in the Andean orogenic terranes to the west and northwest. The Caribbean Mountains, largely composed of greenschist-facies pelites, phyllites, carbonates, and metavolcanics, supply assemblages dominated by epidote and calcic amphibole. Minor amounts of the high-pressure index minerals glaucophane and lawsonite indicate the presence of blueschistfacies rocks, reflecting the origin of the Caribbean Mountains by subduction-related tectonism. The northern Mérida Andes, which comprise basement gneisses and granites overlain by unmetamorphosed to low-grade metamorphosed clastics, supply two types of assemblage reflecting these two lithological types: garnet-sillimanite-staurolite-amphibole suites from the basement rocks, and epidote-amphibole suites from the overlying cover sequence. The southern Mérida Andes supply stable heavy mineral suites reflecting recycling from the extensive unmetamorphosed sandstones that occur at outcrop. By considering suites from different physiographical provinces, the effects of short-term alluvial storage in the Llanos on heavy mineral assemblages have been evaluated. Weathering during alluvial storage appears to be effective in modifying the apatite-tourmaline ratio, which shows a steady, marked decline with distance from the mountain front, resulting from the removal of apatite during weathering. Clinopyroxene and garnet may also show evidence of loss through weathering, although the trends are poorly constrained statistically. Epidote and amphibole proportions remain essentially constant, possibly through a balance between loss through weathering and continual resupply from the breakdown of rock fragments. In general, the heavy mineral assemblages are less affected than the bulk mineralogy by alluvial storage on the Llanos.

  8. [Determination of deuterium concentration in foods and influence of water with modified isotopic composition on oxidation parameters and heavy hydrogen isotopes content in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, A A; Bykov, I M; Baryshev, M G; Dzhimak, S S; Bykov, M I

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study of the deuterium (D) content in food products as well as the influence of deuterium depleted water (DDW) on the concentration of heavy hydrogen isotopes in the blood and lyophilized tissues of rats. The most significant difference in the content of D was found between potato and pork fat, which indexes the standard delta notation (δ) D in promille, related to the international standard SMOW (Standard Mean Ocean of Water) amounted to -83,2 per thousand and -250,7 per thousand, respectively (pdeuterium concentration ranged from -75,5 per thousand (Narzan) to +72,1 per thousand (Kubai), that indicates the ability of some food products to increase the concentration of heavy hydrogen atoms in the body. The data obtained in the experimental modeling of the diet of male Wistar rats in the age of 5-6 mo (weight 235 ± 16 g) using DDW (δD = -743,2 per thousand) instead of drinking water (δD = -37,0 per thousand) with identical mineral composition showed that after 2 weeks significant (p deuterium-protium, D/H) gradient in the body is possible. Changing the direction of isotopic D/H gradient in laboratory animals in comparison with its physiological indicators (72-127 per thousand, "plasma>tissue") is due to different rates ofisotopic exchange reactions in plasma and tissues (liver, kidney, heart), which can be explained by entering into the composition of a modified diet of organic substrates with more than DDW concentration D, which are involved in the construction of cellular structures and eventually lead to a redistribution of D and change direction of D/H gradient "plasmacomposition, aimed at reducing the level of heavy non-radioactive atoms will allow the targeted nutritional correction of prooxidant-antioxidant status of

  9. One step grafting of iron phthalocyanine containing flexible chains on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles towards high performance polymer magnetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zejun; Zhou, Xuefei; Yang, Xulin; Jia, Kun, E-mail: Jiakun@uestc.edu.cn; Liu, Xiaobo, E-mail: liuxb@uestc.edu.cn

    2015-07-01

    To develop high-performance inorganic particles/polymer composites, the interfacial interaction and dispersion of inorganic particles are the two essential issues to be considered. Herein, we report an effective approach to graft iron phthalocyanine containing flexible chains (NP-ph) on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The hybrids were monodispersed solid nanoparticles with the average diameter of about 250 nm. About 16.8% of the phthalocyanine oligomer was incorporated into the resulting NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were subsequently used as the novel filler for preparation of high performance poly(arylene ether nitrile)s (PAEN) composites. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation showed that the NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles present better dispersion and interfacial compatibility with PAEN matrix than that of raw Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which was further confirmed by rheological study. Consequently, the improved thermal stability and enhanced mechanical properties were obtained from composites using NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) results showed that the prepared PAEN composites exhibited higher saturation magnetization and soft magnetic properties. Meanwhile, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the PAEN/NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite films increased with the increase of the hybrid nanoparticles loading. Thus, the PAEN/NP-ph@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite would find potential applications in organic magnetic films fields due to their high thermal stability, excellent flexibility and tunable magnetic properties. - Highlights: • An effective approach to graft CuPc containing flexible chains on Fe. • Effect on the mechanical, thermal and interfacial properties were investigated. • The dispersion state was characterized using parallel-plate rheometry. • The mechanism of interfacial compatibility was clarified.

  10. Chemotaxonomic significance of distribution and stable carbon isotopic composition of long-chain alkanes and alkan-1-ols in C{sub 4} grass waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommerskirchen, F.; Plader, A. [Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg (Germany). Institute of Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment; Eglinton, G. [Hanse Institute for Advanced Study, Delmenhorst (Germany); Chikaraishii, Yoshito [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka (Japan). Institute for Research on Earth Evolution

    2006-10-15

    Grasses (Poaceae) are distributed across the world in broad latitudinal belts and are an important source of C4 biomass in the geological record of soils as well as lake and marine sediments. We examined long-chain leaf wax components of thirty-five C{sub 4} grasses of the subfamilies Aristidoideae, Chloridoideae and Panicoideae from the southern African grasslands and savannas and three C{sub 3} grasses of the subfamily Pooideae from Peru and Australia and review the relevant botanical, phytogeographic and leaf wax compositional background information. Contents, distribution patterns and molecular stable carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain n-alkanes (n-C{sub 27} to n-C{sub 35}) and n-alkan-1-ols (n-C{sub 22} to n-C{sub 32}) were used to estimate the chemotaxonomic relevance of wax signatures of whole plants, separately for different subfamilies and for members of the three C{sub 4} subtypes (NADP-ME, NAD-ME and PCK). Two grass species were separated into flower heads, leaves and stems and the parts analysed separately. Grass flowers contain remarkable amounts of short-chain n-alkanes, which may have a significant influence on the chemical signature of the whole plant, whereas n-alkanol distribution patterns exhibit no systematics. The stable carbon isotopic composition of both biomarker types in different plant parts is remarkably uniform. Chemotaxonomic differentiation was not possible on a species level based on whole plant samples, but was more successful for averages of subfamily and photosynthetic subtype data. Wax signatures of C{sub 4} grasses are generally distinguishable from those of C{sub 3} species by heavier isotopic values, higher contents of n-C{sub 31} and n-C{sub 33} alkanes and the abundance of the n-C{sub 32} n-alkanol, which is largely absent in C{sub 3} grass waxes. Especially the waxes of the NAD-ME and PCK C{sub 4}-subtype grasses, which thrive in extremely arid tropical and subtropical areas, contain high relative amounts of longer-chain

  11. Polypyrrole-chitosan/nickel-ferrite nanoparticle composite layer for detecting heavy metal ions using surface plasmon resonance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Naseri, Mahmoud; Rashid, Suraya Abdul

    2017-08-01

    A polypyrrole-chitosan/nickel ferrite nanoparticle composite layer was prepared using the electrochemical method to detect nickel, iron, cobalt, aluminium, manganese, mercury, and lead ions. The polypyrrole-chitosan/nickel ferrite nanoparticle composite layers were characterized using field emission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The polymer composite was used to improve the surface of the gold layer to apply the surface plasmon resonance technique. The sensor detected the ferromagnetic ions down to a level of 0.001 ppm, and the detection of diamagnetic ions was conducted with a limitation of roughly 0.5 ppm. The polymer composite improved the response time of the sensor better than the other polymer composite sensing layers did.

  12. Side-chain selective and covalent labelling of proteins by organometallic complexes of heavy transition metals--possible application in radio-crystallography of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmain, M; Gorfti, A; Jaouen, G

    1998-11-15

    Organo-rhenium and organo-tungsten N-succinimidyl and N-sulfosuccinimidyl esters react at amino groups of proteins to form stable amide bonds between the protein and the heavy transition metal complexes. We show here that factors such as pH of the reaction medium and nature of the reagent (coordinating metal, surrounding ligands, type of ester) had a marked influence on the final number of coupled organometallic groups per protein molecule, defined as the coupling ratio. By operating with stoichiometric quantities of reagent with respect to the number of aqino groups, up to 30 organometallic groups were introduced into the model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). BSA conjugates were characterized by gel electrophoresis in non-denaturating conditions. Hen egg-white lysozyme organo-tungsten conjugates were prepared in the same manner and the peptides resulting from their tryptic hydrolysis were analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. A tentative assignment of the preferential amino sites of conjugation is suggested from the latter results.

  13. Digenic inheritance of mutations in the cardiac troponin (TNNT2) and cardiac beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7) as the cause of severe dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Evmorfia; Soltani, Mohammadhossein; Firoozabadi, Ali Dehghani; Namayandeh, Seyedeh Mahdieh; Crockford, Jade; Maroofian, Reza; Jamshidi, Yalda

    2017-09-01

    Familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by ventricular dilation and depressed myocardial performance. It is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with mutations in over 60 genes. We carried out whole exome sequencing in combination with cardiomyopathy-related gene-filtering on two affected family members to identify the possible causative mutation in a consanguineous Iranian family with DCM. Two novel variants in cardiomyopathy-related genes were identified: c.247 A > C; p.N83H in the Troponin T Type 2 gene (TNNT2) and c.2863G > A; p.D955N in the Myosin Heavy Polypeptide 7 gene (MYH7). Sanger sequencing and co-segregation analysis in the remaining family members supported the coexistence of these digenic mutations in affected members of the family. Carriers of either variant alone were asymptomatic. In summary, we find that digenic inheritance of two novel variants in DCM related genes is associated with a severe form of DCM. Exome sequencing has been shown to be very useful in identifying pathogenic mutations in cardiomyopathy families, and this report emphasizes the importance of comprehensive screening of DCM related genes, even after the identification of a single disease-causing mutation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of a traditional Chinese medicine formula and its extraction on muscle fiber characteristics in finishing pigs, porcine cell proliferation and isoforms of myosin heavy chain gene expression in myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine formula (TCMF on muscle fiber characteristics in finishing pigs and the effects of the formula’s extract (distilled water, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether extraction on porcine cell proliferation and isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC gene expression in myocytes. Methods In a completely randomized design, ninety pigs were assigned to three diets with five replications per treatment and six pigs per pen. The diets included the basal diet (control group, TCMF1 (basal diet+2.5 g/kg TCMF and TCMF2 (basal diet+5 g/kg TCMF. The psoas major muscle was obtained from pigs at the end of the experiment. Muscle fiber characteristics in the psoas major muscle were analyzed using myosin ATPase staining. Cell proliferation was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT dye and cytometry. Isoforms of MyHC gene expression were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The final body weight and carcass weight of finishing pigs were increased by TCMF1 (p<0.05, while the psoas major muscle cross-sectional area was increased by TCMF (p<0.05. The cross-sectional area and diameter of psoas major muscle fiber I, IIA, and IIB were increased by TCMF2 (p<0.05. The cross-sectional area and fiber diameter of psoas major muscle fiber IIA and IIB were increased by diet supplementation with TCMF1 (p<0.05. Psoas major muscle fiber IIA and IIB fiber density from the pigs fed the TCMF1 diet and the type IIB fiber density from the pigs fed the TCMF2 diet were lower compared to pigs fed the control diet (p<0.05. Pigs fed TCMF2 had a higher composition of type I fiber and a lower percentage of type IIB fiber in the psoas major muscle (p<0.05. The expression levels of MyHC I, MyHC IIa, and MyHC IIx mRNA increased and the amount of MyHC IIb mRNA decreased in the psoas major muscle from TCMF2, whereas MyHC I and MyHC IIx mRNA increased

  15. Impact of culturing conditions on the abundance and composition of long chain alkyl diols in species of the genus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balzano, S.; Villanueva, L.; de Bar, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2017-01-01

    Long chain alkyl diols (LCDs) are widespread in sediments and are synthesized, among others, by microalgae of the genus Nannochloropsis. The factors regulating the synthesis of LCDs and their biological function are, however, unclear. We investigated the changes in abundance of free + ester-bound

  16. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhong Wang; Xiaoxiao Wang; Juntao Li; Yiqiang Chen; Wenjun Yang; Liying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and ...

  17. Isolation and characterization of the soybean Sg-3 gene that is involved in genetic variation in sugar chain composition at the C-3 position in soyasaponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Takagi, Kyoko; Tochigi, Saeko; Fujisawa, Yukiko; Nomura, Yuhta; Tsuchinaga, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yuya; Takada, Yoshitake; Kaga, Akito; Anai, Toyoaki; Tsukamoto, Chigen; Seki, Hikaru; Muranaka, Toshiya; Ishimoto, Masao

    2018-02-01

    Soyasaponins are specialized metabolites present in soybean seeds that affect the taste and quality of soy-based foods. The composition of the sugar chains attached to the aglycone moiety of soyasaponins is regulated by genetic loci such as sg-1, -3, and -4. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the Sg-3 gene, which is responsible for conjugating the terminal (third) glucose (Glc) at the C-3 sugar chain of soyasaponins. The gene Glyma.10G104700 is disabled in the sg-3 cultivar, 'Mikuriya-ao,' due to the deletion of genomic DNA that results in the absence of a terminal Glc residue on the C-3 sugar chain. Sg-3 encodes a putative glycosyltransferase (UGT91H9), and its predicted protein sequence has a high homology with that of GmSGT3 (Glyma.08G181000; UGT91H4), which conjugates rhamnose (Rha) to the third position of the C-3 sugar chain in vitro. A recombinant Glyma.10G104700 protein could utilize UDP-Glc as a substrate to conjugate the third Glc to the C-3 sugar chain, and introducing a functional Glyma.10G104700 transgene into the mutant complemented the sg-3 phenotype. Conversely, induction of a premature stop codon mutation in Glyma.10G104700 (W270*) resulted in the sg-3 phenotype, suggesting that Glyma.10G104700 was Sg-3. The gmsgt3 (R339H) mutant failed to accumulate soyasaponins with the third Rha at the C-3 sugar chain, and the third Glc and Rha conjugations were both disabled in the sg-3 gmsgt3 double mutant. These results demonstrated that Sg-3 and GmSGT3 are non-redundantly involved in the third Glc and Rha conjugation at the C-3 sugar chain of soyasaponins, respectively. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Higher Levels of Aflatoxin M1 Contamination and Poorer Composition of Milk Supplied by Informal Milk Marketing Chains in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Aslam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to observe the seasonal variation in aflatoxin M1 and nutritional quality of milk along informal marketing chains. Milk samples (485 were collected from three different chains over a period of one year. The average concentrations of aflatoxin M1 during the autumn and monsoon seasons (2.60 and 2.59 ppb were found to be significantly higher (standard error of the difference, SED = 0.21: p = 0.003 than in the summer (1.93 ppb. The percentage of added water in milk was significantly lower (SED = 1.54: p < 0.001 in summer (18.59% than in the monsoon season (26.39%. There was a significantly different (SED = 2.38: p < 0.001 mean percentage of water added by farmers (6.23%, small collectors (14.97%, large collectors (27.96% and retailers (34.52%. This was reflected in changes in milk quality along the marketing chain. There was no difference (p = 0.178 in concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk collected from the farmers (2.12 ppb, small collectors (2.23 ppb, large collectors (2.36 ppb and retailers (2.58 ppb. The high levels of contamination found in this study, which exceed the standards set by European Union (0.05 ppb and USFDA (0.5 ppb, demand radical intervention by regulatory authorities and mass awareness of the consequences for consumer health and safety.

  19. Effect of adjustable molecular chain structure and pure silica zeolite nanoparticles on thermal, mechanical, dielectric, UV-shielding and hydrophobic properties of fluorinated copolyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Liao, Guangfu; Zhang, Shulai; Pang, Long; Tong, Hao; Zhao, Wenzhe; Xu, Zushun

    2018-01-01

    A series of polyimide (PI) films, polyimide/pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (PSZN) blend films and polyimide/amine-functionalized pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (APSZN) composite films were successfully prepared by random copolycondensation. Thereinto, PSZN were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The polyimides were derived from 4,4‧-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA), and three adjustable molar ratios (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) of 2,2-bis[4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy)phenyl] propane dianhydride (BPADA) and 4,4‧-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA). The effects of PSZN, APSZN and different chain structure on PI films were specifically evaluated in terms of morphology, thermal, mechanical, dielectric and UV-shielding properties, etc. Comparison was given among pure PI flims, PI/PSZN blend films and PI/APSZN composite flims. The results showed that the thermal and mechanical properties of PI films were drastically impaired after adding PSZN. On the contrary, the strength, toughness and thermal stability were improved after adding APSZN. Moreover, the dielectric constants of the PI/APSZN composite flims were lowered but UV-shielding properties were enhanced. Interestingly, we found that the greatest effects were obtained through introducing APSZN in PI derived by the 1:1 ratio of BPADA:6FDA. The corresponding PI/APSZN composite flim exhibited the most reinforced and toughened properties, the largest decrement of dielectric constant and the best UV-shielding efficiency, which made the composite flim be used as ultraviolet shielding material in outer space filled with high temperature and intensive ultraviolet light. Meanwhile, this work also provided a facile way to synthesize composite materials with adjustable performance.

  20. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH(M86-2) promoter in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Md; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM86-2, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYHM86-2 promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614bp 5'-flanking sequences of MYHM86-2 contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYHM86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYHM86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYHM86-2 expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYHM86-2 expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Utilization of Ig heavy chain variable, diversity, and joining gene segments in children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: implications for the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aihong; Rue, Montse; Zhou, Jianbiao; Wang, Hongjun; Goldwasser, Meredith A; Neuberg, Donna; Dalton, Virginia; Zuckerman, David; Lyons, Cheryl; Silverman, Lewis B; Sallan, Stephen E; Gribben, John G

    2004-06-15

    Sequence analysis of the immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgH) has demonstrated preferential usage of specific variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) genes at different stages of B-cell development and in B-cell malignancies, and this has provided insight into B-cell maturation and selection. Knowledge of the association between rearrangement patterns based on updated databases and clinical characteristics of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. We analyzed 381 IgH sequences identified at presentation in 317 children with B-lineage ALL and assessed the V(H)D(H)J(H) gene utilization profiles. The D(H)J(H)-proximal V(H) segments and the D(H)2 gene family were significantly overrepresented. Only 21% of V(H)-J(H) joinings were potentially productive, a finding associated with a trend toward an increased risk of relapse. These results suggest that physical location at the V(H) locus is involved in preferential usage of D(H)J(H)-proximal V(H) segments whereas D(H) and J(H) segment usage is governed by position-independent molecular mechanisms. Molecular pathophysiology appears relevant to clinical outcome in patients who have only productive rearrangements, and specific rearrangement patterns are associated with differences in the tumor biology of childhood ALL.

  2. Lack of Phenotypic Differences by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MYH7 (β-Myosin Heavy Chain)- Versus MYBPC3 (Myosin-Binding Protein C)-Related Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Hindieh, Waseem; Gruner, Christiane; Fourey, Dana; Appelbaum, Evan; Rowin, Ethan; Care, Melanie; Lesser, John R; Haas, Tammy S; Udelson, James E; Manning, Warren J; Olivotto, Iacopo; Tomberli, Benedetta; Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S; Crean, Andrew M; Rakowski, Harry; Chan, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    The 2 most commonly affected genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are MYH7 (β-myosin heavy chain) and MYBPC3 (β-myosin-binding protein C). Phenotypic differences between patients with mutations in these 2 genes have been inconsistent. Scarce data exist on the genotype-phenotype association as assessed by tomographic imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 358 consecutive genotyped hypertrophic cardiomyopathy probands at 5 tertiary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy centers. Genetic testing revealed a pathogenic mutation in 159 patients (44.4%). The most common genes identified were MYH7 (n=53) and MYBPC3 (n=75); 33.1% and 47% of genopositive patients, respectively. Phenotypic characteristics by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of these 2 groups were similar, including left ventricular volumes, mass, maximal wall thickness, morphology, left atrial volume, and mitral valve leaflet lengths (all P=non-significant). The presence of late gadolinium enhancement (65% versus 64%; P=0.99) and the proportion of total left ventricular mass (%late gadolinium enhancement; 10.4±13.2% versus 8.5±8.5%; P=0.44) were also similar. This multicenter multinational study shows lack of phenotypic differences between MYH7- and MYBPC3-associated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Postmutational mechanisms appear more relevant to thick-filament disease expression and outcome than the disease-causing variant per se. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. A PCR-based integrated protocol for the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7): development of a diagnostic tool for HCM disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Zapheiropoulos, Athanassios Z; Voutsinas, Gerassimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2008-06-01

    Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) constitutes a genetic disease of the sarcomere characterized by a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. A variety of different mutations affecting the at least eight sarcomeric gene products has been identified and the majority of them appear to function through a dominant negative mechanism. Family history analysis and genetic counseling have been widely adopted as integral tools for the evaluation and management of individuals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Genetic testing of the disease has been progressively released into the clinical mainstream, thus rendering the development of novel and potent molecular diagnostic protocols an inevitable task. To this direction, we have evolved an integrated PCR-based molecular protocol, which through the utilization of novel "exonic" primers allows, among others, the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene locus (MYH7) mainly characterized by the critical for HCM Arginine residue 403 (R(403)). Interestingly, through a DNA sequencing approach, a single nucleotide substitution from "G" to "T" was detected in the adjacent 13th intron, thus divulging the versatile potential of the present molecular protocol to clinical practice.

  4. Airborne heavy metal pollution and its effects on foliar elemental composition of Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium myrtillus in Sør-Varanger, northern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, C; Junttila, O

    2001-01-01

    Uptake of Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ca, K, Mg, P, and S in Empetrum nigrum L. ssp. hermaphroditum Hagerup and Vaccinium myrtillus L. from Ni, Cu and SO2 contaminated sites in Sør-Varanger, northern Norway, were investigated. The primary objective was to study the effect of airborne heavy metal pollution on foliar element composition of these two dwarf shrubs. Ni distribution and availability in soils clearly indicate atmospheric deposition of Ni particulates in Sør-Varanger. Foliar Ni concentrations in E. hermaphroditum and V. myrtillus increased in relation to plant available Ni in corresponding soils. Leaves of E. hermaphroditum generally contained higher concentrations of Ni than leaves of V. myrtillus. Emissions influenced some features of leaf elemental composition of the two species in very different ways. In leaves of V. myrtillus, S increased in proportion to Ni and Cu, while levels of Mn decreased. In leaves of E. hermaphroditum, Fe increased in proportion to Ni and Cu, while levels of Ca decreased.

  5. Nitrate and the origin of saliva influence composition and short chain fatty acid production of oral microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, J.E.; Buijs, M.J.; Brandt, B.W.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is emerging as a possible health benefactor. Especially the microbial conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the oral cavity and the subsequent conversion to nitric oxide in the stomach are of interest in this regard. Yet, how nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of the oral

  6. Response of rhizosphere microbial community structure and diversity to heavy metal co-pollution in arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Linjing; Zeng, Guangming; Fan, Changzheng; Lu, Lunhui; Chen, Xunfeng; Chen, Ming; Wu, Haipeng; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Due to the emerging environmental issues related to heavy metals, concern about the soil quality of farming lands near manufacturing district is increasing. Investigating the function of soil microorganisms exposed to long-term heavy metal contamination is meaningful and important for agricultural soil utilization. This article studied the potential influence of several heavy metals on microbial biomass, activity, abundance, and community composition in arable soil near industrial estate in Zhuzhou, Hunan province, China. The results showed that soil organic contents (SOC) were significantly positive correlated with heavy metals, whereas dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was greatly depressed by the heavy metal stress. Negative correlation was found between heavy metals and basal soil respiration (BSR), and no correlation was found between heavy metals and microbial biomass content (MBC). The quantitative PCR (QPCR) and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis could suggest that heavy metal pollution has significantly decreased abundance of bacteria and fungi and also changed their community structure. The results could contribute to evaluate heavy metal pollution level in soil. By combining different environmental parameters, it would promote the better understanding of heavy metal effect on the size, structure, and activity of microbial community in arable soil.

  7. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachleben, Joseph R; Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2014-07-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues.

  8. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  9. Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    acute toxicity and sublethal chronic action the devastating effects that the accumulation - ... surrounding waters. The results showed a programmes of heavy metals in aquatic strong and positive correlation (r = 0.97) ecosystems. between amounts of metals in the aquatic ...... Chemical composition of agricultural waste.

  10. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (pcoconut oil level increased (poil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers.

  11. Nitrate and the Origin of Saliva Influence Composition and Short Chain Fatty Acid Production of Oral Microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jessica E; Buijs, Mark J; Brandt, Bernd W; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate is emerging as a possible health benefactor. Especially the microbial conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the oral cavity and the subsequent conversion to nitric oxide in the stomach are of interest in this regard. Yet, how nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of the oral ecosystem is not fully understood. To investigate the effect of nitrate on oral ecology, we performed a 4-week experiment using the multiplaque artificial mouth (MAM) biofilm model. This model was inoculated with stimulated saliva of two healthy donors. Half of the microcosms (n = 4) received a constant supply of nitrate, while the other half functioned as control (n = 4). Additionally, all microcosms received a nitrate and sucrose pulse, each week, on separate days to measure nitrate reduction and acid formation. The bacterial composition of the microcosms was determined by 16S rDNA sequencing. The origin of the saliva (i.e., donor) showed to be the strongest determinant for the development of the microcosms. The supplementation of nitrate was related to a relatively high abundance of Neisseria in the microcosms of both donors, while Veillonella was highly abundant in the nitrate-supplemented microcosms of only one of the donors. The lactate concentration after sucrose addition was similarly high in all microcosms, irrespective of treatment or donor, while the concentration of butyrate was lower after nitrate addition in the nitrate-receiving microcosms. In conclusion, nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of oral microcosms, although the result is strongly dependent on the inoculum.

  12. Effect of molecular chain length on the mechanical and thermal properties of amine-functionalized graphene oxide/polyimide composite films prepared by in situ polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Hao; Yang, Shin-Yi; Wang, Jen-Yu; Tien, Hsi-Wen; Hsiao, Sheng-Tsung; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Shin-Ming; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Wu, Yi-Fang

    2013-02-01

    This study fabricates amine (NH(2))-functionalized graphene oxide (GO)/polyimide(PI) composite films with high performance using in situ polymerization. Linear poly(oxyalkylene)amines with two different molecular weights 400 and 2000 (D400 and D2000) have been grafted onto the GO surfaces, forming two types of NH(2)-functionalized GO (D400-GO/D2000-GO). NH(2)-functionalized GO, especially D400-GO, demonstrated better reinforcing efficiency in mechanical and thermal properties. The observed property enhancement are due to large aspect ratio of GO sheets, the uniform dispersion of the GO within the PI matrix, and strong interfacial adhesion due to the chemical bonding between GO and the polymeric matrix. The Young's modulus of the composite films with 0.3 wt % D400-GO loading is 7.4 times greater than that of neat PI, and tensile strength is 240% higher than that of neat PI. Compared to neat PI, 0.3 wt % D400-GO/PI film exhibits approximately 23.96 °C increase in glass transition temperature (T(g)). The coefficient of thermal expansion below T(g) is significantly decreased from 102.6 μm/°C (neat PI) to 53.81 μm/°C (decreasing 48%) for the D400-GO/PI composites with low D400-GO content (0.1 wt %). This work not only provides a method to develop the GO-based polyimide composites with superior performances but also conceptually provides a chance to modulate the interfacial interaction between GO and the polymer through designing the chain length of grafting molecules on NH(2)-functionalized GO.

  13. Upgrading oilsands bitumen and heavy oil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Murray R

    2015-01-01

    .... Beginning with a thorough grounding in the composition, fluid properties, reaction behaviour, and conomics of bitumen and heavy oil, Murray Gray then delves into current processing technologies...

  14. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Variable Region of Llama Heavy Chain-Only Antibody JM4 Efficiently Blocks both Cell-Free and T Cell-T Cell Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Weiming; Matz, Julie; Ye, Chaobaihui; Bracq, Lucie; Delon, Jerome; Kimata, Jason T; Chen, Zhiwei; Benichou, Serge; Zhou, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The variable regions (VHHs) of two heavy chain-only antibodies, JM2 and JM4, from llamas that have been immunized with a trimeric gp140 bound to a CD4 mimic have been recently isolated (here referred to as VHH JM2 and VHH JM4, respectively). JM2 binds the CD4-binding site of gp120 and neutralizes HIV-1 strains from subtypes B, C, and G. JM4 binds gp120 and neutralizes HIV-1 strains from subtypes A, B, C, A/E, and G in a CD4-dependent manner. In the present study, we constructed glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored VHH JM2 and JM4 along with an E4 control and transduced them into human CD4+ cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. We report that by genetically linking the VHHs with a GPI attachment signal, VHHs are targeted to the lipid rafts of the plasma membranes. Expression of GPI-VHH JM4, but not GPI-VHH E4 and JM2, on the surface of transduced TZM.bl cells potently neutralizes multiple subtypes of HIV-1 isolates, including tier 2 or 3 strains, transmitted founders, quasispecies, and soluble single domain antibody (sdAb) JM4-resistant viruses. Moreover, transduction of CEMss-CCR5 cells with GPI-VHH JM4, but not with GPI-VHH E4, confers resistance to both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission of HIV-1 and HIV-1 envelope-mediated fusion. Finally, GPI-VHH JM4-transduced human primary CD4 T cells efficiently resist both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission of HIV-1. Thus, we conclude that VHH JM4, when targeted to the lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, efficiently neutralizes HIV-1 infection via both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission. Our findings should have important implications for GPI-anchored antibody-based therapy against HIV-1. Lipid rafts are specialized dynamic microdomains of the plasma membrane and have been shown to be gateways for HIV-1 budding as well as entry into T cells and macrophages. In nature, many glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins localize in the lipid rafts. In the present study, we developed GPI

  15. Does a Heavy Fe-Isotope Composition of Akilia Quartz-Amphibole-Pyroxene Rocks Necessitate a BIF Origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, M J; Schoenberg, R; Fedo, C M; Kamber, B S

    2015-10-01

    The age and origin of the quartz-amphibole-pyroxene (qap) gneiss from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, have been the subject of intense debate since the light C-isotope composition of graphite inclusions in apatite was interpreted to indicate the presence of Earth's earliest biological activity. Although this claim for biogenic relicts has been vigorously challenged, the possibility that the rocks might represent some of Earth's earliest water-lain sediments and, hence, a suitable repository for life remains an open question. While some workers have suggested that the entire sequence represents an originally mafic-ultramafic igneous precursor subsequently modified by metasomatism, quartz injection, high-grade metamorphism, and extreme ductile deformation, others maintain that at least a small part of the sequence retains geochemical characteristics indicative of a chemical sedimentary origin. Fractionated Fe isotopes with δ(56)Fe values similar to those observed in Isua BIF have been reported from high-SiO2 units of qap and used to support a chemical sedimentary protolith for the qap unit. Here, we present new Fe isotope data from all lithologic variants in the qap gneiss on Akilia, including layers of undisputed ultramafic igneous origin. Since the latter require introduction of fractionated Fe into at least part of the qap unit, we argue that Fe isotopes must therefore be treated with considerable caution when used to infer BIF for part or all of the qap protolith.

  16. Fast-to-Slow Transition of Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function and Corresponding Changes in Myosin Heavy and Light Chain Formation in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Tanja; Braubach, Peter; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Lindenberg, Katrin S; Melzer, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Huntington´s disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease resulting from an expanded polyglutamine sequence (poly-Q) in the protein huntingtin (HTT). Various studies report atrophy and metabolic pathology of skeletal muscle in HD and suggest as part of the process a fast-to-slow fiber type transition that may be caused by the pathological changes in central motor control or/and by mutant HTT in the muscle tissue itself. To investigate muscle pathology in HD, we used R6/2 mice, a common animal model for a rapidly progressing variant of the disease expressing exon 1 of the mutant human gene. We investigated alterations in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a typical fast-twitch muscle, and the soleus (SOL), a slow-twitch muscle. We focussed on mechanographic measurements of excised muscles using single and repetitive electrical stimulation and on the expression of the various myosin isoforms (heavy and light chains) using dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of whole muscle and single fiber preparations. In EDL of R6/2, the functional tests showed a left shift of the force-frequency relation and decrease in specific force. Moreover, the estimated relative contribution of the fastest myosin isoform MyHC IIb decreased, whereas the contribution of the slower MyHC IIx isoform increased. An additional change occurred in the alkali MyLC forms showing a decrease in 3f and an increase in 1f level. In SOL, a shift from fast MyHC IIa to the slow isoform I was detectable in male R6/2 mice only, and there was no evidence of isoform interconversion in the MyLC pattern. These alterations point to a partial remodeling of the contractile apparatus of R6/2 mice towards a slower contractile phenotype, predominantly in fast glycolytic fibers.

  17. A heterodimer of a VHH (variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only) antibody that inhibits anthrax toxin cell binding linked to a VHH antibody that blocks oligomer formation is highly protective in an anthrax spore challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leysath, Clinton E; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Vrentas, Catherine; Crown, Devorah; Leppla, Stephen H; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2015-03-06

    Anthrax disease is caused by a toxin consisting of protective antigen (PA), lethal factor, and edema factor. Antibodies against PA have been shown to be protective against the disease. Variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs) with affinity for PA were obtained from immunized alpacas and screened for anthrax neutralizing activity in macrophage toxicity assays. Two classes of neutralizing VHHs were identified recognizing distinct, non-overlapping epitopes. One class recognizes domain 4 of PA at a well characterized neutralizing site through which PA binds to its cellular receptor. A second neutralizing VHH (JKH-C7) recognizes a novel epitope. This antibody inhibits conversion of the PA oligomer from "pre-pore" to its SDS and heat-resistant "pore" conformation while not preventing cleavage of full-length 83-kDa PA (PA83) by cell surface proteases to its oligomer-competent 63-kDa form (PA63). The antibody prevents endocytosis of the cell surface-generated PA63 subunit but not preformed PA63 oligomers formed in solution. JKH-C7 and the receptor-blocking VHH class (JIK-B8) were expressed as a heterodimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA). This VNA displayed improved neutralizing potency in cell assays and protected mice from anthrax toxin challenge with much better efficacy than the separate component VHHs. The VNA protected virtually all mice when separately administered at a 1:1 ratio to toxin and protected mice against Bacillus anthracis spore infection. Thus, our studies show the potential of VNAs as anthrax therapeutics. Due to their simple and stable nature, VNAs should be amenable to genetic delivery or administration via respiratory routes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1 Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Augière

    Full Text Available A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects, conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5.A set of 399 poly(AC markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1 among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys and p.(Met125Val which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser,p.(Asp313His and p.(Arg314His which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface.Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin.

  19. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  20. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment.

  1. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  2. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  3. Comparison of Heavy-Duty Scuffing Behavior between Chromium-Based Ceramic Composite and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Coated Ring Sliding against Cast Iron Liner under Starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Yu, Baihong; Lv, Yutao; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    A running-in and starved lubrication experiment is designed to investigate the heavy-duty scuffing behavior of piston ring coatings against cast iron (Fe) cylinder liner using the piston ring reciprocating liner test rig. The scuffing resistance of the piston ring with the chromium-based ceramic composite coating (CKS), and that with the thermally sprayed nickel-chromium-molybdenum coating (NCM) is compared at different nominal pressures (40~100 MPa) and temperatures (180~250 °C). With the failure time as a criterion, the rank order is as follows: NCM/Fe > CKS/Fe. Before the scoring occurs at the interface of the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL), the cast iron liner enters into a “polish wear” stage, and iron-based adhesive materials begin to form on the piston ring surface. With the macroscopic adhesion formation, the plastic shearing cycle causes surface damages mainly due to abrasive effects for the CKS/Fe pairs and adhesive effects for the NCM/Fe pairs. PMID:29036911

  4. Comparison of Heavy-Duty Scuffing Behavior between Chromium-Based Ceramic Composite and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Coated Ring Sliding against Cast Iron Liner under Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A running-in and starved lubrication experiment is designed to investigate the heavy-duty scuffing behavior of piston ring coatings against cast iron (Fe cylinder liner using the piston ring reciprocating liner test rig. The scuffing resistance of the piston ring with the chromium-based ceramic composite coating (CKS, and that with the thermally sprayed nickel-chromium-molybdenum coating (NCM is compared at different nominal pressures (40~100 MPa and temperatures (180~250 °C. With the failure time as a criterion, the rank order is as follows: NCM/Fe > CKS/Fe. Before the scoring occurs at the interface of the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL, the cast iron liner enters into a “polish wear” stage, and iron-based adhesive materials begin to form on the piston ring surface. With the macroscopic adhesion formation, the plastic shearing cycle causes surface damages mainly due to abrasive effects for the CKS/Fe pairs and adhesive effects for the NCM/Fe pairs.

  5. A Cholera Conjugate Vaccine Containing O-specific Polysaccharide (OSP) of V. cholerae O1 Inaba and Recombinant Fragment of Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain (OSP:rTTHc) Induces Serum, Memory and Lamina Proprial Responses against OSP and Is Protective in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed, Md Abu; Bufano, Meagan Kelly; Xu, Peng; Eckhoff, Grace; Charles, Richelle C; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Sultana, Tania; Rashu, Md Rasheduzzaman; Berger, Amanda; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Mandlik, Anjali; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Leung, Daniel T; LaRocque, Regina C; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Vann, W F; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the cause of cholera, a severe watery diarrhea. Protection against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity is defined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we describe a conjugate vaccine for cholera prepared via squaric acid chemistry from the OSP of V. cholerae O1 Inaba strain PIC018 and a recombinant heavy chain fragment of tetanus toxin (OSP:rTTHc). We assessed a range of vaccine doses based on the OSP content of the vaccine (10-50 μg), vaccine compositions varying by molar loading ratio of OSP to rTTHc (3:1, 5:1, 10:1), effect of an adjuvant, and route of immunization. Immunized mice developed prominent anti-OSP and anti-TT serum IgG responses, as well as vibriocidal antibody and memory B cell responses following intramuscular or intradermal vaccination. Mice did not develop anti-squarate responses. Intestinal lamina proprial IgA responses targeting OSP occurred following intradermal vaccination. In general, we found comparable immune responses in mice immunized with these variations, although memory B cell and vibriocidal responses were blunted in mice receiving the highest dose of vaccine (50 μg). We found no appreciable change in immune responses when the conjugate vaccine was administered in the presence or absence of immunoadjuvant alum. Administration of OSP:rTTHc resulted in 55% protective efficacy in a mouse survival cholera challenge model. We report development of an Inaba OSP:rTTHc conjugate vaccine that induces memory responses and protection against cholera in mice. Development of an effective cholera conjugate vaccine that induces high level and long-term immune responses against OSP would be beneficial, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens.

  6. A Cholera Conjugate Vaccine Containing O-specific Polysaccharide (OSP of V. cholerae O1 Inaba and Recombinant Fragment of Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain (OSP:rTTHc Induces Serum, Memory and Lamina Proprial Responses against OSP and Is Protective in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Sayeed

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is the cause of cholera, a severe watery diarrhea. Protection against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity is defined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS.Here we describe a conjugate vaccine for cholera prepared via squaric acid chemistry from the OSP of V. cholerae O1 Inaba strain PIC018 and a recombinant heavy chain fragment of tetanus toxin (OSP:rTTHc. We assessed a range of vaccine doses based on the OSP content of the vaccine (10-50 μg, vaccine compositions varying by molar loading ratio of OSP to rTTHc (3:1, 5:1, 10:1, effect of an adjuvant, and route of immunization.Immunized mice developed prominent anti-OSP and anti-TT serum IgG responses, as well as vibriocidal antibody and memory B cell responses following intramuscular or intradermal vaccination. Mice did not develop anti-squarate responses. Intestinal lamina proprial IgA responses targeting OSP occurred following intradermal vaccination. In general, we found comparable immune responses in mice immunized with these variations, although memory B cell and vibriocidal responses were blunted in mice receiving the highest dose of vaccine (50 μg. We found no appreciable change in immune responses when the conjugate vaccine was administered in the presence or absence of immunoadjuvant alum. Administration of OSP:rTTHc resulted in 55% protective efficacy in a mouse survival cholera challenge model.We report development of an Inaba OSP:rTTHc conjugate vaccine that induces memory responses and protection against cholera in mice. Development of an effective cholera conjugate vaccine that induces high level and long-term immune responses against OSP would be beneficial, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens.

  7. Branched-chain fatty acid composition of human milk and the impact of maternal diet: the Global Exploration of Human Milk (GEHM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingess, Kelly A; Valentine, Christina J; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Davidson, Barbara S; Woo, Jessica G; Summer, Suzanne; Peng, Yongmei M; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Ran-Ressler, Rinat R; McMahon, Robert J; Brenna, J Thomas; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2017-01-01

    An understudied component of the diet, branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are distinctive saturated fatty acids that may have an important influence on health. Human-milk fatty acid composition is known to differ worldwide, but comparative data are lacking on BCFAs. We tested the hypotheses that concentrations of BCFAs in human milk differ between populations and are associated with maternal diet. We surveyed the BCFA composition of samples collected as part of a standardized, prospective study of human-milk composition. Mothers were enrolled from 3 urban populations with differing diets: Cincinnati, Ohio; Shanghai, China; and Mexico City, Mexico. Enrollment was limited to healthy mothers of term singleton infants. We undertook a cross-sectional analysis of milk from all women with samples at postpartum week 4 (n = 359; ∼120 women/site). Fatty acids were extracted from milk by using a modified Bligh-Dyer technique and analyzed by gas chromatography. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA and Tobit regression. For Cincinnati mothers, 24-h diet recalls were analyzed in relation to the individual BCFA concentrations measured in milk samples. Total BCFAs in milk differed by site, with the highest concentration in Cincinnati followed by Mexico City and Shanghai (mean ± SE: 7.90 ± 0.41, 6.10 ± 0.36, and 4.27 ± 0.25 mg/100 mL, respectively; P Milk concentrations of iso-14:0 and anteiso-15:0 were associated with maternal intake of dairy; iso-16:0 was associated with maternal intakes of dairy and beef. BCFA concentrations in milk at 4 wk postpartum differed between mothers from Cincinnati, Shanghai, and Mexico City. Variations in human-milk BCFAs are influenced by diet. The impact of BCFAs on infant health warrants investigation. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Processed and prepared corn products as sources of lutein and zeaxanthin: compositional variation in the food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Giovanna P R; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2007-01-01

    Widely consumed by populations of all socioeconomic classes worldwide, corn is one of the few food sources of lutein and zeaxanthin. However, data on these carotenoids in processed corn and corn as eaten are lacking. Thus, the major carotenoids in the principal brands of processed corn (canned corn, corn meal, corn flour, corn flake) and in typical corn dishes (farofa, boiled corn, pamonha, curau, fried and boiled polenta) were determined. There was marked variation between processed products and between brands of the same product, but variation between lots of the same brand was small. Canned corn had the highest zeaxanthin (11.91 to 18.06 microg/g), beta-cryptoxanthin (2.32 to 3.77 microg/g), and beta-carotene (1.79 to 2.75 microg/g) contents. The corn flake breakfast cereal had the second highest amount of zeaxanthin (9.08 to 12.77 microg/g). Corn meal had the highest lutein (4.02 to 7.62 microg/g) level and also had good zeaxanthin content (6.13 to 11.39 microg/g), but drastic reduction of all carotenoids, especially zeaxanthin, occurred when it was toasted to farofa. Boiled corn also had lower carotenoid levels compared to the raw corn. The wide variations in carotenoid concentrations appeared to be due mainly to varietal differences in the carotenoid composition of raw materials and to losses during processing and preparation for consumption.

  9. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0 was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21 and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42. Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100. Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01. Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01. Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05, intermuscular fat width (p<0.01 and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01 showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers.

  10. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all...

  11. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  12. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  13. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  14. Postnatal development of fiber type composition in rabbit jaw and leg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, J.A.; Helmers, R.; de Gouyon Matignon, M.; van Wessel, T.; Langenbach, G.E.; van Eijden, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the difference in fiber type composition and cross-sectional areas during postnatal development in male rabbit jaw muscles and compared these with changes in leg muscles. The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content of the fibers was determined by immunohistochemistry. No fiber type difference

  15. Tracing the signatures of heavy ions in the plasma environment of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Ion Composition Analyzer (ICA) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, G.; Yamauchi, M.; Wieser, M.; Nilsson, H.; Behar, E.; Stenberg Wieser, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Ion Composition Analyzer (ICA) on board ROSETTA is a part of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC). It is designed to measure the 3-D velocity distribution function of the plasma ions in the environment of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Besides the solar wind plasma ions, ICA detected the heavy ions of cometary origin at both low energy (ICA distinguished ions of water origin but in principle it should be able to detect CO2+. However, we have not yet succeeded to separate CO2+ ions from O+ or H2O+ ion, mainly due to non-uniform sensitivity and noise level at different mass-channels//azimuthal-sectors, and high cross talk. In May 2016, when ROSETTA was relatively close to the comet (between 6 and 20 km), we observe a second plasma ion population in a higher energy per charge range ( 60-200 eV/q) than the water group ions at 30- 50eV/q. To examine whether this secondary population is still the water group or other ions, such as CO2+, we cleaned the raw data by correcting the non-uniform sensitivity assuming that the noise level should be uniform over different channels. After such a simple cleaning we already found that the mass peak at low energy and that for higher-energy are occasionally similar but in some cases are quite different. Furthermore, we investigate few cases where the low-energy mass peak seems to consist of different Gaussian slopes, indicating that this peak could be composed of two mass peaks. In this presentation we show our techniques we follow to process the data, and we show how we identify the secondary ion component from the May 2016 data.

  16. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: Transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaduzzaman, Md. [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kinoshita, Shigeharu, E-mail: akino@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Watabe, Shugo [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); School of Marine Biosciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYH{sub M86-2}, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614 bp 5′-flanking sequences of MYH{sub M86-2} contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. - Highlights: ► MYH{sub M86-2} is highly expressed in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae. ► MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity depends on the hedgehog signaling. ► Sox6 binding elements inhibits MYH{sub M86-2} expression in fast muscle fibers. ► Sox6 elements function as transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity. ► NFAT and MEF2 binding elements play a key role for directing MYH{sub M86-2} expression.

  17. Effects of host gut-derived probiotic bacteria on gut morphology, microbiota composition and volatile short chain fatty acids production of Malaysian Mahseer Tor tambroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asaduzzaman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Three host-associated probiotics (Bacillus sp. AHG22, Alcaligenes sp. AFG22, and Shewanella sp. AFG21 were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of Tor tambroides, and their effects were evaluated on gut morphology, microbiota composition and volatile short chain fatty acids (VSCFAs production of the same species. A control diet (40% crude protein and 10% lipid was formulated, and three different probiotic supplemented diets were prepared by immersing the control diet in each host-derived isolated probiotic, suspended in sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS, to achieve concentration at 1.0 × 108 CFU g−1 feed. Triplicate groups of T. tambroides juveniles (1.39 ± 0.06 g were stocked in twelve glass aquaria (100 L capacity with stocking density of 20 individuals per aquarium. The feed was applied twice daily at 3.0% of the body weight per day for 90 days. The intake of probiotics drastically modified the gut microbiota composition. The average number of OTUs, Shannon index and Margalef species richness were significantly higher in host-associated probiotic treatments compared to the control. A significant increase of lipolytic, proteolytic and cellulolytic bacterial number were observed in the gastrointestinal tracts of T. tambroides fed the diets supplemented with Alcaligenes sp. AFG22 compared to the control. Villus length, villus width and villus area were significantly higher in T. tambroides juveniles fed the diet supplemented with Alcaligenes sp. AFG22. Acetate and butyrate were detected as main VSCFA production in the gastrointestinal tract of T. tambroides. Acetate and total VSCFAs production in Alcaligenes sp. AFG22 supplemented treatment was significantly higher than control. These results indicate that host-derived probiotics, especially Alcaligenes sp. has a significant potential as an important probiotic to enhance the nutrients utilization and metabolism through increasing gut surface area and VSCFAs

  18. Tailoring seed oil composition in the real world: optimising omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation in transgenic Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Sarah; Han, Lihua; Haslam, Richard P; Michaelson, Louise V; Sturtevant, Drew; Aziz, Mina; Chapman, Kent D; Sayanova, Olga; Napier, Johnathan A

    2017-07-26

    There is considerable interest in the de novo production of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), not least of all given the importance of these fatty acids in both aquaculture and human nutrition. Previously we have demonstrated the feasibility of using metabolic engineering in transgenic plants (Camelina sativa) to modify the seed oil composition to now include EPA and/or DHA. In this study, we further tailored the seed oil profile to reduce the omega-6 content, and evaluated the performance of such GM plants under field conditions (i.e. environmental releases), in terms of agronomic performance and also the lipidomic profile of seed oil. We used MALDI- mass spectrometry imaging to identify discrete tissue-types in the seed in which these non-native fatty acids preferentially accumulated. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the complexity of plant lipid metabolism and the challenges associated with predictive manipulation of these pathways. However, this study identified the likely dispensable nature of a Δ12-desturase activity in our omega-3 metabolic engineering rationales for Camelina.

  19. Bacterial membrane activity of a-peptide/b-peptoid chimeras: Influence of amino acid composition and chain length on the activity against different bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M; Franzyk, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells and subseq...... of the bacterial cell envelope, and the outer membrane may act as a barrier in Gram-negative bacteria. The tolerance of S. marcescens to chimeras may be due to differences in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide layer also responsible for its resistance to polymyxin B.......BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells...... and subsequent killing is usually not tested. In this report, six α-peptide/β-peptoid chimeras were examined for the effect of amino acid/peptoid substitutions and chain length on the membrane perturbation and subsequent killing of food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. RESULTS: All six AMP analogues...

  20. The effect of selected synbiotics on microbial composition and short-chain fatty acid production in a model system of the human colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella C van Zanten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics can be used to modulate both the composition and activity of the gut microbiota and thereby potentially affecting host health beneficially. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eight synbiotic combinations on the composition and activity of human fecal microbiota using a four-stage semicontinuous model system of the human colon. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Carbohydrates were selected by their ability to enhance growth of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 (Bl-04 under laboratory conditions. The most effective carbohydrates for each probiotic were further investigated, using the colonic model, for the ability to support growth of the probiotic bacteria, influence the composition of the microbiota and stimulate formation of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA.The following combinations were studied: NCFM with isomaltulose, cellobiose, raffinose and an oat β-glucan hydrolysate (OBGH and Bl-04 with melibiose, xylobiose, raffinose and maltotriose. All carbohydrates showed capable of increasing levels of NCFM and Bl-04 during fermentations in the colonic model by 10(3-10(4 fold and 10-10(2 fold, respectively. Also the synbiotic combinations decreased the modified ratio of Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes (calculated using qPCR results for Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas group, Clostridium perfringens cluster I, Clostridium coccoides - Eubacterium rectale group and Clostridial cluster XIV as well as significantly increasing SCFA levels, especially acetic and butyric acid, by three to eight fold, as compared to the controls. The decreases in the modified ratio of Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes were found to be correlated to increases in acetic and butyric acid (p=0.04 and p=0.03, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show that all synbiotic combinations investigated are able to shift the predominant bacteria and the

  1. Property Enhancement Effects of Side-Chain-Type Naphthalene-Based Sulfonated Poly(arylene ether ketone) on Nafion Composite Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baolong; Hong, Lihua; Li, Yunfeng; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Chengji; Na, Hui

    2017-09-20

    Nafion/SNPAEK-x composite membranes were prepared by blending raw Nafion and synthesized side-chain-type naphthalene-based sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) with a sulfonation degree of 1.35 (SNPAEK-1.35). The incorporation of SNPAEK-1.35 polymer with ion exchange capacity (IEC) of 2.01 mequiv·g -1 into a Nafion matrix has the property enhancement effects, such as increasing IECs, improving proton conductivity, enhancing mechanical properties, reducing methanol crossover, and improving single cell performance of Nafion. Morphology studies show that Nafion/SNPAEK-x composite membranes exhibit a well-defined microphase separation structure depending on the contents of SNPAEK-1.35 polymer. Among them, Nafion/SNPAEK-7.5% with a bicontinuous morphology exhibits the best comprehensive properties. For example, it shows the highest proton conductivities of 0.092 S cm -1 at 25 °C and 0.163 S cm -1 at 80 °C, which are higher than those of recast Nafion with 0.073 S cm -1 at 25 °C and 0.133 S cm -1 at 80 °C, respectively. Nafion/SNPAEK-5.0% and Nafion/SNPAEK-7.5% membranes display an open circuit voltage of 0.77 V and a maximum power density of 47 mW cm -2 at 80 °C, which are much higher than those of recast Nafion of 0.63 V and 24 mW cm -2 under the same conditions. Nafion/SNPAEK-5.0% membrane also has comparable tensile strength (12.7 MPa) to recast Nafion (13.7 MPa), and higher Young's modulus (330 MPa) than that of recast Nafion (240 MPa). By combining their high proton conductivities, comparable mechanical properties, and good single cell performance, Nafion/SNPAEK-x composite membranes have the potential to be polymer electrolyte materials for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  2. Dependence of the heavy-metal uptake of higher fungi on substrate composition and site factors. Abhaengigkeit der Schwermetallaufnahme hoeherer Pilze von der Substratzusammensetzung und von Standortsfaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietl, G.

    1987-01-01

    The first part of the work investigates the effect of Cd (in the form of the nitrate) on self-cultured champignons (Agaricus bisporus) as regards mycelium growth and fruit development as well as influences on the toxic effect from various substrate additives. The experiments show A. bisporus to be a suitable species for producing standard materials for different heavy-metal concentrations and combinations. In the second part, the heavy-metal content in four different species, Mycena pura s.str., M. rosea, M. pelianthina and M. diosma from different sites (needle and leaf-wood) is established. According to the conclusion drawn, these mushrooms, because of their heavy-metal-accumulating properties, are definitely suited as biological indicators of heavy metal in soil. (MG) With 14 figs., 37 tabs.

  3. COMPOSITE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An effective medium theory of ferroelectric ceramic-polymer composite materials which treats both components symmetrically has been investigated to demonstrate the role played by the microgeometry of inclusions on dielectric, mechanical and piezoelectric properties of 0-3 composites. The limits of the various theoretical ...

  4. Heavy metal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    niloticus after exposure to sublethal concentrations of heavy metals such as copper, lead and zinc for a 12-week period, using static renewable toxicity tests. The concentrations of the metals accumulated in the tissue of exposed fish were about 3-5 times higher than the concentrations detected in control fish.

  5. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding) Overview Menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding. Although heavy menstrual bleeding is a common concern, ...

  6. Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Considers how photography is more than just pointing a camera in the right direction. Explains that good pictures use elements of composition such as the Rule of Thirds, leading lines, framing and repetition of shapes. Presents 16 photographs from college and secondary school publications, and describes the techniques that makes them effective.…

  7. Markov chains

    CERN Document Server

    Revuz, D

    1984-01-01

    This is the revised and augmented edition of a now classic book which is an introduction to sub-Markovian kernels on general measurable spaces and their associated homogeneous Markov chains. The first part, an expository text on the foundations of the subject, is intended for post-graduate students. A study of potential theory, the basic classification of chains according to their asymptotic behaviour and the celebrated Chacon-Ornstein theorem are examined in detail. The second part of the book is at a more advanced level and includes a treatment of random walks on general locally compact abelian groups. Further chapters develop renewal theory, an introduction to Martin boundary and the study of chains recurrent in the Harris sense. Finally, the last chapter deals with the construction of chains starting from a kernel satisfying some kind of maximum principle.

  8. Heavy metals and Pb isotopic composition of aerosols in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong and Guangzhou, South China—Evidence of the long-range transport of air contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Celine S. L.; Li, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Ding, Ai-Jun; Wang, Tao

    Rapid urbanization and industrialization in South China has placed great strain on the environment and on human health. In the present study, the total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in the urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong and Guangzhou, the two largest urban centres in South China, was sampled from December 2003 to January 2005. The samples were analysed for the concentrations of major elements (Al, Fe, Mg and Mn) and trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, V and Zn), and for Pb isotopic composition. Elevated concentrations of metals, especially Cd, Pb, V and Zn, were observed in the urban and suburban areas of Guangzhou, showing significant atmospheric trace element pollution. Distinct seasonal patterns were observed in the heavy metal concentrations of aerosols in Hong Kong, with higher metal concentrations during the winter monsoon period, and lower concentrations during summertime. The seasonal variations in the metal concentrations of the aerosols in Guangzhou were less distinct, suggesting the dominance of local sources of pollution around the city. The Pb isotopic composition in the aerosols of Hong Kong had higher 206Pb/ 207Pb and 208Pb/ 207Pb ratios in winter, showing the influence of Pb from the northern inland areas of China and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, and lower 206Pb/ 207Pb and 208Pb/ 207Pb ratios in summer, indicating the influence of Pb from the South Asian region and from marine sources. The back trajectory analysis showed that the enrichment of heavy metals in Hong Kong and Guangzhou was closely associated with the air mass from the north and northeast that originated from northern China, reflecting the long-range transport of heavy metal contaminants from the northern inland areas of China to the South China coast.

  9. Heavy mineral compositions and zircon U-Pb ages of Cenozoic sandstones in the SW Qaidam basin, northern Tibetan Plateau: Implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Wu, Chaodong; Wang, Jialin; Zhou, Tianqi; Li, Jijun; Zhang, Changhao; Li, Linlin

    2017-09-01

    The Qaidam basin is the largest intermountain basin within the Tibetan Plateau. The spatio-temporal evolution of the basin and the provenances of the deposits in the SW Qaidam basin were greatly influenced by the boundary ranges. Comprehensive research is needed to identify the relationships between the basin and the surrounding ranges. Therefore, 4682 heavy mineral data from 70 wells and 720 detrital zircon ages from 8 samples were used to investigate the provenances of the deposits in the SW Qaidam basin and to further constrain the tectonic evolution of the boundary ranges. The heavy mineral data, zircon U-Pb ages, and paleocurrent data indicate that the Qimen Tagh Range and the Altyn Tagh Range were two provenances of the sediments deposited in the SW Qaidam basin during the Cenozoic. The variations of heavy mineral assemblages and ZTR index (100 ∗ (zircon + tourmaline + rutile)/total transparent heavy minerals) on the northern flank of the Qimen Tagh Range suggest that the Qimen Tagh Range experienced rapid uplift in the Early to Middle Miocene. Furthermore, according to the greatly increased quantities of epidote and hornblende sourced from the Altyn Tagh Range and the obvious decrease in the ZTR index values, the Altyn Tagh Range underwent fast uplift in the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene. In addition, based on the ages of the granitic plutons in the Altyn Tagh Range and the zircon ages in the Ganchaigou and Qigequan sections, the strike-slip movement of the Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) initiated during or no later than the Middle Eocene, resulting in the ATF offsets of ca. 200 km between the Middle Eocene and the Miocene and of ca. 345 km between the Middle Eocene and the present.

  10. Carbohydrate composition of immunoglobulins from diverse species of verterbrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, R.T.; Niedermeier, W.; Weinheimer, P.F.; Clem, L.W.; Leslie, G.A.; Bennett, J.C.

    1972-08-01

    Immunoglobulins and their respective heavy (H) and light (L) polypeptide chains from species representing the major classes of vertebrates were analyzed for their carbohydrate composition by gas chromatography of the alditol acetate derivatives of the monosaccharides released by acid hydrolysis. Mannose, galactose, glucosamine and sialic acid were present in the immunoglobulins from all the species investigated. Most of the carbohydrate was found associated with the H chains. Whereas species representative of the mammals and birds had mannose to galactose ratios greater than one, the ratio to these sugars to each other in the immunoglobulins from animals below the birds was on the order of one.

  11. Advances in single chain technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Marina; Latorre-Sanchez, Alejandro; Pomposo, José A

    2015-10-07

    The recent ability to manipulate and visualize single atoms at atomic level has given rise to modern bottom-up nanotechnology. Similar exquisite degree of control at the individual polymeric chain level for producing functional soft nanoentities is expected to become a reality in the next few years through the full development of so-called "single chain technology". Ultra-small unimolecular soft nano-objects endowed with useful, autonomous and smart functions are the expected, long-term valuable output of single chain technology. This review covers the recent advances in single chain technology for the construction of soft nano-objects via chain compaction, with an emphasis in dynamic, letter-shaped and compositionally unsymmetrical single rings, complex multi-ring systems, single chain nanoparticles, tadpoles, dumbbells and hairpins, as well as the potential end-use applications of individual soft nano-objects endowed with useful functions in catalysis, sensing, drug delivery and other uses.

  12. Musical Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenkov, Dima; Dawin, Jean René

    A system for using dice to compose music randomly is known as the musical dice game. The discrete time MIDI models of 804 pieces of classical music written by 29 composers have been encoded into the transition matrices and studied by Markov chains. Contrary to human languages, entropy dominates over redundancy, in the musical dice games based on the compositions of classical music. The maximum complexity is achieved on the blocks consisting of just a few notes (8 notes, for the musical dice games generated over Bach's compositions). First passage times to notes can be used to resolve tonality and feature a composer.

  13. Heavy Resistance Training and Peri-Exercise Ingestion of a Multi-Ingredient Ergogenic Nutritional Supplement in Males: Effects on Body Composition, Muscle Performance and Markers of Muscle Protein Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spillane, Neil Schwarz, Darryn S. Willoughby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and peri-exercise ergogenic multi-ingredient nutritional supplement ingestion on blood and skeletal markers of muscle protein synthesis (MPS, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty-four college-age males were randomly assigned to either a multi-ingredient SizeOn Maximum Performance (SIZE or protein/carbohydrate/creatine (PCC comparator supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05. Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were not differentially affected (p > 0.05. However, fat-free mass was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p = 0.037. Lower-body muscle strength (p = 0.029 and endurance (p = 0.027 were significantly increased with resistance training, but not supplementation (p > 0.05. Serum insulin, IGF-1, GH, and cortisol were not differentially affected (p > 0.05. Muscle creatine content was significantly increased in both groups from supplementation (p = 0.044. Total muscle protein (p = 0.038, MHC 1 (p = 0.041, MHC 2A, (p = 0.029, total IRS- (p = 0.041, and total Akt (p = 0.011 were increased from resistance training, but not supplementation. In response to heavy resistance training when compared to PCC, the peri-exercise ingestion of SIZE did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS.

  14. Species variation of Aegilops genus and heavy metal content in plant habitat soil at southern Adriatic localities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aegilops genus is a wild relative to the bread wheat, having chromosomes homologous to wheat chromosomes. That genus could be the source of many usefull abiotic stress tolerance genes. Facing a global climate changes, as well as, environmental erosion, it is important to create a desirable genetic variability that could correspond to environmental challenges. Heavy metals in soil could cause soil pollution, could lead to different phenotypic changes in plants, and could enter food chain. Assessment of Aegilops sp. population variation, as well as, heavy metal content in their habitat was the main goal in this research. Aegilops population composition was examined and samples were taken from 55 localities of South Adriatic coastal and littoral areas. Topsoil samples from all the localities were taken and heavy metal content, namely Cr, Pb, Zn, Ni, Cd and Cu, was analyzed,. Manganese content was measured, as well. Value of pH was established.

  15. Comparison of Heavy- and Light-Weight Composite Mesh in Pain Reduction Among Patients with Inguinal Hernia: A 1-Year Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogate AS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inguinal hernia is commonly addressed complication among men and women. Surgical mesh repair is widely used as a treatment. Postoperative chronic pain is a major complication and concern, as it restricts the patient’s regular activities. Objective: To compare the heavy-weight polypropylene and the light-weight prolene mesh for the reduction of postoperative pain in patients undergoing Lichtenstein mesh repair of inguinal hernia. Methodology: This 1-year randomized study included 60 patients with inguinal hernia. They were divided into two equal groups (n=30- light-weight prolene (SP-study group and heavy-weight polypropylene mesh (RP-control group. Lichtenstein mesh repair surgery was performed on the patients according to the groups assigned. Postoperative pain was assessed based on visual analog score ranging from 0 to 10. Patients were followed up postoperative for the first, second, and third week. Microsoft Excel was used to enter the data and categorical data were expressed as rates, ratios and percentages. Data were compared using Fishers exact test and chi-square test. Results: During the first follow-up, all the patients in group SP reported moderate pain; however, 60% of patients in group RP reported pain (p<0.001. During second follow-up, majority of the patients (90% in group SP reported mild pain compared to 26.67% patients in group RP (p<0.001. At the third follow-up, all the patients (100% in group SP reported mild pain compared to 53.33% patients in group RP (p<0.001. Conclusion: The prolene light mesh significantly reduced the postoperative pain in patients undergoing Lichtenstein mesh repair for inguinal hernia as compared to heavy-weight mesh.

  16. A high protein diet (3.4 g/kg/d) combined with a heavy resistance training program improves body composition in healthy trained men and women--a follow-up investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Jose; Ellerbroek, Anya; Silver, Tobin; Orris, Steve; Scheiner, Max; Gonzalez, Adriana; Peacock, Corey A

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of a high protein diet (>4 g/kg/d) in trained men and women who did not alter their exercise program has been previously shown to have no significant effect on body composition. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine if a high protein diet in conjunction with a periodized heavy resistance training program would affect indices of body composition, performance and health. Forty-eight healthy resistance-trained men and women completed this study (mean ± SD; Normal Protein group [NP n = 17, four female and 13 male]: 24.8 ± 6.9 yr; 174.0 ± 9.5 cm height; 74.7 ± 9.6 kg body weight; 2.4 ± 1.7 yr of training; High Protein group [HP n = 31, seven female and 24 male]: 22.9 ± 3.1 yr; 172.3 ± 7.7 cm; 74.3 ± 12.4 kg; 4.9 ± 4.1 yr of training). Moreover, all subjects participated in a split-routine, periodized heavy resistance-training program. Training and daily diet logs were kept by each subject. Subjects in the NP and HP groups were instructed to consume their baseline (~2 g/kg/d) and >3 g/kg/d of dietary protein, respectively. Subjects in the NP and HP groups consumed 2.3 and 3.4 g/kg/day of dietary protein during the treatment period. The NP group consumed significantly (p diet (3.4 g/kg/d) in conjunction with a heavy resistance-training program may confer benefits with regards to body composition. Furthermore, there is no evidence that consuming a high protein diet has any deleterious effects.

  17. Poisoning of domestic animals with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velev Romel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term heavy metal refers to a metal that has a relatively high density and is toxic for animal and human organism at low concentrations. Heavy metals are natural components of the Earth's crust. They cannot be degraded or destroyed. To a small extent they enter animal organism via food, drinking water and air. Some heavy metals (e.g cooper, iron, chromium, zinc are essential in very low concentrations for the survival of all forms of life. These are described as essential trace elements. However, when they are present in greater quantities, like the heavy metals lead, cadmium and mercury which are already toxic in very low concentrations, they can cause metabolic anomalies or poisoning. Heavy metal poisoning of domestic animals could result, for instance, from drinking-water contamination, high ambient air concentrations near emission sources, or intake via the food chain. Heavy metals are dangerous because they tend to bioaccumulate in a biological organism over time. Manifestation of toxicity of individual heavy metals varies considerably, depending on dose and time of exposure, species, gender and environmental and nutritional factors. Large differences exist between the effects of a single exposure to a high concentration, and chronic exposures to lower doses. The aim of this work is to present the source of poisoning and toxicity of some heavy metals (lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, arsenic, as well as new data about effects of those heavy metals on the health of domestic animals. .

  18. Liver-specific loss of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase-1 decreases triacylglycerol synthesis and beta-oxidation and alters phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei O; Ellis, Jessica M; Paich, Heather A; Wang, Shuli; Gong, Nan; Altshuller, George; Thresher, Randy J; Koves, Timothy R; Watkins, Steven M; Muoio, Deborah M; Cline, Gary W; Shulman, Gerald I; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2009-10-09

    In mammals, a family of five acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), each the product of a separate gene, activates long chain fatty acids to form acyl-CoAs. Because the ACSL isoforms have overlapping preferences for fatty acid chain length and saturation and are expressed in many of the same tissues, the individual function of each isoform has remained uncertain. Thus, we constructed a mouse model with a liver-specific knock-out of ACSL1, a major ACSL isoform in liver. Eliminating ACSL1 in liver resulted in a 50% decrease in total hepatic ACSL activity and a 25-35% decrease in long chain acyl-CoA content. Although the content of triacylglycerol was unchanged in Acsl1(L)(-/-) liver after mice were fed either low or high fat diets, in isolated primary hepatocytes the absence of ACSL1 diminished the incorporation of [(14)C]oleate into triacylglycerol. Further, small but consistent increases were observed in the percentage of 16:0 in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and of 18:1 in phosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphatidylcholine, whereas concomitant decreases were seen in 18:0 in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and lysophosphatidylcholine. In addition, decreases in long chain acylcarnitine content and diminished production of acid-soluble metabolites from [(14)C]oleate suggested that hepatic ACSL1 is important for mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. Because the Acsl1(L)(-/-) mice were not protected from developing either high fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis or insulin resistance, our study suggests that lowering the content of hepatic acyl-CoA without a concomitant decrease in triacylglycerol and other lipid intermediates is insufficient to protect against hepatic insulin resistance.

  19. Liver-specific Loss of Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase-1 Decreases Triacylglycerol Synthesis and β-Oxidation and Alters Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei O.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Paich, Heather A.; Wang, Shuli; Gong, Nan; Altshuller, George; Thresher, Randy J.; Koves, Timothy R.; Watkins, Steven M.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, a family of five acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), each the product of a separate gene, activates long chain fatty acids to form acyl-CoAs. Because the ACSL isoforms have overlapping preferences for fatty acid chain length and saturation and are expressed in many of the same tissues, the individual function of each isoform has remained uncertain. Thus, we constructed a mouse model with a liver-specific knock-out of ACSL1, a major ACSL isoform in liver. Eliminating ACSL1 in liver resulted in a 50% decrease in total hepatic ACSL activity and a 25–35% decrease in long chain acyl-CoA content. Although the content of triacylglycerol was unchanged in Acsl1L−/− liver after mice were fed either low or high fat diets, in isolated primary hepatocytes the absence of ACSL1 diminished the incorporation of [14C]oleate into triacylglycerol. Further, small but consistent increases were observed in the percentage of 16:0 in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and of 18:1 in phosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphatidylcholine, whereas concomitant decreases were seen in 18:0 in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and lysophosphatidylcholine. In addition, decreases in long chain acylcarnitine content and diminished production of acid-soluble metabolites from [14C]oleate suggested that hepatic ACSL1 is important for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. Because the Acsl1L−/− mice were not protected from developing either high fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis or insulin resistance, our study suggests that lowering the content of hepatic acyl-CoA without a concomitant decrease in triacylglycerol and other lipid intermediates is insufficient to protect against hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:19648649

  20. Effects of a medium chain triglyceride oil mixture and alpha-lipoic acid diet on body composition, antioxidant status, and plasma lipid levels in the Golden Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, Stephanie D; Wang, Yanwen; Kubow, Stan; Jones, Peter J H

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (ALP) versus a medium chain triglyceride oil mixture (MCTo), which was designed to increase energy expenditure and to improve lipid profiles containing medium chain triglycerides, phytosterols, and omega-3 fatty acids in the form of flaxseed oil. A total of 48 hamsters were fed a) hypercholesterolemic (HC) control, b) HC MCTo, c) HC ALP, or d) HC MCTo/ALP diet for 4 weeks. No differences were observed on food intake, body weight, total body water, lean and fat mass, and tissue thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). ALP alone had no effect on total cholesterol (TC); however, MCTo feeding increased TC with (P Hamsters fed ALP had a lower (P hamster.

  1. In vitro amylolysis of pulse and hylon VII starches explained in terms of their composition, morphology, granule architecture and interaction between hydrolysed starch chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaran, S; Hoover, R; Vamadevan, V; Waduge, R N; Liu, Q

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the factors underlying the susceptibility of pulse (lablab bean, navy bean, rice bean, tepary bean, velvet bean, and wrinkled pea) and hylon VII starches towards in vitro hydrolysis by the combined action of pancreatin and amyloglucosidase. The time taken to reach an equivalent level of hydrolysis (50%) varied significantly among the starches. Changes to molecular order, crystallinity, double helical content, radial orientation of starch chains (polarized light), enthalpy and apparent amylose content during the progress of hydrolysis showed that rate and extent of hydrolysis were influenced both by the structure of the native starches at different levels (molecular, mesoscopic, microscopic) of granule organization, and by the extent of retrogradation between hydrolysed starch chains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  3. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O' Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  4. Assessment of very long-chain fatty acids as complementary or alternative natural fecal markers to n-alkanes for estimating diet composition of goats feeding on mixed diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L M M; Carvalho, S; Falco, V; Celaya, R; García, U; Santos, A S; Rodrigues, M A M; Osoro, K

    2009-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the use of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) as an alternative or a complement to n-alkane markers for estimation of diet composition of goats fed 7 different diets, composed of different proportions of herbaceous (Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) and heathland woody species (Erica umbellata, Erica cinerea, Calluna vulgaris, Erica arborea, and Ulex gallii), in a metabolism study. Diet composition was estimated from VLCFA (i.e., C(22) to C(34)) and alkane (i.e., C(25) to C(33)) concentrations in diet and feces, by least squares procedures. For all plant species VLCFA concentrations were greater than their alkane concentrations, especially for the herbaceous species and U. gallii. In general, fecal recovery of both markers was incomplete and increased in a curvilinear (P power among plant species. Use of uncorrected fecal marker concentrations provided the poorest estimates of diet composition, and use of individual recovery data and mean fecal recovery data of the dietary treatment yielded the most accurate ones. Results obtained in this study show that VLCFA have potential to be used as diet composition markers along with alkanes.

  5. Heavy metals in the environment; uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of spatial predictions of heavy metals in wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Jansen, M.J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals seriously threaten the health of human beings when they enter the food chain. Therefore, policymakers require precise predictions of heavy metal concentrations in agricultural crops. In this paper we quantify the uncertainty of regression predictions of Cd and Pb in wheat (Triticum

  6. Dystrophin deficiency in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMDJ) alters myosin heavy chain expression profiles in the diaphragm more markedly than in the tibialis cranialis muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Hijikata Takao; Nakamura Akinori; Yuasa Katsutoshi; Takeda Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous collections of muscle fiber types, the arrangement of which contributes to a variety of functional capabilities in many muscle types. Furthermore, skeletal muscles can adapt individual myofibers under various circumstances, such as disease and exercise, by changing fiber types. This study was performed to examine the influence of dystrophin deficiency on fiber type composition of skeletal muscles in canine X-linked muscular dy...

  7. Elemental composition study of heavy metal (Ni, Cu, Zn) in riverbank soil by electrokinetic-assisted phytoremediation using XRF and SEM/EDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamari, Suhailly [Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) (Malaysia); Embong, Zaidi [Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) and Research Center for Soft Soils (RECESS), Office of Research, Innovation, Commercialization and Consultancy Management - ORRIC, Universiti Tun Hussein (Malaysia); Bakar, Ismail [Research Center for Soft Soils (RECESS), Office of Research, Innovation, Commercialization and Consultancy Management (ORRIC), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia -UTHM, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Electrokinetic (EK)-assisted phytoremediation is one of the methods that have a big potential in enhancing the ability of plant uptake in soils remediation process. This research was conducted to investigate the difference in elemental composition concentration of riverbank soil and the change of pH between pre- and post-phytoremediation under the following condition: 1) control or as-receive sample; 2) Dieffenbachia spp plant with EK system (a pair of EK electrodes connected to a direct current (DC) power supply). After the electrodes were connected to a magnitude of 6V/cm{sup −1} electric field for 4 hours/day, the soil and plant samples were analyzed using and X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRF) and Scanning Electron Microscope / Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). The SEM/EDX analysis showed that concentration of elemental composition (Ni, Cu and Zn) in post-phytoremediation plant powder samples had increase while elemental concentrations in the post-phytoremediation soil samples were decreased. XRF analysis presented a variation in soil elemental composition concentration from anode to cathode where the concentration near anode region increased while decreased near the cathode region. A significant changes in soil pH were obtained where the soil pH increase in cathode region while decrease in anode region. The results reveal that the assistance of EK in phytoremediation process has increase the efficiency of plant uptake.

  8. Study the chemical composition and biological outcomes resulting from the interaction of the hormone adrenaline with heavy elements: Infrared, Raman, electronic, 1H NMR, XRD and SEM studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Omar B.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal adrenaline complexes formed from the reaction of adrenaline with Al3+, Zn2+, Sn2+, Sb3+, Pb2+and Bi3+ ions in methanolic solvent at 60 °C. The final reaction products have been isolated and characterization using elemental analyses (% of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen), conductivity measurements, mid infrared, Raman laser, UV-Vis, 1H NMR spectra, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Upon the spectroscopic, conductivity and elemental analyses, the stoichiometric reactions indicated that the data obtained refer to 1:2 (M:L) for Zn2+, Sn2+, Pb2+and Bi3+ complexes [Zn(Adr)2(Cl)2], [Sn(Adr)2]Cl2, [Pb(Adr)2](NO3)2 and [Bi(Adr)2(Cl)2]Cl, while the molar ratio 1:3 (M:L) for Al3+ and Sb3+ with formulas [Al(Adr)3](NO3)3 and [Sb(Adr)3]Cl3. The infrared and Raman laser spectra interpreted the mode of interactions which associated through the two phenolic groups of catechol moiety. The adrenaline chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial and antifungal activities than the free adrenaline chelate.

  9. The effects of creatine ethyl ester supplementation combined with heavy resistance training on body composition, muscle performance, and serum and muscle creatine levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Mike

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous creatine formulations have been developed primarily to maximize creatine absorption. Creatine ethyl ester is alleged to increase creatine bio-availability. This study examined how a seven-week supplementation regimen combined with resistance training affected body composition, muscle mass, muscle strength and power, serum and muscle creatine levels, and serum creatinine levels in 30 non-resistance-trained males. In a double-blind manner, participants were randomly assigned to a maltodextrose placebo (PLA, creatine monohydrate (CRT, or creatine ethyl ester (CEE group. The supplements were orally ingested at a dose of 0.30 g/kg fat-free body mass (approximately 20 g/day for five days followed by ingestion at 0.075 g/kg fat free mass (approximately 5 g/day for 42 days. Results showed significantly higher serum creatine concentrations in PLA (p = 0.007 and CRT (p = 0.005 compared to CEE. Serum creatinine was greater in CEE compared to the PLA (p = 0.001 and CRT (p = 0.001 and increased at days 6, 27, and 48. Total muscle creatine content was significantly higher in CRT (p = 0.026 and CEE (p = 0.041 compared to PLA, with no differences between CRT and CEE. Significant changes over time were observed for body composition, body water, muscle strength and power variables, but no significant differences were observed between groups. In conclusion, when compared to creatine monohydrate, creatine ethyl ester was not as effective at increasing serum and muscle creatine levels or in improving body composition, muscle mass, strength, and power. Therefore, the improvements in these variables can most likely be attributed to the training protocol itself, rather than the supplementation regimen.

  10. Doubly Heavy Baryons, Heavy Quark-DiQuark Symmetry and NRQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Fleming; Thomas Mehen

    2005-09-27

    In the heavy quark limit, properties of heavy mesons and doubly heavy baryons are related by heavy quark-diquark symmetry. This problem is reanalyzed in the framework of Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD). We introduce a novel method for deriving Potential NRQCD (pNRQCD) Lagrangians for composite fields from vNRQCD, which contains quarks and antiquarks as explicit degrees of freedom and maintains manifest power counting in the velocity via a label formalism. A Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation is used to eliminate four quark interactions in vNRQCD and then quarks and antiquarks are integrated out to get effective Lagrangians for composite fields. This method is used to rederive Lagrangians for the Q\\bar Q and QQ sectors of pNRQCD and give a correct derivation of the O(1/m_Q) prediction for the hyperfine splitting of doubly heavy baryons.

  11. Determination of heavy metals in the ambient atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarapu, Lakshmi Narayana; Baek, Sung-Ok

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal determination in ambient air is an important task for environmental researchers because of their toxicity to human beings. Some heavy metals (hexavalent chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni)) have been listed as carcinogens. Furthermore, heavy metals in the atmosphere can accumulate in various plants and animals and enter humans through the food chain. This article reviews the determination of heavy metals in the atmosphere in different areas of the world since 2006. The results showed that most researchers concentrated on toxic metals, such as Cr, Cd, Ni, As and lead. A few studies used plant materials as bio-monitors for the atmospheric levels of heavy metals. Some researchers found higher concentrations of heavy metals surrounding industrial areas compared with residential and/or commercial areas. Most studies reported the major sources of the particulate matter and heavy metals in the atmosphere to be industrial emissions, vehicular emissions and secondary aerosols.

  12. Short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in air and soil of subtropical terrestrial environment in the pearl river delta, South China: distribution, composition, atmospheric deposition fluxes, and environmental fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Zhineng; Li, Qilu; Pan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruijie; Liu, Di; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Xiang; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Zhang, Gan

    2013-03-19

    Research on the environmental fate of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs) in highly industrialized subtropical areas is still scarce. Air, soil, and atmospheric deposition process in the Pearl River Delta of South China were investigated, and the average SCCP and MCCP concentrations were 5.2 μg/sampler (17.69 ng/m(3)) and 4.1 μg/sampler for passive air samples, 18.3 and 59.3 ng/g for soil samples, and 5.0 and 5.3 μg/(m(2)d) for deposition samples, respectively. Influenced by primary sources and the properties of chlorinated paraffins (CPs), a gradient trend of concentrations and a fractionation of composition from more to less industrialized areas were discovered. Intense seasonal variations with high levels in summer air and winter deposition samples indicated that the air and deposition CP levels were controlled mainly by the vapor and particle phase, respectively. Complex environmental processes like volatilization and fractionation resulted in different CP profiles in different environment matrixes and sampling locations, with C(10-11) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-7), C(10-12) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-8), and C(11-12) C(l6-8) and C(14) C(l7-8) dominating in air, soil, and atmospheric deposition, respectively. Shorter-chain and less chlorinated congeners were enriched in air in the less industrialized areas, while longer-chain and higher chlorinated congeners were concentrated in soil in the more industrialized areas. This is suggesting that the gaseous transport of CPs is the dominant mechanism responsible for the higher concentrations of lighter and likely more mobile CPs in the rural areas.

  13. Structural repertoire of immunoglobulin λ light chains

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    The immunoglobulin λ isotype is present in nearly all vertebrates and plays an important role in the human immune system. Despite its importance, few systematic studies have been performed to analyze the structural conformation of its variable regions, contrary to what is the case for κ and heavy chains. We show here that an analysis of the structures of λ chains allows the definition of a discrete set of recurring conformations (canonical structures) of their hypervariable loops and, most importantly, the identification of sequence constraints that can be used to predict their structure. We also show that the structural repertoire of λ chains is different and more varied than that of the κ chains, consistently with the current view of the involvement of the two major light-chain families in complementary strategies of the immune system to ensure a fine tuning between diversity and stability in antigen recognition. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Modulation of fatty acid composition and growth in Sporosarcina species in response to temperatures and exogenous branched-chain amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kentaro; Nagano, Hideaki; Ando, Akinori; Shima, Jun; Ogawa, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Psychrotolerant endospore-forming Sporosarcina species have been predominantly isolated from minced fish meat (surimi), which is stored under refrigeration after heat treatment. To develop a better method for preserving surimi-based food products, we studied the growth and fatty acid compositions of the isolated strain S92h as well as Sporosarcina koreensis and Sporosarcina aquimarina at cold and moderate temperatures. The growth rates of strain S92h and S. koreensis were the fastest and slowest at cold temperatures, respectively, although these strains grew at a similar rate at moderate temperatures. In all three strains, the proportions of anteiso-C 15:0 and unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) were significantly higher at cold temperatures than at moderate temperatures. Furthermore, supplementation with valine, leucine, and isoleucine resulted in proportional increases in iso-C 16:0 , iso-C 15:0 , and anteiso-C 15:0 , respectively, among the fatty acid compositions of these strains. The proportions of the UFAs were also altered by the supplementation. At cold temperatures, the growth rates of strain S92h and S. koreensis, but not of S. aquimarina, were affected by supplementation with leucine. Supplementation with isoleucine enhanced the growth of S. koreensis at cold temperatures but not that of the other strains. Valine did not affect the growth of any strain. These results indicate that anteiso-C 15:0 and UFAs both play important roles in the cold tolerance of the genus Sporosarcina and that these bacteria modulate their fatty acid compositions in response to the growth environment.

  15. Single chain Fab (scFab fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Mariam

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH and and the variable part of the light chain (VL by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Results Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd and the light chain (LC, resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab, can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabΔC connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1 and the constant part of the light chain (CL were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies as well as multimers were characterised. Conclusion A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of

  16. A heavy load for heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 25 September, the two large coils for the dipole magnet of ALICE, the LHC experiment dedicated to heavy ions, arrived at Point 2 on two heavy load trucks after a 1200 km journey from their assembly in Vannes, France.

  17. Influence of genetic type, live weight at slaughter and carcass fatness on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue of raw ham in the heavy pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiego, D P Lo; Santoro, P; Macchioni, P; De Leonibus, E

    2005-01-01

    The study aimed to assess some quality traits of the subcutaneous adipose tissue of raw ham for Parma production, obtained from 56 "traditional" Landrace×Large White (L×LW) and 56 Cotswold commercial hybrid (CH) pigs reared in the same conditions and slaughtered at an average live weight (l.w.) of about 165 kg. Further, the relationships between lipid composition, l.w. and carcass fatness were studied. Compared to the CH, the fatty tissue of L×LW pigs showed a lower water (6.33% vs. 7.35%, P<0.01) and a higher lipid (91.18% vs. 90.18%, P<0.01) content. CH lipids had higher polyunsaturated fatty acids (16.53% vs. 13.75%, P<0.01), and smaller saturated fatty acids (38.20% vs. 40.26%, P<0.01) content and a higher iodine value (69.69 vs. 65.22, P<0.01). An increased slaughter weight was associated with a lower degree of lipid unsaturation, but only the lowest weight class (<160 kg) showed a significant difference compared to the other two classes (⩾160<170 and ⩾170 kg). Regardless of genetic type or l.w. class, an increase in backfat thickness is associated with an increase in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and a remarkable reduction in polyunsaturated content.

  18. Surface Decoration of Amino-Functionalized Metal-Organic Framework/Graphene Oxide Composite onto Polydopamine-Coated Membrane Substrate for Highly Efficient Heavy Metal Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhuang; Feng, Kai; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-01-25

    A new metal-organic framework/graphene oxide composite (IRMOF-3/GO) with high adsorption capacity of copper(II) (maximal adsorption amount = 254.14 mg/g at pH 5.0 and 25 °C) was prepared. Novel and highly efficient nanofiltration (NF) membrane can be facilely fabricated via surface decoration of IRMOF-3/GO onto polydopamine (PDA)-coated polysulfone (PSF) substrate. After decoration of IRMOF-3/GO, membrane surface potential increased from 6.7 to 13.1 mV at pH 5.0 and 25 °C. Due to the adsorption effect of IRMOF-3/GO and the enhancement of membrane surface potential, the prepared NF membrane (the loading amount of IRMOF-3/GO is ca. 13.6 g/m2) exhibits a highly efficient rejection of copper(II). The copper(II) rejection reaches up to ∼90%, while maintaining a relatively high flux of ∼31 L/m2/h at the pressure of 0.7 MPa and pH 5.0. Moreover, the membrane also presents an outstanding stability throughout the 2000 min NF testing period. Thus, the newly developed NF membrane shows a promising potential for water cleaning. This work provides a worthy reference for designing highly efficient NF membranes modified by metal-organic framework (MOF) relevant materials.

  19. Association between heavy metal and metalloid levels in topsoil and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura Rupérez, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2017-03-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the geochemical composition of the soil. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between heavy metal and metalloid levels in topsoil (upper soil horizon) and cancer mortality in mainland Spain. Ecological cancer mortality study at a municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths (27 different tumour locations) in 7917 Spanish mainland towns, from 1999 to 2008. The elements included in this analysis were Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. For the analysis, the data on the topsoil composition have been transformed by the centred logratio (clr-transformation). Principal factor analysis was performed to obtain independent latent factors for the transformed variables. To estimate the effect of heavy metal levels in topsoil composition on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included each town's factor scores as the explanatory variable. Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) was used as a tool for Bayesian inference. All results were adjusted for sociodemographic variables. The results showed an association between trace contents of heavy metals and metalloids in topsoil and mortality due to tumours of the digestive system in mainland Spain. This association was observed in both sexes, something that would support the hypothesis that the incorporation of heavy metals into the trophic chain might be playing a role in the aetiology of some types of cancer. Topsoil composition and the presence of potentially toxic elements in trace concentrations might be an additional component in the aetiology of some types of cancer, and go some way to determine the ensuing geographic

  20. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryn S. Willoughby

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p 0.05 or supplementation (p > 0.05. In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p 0.05. In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p 0.05. All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05 or supplementation (p > 0.05. The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle.