WorldWideScience

Sample records for heated pre-stellar core

  1. Sulphur chemistry in the L1544 pre-stellar core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastel, Charlotte; Quénard, D.; Le Gal, R.; Wakelam, V.; Andrianasolo, A.; Caselli, P.; Vidal, T.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2018-05-01

    The L1544 pre-stellar core has been observed as part of the ASAI IRAM 30m Large Program as well as follow-up programs. These observations have revealed the chemical richness of the earliest phases of low-mass star-forming regions. In this paper we focus on the twenty-one sulphur bearing species (ions, isotopomers and deuteration) that have been detected in this spectral-survey through fifty one transitions: CS, CCS, C3S, SO, SO2, H2CS, OCS, HSCN, NS, HCS+, NS+ and H2S. We also report the tentative detection (4 σ level) for methyl mercaptan (CH3SH). LTE and non-LTE radiative transfer modelling have been performed and we used the NAUTILUS chemical code updated with the most recent chemical network for sulphur to explain our observations. From the chemical modelling we expect a strong radial variation for the abundances of these species, which mostly are emitted in the external layer where non thermal desorption of other species has previously been observed. We show that the chemical study cannot be compared to what has been done for the TMC-1 dark cloud, where the abundance is supposed constant along the line of sight, and conclude that a strong sulphur depletion is necessary to fully reproduce our observations of the prototypical pre-stellar core L1544.

  2. NH3 (10-00) in the pre-stellar core L1544

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Keto, E.

    2017-01-01

    GHz and study the abundance profile of ammonia across the pre-stellar core L1544 to test current theories of its physical and chemical structure. Recently calculated collisional coefficients have been included in our non-LTE radiative transfer code to reproduce Herschel observations. A gas......Pre-stellar cores represent the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation, therefore it is important to study their physical and chemical structure. Because of their volatility, nitrogen-bearing molecules are key to study the dense and cold gas present in pre-stellar cores....... The NH3 rotational transition detected with Herschel-HIFI provides a unique combination of sensitivity and spectral resolution to further investigate physical and chemical processes in pre-stellar cores. Here we present the velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI observations of the ortho-NH3(10-00) line at 572...

  3. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN THE L1544 PRE-STELLAR CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Gießenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany); Marcelino, Nuria [INAF, Osservatorio di Radioastronomia, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Billot, Nicolas [Instituto de Radioastronomía Milimétrica, Avenida Divina Pastora 7, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, 132 Hampstead Road, London NW1 2PS (United Kingdom); Testi, Leonardo [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Vastel, Charlotte [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Lefloch, Bertrand [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Bachiller, Rafael, E-mail: i.jimenez-serra@qmul.ac.uk [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (OAN, IGN), Calle Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T < 10 K) has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modeling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly extinguished continuum peak with A{sub V}≥ 30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average A{sub V}∼ 7.5–8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH{sub 3}OH. Our observations show that CH{sub 3}O, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}CHO are more abundant (by factors of ∼2–10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH{sub 3}OCHO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O, HCCCHO, CH{sub 2}CHCN, and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3), but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modeling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because (i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; (ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and (iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains.

  4. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN THE L1544 PRE-STELLAR CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T < 10 K) has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modeling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly extinguished continuum peak with A_V≥ 30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average A_V∼ 7.5–8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH_3OH. Our observations show that CH_3O, CH_3OCH_3, and CH_3CHO are more abundant (by factors of ∼2–10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH_3OCHO, c-C_3H_2O, HCCCHO, CH_2CHCN, and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3), but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modeling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because (i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; (ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and (iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains.

  5. Evolution and Photoevaporation of Protoplanetary Disks in Clusters: The Role of Pre-stellar Core Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Chang, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    We explore the effects of progenitor pre-stellar core properties on the evolution of disks with external photoevaporation in clusters. Since the strength of external photoevaporation is largely determined by the depth of the gravitational potential well of the disk, the external photoevaporation rate is the function of star mass and disk size. The properties of a core collapse set up the initial conditions of protoplanetary disks, so they influence the evolutions of star mass and disk size. Our calculations show that the core properties can dramatically influence the efficiency of external photoevaporation. For the core with low angular velocity, most core mass directly falls onto the central star or onto the disk near the star. External photoevaporation is suppressed even if external radiation from nearby massive stars are strong. In this case, the disk evolution in clusters is primarily driven by its own internal viscosity. However, if the core angular velocity is high, most core mass falls onto the disk far from the central star. External photoevaporation is so strong that the disk mass is severely evaporated. Finally, the star mass is very low and the disk lifetime is very short. Our calculations could interpret some observational features of disks in clusters, such as the diameter distribution of disks in the Trapezium cluster and the correlation between mass accretion rate and star mass. We suggest that the disk mass determined by (sub)millimeter wavelength observations may be underestimated.

  6. Star formation: study of the collapse of pre-stellar dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercon, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    One of the priorities of contemporary astrophysics remains to understand the mechanisms which lead to star formation. In the dense cores where star formation occurs, temperature, pressure, etc... are such that it is impossible to reproduce them in the laboratory. Numerical calculations remain the only mean to study physical phenomena that are involved in the star formation process. The focus of this thesis has been on the numerical methods that are used in the star formation context to describe highly non-linear and multi-scale phenomena. In particular, I have concentrated my work on the first stages of the pre-stellar dense cores collapse. This work is divided in 4 linked part. In a first study, I use a 1D Lagrangian code in spherical symmetry (Audit et al. 2002) to compare three models that incorporate radiative transfer and matter-radiation interactions. This comparison was based on simple gravitational collapse calculations which lead to the first Larson core formation. It was found that the Flux Limited Diffusion model is appropriate for star formation calculations. I also took benefit from this first work to study the properties of the accretion shock on the first Larson core. We developed a semi-analytic model based on well-known assumptions, which reproduces the jump properties at the shock. The second study consisted in implementing the Flux Limited Diffusion model with the radiation-hydrodynamics equations in the RAMSES code (Teyssier 2002). After a first step of numerical tests that validate the scheme, we used RAMSES to perform the first multidimensional collapse calculations that combine magnetic field and radiative transfer effects at small scales with a high numerical resolution. Our results show that the radiative transfer has a significant impact on the fragmentation in the collapse of pre-stellar dense cores. I also present a comparison we made between the RAMSES code (Eulerian approach) and the SPH code DRAGON (Goodwin 2004, Lagrangian approach

  7. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  8. Detection of the HC3NH+ and HCNH+ ions in the L1544 pre-stellar core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quénard, D.; Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Hily-Blant, P.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2017-09-01

    The L1544 pre-stellar core was observed as part of the ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM) Large Program. We report the first detection in a pre-stellar core of the HCNH+ and HC3NH+ ions. The high spectral resolution of the observations allows us to resolve the hyperfine structure of HCNH+. Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis leads to derive a column density equal to (2.0 ± 0.2) × 1013 cm-2 for HCNH+ and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 1011 cm-2 for HC3NH+. We also present non-LTE analysis of five transitions of HC3N, three transitions of H13CN and one transition of HN13C, all of them linked to the chemistry of HCNH+ and HC3NH+. We computed for HC3N, HCN and HNC a column density of (2.0 ± 0.4) × 1013 cm-2, (3.6 ± 0.9) × 1014 cm-2 and (3.0 ± 1.0) × 1014 cm-2, respectively. We used the gas-grain chemical code nautilus to predict the abundances of all these species across the pre-stellar core. Comparison of the observations with the model predictions suggests that the emission from HCNH+ and HC3NH+ originates in the external layer where non-thermal desorption of other species was previously observed. The observed abundance of both ionic species ([HCNH+] ≃ 3 × 10-10 and [HC3NH+] ≃ [1.5 - 3.0] × 10-12, with respect to H2) cannot be reproduced at the same time by the chemical modelling within the error bars of the observations only. We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and suggest that the current chemical models are not fully accurate or complete. However, the modelled abundances are within a factor of 3, consistent with the observations, considering a late stage of the evolution of the pre-stellar core, compatible with previous observations.

  9. DENSE MOLECULAR CORES BEING EXTERNALLY HEATED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Mi-Ryang [Radio Astronomy division, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Gopinathan, Maheswar [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital 263129 (India); Jeong, Woong-Seob, E-mail: archer81@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajungro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34113 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-20

    We present results of our study of eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3–160 μ m) imaging observations with the AKARI telescope and molecular line (HCN and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) mapping observations with the KVN telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to millimeter continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosities of ∼0.3–4.4 L {sub ⊙}. The other six cores are found to remain starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3–6 K toward the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an overdominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory motion, probably due to the external heating. Most of the starless cores show a coreshine effect due to the scattering of light by the micron-sized dust grains. This may imply that the age of the cores is of the order of ∼10{sup 5} years, which is consistent with the timescale required for the cores to evolve into an oscillatory stage due to external perturbation. Our observational results support the idea that the external feedback from nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields may play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the cores.

  10. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  11. Analysis of core and core barrel heat-up under conditions simulating severe reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellaiah, S.; Viskanta, R.; Ranganathan, P.; Anand, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a model for estimating the temperature distributions in the reactor core, core barrel, thermal shield and reactor pressure vessel of a PWR during an undercooling transient. A number of numerical calculations simulating the core uncovering of the TMI-2 reactor and the subsequent heat-up of the core have been performed. The results of the calculations show that the exothermic heat release due to Zircaloy oxidation contributes to the sharp heat-up of the core. However, the core barrel temperature rise which is driven by the temperature increase of the edge of the core (e.g., the core baffle) is very modest. The maximum temperature of the core barrel never exceeded 610 K (at a system pressure of 68 bar) after a 75 minute simulation following the start of core uncovering

  12. Some factors affecting radiative heat transport in PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1989-04-01

    This report discusses radiative heat transport in Pressurized Water Reactor cores, using simple models to illustrate basic features of the transport process. Heat transport by conduction and convection is ignored in order to focus attention on the restrictions on radiative heat transport imposed by the geometry of the heat emitting and absorbing structures. The importance of the spacing of the emitting and absorbing structures is emphasised. Steady state temperature distributions are found for models of cores which are uniformly heated by fission product decay. In all of the models, a steady state temperature distribution can only be obtained if the central core temperature is in excess of the melting point of UO 2 . It has recently been reported that the MIMAS computer code, which takes into account radiative heat transport, has been used to model the heat-up of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor core, and the computations indicate that the core could not have reached the melting point of UO 2 at any time or any place. We discuss this result in the light of the calculations presented in this paper. It appears that the predicted stabilisation of the core temperatures at ∼ 2200 0 C may be a consequence of the artificially large spacing between the radial rings employed in the MIMAS code, rather than a result of physical significance. (author)

  13. Thermohydraulic behaviour and heat transfer in the molten core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineke, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    Increasing the application of nuclear reactors to produce electrical power extremely unprobable accidents should be investigated too. In the Federal Republic of Germany, a research program is performed for some years engaged in accidents at light water reactors in which the melting of the reactor core is presumed. A part of this program is to investigate the thermohydraulic and the heat transfer behavior in an accumulation of molten core material. The knowledge of these events is necessary to analyse the accident exactly. Further on the results of this work are of great importance to build a catcher for the molten core material. As a result of the decay heat the molten material is heated up and the density differences induce a free convection motion. In this work the thermohydraulic behavior and the distribution of the escaping heat fluxes for several accumulations of molten core material were determined. The numerical methods for solving the system of partial differential equation were used to develop computer codes, able to compute the average and local heat fluxes at the walls enclosing the molten core material and the inside increase of the temperature. The numerical computations were confirmed and verified by experimental investigations. In these investigations the molten core material was always assumed as a homogeneous fluid. In this case, the results could be reproduced by simple power laws

  14. Numerical Analysis of Heat Storage and Heat Conductivity in the Concrete Hollow Core Deck Element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2011-01-01

    extent these simplified models estimate the heat storage potential of precast hollow-core concrete decks correctly. This study investigates various approaches on how to model the heat transfer within the air void in the deck. Furthermore, it is analysed how different heat transfer models influence...... the overall heat transfer and heat storage in the hollow-core decks. The presented results allow comparison between detailed results from 2D-COMSOL simulations and simple 1D calculations from the whole building simulation tool such as BSim program and moreover, it is possible to validate the calculation...... method in BSim for the concrete deck element with air voids. Finally, this paper presents a comparison of the calculated heat conductivity of the hollow-core concrete deck and the measured heat conductivity for the same deck by using hot box apparatus....

  15. AGN Heating in Simulated Cool-core Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Ruszkowski, Mateusz [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bryan, Greg L., E-mail: yuanlium@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Pupin Physics Laboratories, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    We analyze heating and cooling processes in an idealized simulation of a cool-core cluster, where momentum-driven AGN feedback balances radiative cooling in a time-averaged sense. We find that, on average, energy dissipation via shock waves is almost an order of magnitude higher than via turbulence. Most of the shock waves in the simulation are very weak shocks with Mach numbers smaller than 1.5, but the stronger shocks, although rare, dissipate energy more effectively. We find that shock dissipation is a steep function of radius, with most of the energy dissipated within 30 kpc, more spatially concentrated than radiative cooling loss. However, adiabatic processes and mixing (of post-shock materials and the surrounding gas) are able to redistribute the heat throughout the core. A considerable fraction of the AGN energy also escapes the core region. The cluster goes through cycles of AGN outbursts accompanied by periods of enhanced precipitation and star formation, over gigayear timescales. The cluster core is under-heated at the end of each cycle, but over-heated at the peak of the AGN outburst. During the heating-dominant phase, turbulent dissipation alone is often able to balance radiative cooling at every radius but, when this is occurs, shock waves inevitably dissipate even more energy. Our simulation explains why some clusters, such as Abell 2029, are cooling dominated, while in some other clusters, such as Perseus, various heating mechanisms including shock heating, turbulent dissipation and bubble mixing can all individually balance cooling, and together, over-heat the core.

  16. Critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kureta, Masatoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    Fuel rods of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are so designed to be in tight lattices as to reduce moderation and achieve higher conversion ratio. As for the BWR type reactor coolant flow rate is reduced small compared with the existing BWR, so average void fraction comes to be langer. In order to evaluate thermo hydraulic characteristics of designed cores, critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core have been conducted using simulated high pressure coolant loops for both the PWR and BWR seven fuel rod bundles. Experimental data on critical heat flux for full bundles have been accumulated and applied to assess the critical power of designed cores using existing codes. Evaluated results are conservative enough to satisfy the limiting condition. Further experiments on axial power distribution effects and 37 fuel rod bundle tests will be performed to validate thermohydraulic characteristics of designed cores. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi

    2002-01-01

    Fuel rods of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are so designed to be in tight lattices as to reduce moderation and achieve higher conversion ratio. As for the BWR type reactor coolant flow rate is reduced small compared with the existing BWR, so average void fraction comes to be langer. In order to evaluate thermo hydraulic characteristics of designed cores, critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core have been conducted using simulated high pressure coolant loops for both the PWR and BWR seven fuel rod bundles. Experimental data on critical heat flux for full bundles have been accumulated and applied to assess the critical power of designed cores using existing codes. Evaluated results are conservative enough to satisfy the limiting condition. Further experiments on axial power distribution effects and 37 fuel rod bundle tests will be performed to validate thermohydraulic characteristics of designed cores. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Bell, R.E.; Berry, L.A.; Bonoli, P.T.; Harvey, R.W.; Hosea, J.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Ryan, P.M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Wright, J.C.; Yuh, H. and the NSTX Team

    2009-01-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations

  19. Precessing vortex core in a swirling wake with heat release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, A.; Klimov, A.; Molevich, N.; Moralev, I.; Porfiriev, D.; Sugak, S.; Zavershinskii, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Precessing vortex core is left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. • The precession frequency grows with the heat-source power. • Growth of the heat-source power decreases vortex core oscillations. • The left-handed bending mode is the most unstable mode in the low-density wake. - Abstract: Numerical simulation of the non-stationary three-dimensional swirling flow is presented for an open tube with a paraxial heat source. In the considered type of swirling flows, it is shown that a precessing vortex core (PVC) appears. The obtained PVC is a left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. The influence of the heat release enhancement on parameters of PVC is investigated. Using various turbulence models (the Spalart–Allmaras, k–ω and SST models), it is shown that an increase in the heat-source power leads to an increase in the PVC frequency and to a decrease in the amplitude of PVC oscillations. Moreover, we conduct the linear stability analysis of the simplified flow model with paraxial heating (the Rankine vortex with the piecewise axial flow and density) and demonstrate that its results correspond to the results of numerical simulations rather well. In particular, we prove that the left-handed bending mode (m = +1) is the most unstable one in the low-density wake and its frequency increases with a decrease of density ratio that is similar to the behavior of precession frequency with an increase of heat-source power.

  20. Laser Heating of the Core-Shell Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Dumitru, Ioan; Stancu, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    The induced thermal stress in a heating process is an important parameter to be known and controlled in the magnetization process of core-shell nanowires. This paper analyses the stress produced by a laser heating source placed at one end of a core-shell type structure. The thermal field was computed with the non-Fourier heat transport equation using a finite element method (FEM) implemented in Comsol Multiphysics. The internal stresses are essentially due to thermal gradients and different expansion characteristics of core and shell materials. The stress values were computed using the thermo elastic formalism and are depending on the laser beam parameters (spot size, power etc.) and system characteristics (dimensions, thermal characteristics). Stresses in the GPa range were estimated and consequently we find that the magnetic state of the system can be influenced significantly. A shell material as the glass which is a good thermal insulator induces in the magnetic core, the smaller stresses and consequently the smaller magnetoelastic energy. These results lead to a better understanding of the switching process in the magnetic materials.

  1. Numerical simulation on coolant flow and heat transfer in core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhaohui; Wang Xuefang; Shen Mengyu

    1997-01-01

    To simulate the coolant flow and the heat transfer characteristics of a core, a computer code, THAPMA (Thermal Hydraulic Analysis Porous Medium Analysis) has been developed. In THAPMA code, conservation equations are based on a porous-medium formulation, which uses four parameters, i.e, volume porosity, directional surface porosity, distributed resistance, and distributed heat source (sink), to model the effects of fuel rods and other internal solid structures on flow and heat transfer. Because the scheme and the solution are very important in accuracy and speed of calculation, a new difference scheme (WSUC) has been used in the energy equation, and a modified PISO solution method have been employed to simulate the steady/transient states. The code has been proved reliable and can effectively solve the transient state problem by several numerical tests. According to the design of Qinshan NPP-II, the flow and heat transfer phenomena in reactor core have been numerically simulated. The distributions of the velocity and the temperature can provide a theoretical basis for core design and safety analysis

  2. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles

  3. Small ex-core heat pipe thermionic reactor concept (SEHPTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacox, M.G.; Bennett, R.G.; Lundberg, L.B.; Miller, B.G.; Drexler, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed an innovative space nuclear power concept with unique features and significant advantages for both Defense and Civilian space missions. The Small Ex-core Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept was developed in response to Air Force needs for space nuclear power in the range of 10 to 40 kilowatts. This paper describes the SEHPTR concept and discusses the key technical issues and advantages of such a system

  4. Dependence of core heating properties on heating pulse duration and intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Cai, Hongbo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2009-11-01

    In the cone-guiding fast ignition, an imploded core is heated by the energy transport of fast electrons generated by the ultra-intense short-pulse laser at the cone inner surface. The fast core heating (˜800eV) has been demonstrated at integrated experiments with GEKKO-XII+ PW laser systems. As the next step, experiments using more powerful heating laser, FIREX, have been started at ILE, Osaka university. In FIREX-I (phase-I of FIREX), our goal is the demonstration of efficient core heating (Ti ˜ 5keV) using a newly developed 10kJ LFEX laser. In the first integrated experiments, the LFEX laser is operated with low energy mode (˜0.5kJ/4ps) to validate the previous GEKKO+PW experiments. Between the two experiments, though the laser energy is similar (˜0.5kJ), the duration is different; ˜0.5ps in the PW laser and ˜ 4ps in the LFEX laser. In this paper, we evaluate the dependence of core heating properties on the heating pulse duration on the basis of integrated simulations with FI^3 (Fast Ignition Integrated Interconnecting) code system.

  5. Solid-Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-01-01

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP). Like the SAFE 400 space nuclear reactor core, the HPENHS core is comprised of fuel rods and HPs embedded in a solid structure arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a 3:1 ratio. The core is oriented horizontally and has a square rather cylindrical cross section for effective heat transfer. The HPs extend from the two axial reflectors in which the fission gas plena are embedded and transfer heat to an intermediate coolant that flows by natural-circulation. The HP-ENHS is designed to preserve many features of the ENHS including 20-year operation without refueling, very small excess reactivity throughout life, natural circulation cooling, walkaway passive safety, and robust proliferation resistance. The target power level and specific power of the HP-ENHS reactor are those of the reference ENHS reactor. Compared to previous ENHS reactor designs utilizing a lead or lead-bismuth alloy natural circulation cooling system, the HP-ENHS reactor offers a number of advantageous features including: (1) significantly enhanced passive decay heat removal capability; (2) no positive void reactivity coefficients; (3) relatively lower corrosion of the cladding (4) a core that is more robust for transportation; (5) higher temperature potentially offering higher efficiency and hydrogen production capability. This preliminary study focuses on five areas: material compatibility analysis, HP performance analysis, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety analysis. Of the four high-temperature structural materials evaluated, Mo TZM alloy is the preferred choice; its upper estimated feasible operating temperature is 1350 K. HP performance is evaluated as a function of working fluid type, operating temperature, wick design and HP diameter and length. Sodium is the

  6. Analysis of core plasma heating and ignition by relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Clarification of the pre-compressed plasma heating by fast electrons produced by relativistic laser-plasma interaction is one of the most important issues of the fast ignition scheme in ICF. On the basis of overall calculations including the heating process, both by relativistic hot electrons and alpha-particles, and the hydrodynamic evolution of bulk plasma, we examine the feature of core plasma heating and the possibility of ignition. The deposition of the electron energy via long-range collective mode, i.e. Langmuir wave excitation, is shown to be comparable to that through binary electron-electron collisions; the calculation neglecting the wave excitation considerably underestimates the core plasma heating. The ignition condition is also shown in terms of the intensity I(h) and temperature T(h) of hot electrons. It is found that I(h) required for ignition increases in proportion to T(h). For efficiently achieving the fast ignition, electron beams with relatively 'low' energy (e.g.T(h) below 1 MeV) are desirable. (author)

  7. Heating analysis of cobalt adjusters in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Qiliang; Li Kang; Fu Yaru

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce 60 Co source for industry and medicine applications in CANDU-6 reactor, the stainless steel adjusters were replaced with the cobalt adjusters. The cobalt rod will generate the heat when it is irradiated by neutron and γ ray. In addition, 59 Co will be activated and become 60 Co, the ray released due to 60 Co decay will be absorbed by adjusters, and then the adjusters will also generate the heat. So the heating rate of adjusters to be changed during normal operation must be studied, which will be provided as the input data for analyzing the temperature field of cobalt adjusters and the relative heat load of moderator. MCNP code was used to simulate whole core geometric configuration in detail, including reactor fuel, control rod, adjuster, coolant and moderator, and to analyze the heating rate of the stainless steel adjusters and the cobalt adjusters. The maximum heating rate of different cobalt adjuster based on above results will be provided for the steady thermal hydraulic and accident analysis, and make sure that the reactor is safe on the thermal hydraulic. (authors)

  8. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M * > 10 6 M ☉ . The D M core mass removal efficiency — dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M vir 5/3 , the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s –1 in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos

  9. Core optimization studies for a small heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.

    1986-11-01

    Small heating reactor cores are characterized by a high contribution of the leakage to the neutron balance and by a large power density variation in the axial direction. A limited number of positions is available for the control rods, which are necessary to satisfy overall reactivity requirements subject to a safety related constraint on the maximum worth of each rod. Design approaches aimed to improve safety and fuel utilization performance of the core include separation of the cooling and moderating functions of the water with the core in order to reduce hot-to-cold reactivity shift and judicious application of the axial Gd zoning aimed to improve the discharge burnup distribution. Several design options are analyzed indicating a satisfactory solution of the axial burnup distribution problem. The feasibility of the control rod system including zircaloy, stainless steel, natural boron and possibly enriched boron rods is demonstrated. A preliminary analysis indicates directions for further improvements of the core performance by an additional reduction of the hot-to-cold reactivity shift and by a reduction of the depletion reactivity swing adopting a higher gadolinium concentration in the fuel or a two-batch fuel management scheme. (author)

  10. Heat transfer in reactor cavity during core-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adroguer, B.; Cenerino, G.

    1989-08-01

    In the unlikely event of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the core may melt through the vessel and slump into the concrete reactor cavity. The hot mixture of the core material called corium interacts thermally with the concrete basemat. The WECHSL code, developed at K.f.K. Karlsruhe in Germany is used at the Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute (I.P.S.N.) of CEA to compute this molten corium concrete interaction (MCCI). Some uncertainties remain in the partition of heat from the corium between the basemat and the upper surrounding structures in the cavity where the thermal conditions are not computer. The CALTHER code, under development to perform a more mechanistic evaluation of the upward heat flux has been linked to WECHSL-MOD2 code. This new version enables the modelling of the feedback effects from the conditions in the cavity to the MCCI and the computation of the fraction of upward flux directly added to the cavity atmosphere. The present status is given in the paper. Preliminary calculations of the reactor case for silicate and limestone common sand (L.C.S.) concretes are presented. Significant effects are found on concrete erosion, gases release and temperature of the upper part of corium, particularly for L.C.S. concrete

  11. A dynamic model for helium core heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiesser, W.E.; Shih, H.J.; Hartozog, D.G.; Herron, D.M.; Nahmias, D.; Stuber, W.G.; Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1990-04-01

    To meet the helium (He) requirements of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), the cryogenic plants must be able to respond to time-varying loads. Thus the design and simulation of the cryogenic plants requires dynamic models of their principal components, and in particular, the core heat exchangers. In this paper, we detail the derivation and computer implementation of a model for core heat exchangers consisting of three partial differential equations (PDES) for each fluid stream (the continuity, energy and momentum balances for the He), and one PDE for each parting sheet (the energy balance for the parting sheet metal); the PDEs have time and axial position along the exchanger as independent variables. The computer code can accommodate any number of fluid streams and parting sheets in an adiabatic group. Features of the code include: rigorous or approximate thermodynamic properties for He, upwind and downwind approximation of the PDE spatial derivatives, and sparse matrix time integration. The outputs from the code include the time-dependent axial profiles of the fluid He mass flux, density, pressure, temperature, internal energy and enthalpy. The code is written in transportable Fortran 77, and can therefore be executed on essentially any computer

  12. A dynamic model for helium core heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiesser, W.E.; Shih, H.J.; Hartzog, D.G.; Herron, D.M.; Nahmias, D.; Stuber, W.G.; Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the helium (He) requirements of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), the cryogenic plants must be able to respond to time-varying loads. Thus the design and simulation of the cryogenic plants requires dynamic models of their principal components, and in particular, the core heat exchangers. In this paper, we detail the derivation and computer implementation of a model for core heat exchangers consisting of three partial differential equations (PDEs) for each fluid stream (the continuity, energy and momentum balances for the He), and one PDE for each parting sheet (the energy balance for the parting sheet metal); the PDEs have time and axial position along the exchanger as independent variables. The computer code can accommodate any number of fluid streams and parting sheets in an adiabatic group. Features of the code include: rigorous or approximate thermodynamic properties for He, upwind and downwind approximation of the PDE spatial derivatives, and sparse matrix time integration. The outputs from the code include the time-dependent axial profiles of the fluid He mass flux, density, pressure, temperature, internal energy and enthalpy. The code is written in transportable Fortran 77, and can therefore be executed on essentially any computer. 10 refs., 10 figs

  13. Core debris cooling with flooded vessel or core-catcher. Heat exchange coefficients under natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouge, S.; Seiler, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    External cooling by natural water circulation is necessary for molten core retention in LWR lower head or in a core-catcher. Considering the expected heat flux levels (between 0.2 to 1.5 MW/m 2 ) film boiling should be avoided. This rises the question of the knowledge of the level of the critical heat flux for the considered geometries and flow paths. The document proposes a state of the art of the research in this field. Mainly small scale experiments have been performed in a very recent past. These experiments are not sufficient to extrapolate to large scale reactor structures. Limited large scale experimental results exist. These results together with some theoretical investigations show that external cooling by natural water circulation may be considered as a reasonable objective of severe accident R and D. Recently (in fact since the beginning of 1994) new results are available from large scale experiments (CYBL, ULPU 2000, SULTAN). These results indicate that CHF larger than 1 MW/m 2 can be obtained under natural water circulation conditions. In this report, emphasis is given to the pursuit of finding predictive models for the critical heat flux in large, naturally convective channels with thick walls. This theoretical understanding is important for the capability to extrapolate to different situations (various geometries, flow paths....). The outcome of this research should be the ability to calculate Boundary Layer Boiling situations (2D), channelling boiling situations (1D) and related CHF conditions. However, a more straightforward approach can be used for the analysis of specific designs. Today there are already some CHF data available for hemispherical geometry and these data can be used before a mechanistic understanding is achieved

  14. Experiment on heat transfer in simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yukihiro; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Kawaguchi, Takahiro.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate heat transfer between molten core and concrete in LWR severe accidents, experiments were performed using water as the molten core, paraffin as the concrete, and air as gases from the decomposition of concrete. It was found that the heat transfer on the interface between paraffin and water were promoted strongly by the air gas. (author)

  15. Multiobjective optimization for design of multifunctional sandwich panel heat pipes with micro-architected truss cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    A micro-architected multifunctional structure, a sandwich panel heat pipe with a micro-scale truss core and arterial wick, is modeled and optimized. To characterize multiple functionalities, objective equations are formulated for density, compressive modulus, compressive strength, and maximum heat flux. Multiobjective optimization is used to determine the Pareto-optimal design surfaces, which consist of hundreds of individually optimized designs. The Pareto-optimal surfaces for different working fluids (water, ethanol, and perfluoro(methylcyclohexane)) as well as different micro-scale truss core materials (metal, ceramic, and polymer) are determined and compared. Examination of the Pareto fronts allows comparison of the trade-offs between density, compressive stiffness, compressive strength, and maximum heat flux in the design of multifunctional sandwich panel heat pipes with micro-scale truss cores. Heat fluxes up to 3.0 MW/m 2 are predicted for silicon carbide truss core heat pipes with water as the working fluid.

  16. The Influence of Heat Flux Boundary Heterogeneity on Heat Transport in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C. J.; Mound, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Rotating convection in planetary systems can be subjected to large lateral variations in heat flux from above; for example, due to the interaction between the metallic cores of terrestrial planets and their overlying silicate mantles. The boundary anomalies can significantly reorganise the pattern of convection and influence global diagnostics such as the Nusselt number. We have conducted a suite of numerical simulations of rotating convection in a spherical shell geometry comparing convection with homogeneous boundary conditions to that with two patterns of heat flux variation at the outer boundary: one hemispheric pattern, and one derived from seismic tomographic imaging of Earth's lower mantle. We consider Ekman numbers down to 10-6 and flux-based Rayleigh numbers up to 800 times critical. The heterogeneous boundary conditions tend to increase the Nusselt number relative to the equivalent homogeneous case by altering both the flow and temperature fields, particularly near the top of the convecting region. The enhancement in Nusselt number tends to increase as the amplitude and wavelength of the boundary heterogeneity is increased and as the system becomes more supercritical. In our suite of models, the increase in Nusselt number can be as large as 25%. The slope of the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling also changes when boundary heterogeneity is included, which has implications when extrapolating to planetary conditions. Additionally, regions of effective thermal stratification can develop when strongly heterogeneous heat flux conditions are applied at the outer boundary.

  17. Convective heating of the inner core of red giants prior to the peak of the core helium flash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.W.; Demarque, P.; Deupree, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of convective overshooting across the temperature inversion in the cores of red giants are investigated from the onset of the core convection zone to the peak of the core helium flash using a model for overshooting in stellar evolution, based on two-dimensional and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash. A major effect of the overshooting is the substantial heating of the material interior to the temperature inversion, producing a smoother temperature profile. This interior heating is thus unimportant until approximately 1 week preceding the time of maximum temperature, but then produces temperature changes on a time scale short with respect to the evolution time scale. Interior heating (1) alters the standard relation of the maximum temperature and the density at the point of maximum temperature, (2) makes the maximum temperature occur at a smaller mass fraction, (3) causes the time of maximum temperature to occur hundreds of years earlier in the red giant evolution, and (4) redistributes the mass from the location of maximum temperature. Since the degree of degeneracy is known to affect the violence of the flash in the hydrodynamic phase, internal heating may play an important role in determining the subsequent evolution of the core

  18. Innovative research reactor core designed. Estimation and analysis of gamma heating distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto

    2014-01-01

    The Gamma heating value is an important factor needed for safety analysis of each experiments that will be realized on research reactor core. Gamma heat is internal heat source occurs in each irradiation facilities or any material irradiated in reactor core. This value should be determined correctly because of the safety related problems. The gamma heating value is in general depend on. reactor core characteristics, different one and other, and then each new reactor design should be completed by gamma heating data. The Innovative Research Reactor is one of the new reactor design that should be completed with any safety data, including the gamma heating value. For this reasons, calculation and analysis of gamma heating in the hole of reactor core and irradiation facilities in reflector had been done by using of modified and validated Gamset computer code. The result shown that gamma heating value of 11.75 W/g is the highest value at the center of reactor core, higher than gamma heating value of RSG-GAS. However, placement of all irradiation facilities in reflector show that safety characteristics for irradiation facilities of innovative research reactor more better than RSG-GAS reactor. Regarding the results obtained, and based on placement of irradiation facilities in reflector, can be concluded that innovative research reactor more safe for any irradiation used. (author)

  19. The TMI-2 core relocation: Heat transfer and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, M.; Fauske, H.K.

    1987-07-01

    It is postulated that the collapse of the upper debris bed was the main cause of core failure and core material relocation during the TMI-2 accident. It is shown that this mechanism of core relocation can account for the timescale(s) and energy transfer rate inferred from plant instrumentation. Additional analysis suggests that the water in the lower half of the reactor vessel was subcooled at the onset of relocation, as subcooling serves to explain the final coolable configuration at the bottom of the TMI vessel

  20. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delventhal, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Findings from several studies have demonstrated that the use of a heat and moisture exchanger increases airway humidity, which in turn increases mean airway temperature and prevents decreases in core body temperature...

  1. Demonstration of Efficient Core Heating of Magnetized Fast Ignition in FIREX project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-01

    Extensive theoretical and experimental research in the FIREX ``I project over the past decade revealed that the large angular divergence of the laser generated electron beam is one of the most critical problems inhibiting efficient core heating in electron-driven fast ignition. To solve this problem, beam guiding using externally applied kilo-tesla class magnetic field was proposed, and its feasibility has recently been numerically demonstrated. In 2016, integrated experiments at ILE Osaka University demonstrated core heating efficiencies reaching > 5 % and heated core temperatures of 1.7 keV. In these experiments, a kilo-tesla class magnetic field was applied to a cone-attached Cu(II) oleate spherical solid target by using a laser-driven capacitor-coil. The target was then imploded by G-XII laser and heated by the PW-class LFEX laser. The heating efficiency was evaluated by measuring the number of Cu-K- α photons emitted. The heated core temperature was estimated by the X-ray intensity ratio of Cu Li-like and He-like emission lines. To understand the detailed dynamics of the core heating process, we carried out integrated simulations using the FI3 code system. Effects of magnetic fields on the implosion and electron beam transport, detailed core heating dynamics, and the resultant heating efficiency and core temperature will be presented. I will also discuss the prospect for an ignition-scale design of magnetized fast ignition using a solid ball target. This work is partially supported by JSPA KAKENHI Grant Number JP16H02245, JP26400532, JP15K21767, JP26400532, JP16K05638 and is performed with the support and the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS12KUGK057, NIFS15KUGK087).

  2. Natural convection as the way of heat removal from fast reactor core at cooldown regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Kuzina, J.A.; Uhov, V.A.; Sorokin, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    The problems of thermohydraulics in fast reactors at cooldown regimes at heat removal by natural convection are considered The results of experiments and calculations obtained in various countries in this area are presented. The special attention is given to heat removal through inter-assembly space in the core and also to problems of thermohydraulics in the upper plenum. (author)

  3. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Masahiro [City College of New York, NY (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City College of New York, NY (United States); Artoun, Narbeh [City College of New York, NY (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy [City College of New York, NY (United States); Sohal, Manohar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-21

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  4. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaji, Masahiro; Valentin, Francisco I.; Artoun, Narbeh; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Sohal, Manohar; Schultz, Richard; McEligot, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  5. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in molten core debris-concrete systems. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D K

    1979-01-01

    The heat and mass transport phenomena taking place in volumetrically-heated fluids have become of interest in recent years due to their significance in assessments of fast reactor safety and post-accident heat removal (PAHR). Following a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), the core and reactor internals may melt down. The core debis melting through the reactor vessel and guard vessel may eventually contact the concrete of the reactor cell floor. The interaction of the core debris with the concrete as well as the melting of the debris pool into the concrete will significantly affect efforts to prevent breaching of the containment and the resultant release of radioactive effluents to the environment.

  6. Integrated CFD investigation of heat transfer enhancement using multi-tray core catcher in SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhi; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Velusamy, K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat transfer enhancement using multi-tray core catcher for SFR is investigated. • The capability of a single core collector tray is estimated. • Double and triple collector trays with innovative designs is discussed. • Provision of openings in the trays contributed to enhanced natural circulation. - Abstract: To render future SFR more robust and safe, certain BDBE have been considered in the recent years. A Core Disruptive Accident leading to a whole core meltdown scenario has gained the interest of researchers. Various design concepts and safety measures have been suggested and incorporated in design to address such a low probability scenario. A core catcher concept, in particular, has proved to be inevitable as an in-vessel core retention device in SFR for safe retention of core debris arising out after the severe accident. This study aims to analyse the cooling capability of the innovative design concept of core catcher to remove decay heat of degraded core after the accident. First, the capability of single collection tray is established and then the study is extended to two and three collection trays with different design concepts. Transient forms of governing equations of mass, momentum and energy conservations along with k-ε turbulence model are solved by finite volume based CFD solver. Boussinesq approximation is invoked to model buoyancy in sodium. The study shows that a single collection tray is capable of removing up to 20 MW decay heat load in a typical 500 MWe pool type SFR. Further, studies are carried out to improve the natural circulation of sodium around the source, in the lower plenum and to distribute core debris of the whole core to multiple collection trays. It is found that the double and triple collection trays can accommodate decay loads up to 29 MW. Provision of openings in the collection trays has proved to be effective in improving the heat transfer and sodium flow as well as in distributing the core debris to the

  7. Critical evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys for use in space reactor core heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is examined, and the advantages and disadvantages of this material are brought into focus. Even though pure molybdenum heat pipes have been built and tested, this metal's high ductile-brittle transition temperature and modest creep strength place significant design restrictions on a core heat pipe made from it. Molybdenum alloys are examined with regard to their promise as potential replacements for pure molybdenum. The properties of TZM and molybdenum-rhenium alloys are examined, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15 wt % rhenium offer the most advantage as an alternative to pure molybdenum in space reactor core heat pipes

  8. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .tests, the point kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  9. Passive decay heat removal from the core region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichen, E.F.; Jaegers, H.

    2002-01-01

    The decay heat in commercial Light Water Reactors is commonly removed by active and redundant safety systems supported by emergency power. For advanced power plant designs passive safety systems using a natural circulation mode are proposed: several designs are discussed. New experimental data gained with the NOKO and PANDA facilities as well as operational data from the Dodewaard Nuclear Power Plant are presented and compared with new calculations by different codes. In summary, the effectiveness of these passive decay heat removal systems have been demonstrated: original geometries and materials and for the NOKO facility and the Dodewaard Reactor typical thermal-hydraulic inlet and boundary conditions have been used. With several codes a good agreement between calculations and experimental data was achieved. (author)

  10. Heat removal capability of core-catcher with inclined cooling channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Tahara, M.; Kurita, T.; Hamazaki, R.; Morooka, S.

    2009-01-01

    A core-catcher is one of the mitigation systems that provide functions of molten corium cooling and stabilization during a severe accident. Toshiba has been developing a compact core-catcher to be placed at the lower drywell floor in the containment vessel for the next generation BWR as well as near term ABWR. This paper presents the evaluation of heat removal capability of the core-catcher with inclined cooling channels, our verification status and plan. The heat removal capability of the core-catcher is analyzed by using the newly developed two-phase flow analysis code which incorporates drift flux parameters for inclined channels and the CHF correlation obtained from SULTAN tests. Effects of geometrical parameters such as the inclination and the gap size of the cooling channel on the heat removal capability are also evaluated. These results show that the core-catcher has sufficient capability to cool the molten corium during a severe accident. Based on the analysis, it has been shown that the core-catcher has an efficient capability of heat removal to cool the molten corium. (author)

  11. Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer during core uncovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1987-01-01

    The low and high power core uncovery patterns were observed in the high-pressure quasi-steady core uncovery experiments in a 25-rod bundle. The boundary between the two patterns was obtained in the experiments. The difference of two patterns was considered to be due to the slug-annular transition below the dryout points. The Osakabe's slug-annular transition model was the good boundary between the two patterns. The small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) experiments were conducted by using the integral experimental facility with the 1,168-rod core. The transient core uncovery pattern was expected as the low power core uncovery pattern based on the quasisteady experiments mentioned above. The transient core uncovery patterns were classified into the boiloff and hydraulic core uncovery. In the boiloff core uncovery, the dryout points were controlled with the mixture level like the quasi-steady state. In the hydraulic core uncovery, the dryout points were not controlled with the mixture level alone, and the multi-dimensional dryout process in the core and the relatively high heat transfer above the dryout points were observed. It was considered that a part of water was remained above the dryout points due to the rapid depression of core liquid level. (author)

  12. Core-Sheath Paraffin-Wax-Loaded Nanofibers by Electrospinning for Heat Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Xiao, Xiudi; Zhan, Yongjun; Huan, Changmeng; Qi, Shuai; Cheng, Haoliang; Xu, Gang

    2018-04-18

    Paraffin wax (PW) is widely used for smart thermoregulation materials due to its good thermal performance. However, the leakage and low thermal conductivity of PW hinder its application in the heat storage field. Accordingly, developing effective methods to address these issues is of great importance. In this study, we explored a facile approach to obtain PW-loaded core-sheath structured flexible nanofibers films via coaxial electrospinning technique. The PW as the core layer was successfully encapsulated by the sheath-layer poly(methyl methacrylate). The diameter of the fiber core increased from 395 to 848 nm as the core solution speed rate increased from 0.1 to 0.5 mL/h. In addition, it can be seen that higher core solution speed rate could lead to higher PW encapsulation efficiency according to the transmission electron microscopy results. The core-sheath nanofiber films, moreover, possessed the highest latent heat of 58.25 J/g and solidifying enthalpy of -56.49 J/g. In addition, we found that after 200 thermal cycles, there was little change in latent heat, which demonstrated that it is beneficial for the PW-loaded core-sheath structure to overcome the leakage issue and enhance thermal stability properties for the thermoregulation film.

  13. CAUSE AND EFFECT OF FEEDBACK: MULTIPHASE GAS IN CLUSTER CORES HEATED BY AGN JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Sharma, P.

    2012-01-01

    Multiwavelength data indicate that the X-ray-emitting plasma in the cores of galaxy clusters is not cooling catastrophically. To a large extent, cooling is offset by heating due to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) via jets. The cool-core clusters, with cooler/denser plasmas, show multiphase gas and signs of some cooling in their cores. These observations suggest that the cool core is locally thermally unstable while maintaining global thermal equilibrium. Using high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations we study the formation of multiphase gas in cluster cores heated by collimated bipolar AGN jets. Our key conclusion is that spatially extended multiphase filaments form only when the instantaneous ratio of the thermal instability and free-fall timescales (t TI /t ff ) falls below a critical threshold of ≈10. When this happens, dense cold gas decouples from the hot intracluster medium (ICM) phase and generates inhomogeneous and spatially extended Hα filaments. These cold gas clumps and filaments 'rain' down onto the central regions of the core, forming a cold rotating torus and in part feeding the supermassive black hole. Consequently, the self-regulated feedback enhances AGN heating and the core returns to a higher entropy level with t TI /t ff > 10. Eventually, the core reaches quasi-stable global thermal equilibrium, and cold filaments condense out of the hot ICM whenever t TI /t ff ∼< 10. This occurs despite the fact that the energy from AGN jets is supplied to the core in a highly anisotropic fashion. The effective spatial redistribution of heat is enabled in part by the turbulent motions in the wake of freely falling cold filaments. Increased AGN activity can locally reverse the cold gas flow, launching cold filamentary gas away from the cluster center. Our criterion for the condensation of spatially extended cold gas is in agreement with observations and previous idealized simulations.

  14. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 3. Coupling core module with primary heat transport system module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    1998-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including inter-wrapper flow under various reactor operation conditions. In this work, the core module as a main part of the ACT developed last year, which simulates thermal-hydraulics in the subassemblies and the inter-subassembly gaps, was coupled with an one dimensional plant system thermal-hydraulic analysis code LEDHER to simulate transients in the primary heat transport system and to give appropriate boundary conditions to the core model. The effective algorithm to couple these two calculation modules was developed, which required minimum modification of them. In order to couple these two calculation modules on the computing system, parallel computing technique using PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) programming environment was applied. The code system was applied to analyze an out-of-pile sodium experiment simulating core with 7 subassemblies under transient condition for code verification. It was confirmed that the analytical results show a similar tendency of experimental results. (author)

  15. Results of out-of-pile experiments to investigate the possibilities of cooling a core melt with internal heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1976-01-01

    After serious hypothetical reactor accidents, melted core materials with internal heat production can occur in large quantities. A retention of these molten core masses within the containment must be ensured. The knowledge of the heat transport from volume-heated layers is necessary to clarify this matter. (orig./LH) [de

  16. A concept of passive safety pressurized water reactor system with inherent matching nature of core heat generation and heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio; Araya, Fumimasa; Iwamura, Takamichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of manpower in operation and maintenance by simplification of the system are essential to improve the safety and the economy of future light water reactors. At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a concept of a simplified passive safety reactor system JPSR was developed for this purpose and in the concept minimization of developing work and conservation of scale-up capability in design were considered. The inherent matching nature of core heat generation and heat removal rate is introduced by the core with high reactivity coefficient for moderator density and low reactivity coefficient for fuel temperature (Doppler effect) and once-through steam generators (SGs). This nature makes the nuclear steam supply system physically-slave for the steam and energy conversion system by controlling feed water mass flow rate. The nature can be obtained by eliminating chemical shim and adopting in-vessel control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) units and a low power density core. In order to simplify the system, a large pressurizer, canned pumps, passive residual heat removal systems with air coolers as a final heat sink and passive coolant injection system are adopted and the functions of volume and boron concentration control and seal water supply are eliminated from the chemical and volume control system (CVCS). The emergency diesel generators and auxiliary component cooling system of 'safety class' for transferring heat to sea water as a final heat sink in emergency are also eliminated. All of systems are built in the containment except for the air coolers of the passive residual heat removal system. The analysis of the system revealed that the primary coolant expansion in 100% load reduction in 60 s can be mitigated in the pressurizer without actuating the pressure relief valves and the pressure in 50% load change in 30 s does not exceed the maximum allowable pressure in accidental conditions in regardless of pressure regulation. (author)

  17. CHAP-2 heat-transfer analysis of the Fort St. Vrain reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotas, J.F.; Stroh, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Composite High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Analysis Program (CHAP) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in gas-cooled reactor plants. The CHAP-2 reactor-core model uses the finite-element method to initialize a two-dimensional temperature map of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) core and its top and bottom reflectors. The code generates a finite-element mesh, initializes noding and boundary conditions, and solves the nonlinear Laplace heat equation using temperature-dependent thermal conductivities, variable coolant-channel-convection heat-transfer coefficients, and specified internal fuel and moderator heat-generation rates. This paper discusses this method and analyzes an FSV reactor-core accident that simulates a control-rod withdrawal at full power

  18. Heat transfer analysis to investigate the core catcher plate assembly in SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Swapnil; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Velusamy, K.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Severe accident scenario in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is the major concern for public acceptance. After severe accident, the molten core continuously generates substantial decay heat. However, an in-vessel core catcher plate is provided to remove the decay heat passively. The numerical investigation of pool hydraulics phenomena in sodium pool of typical Indian SFR has been carried out. The debris may form a heap with different angle over the core catcher plate due to molten fuel density and interaction force. Therefore, the debris bed with different heap angle has been analyzed for steady and transient state conditions. The governing equation of fluid flow and heat transfer are solved by finite volume method based solver with the k-ε turbulent model. The time period Δ for which temperature is exceeding above safety limit with different debris heap angle have been established. (author)

  19. Core heat transfer analysis during a BWR LOCA simulation experiment at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Koizumi, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ROSA-III test facility is a 1/424-th volumetrically scaled BWR/6 simulator with an electrically heated core to study the thermal-hydraulic response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Heat transfer analyses for 5, 15, 50 and 200% break tests were conducted to understand the basic heat transfer behavior in the core under BWR LOCA conditions and to obtain a data base of post-critical heat flux (CHF) heat transfer coefficients and quench temperature. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient of dried-out rods at the core midplane during a steam cooling period is less than approximately 120 W/m 2 K. It is larger than existing data measured at lower pressures during a spray cooling period. Bottom-up quench temperatures are given by a simple equations: The sum of the saturation temperature and a constant of 262 K. Then the heat transfer model in the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code was revised using the present results. The rod surface temperature behavior in the 200% break test was calculated better by using the revised model although the model is very simple. (orig.)

  20. Passive decay heat removal by sump cooling after core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Mueller, U.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents the basic physical phenomena and scaling criteria of decay heat removal from a large coolant pool by single-phase and two-phase natural circulation flow. The physical significance of the dimensionless similarity groups derived is evaluated. The above results are applied to the SUCO program that is performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The SUCO program is a three-step series of scaled model experiments investigating the possibility of a sump cooling concept for future light water reactors. The sump cooling concept is based on passive safety features within the containment. The work is supported by the German utilities and the Siemens AG. The article gives first measurement results of the 1:20 linearly scaled plane two-dimensional SUCOS-2D test facility. The experimental results of the model geometry are transformed to prototype conditions

  1. 3-D thermal hydraulic analysis of transient heat removal from fast reactor core using immersion coolers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, I.; Volkov, A.

    2000-01-01

    For advanced fast reactors (EFR, BN-600M, BN-1600, CEFR) the special complementary loop is envisaged in order to ensure the decay heat removal from the core in the case of LOF accidents. This complementary loop includes immersion coolers that are located in the hot reactor plenum. To analyze the transient process in the reactor when immersion coolers come into operation one needs to involve 3-D thermal hydraulics code. Furthermore sometimes the problem becomes more complicated due to necessity of simulation of the thermal hydraulics processes into the core interwrapper space. For example on BN-600M and CEFR reactors it is supposed to ensure the effective removal of decay heat from core subassemblies by specially arranged internal circulation circuit: 'inter-wrapper space'. For thermal hydraulics analysis of the transients in the core and in the whole reactor including hot plenum with immersion coolers and considering heat and mass exchange between the main sodium flow and sodium that moves in the inter-wrapper space the code GRIFIC (the version of GRIF code family) was developed in IPPE. GRIFIC code was tested on experimental data obtained on RAMONA rig under conditions simulating decay heat removal of a reactor with the use of immersion coolers. Comparison has been made of calculated and experimental result, such as integral characteristics (flow rate through the core and water temperature at the core inlet and outlet) and the local temperatures (at thermocouple location) as well. In order to show the capabilities of the code some results of the transient analysis of heat removal from the core of BN-600M - type reactor under loss-of-flow accident are presented. (author)

  2. Core-adjacent instrumentation systems for pebble bed reactors for process heat application - state of planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benninghofen, G.; Serafin, N.; Spillekothen, H.G.; Hecker, R.; Brixy, H.; Serpekian, T.

    1982-06-01

    Planning and theoretical/experimental development work for core surveillance instrumentation systems is being performed to meet requirements of pebble bed reactors for process heat application. Detailed and proved instrumentation concepts are now available for the core-adjacent instrumentation systems. The current work and the results of neutron flux measurements at high temperatures are described. Operation devices for long-term accurate gas outlet temperature measurements up to approximately 1423 deg. K will also be discussed. (author)

  3. Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement in JT-II plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ascasibar, E.; Balbin, R.; Castejon, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Petrov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement are triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in TJ-II ECH plasmas. Transitions triggered by the rational surface n=4/m=2 show an increase in the ion temperature synchronized with the increase in the electron temperature. SXR measurements demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, the rational surface positioned inside the plasma core region precedes and provides a trigger for the transition. (author)

  4. Cause and Effect of Feedback: Multiphase Gas in Cluster Cores Heated by AGN Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Sharma, P.

    2012-02-01

    Multiwavelength data indicate that the X-ray-emitting plasma in the cores of galaxy clusters is not cooling catastrophically. To a large extent, cooling is offset by heating due to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) via jets. The cool-core clusters, with cooler/denser plasmas, show multiphase gas and signs of some cooling in their cores. These observations suggest that the cool core is locally thermally unstable while maintaining global thermal equilibrium. Using high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations we study the formation of multiphase gas in cluster cores heated by collimated bipolar AGN jets. Our key conclusion is that spatially extended multiphase filaments form only when the instantaneous ratio of the thermal instability and free-fall timescales (t TI/t ff) falls below a critical threshold of ≈10. When this happens, dense cold gas decouples from the hot intracluster medium (ICM) phase and generates inhomogeneous and spatially extended Hα filaments. These cold gas clumps and filaments "rain" down onto the central regions of the core, forming a cold rotating torus and in part feeding the supermassive black hole. Consequently, the self-regulated feedback enhances AGN heating and the core returns to a higher entropy level with t TI/t ff > 10. Eventually, the core reaches quasi-stable global thermal equilibrium, and cold filaments condense out of the hot ICM whenever t TI/t ff fashion. The effective spatial redistribution of heat is enabled in part by the turbulent motions in the wake of freely falling cold filaments. Increased AGN activity can locally reverse the cold gas flow, launching cold filamentary gas away from the cluster center. Our criterion for the condensation of spatially extended cold gas is in agreement with observations and previous idealized simulations.

  5. Heat Removal Performance of Hybrid Control Rod for Passive In-Core Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The two-phase closed heat transfer device can be divided by thermosyphon heat pipe and capillary wicked heat pipe which uses gravitational force or capillary pumping pressure as a driving force of the convection of working fluid. If there is a temperature difference between reactor core and ultimate heat sink, the decay heat removal and reactor shutdown is possible at any accident conditions without external power sources. To apply the hybrid control rod to the commercial nuclear power plants, its modelling about various parameters is the most important work. Also, its unique geometry is coexistence of neutron absorber material and working fluid in a cladding material having annular vapor path. Although thermosyphon heat pipe (THP) or wicked heat pipe (WHP) shows high heat transfer coefficients for limited space, the maximum heat removal capacity is restricted by several phenomena due to their unique heat transfer mechanism. Validation of the existing correlations on the annular vapor path thermosyphon (ATHP) which has different wetted perimeter and heated diameter must be conducted. The effect of inner structure, and fill ratio of the working fluid on the thermal performance of heat pipe has not been investigated. As a first step of the development of hybrid heat pipe, the ATHP which contains neutron absorber in the concentric thermosyphon (CTHP) was prepared and the thermal performance of the annular thermosyphon was experimentally studied. The heat transfer characteristics and flooding limit of the annular vapor path thermosyphon was studied experimentally to model the performance of hybrid control rod. The following results were obtained: (1) The annular vapor path thermosyphon showed better evaporation heat transfer due to the enhanced convection between adiabatic and condenser section. (2) Effect of fill ratio on the heat transfer characteristics was negligible. (3) Existing correlations about flooding limit of thermosyphon could not reflect the annular vapor

  6. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  7. Heat flow at the proposed Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) Site: Tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costain, John K.; Decker, Edward R.

    The heat flow in northwestern South Carolina at the Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) site area is approximately 55 mW/m². This data supplements other data to the east in the Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain provinces where heat flows > 55 mW/m² are characteristic of post- and late-synmetamorphic granitoids. Piedmont heat flow and heat generation data for granites, metagranites, and one Slate Belt site, in a zone approximately parallel to major structural Appalachian trends, define a linear relation. Tectonic truncation of heat-producing crust at a depth of about 8 km (a depth equal to the slope of the heat flow-heat production line) is proposed to explain the linear relation. Using the value of reduced heat flow estimated from this empirical relation, and assuming thicknesses of heat-producing crust defined by new ADCOH seismic data, the heat flow and heat production at the ADCOH site are consistent with a depth to the base of the Inner Piedmont crystalline allochthon of about 5.5 km. Seismic data at the ADCOH site confirm that the Inner Piedmont is tectonically truncated at about 5.5 km by the Blue Ridge master decollement. Temperatures at 10 km at the ADCOH site are predicted to be less than 200 °C.

  8. Numerical Analysis on Heat Flux Distribution through the Steel Liner of the Ex-vessel Core Catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Hong; Choi, Choeng Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Jo; Lee, Kyu Bok [KEPCO, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to prevent material failure of steel container of the core catcher system due to high temperatures, heat flux through the steel liner wall must be kept below the critical heat flux (CHF), and vapor dry-out of the cooling channel must be avoided. In this study, CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the heat flux distribution in the core catcher system, involving following physical phenomena: natural convection in the corium pool, boiling heat transfer and solidification/melting of the corium. A CFD methodology has been developed to simulate the thermal/hydraulic phenomena in the core catcher system, and a numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the heat flux through the steel liner of the core catcher. High heat flux values are formed at the free surface of the corium pool. However, the heat flux through the steel liner is maintained below the critical heat flux.

  9. A computationally efficient method for full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling of sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Rui, E-mail: rhu@anl.gov; Yu, Yiqi

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Developed a computationally efficient method for full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling of sodium fast reactors. • Applied fully-coupled JFNK solution scheme to avoid the operator-splitting errors. • The accuracy and efficiency of the method is confirmed with a 7-assembly test problem. • The effects of different spatial discretization schemes are investigated and compared to the RANS-based CFD simulations. - Abstract: For efficient and accurate temperature predictions of sodium fast reactor structures, a 3-D full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling capability is developed for an advanced system analysis tool, SAM. The hexagon lattice core is modeled with 1-D parallel channels representing the subassembly flow, and 2-D duct walls and inter-assembly gaps. The six sides of the hexagon duct wall and near-wall coolant region are modeled separately to account for different temperatures and heat transfer between coolant flow and each side of the duct wall. The Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) solution method is applied to solve the fluid and solid field simultaneously in a fully coupled fashion. The 3-D full-core conjugate heat transfer modeling capability in SAM has been demonstrated by a verification test problem with 7 fuel assemblies in a hexagon lattice layout. Additionally, the SAM simulation results are compared with RANS-based CFD simulations. Very good agreements have been achieved between the results of the two approaches.

  10. Turbulence-induced heat transfer in PBMR core using LES and RANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Jae; Yoon, Su-Jong; Park, Goon-Cherl; Lee, Won-Jae

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the results of numerical simulations on flow fields and relevant heat transfer in the pebble bed reactor (PBR) core, since the coolant passes a highly complicated random flow path with a high Reynolds number, an appropriate treatment of the turbulence is required. A set of simple experiments for the flow over a circular cylinder with heat transfer was conducted to finally select the large eddy simulation (LES) and k-ω model among the considering Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models for PBR application. Using these models, the PBR cores, whose geometries were simplified to the body-centered cubical (BCC) and face-centered cubical (FCC) structures, were simulated. A larger pressure drop, a more random flow field, a higher vorticity magnitude and a higher temperature at the local hot spots on the pebble surface were found in the results of the LES than in those of RANS for both geometries. In cases of the LES, the flow structures were resolved up to the grid scales. Irregular distributions of the flow and local heat transfer were found in the BCC core, while relatively regular distributions for the FCC core. The turbulent nature of the coolant flow in the pebble core evidently affected the fuel surface temperature distribution. (author)

  11. Evaluation of upward heat flux in ex-vessel molten core heat transfer using MELCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.Y.; Park, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to share experiences of MELCOR application to resolve the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) issue in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In the evaluation of concrete erosion, the heat transfer modeling from the molten corium internal to the corium pool surface is very important and uncertain. MELCOR employs Kutateladze or Greene's bubble-enhanced heat transfer model for the internal heat transfer. The phenomenological uncertainty is so large that the model provides several model parameters in addition to the phenomenological model for user flexibility. However, the model parameters do not work on Kutateladze correlation at the top of the molten layer. From our experience, a code modification is suggested to match the upward heat flux with the experimental results. In this analysis, minor modification was carried out to calculate heat flux from the top molten layer to corium surface, and efforts were made to find out the best value of the model parameter based on upward heat flux of MACE test M1B. Discussion also includes its application to KNGR. (author)

  12. An improved heat transfer configuration for a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.S.; Walton, J.T.; Mcguire, M.L.

    1992-07-01

    Interrupted flow, impingement cooling, and axial power distribution are employed to enhance the heat-transfer configuration of a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine. Impingement cooling is introduced to increase the local heat-transfer coefficients between the reactor material and the coolants. Increased fuel loading is used at the inlet end of the reactor to enhance heat-transfer capability where the temperature differences are the greatest. A thermal-hydraulics computer program for an unfueled NERVA reactor core is employed to analyze the proposed configuration with attention given to uniform fuel loading, number of channels through the impingement wafers, fuel-element length, mass-flow rate, and wafer gap. The impingement wafer concept (IWC) is shown to have heat-transfer characteristics that are better than those of the NERVA-derived reactor at 2500 K. The IWC concept is argued to be an effective heat-transfer configuration for solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engines. 11 refs

  13. Heat-transfer analysis of the existing HEU and proposed LEU cores of Pakistan research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Nabbi, R.

    1987-02-01

    In connection with conversion of Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR) from the use of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of both existing HEU and proposed LEU cores has been carried out. Keeping in mind the possibility of power upgrading, the performance of proposed LEU core, under 10 MW operating conditions, has also been evaluated. Computer code HEATHYD has been used for this purpose. In order to verify the reliability of the code, IAEA benchmark 2 MW reactor was analyzed. The cooling parameters evaluated include: coolant velocity, critical velocity, pressure drop, temperature distribution in the core, heat fluxes at onset of nucleate boiling, flow instability and burnout and corresponding safety margins. From the results of the study it can be concluded that the conversion of the core to LEU fuel will result in higher safety margins, as compared to existing HEU core, mainly because the increased number of fuel plates in the proposed design will reduce the average heat flux significantly. Anyhow upgrading of the reactor power to 10 MW will need the flow rate to be adjusted between 850 to 900 m 3 /hr, to achieve reasonable safety margins, at least, comparable with the existing HEU core. (orig.)

  14. Transient core-debris bed heat-removal experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Klein, J.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Chen, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    An experimental investigation is reported of the thermal interaction between superheated core debris and water during postulated light-water reactor degraded core accidents. Data are presented for the heat transfer characteristics of packed beds of 3 mm spheres which are cooled by overlying pools of water. Results of transient bed temperature and steam flow rate measurements are presented for bed heights in the range 218 mm-433 mm and initial particle bed temperatures between 530K and 972K. Results display a two-part sequential quench process. Initial frontal cooling leaves pockets or channels of unquenched spheres. Data suggest that heat transfer process is limited by a mechanism of countercurrent two-phase flow. An analytical model which combines a bed energy equation with either a quasisteady version of the Lipinski debris bed model or a critical heat flux model reasonably well predicts the characteristic features of the bed quench process. Implications with respect to reactor safety are discussed

  15. Core thermal response during Semiscale Mod-1 blowdown heat transfer tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, T.K.

    1976-06-01

    Selected experimental data and results calculated from experimental data obtained from the Semiscale Mod-1 PWR blowdown heat transfer test series are analyzed. These tests were designed primarily to provide information on the core thermal response to a loss-of-coolant accident. The data are analyzed to determine the effect of core flow on the heater rod thermal response. The data are also analyzed to determine the effects of initial operating conditions on the rod cladding temperature behavior during the transient. The departure from nucleate boiling and rewetting characteristics of the rod surfaces are examined for radial and axial patterns in the response. Repeatability of core thermal response data is also investigated. The test data and the core thermal response calculated with the RELAP4 code are compared

  16. Core heat transfer experiment for JRR-3 to be upgraded at 20 MWt, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Miyata, Keiichi; Ikawa, Hiromasa; Ohgawara, Masami; Kaminaga, Masanori

    1985-09-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the condition of onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) heat flux under forced convection in a vertical rectangular channel, both of which take important roles in the core thermal-hydraulic design of the upgraded JRR-3. This report presents the validity and applicability of the correlations proposed for ONB condition and DNB heat flux, based on the analysis of the experimental results. The upgraded JRR-3 is a low-pressure, low-temperature research reactor and the core heat generation is removed by two cooling modes, one is natural circulation under upflow up to 200 kW and the other is forced circulation under downflow up to 20 MW. Therefore, the difference in heat transfer characteristics between upflow and downflow were investigated in the experiments, which were carried out by using a heated channel properly simulating a subchannel of fuel element because the heat transfer characteristics are considered to be strongly dependent on the configuration of flow channel. (author)

  17. Simulation of nonlinear dynamics of a PWR core by an improved lumped formulation for fuel heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jian; Cotta, Renato M.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, thermohydraulic behaviour of PWR, during reactivity insertion and partial loss-of-flow, is simulated by using a simplified mathematical model of reactor core and primary coolant. An improved lumped parameter formulation for transient heat conduction in fuel rod is used for core heat transfer modelling. Transient temperature response of fuel, cladding and coolant is analysed. (author)

  18. Visualization of Heat Transfer and Core Damage With RGUI 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesina, George L.

    2002-01-01

    Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) have become an integral and essential part of computer software. In the ever-changing world of computing, they provide the user with a valuable means to learn, understand, and use the application software while also helping applications adapt to and span different computing paradigms, such as different operating systems. For these reasons, GUI development for nuclear plant analysis programs has been ongoing for a decade and a half and much progress has been made. With the development of codes such as RELAP5-3D [1] and SCDAP/RELAP5 that have multi-dimensional modeling capability, it has become necessary to represent three-dimensional, calculated data. The RELAP5-3D Graphical User Interface (RGUI) [4] was designed specifically for this purpose. It reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional models and enhances the analysts' ability to recognize plant behavior visually. Previous versions of RGUI [5] focused on visualizing reactor coolant behavior during a simulated transient or accident. Recent work has extended RGUI to display two other phenomena, heat transfer and core damage. Heat transfer is depicted through the visualization of RELAP5-3D heat structures. Core damage is visualized by displaying fuel rods and other core structures in a reactor vessel screen. Conditions within the core are displayed via numerical results and color maps. These new features of RGUI 1.5 are described and illustrated. (authors)

  19. Natural Convection Heat Transfer of Oxide Pool During In-Vessel Retention of Core Melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The integrity of reactor vessel may be threatened by the heat generation at the oxide pool and to the natural convection heat transfer to the reactor vessel by those two layers. Therefore, External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) is performed in order to secure the integrity of the reactor vessel. Whether the IVR(In-Vessel Retention) Strategy can be applicable to a larger reactor is the technical concern, which nourished the research interest for the natural convection heat transfer of metal and oxide pool and ERVC performance. Especially, it is hard to simulate oxide pool by experimentally due to the high level of buoyancy. Moreover, the volumetrically exothermic working fluid should be adopted to simulate the behavior of the core melts. Therefore, the volumetric heat sources that immersed in the working fluid have been adopted to simulate oxide pool by experiment. We investigated oxide pool with two different designs of the volumetric heat sources that adopted previous experiments. The investigation was performed by mass transfer experiment using analogy between heat and mass transfers. The results were compared to previous studies. We simulated the natural convection heat transfer of the oxide pool by mass transfer experiment. The isothermally cooled condition was established by limiting current technique firstly. The results were compared to previous studies under identical design of the volumetric heat sources. The average Nu's of the curvature and the top plate were close to the previous studies.

  20. Analysis of gamma heating at TRIGA mark reactor core Bandung using plate type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto; Tukiran Surbakti

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the discontinuation of TRIGA fuel element production by its producer, the operation of all TRIGA type reactor of at all over the word will be disturbed, as well as TRIGA reactor in Bandung. In order to support the continuous operation of Bandung TRIGA reactor, a study on utilization of fuel plate mode, as used at RSG-GAS reactor, to replace the cylindrical model has been done. Various assessments have been done, including core design calculation and its safety aspects. Based on the neutronic calculation, utilization of fuel plate shows that Bandung TRIGA reactor can be operated by 20 fuel elements only. Compared with the original core, the new reactor core configuration is smaller and it results in some empty space that can be used for in-core irradiation facilities. Due to the existing of in-core irradiation facilities, the gamma heating value became a new factor that should be evaluated for safety analysis. For this reason, the gamma heating for TRIGA Bandung reactor using fuel plate was calculated by Gamset computer code. The calculations based on linear attenuation equations, line sources and gamma propagation on space. Calculations were also done for reflector positions (Lazy Susan irradiation facilities) and central irradiation position (CIP), especially for any material samples. The calculation results show that gamma heating for CIP is significantly important (0.87 W/g), but very low value for Lazy Susan position (lest then 0.11 W/g). Based on this results, it can be concluded that the utilization of CIP as irradiation facilities need to consider of gamma heating as data for safety analysis report. (author)

  1. Heat Transfer Analysis of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) Core Catcher Test Facility Volley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikkarainen, Mika; Laine, Jani; Purhonen, Heikki; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta [Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. 20 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Sairanen, Risto [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. 14 00881 Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The EPR is designed to cope with severe accidents, involving core meltdown. A specific melt spreading area has been designed within the containment. This core catcher will be flooded by water, which transfers the decay heat to the containment heat removal system. To improve cooling, horizontal flow channels made of cast iron are located also below the core catcher. STUK, the radiation and nuclear safety authority in Finland, wanted an independent study of the functionality of the core catcher design. Effect of the presence of insulation material and boric acid in the cooling water was to be studied, as well as the general behavior of the system in different phases of the flooding of the core melt spreading area. To verify the function of the core catcher design, a scaled down test facility was built at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Since there are some physical restrictions of a test facility computational tools were applied especially for the tests where steady state conditions could not be reached without endangering the integrity of the test facility. This paper introduces the Volley test facility, computational simulations and compares them with the test results. Simulated temperatures of those Volley tests, which could be run until steady state conditions, are very close to the measured temperatures. It can be concluded also, that the temperatures are evidently below the cast iron melting point with heat fluxes used in the tests, if there is a small flow inside the cooling channels or even in case when only a few adjacent cooling channels are totally dry. (authors)

  2. Heat Transfer Analysis of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) Core Catcher Test Facility Volley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikkarainen, Mika; Laine, Jani; Purhonen, Heikki; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta; Sairanen, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The EPR is designed to cope with severe accidents, involving core meltdown. A specific melt spreading area has been designed within the containment. This core catcher will be flooded by water, which transfers the decay heat to the containment heat removal system. To improve cooling, horizontal flow channels made of cast iron are located also below the core catcher. STUK, the radiation and nuclear safety authority in Finland, wanted an independent study of the functionality of the core catcher design. Effect of the presence of insulation material and boric acid in the cooling water was to be studied, as well as the general behavior of the system in different phases of the flooding of the core melt spreading area. To verify the function of the core catcher design, a scaled down test facility was built at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Since there are some physical restrictions of a test facility computational tools were applied especially for the tests where steady state conditions could not be reached without endangering the integrity of the test facility. This paper introduces the Volley test facility, computational simulations and compares them with the test results. Simulated temperatures of those Volley tests, which could be run until steady state conditions, are very close to the measured temperatures. It can be concluded also, that the temperatures are evidently below the cast iron melting point with heat fluxes used in the tests, if there is a small flow inside the cooling channels or even in case when only a few adjacent cooling channels are totally dry. (authors)

  3. ISOTROPIC HEATING OF GALAXY CLUSTER CORES VIA RAPIDLY REORIENTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babul, Arif; Sharma, Prateek; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets carry more than sufficient energy to stave off catastrophic cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of cool-core clusters. However, in order to prevent catastrophic cooling, the ICM must be heated in a near-isotropic fashion and narrow bipolar jets with P jet = 10 44–45 erg s –1 , typical of radio AGNs at cluster centers, are inefficient in heating the gas in the transverse direction to the jets. We argue that due to existent conditions in cluster cores, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) will, in addition to accreting gas via radiatively inefficient flows, experience short stochastic episodes of enhanced accretion via thin disks. In general, the orientation of these accretion disks will be misaligned with the spin axis of the black holes (BHs) and the ensuing torques will cause the BH's spin axis (and therefore the jet axis) to slew and rapidly change direction. This model not only explains recent observations showing successive generations of jet-lobes-bubbles in individual cool-core clusters that are offset from each other in the angular direction with respect to the cluster center, but also shows that AGN jets can heat the cluster core nearly isotropically on the gas cooling timescale. Our model does require that the SMBHs at the centers of cool-core clusters be spinning relatively slowly. Torques from individual misaligned disks are ineffective at tilting rapidly spinning BHs by more than a few degrees. Additionally, since SMBHs that host thin accretion disks will manifest as quasars, we predict that roughly 1-2 rich clusters within z < 0.5 should have quasars at their centers.

  4. A Simplified Method for Stationary Heat Transfer of a Hollow Core Concrete Slab Used for TABS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Lei, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Thermally activated building systems (TABS) have been an energy efficient way to improve the indoor thermal comfort. Due to the complicated structure, heat transfer prediction for a hollow core concrete used for TABS is difficult. This paper proposes a simplified method using equivalent thermal...... resistance for the stationary heat transfer of this kind of system. Numerical simulations are carried out to validate this method, and this method shows very small deviations from the numerical simulations. Meanwhile, this method is used to investigate the influence of the thickness of insulation on the heat...... transfer. The insulation with a thickness of more than 0.06 m can keep over 95 % of the heat transferred from the lower surface, which is beneficial to the radiant ceiling cooling. Finally, this method is extended to involve the effect of the pipe, and the numerical comparison results show that this method...

  5. Rates of chemical reaction and atmospheric heating during core debris expulsion from a pressurized vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockman, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1986-01-01

    Core debris may be expelled from a pressurized reactor vessel during a severe nuclear reactor accident. Experimental studies of core debris expulsion from pressurized vessels have established that the expelled material can be lofted into the atmosphere of the reactor containment as particulate 0.4 to 2 mm in diameter. These particles will vigorously react with steam and oxygen in the containment atmosphere. Data on such reactions during tests with 80 kg of expelled melt will be reported. A model of the reaction rates based on gas phase mass transport will be described and shown to account for atmospheric heating and aerosol generation observed in the tests

  6. Critical heat flux predictions for the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    This study provides best estimate predictions of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and the Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) to support the proposed upgrade of the Annual Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) from its present value of 2 MWt to 4 MWt. These predictions are based on the University of New Mexico (UNM) - CHF correlation, originally developed for uniformly heated vertical annuli. The UNM-CHF correlation is applicable to low-flow and low-pressure conditions, which are typical of those in the ACRR. The three hypotheses that examined the effect of the nonuniform axial heat flux distribution in the ACRR core are (1) the local conditions hypotheses, (2) the total power hypothesis, and (3) the global conditions hypothesis. These hypotheses, in conjunction with the UNM-CHF correlation, are used to estimate the CHF and CHFR in the ACRR. Because the total power hypothesis predictions of power per rod at CHF are approximately 15%-20% lower than those corresponding to saturation exit conditions, it can be concluded that the total power hypothesis considerably underestimates the CHF for nonuniformly heated geometries. This conclusion is in agreement with previous experimental results. The global conditions hypothesis, which is more conservative and more accurate of the other two, provides the most reliable predictions of CHF/CHFR for the ACRR. The global conditions hypothesis predictions of CHFR varied between 2.1 and 3.9, with the higher value corresponding to the lower water inlet temperature of 20 degrees C

  7. Possible generation of heat from nuclear fusion in Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2016-11-23

    The cause and source of the heat released from Earth's interior have not yet been determined. Some research groups have proposed that the heat is supplied by radioactive decay or by a nuclear georeactor. Here we postulate that the generation of heat is the result of three-body nuclear fusion of deuterons confined in hexagonal FeDx core-centre crystals; the reaction rate is enhanced by the combined attraction effects of high-pressure (~364 GPa) and high-temperature (~5700 K) and by the physical catalysis of neutral pions: 2 D +  2 D +  2 D → 2 1 H +  4 He + 2  + 20.85 MeV. The possible heat generation rate can be calculated as 8.12 × 10 12  J/m 3 , based on the assumption that Earth's primitive heat supply has already been exhausted. The H and He atoms produced and the anti-neutrino are incorporated as Fe-H based alloys in the H-rich portion of inner core, are released from Earth's interior to the universe, and pass through Earth, respectively.

  8. Effect of heat transfer in the fog region during core reflooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouai, N. M.; El-sawy, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Core reflooding following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) received considerable attention during the past thirty years. In this paper a one dimensional model is used to study the effect of the heat transfer in the fog region ahead of the wet front reflooding rate of a cylindrical fuel element following a LOCA in a PWR. The heat conduction equation in the cladding is solved in coordinate system moving with the wet front under a variety of condition to investigate the effects of such parameters as the initial cladding surface temperature, the decay heat generation rate in the fuel and the mode of heat transfer prevailing. The cladding surface is divided into three axial regions according to the mechanism of heat transfer, namely, a boiling region behind the wet front, a fog region ahead of the wet front and a dry region further downstream of the wet front. The effect of changing the heat transfer coefficient in the fog region on the rewetting rate and on the fog length is investigated. The results of this simple model show that increasing the heat transfer in the fog region increases the rewetting velocity and consequently decreases the fog length. The results are in general agreement with a more accurate two-dimensional model and experimental data. (author)

  9. Diversified emergency core cooling in CANDU with a passive moderator heat rejection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinks, N [AECL Research, Chalk River Labs., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    A passive moderator heat rejection system is being developed for CANDU reactors which, combined with a conventional emergency-coolant injection system, provides the diversity to reduce core-melt frequency to order 10{sup -7} per unit-year. This is similar to the approach used in the design of contemporary CANDU shutdown systems which leads to a frequency of order 10{sup -8} per unit-year for events leading to loss of shutdown. Testing of a full height 1/60 power-and-volume-scaled loop has demonstrated the feasibility of the passive system for removal of moderator heat during normal operation and during accidents. With the frequency of core-melt reduced, by these measures, to order 10{sup -7} per unit year, no need should exist for further mitigation. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs.

  10. Multiregional coupled conduction--convection model for heat transfer in an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, G.E. Jr.; Childs, K.W.; Sanders, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    HEXEREI is a three-dimensional, coupled conduction-convection heat transfer and multichannel fluid dynamic analysis computer code with both steady-state and transient capabilities. The program was developed to provide thermal-fluid dynamic analysis of a core following the general design for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs); its purpose was to provide licensing evaluations for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In order to efficiently model the HTGR core, the nodal geometry of HEXEREI was chosen as a regular hexagonal array perpendicular to the axis of and bounded by a right circular cylinder. The cylindrical nodal geometry surrounds the hexagonal center portion of the mesh; these two different types of nodal geometries must be connected by interface nodes to complete the accurate modeling of the HTGR core. HEXEREI will automatically generate a nodal geometry that will accurately model a complex assembly of hexagonal and irregular prisms. The accuracy of the model was proven by a comparison of computed values with analytical results for steady-state and transient heat transfer problems. HEXEREI incorporates convective heat transfer to the coolant in many parallel axial flow channels. Forced and natural convection (which permits different flow directions in parallel channels) is included in the heat transfer and fluid dynamic models. HEXEREI incorporates a variety of steady-state and transient solution techniques that can be matched with a particular problem to minimize the computational time. HEXEREI was compared with a code of similar capabilities that was based on a Cartesian mesh. This code modeled only one specific core design, and the mesh spacing was closer than that generated by HEXEREI. Good agreement was obtained with the detail provided by the representations

  11. Heat and fission product transport in molten core material pool with crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Suh, K.Y.; Kang, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in a molten pool are influenced by internal volumetric heat generated from the radioactive decay of fission product species retained in the reactor vessel during a severe accident. The pool superheat is determined based on the overall energy balance that equates the heat production rate to the heat loss rate. Decay heat of fission products in the pool is estimated by product of the mass concentration and energy conversion factor of each fission product. Twenty-nine elements are chosen and classified by their chemical properties to calculate heat generation rate in the pool. The mass concentration of a fission product is obtained from released fraction and the tabular output of the ORIGEN 2 code. The initial core and pool inventories at each time can also be estimated using ORIGEN 2. The released fraction of each fission product is calculated based on the bubble dynamics and mass transport. Numerical analysis is performed for heat and fission product transport in a molten core material pool during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The pool is assumed to be a partially filled hemisphere, whose change in geometry is neglected during the numerical calculation. Calculated results indicate that the peak temperature in the molten pool is significantly lowered, since a substantial amount of the volatile fission products is released from the molten pool during progression of the accident. The results may directly be applied to the existing severe accident analysis codes to more mechanistically determine the thermal load to the reactor vessel lower head during the in-vessel retention

  12. Studies of Deteriorated Heat Transfer in Prismatic Cores Stemming from Irradiation-Induced Geometry Distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Brian G.; Schultz, Richard R.; McEligot, Don M.; McCreery, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    A reference design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is to use General Atomics Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). For such a configuration in normal operation, the helium coolant flow proceeds from the upper plenum to the lower plenum principally through the core coolant channels and the interstitial gaps (bypass flow) that separate the prismatic blocks from one another. Only the core prismatic blocks have coolant channels. The interstitial gaps are present throughout the core, the inner reflector region, and the out reflector region. The bypass flows in a prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) are of potential concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels and, thereby, can increase outlet gas temperatures and maximum fuel temperatures. Consequently, it is appropriate to account for bypass flows in reactor thermal gas dynamic analyses. The objectives of this project include the following: fundamentally understand bypass flow and heat transfer at scaled, undistorted conditions and with geometry distortions; develop improved estimates of associated loss coefficients, surface friction and heat transfer for systems and network codes; and obtain related data for validation of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) or system (e.g., RELAP5) codes which can be employed in predictions for a GCR for normal power, reduced power, and residual heat removal operations.

  13. Studies of Deteriorated Heat Transfer in Prismatic Cores Stemming from Irradiation-Induced Geometry Distortion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian G. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Schultz, Richard R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McEligot, Don M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); McCreery, Glenn [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-31

    A reference design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is to use General Atomics Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). For such a configuration in normal operation, the helium coolant flow proceeds from the upper plenum to the lower plenum principally through the core coolant channels and the interstitial gaps (bypass flow) that separate the prismatic blocks from one another. Only the core prismatic blocks have coolant channels. The interstitial gaps are present throughout the core, the inner reflector region, and the out reflector region. The bypass flows in a prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) are of potential concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels and, thereby, can increase outlet gas temperatures and maximum fuel temperatures. Consequently, it is appropriate to account for bypass flows in reactor thermal gas dynamic analyses. The objectives of this project include the following: fundamentally understand bypass flow and heat transfer at scaled, undistorted conditions and with geometry distortions; develop improved estimates of associated loss coefficients, surface friction and heat transfer for systems and network codes; and obtain related data for validation of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) or system (e.g., RELAP5) codes which can be employed in predictions for a GCR for normal power, reduced power, and residual heat removal operations.

  14. In core instrumentation for online nuclear heating measurements of material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynard, C.; Andre, J.; Brun, J.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Zerega, Y.; Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J-P.; Fourmentel, D.; Glayse, W.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Iracane, D.; Villard, J.-F.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on nuclear heating. This work belongs to a new advanced research program called IN-CORE which means 'Instrumentation for Nuclear radiations and Calorimetry Online in REactor' between the LCP (University of Provence-CNRS) and the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) - Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) program. This program started in September 2009 and is dedicated to the conception and the design of an innovative mobile experimental device coupling several sensors and ray detectors for on line measurements of relevant physical parameters (photonic heating, neutronic flux ...) and for an accurate parametric mapping of experimental channels in the JHR Core. The work presented below is the first step of this program and concerns a brief state of the art related to measurement methods of nuclear heating phenomena in research reactor in general and MTR in particular. A special care is given to gamma heating measurements. A first part deals with numerical codes and models. The second one presents instrumentation divided into various kinds of sensor such as calorimeter measurements and gamma ionization chamber measurements. Their basic principles, characteristics such as metrological parameters, operating mode, disadvantages/advantages, ... are discussed. (author)

  15. Linking lowermost mantle structure, core-mantle boundary heat flux and mantle plume formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingming; Zhong, Shijie; Olson, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of Earth's lowermost mantle exert significant control on the formation of mantle plumes and the core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux. However, it is not clear if and how the variation of CMB heat flux and mantle plume activity are related. Here, we perform geodynamic model experiments that show how temporal variations in CMB heat flux and pulses of mantle plumes are related to morphologic changes of the thermochemical piles of large-scale compositional heterogeneities in Earth's lowermost mantle, represented by the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). We find good correlation between the morphologic changes of the thermochemical piles and the time variation of CMB heat flux. The morphology of the thermochemical piles is significantly altered during the initiation and ascent of strong mantle plumes, and the changes in pile morphology cause variations in the local and the total CMB heat flux. Our modeling results indicate that plume-induced episodic variations of CMB heat flux link geomagnetic superchrons to pulses of surface volcanism, although the relative timing of these two phenomena remains problematic. We also find that the density distribution in thermochemical piles is heterogeneous, and that the piles are denser on average than the surrounding mantle when both thermal and chemical effects are included.

  16. Homogenization of some radiative heat transfer models: application to gas-cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ganaoui, K.

    2006-09-01

    In the context of homogenization theory we treat some heat transfer problems involving unusual (according to the homogenization) boundary conditions. These problems are defined in a solid periodic perforated domain where two scales (macroscopic and microscopic) are to be taken into account and describe heat transfer by conduction in the solid and by radiation on the wall of each hole. Two kinds of radiation are considered: radiation in an infinite medium (non-linear problem) and radiation in cavity with grey-diffuse walls (non-linear and non-local problem). The derived homogenized models are conduction problems with an effective conductivity which depend on the considered radiation. Thus we introduce a framework (homogenization and validation) based on mathematical justification using the two-scale convergence method and numerical validation by simulations using the computer code CAST3M. This study, performed for gas cooled reactors cores, can be extended to other perforated domains involving the considered heat transfer phenomena. (author)

  17. Study of heat removal by natural convection from the internal core catcher in PFBR using water model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasmin Sudha, A.; Punitha, G.; Das, S.K.; Lydia, G.; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Harvey, J.; Kannan, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the event of a core meltdown accident in a Fast Breeder Reactor, the molten core material settling on the bottom of the main vessel can endanger the structural integrity of the main vessel. In the design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor in India, the construction of which is about to commence, a core catcher is provided as the internal core retention device to collect and retain the core debris in a coolable configuration. Heat transfer by natural convection above and below the core catcher plate, in the zone beneath the core support structure is evaluated from water mockup experiments in the 1:4 geometrically scaled setup. These studies were undertaken towards comparison of experimentally measured temperatures at different locations with the numerical results. The core catcher assembly consists of a core catcher plate, a heat shield plate and a chimney. Decay heat from the core debris is simulated by electrical heating of the heat shield plate. An opening is provided in the cover plate to reproduce the situation in the actual accident where the core debris would have breached a part of the core support structure. Experiments were carried out with different heat flux levels prevailing upon the heat shield plate. Temperature monitoring was done at more than 100 locations, distributed both on the solid components and in water. The temperature data was analysed to get the temperature profile at different steady state conditions. Flow visualisation was also carried out using water soluble dye to establish the direction of the convective currents. The captured images show that water flows through the slots provided in the top portion of the chimney in the upward direction as evidenced from the diffusion of dye injected inside the chimney. Both the temperature data and flow visualisation confirm mixing of water through the opening in the core support structure which indicates that natural convection is set up in that zone

  18. Development of heat transfer package for core thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of upgraded JRR-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Ikawa, Hiromasa; Kaminaga, Masanori

    1985-01-01

    A heat transfer package was developed for the core thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of the Japan Research Reactor-3 (JRR-3) which is to be remodeled to a 20 MWt pool-type, light water-cooled reactor with 20 % low enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type fuel. This paper presents the constitution of the developed heat transfer package and the applicability of the heat transfer correlations adopted in it, based on the heat transfer experiments in which thermal-hydraulic features of the new JRR-3 core were properly reflected. (author)

  19. Thermal hydraulic parametric investigation of decay heat removal from degraded core of a sodium cooled fast Breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Lokesh [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kumar Sharma, Anil, E-mail: aksharma@igcar.gov.in [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India); Velusamy, K. [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Decay heat removal from degraded core of a typical SFR is highlighted. • Influence of number of DHXs in operation on PAHR is analyzed. • Investigations on structural integrity of the inner vessel and core catcher. • Feasibility study for retention of a part of debris in upper pool of SFR. - Abstract: Ensuring post accident decay heat removal with high degree of reliability following a Core Disruptive Accident (CDA) is very important in the design of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR). In the recent past, a lot of research has been done towards the design of an in-vessel core catcher below the grid plate to prevent the core debris reaching the main vessel in a pool type SFR. However, during an energetic CDA, the entire core debris is unlikely to reach the core catcher. A significant part of the debris is likely to settle in core periphery between radial shielding subassemblies and the inner vessel. Failure of inner vessel due to the decay heat can lead to core debris reaching the main vessel and threatening its integrity. On the other hand, retention of a part of debris in core periphery can reduce the load on main core catcher. Towards achieving an optimum design of SFR and safety evaluation, it is essential to quantify the amount of heat generating core debris that can be retained safely within the primary vessel. This has been performed by a mathematical simulation comprising solution of 2-D transient form of the governing equations of turbulent sodium flow and heat transfer with Boussinesq approximations. The conjugate conduction-convection model adopted for this purpose is validated against in-house experimental data. Transient evolutions of natural convection in the pools and structural temperatures in critical components have been predicted. It is found that 50% of the core debris can be safely accommodated in the gap between radial shielding subassemblies and inner vessel without exceeding structural temperature limit. It is also

  20. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  1. A heat transfer correlation based on a surface renewal model for molten core concrete interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B. . E-mail bruno.tourniaire@cea.fr

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of heat transfer between corium pool and concrete basemat is of particular significance in the framework of the study of PWR's severe accident. Heat transfer directly governs the ablation velocity of concrete in case of molten core concrete interaction (MCCI) and, consequently, the time delay when the reactor cavity may fail. From a restricted hydrodynamic point of view, this issue is related to heat transfer between a heated bubbling pool and a porous wall with gas injection. Several experimental studies have been performed with simulant materials and many correlations have been provided to address this issue. The comparisons of the results of these correlations with the measurements and their extrapolation to reactor materials show that strong discrepancies between the results of these models are obtained which probably means that some phenomena are not well taken into account. The main purpose of this paper is to present an alternative heat transfer model which was originally developed for chemical engineering applications (bubble columns) by Deckwer. A part of this work is devoted to the presentation of this model, which is based on a surface renewal assumption. Comparison of the results of this model with available experimental data in different systems are presented and discussed. These comparisons clearly show that this model can be used to deal with the particular problem of MCCI. The analyses also lead to enrich the original model by taking into account the thermal resistance of the wall: a new formulation of the Deckwer's correlation is finally proposed

  2. Calculation and analysis of generator limiting regimes with respect to stator end core heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Miloje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new simplified procedure for defining the limiting operating regimes on the generator capability curve, with respect to stator end core heating, is proposed and described in this paper. First of all, a simplified analysis of axial flux leakage that penetrates into the end plates of the stator is carried out and the corresponding power losses are calculated. Then the analysis of measured point temperature increases over the stator end core, and a qualitative and quantitative overview of the effects, are presented. A simplified procedure for defining the limiting regime with regard to the heating stator end core, which is illustrated for the case of an operating diagram for a given generator of apparent power of 727 MVA (B2 is also described. The given limiting line constructed using this method is similar to the appropriate line constructed on the basis of complex and lengthy factory and on-site tests performed by the manufacturer and the user. According to the results and the check, the proposed method has been proved and the application of the simplified procedure can be recommended for use along with other procedures, at least when it comes to similar synchronous generators in Serbia's Electric Power Industry.

  3. Numerical simulation of passive heat removal under severe core meltdown scenario in a sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Dijo K.; Mangarjuna Rao, P., E-mail: pmr@igcar.gov.in; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • PAHR in SFR under large core relocation to in-vessel core catcher is numerically analyzed. • A 1-D thermal conduction model and a 2-D axisymmetric CFD model are developed for turbulent natural convection phenomenon. • The side pool (cold pool) was found out to be instrumental in storing heat and dissipating it to the heat sink. • Single tray type in-vessel core catcher is found to be thermally effective under one-fourth core relocation. - Abstract: A sequence of highly unlikely events leading to significant meltdown of the Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) core can cause the failure of reactor vessel if the molten fuel debris settles at the bottom of the reactor main vessel. To prevent this, pool type SFRs are usually provided with an in-vessel core catcher above the bottom wall of the main vessel. The core catcher should collect, retain and passively cool these debris by facilitating decay heat removal by natural convection. In the present work, the heat removal capability of the existing single tray core catcher design has been evaluated numerically by analyzing the transient development of natural convection loops inside SFR pool. A 1-D heat diffusion model and a simplified 2-D axi-symmetric CFD model are developed for the same. Maximum temperature of the core catcher plate evaluated for different core meltdown scenarios using these models showed that there is much higher heat removal potential for single tray in-vessel SFR core catcher compared to the design basis case of melting of 7 subassemblies under total instantaneous blockage of a subassembly. The study also revealed that the side pool of cold sodium plays a significant role in decay heat removal. The maximum debris bed temperature attained during the initial hours of PAHR does not depend much on when the Decay Heat Exchanger (DHX) gets operational, and it substantiates the inherent safety of the system. The present study paves the way for better understanding of the thermal

  4. Concepts for passive heat removal and filtration systems under core meltdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.; Neitzel, H.-J.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the new containment concept being developed by KfK is the complete passive enclosure of a power reactor after a core meltdown accident by means of a solid containment structure and passive removal of the decay heat. This is to be accomplished by cooling the containment walls with ambient air, with thermoconvection as the driving force. The concept of the containment is described. Data are given of the heat removal and the requirements for filtration of the exhaust air, which is contaminated due to the leak rate assumed for the inner containment. The concept for the filter system is described. Various solutions for reduction of the large volumetric flow to be filtered are discussed. 3 refs., 8 figs

  5. Warm-Core Intensification of a Hurricane Through Horizontal Eddy Heat Transports Inside the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Fulton, John; Nolan, David S.

    2001-01-01

    A simulation of Hurricane Bob (1991) using the PSU/NCAR MM5 mesoscale model with a finest mesh spacing of 1.3 km is used to diagnose the heat budget of the hurricane. Heat budget terms, including latent and radiative heating, boundary layer forcing, and advection terms were output directly from the model for a 6-h period with 2-min frequency. Previous studies of warm core formation have emphasized the warming associated with gentle subsidence within the eye. The simulation of Hurricane Bob also identifies subsidence warming as a major factor for eye warming, but also shows a significant contribution from horizontal advective terms. When averaged over the area of the eye, excluding the eyewall (at least in an azimuthal mean sense), subsidence is found to strongly warm the mid-troposphere (2-9 km) while horizontal advection warms the mid to upper troposphere (5-13 km) with about equal magnitude. Partitioning of the horizontal advective terms into azimuthal mean and eddy components shows that the mean radial circulation cannot, as expected, generally contribute to this warming, but that it is produced almost entirely by the horizontal eddy transport of heat into the eye. A further breakdown of the eddy components into azimuthal wave numbers 1, 2, and higher indicates that the warming is dominated by wave number 1 asymmetries, with smaller contributions coming from higher wave numbers. Warming by horizontal eddy transport is consistent with idealized modeling of vortex Rossby waves and work is in progress to identify and clarify the role of vortex Rossby waves in warm-core intensification in both the full-physics model and idealized models.

  6. Assessment of Two-Phase Flow Heat Transfer Correlations for Molten Core-Concrete Interaction Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B.; Varo, O.

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of heat transfer between corium pool and concrete basemat is of particular significance in the framework of the study of PWR's severe accident. Heat transfer directly governs the ablation velocity of concrete in case of molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) and, consequently, the time delay when the reactor cavity may fail. From a restricted hydrodynamic point of view, this issue is related to heat transfer between a heated bubbling pool and a porous wall with gas injection. Several experimental studies have been performed with simulant materials and many correlations have been provided to address this issue. The main purpose of this paper is to assess these correlations from comparisons against the available experimental data. After a review of these data, the different correlations are presented. Attention focuses here on the correlations generally used in MCCI study: Kutateladze-Malenkov, Konsetov and BALI correlations. The Deckwer's correlation is also included in this review. The comparisons between the results of these correlations and the experimental data are then discussed. (authors)

  7. LMFR core and heat exchanger thermohydraulic design: former USSR and present Russian approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The information presented in this report is dealing with liquid metal cooled fast reactors some of which are in operation (France, Japan, Russian federation) or under construction. Comprehensive thermal hydraulic research both experimental and numeric applied to such reactors was carried out in the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russian Federation. The IAEA Working Group on fast Reactors (IWGFR) recommended that IPPE should generalize its thermal hydraulic studies as well as results of other countries published previously in the field of liquid metal flow distribution and heat transfer in fuel pin and heat exchanger rod bundles (France, Germany, Japan, India, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States). The validity of computer codes and design approaches was proven by comparison of calculated results with measured values of velocity, pressure, temperature distributions in rod bundles cooled/heated by liquid metal, usually sodium. The report includes the methodology and philosophy of the analytical and experimental investigations when applied to core and heat exchanger thermal hydraulic design of Light Water Moderated Fast Reactors (LMFRs)

  8. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  9. Post shut-down decay heat removal from nuclear reactor core by natural convection loops in sodium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sundararajan, T., E-mail: tsundar@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Parthasarathy, U.; Velusamy, K. [Nuclear Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Transient simulations are performed for a worst case scenario of station black-out. • Inter-wrapper flow between various sub-assemblies reduces peak core temperature. • Various natural convection paths limits fuel clad temperatures below critical level. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Indian pool type Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has a passive core cooling system, known as the Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) which aids to remove decay heat after shut down phase. Immediately after reactor shut down the fission products in the core continue to generate heat due to beta decay which exponentially decreases with time. In the event of a complete station blackout, the coolant pump system may not be available and the safety grade decay heat removal system transports the decay heat from the core and dissipates it safely to the atmosphere. Apart from SGDHRS, various natural convection loops in the sodium pool carry the heat away from the core and deposit it temporarily in the sodium pool. The buoyancy driven flow through the small inter-wrapper gaps (known as inter-wrapper flow) between fuel subassemblies plays an important role in carrying the decay heat from the sub-assemblies to the hot sodium pool, immediately after reactor shut down. This paper presents the transient prediction of flow and temperature evolution in the reactor subassemblies and the sodium pool, coupled with the safety grade decay heat removal system. It is shown that with a properly sized decay heat exchanger based on liquid sodium and air chimney stacks, the post shutdown decay heat can be safely dissipated to atmospheric air passively.

  10. ANALYSIS OF GAMMA HEATING AT TRIGA MARK REACTOR CORE BANDUNG USING PLATE TYPE FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiyanto Setiyanto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In accordance with the discontinuation of TRIGA fuel element production by its producer, the operation of all TRIGA type reactor of at all over the word will be disturbed, as well as TRIGA reactor in Bandung. In order to support the continuous operation of Bandung TRIGA reactor, a study on utilization of fuel plate mode, as used at RSG-GAS reactor, to replace the cylindrical model has been done. Various assessments have been done, including core design calculation and its safety aspects. Based on the neutronic calculation, utilization of fuel plate shows that Bandung TRIGA reactor can be operated by 20 fuel elements only. Compared with the original core, the new reactor core configuration is smaller and it results in some empty space that can be used for in-core irradiation facilities. Due to the existing of in-core irradiation facilities, the gamma heating value became a new factor that should be evaluated for safety analysis. For this reason, the gamma heating for TRIGA Bandung reactor using fuel plate was calculated by Gamset computer code. The calculations based on linear attenuation equations, line sources and gamma propagation on space. Calculations were also done for reflector positions (Lazy Susan irradiation facilities and central irradiation position (CIP, especially for any material samples. The calculation results show that gamma heating for CIP is significantly important (0,87 W/g, but very low value for Lazy Susan position (lest then 0,11 W/g. Based on this results, it can be concluded that the utilization of CIP as irradiation facilities need to consider of gamma heating as data for safety analysis report. Keywords: gamma heating, nuclear reactor, research reactor, reactor safety.   ABSTRAK Dengan dihentikannya produksi elemen bakar reaktor jenis Triga oleh produsen, maka semua reaktor TRIGA di dunia terganggu operasinya, termasuk juga reaktor TRIGA 2000 di Bandung. Untuk mendukung pengoperasian reaktor TRIGA Bandung

  11. Influence of composition and rate heating on formation of black core in bodies obtained with red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, L.N.L.; Goncalves, W.P.; Silva, B.J. da; Macedo, R.S.; Santos, R.C.; Lisboa, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the heating of pieces of red pottery can the defect known as black core, this may deteriorate the technical and aesthetic characteristics of the final product. This study evaluated the influence of chemical composition and heating rate on the formation of black core in bodies red ceramic. The masses were treated and samples were extruded, dried, sintered at 900 °C, with heating rates of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 °C / min. and determined the following properties: water absorption, linear shrinkage and flexural strength. The pieces made with the mass containing lower content of iron oxide showed better resistance to bending when subjected to rapid heating. The presence of the black core was identified through visual analysis of the pieces after the break, being more apparent in parts subject to rates above 5 °C / min. (author)

  12. Heat Transfer in Pebble-Bed Nuclear Reactor Cores Cooled by Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddar, Lakshana Ravindranath

    With electricity demand predicted to rise by more than 50% within the next 20 years and a burgeoning world population requiring reliable emissions-free base-load electricity, can we design advanced nuclear reactors to help meet this challenge? At the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR) are currently being investigated. FHRs are designed with better safety and economic characteristics than conventional light water reactors (LWR) currently in operation. These reactors operate at high temperature and low pressure making them more efficient and safer than LWRs. The pebble-bed FHR (PB-FHR) variant includes an annular nuclear reactor core that is filled with randomly packed pebble fuel. It is crucial to characterize the heat transfer within this unique geometry as this informs the safety limits of the reactor. The work presented in this dissertation focused on furthering the understanding of heat transfer in pebble-bed nuclear reactor cores using fluoride salts as a coolant. This was done through experimental, analytical and computational techniques. A complex nuclear system with a coolant that has never previously been in commercial use requires experimental data that can directly inform aspects of its design. It is important to isolate heat transfer phenomena in order to understand the underlying physics in the context of the PB-FHR, as well as to make decisions about further experimental work that needs to be done in support of developing the PB-FHR. Certain organic oils can simulate the heat transfer behaviour of the fluoride salt if relevant non-dimensional parameters are matched. The advantage of this method is that experiments can be done at a much lower temperature and at a smaller geometric scale compared to FHRs, thereby lowering costs. In this dissertation, experiments were designed and performed to collect data demonstrating similitude. The limitations of these experiments were also elucidated by

  13. Concept Design of a Gravity Core Cooling Tank as a Passive Residual Heat Removal System for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwonyeong; Chi, Daeyoung; Kim, Seong Hoon; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Yoon, Juhyeon

    2014-01-01

    A core downward flow is considered to use a plate type fuel because it is benefit to install the fuel in the core. If a flow inversion from a downward to upward flow in the core by a natural circulation is introduced within a high heat flux region of residual heat, the fuel fails instantly due to zero flow. Therefore, the core downward flow should be sufficiently maintained until the residual heat is in a low heat flux region. In a small power research reactor, inertia generated by a flywheel of the PCP can maintain a downward flow shortly and resolve the problem of a flow inversion. However, a high power research reactor more than 10 MW should have an additional method to have a longer downward flow until a low heat flux. Usually, other research reactors have selected an active residual heat removal system as a safety class. But, an active safety system is difficult to design and expensive to construct. A Gravity Core Cooling Tank (GCCT) beside the reactor pool with a Residual Heat Removal Pipe connecting two pools was developed and designed preliminarily as a passive residual heat removal system for an open-pool type research reactor. It is very simple to design and cheap to construct. Additionally, a non-safety, but active residual heat removal system is applied with the GCCT. It is a Pool Water Cooling and Purification System. It can improve the usability of the research reactor by removing the thermal waves, and purify the reactor pool, the Primary Cooling System, and the GCCT. Moreover, it can reduce the pool top radiation level

  14. Pressurized Hybrid Heat Pipe for Passive IN-Core Cooling System (PINCs) in Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The representative operating limit of the thermosyphon heat pipe is flooding limit that arises from the countercurrent flow of vapor and liquid. The effect of difference between wetted perimeter and heated perimeter on the flooding limit of the thermosyphons has not been studied; despite the effect of cross-sectional area of the vapor path on the heat transfer characteristics of thermosyphons have been studied. Additionally, the hybrid heat pipe must operate at the high temperature and high pressure environment because it will be inserted to the active core to remove the decay heat. However, the previously studied heat pipes operated below the atmospheric pressure. Therefore, the effect of the unique geometry for hybrid heat pipe and operating pressure on the heat transfer characteristics including the flooding limit of hybrid heat pipe was experimentally measured. Hybrid heat pipe as a new conceptual decay heat removal device was proposed. For the development of hybrid heat pipe operating at high temperature and high pressure conditions, the pressurized hybrid heat pipe was prepared and the thermal performances including operation limits of hybrid heat pipe were experimentally measured. Followings were obtained: (1) As operating pressure of the heat pipe increases, the evaporation heat transfer coefficient increases due to heat transfer with convective pool boiling mode. (2) Non-condensable gas charged in the test section for the pressurization lowered the condensation heat transfer by impeding the vapor flow to the condenser. (3) The deviations between experimentally measured flooding limits for hybrid heat pipes and the values from correlation for annular thermosyphon were observed.

  15. Natural convection and radiation heat transfer in a vertical porous layer with a hexagonal honeycomb core. 2nd Report. Experiment on heat transfer; Honeycomb core de shikirareta enchoku takoshitsu sonai no shizen tairyu - fukusha fukugo netsu dentatsu. 2. Dennetsu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Y; Asako, Y [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1997-06-25

    The combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer characteristics in a vertical porous layer with a hexagonal honeycomb core were investigate experimentally. The temperature distributions on the honeycomb core wall and the combined heat transfer rates through the porous layer were measured. The measurements of the heat transfer were accomplished using the guarded hot plate (GHP) method. The honeycomb core wall was made of paper and large mesh foamed resins were inserted into the honeycomb enclosures. The measurements were performed while varying the radiation parameters between 0.5 to 0.65, varying the temperature ratios between 0.01 to 0.1 and varying the Darcy-Rayleigh numbers between 5 to 80, and for a fixed aspect ratio of H/L=1. The experimental results for Nusselt numbers agreed well with our available numerical results. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Turbulent heat transfer in a coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Saha, Arun K.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Exact predictions in nuclear reactors are more crucial, because of the safety aspects. It necessitates the appropriate modeling of heat transfer phenomena in the reactors core. A two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model is used to study the detailed analysis of the coolant region of a fuel pin. Governing equations are solved using Marker and Cell (MAC) method. Standard wall functions k-ε turbulence model is incorporated to consider the turbulent behaviour of the flow field. Validation of the code and a few results for a typical PWR running at normal operating conditions reported earlier. There were some discrepancies in the old calculations. These discrepancies have been resolved and updated results are presented in this work. 2D thermal-hydraulics model results have been compared with the 1D thermal-hydraulics model results and conclusions have been drawn. (author)

  17. Response of a core coherent density oscillation on electron cyclotron resonance heating in Heliotron J plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Lu, X. X.; Kenmochi, N.; Ida, K.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Kado, S.; Kokubu, D.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Otani, Y.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2018-01-01

    We report properties of a coherent density oscillation observed in the core region and its response to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in Heliotron J plasma. The measurement was performed using a multi-channel beam emission spectroscopy system. The density oscillation is observed in a radial region between the core and the half radius. The poloidal mode number is found to be 1 (or 2). By modulating the ECH power with 100 Hz, repetition of formation and deformation of a strong electron temperature gradient, which is likely ascribed to be an electron internal transport barrier, is realized. Amplitude and rotation frequency of the coherent density oscillation sitting at the strong electron temperature gradient location are modulated by the ECH, while the poloidal mode structure remains almost unchanged. The change in the rotation velocity in the laboratory frame is derived. Assuming that the change of the rotation velocity is given by the background E × B velocity, a possible time evolution of the radial electric field was deduced.

  18. Diffusion induced nuclear reactions in metals: a possible source of heat in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, V.M.; Iyer, S.S.S.

    1989-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that diffusion of light nuclei in metals can give rise to unusual electrical charge distributions in their lattice structures, inducing thereby certain nuclear reactions that are otherwise uncommon. In the light of these results we advance the hypothesis that such nuclear reactions take place in the metal rich core of the earth, based on following observations: 1 - The solubility of hydrogen in metals is relatively high compared to that in silicates. 2 - Studies of rare gas samples in intraplate volcanos and diamonds show that 3 He/ He ratio increases with depth in the mantle. 3 - There are indications that He is positively correlated with enrichment of metals in lavas. We propose that hydrogen incorporated into metallic phases at the time of planetary accretion was carried to the core by downward migration of metal rich melts during the early states of proto-earth. Preliminary estimates suggest that cold fusion reactions can give rise to an average rate of heat generation of 8.2x10 12 W and may thus serve as a supplementary source of energy for the geomagnetic dynamo. (author)

  19. Technical specification improvements to containment heat removal and emergency core cooling systems: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, W.P.; Ha, C.; Pentzien, D.C.; Visweswaran, S.

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis for technical specification improvements to the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) and containment heat removal systems (EPRI Research Project 2142-3). The objective of this project is to further develop a reliability- and risk-based methodology to provide improvements by considering groups of surveillance test intervals and allowed out-of-service times jointly. This was done for the technical specifications for the ECCS, containment heat removal equipment, and supporting systems of a boiling water reactor plant. The project (1) developed a methodology for optimizing groups of surveillance test intervals and allowed out-of-service times jointly, (2) applied the methodology in a case study of a specific operating plant, Hatch-2, and (3) evaluated benefits of the application. The results of the case study demonstrate that beneficial technical specification improvements can be realized with application of the methodology. By tightening a small group of sensitive surveillance test intervals (STIs) and allowed out-of-service times (AOTs), a larger group of less sensitive STIs and AOTs can be extended resulting in an overall plant operating cost improvement without reducing the plant safety. The reliability- and risk-based methodology and results from this project can be effectively applied for technical specification improvements at other operating plants

  20. The effect of humidified heated breathing circuit on core body temperature in perioperative hypothermia during thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hue Jung; Moon, Ho Sik; Moon, Se Ho; Do Jeong, Hyeon; Jeon, Young Jae; Do Han, Keung; Koh, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: During general anesthesia, human body easily reaches a hypothermic state, which is mainly caused by heat redistribution. Most studies suggested that humidified heated breathing circuits (HHBC) have little influence on maintenance of the core temperature during early phase of anesthesia. This study was aimed at examining heat preservation effect with HHBC in case of undergoing surgery with less exposure of surgical fields and short surgical duration. Methods: Patients aged 19 to 70 yr - old, ASA-PS I or II who were scheduled for elective thyroidectomy were assigned and divided to the group using HHBC (G1) and the group using conventional circuit (G2) by random allocation. During operation, core, skin, and room temperatures were measured every 5minutes by specific thermometer. Results: G1 was decreased by a lesser extent than G2 in core temperature, apparently higher at 30 and 60 minutes after induction. Skin and room temperatures showed no differences between the two groups (p>0.05). Consequently, we confirmed HHBC efficiently prevented a decrease in core temperature during early period in small operation which has difficulty in preparing warming devices or environments were not usually considered. Conclusions: This study showed that HHBC influences heat redistribution in early period of operation and can lessen the magnitude of the decrease in core body temperature. Therefore, it can be applied efficiently for other active warming devices in mild hypothermia.

  1. Power Relative to Body Mass Best Predicts Change in Core Temperature During Exercise-Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Oliver R; Willmott, Ashley G B; James, Carl A; Hayes, Mark; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-02-01

    Gibson, OR, Willmott, AGB, James, CA, Hayes, M, and Maxwell, NS. Power relative to body mass best predicts change in core temperature during exercise-heat stress. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 403-414, 2017-Controlling internal temperature is crucial when prescribing exercise-heat stress, particularly during interventions designed to induce thermoregulatory adaptations. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the rate of rectal temperature (Trec) increase, and various methods for prescribing exercise-heat stress, to identify the most efficient method of prescribing isothermic heat acclimation (HA) training. Thirty-five men cycled in hot conditions (40° C, 39% R.H.) for 29 ± 2 minutes. Subjects exercised at 60 ± 9% V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, with methods for prescribing exercise retrospectively observed for each participant. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated for each prescriptive variable against the rate of change in Trec (° C·h), with stepwise multiple regressions performed on statistically significant variables (p ≤ 0.05). Linear regression identified the predicted intensity required to increase Trec by 1.0-2.0° C between 20- and 45-minute periods and the duration taken to increase Trec by 1.5° C in response to incremental intensities to guide prescription. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) relationships with the rate of change in Trec were observed for prescriptions based on relative power (W·kg; r = 0.764), power (%Powermax; r = 0.679), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (r = 0.577), V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (%V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak; r = 0.562), heart rate (HR) (%HRmax; r = 0.534), and thermal sensation (r = 0.311). Stepwise multiple regressions observed relative power and RPE as variables to improve the model (r = 0.791), with no improvement after inclusion of any anthropometric variable. Prescription of exercise under heat stress using power (W·kg or %Powermax) has the strongest relationship with the rate of change in

  2. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  3. Theoretical analysis and numerical modelling of heat transfer and fuel migration in underlying soils and constructive elements of nuclear plants during an accident release from the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutunjan, R.V.; Bolshov, L.A.; Vitukov, V.V.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Dykhne, A.M.; Kiselev, V.P.; Klementova, S.V.; Krayushkin, I.E.; Moskovchenko, A.V.; Pismennii, V.D.; Popkov, A.G.; Chernov, S.Y.; Chudanov, V.V.; Khoruzhii, O.V.; Yudin, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Migration of fuel fragments and core fission products during severe accidents on nuclear plants is studied analytically and numerically. The problems of heat transfer and migration of volume heat sources in construction materials and underlying soils are considered

  4. Heat Storage Performance of the Prefabricated Hollow Core Concrete Deck Element with Integrated Microencapsulated Phase Change Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the numerically calculated dynamic heat storage capacity of the prefabricated hollow core concrete deck element with and without microencapsulated phase change material (PCM). The reference deck is the ordinary deck made of standard concrete material and that is broadly used...

  5. Heated wire humidification circuit attenuates the decrease of core temperature during general anesthesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic hip surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sooyong; Yoon, Seok-Hwa; Youn, Ann Misun; Song, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Ja Gyung

    2017-12-01

    Intraoperative hypothermia is common in patients undergoing general anesthesia during arthroscopic hip surgery. In the present study, we assessed the effect of heating and humidifying the airway with a heated wire humidification circuit (HHC) to attenuate the decrease of core temperature and prevent hypothermia in patients undergoing arthroscopic hip surgery under general anesthesia. Fifty-six patients scheduled for arthroscopic hip surgery were randomly assigned to either a control group using a breathing circuit connected with a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) (n = 28) or an HHC group using a heated wire humidification circuit (n = 28). The decrease in core temperature was measured from anesthetic induction and every 15 minutes thereafter using an esophageal stethoscope. Decrease in core temperature from anesthetic induction to 120 minutes after induction was lower in the HHC group (-0.60 ± 0.27℃) compared to the control group (-0.86 ± 0.29℃) (P = 0.001). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia or the incidence of shivering in the postanesthetic care unit. The use of HHC may be considered as a method to attenuate intraoperative decrease in core temperature during arthroscopic hip surgery performed under general anesthesia and exceeding 2 hours in duration.

  6. Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in the stellarator TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; AscasIbar, E.; BalbIn, R.; Cappa, A.; Castejon, F.; Eguilior, S.; Fernandez, A.; Guasp, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Petrov, S.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement are triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in TJ-II electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasmas. Experiments are performed changing the magnetic shear around the rational surface n = 3/m = 2 to study its influence on the transition; ECH power modulation is used to look at transport properties. The improvement in the electron heat confinement shows no obvious dependence on the magnetic shear. Transitions triggered by the rational surface n = 4/m = 2 show, in addition, an increase in the ion temperature synchronized with the increase in the electron temperature. Ion temperature changes had not been previously observed either in TJ-II or in any other helical device. SXR measurements demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, the rational surface positioned inside the plasma core region precedes and provides a trigger for the transition

  7. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  8. Summary of experimental core turbulence characteristics in ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges in T-10 tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vershkov, V.A.; Shelukhin, D.A.; Soldatov, S.V.; Urazbaev, A.O.; Grashin, S.A.; Eliseev, L.G.; Melnikov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of experimental turbulence investigations carried out at T-10 for more than 10 years. The turbulence characteristics were investigated using correlation reflectometry, multipin Langmuir probe (MLP) and heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. The reflectometry capabilities were analysed using 2D full-wave simulations and verified by direct comparison using a MLP. The ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges show the distinct transition from the core turbulence, having complex spectral structure, to the unstructured one in the scrape-off layer. The core turbulence includes 'broad band, quasi-coherent' features, arising due to the excitation of rational surfaces with high poloidal m-numbers, with a low frequency near zero and specific oscillations at 15-30 kHz. All experimentally measured properties of low frequency and high frequency quasi-coherent oscillations are in good agreement with predictions of linear theory for the ion temperature gradient/dissipative trapped electron mode instabilities. Significant local changes in the turbulence characteristics were observed at the edge velocity shear layer and in the core near q = 1 radius after switching off the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). The local decrease in the electron heat conductivity and decrease in the turbulence level could be evidence of the formation of an electron internal transport barrier. The dynamic behaviour of the core turbulence was also investigated for the case of fast edge cooling and the beginning phase of ECRH

  9. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ∼29 J g(-1) for Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g(-1) K(-1) for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.

  10. Shivering heat production and core cooling during head-in and head-out immersion in 17 degrees C water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Thea; Cahill, Farrell; Kocay, Sheila; Giesbrecht, Gordon G

    2008-05-01

    Many cold-water scenarios cause the head to be partially or fully immersed (e.g., ship wreck survival, scuba diving, cold-water adventure swim racing, cold-water drowning, etc.). However, the specific effects of head cold exposure are minimally understood. This study isolated the effect of whole-head submersion in cold water on surface heat loss and body core cooling when the protective shivering mechanism was intact. Eight healthy men were studied in 17 degrees C water under four conditions: the body was either insulated or exposed, with the head either out of the water or completely submersed under the water within each insulated/exposed subcondition. Submersion of the head (7% of the body surface area) in the body-exposed condition increased total heat loss by 11% (P < 0.05). After 45 min, head-submersion increased core cooling by 343% in the body-insulated subcondition (head-out: 0.13 +/- 0.2 degree C, head-in: 0.47 +/- 0.3 degree C; P < 0.05) and by 56% in the body-exposed subcondition (head-out: 0.40 +/- 0.3 degree C and head-in: 0.73 +/- 0.6 degree C; P < 0.05). In both body-exposed and body-insulated subconditions, head submersion increased the rate of core cooling disproportionally more than the relative increase in total heat loss. This exaggerated core-cooling effect is consistent with a head cooling induced reduction of the thermal core, which could be stimulated by cooling of thermosensitive and/or trigeminal receptors in the scalp, neck, and face. These cooling effects of head submersion are not prevented by shivering heat production.

  11. Influence of heat treatment on hole transfer dynamics in core-shell quantum dot/organic hole conductor hybrid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingye; Zheng, Youjin; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Bing

    2017-08-01

    The influence of heat treatment on hole transfer (HT) processes from the CdSe/ZnS and CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) to 4,4‧,4″-Tris(carbazol-9-yl)-triphenylamine (TCTA) in QD/TCTA hybrid films has been researched with time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL dynamic results demonstrated a heat-treatment-temperature-dependent HT process from the core-shell CdSe QDs to TCTA. The HT rates and efficiencies can be effectively increased due to reduced distance between core-shell CdSe QDs and TCTA after heat treatment. The CdS shell exhibited a more obvious effect on HT from the core-shell CdSe QDs to TCTA than on electron transfer to TiO2, due to higher barrier for holes to tunnel through CdS shell and larger effective mass of holes in CdS than electrons. These results indicate that heat treatment would be an effective means to further optimize solid-state QD sensitized solar cells and rational design of CdS shell is significant.

  12. Warm-Core Intensification Through Horizontal Eddy Heat Transports into the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Fulton, John; Nolan, David S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism for the formation and intensification of the hurricane warm core is not well understood. The generally accepted explanation is that the warm core forms as a result of gentle subsidence of air within the eye that warms as a result of adiabatic compression. Malkus suggested that this subsidence is part of a deep circulation in which air begins descent at high levels in the eye, acquires cyclonic angular momentum as it descends to lower levels, and then diverges at low levels, where it is entrained back into the eyewall. Inward mixing from the eyewall is hypothesized to force the subsidence and maintain the moisture and momentum budgets of the subsiding air. Willoughby suggested that air within the eye has remained so since it was first enclosed during the formation of the eyewall and that it subsides at most only a few kilometers rather than through the depth of the troposphere. He relates the subsidence to the low-level divergence and entrainment into the eyewall noted by Malkus, but suggests that shrinkage of the eye's volume is more than adequate to account for the air lost to the eyewall or converted to cloudy air by turbulent mixing across the eye boundary. Smith offered an alternative view of the subsidence forcing, suggesting that vertical motion in a mature hurricane eye is generated largely by imbalances between the downward vertical pressure gradient force and the upward buoyancy force. The vertical pressure gradient force is associated with the decay and/or radial spread of the tangential wind field with height at those levels were the winds are in approximate gradient wind balance. The rate of subsidence is just that required to warm the air sufficiently such that the buoyancy remains in close hydrostatic balance with an increasing vertical pressure gradient force. In this study, a very high-resolution simulation of Hurricane Bob using a cloud-resolving grid scale of 1.3 km is used to examine the heat budget within the storm with particular

  13. Contribution to the modelling of flows and heat transfers during the reflooding phase of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, D.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis contributes to modelise thermohydraulic phenomena occuring in a pressurized water nuclear reactor core during the reflood phase of a LOCA. The reference accident and phenomena occuring during reflooding are described as well as flow regime and heat transfer proposed models. With these models, we developed a code to compute fluid conditions and fuel rods temperatures in a reactor core chanel. In order to test this code, results of computation are compared with experiments (FLECHT Skewed Tests) and a conclusion is drawn [fr

  14. Heating mechanisms for intermittent loops in active region cores from AIA/SDO EUV observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Nigro, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro Nazionale Interuniversitario Struttura della Materia, Unita di Cosenza, I-87030 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    We investigate intensity variations and energy deposition in five coronal loops in active region cores. These were selected for their strong variability in the AIA/SDO 94 Å intensity channel. We isolate the hot Fe XVIII and Fe XXI components of the 94 Å and 131 Å by modeling and subtracting the 'warm' contributions to the emission. HMI/SDO data allow us to focus on 'inter-moss' regions in the loops. The detailed evolution of the inter-moss intensity time series reveals loops that are impulsively heated in a mode compatible with a nanoflare storm, with a spike in the hot 131 Å signals leading and the other five EUV emission channels following in progressive cooling order. A sharp increase in electron temperature tends to follow closely after the hot 131 Å signal confirming the impulsive nature of the process. A cooler process of growing emission measure follows more slowly. The Fourier power spectra of the hot 131 Å signals, when averaged over the five loops, present three scaling regimes with break frequencies near 0.1 min{sup –1} and 0.7 min{sup –1}. The low frequency regime corresponds to 1/f noise; the intermediate indicates a persistent scaling process and the high frequencies show white noise. Very similar results are found for the energy dissipation in a 2D 'hybrid' shell model of loop magneto-turbulence, based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics, that is compatible with nanoflare statistics. We suggest that such turbulent dissipation is the energy source for our loops.

  15. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...... analysis and geochemical modeling. Synthetic formation water is injected into two sets of Gassum Formation samples at 25, 50 (reservoir temperature), 100, and 150 degrees C with a velocity of 0.05 and 0.1 PV/h, respectively. Results show a significant increase in the aqueous concentration of silicium...

  16. Flow and heat transfer thermohydraulic modelisation during the reflooding phase of a P.W.R.'s core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Patrick

    1978-04-01

    Some generalities about L.O.C.A. are first recalled. The French experimental studies about Emergency Core Cooling System are briefly described. The different heat transfer mechanisms to take into account, according to the flow pattern in the dry zone, and the correlations or methods to calculate them, are defined. Then the Thermohydraulic code computer: FLIRA, which describe the reflooding phase, and a modelisation taking into account the different flow patterns are setted. A first interpretation of ERSEC experiments with a tubular test section shows that it is possible, with this modelisation and some classical heat transfer correlations, to describe the reflooding phase. [fr

  17. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  18. Detection prospects for GeV neutrinos from collisionally heated gamma-ray bursts with IceCube/DeepCore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, I; Beloborodov, A M; Hurley, K; Márka, S

    2013-06-14

    Jet reheating via nuclear collisions has recently been proposed as the main mechanism for gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission. In addition to producing the observed gamma rays, collisional heating must generate 10-100 GeV neutrinos, implying a close relation between the neutrino and gamma-ray luminosities. We exploit this theoretical relation to make predictions for possible GRB detections by IceCube + DeepCore. To estimate the expected neutrino signal, we use the largest sample of bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in 1991-2000. GRB neutrinos could have been detected if IceCube + DeepCore operated at that time. Detection of 10-100 GeV neutrinos would have significant implications, shedding light on the composition of GRB jets and their Lorentz factors. This could be an important target in designing future upgrades of the IceCube + DeepCore observatory.

  19. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  20. Sandwich Core Heat-Pipe Radiator for Power and Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc; Sanzi, James; Locci, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation heat-pipe radiator technologies are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide advancements in heat-rejection systems for space power and propulsion systems. All spacecraft power and propulsion systems require their waste heat to be rejected to space in order to function at their desired design conditions. The thermal efficiency of these heat-rejection systems, balanced with structural requirements, directly affect the total mass of the system. Terrestrially, this technology could be used for thermal control of structural systems. One potential use is radiant heating systems for residential and commercial applications. The thin cross section and efficient heat transportability could easily be applied to flooring and wall structures that could evenly heat large surface areas. Using this heat-pipe technology, the evaporator of the radiators could be heated using any household heat source (electric, gas, etc.), which would vaporize the internal working fluid and carry the heat to the condenser sections (walls and/or floors). The temperature could be easily controlled, providing a comfortable and affordable living environment. Investigating the appropriate materials and working fluids is needed to determine this application's potential success and usage.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigations of high temperature gas heat transfer and flow in a VHTR reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin Rodriguez, Francisco Ivan

    High pressure/high temperature forced and natural convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. VHTRs are designed with the capability to withstand accidents by preventing nuclear fuel meltdown, using passive safety mechanisms; a product of advanced reactor designs including the implementation of inert gases like helium as coolants. The present experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced and natural circulation experiments. This work examines fundamental aspects of high temperature gas heat transfer applied to VHTR operational and accident scenarios. Two different types of experiments, forced convection and natural circulation, were conducted under high pressure and high temperature conditions using three different gases: air, nitrogen and helium. The experimental data were analyzed to obtain heat transfer coefficient data in the form of Nusselt numbers as a function of Reynolds, Grashof and Prandtl numbers. This work also examines the flow laminarization phenomenon (turbulent flows displaying much lower heat transfer parameters than expected due to intense heating conditions) in detail for a full range of Reynolds numbers including: laminar, transition and turbulent flows under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer. This phenomenon could give rise to deterioration in convection heat transfer and occurrence of hot spots in the reactor core. Forced and mixed convection data analyzed indicated the occurrence of flow laminarization phenomenon due to the buoyancy and acceleration effects induced by strong heating. Turbulence parameters were also measured using a hot wire anemometer in forced convection experiments to confirm the existence of the flow laminarization phenomenon. In particular, these results demonstrated the influence of pressure on delayed transition between laminar and turbulent flow. The heat

  2. Cause and countermeasure for heat up of HTTR core support plate at power rise tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Takada, Eiji; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kawasaki, Kozo; Saikusa, Akio; Kojima, Takao; Iyoku, Tatuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    HTTR has carried out many kinds of tests as power rise tests in which reactor power rises step by step after attained the first criticality. In the tests, temperature of a core support plate reached higher than expected at each power level, the temperature was expected to be higher than the maximum working temperature at 100% power level. Therefore, tests under the high temperature test operation mode, in which the core flow rate was different, were carried out to predict the temperature at 100% power precisely, and investigate the cause of the temperature rise. From the investigation, it was clear that the cause was gap flow in the core support structure. Furthermore, it was estimated that the temperature of the core support plate rose locally due to change in gap width between the core support plate and a seal plate due to change in core pressure drop. The maximum working temperature of the core support plate was revised. The integrity of core support plate under the revised maximum working temperature condition was confirmed by stress analyses. (author)

  3. Detergent inhibited, heat labile nucleoside triphosphatase in cores of avian myeloblastosis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Endogenous DNA synthesis was studied in isolated core particles of avian myeloblastosis virus. It was found that cores contained an enzymatic activity which rapidly converted the added nucleoside triphosphates to diphosphates (but not further) at 0 degrees C, thus inhibiting DNA synthesis...

  4. Evaluating infant core temperature response in a hot car using a heat balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew J; Duzinski, Sarah V; Dolinak, David; Null, Jan; Iyer, Sujit S

    2015-03-01

    Using a 1-year old male infant as the model subject, the objectives of this study were to measure increased body temperature of an infant inside an enclosed vehicle during the work day (8:00 am-4:00 pm) during four seasons and model the time to un-compensable heating, heat stroke [>40 °C (>104 °F)], and critical thermal maximum [>42 °C (>107.6 °F)]. A human heat balance model was used to simulate a child's physiological response to extreme heat exposure within an enclosed vehicle. Environmental variables were obtained from the nearest National Weather Service automated surface observing weather station and from an observational vehicular temperature study conducted in Austin, Texas in 2012. In all four seasons, despite differences in starting temperature and solar radiation, the model infant reached heat stroke and demise before 2:00 pm. Time to heat stroke and demise occurred most rapidly in summer, at intermediate durations in fall and spring, and most slowly in the winter. In August, the model infant reached un-compensable heat within 20 min, heat stroke within 105 min, and demise within 125 min. The average rate of heating from un-compensable heat to heat stroke was 1.7 °C/h (3.0 °F/h) and from heat stroke to demise was 4.8 °C/h (8.5 °F/h). Infants left in vehicles during the workday can reach hazardous thermal thresholds quickly even with mild environmental temperatures. These results provide a seasonal analogue of infant heat stroke time course. Further effort is required to create a universally available forensic tool to predict vehicular hyperthermia time course to demise.

  5. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  6. Method and device to remove the decay heat produced in the core of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loimann, E.; Reutler, H.

    1977-01-01

    For decay haet removal of the HTGR the heat absorbed by the top reflector is discharged by means of heat exchangers. For this purpose the heat exchangers are arranged between the top bricks consisting of graphite blocks. By convection or forced circulation with the aid of pumps the liquid coolant is flowing in a cycle between the individual heat exchangers connected in parallel and a heat sink arranged outside the containment. The distributing and collection pipes are mounted between the upper and lower thermal shield. The heat exchanger compartments themselves consist of double-walled hollow bodies with a disc-shaped section and a columnar part extending from there to one side respectively. (RW) [de

  7. ORIGEN2.1 Cycle Specific Calculation of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant Decay Heat and Core Inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, J.; Grgic, D.; Konjarek, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents ORIGEN2.1 computer code calculation of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant core for Cycle 24. The isotopic inventory, core activity and decay heat are calculated in one run for the entire core using explicit depletion and decay of each fuel assembly. Separate pre-ori application which was developed is utilized to prepare corresponding ORIGEN2.1 inputs. This application uses information on core loading pattern to determine fuel assembly specific depletion history using 3D burnup which is obtained from related PARCS computer code calculation. That way both detailed single assembly calculations as well as whole core inventory calculations are possible. Because of the immense output of the ORIGEN2.1, another application called post-ori is used to retrieve and plot any calculated property on the basis of nuclide, element, summary isotope or group of elements for activation products, actinides and fission products segments. As one additional possibility, with the post-ori application it is able to calculate radiotoxicity from calculated ORIGEN2.1 inventory. The results which are obtained using the calculation model of ORIGEN2.1 computer code are successfully compared against corresponding ORIGEN-S computer code results.(author).

  8. Performance Evaluation of the Concept of Hybrid Heat Pipe as Passive In-core Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    As an arising issue for inherent safety of nuclear power plant, the concept of hybrid heat pipe as passive in-core cooling systems was introduced. Hybrid heat pipe has unique features that it is inserted in core directly to remove decay heat from nuclear fuel without any changes of structures of existing facilities of nuclear power plant, substituting conventional control rod. Hybrid heat pipe consists of metal cladding, working fluid, wick structure, and neutron absorber. Same with working principle of the heat pipe, heat is transported by phase change of working fluid inside metal cask. Figure 1 shows the systematic design of the hybrid heat pipe cooling system. In this study, the concept of a hybrid heat pipe was introduced as a Passive IN-core Cooling Systems (PINCs) and demonstrated for internal design features of heat pipe containing neutron absorber. Using a commercial CFD code, single hybrid heat pipe model was analyzed to evaluate thermal performance in designated operating condition. Also, 1-dimensional reactor transient analysis was done by calculating temperature change of the coolant inside reactor pressure vessel using MATLAB. As a passive decay heat removal device, hybrid heat pipe was suggested with a concept of combination of heat pipe and control rod. Hybrid heat pipe has distinct feature that it can be a unique solution to cool the reactor when depressurization process is impossible so that refueling water cannot be injected into RPV by conventional ECCS. It contains neutron absorber material inside heat pipe, so it can stop the reactor and at the same time, remove decay heat in core. For evaluating the concept of hybrid heat pipe, its thermal performance was analyzed using CFD and one-dimensional transient analysis. From single hybrid heat pipe simulation, the hybrid heat pipe can transport heat from the core inside to outside about 18.20 kW, and total thermal resistance of hybrid heat pipe is 0.015 .deg. C/W. Due to unique features of long heat

  9. Core-debris quenching-heat-transfer rates under top- and bottom-reflood conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Sanborn, Y.

    1983-02-01

    This paper presents recent experimental data for the quench-heat-transfer characteristics of superheated packed beds of spheres which were cooled, in separate experiments, by top- and bottom-flooding modes. Experiments were carried out with beds of 3-mm steel spheres of 330-mm height. The initial bed temperature was 810 K. The observed heat-transfer rates are strongly dependent on the mode of water injection. The results suggest that top-flood bed quench heat transfer is limited by the rate at which water can penetrate the bed under two-phase countercurrent-flow conditions. With bottom-reflood the heat-transfer rate is an order-of-magnitude greater than under top-flood conditions and appears to be limited by particle-to-fluid film boiling heat transfer

  10. Heat load imposed on reactor vessels during in-vessel retention of core melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Chung, Bum-Jin, E-mail: bjchung@khu.ac.kr

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Angular heat load on reactor vessel by natural convection of oxide pool was measured. • High Ra was achieved by using mass transfer experiments based on analogy concept. • Measured Nusselt numbers agreed reasonably with the other existing studies. • Three different types of volumetric heat sources were compared. • They didn’t affect the heat flux of the top plate but affected those of the reactor vessel. - Abstract: We measured the heat load imposed on reactor vessels by natural convection of the oxide pool in severe accidents. Based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer, mass transfer experiments were performed using a copper sulfate electroplating system. A modified Rayleigh number of the order 10{sup 14} was achieved in a small facility with a height of 0.1 m. Three different types of volumetric heat sources were compared and the average Nusselt number of the curved surface was 39% lower, whereas in the case of the top plate was 6% higher than in previous studies with a two-dimensional geometry due to the high Sc value of this study. Reliable experimental data on the angular heat flux ratios were reported compared to those of the BALI and SIGMA CP facilities in terms of fluctuations and consistency.

  11. Numerical solution of heat transfer process in a prismatic VHTR core accompanying bypass and cross flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional CFD analysis is conducted for the thermal analysis in the reactor core. • Hot spot temperature, coolant channel outlet temperature distribution are affected by bypass flow. • Bypass gap size has significant influence on temperature and flow distribution in the core. • Cross flow has some effect on the temperature distribution of the coolant in the core due to flow mixing in the cross gaps. - Abstract: Bypass flow and cross flow gaps both exist in the core of a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), which is inevitable owing to tolerances in manufacturing, thermal expansion and irradiation shrinkage. The coolant mass flow rate distribution, temperature distribution, and hot spot temperature are significantly affected by bypass and cross flows. In the present study, three-dimensional CFD analysis is conducted for thermal analysis of the reactor core. A validation study for the turbulence model is performed by comparing the friction coefficient with published correlations. A sensitivity study of the near wall mesh is conducted to ensure mesh quality. Parametric studies are performed by changing the size of the bypass and cross gaps using a one-twelfth sector of a fuel block. Simulation results show the influence of the bypass gap size on temperature distribution and coolant mass flow rate distribution in the prismatic core. It is shown that the maximum fuel and coolant channel outlet temperatures increase with an increase in the gap size, which may lead to a structural risk to the fuel block. The cross flow is divided into two types: the cross flow from the bypass gap to the coolant channels and the cross flow from the high-pressure coolant channels to low-pressure coolant channels. These two types of flow have an opposing influence on the temperature gradient. It is found that the presence of the cross flow gaps may have a significant effect on the distribution of the coolant in the core due to flow mixing in the

  12. High Efficiency, High Temperature Foam Core Heat Exchanger for Fission Surface Power Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fission-based power systems with power levels of 30 to ≥100 kWe will be needed for planetary surface bases. Development of high temperature, high efficiency heat...

  13. Non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal heating on mantle flush events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Yuen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal-heating on the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle and on mantle flush events caused by the two major phase transitions. Both two- and three-dimensional models have been employed. The mantle viscosity responds to the secular cooling through changes in the averaged temperature field. A viscosity which decreases algebraically with the average temperature has been considered. The time-dependent internal-heating is prescribed to decrease exponentially with a single decay time. We have studied the thermal histories with initial Rayleigh numbers between 2 x 107 and 108 . Flush events, driven by the non-equilibrium forcings, are much more dramatic than those produced by the equilibrium boundary conditions and constant internal heating. Multiple flush events are found under non-equilibrium conditions in which there is very little internal heating or very fast decay rates of internal-heating. Otherwise, the flush events take place in a relatively continuous fashion. Prior to massive flush events small-scale percolative structures appear in the 3D temperature fields. Time-dependent signatures, such as the surface heat flux, also exhibits high frequency oscillatory patterns prior to massive flush events. These two observations suggest that the flush event may be a self-organized critical phenomenon. The Nusselt number as a function of the time-varying Ra does not follow the Nusselt vs. Rayleigh number power-law relationship based on equilibrium (constant temperature boundary conditions. Instead Nu(t may vary non-monotonically with time because of the mantle flush events. Convective processes in the mantle operate quite differently under non-equilibrium conditions from its behaviour under the usual equilibrium situations.

  14. Fission product retention in TRISO coated UO2 particle fuels subjected to HTR simulated core heating tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.A.; Kania, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the examination and analysis of 25,730 individual microspheres from spherical fuel elements HFR-K3/1 and HFR-K3/3 are reported. The parent spheres were irradiated in excess of end-of-life exposure and subsequently subjected to simulated core heating tests in a special high-temperature furnace at Forschungszentrum, Juelich, GmbH (KFA). Following the heating tests, the spheres were electrolytically deconsolidated to obtain unbounded fuel particles for Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) analysis. For sphere HFR-K3/1, which was heated for 500 h at 1600 deg. C, only four particles were identified as having released fission products. The remaining particles from the sphere showed no statistical evidence of fission product release. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination showed that three of the defect particles had large sections of the TRISO coating missing, while the fourth appeared normal. For sphere HFR-K3/3, which was heated for 100 h at 1800 deg. C, the IMGA data revealed that fission product release (cesium) from individual particles was significant and that there was large particle-to-particle variation in retention capabilities. Individual particle release (cesium) averaged ten times the KFA-measured integral spherical fuel element release value. In addition, the bimodal distribution of the individual particle data indicated that two distinct modes of failure at fuel temperatures of 1800 deg. C and above may exist. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Multiple zonal jets and convective heat transport barriers in a quasi-geostrophic model of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation for the velocity field, whereas the temperature field is 3-D. This approximation allows us to perform simulations for Ekman numbers down to 10-8, Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (˜10-1) and Reynolds numbers up to 3 × 104. Persistent zonal flows composed of multiple jets form as a result of the mixing of potential vorticity. For the largest Rayleigh numbers computed, the zonal velocity is larger than the convective velocity despite the presence of boundary friction. The convective structures and the zonal jets widen when the thermal forcing increases. Prograde and retrograde zonal jets are dynamically different: in the prograde jets (which correspond to weak potential vorticity gradients) the convection transports heat efficiently and the mean temperature tends to be homogenized; by contrast, in the cores of the retrograde jets (which correspond to steep gradients of potential vorticity) the dynamics is dominated by the propagation of Rossby waves, resulting in the formation of steep mean temperature gradients and the dominance of conduction in the heat transfer process. Consequently, in quasi-geostrophic systems, the width of the retrograde zonal jets controls the efficiency of the heat transfer.

  16. Fission product retention in TRISCO coated UO2 particle fuels subjected to HTR simulated core heating tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.A.; Kania, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    Results of the examination and analysis of 25,730 individual microspheres from spherical fuel elements HFR-K3/1 and HFR-K3/3 are reported. The parent spheres were irradiated in excess of end-of-life exposure and subsequently subjected to simulated core heating tests in a special high-temperature furnace at Forschungszentrum, Juelich, GmbH (KFA). Following the heating tests, the spheres were electrolytically deconsolidated to obtain unbonded fuel particles for Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) analysis. For sphere HFR-K3/1, which was heated for 500 h at 1600 degree C, only four particles were identified as having released fission products. The remaining particles from the sphere showed no statistical evidence of fission product release. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination showed that three of the defect particles had large sections of the TRISO coating missing, while the fourth appeared normal. For sphere HFR-K3/3, which was heated for 100 h at 1800 degree C, the IMGA data revealed that fission product release (cesium) from individual particles was significant and that there was large particle-to-particle variation in retention capabilities. Individual particle release (cesium) averaged ten times the KFA-measured integral spherical fuel element release value. In addition, the bimodal distribution of the individual particle data indicated that two distinct modes of failure at fuel temperatures of 1800 degree C and above may exist. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Mass transfer experiments for the heat load during in-vessel retention of core melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Kyun; Chung, Bum Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We investigated the heat load imposed on the lower head of a reactor vessel by the natural convection of the oxide pool in a severe accident. Mass transfer experiments using a CuSO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electroplating system were performed based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer. The Ra′{sub H} of 10{sup 14} order was achieved with a facility height of only 0.1 m. Three different volumetric heat sources were compared; two had identical configurations to those previously reported, and the other was designed by the authors. The measured Nu's of the lower head were about 30% lower than those previously reported. The measured angular heat flux ratios were similar to those reported in existing studies except for the peaks appearing near the top. The volumetric heat sources did not affect the Nu of the lower head but affected the Nu of the top plate by obstructing the rising flow from the bottom.

  18. Heat transfer in the core graphite structures of RBMK nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoglinger, E., E-mail: ernst.knoglinger@a1.net [Am Winklerwald 15, A 4020 Linz (Austria); Wölfl, H., E-mail: herbert.woelfl@tele2.at [Berg, Im Weideland 19, A 4060 Linz (Austria); Kaliatka, A., E-mail: algirdas.kaliatka@lei.lt [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Proposed solution of heat transfer model from a hollow cylinder to a fluid through narrow duct. • Thermal conductance of annular gaps, filled by two component gas was discussed. • Xenon transient preceding the Chernobyl Accident was analyzed. • Reactivity balance during power manoeuvres and potenrial causes of the accident were discussed. - Abstract: Conductive and combined radiative/conductive gap conductance models are presented and discussed in great detail. The heat resistance concept and an exact solution to the one dimensional heat conduction equation for a 3-region composite hollow cylinder are used to calculate gap conductance in function of gap gas composition and fuel burn up. The study includes the back calculation of a reactor experiment performed at the Ignalina NPP Unit-1 which provides some insight in the function of the RBMK nitrogen supply and regulating device and an investigation of the role the graphite temperature played during the power manoeuvres preceding the Chernobyl Accident.

  19. Development and test of a space-reactor-core heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Runyan, J.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Keddy, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 1500 0 K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm 2 . The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell. Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 1500 0 K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test

  20. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. Shivering heat production and body fat protect the core from cooling during body immersion, but not during head submersion: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Thea; Lix, Lisa; Giesbrecht, Gordon

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies showed that core cooling rates are similar when only the head or only the body is cooled. Structural equation modeling was used on data from two cold water studies involving body-only, or whole body (including head) cooling. Exposure of both the body and head increased core cooling, while only body cooling elicited shivering. Body fat attenuates shivering and core cooling. It is postulated that this protection occurs mainly during body cooling where fat acts as insulation against cold. This explains why head cooling increases surface heat loss with only 11% while increasing core cooling by 39%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic ...... minor effects on the properties of the reservoir and that storage of excess heat in the Gassum Formation in the Stenlille area may be possible provided operational precautions are taken....... analysis and geochemical modeling. Synthetic formation water is injected into two sets of Gassum Formation samples at 25, 50 (reservoir temperature), 100, and 150 degrees C with a velocity of 0.05 and 0.1 PV/h, respectively. Results show a significant increase in the aqueous concentration of silicium...... and iron with increasing temperature due to dissolution of silica and siderite. Increasing the reservoir temperature from 50 to 100 degrees C enhanced the naturally occurring weathering of Na-rich feldspar to kaolinite. Dissolution of quartz increased sharply above 100 degrees C and was the dominating...

  3. INFERENCE OF HEATING PROPERTIES FROM “HOT” NON-FLARING PLASMAS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, W. T.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Cargill, P. J., E-mail: will.t.barnes@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-20

    Despite its prediction over two decades ago, the detection of faint, high-temperature (“hot”) emission due to nanoflare heating in non-flaring active region cores has proved challenging. Using an efficient two-fluid hydrodynamic model, this paper investigates the properties of the emission expected from repeating nanoflares (a nanoflare train) of varying frequency as well as the separate heating of electrons and ions. If the emission measure distribution (EM(T)) peaks at T = T{sub m} , we find that EM(T{sub m}) is independent of details of the nanoflare train, and EM(T) above and below T{sub m} reflects different aspects of the heating. Below T{sub m} , the main influence is the relationship of the waiting time between successive nanoflares to the nanoflare energy. Above T{sub m}, power-law nanoflare distributions lead to an extensive plasma population not present in a mono-energetic train. Furthermore, in some cases, characteristic features are present in EM(T). Such details may be detectable given adequate spectral resolution and a good knowledge of the relevant atomic physics. In the absence of such resolution we propose some metrics that can be used to infer the presence of “hot” plasma.

  4. EXTERNALLY HEATED PROTOSTELLAR CORES IN THE OPHIUCHUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrochemistry Laboratory, Mail Code 691, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bjerkeli, Per, E-mail: johan.lindberg@nasa.gov [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Niels Bohr Institute and Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2017-01-20

    We present APEX 218 GHz observations of molecular emission in a complete sample of embedded protostars in the Ophiuchus star-forming region. To study the physical properties of the cores, we calculate H{sub 2}CO and c -C{sub 3}H{sub 2} rotational temperatures, both of which are good tracers of the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas. We find that the H{sub 2}CO temperatures range between 16 K and 124 K, with the highest H{sub 2}CO temperatures toward the hot corino source IRAS 16293-2422 (69–124 K) and the sources in the ρ Oph A cloud (23–49 K) located close to the luminous Herbig Be star S1, which externally irradiates the ρ Oph A cores. On the other hand, the c -C{sub 3}H{sub 2} rotational temperature is consistently low (7–17 K) in all sources. Our results indicate that the c -C{sub 3}H{sub 2} emission is primarily tracing more shielded parts of the envelope whereas the H{sub 2}CO emission (at the angular scale of the APEX beam; 3600 au in Ophiuchus) mainly traces the outer irradiated envelopes, apart from in IRAS 16293-2422, where the hot corino emission dominates. In some sources, a secondary velocity component is also seen, possibly tracing the molecular outflow.

  5. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Epidermal Heat Flux Sensors for Measurements of Core Body Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihui; Webb, Richard Chad; Luo, Hongying; Xue, Yeguang; Kurniawan, Jonas; Cho, Nam Heon; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Long-term, continuous measurement of core body temperature is of high interest, due to the widespread use of this parameter as a key biomedical signal for clinical judgment and patient management. Traditional approaches rely on devices or instruments in rigid and planar forms, not readily amenable to intimate or conformable integration with soft, curvilinear, time-dynamic, surfaces of the skin. Here, materials and mechanics designs for differential temperature sensors are presented which can attach softly and reversibly onto the skin surface, and also sustain high levels of deformation (e.g., bending, twisting, and stretching). A theoretical approach, together with a modeling algorithm, yields core body temperature from multiple differential measurements from temperature sensors separated by different effective distances from the skin. The sensitivity, accuracy, and response time are analyzed by finite element analyses (FEA) to provide guidelines for relationships between sensor design and performance. Four sets of experiments on multiple devices with different dimensions and under different convection conditions illustrate the key features of the technology and the analysis approach. Finally, results indicate that thermally insulating materials with cellular structures offer advantages in reducing the response time and increasing the accuracy, while improving the mechanics and breathability. PMID:25953120

  6. Gyrokinetic analyses of core heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with different toroidal rotation direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Emi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Urano, Hajime; Ide, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas with an internal transport barrier (ITB) are capable of maintaining improved confinement performance. The ITBs formed in plasmas with the weak magnetic shear and the weak radial electric field shear are often observed to be modest. In these ITB plasmas, it has been found that the electron temperature ITB is steeper when toroidal rotation is in a co-direction with respect to the plasma current than when toroidal rotation is in a counter-direction. To clarify the relationship between the direction of toroidal rotation and heat transport in the ITB region, we examine dominant instabilities using the flux-tube gyrokinetic code GS2. The linear calculations show a difference in the real frequencies; the counter-rotation case has a more trapped electron mode than the co-rotation case. In addition, the nonlinear calculations show that with this difference, the ratio of the electron heat diffusivity χ_e to the ion's χ_i is higher for the counter-rotation case than for the co-rotation case. The difference in χ_e /χ_i agrees with the experiment. We also find that the effect of the difference in the flow shear between the two cases due to the toroidal rotation direction on the linear growth rate is not significant. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo estimation of the dose and heating of cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, D.; Dumitrache, I.

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a part of a more complex project related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods with cobalt assemblies in the CANDU 6 reactor core. The 60 Co produced by 59 Co irradiation could be used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper will mainly describe some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronic equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and heating of the irradiated cobalt rods, are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 2.1. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. (authors)

  8. Multi-bundle sodium experiments for thermohydraulics in core subassemblies during natural circulation decay heat removal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, H.; Ieda, Y.; Toda, S.; Isozaki, T.; Sugawara, S.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of multi-subassembly sodium experiments, CCTL-CFR tests and PLANDTL-DHX tests, have been carried out in order to investigate thermohydraulics in a fast reactor core during natural circulation. Basic experiments are carried out in CCTL-CFR test rig without inter-wrapper gap and under steady state. Integral experiments are performed in PLANDTL-DHX test rig with the inter-wrapper gap and a dip cooler in an upper plenum under steady state and transient conditions. The first series of the experiments and post analyses showed that inter-subassembly heat transfer had significant effects on the transverse temperature distribution in the subassembly and was strongly coupled with intra-subassembly flow redistribution. And the cold sodium provided by the dip cooler could reduce the hot spot temperature in the pin bundle mainly via the inter-wrapper gap. (author)

  9. Shock Compression and Melting of an Fe-Ni-Si Alloy: Implications for the Temperature Profile of the Earth's Core and the Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Sekine, Toshimori; Lin, Jung-Fu; He, Hongliang; Liu, Fusheng; Zhang, Mingjian; Sato, Tomoko; Zhu, Wenjun; Yu, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the melting behavior and the thermal equation of state of Fe-Ni alloyed with candidate light elements at conditions of the Earth's core is critical for our knowledge of the region's thermal structure and chemical composition and the heat flow across the liquid outer core into the lowermost mantle. Here we studied the shock equation of state and melting curve of an Fe-8 wt% Ni-10 wt% Si alloy up to 250 GPa by hypervelocity impacts with direct velocity and reliable temperature measurements. Our results show that the addition of 10 wt% Si to Fe-8 wt% Ni alloy slightly depresses the melting temperature of iron by 200-300 (±200) K at the core-mantle boundary ( 136 GPa) and by 600-800 (±500) K at the inner core-outer core boundary ( 330 GPa), respectively. Our results indicate that Si has a relatively mild effect on the melting temperature of iron compared with S and O. Our thermodynamic modeling shows that Fe-5 wt% Ni alloyed with 6 wt% Si and 2 wt% S (which has a density-velocity profile that matches the outer core's seismic profile well) exhibits an adiabatic profile with temperatures of 3900 K and 5300 K at the top and bottom of the outer core, respectively. If Si is a major light element in the core, a geotherm modeled for the outer core indicates a thermal gradient of 5.8-6.8 (±1.6) K/km in the D″ region and a high heat flow of 13-19 TW across the core-mantle boundary.

  10. SOFIA/EXES High Spectral Resolution Observations of the Orion Hot Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Colgan, Sean; Le Gal, Romane; Acharya, Kinsuk; Huang, Xinchuan; Herbst, Eric; Lee, Timothy J.; Richter, Matthew J.; Boogert, Adwin

    2018-01-01

    The Orion hot core has one of the richest molecular chemistries observed in the ISM. In the MIR, the Orion hot core composition is best probed by the closest, compact, bright background continuum source in this region, IRc2. We present high-spectral resolution observations from 12.96 - 13.33 μm towards Orion IRc2 using the mid-infrared spectrograph, EXES, on SOFIA, to probe the physical and chemical conditions of the Orion hot core. All ten of the rovibrational C2H2 transitions expected in our spectral coverage, are detected with high S/N, yielding continuous coverage of the R-branch lines from J=9-8 to J=18-17, including both ortho and para species. Eight of these rovibrational transitions are newly reported detections. These data show distinct ortho and para ladders towards the Orion hot core for the first time, with an ortho to para ratio (OPR) of only 0.6 - much lower than the high temperature equilibrium value of 3. A non-equilibrium OPR is a further indication of the Orion hot core being heated externally by shocks likely resulting from a well-known explosive event which occurred 500 yrs ago. The OPR conversion timescales are much longer than the 500 yr shock timescale and thus a low OPR might be a remnant from an earlier colder pre-stellar phase before the density enhancement (now the hot core) was impacted by shocks.We will also present preliminary results from an on-going SOFIA Cycle-5 impact program to use EXES to conduct an unbiased, high-S/N, continuous, molecular line survey of the Orion hot core from 12.5 - 28.3 microns. This survey is expected to be 50 times better than ISO in detecting isolated, narrow lines to (a) resolve the ro-vibrational structure of the gas phase molecules and their kinematics, (b) detect new gas phase molecules missed by ISO, and (c) provide useful constraints on the hot core chemistry and the source of Orion hot core excitation. This survey will greatly enhance the inventory of resolved line features in the MIR for hot cores

  11. Experimental and numerical simulation of passive decay heat removal by sump cooling after core melt down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Mueller, U.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents the basic physical phenomena and scaling criteria of passive decay heat removal from a large coolant pool by single-phase natural circulation. The physical significance of the dimensionless similarity groups derived is evaluated. The results are applied to the SUCO program that experimentally and numerically investigates the possibility of a sump cooling concept for future light water reactors. The sump cooling concept is based on passive safety features within the containment. The work is supported by the German utilities and the Siemens AG. The article gives results of temperature and velocity measurements in the 1:20 linearly scaled SUCOS-2D test facility. The experiments are backed up by numerical calculations using the commercial software Fluent. Finally, using the similarity analysis from above, the experimental results of the model geometry are scaled-up to the conditions in the prototype, allowing a statement with regard to the feasibility of the sump cooling concept. (author)

  12. Experimental and numerical simulation of passive decay heat removal by sump cooling after core melt down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knebel, J.U.; Mueller, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Technik und Umwelt Inst. fuer Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik (IATF), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    This article presents the basic physical phenomena and scaling criteria of passive decay heat removal from a large coolant pool by single-phase natural circulation. The physical significance of the dimensionless similarity groups derived is evaluated. The results are applied to the SUCO program that experimentally and numerically investigates the possibility of a sump cooling concept for future light water reactors. The sump cooling concept is based on passive safety features within the containment. The work is supported by the German utilities and the Siemens AG. The article gives results of temperature and velocity measurements in the 1:20 linearly scaled SUCOS-2D test facility. The experiments are backed up by numerical calculations using the commercial software Fluent. Finally, using the similarity analysis from above, the experimental results of the model geometry are scaled-up to the conditions in the prototype, allowing a statement with regard to the feasibility of the sump cooling concept. (author)

  13. Mathematical prediction of core body temperature from environment, activity, and clothing: The heat strain decision aid (HSDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Adam W; Blanchard, Laurie A; Friedl, Karl E; Cadarette, Bruce S; Hoyt, Reed W

    2017-02-01

    Physiological models provide useful summaries of complex interrelated regulatory functions. These can often be reduced to simple input requirements and simple predictions for pragmatic applications. This paper demonstrates this modeling efficiency by tracing the development of one such simple model, the Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA), originally developed to address Army needs. The HSDA, which derives from the Givoni-Goldman equilibrium body core temperature prediction model, uses 16 inputs from four elements: individual characteristics, physical activity, clothing biophysics, and environmental conditions. These inputs are used to mathematically predict core temperature (T c ) rise over time and can estimate water turnover from sweat loss. Based on a history of military applications such as derivation of training and mission planning tools, we conclude that the HSDA model is a robust integration of physiological rules that can guide a variety of useful predictions. The HSDA model is limited to generalized predictions of thermal strain and does not provide individualized predictions that could be obtained from physiological sensor data-driven predictive models. This fully transparent physiological model should be improved and extended with new findings and new challenging scenarios. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Heat dissipation for the Intel Core i5 processor using multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based ethylene glycol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thang, Bui Hung; Trinh, Pham Van; Quang, Le Dinh; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc; Huong, Nguyen Thi

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are some of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown by using chemical vapor deposition is 600 ± 100 Wm -1 K -1 compared with the thermal conductivity 419 Wm -1 K -1 of Ag. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids - a new class of nanomaterials, have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering potential in heat dissipation applications for electronic devices, such as computer microprocessor, high power LED, etc. In this work, a multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based liquid was made of well-dispersed hydroxyl-functional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-OH) in ethylene glycol (EG)/distilled water (DW) solutions by using Tween-80 surfactant and an ultrasonication method. The concentration of MWCNT-OH in EG/DW solutions ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 gram/liter. The dispersion of the MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions was evaluated by using a Zeta-Sizer analyzer. The MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions were used as coolants in the liquid cooling system for the Intel Core i5 processor. The thermal dissipation efficiency and the thermal response of the system were evaluated by directly measuring the temperature of the micro-processor using the Core Temp software and the temperature sensors built inside the micro-processor. The results confirmed the advantages of CNTs in thermal dissipation systems for computer processors and other high-power electronic devices.

  15. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1985-08-01

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  16. Transient core characteristics of small molten salt reactor coupling problem between heat transfer/flow and nuclear fission reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takahisa; Mitachi, Koshi

    2004-01-01

    This paper performed the transient core analysis of a small Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The emphasis is that the numerical model employed in this paper takes into account the interaction among fuel salt flow, nuclear reaction and heat transfer. The model consists of two group diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluexs, balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors and energy conservation equations for fuel salt and graphite moderator. The results of transient analysis are that (1) fission reaction (heat generation) rate significantly increases soon after step reactivity insertion, e.g., the peak of fission reaction rate achieves about 2.7 times larger than the rated power 350 MW when the reactivity of 0.15% Δk/k 0 is inserted to the rated state, and (2) the self-control performance of the small MSR effectively works under the step reactivity insertion of 0.56% Δk/k 0 , putting the fission reaction rate back on the rated state. (author)

  17. Effects of Re-heating Tissue Samples to Core Body Temperature on High-Velocity Ballistic Projectile-tissue Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Henneberg, Maciej; Wachsberger, Christian; Maiden, Nicholas; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-11-01

    Damage produced by high-speed projectiles on organic tissue will depend on the physical properties of the tissues. Conditioning organic tissue samples to human core body temperature (37°C) prior to conducting ballistic experiments enables their behavior to closely mimic that of living tissues. To minimize autolytic changes after death, the tissues are refrigerated soon after their removal from the body and re-heated to 37°C prior to testing. This research investigates whether heating 50-mm-cube samples of porcine liver, kidney, and heart to 37°C for varying durations (maximum 7 h) can affect the penetration response of a high-speed, steel sphere projectile. Longer conditioning times for heart and liver resulted in a slight loss of velocity/energy of the projectile, but the reverse effect occurred for the kidney. Possible reasons for these trends include autolytic changes causing softening (heart and liver) and dehydration causing an increase in density (kidney). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Development of an improved wearable device for core body temperature monitoring based on the dual heat flux principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingjie; Zhou, Congcong; He, Cheng; Li, Yuan; Ye, Xuesong

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized wearable core body temperature (CBT) monitoring system based on the dual heat flux (DHF) principle was developed. By interspersing calcium carbonate powder in PolyDimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a reformative heat transfer medium was produced to reduce the thermal equilibrium time. Besides, a least mean square (LMS) algorithm based active noise cancellation (ANC) method was adopted to diminish the impact of ambient temperature fluctuations. Theoretical analyses, finite element simulation, experiments on a hot plate and human volunteers were performed. The results showed that the proposed system had the advantages of small size, reduced initial time (~23.5 min), and good immunity to fluctuations of the air temperature. For the range of 37-41 °C on the hot plate, the error compared with a Fluke high accuracy thermometer was 0.08  ±  0.20 °C. In the human experiments, the measured temperature in the rest trial (34 subjects) had a difference of 0.13  ±  0.22 °C compared with sublingual temperature, while a significant increase of 1.36  ±  0.44 °C from rest to jogging was found in the exercise trial (30 subjects). This system has the potential for reliable continuous CBT measurement in rest and can reflect CBT variations during exercise.

  19. CORTAP: a coupled neutron kinetics-heat transfer digital computer program for the dynamic simulation of the high temperature gas cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    CORTAP (Core Transient Analysis Program) was developed to predict the dynamic behavior of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) core under normal operational transients and postulated accident conditions. CORTAP is used both as a stand-alone component simulation and as part of the HTGR nuclear steam supply (NSS) system simulation code ORTAP. The core thermal neutronic response is determined by solving the heat transfer equations for the fuel, moderator and coolant in an average powered region of the reactor core. The space independent neutron kinetics equations are coupled to the heat transfer equations through a rapidly converging iterative technique. The code has the capability to determine conservative fuel, moderator, and coolant temperatures in the ''hot'' fuel region. For transients involving a reactor trip, the core heat generation rate is determined from an expression for decay heat following a scram. Nonlinear effects introduced by temperature dependent fuel, moderator, and coolant properties are included in the model. CORTAP predictions will be compared with dynamic test results obtained from the Fort St. Vrain reactor owned by Public Service of Colorado, and, based on these comparisons, appropriate improvements will be made in CORTAP

  20. An Equation Governing Ultralow-Velocity Zones: Implications for Holes in the ULVZ, Lateral Chemical Reactions at the Core-Mantle Boundary, and Damping of Heat Flux Variations in the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Matsui, H.

    2017-12-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZ) are increasingly illuminated by seismology, revealing surprising diversity in size, shape, and physical characteristics. The only viable hypotheses are that ULVZs are a compositionally distinct FeO-enriched dense material, which could have formed by fractional crystallization of a basal magma ocean, segregation of subducted banded iron formations, precipitation of solids from the outer core, partial melting and segregation of iron-rich melts from subducted basalts, or most likely a combination of many different processes. But many questions remain: Are ULVZ partially molten in some places, and not in others? Are ULVZ simply the thicker portions of an otherwise global thin layer, covering the entire CMB and thus blocking or moderating chemical interactions between the core and overlying mantle? Is such a layer inter-connected and able to conduct electrical currents that allow electro-magnetic coupling of core and mantle angular momentum? Are they being eroded and shrinking in size due to viscous entrainment, or is more material being added to ULVZ over time? Here we derive an advection-diffusion-like equation that governs the dynamical evolution of a chemically distinct ULVZ. Analysis of this equation shows that ULVZ should become readily swept aside by viscous mantle flows at the CMB, exposing "ordinary mantle" to the top of the core, thus inducing chemical heterogeneity that drives lateral CMB chemical reactions. These reactions are correlated with heat flux, thus maintaining large-scale pressure variations atop the core that induce cyclone-like flows centered around ULVZ and ponded subducted slabs. We suggest that turbulent diffusion across adjacent cyclone streams inside a stratified region atop the core readily accommodates lateral transport and re-distribution of components such as O and Si, in addition to heat. Our model implies that the deeper core is at least partly shielded from the influence of strong heat flux variations at

  1. Constraints on the initial conditions of stellar formation from ISOCAM observations of dense cores seen in absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacmann, Aurore

    1999-01-01

    Stars form in molecular clouds by gravitational collapse of small condensations called pre-stellar cores. This stage of the star formation process is still relatively unknown since these dense cores are deeply embedded within a thick cocoon of matter. The collapse, as well as the accretion phase depend on the structure of these objects. In order to constrain the initial conditions of star formation. We have carried out a study of the density structure of a vast sample of pre-stellar cores that we observed with the mid-infrared camera ISOCAM aboard the ISO satellite. As the cores are very dense and cold, they are seen in absorption against the diffuse mid-infrared background. This absorption method is highly interesting for our study since it is sensitive to the density structure in the outer parts of the cores. The study of these cores enabled us to confirm the presence of a flattening in their central parts, to show that their column density profiles were composed of a portion close to a NH_2 ∝ r"-"1 power-law, and that some of them presented an edge, i.e. that the slope in the outer parts of the profiles became steeper than NH_2 ∝ r"-"2. An implication of the presence of an edge is that the mass reservoir available for star formation in these cores is finite, supporting the idea that the stellar initial mass function is partly determined at a pre-stellar stage. Comparison of our results with various models of core structure shows that the column density profiles we obtained are consistent with ambipolar diffusion models of magnetically supported cores, although they require a strong background magnetic field which has up to now not been observed in these kinds of regions. (author) [fr

  2. Heat dissipation for the Intel Core i5 processor using multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based ethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, Bui Hung; Trinh, Pham Van; Quang, Le Dinh; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Ho Chi Minh CIty (Viet Nam); Huong, Nguyen Thi [Hanoi University of Science, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are some of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown by using chemical vapor deposition is 600 ± 100 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} compared with the thermal conductivity 419 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} of Ag. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids - a new class of nanomaterials, have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering potential in heat dissipation applications for electronic devices, such as computer microprocessor, high power LED, etc. In this work, a multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based liquid was made of well-dispersed hydroxyl-functional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-OH) in ethylene glycol (EG)/distilled water (DW) solutions by using Tween-80 surfactant and an ultrasonication method. The concentration of MWCNT-OH in EG/DW solutions ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 gram/liter. The dispersion of the MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions was evaluated by using a Zeta-Sizer analyzer. The MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions were used as coolants in the liquid cooling system for the Intel Core i5 processor. The thermal dissipation efficiency and the thermal response of the system were evaluated by directly measuring the temperature of the micro-processor using the Core Temp software and the temperature sensors built inside the micro-processor. The results confirmed the advantages of CNTs in thermal dissipation systems for computer processors and other high-power electronic devices.

  3. Analysis of two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer in inclined channel of core-catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Abe, N.; Kurita, T.; Hamazaki, R.; Kojima, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Passive Corium Cooling System (CCS) provides a function of ex-vessel debris cooling and molten core stabilization during a severe accident. CCS features inclined cooling channels arranged axi-symmetrically below the core-catcher basin. In order to estimate the coolability of the inclined cooling channel, it is indispensable to identify the flow pattern of the two-phase flow in the cooling channel. Several former studies for the two-phase flow pattern in the inclined channel are referred. Taitel and Dukler (1976) developed a prediction method of the flow pattern transition in horizontal and near horizontal tubes. Barnea et al. (1980) showed the flow pattern map of upward flow with 10 degrees inclination. Sakaguti et al. (1996) observed the two-phase flow patterns in the horizontal pipe connected with slightly upward pipe, in which the flow pattern in the pipe with a bending part was expressed by the combination of a basic flow pattern and some auxiliary flow patterns. Then we investigated these studies In order to identify the flow patterns observed in the inclined cooling channel of CCS. Furthermore we experimentally observed the flow patterns in the inclined cooling channel with various inlet conditions. As a result of the investigation and observation, typical flow patterns in the inclined cooling channel were identified. Two typical flow patterns were observed depending on the steam flow rate, one of which is 'elongated bubble 'flow, and the other is 'churn with collapsing backward and upward slug 'flow The flow and heat transfer in the inclined channel of CCS is analyzed by using a two-phase analysis code employing two-fluid model in which the constitutive equations for the two-phase flow in inclined channels are incorporated. That is, drift flux parameter for each of the elongated bubble flow, and the churn with collapsing backward and upward slug flow are incorporated to the two-phase analysis code, which are based on the rising velocity of the long bubble in

  4. INCREASES IN CORE TEMPERATURE COUNTERBALANCE EFFECTS OF HEMOCONCENTRATION ON BLOOD VISCOSITY DURING PROLONGED EXERCISE IN THE HEAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Michael J.; Krippes, Taylor; Kolkhorst, Fred W.; Williams, Alexander T.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that blood viscosity is significantly increased following exercise. However, these studies measured both pre- and post-exercise blood viscosity at 37 °C even though core and blood temperatures would be expected to have increased during the exercise. Consequently, the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on mitigating change in blood viscosity may have been missed. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of exercise-induced hemoconcentration and hyperthermia, as well as determine their combined effects, on blood viscosity. Nine subjects performed 2 h of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat (37 °C, 40% rH), which resulted in significant increases from pre-exercise values for rectal temperature (37.11 ± 0.35 °C to 38.76 ± 0.13 °C), hemoconcentration (hematocrit = 43.6 ± 3.6% to 45.6 ± 3.5%), and dehydration (Δbody weight = −3.6 ± 0.7%). Exercise-induced hemoconcentration significantly (P viscosity by 9% (3.97 to 4.30 cP at 300 s−1) while exercise-induced hyperthermia significantly decreased blood viscosity by 7% (3.97 to 3.70 cP at 300 s−1). However, when both factors were considered together, there was no overall change in blood viscosity (3.97 to 4.03 cP at 300 s−1). The effects of exercise-induced hemoconcentration, increased plasma viscosity, and increased red blood cell aggregation, all of which increased blood viscosity, were counterbalanced by increased RBC deformability (e.g., RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and elongation index) caused by the hyperthermia. Thus, blood viscosity remained unchanged following prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in the heat. PMID:26682653

  5. Heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores with increased core water content and with or without major DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popham, D.L.; Sengupta, S.; Setlow, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spores of a Bacillus subtilis strain with an insertion mutation in the dacB gene, which codes for an enzyme involved in spore cortex biosynthesis, have a higher core water content than wild-type spores. Spores lacking the two major α/β-type small, acid-soluble proteins (SASP) (termed a α - β - spores) have the same core water content as do wild-type spores, but α - β - dacB spores had more core water than did dacB spores. The resistance of α - β - , α - β - dacB, dacB, and wild-type spores to dry and moist heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV radiation has been determined, as has the role of DNA damage in spore killing by moist heat and hydrogen peroxide. These data (1) suggest that core water content has little if any role in spore UV resistance and are consistent with binding of α/β-type SASP to DNA being the major mechanism providing protection to spores from UV radiation; (2) suggest that binding of αβ-type SASP to DNA is the major mechanism unique to spores providing protection from dry heat; (3) suggest that spore resistance to moist heat and hydrogen peroxide is affected to a large degree by the core water content, as increased core water resulted in large decreases in spore resistance to these agents; and (4) indicate that since this decreased resistance (i.e., in dacB spores) is not associated with increased spore killing by DNA damage, spore DNA must normally be extremely well protected against such damage, presumably by the saturation of spore DNA by α/β-type SASP. 19 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Increases in core temperature counterbalance effects of haemoconcentration on blood viscosity during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Michael J; Krippes, Taylor; Kolkhorst, Fred W; Williams, Alexander T; Cabrales, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of exercise-induced haemoconcentration and hyperthermia on blood viscosity. What is the main finding and its importance? Exercise-induced haemoconcentration, increased plasma viscosity and increased blood aggregation, all of which increased blood viscosity, were counterbalanced by increased red blood cell (RBC) deformability (e.g. RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and elongation index) caused by the hyperthermia. Thus, blood viscosity remained unchanged following prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in the heat. Previous studies have reported that blood viscosity is significantly increased following exercise. However, these studies measured both pre- and postexercise blood viscosity at 37 °C even though core and blood temperatures would be expected to have increased during the exercise. Consequently, the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on mitigating change in blood viscosity may have been missed. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of exercise-induced haemoconcentration and hyperthermia and to determine their combined effects on blood viscosity. Nine subjects performed 2 h of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat (37 °C, 40% relative humidity), which resulted in significant increases from pre-exercise values for rectal temperature (from 37.11 ± 0.35 to 38.76 ± 0.13 °C), haemoconcentration (haematocrit increased from 43.6 ± 3.6 to 45.6 ± 3.5%) and dehydration (change in body weight = -3.6 ± 0.7%). Exercise-induced haemoconcentration significantly (P blood viscosity by 9% (from 3.97 to 4.33 cP at 300 s(-1)), whereas exercise-induced hyperthermia significantly decreased blood viscosity by 7% (from 3.97 to 3.69 cP at 300 s(-1)). When both factors were considered together, there was no overall change in blood viscosity (from 3.97 to 4.03 cP at 300 s(-1)). The effects of exercise-induced haemoconcentration, increased plasma

  7. Development of Core Heat Removal Objective Provision Trees for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Defense-in-Depth Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huichang; Kang, Bongsuk; Lee, Youngho [TUEV Rheinland Korea Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Based on the definition of Defense-in-Depth levels and safety functions for KALIMER sodium-cooled fast reactor, suggested in the reference and, OPTs for level 1, 2, and 3 defense-in-depth and core heat removal safety function, were developed and suggested in this paper. The purpose of this OPT is first to assure the defensein-depth design during the licensing of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR), but it will also contribute in evaluating the completeness of regulatory requirements under development by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). The challenges and mechanisms and provisions were briefly explained in this paper. Comparing the mechanisms and provisions with the requirements will contribute in identifying the missing requirements. Since the design of PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV SFR) is not mature yet, the OPT is developed for KALIMER design. Developed OPTs in this study can be used for the identification of potential design vulnerabilities. When detailed identification of provisions in terms of design features were achieved through the next step of this study, it can contribute to the establishment of defensein-depth evaluation frame for the regulatory reviews for the licensing process. At this moment, the identified provisions have both aspects as requirements and design features already adopted in KALIMER design. In the next stage of this study, derived provisions to be adopted will be compared with the actual design features and findings can be suggested as recommendations for the safety improvement.

  8. Experimental and numerical CHT-investigations of cooling structures formed by lost cores in cast housings for optimal heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlstädt, S.; Vynnycky, M.; Gebauer-Teichmann, A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the cooling performance of six different lost core designs for automotive cast houses with regard to their cooling efficiency. For this purpose, the conjugate heat transfer (CHT) solver, chtMultiregion, of the freely available CFD-toolbox OpenFOAM in its implementation of version 2.3.1 is used. The turbulence contribution to the Navier-Stokes equations is accounted for by using the RANS Menter SST k - ω model. The results are validated for one of the geometries by comparing with experimental data. Of the six investigated cooling structures, the one that forces the fluid flow to change its direction the most produces the lowest temperatures on the surface of the cast housing. This good cooling performance comes at the price of the highest pressure loss in the cooling fluid and hence increased pump power. It is also found that the relationship between performance and pressure drop is by no means generally linear. Slight changes in the design can lead to a structure which cools almost as well, but at much decreased pressure loss. Regarding the absolute values, the simulations showed that the designed cooling structures are suitable for handling the cooling requirements in the particular applications and that the maximum temperature stays below the critical limits of the electronic components.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs fluctuations and crash events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quite periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E x B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E x B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  10. First In-Core Simultaneous Measurements of Nuclear Heating and Thermal Neutron Flux Obtained With the Innovative Mobile Calorimeter CALMOS Inside the OSIRIS Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcreff, Hubert; Salmon, Laurent; Bubendorff, Jacques; Lepeltier, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear heating inside a MTR reactor has to be known in order to design and run irradiation experiments which have to fulfill target temperature constraints. This measurement is usually carried out by calorimetry. The innovative calorimetric system, CALMOS, has been studied and built in 2011 for the 70MWth OSIRIS reactor operated by CEA. Thanks to a new type of calorimetric probe, associated to a specific displacement system, it provides measurements along the fissile height and above the core. Calorimeter working modes, measurement procedures, main modeling and experimental results and expected advantages of this new technique have been already presented in previous papers. However, these first in-core measurements were not performed beyond 6 W · g-1, due to an inside temperature limitation imposed by a safety authority requirement. In this paper, we present the first in-core simultaneous measurements of nuclear heating and conventional thermal neutron flux obtained by the CALMOS device at 70 MW nominal reactor power. For the first time, this experimental system was operated in nominal in-core conditions, with nominal neutron flux up to 2.7 1014 n · cm-2 · s-1 and nuclear heating up to 12 W · g-1. After a brief reminder of the calorimetric cell configuration and displacement system specificities, first nuclear heating distributions at nominal power are presented and discussed. In order to reinforce the heating evaluation, a comparison is made between results obtained by the probe calibration coefficient and the zero methods. Thermal neutron flux evaluation from SPND signal processing required a specific TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo calculation which has been performed with the precise CALMOS cell geometry. In addition, the Finite Element model for temperatures map prediction inside the calorimetric cell has been upgraded with recent experimental data obtained up to 12 W · g-1. Finally, the experience feedback led us to improvement perspectives. A second device is

  11. Estimation of core body temperature from skin temperature, heat flux, and heart rate using a Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welles, Alexander P; Xu, Xiaojiang; Santee, William R; Looney, David P; Buller, Mark J; Potter, Adam W; Hoyt, Reed W

    2018-05-18

    Core body temperature (T C ) is a key physiological metric of thermal heat-strain yet it remains difficult to measure non-invasively in the field. This work used combinations of observations of skin temperature (T S ), heat flux (HF), and heart rate (HR) to accurately estimate T C using a Kalman Filter (KF). Data were collected from eight volunteers (age 22 ± 4 yr, height 1.75 ± 0.10 m, body mass 76.4 ± 10.7 kg, and body fat 23.4 ± 5.8%, mean ± standard deviation) while walking at two different metabolic rates (∼350 and ∼550 W) under three conditions (warm: 25 °C, 50% relative humidity (RH); hot-humid: 35 °C, 70% RH; and hot-dry: 40 °C, 20% RH). Skin temperature and HF data were collected from six locations: pectoralis, inner thigh, scapula, sternum, rib cage, and forehead. Kalman filter variables were learned via linear regression and covariance calculations between T C and T S , HF, and HR. Root mean square error (RMSE) and bias were calculated to identify the best performing models. The pectoralis (RMSE 0.18 ± 0.04 °C; bias -0.01 ± 0.09 °C), rib (RMSE 0.18 ± 0.09 °C; bias -0.03 ± 0.09 °C), and sternum (RMSE 0.20 ± 0.10 °C; bias -0.04 ± 0.13 °C) were found to have the lowest error values when using T S , HF, and HR but, using only two of these measures provided similar accuracy. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Development, verification and validation of an FPGA-based core heat removal protection system for a PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yichun, E-mail: ycwu@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Shui, Xuanxuan, E-mail: 807001564@qq.com [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Cai, Yuanfeng, E-mail: 1056303902@qq.com [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Zhou, Junyi, E-mail: 1032133755@qq.com [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Wu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: npic_wu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Reactor System Design Technology, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zheng, Jianxiang, E-mail: zwu@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • An example on life cycle development process and V&V on FPGA-based I&C is presented. • Software standards and guidelines are used in FPGA-based NPP I&C system logic V&V. • Diversified FPGA design and verification languages and tools are utilized. • An NPP operation principle simulator is used to simulate operation scenarios. - Abstract: To reach high confidence and ensure reliability of nuclear FPGA-based safety system, life cycle processes of discipline specification and implementation of design as well as regulations verification and validation (V&V) are needed. A specific example on how to conduct life cycle development process and V&V on FPGA-based core heat removal (CHR) protection system for CPR1000 pressure water reactor (PWR) is presented in this paper. Using the existing standards and guidelines for life cycle development and V&V, a simplified FPGA-based CHR protection system for PWR has been designed, implemented, verified and validated. Diversified verification and simulation languages and tools are used by the independent design team and the V&V team. In the system acceptance testing V&V phase, a CPR1000 NPP operation principle simulator (OPS) model is utilized to simulate normal and abnormal operation scenarios, and provide input data to the under-test FPGA-based CHR protection system and a verified C code CHR function module. The evaluation results are applied to validate the under-test FPGA-based CHR protection system. The OPS model operation outputs also provide reasonable references for the tests. Using an OPS model in the system acceptance testing V&V is cost-effective and high-efficient. A dedicated OPS, as a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) item, would contribute as an important tool in the V&V process of NPP I&C systems, including FPGA-based and microprocessor-based systems.

  13. Decay heat and activity of the structural materials of the fuel and blanket assemblies of the second and third core of KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterhagen, D.

    1986-06-01

    The decay heat and activity caused by structural materials have been calculated for the fuel assemblies of KNK II (second and third core) with a residence time of 720 equivalent full-power days (efpd) and the blanket assemblies with 1880 efpd. The values are given for the different zones of the assemblies (head, active zone, fission gas plenum, foot and stellite area) for decay times from 1 to 20 years. For decay times beyond 2 years more than 80 % of the decay heat are caused by the Co60-decay, more than 60 % of which result from the stellite in the foot area [de

  14. New ADAC centre cools and heats environmental-friendly. Concrete core tempering; Neue ADAC-Zentrale kuehlt und heizt umweltvertraeglich. Betonkerntemperierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    2010-12-15

    At present, the new centre of the General German Automobile Association (ADAC) arises in Munich's suburb Sendling/Westpark. In summer 2011, nearly 2,400 coworkers of ADAC so far distributed over six locations in Munich shall work together in the new office building. So that they feel well in this new building, Rehau AG (Rehau, Federal Republic of Germany) supplies an environmental-friendly heating and cooling of the building by means of concrete core tempering.

  15. Effect of heat source shape on the thermal field in the pebble bed core of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, in order to minimize the error brought by non-uniform heat flux, the spherical heaters are employed as heat source; subsequently, thermal field and heat transfer characteristics of the pebbles are investigated. The thermal field of the pebble surface in PBR is measured with heat source in different shapes. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. However, the possible appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of HTGR may affect the integrity of the pebbles, which has drawn the attention of many scientists to investigate the thermal field and to predict the maximum temperature locations in the pebbles using CFD method, Lee et.al has also done some experimental work on measuring the surface temperature of the pebbles as well as visualizing flow patterns of the coolant gas, and it was found that the temperature near the contacting points between pebbles was not higher than the flow stagnation points due to the higher thermal conductivity of the pebble. Certain error of temperature measurement might occur because of not very uniform heat flux in the pebbles since heater in cylindrical shape was utilized as heat source in previous experiment. More uniform heat flux and more complicated thermal profile are found in the result obtained using spherical heaters. The result shows that the temperature in contact point is higher than that in the top point, which is different from the previous results. The complex thermal phenomena observed in the lower-half side-sphere can be explained by the flow pattern near the surface.

  16. Development of local heat transfer and pressure drop models for pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor cores - HTR2008-58296

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, B.; Worsley, M.; Stainsby, R.; Grief, A.; Dennier, A.; Macintosh, S.; Van Heerden, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient predictions for a typical coolant flow within the core of a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by examining a representative group of pebbles remote from the reflector region. The three- dimensional steady state flow and heat transfer predictions utilized in this work are obtained from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model created in the commercial software ANSYS FLUENT TM . This work utilizes three RANS turbulence models and the Chilton-Colburn analogy for heat transfer. A methodology is included in this paper for creating a quality unstructured mesh with prismatic surface layers on a random arrangement of touching pebbles. The results of the model are validated by comparing them with the correlations of the German KTA rules for a PBR. (authors)

  17. Natural convection and radiation heat transfer in a vertical porous layer with a hexagonal honeycomb core. 1st Report. Numerical analysis; Honeycomb core de shikirareta enchoku takoshitsu sonai no shizen tairyu - fukusha fukugo netsu dentatsu. 1. Suchi kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Y; Asako, Y [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Technology; Faghri, M [University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States)

    1997-06-25

    Combined heat transfer characteristics are obtained numerically for three-dimensional natural convection and thermal radiation in a long and wide vertical porous layer with a hexagonal honeycomb core. The porous layer is assumed to be both homogeneous and isotropic. The pure Darcy law for the fluid flow and Rosseland`s approximation for the radiation are employed. The numerical methodology is based on an algebraic coordinate transformation technique and the transformed governing equations are solved using the SIMPLE algorithm. The effect of radiation on the beat transfer characteristics is investigated in a wide range of radiation numbers and temperature ratios, for two Darcy-Rayleigh number values (Ra*=100, 1000), and for a fixed aspect ratio of H/L=1. The results are presented in the form of combined and convection heat transfer coefficients, and are compared with the corresponding values for pure natural convection. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An estimation of core damage frequency of a pressurized water reactor during midloop operation due to loss of residual heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.; Chen, C.T.; Lee, M.

    1995-01-01

    The core damage frequency caused by loss of residual heat removal (RHR) events was assessed during midloop operation of a Westinghouse-designed three-loop pressurized water reactor. The assessment considers two types of outages (refueling and drained maintenance) and uses failure data collected specifically for shutdown condition. Event trees were developed for five categories of loss of RHR events. Human actions to mitigate the loss of RHR events were identified and human error probabilities were quantified using the human cognitive reliability (HCR) and the technique for human error rate prediction (THERP) models. The results showed that the core damage frequency caused by loss of RHR events during midloop operation was 3.4 x 10 -5 per year. The results also showed that the core damage frequency can be reduced significantly by removing a pressurizer safety valve before entering midloop operation. The establishment of reflux cooling, i.e., decay heat removal through the steam generator secondary side, also plays an important role in mitigating the loss of RHR events during midloop operation

  19. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  20. First in-core simultaneous measurements of nuclear heating and thermal neutron flux obtained with the innovative mobile calorimeter CALMOS inside the OSIRIS reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeltier, Valerie; Bubendorff, Jacques; Carcreff, Hubert [Nuclear studies and reactor irradiation Service, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Salmon, Laurent [Thermalhydraulics and Fluid Mechanics Section, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear heating inside a MTR reactor has to be known in order to design and to run irradiation experiments which have to fulfill target temperature constraints. This measurement is usually carried out by calorimetry. The innovative calorimetric system, CALMOS, has been studied and built in 2011 for the 70 MWth OSIRIS reactor operated by CEA. Thanks to a new type of calorimetric probe, associated to a specific displacement system, it provides measurements along the fissile height and above the core. This development required preliminary modelling and irradiation of mock-ups of the calorimetric probe in the ex-core area, where nuclear heating rate does not exceed 2 W.g{sup -1}. The calorimeter working modes, the different measurement procedures allowed with such a new probe, the main modeling and experimental results and expected advantages of this new technique have been already presented. However, these first in-core measurements were not performed beyond 6 W.g{sup -1}, due to an inside temperature limitation imposed by a safety authority requirement. In this paper, we present the first in-core simultaneous measurements of nuclear heating and conventional thermal neutron flux obtained by the CALMOS device at the 70 MW nominal reactor power. For the first time, this experimental system was operated in nominal in-core conditions, with nominal neutron flux up to 2.7 10{sup 14} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} and nuclear heating up to 12 W.g{sup -1}. A comprehensive measurement campaign carried out from 2013 to 2015 inside all accessible irradiation locations of the core, allowed to qualify definitively this new device, not only in terms of measurement ability but also in terms of reliability. After a brief reminder of the calorimetric cell configuration and displacement system specificities, first nuclear heating distributions at nominal power are presented and discussed. In order to reinforce the heating evaluation, a systematic comparison is made between results obtained by

  1. Evaluation of a novel noninvasive continuous core temperature measurement system with a zero heat flux sensor using a manikin of the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Ivo F; Perl, Thorsten; Bauer, Martin; Bräuer, Anselm

    2015-02-01

    Reliable continuous perioperative core temperature measurement is of major importance. The pulmonary artery catheter is currently the gold standard for measuring core temperature but is invasive and expensive. Using a manikin, we evaluated the new, noninvasive SpotOn™ temperature monitoring system (SOT). With a sensor placed on the lateral forehead, SOT uses zero heat flux technology to noninvasively measure core temperature; and because the forehead is devoid of thermoregulatory arteriovenous shunts, a piece of bone cement served as a model of the frontal bone in this study. Bias, limits of agreements, long-term measurement stability, and the lowest measurable temperature of the device were investigated. Bias and limits of agreement of the temperature data of two SOTs and of the thermistor placed on the manikin's surface were calculated. Measurements obtained from SOTs were similar to thermistor values. The bias and limits of agreement lay within a predefined clinically acceptable range. Repeat measurements differed only slightly, and stayed stable for hours. Because of its temperature range, the SOT cannot be used to monitor temperatures below 28°C. In conclusion, the new SOT could provide a reliable, less invasive and cheaper alternative for measuring perioperative core temperature in routine clinical practice. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate these results.

  2. INFERENCE OF HEATING PROPERTIES FROM “HOT” NON-FLARING PLASMAS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES. I. SINGLE NANOFLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, W. T.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Cargill, P. J., E-mail: will.t.barnes@rice.edu [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-20

    The properties that are expected of “hot” non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions are investigated using hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops code. Here we study a single nanoflare and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK, which is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium, and for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the “smoking gun” of nanoflare heating, lies between 10{sup 6.6} and 10{sup 7} K. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  3. Proceeding of JSPS-CAS Core University Program seminar on production and control of high performance plasmas with advanced plasma heating and diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Morita, Shigeru

    2011-02-01

    The JSPS-CAS Core University Program (CUP) seminar on 'Production and control of high performance plasmas with advanced plasma heating and diagnostic systems' took place in Guilin Bravo Hotel, Guilin, China, 1-4 November 2010. This seminar was organized in the framework of CUP in the field of plasma and nuclear fusion. Two special talks and 46 oral talks were presented in the seminar including 36 Chinese, 18 Japanese and 4 Korean attendees. Production and control of high performance plasmas is a crucial issue for realizing an advanced nuclear fusion reactor in addition to developments of advanced plasma heating and diagnostics. This seminar was motivated along the issues. Results in the field of fusion experiments obtained through CUP activities during recent two years were summarized. Possible direction of future collaboration and further encouragement of scientific activity of younger scientists were also discussed in this seminar with future experimental plans in both countries. (author)

  4. Proceeding of JSPS-CAS core university program seminar on production and control of high performance plasmas with advanced plasma heating and diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiang; Morita, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    The JSPS-CAS Core University Program (CUP) seminar on 'Production and control of high performance plasmas with advanced plasma heating and diagnostic systems' took place in Shiner hotel, Lijiang, China, 4-7 November 2008. This seminar was organized in the framework of CUP in the field of plasma and nuclear fusion. One special talk and 34 oral talks were presented in the seminar including 16 Japanese attendees. Production and control of high performance plasmas is a crucial issue for realizing an advanced nuclear fusion reactor in addition to developments of advanced plasma heating and diagnostics. This seminar was motivated along the issues. Results obtained from CUP activities during recent four years were summarized. Several crucial issues to be resolved near future were also extracted in this seminar. The 31 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. In-core program for on line measurements of neutron, photon and nuclear heating parameters inside Jules Horowitz MTR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate on-line measurements of key parameters inside experimental channels of Material Testing Reactor are necessary to dimension the irradiation devices and consequently to conduct smart experiments on fuels and materials under suitable conditions. In particular the quantification of nuclear heating, a relevant parameter to reach adapted thermal conditions, has to be improved. These works focus on an important collaborative program between CEA and Aix-Marseille University called INCORE (Instrumentation for Nuclear radiations and Calorimetry On-line in Reactor) dedicated to the development of a new measurement methodology to quantify both nuclear heating and accurate radiation flux levels (neutrons and photons). The methodology, which is based on experiments carried out under irradiation conditions with a multi-sensor device (ionization chamber, fission chamber, gamma thermometer, calorimeter, SPND, SPGD) as well as works performed out-of nuclear/radiative environment on a reference sensor used to measure nuclear heating (calorimeter), is presented (authors)

  6. The effects of heated and room-temperature abdominal lavage solutions on core body temperature in dogs undergoing celiotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Michael A; McLaughlin, Ron; Hendrix, P K

    2005-01-01

    To document the magnitude of temperature elevation obtained with heated lavage solutions during abdominal lavage, 18 dogs were lavaged with sterile isotonic saline intraoperatively (i.e., during a celiotomy). In nine dogs, room-temperature saline was used. In the remaining nine dogs, saline heated to 43+/-2 degrees C (110+/-4 degrees F) was used. Esophageal, rectal, and tympanic temperatures were recorded every 60 seconds for 15 minutes after initiation of the lavage. Temperature levels decreased in dogs lavaged with room-temperature saline. Temperature levels increased significantly in dogs lavaged with heated saline after 2 to 6 minutes of lavage, and temperatures continued to increase throughout the 15-minute lavage period.

  7. Use of an Esophageal Heat Exchanger to Maintain Core Temperature during Burn Excisions and to Attenuate Pyrexia on the Burns Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Williams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Burns patients are vulnerable to hyperthermia due to sepsis and SIRS and to hypothermia due to heat loss during excision surgery. Both states are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We describe the first use of a novel esophageal heat exchange device in combination with a heater/cooler unit to manage perioperative hypothermia and postoperative pyrexia. Material and Methods. The device was used in three patients with full thickness burns of 51%, 49%, and 45% body surface area to reduce perioperative hypothermia during surgeries of >6 h duration and subsequently to control hyperthermia in one of the patients who developed pyrexia of 40°C on the 22nd postoperative day due to E. coli/Candida septicaemia which was unresponsive to conventional cooling strategies. Results. Perioperative core temperature was maintained at 37°C for all three patients, and it was possible to reduce ambient temperature to 26°C to increase comfort levels for the operating team. The core temperature of the pyrexial patient was reduced to 38.5°C within 2.5 h of instituting the device and maintained around this value thereafter. Conclusion. The device was easy to use with no adverse incidents and helped maintain normothermia in all cases.

  8. Experimental study on coolability of particulate core-metal debris bed with oxidization, (2). Fragmentation and enhanced heat transfer in zircaloy debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Guanghui; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Aoki, Hiroomi; Kimura, Iichi

    2006-01-01

    The oxidization and coolability characteristics of the particulate Zircaloy debris bed, which is deposited under the hard debris and through which first vapor penetrates and then water penetrates, are studied in the present paper. In the vapor penetration experiments, it is found that Zircaloy debris particles are effectively broken into small pieces after making thick oxidized layer with deep clacks by rapid oxidization under the condition that vapor with 20 cm/s penetrates for 30 to 70 min at an initial debris bed temperature of 1,030degC. It is also confirmed in the water penetration experiments that the oxidized particle debris bed has potentially of high coolability when water penetrates through the fully oxidized particle bed because of a high capillary force originating from those particles with deep cracks on their surfaces. Based on the present study, a new scenario for the appearance and disappearance of the hot spot in the TMI-2 accident is possible. The particulate core-metal core-metal debris bed is first heated up by rapid oxidization with heat generation when vapor can penetrate through the debris bed with porosities. This corresponds to the appearance of the hot spot. The resultant oxidized particulate debris bed causes a high coolability due to its high capillary force when the water can touch the debris bed at wet condition. This corresponds to the disappearance of the hot spot. (author)

  9. Effect of core body temperature, time of day, and climate conditions on behavioral patterns of lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J D; Hall, L W; Collier, R J; Smith, J F

    2015-01-01

    Cattle show several responses to heat load, including spending more time standing. Little is known about what benefit this may provide for the animals. Data from 3 separate cooling management trials were analyzed to investigate the relationship between behavioral patterns in lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress and their body temperature. Cows (n=157) were each fitted with a leg data logger that measured position and an intravaginal data logger that measures core body temperature (CBT). Ambient conditions were also collected. All data were standardized to 5-min intervals, and information was divided into several categories: when standing and lying bouts were initiated and the continuance of each bout (7,963 lying and 6,276 standing bouts). In one location, cows were continuously subjected to heat-stress levels according to temperature-humidity index (THI) range (THI≥72). The THI range for the other 2 locations was below and above a heat-stress threshold of 72 THI. Overall and regardless of period of day, cows stood up at greater CBT compared with continuing to stand or switching to a lying position. In contrast, cows lay down at lower CBT compared with continuing to lie or switching to a standing position, and lying bouts lasted longer when cows had lower CBT. Standing bouts also lasted longer when cattle had greater CBT, and they were less likely to lie down (less than 50% of lying bouts initiated) when their body temperature was over 38.8°C. Also, cow standing behavior was affected once THI reached 68. Increasing CBT decreased lying duration and increased standing duration. A CBT of 38.93°C marked a 50% likelihood a cow would be standing. This is the first physiological evidence that standing may help cool cows and provides insight into a communally observed behavioral response to heat. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance evaluation of solar heating system with thermal core type soil heat storage. Part 5. Performance prediction and evaluation of the system considered of the weather condition; Taiyonetsu riyo netsu kakushiki dojo chikunetsu system no seino hyoka. 5. Kisho joken wo koryoshita system no seino yosoku to hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, N [Nishimatsu Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Y [Kogakuin University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    The paper studied a solar heating system with thermal core type soil heat storage (combining a thermal core composing of a water tank and an underground pebble tank and the soil around the heat storage tank and also using solar energy). Solar energy is stored by temperature level in the high temperature water tank, the low temperature pebble heat storage tank and the soil around the heat storage tank. Heat is recovered according to temperature as direct ventilation space heating (utilization of pebble tank air), floor heating (utilization of hot water of the heat storage water tank) and heat pump heat source (utilization of pebble tank air). A study was made of performance and regional effectiveness of the system under different weather conditions. A study was also made of effects of the water tank for short term heat storage by changing the water volume. Using the same structure, etc. for the system, the system was evaluated using weather data of Sapporo, Tokyo and Kagoshima. In terms of efficiency of the system, the system structure was found to be most suitable for weather conditions in Tokyo. However, the air heat source heat pump which cannot be usually used in the cold area has come to be used. Such effect except efficiency is also considered, and the amount of performance to be targeted in each region changes. 2 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Development of core hot spot evaluation method for decay heat removal by natural circulation under transient conditions in sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Doda, Norihiro; Kamide, Hideki; Watanabe, Osamu; Ohkubo, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Toward the commercialization of fast reactors, a design study of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is being performed. In this design study, the adoption of decay heat removal system operated by fully natural circulation is being examined from viewpoints of economic competitiveness and passive safety. This paper describes a new evaluation method of core hot spot under transient conditions from forced to natural circulation operations that is necessary for confirming feasibility of the fully natural circulation decay heat removal system. The new method consists of three analysis steps in order to include effects of thermal hydraulic phenomena particular to the natural circulation decay heat removal, e.g., flow redistribution in fuel assemblies caused by buoyancy force, and therefore it enables more rational hot spot evaluation rather than conventional ones. This method was applied to a hot spot evaluation of loss-of-external-power event and the result was compared with those by conventional 1D and detailed 3D simulations. It was confirmed that the proposed method can estimate the hot spot with reasonable degree of conservativeness. (author)

  12. Modelling of heat transfer between molten core and concrete with account of phase changes in the melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, S.M.; Zemlianoukhin, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of the process of heat transfer between molten corium and concrete in the case of severe accident in a PWR is performed. It is shown that Bradley's model may be improved for the case of an oxidic melt. A new model is developed and incorporated in the WECHSL-Mod2 Code. Post-test calculations of melt-concrete interaction experiments are carried out. The comparison and analysis of the experimental results and calculations are presented. (9 figures) (Author)

  13. A study on transient heat transfer of the EU-ABWR external core catcher using the phase-change effective convectivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Chi Thanh; Nguyen Viet Hung; Tahara, Mika; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hamazaki, Ryoichi; Kudinov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In advanced designs of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), for mitigation of severe accident consequences, on the one hand, the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) concept has been implemented. On the other hand in other new NPP designs (Generation III and III+) with large power reactors, the External Core Catcher (ECC) has been widely adopted. Assessment of ECC design robustness is largely based on analysis of heat transfer of a melt pool formed in the ECC. Transient heat transfer analysis of an ECC is challenging due to (i) uncertainty in the in-vessel accident progression and subsequent vessel failure modes; (ii) long transient, (iii) high Rayleigh number and complex flows involving phase change of the melt pool formed in an ECC. The present paper is concerned with analysis of transient melt pool heat transfer in the ECC of new Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) designed by Toshiba Corporation (Japan). According to the ABWR severe accident management strategy, the ECC is initially dry. In order to prevent steam explosion flooding is initiated after termination of melt relocation from the vessel. The ECC full of melt is cooled from the top directly by water and from the bottom through the ECC walls. In order to assess sustainability of the ECC, heat transfer simulation of a stratified melt pool formed in the ECC is carried out. The problem addressed in this work is heat flux distribution at ECC boundaries when cooling is applied (i) from the bottom, (ii) from the top and from the bottom. To perform melt pool heat transfer simulation, we employ Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM) which was originally developed as a computationally efficient, sufficiently accurate, 2D/3D accident analysis tools for simulation of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower plenum. Thermal loads from the melt pool to ECC boundaries are determined for selected ex-vessel accident scenarios. Performance of the ECC, efficiency of severe accident management (SAM) measures and

  14. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  15. WWER-440 reactor thermal power increase. Up-to-date approaches to substantiation of the core heat-engineering reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Lushin, V.; Zubtsov, D.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the Units power is an urgent problem for nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors. Improving the fuel assembly designs and calculated codes creates all prerequisites to fulfil this purpose. The decrease in the core power peaking is reached by using the profiled fuel assemblies, burnable absorber integrated into the fuel, the FA with the modernized interface attachment, modern calculated codes that allows to reduce conservatism of the RP safety substantiation. A wide spectrum of experimental study of behaviour of the fuel having reached burn-up (50-60) MW days / kg U under the transients and accident conditions was carried out, the post-irradiated examination of the fuel assemblies, fuel rods and fuel pellets with four and five annual operating fuel cycle were performed as well and confirmed the high reliability of the fuel, the presence of large margins of the fuel stack state that contributes to reactor operation at the increased power. The results of the carried out experiments on implementing the five and six annual fuel cycles show that the limiting fuel state as to its serviceability in the WWER-440 reactors is far from being reached. Presently there is an experience of the increased power operation of Kola NPP, Units 1, 2, 4 and Rovno NPP, Unit 2. The Loviisa NPP Units are operated at 109 % power. The Russian experts had gained an experience in substantiating the core operation at 108 % power for Paks NPP, Unit 4. In this paper the additional conditions for increasing the power of the Kola NPP, Units 1 and 2 and the main results of substantiation of increase in power of the Paks NPP, Unit 4 up to 1485 MW are presented in details

  16. Theoretical investigations of the fission product release out of the core of a high temperature reactor during hypothetical heat up accidents as example of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalas, T.A.; Iniotakis, N.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1986-03-01

    The investigation has been performed by means of a physical model, taking into account the micro- and macro-structures of the pyrolytical and graphitical reactor components as well as renouncing an introduction of effective diffusion coefficients by the description of the fission products transport through the coated particle layers and the fuel elements and renouncing an assumption of the spontaneously adsorption-desorption equilibrium on the surface of the fuel elements. The solving method and the respective computer codes were also developed. In addition the theoretically calculated and the experimentally determined results regarding the caesium release from single coated particles as well as fuel elements at accident temperatures were compared. Finally the caesium release from the core of the PNP-500 reactor during a heat up accident has been estimated and discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Multi-bundle sodium experiments for thermohydraulics in core subassemblies during natural circulation decay heat removal operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, H; Ieda, Y; Toda, S; Isozaki, T; Sugawara, S [Reactor Engineering Section, O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1993-02-01

    Two types of multi-subassembly sodium experiments, CCTL-CFR tests and PLANDTL-DHX tests, have been carried out in order to investigate thermohydraulics in a fast reactor coreduring natural circulation. Basic experiments are carried out in CCTL-CFR test rig without inter-wrapper gap and under steady state. Integral experiments are performed in PLANDTL-DHX test rig with the inter-wrapper gap and a dip cooler in an upper plenum under steady state and transient conditions. The first series of the experiments and post analyses showed that inter-subassembly heat transfer had significant effects on the transverse temperature distribution in the subassembly and was strongly coupled with intra-subassembly flow redistribution. And the cold sodium provided by the dip cooler could reduce the hot spot temperature in the pin bundle mainly via the inter-wrapper gap. (author)

  18. Observation of inward and outward particle convection in the core of electron cyclotron heated and current driven plasmas in the Tokamak a Configuration Variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furno, I.; Weisen, H.

    2003-01-01

    In the Tokamak a Configuration Variable [F. Hofmann, J.B. Lister, M. Anton et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 36, B277 (1994)], inward or outward convection in the core of electron cyclotron heated and current driven plasmas is observed, depending on discharge conditions. In sawtoothing discharges with central electron cyclotron heating, outward convection is observed when a quasicontinuous m=1 kink mode is present, resulting in inverted sawteeth on the central electron density, while in the absence thereof, inward convection between successive sawtooth crashes leads to 'normal' sawteeth. The occurrence of a kink mode depends sensitively on plasma triangularity. When sawteeth are stabilized with central co- or counterelectron cyclotron current drive, stationary hollow electron density profiles are observed in the presence of m=1 modes, while peaked or flat profiles are observed in magnetohydrodynamic quiescent discharges. The observation of peaked density profiles in fully electron cyclotron driven plasmas demonstrates that pinch processes other than the Ware pinch must be responsible for these phenomena

  19. The development of NRTM-turbine flow meter and measurement of the coolant flow rate in-core of 5 MW heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Meisheng; Wang Xiuqin; Ni Mengchen

    1995-01-01

    In order to measure the coolant flow rate in-core of 5 MW Heating Reactor the special turbine flowmeter of the type of NRTM has been developed. It consists of a body, a turbine with long screw blade and six pieces of Alnico magnets, and a coil mounted on the body. The advantage of this turbine flowmeter is of low resistance and long working-life. Another advantage is that when the turbine is working or not working its factor of resistance is about the same. It is very important for a natural circulation heating reactor. Because the cable, which is welded to the coil assembly, is long enough to extend out of the reactor vessel to the control room, the signal of flow rate is easy to be disturbed by noise in the case. The traditional method of counting the frequency of the A-C voltage which is induced in the coil has a poor ability for resisting noise. The method of the frequency-spectrum analysis of the frequency of the A-C voltage is used to make sure the accuracy of the measurement of the turbine flow meter. Compared with the method of the count it has a good ability for resisting noise. After three years operation a lot of valuable data were obtained

  20. TWO MASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE L 1641 MOLECULAR CLOUDS: THE HERSCHEL CONNECTION OF DENSE CORES AND FILAMENTS IN ORION A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychroni, D.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Turrini, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Roy, A.; André, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Martin, P.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Bontemps, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel survey maps of the L 1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of the dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there, is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 M ☉ and drives the shape of the core mass function (CMF) at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM∝M –1.4±0.4 . The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 M ☉ and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ∼4 M ☉ . We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud

  1. TWO MASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE L 1641 MOLECULAR CLOUDS: THE HERSCHEL CONNECTION OF DENSE CORES AND FILAMENTS IN ORION A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Athens, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Turrini, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (INAF-IAPS), via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Roy, A.; André, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU CNRS/INSU Université Paris Diderot, Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, P. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Di Francesco, J. [National Research Council Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Arzoumanian, D. [IAS, CNRS (UMR 8617), Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiment 121, F-91400 Orsay (France); Bontemps, S., E-mail: dpolychroni@phys.uoa.gr [Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, CNRS/INSU, UMR 5804, BP 89, F-33271, Floirac Cedex (France); and others

    2013-11-10

    We present Herschel survey maps of the L 1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of the dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there, is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 M {sub ☉} and drives the shape of the core mass function (CMF) at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM∝M {sup –1.4±0.4}. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 M {sub ☉} and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ∼4 M {sub ☉}. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud.

  2. The recommended Threshold Limit Values for heat exposure fail to maintain body core temperature within safe limits in older working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Meade, Robert D; D'Souza, Andrew W; Flouris, Andreas D; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Sigal, Ronald J; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-09-01

    The American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) Threshold Limit Values (TLV® guidelines) for work in the heat consist of work-rest (WR) allocations designed to ensure a stable core temperature that does not exceed 38°C. However, the TLV® guidelines have not been validated in older workers. This is an important shortcoming given that adults as young as 40 years demonstrate impairments in their ability to dissipate heat. We therefore evaluated body temperature responses in older adults during work performed in accordance to the TLV® recommended guidelines. On three occasions, 9 healthy older (58 ± 5 years) males performed a 120-min work-simulated protocol in accordance with the TLV® guidelines for moderate-to-heavy intensity work (360 W fixed rate of heat production) in different wet-bulb globe temperatures (WBGT). The first was 120 min of continuous (CON) cycling at 28.0°C WBGT (CON[28°C]). The other two protocols were 15-min intermittent work bouts performed with different WR cycles and WBGT: (i) WR of 3:1 at 29.0°C (WR3:1[29°C]) and (ii) WR of 1:1 at 30.0°C (WR1:1[30°C]). Rectal temperature was measured continuously. The rate of change in mean body temperature was determined via thermometry (weighting coefficients: rectal, 0.9; mean skin temperature, 0.1) and direct calorimetry. Rectal temperature exceeded 38°C in all participants in CON[28°C] and WR3:1[29°C] whereas a statistically similar proportion of workers exceeded 38°C in WR1:1[30°C] (χ 2 ; P = 0.32). The average time for rectal temperature to reach 38°C was: CON[28°C], 53 ± 7; WR3:1[29°C], 79 ± 11; and WR1:1[30°C], 100 ± 29 min. Finally, while a stable mean body temperature was not achieved in any work condition as measured by thermometry (i.e., >0°C·min -1 ; all Pheat balance as determined by direct calorimetry was achieved in WR3:1[29°C] and WR1:1[30°C] (both P ≥ 0.08). Our findings indicate that the TLV® guidelines do not prevent body core

  3. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Formation of Core-Shell-Structured Reinforcing Particles during Heating of Al–Ti Powder Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tijun; Gao, Min; Tong, Yunqi

    2018-01-01

    To prepare core-shell-structured Ti@compound particle (Ti@compoundp) reinforced Al matrix composite via powder thixoforming, the effects of alloying elements, such as Si, Cu, Mg, and Zn, on the reaction between Ti powders and Al melt, and the microstructure of the resulting reinforcements were investigated during heating of powder compacts at 993 K (720 °C). Simultaneously, the situations of the reinforcing particles in the corresponding semisolid compacts were also studied. Both thermodynamic analysis and experiment results all indicate that Si participated in the reaction and promoted the formation of Al–Ti–Si ternary compounds, while Cu, Mg, and Zn did not take part in the reaction and facilitated Al3Ti phase to form to different degrees. The first-formed Al–Ti–Si ternary compound was τ1 phase, and then it gradually transformed into (Al,Si)3Ti phase. The proportion and existing time of τ1 phase all increased as the Si content increased. In contrast, Mg had the largest, Cu had the least, and Si and Zn had an equivalent middle effect on accelerating the reaction. The thicker the reaction shell was, the larger the stress generated in the shell was, and thus the looser the shell microstructure was. The stress generated in (Al,Si)3Ti phase was larger than that in τ1 phase, but smaller than that in Al3Ti phase. So, the shells in the Al–Ti–Si system were more compact than those in the other systems, and Si element was beneficial to obtain thick and compact compound shells. Most of the above results were consistent to those in the semisolid state ones except the product phase constituents in the Al–Ti–Mg system and the reaction rate in the Al–Ti–Zn system. More importantly, the desirable core-shell structured Ti@compoundp was only achieved in the semisolid Al–Ti–Si system. PMID:29342946

  4. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Formation of Core-Shell-Structured Reinforcing Particles during Heating of Al-Ti Powder Compacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tijun; Gao, Min; Tong, Yunqi

    2018-01-15

    To prepare core-shell-structured Ti@compound particle (Ti@compound p ) reinforced Al matrix composite via powder thixoforming, the effects of alloying elements, such as Si, Cu, Mg, and Zn, on the reaction between Ti powders and Al melt, and the microstructure of the resulting reinforcements were investigated during heating of powder compacts at 993 K (720 °C). Simultaneously, the situations of the reinforcing particles in the corresponding semisolid compacts were also studied. Both thermodynamic analysis and experiment results all indicate that Si participated in the reaction and promoted the formation of Al-Ti-Si ternary compounds, while Cu, Mg, and Zn did not take part in the reaction and facilitated Al₃Ti phase to form to different degrees. The first-formed Al-Ti-Si ternary compound was τ1 phase, and then it gradually transformed into (Al,Si)₃Ti phase. The proportion and existing time of τ1 phase all increased as the Si content increased. In contrast, Mg had the largest, Cu had the least, and Si and Zn had an equivalent middle effect on accelerating the reaction. The thicker the reaction shell was, the larger the stress generated in the shell was, and thus the looser the shell microstructure was. The stress generated in (Al,Si)₃Ti phase was larger than that in τ1 phase, but smaller than that in Al₃Ti phase. So, the shells in the Al-Ti-Si system were more compact than those in the other systems, and Si element was beneficial to obtain thick and compact compound shells. Most of the above results were consistent to those in the semisolid state ones except the product phase constituents in the Al-Ti-Mg system and the reaction rate in the Al-Ti-Zn system. More importantly, the desirable core-shell structured Ti@compound p was only achieved in the semisolid Al-Ti-Si system.

  5. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm2 in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm 2 of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  6. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm{sup 2} in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm{sup 2} of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  7. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Alves, F. O.; Beltran, M. T.; Morata, O.; Masque, J. M.; Busquet, G.; Sanchez-Monge, A.; Estalella, R.; Franco, G. A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Pipe Nebula is a massive, nearby dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency which makes it a good laboratory in which to study the very early stages of the star formation process. The Pipe Nebula is largely filamentary and appears to be threaded by a uniform magnetic field at scales of a few parsecs, perpendicular to its main axis. The field is only locally perturbed in a few regions, such as the only active cluster-forming core B59. The aim of this study is to investigate primordial conditions in low-mass pre-stellar cores and how they relate to the local magnetic field in the cloud. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to carry out a continuum and molecular survey at 3 and 1 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward four selected starless cores inside the Pipe Nebula. We found that the dust continuum emission maps trace the densest regions better than previous Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) extinction maps, while 2MASS extinction maps trace the diffuse gas better. The properties of the cores derived from dust emission show average radii of ∼0.09 pc, densities of ∼1.3x10 5 cm -3 , and core masses of ∼2.5 M sun . Our results confirm that the Pipe Nebula starless cores studied are in a very early evolutionary stage and present a very young chemistry with different properties that allow us to propose an evolutionary sequence. All of the cores present early-time molecular emission with CS detections in the whole sample. Two of them, cores 40 and 109, present strong late-time molecular emission. There seems to be a correlation between the chemical evolutionary stage of the cores and the local magnetic properties that suggests that the evolution of the cores is ruled by a local competition between the magnetic energy and other mechanisms, such as turbulence.

  8. A Bayesian reliability study on motorized valves for the emergency core cooling, heat transport isolation and shutdown cooling systems at Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.E.; Rennick, D.F.; Nainer, A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this is to examine operational data on 32 motorized valves in the emergency core cooling, shutdown cooling and heat transport isolation systems and determine if the evidence would support a reduction in testing frequency of these valves. The methodology used is to examine the data which has accumulated on motorized valve failures since Gentilly-2 first entered service, compare these data with similar data from other sources, and determine whether the evidence indicate that demand-based, wear out type failure mechanisms play a significant role in the recorded failures. The statistical data are then updated, using a Bayesian updating procedure, to obtain revised time based failure rates and demand based probabilities of failure on demand for the motorized valves. The revised failure rates and probabilities are then applied to the fault tree models for the systems of interest to determine what effects there would be, with the current test intervals and with extended test intervals, on the probability of failure of the systems. (author)

  9. Analysis of the heat transfer models for the development of the 3D model of thermal hydraulics of the BWR core and possible implementation in the SUN-RAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez S, R.A.; Morales S, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    In previous versions of the SUN-RAH, the core of the reactor was simulated starting from the punctual kinetics of neutrons of the same one. Different mathematical models to implement an unidimensional simulation of the thermal hydraulics of the core of the reactor to have a tool but exact were proposed. Of among the different ones modeling, those of Heat Transfer of n nodes and that of a differential equation of heat transfer were chosen. Both present the mathematical derivation of the equations of radial transfer of the heat generated in a bar of fuel, numeric routines for the calculation of the typical thermodynamic properties, calculation of the stationary state and dynamic response of some premature operational occurrences. It was carried out the comparison among both proposals with the purpose of being implemented in the SUN-RAH. This simulator includes all the main components of the thermodynamic cycle, with that the implementation of the one dimension models of the core, will be transform it into a tool but reliable. To make congruent the multidimensional kinetics of neutrons is necessary to have a model of heat transfer congruent with her for that here an analysis is made of that model of transfer it can be used in a great number of neutronic nodes. (Author)

  10. Formation of massive, dense cores by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahira, Ken; Shima, Kazuhiro; Habe, Asao; Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2018-05-01

    We performed sub-parsec (˜ 0.014 pc) scale simulations of cloud-cloud collisions of two idealized turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) with different masses in the range of (0.76-2.67) × 104 M_{⊙} and with collision speeds of 5-30 km s-1. Those parameters are larger than in Takahira, Tasker, and Habe (2014, ApJ, 792, 63), in which study the colliding system showed a partial gaseous arc morphology that supports the NANTEN observations of objects indicated to be colliding MCs using numerical simulations. Gas clumps with density greater than 10-20 g cm-3 were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked through the simulation to investigate the effects of the mass of colliding clouds and the collision speeds on the resulting core population. Our results demonstrate that the smaller cloud property is more important for the results of cloud-cloud collisions. The mass function of formed cores can be approximated by a power-law relation with an index γ = -1.6 in slower cloud-cloud collisions (v ˜ 5 km s-1), and is in good agreement with observation of MCs. A faster relative speed increases the number of cores formed in the early stage of collisions and shortens the gas accretion phase of cores in the shocked region, leading to the suppression of core growth. The bending point appears in the high-mass part of the core mass function and the bending point mass decreases with increase in collision speed for the same combination of colliding clouds. The higher-mass part of the core mass function than the bending point mass can be approximated by a power law with γ = -2-3 that is similar to the power index of the massive part of the observed stellar initial mass function. We discuss implications of our results for the massive-star formation in our Galaxy.

  11. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  12. A Calculation of Nuclear Heating by Activation Product of Structure Materials for the In-core Irradiation Hole in the HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Tae Yang; Park, B. G.; Kim, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Only delayed gamma heating is considered in this paper. Contribution of the delayed gamma heating is expected to be negligible for the reactor power. For the neutron irradiation, however, the contribution of delayed gamma heating is not negligible issue, and it should be evaluated for safety analysis. Additionally, in the case of temperature-sensitive irradiation targets, the delayed gamma heating should be evaluated precisely. For the HANARO, the delayed gamma heating has been evaluated by modifying the library data of the calculation code or by assuming the heating to be conservative value based on prompt gamma heating. For the method of modifying the library data, however, it should be able to estimate isotopes which contribute to heat generation exactly. And furthermore, it should be concerned to determine modified emission yield of gamma-rays depending on the half-life. For the method of assuming conservative value, it is hard to determine whether the assumed heating value is enough conservative or not. In this study, a methodology for evaluation of nuclear heating by structure materials irradiated for a long time is established with the ORIGEN and MCNP codes. And this method is applied to determine the nuclear heating of the RI capsule in the IR2 irradiation hole in the HANARO. In this paper, the methodology for evaluation of heat generation by irradiated structure materials was established by using the ORIGEN and MCNP codes. From this result, the contribution by farther structures was expected to be negligible. Meanwhile, heat generation by delayed gamma-ray was calculated less than 0.03% of heat generation by prompt radiations. The result of this study indicates that there are some remaining issues for the real situation of the neutron irradiation at HANARO.

  13. Flow regimes and heat transfer modes identification in ANGRA 2 core, during small break in the primary loop with area of 100 cm2, simulated with RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the flow regimes and the heat transfer modes is important for the analysis of accidents such as the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used in the RELAP5/MOD3.2.gama code in ANGRA 2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 100cm 2 -rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of ANGRA 2 (FSAR - A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of ANGRA 2 during the postulated accident. (author)

  14. Homogenization of some radiative heat transfer models: application to gas-cooled reactor cores; Homogeneisation de modeles de transferts thermiques et radiatifs: application au coeur des reacteurs a caloporteur gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ganaoui, K

    2006-09-15

    In the context of homogenization theory we treat some heat transfer problems involving unusual (according to the homogenization) boundary conditions. These problems are defined in a solid periodic perforated domain where two scales (macroscopic and microscopic) are to be taken into account and describe heat transfer by conduction in the solid and by radiation on the wall of each hole. Two kinds of radiation are considered: radiation in an infinite medium (non-linear problem) and radiation in cavity with grey-diffuse walls (non-linear and non-local problem). The derived homogenized models are conduction problems with an effective conductivity which depend on the considered radiation. Thus we introduce a framework (homogenization and validation) based on mathematical justification using the two-scale convergence method and numerical validation by simulations using the computer code CAST3M. This study, performed for gas cooled reactors cores, can be extended to other perforated domains involving the considered heat transfer phenomena. (author)

  15. Flow regimes and heat transfer modes identification in ANGRA 2 core, during small break in the primary loop with area of 100 cm{sup 2}, simulated with RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdgian@ipen.br, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the flow regimes and the heat transfer modes is important for the analysis of accidents such as the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used in the RELAP5/MOD3.2.gama code in ANGRA 2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 100cm{sup 2}-rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of ANGRA 2 (FSAR - A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of ANGRA 2 during the postulated accident. (author)

  16. Constraints on the Lost City Hydrothermal System from borehole thermal data; 3-D models of heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in an oceanic core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarenko, S.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    A perennial problem in near-ridge hydrothermal circulation is that the only directly measurable data to test models is often vent fluid temperature. Surface heat flow measurements may be available but without the underlying thermal structure it is not known if they are transient and affected by local hydrothermal flow, or conductive. The Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex at 30 °N on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, offers a unique opportunity to better constrain hydrothermal circulation models. The temperature profile in gabbroic rocks of IODP Hole 1309D was measured in IODPExpedition 340T, and found to be near-conductive, but with a slight inflexion at ~750 mbsf indicating downward advection of fluid above that level. The lack of deep convection is especially remarkable given that the long-lived Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is located only 5km to the south. We have modelled hydrothermal circulation in the Massif using Comsol Multiphysics, comparing 2-D and 3-D topographic models and using temperature-dependent conductivity to give the best estimate of heatflow into the Massif. We can constrain maximum permeability in gabbro below 750 mbsf to 5e-17 m2. The thermal gradient in the upper part of the borehole can be matched with a permeability of 3e-14 m2 in a 750 m thick layer parallel to the surface of the massif, with upflow occurring in areas of high topography and downflow at the location of the borehole. However in 3-D the precise flow pattern is quite model dependent, and the thermal structure can be matched either by downflow centred on the borehole at lower permeability or centred a few hundred metres from the borehole at higher permeability. The borehole gradient is compatible with the longevity (>120 kyr) and outflow temperature (40-90 °C) of the LCHF either with a deep more permeable (1e-14 m2 to 1e-15 m2) domain beneath the vent site in 2-D or a permeable fault slot 500 to 1000m wide and parallel to the transform fault in 3-D. In both cases topography

  17. [Effect of core: dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength of IPS Empress II heat-pressed all-ceramic restorative material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-hong; Feng, Hai-lan; Bao, Yi-wang; Qiu, Yan

    2007-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of core:dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength, fracture mode and origin of bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens. IPS Empress II core ceramic, dentin porcelain and bilayered composite specimens with core:dentin thickness ratio of 2:1 and 1:1 were tested in three-point flexure strength. Mean strengths and standard deviations were determined. The optical microscopy was employed for identification of the fracture mode and origin. The flexure strength of dentin porcelain was the smallest(62.7 MPa), and the strength of bilayered composite specimens was smaller than single-layered core ceramic(190.2 MPa). The core: dentin ratio did not influence the strength of bilayered composite specimens. The frequency of occurrence of bilayered specimen delaminations was higher in the group of core: dentin thickness ratio of 1:1 than in the group of 2:1. IPS Empress II core ceramic was significantly stronger than veneering dentin porcelain. Core:dentin thickness ratio could significantly influence the fracture mode and origin, and bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens showed little influence in the fracture strength.

  18. Measuring methods in out-of-pile simulation experiments investigating the cooling capability of melted core material with internal heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper deals with the application of various measuring methods in model experiments for studying the steady heat transport from volume-heated liquid films by natural convection. The aim of these model experiments is to test computing models for temperature and flow behavior of internally heated liquid films at different boundary conditions. Therefore, besides pure heat transfer measurements, temperature as well as velocity fields must be experimentally determined. Determination of the temperature fields is carried our with suitable thermoelements of small size, the velocity fields are determined by the laser-Doppler method as well as the stroboscopic method for photographically visualizing the flow. (orig.) [de

  19. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  20. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  1. Thermophysiological adaptations to passive mild heat acclimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallubinsky, H; Schellen, L; Kingma, B R M; Dautzenberg, B; van Baak, M A; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D

    Passive mild heat acclimation (PMHA) reflects realistic temperature challenges encountered in everyday life. Active heat acclimation, combining heat exposure and exercise, influences several important thermophysiological parameters; for example, it decreases core temperature and enhances heat

  2. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm 2 , 1000 0 C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm 2 , 1200 0 C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370 0 C

  3. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  4. Heat exchange apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, G.C.; McDaniels, J.D.; Gertsch, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention relates to heat exchangers used for transferring heat from the gas cooled core of a nuclear reactor to a secondary medium during standby and emergency conditions. The construction of the heat exchanger described is such that there is a minimum of welds exposed to the reactor coolant, the parasitic heat loss during normal operation of the reactor is minimized and the welds and heat transfer tubes are easily inspectable. (UK)

  5. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  6. Critical evaluation of the experiments and mathematical models for the determination of fission product release from the spherical fuel elements in cases of core heating accidents in modular HTR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, the thermal behaviour of modular reactors in cases of core heating accidents and the physical phenomena relevant for a release of radioactive materials from HTR fuel elements are explained as far as is necessary for understanding the work. The present mathematical models by which the release of radioactive materials from HTR fuel elements due to diffusion or breaking particles in cases of core heating accidents are also described, examined and evaluated with regard to their applicability to module reactors. The experiments used to verify the mathematical models are also evaluated. The mathematical models are in nearly all cases computer programs, which describe the complicated process of releasing radioactive materials quantitative mathematically. One should point out that these models are constantly being developed further, in line with the increasing amount of knowledge. To conclude the work, proposals are made for improving the certainty of information from experiments and mathematical models to determine the release behaviour of modular reactors. (orig./GL) [de

  7. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The arrangement described relates particularly to heat exchangers for use in fast reactor power plants, in which heat is extracted from the reactor core by primary liquid metal coolant and is then transferred to secondary liquid metal coolant by means of intermediate heat exchangers. One of the main requirements of such a system, if used in a pool type fast reactor, is that the pressure drop on the primary coolant side must be kept to a minimum consistent with the maintenance of a limited dynamic head in the pool vessel. The intermediate heat exchanger must also be compact enough to be accommodated in the reactor vessel, and the heat exchanger tubes must be available for inspection and the detection and plugging of leaks. If, however, the heat exchanger is located outside the reactor vessel, as in the case of a loop system reactor, a higher pressure drop on the primary coolant side is acceptable, and space restriction is less severe. An object of the arrangement described is to provide a method of heat exchange and a heat exchanger to meet these problems. A further object is to provide a method that ensures that excessive temperature variations are not imposed on welded tube joints by sudden changes in the primary coolant flow path. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  8. A Histological Analysis of Visceral Organs to Evaluate the Effect of Duration of Heating From Refrigeration to Core Body Temperature for Ballistics Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-12-01

    Animal organs have been used in ballistics research to investigate the effects on human organs. Such organs are refrigerated until the investigation to minimize autolytic degradation and at times have been reheated to the human core body temperature to simulate the in situ environment. The aim of this investigation was to study the microstructural changes that may occur in fresh chilled visceral organs of the thorax and abdomen (ie, heart, lung, liver, and kidney) during the period of reheating to 37°C. Fifty-millimeter cubes of porcine heart, lung, liver, and kidney were taken rapidly after slaughter, chilled overnight, and the next morning were reheated to core body temperature (37°C). Histological changes occurring in the tissues during the reheating phase were investigated. The findings indicated that no cytoplasmic or nuclear changes occurred in any of the tissues during the period of reheating. Therefore, reheating of animal organs to the human core body temperature is not necessary, if the organs are refrigerated.

  9. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...

  10. The dynamics of massive starless cores with ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jonathan C. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fontani, Francesco [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (∼100 M {sub ☉}) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N{sub 2}H{sup +} in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N{sub 2}D{sup +} cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number m{sub A} ∼ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ∼60 M {sub ☉}, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that m{sub A} ≅ 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  11. An experimental study on the thermal characteristics and heating effect of arc-fault from Cu core in residential electrical wiring fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian-Hua; Tu, Ran; Zeng, Yi; Pan, Leng; Zhang, Ren-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of a series direct current (DC) arc-fault including both electrical and thermal parameters were investigated based on an arc-fault simulator to provide references for multi-parameter electrical fire detection method. Tests on arc fault behavior with three different initial circuit voltages, resistances and arc gaps were conducted, respectively. The influences of circuit conditions on arc dynamic image, voltage, current or power were interpreted. Also, the temperature rises of electrode surface and ambient air were studied. The results showed that, first, significant variations of arc structure and light emitting were observed under different conditions. A thin outer burning layer of vapor generated from electrodes with orange light was found due to the extremely high arc temperature. Second, with the increasing electrode gap in discharging, the arc power was shown to have a non monotonic relationship with arc length for constant initial circuit voltage and resistance. Finally, the temperature rises of electrode surface caused by heat transfer from arc were found to be not sensitive with increasing arc length due to special heat transfer mechanism. In addition, temperature of ambient air showed a large gradient in radial direction of arc.

  12. An experimental study on the thermal characteristics and heating effect of arc-fault from Cu core in residential electrical wiring fires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hua Du

    Full Text Available The characteristics of a series direct current (DC arc-fault including both electrical and thermal parameters were investigated based on an arc-fault simulator to provide references for multi-parameter electrical fire detection method. Tests on arc fault behavior with three different initial circuit voltages, resistances and arc gaps were conducted, respectively. The influences of circuit conditions on arc dynamic image, voltage, current or power were interpreted. Also, the temperature rises of electrode surface and ambient air were studied. The results showed that, first, significant variations of arc structure and light emitting were observed under different conditions. A thin outer burning layer of vapor generated from electrodes with orange light was found due to the extremely high arc temperature. Second, with the increasing electrode gap in discharging, the arc power was shown to have a non monotonic relationship with arc length for constant initial circuit voltage and resistance. Finally, the temperature rises of electrode surface caused by heat transfer from arc were found to be not sensitive with increasing arc length due to special heat transfer mechanism. In addition, temperature of ambient air showed a large gradient in radial direction of arc.

  13. Multiple tectonic mode switches indicate short-duration heat pulses in a Mio-Pliocene metamorphic core complex, West Papua, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L. T.; Hall, R.; Gunawan, I.

    2017-12-01

    The Wandaman Peninsula is a narrow (2 km) promontory in remote western New Guinea. The peninsula is almost entirely composed of medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks considered to be associated with a Mio-Pliocene metamorphic core complex. Previous work has shown that the uplift and exhumation of the core complex has potentially brought some extremely young eclogite to the surface. These might be comparable to the world's youngest (4.3 Ma) eclogites found in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands at the opposite end of New Guinea. We show that tectonic history of this region is complex. This is because the metamorphic sequences in the Wandaman Peninsula record multiple phases of deformation, all within the last few million years. This is demonstrated through methodical collation of cross-cutting relations from field and microstructural studies across the peninsula. The first phase of deformation and metamorphism is associated with crustal extension and partial melting that took place at 5-7 Ma according to new U-Pb data from metamorphic zircons. This extensional phase ceased after a tectonic mode switch and the region was shortened. This is demonstrated by two phases of folding (1. recumbent and 2. open) that overprint the earlier extensional fabrics. All previous structures were later overprinted by brittle extensional faults and uplift. This extensional phase is still taking place today, as is indicated by submerged forests exposed along the coastline associated with recent earthquakes and hot springs. The sequence of metamorphic rocks that are exposed in the Wandaman Peninsula show that stress and thermal conditions can change rapidly. If we consider that the present is a key to the past, then such results can identify the duration of deformation and metamorphic events more accurately than in much older orogenic systems.

  14. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  15. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  16. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Natural convection heat transfer in SIGMA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Dong; Lee, Gang Hee; Suh, Kune Yull

    2004-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) results in core melt formation and relocation at various locations within the reactor core over a considerable period of time. If there is no effective cooling mechanism, the core debris may heat up and commence natural circulation. The high temperature pool of molten core material will threaten the structural integrity of the reactor vessel. The extent and urgency of this threat depend primarily upon the intensity of the internal heat sources and upon the consequent distribution of the heat fluxes on the vessel walls in contact with the molten core material pools. In such a steady molten pool convection state, the thermal loads against the vessel would be determined by the in-vessel heat transfer distribution involving convective and conductive heat transfer from the decay-heated core material pool to the lower head wall in contact with the core material. In this study, upward and downward heat transfer fraction ratio is focused on

  18. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  19. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  20. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  1. Unwanted heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka, M.

    2006-01-01

    The number of small heating plants using biomass is growing. According to TREND's information, Hrinovska energeticka, is the only one that controls the whole supplier chain in cooperation with its parent company in Bratislava. Starting with the collection and processing of wood chips by burning, heat production and heat distribution to the end user. This gives the company better control over costs and consequently its own prices. Last year, the engineering company, Hrinovske storjarne, decided to focus only on its core business and sold its heating plant, Hrinovske tepelne hospodarstvo, to Intech Slovakia and changed the company name to Hrinovska energeticka. Local companies and inhabitants were concerned that the new owner would increase prices. But the company publicly declared and kept promises that the heat price for households would remain at 500 Slovak crowns/gigajoule (13.33 EUR/gigajoule ), one of the lowest prices in Slovakia. This year the prices increased slightly to 570 Slovak crowns (15.2 EUR). 'We needed - even at the cost of lower profit - to satisfy our customers so that we would not lose them. We used this time for transition to biomass. This will allow us to freeze our prices in the coming years,' explained the statutory representative of the company, Ivan Dudak. (authors)

  2. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  3. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  4. Heat Transfer Characteristics of SiC-coated Heat Pipe for Passive Decay Heat Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The main concern with the Fukushima accident was the failure of active and passive core cooling systems. The main function of existing passive decay heat removal systems is feeding additional coolant to the reactor core. Thus, an established emergency core cooling system (ECCS) cannot operate properly because of impossible depressurization under the station blackout (SBO) condition. Therefore, a new concept for passive decay heat removal system is required. In this study, an innovative hybrid control rod concept is considered for passive in-core decay heat removal that differs from the existing direct vessel injection core cooling system and passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections occurs by phase change of the working fluid and capillary action induced by wick structures installed on the inner wall of the heat pipe. In this study, a hybrid control rod is developed to take the roles of both neutron absorption and heat removal by combining the functions of a heat pipe and control rod. Previous studies on enhancing the heat removal capacity of heat pipes used nanofluids, self-rewetting fluids, various wick structures and condensers. Many studies have examined the thermal performances of heat pipes using various nanofluids. They concluded that the enhanced thermal performance of the heat pipe using nanofluids is due to nanoparticle deposition on the wick structures. Thus, the wick structure of heat pipes has been modified by nanoparticle deposition to enhance the heat removal capacity. However, previous studies used relatively small heat pipes and narrow ranges of heat loads. The environment of a nuclear reactor is very specific, and the decay heat produced by fission products after shutdown is relatively large. Thus, this study tested a large-scale heat pipe over a wide range of power. The concept of a hybrid heat pipe for an advanced in-core decay heat removal system was introduced for complete

  5. Heat Transfer Characteristics of SiC-coated Heat Pipe for Passive Decay Heat Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main concern with the Fukushima accident was the failure of active and passive core cooling systems. The main function of existing passive decay heat removal systems is feeding additional coolant to the reactor core. Thus, an established emergency core cooling system (ECCS) cannot operate properly because of impossible depressurization under the station blackout (SBO) condition. Therefore, a new concept for passive decay heat removal system is required. In this study, an innovative hybrid control rod concept is considered for passive in-core decay heat removal that differs from the existing direct vessel injection core cooling system and passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections occurs by phase change of the working fluid and capillary action induced by wick structures installed on the inner wall of the heat pipe. In this study, a hybrid control rod is developed to take the roles of both neutron absorption and heat removal by combining the functions of a heat pipe and control rod. Previous studies on enhancing the heat removal capacity of heat pipes used nanofluids, self-rewetting fluids, various wick structures and condensers. Many studies have examined the thermal performances of heat pipes using various nanofluids. They concluded that the enhanced thermal performance of the heat pipe using nanofluids is due to nanoparticle deposition on the wick structures. Thus, the wick structure of heat pipes has been modified by nanoparticle deposition to enhance the heat removal capacity. However, previous studies used relatively small heat pipes and narrow ranges of heat loads. The environment of a nuclear reactor is very specific, and the decay heat produced by fission products after shutdown is relatively large. Thus, this study tested a large-scale heat pipe over a wide range of power. The concept of a hybrid heat pipe for an advanced in-core decay heat removal system was introduced for complete

  6. What can the SEDs of first hydrostatic core candidates reveal about their nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alison K.; Bate, Matthew R.; Mowat, Chris F.; Hatchell, Jennifer; Harries, Tim J.

    2018-02-01

    The first hydrostatic core (FHSC) is the first stable object to form in simulations of star formation. This stage has yet to be observed definitively, although several candidate FHSCs have been reported. We have produced synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 3D hydrodynamical simulations of pre-stellar cores undergoing gravitational collapse for a variety of initial conditions. Variations in the initial rotation rate, radius and mass lead to differences in the location of the SED peak and far-infrared flux. Secondly, we attempt to fit the SEDs of five FHSC candidates from the literature and five newly identified FHSC candidates located in the Serpens South molecular cloud with simulated SEDs. The most promising FHSC candidates are fitted by a limited number of model SEDs with consistent properties, which suggests that the SED can be useful for placing constraints on the age and rotation rate of the source. The sources we consider most likely to be in FHSC phase are B1-bN, CB17-MMS, Aqu-MM1 and Serpens South candidate K242. We were unable to fit SerpS-MM22, Per-Bolo 58 and Chamaeleon-MMS1 with reasonable parameters, which indicates that they are likely to be more evolved.

  7. INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF NITROGEN-BEARING MOLECULAR SPECIES IN THE STAR-FORMING CORE AHEAD OF HH 80N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masqué, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5 - parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Anglada, Guillem; Osorio, Mayra [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Camino Bajo de Huétor 50, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Beltrán, Maria T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    We present Very Large Array NH{sub 3} and Plateau de Bure Interferometer NH{sub 2}D and HN{sup 13}C observations of the star-forming core ahead of HH 80N, the optically obscured northern counterpart of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 80/81. The main goal is to determine the kinematical information of the high density regions of the core (n ∼> 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) missed in previous works due to the depletion of the species observed (e.g., CS). The obtained maps show different kinematical signatures between the eastern and western parts of the core, suggesting a possible dynamical interaction of the core with the HH 80/81/80N outflow. The analysis of the position-velocity (P-V) plots of these species rules out a previous interpretation of having a molecular ring-like structure with a radius of 6 × 10{sup 4} AU traced by CS infalling onto a central protostar found in the core (IRS1). A high degree of NH{sub 3} deuteration, with respect to the central part of the core harboring IRS1, is derived in the eastern part, where a dust condensation (SE) is located. This deuteration trend of NH{sub 3} suggests that SE is in a pre-stellar evolutionary stage, earlier than that of IRS1. Since SE is the closest condensation to the HH 80N/81/80N outflow, in a case of outflow-core dynamical interaction, it should be perturbed first and be the most evolved condensation in the core. Therefore, the derived evolutionary sequence for SE and IRS1 makes outflow triggered star formation on IRS1 unlikely.

  8. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  9. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  10. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  11. Heat transfer capability analysis of heat pipe for space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huaqi; Jiang Xinbiao; Chen Lixin; Yang Ning; Hu Pan; Ma Tengyue; Zhang Liang

    2015-01-01

    To insure the safety of space reactor power system with no single point failures, the reactor heat pipes must work below its heat transfer limits, thus when some pipes fail, the reactor could still be adequately cooled by neighbor heat pipes. Methods to analyze the reactor heat pipe's heat transfer limits were presented, and that for the prevailing capillary limit analysis was improved. The calculation was made on the lithium heat pipe in core of heat pipes segmented thermoelectric module converter (HP-STMC) space reactor power system (SRPS), potassium heat pipe as radiator of HP-STMC SRPS, and sodium heat pipe in core of scalable AMTEC integrated reactor space power system (SAIRS). It is shown that the prevailing capillary limits of the reactor lithium heat pipe and sodium heat pipe is 25.21 kW and 14.69 kW, providing a design margin >19.4% and >23.6%, respectively. The sonic limit of the reactor radiator potassium heat pipe is 7.88 kW, providing a design margin >43.2%. As the result of calculation, it is concluded that the main heat transfer limit of HP-STMC SRPS lithium heat pipe and SARIS sodium heat pipe is prevailing capillary limit, but the sonic limit for HP-STMC SRPS radiator potassium heat pipe. (authors)

  12. Core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeppner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor cooling system transports the heat liberated in the reactor core to the component - heat exchanger, steam generator or turbine - where the energy is removed. This basic task can be performed with a variety of coolants circulating in appropriately designed cooling systems. The choice of any one system is governed by principles of economics and natural policies, the design is determined by the laws of nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics and by the requirement of reliability and public safety. PWR- and BWR- reactors today generate the bulk of nuclear energy. Their primary cooling systems are discussed under the following aspects: 1. General design, nuclear physics constraints, energy transfer, hydraulics, thermodynamics. 2. Design and performance under conditions of steady state and mild transients; control systems. 3. Design and performance under conditions of severe transients and loss of coolant accidents; safety systems. (orig./RW)

  13. Analysis of the heat transfer models for the development of the 3D model of thermal hydraulics of the BWR core and possible implementation in the SUN-RAH; Analisis de modelos de transferencia de calor para el desarrollo de modelo 3D de la termohidraulica del nucleo de un BWR y posible implementacion en el SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, R A; Morales S, J B [UNAM, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In previous versions of the SUN-RAH, the core of the reactor was simulated starting from the punctual kinetics of neutrons of the same one. Different mathematical models to implement an unidimensional simulation of the thermal hydraulics of the core of the reactor to have a tool but exact were proposed. Of among the different ones modeling, those of Heat Transfer of n nodes and that of a differential equation of heat transfer were chosen. Both present the mathematical derivation of the equations of radial transfer of the heat generated in a bar of fuel, numeric routines for the calculation of the typical thermodynamic properties, calculation of the stationary state and dynamic response of some premature operational occurrences. It was carried out the comparison among both proposals with the purpose of being implemented in the SUN-RAH. This simulator includes all the main components of the thermodynamic cycle, with that the implementation of the one dimension models of the core, will be transform it into a tool but reliable. To make congruent the multidimensional kinetics of neutrons is necessary to have a model of heat transfer congruent with her for that here an analysis is made of that model of transfer it can be used in a great number of neutronic nodes. (Author)

  14. FTR europia gamma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.T. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated and experimental gamma heating rates of europia in the Engineering Mockup Critical Assembly (EMC) were correlated. A calculated to experimental (C/E) ratio of 1.086 was established in validating the theoretical approach and computational technique applied in the calculations. Gamma heat deposition rates in the FTR with Eu 2 O 3 control absorbers were determined from three-dimensional calculations. Maximum gamma heating was found to occur near the tip of a half-inserted row 5 control rod assembly--12.8 watts/gm of europia. Gamma heating profiles were established for a single half-inserted europia absorber assembly. Local heat peaking was found not to alter significantly heating rates computed in the FTR core model, where larger mesh interval sizes precluded examination of spatially-limited heating gradients. These computations provide the basis for thermal-hydraulic analyses to ascertain temperature profiles in the FTR under europia control

  15. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  16. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  17. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  18. Heat pumps: heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pielke, R

    1976-01-01

    The author firstly explains in a general manner the functioning of the heat pump. Following a brief look at the future heat demand and the possibilities of covering it, the various methods of obtaining energy (making use of solar energy, ground heat, and others) and the practical applications (office heating, swimming pool heating etc.) are explained. The author still sees considerable difficulties in using the heat pump at present on a large scale. Firstly there is not enough maintenance personnel available, secondly the electricity supply undertakings cannot provide the necessary electricity on a wide basis without considerable investments. Other possibilities to save energy or to use waste energy are at present easier and more economical to realize. Recuperative and regenerative systems are described.

  19. Validation of Core Temperature Estimation Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    going to heat production [6]. Second, heart rate increases to support the body’s heat dissipation. To dissipate heat, blood vessels near the skin ...vasodilate to increase blood perfusion. Thus, heart rate increases both to support the cardiac output needed both to perform work and to increase skin ...95%) were represented. The data sets also included various hydration states, clothing ensembles, and acclimatization states. Core temperature was

  20. Constraints on The Coupled Thermal Evolution of the Earth's Core and Mantle, The Age of The Inner Core, And The Origin of the 186Os/188Os Core(?) Signal in Plume-Derived Lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal and chemical interaction between the core and mantle has played a critical role in the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's interior. Outer core convection is driven by core cooling and inner core crystallization. Core/mantle heat transfer also buffers mantle potential temperature, resulting in slower rates of mantle cooling (~50-100 K/Ga) than would be predicted from the discrepancy between current rates of surface heat loss (~44 TW) and internal radioactive heat production (~20 TW). Core/mantle heat transfer may also generate thermal mantle plumes responsible for ocean island volcanic chains such as the Hawaiian Islands. Several studies suggest that mantle plumes, in addition to transporting heat from the core/mantle boundary, also carry a chemical signature of core/mantle interaction. Elevated 186Os/188Os ratios in lavas from Hawaii, Gorgona, and in the 2.8 Ga Kostomuksha komatiites have been interpreted as reflecting incorporation of an outer core component with high time-integrated Pt/Os and Re/Os ( Brandon et al., 1999, 2003; Puchtel et al., 2005). Preferential partitioning of Os relative to Re and Pt into the inner core during inner core growth may generate elevated Re/Os and Pt/Os ratios in the residual outer core. Because of the long half-life of 190Pt (the parent of 186Os, t1/2 = 489 Ga), an elevated 186Os/188Os outer core signature in plume lavas requires that inner core crystallization began early in Earth history, most likely prior to 3.5 Ga. This in turn requires low time-averaged core/mantle heat flow (<~2.5 TW) or large quantities of heat-producing elements in the core. Core/mantle heat flow may be estimated using boundary-layer theory, by measuring the heat transported in mantle plumes, by estimating the heat transported along the outer core adiabat, or by comparing the rates of heat production, surface heat loss, and secular cooling of the mantle. All of these independent methods suggest time-averaged core/mantle heat flow of ~5

  1. Heat pipe heat storage performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, A; Pasquetti, R [Univ. de Provence, Marseille (FR). Inst. Universitaire des Systemes; Grakovich, L P; Vasiliev, L L [A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst. of the BSSR, Academy of Sciences, Minsk (BY)

    1989-01-01

    Heat storage offers essential thermal energy saving for heating. A ground heat store equipped with heat pipes connecting it with a heat source and to the user is considered in this paper. It has been shown that such a heat exchanging system along with a batch energy source meets, to a considerable extent, house heating requirements. (author).

  2. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Mijhawan, S.

    1995-07-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually re solidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a core-catcher as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author). 48 refs., 3 tabs., 18 figs

  3. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores. Revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Nijhawan, S.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually resolidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a 'core-catcher' as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author)

  4. RELAP5 / MOD3.2 analysis of INSC standard problem INSCSP - V4 : investigation of heat transfer for partly uncovered VVER-1000 core at the test facility KS (RRC K1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.; Ahrens, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program has been used to analyze a series of tests investigating heat-transfer from a partly uncovered VVER-1000 core in the KS test facility at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC-KI). The analysis documented represents VVER Standard Problem 4 in Joint Project 6, which is the investigation of Computer Code Validation for Transient Analysis of RBMK and VVER Reactors, between the United States and Russian International Nuclear Safety Centers. The experiment facility and data, RELAP5 nodalization, and results are shown for one of the six tests defined in Standard Problem 4. Only part of the data was analyzed due to our conclusion that the available experimental data is not sufficient to allow the modeling of the actual experiment sequence. The experiment initial conditions were reached through a series of transient processes, about which no quantitative information was available. This has required the modeling of an arbitrary computational transient, with the goal of reaching initial conditions similar to those observed during the experiment. The use of an arbitrary transient introduces many degrees of freedom in the analysis, i.e. initial computational values that influence the entire sequence of events, including the loop behavior during the experiment time window. Reasonable agreement between RELAP5 and the experiment data can be obtained by manipulating a number of initial computational values, including the liquid level in the fuel assembly model, the liquid level in the annular region, the quality of the saturated vapor in the voided loop regions, etc. Our study has focused on exploring the sensitivity of results to changes in these initial values which are not based on experimental information, but are selected with the goal of matching the experimentally observed behavior during the experiment time window. We have shown that changes in several initial arbitrary values can lead to similar changes in the

  5. SCTF Core-I test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Sudo, Yukio; Iwamura, Takamichi; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Hirano, Kemmei

    1982-07-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermohydrodynamics in the core and the communication in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a posturated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In the present report, effects of system pressure on reflooding phenomena shall be discussed based on the data of Tests S1-SH2, S1-01 and S1-02 which are the parameteris tests for system pressure effects belonging to the SCTF Core-I forced flooding test series. Major items discussed in this report are (1) hydrodynamic behavior in the system, (2) core thermal behavior, (3) core heat transfer and (4) two-dimensional hydrodynamic behavior in the pressure vessel including the core. (author)

  6. PWR type process heat reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Gilles; Petit, Guy.

    1974-01-01

    The nuclear reactor described is of the pressurized water type. It includes a prestressed concrete vessel, the upper part of which is shut by a closure, and a core surrounded by a core ring. The core fuel assemblies are supported by an initial set of vertical tubes integral with the bottom of the vessel, which serve to guide the rods of the control system. Over the core there is a second set of vertical tubes, able to receive the absorbing part of a control rod when this is raised above the core. An annular pressurizer around the core ring keeps the water in a liquid state. A pump is located above the second set of tubes and is integral with the closure. It circulates the water between the core and the intake of at least one primary heat exchanger, the exchanger (s) being placed between the wall of the vessel and the core ring [fr

  7. Heat pump augmentation of nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutz, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    A system is described for increasing the temperature of a working fluid heated by a nuclear reactor. The system consists of: a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor having a core and a primary cooling loop through which a coolant is circulated so as to undergo an increase in temperature, a closed secondary loop having a working fluid therein, the cooling and secondary loops having cooperative association with an intermediate heat exchanger adapted to effect transfer of heat from the coolant to the working fluid as the working fluid passes through the intermediate heat exchanger, a heat pump connected in the secondary loop and including a turbine and a compressor through which the working fluid passes so that the working fluid undergoes an increase in temperature as it passes through the compressor, a process loop including a process chamber adapted to receive a process fluid therein, the process chamber being connected in circuit with the secondary loop so as to receive the working fluid from the compressor and transfer heat from the working fluid to the process fluid, a heat exchanger for heating the working fluid connected to the process loop for receiving heat therefrom and for transferring heat to the secondary loop prior to the working fluid passing through the compressor, the secondary loop being operative to pass the working fluid from the process chamber to the turbine so as to effect driving relation thereof, a steam generator operatively associated with the secondary loop so as to receive the working fluid from the turbine, and a steam loop having a feedwater supply and connected in circuit with the steam generator so that feedwater passing through the steam loop is heated by the steam generator, the steam loop being connected in circuit with the process chamber and adapted to pass steam to the process chamber with the process fluid

  8. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  9. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  10. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  11. Simulation experiments concerning core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werle, H.

    1979-01-01

    A gas stream causes a remarkable increase in the interfacial heat flux (by a factor of 8 for v = 0.63 cm/s, v = gas volume flux/horizontal area). The most important characteristics of the system investigated (silicon oil/wood metal) are relatively similar to those of a core melt, Therefore a remarkable increase of the interfacial heat transfer by the gas release may be expected also for a core melt, compared with earlier investigations at the system silicon oil/water the influence of a gas stream is nevertheless remarkably lower for silicon oil/wood metal. This shows that the density ratio plays an important role. (orig./RW) [de

  12. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  13. On the effective parallel programming of multi-core processors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varbanescu, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    Multi-core processors are considered now the only feasible alternative to the large single-core processors which have become limited by technological aspects such as power consumption and heat dissipation. However, due to their inherent parallel structure and their diversity, multi-cores are

  14. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  15. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  16. Heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E L; Eisenmann, G; Hahne, E [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik

    1976-04-01

    A survey is presented on publications on design, heat transfer, form factors, free convection, evaporation processes, cooling towers, condensation, annular gap, cross-flowed cylinders, axial flow through a bundle of tubes, roughnesses, convective heat transfer, loss of pressure, radiative heat transfer, finned surfaces, spiral heat exchangers, curved pipes, regeneraters, heat pipes, heat carriers, scaling, heat recovery systems, materials selection, strength calculation, control, instabilities, automation of circuits, operational problems and optimization.

  17. The thermal evolution of Mercury's Fe-Si core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Jurriën Sebastiaan; van Westrenen, Wim

    2018-01-01

    We have studied the thermal and magnetic field evolution of planet Mercury with a core of Fe-Si alloy to assess whether an Fe-Si core matches its present-day partially molten state, Mercury's magnetic field strength, and the observed ancient crustal magnetization. The main advantages of an Fe-Si core, opposed to a previously assumed Fe-S core, are that a Si-bearing core is consistent with the highly reduced nature of Mercury and that no compositional convection is generated upon core solidification, in agreement with magnetic field indications of a stable layer at the top of Mercury's core. This study also present the first implementation of a conductive temperature profile in the core where heat fluxes are sub-adiabatic in a global thermal evolution model. We show that heat migrates from the deep core to the outer part of the core as soon as heat fluxes at the outer core become sub-adiabatic. As a result, the deep core cools throughout Mercury's evolution independent of the temperature evolution at the core-mantle boundary, causing an early start of inner core solidification and magnetic field generation. The conductive layer at the outer core suppresses the rate of core growth after temperature differences between the deep and shallow core are relaxed, such that a magnetic field can be generated until the present. Also, the outer core and mantle operate at higher temperatures than previously thought, which prolongs mantle melting and mantle convection. The results indicate that S is not a necessary ingredient of Mercury's core, bringing bulk compositional models of Mercury more in line with reduced meteorite analogues.

  18. Research on the fundamental process of thermal-hydraulic behaviors in severe accident. Heat transfer on the liquid-liquid interface between molten core pool and coolant. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-027-6. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Saito, Yasushi

    2002-03-01

    Heat transfer experiments under steady and transient conditions were performed using molten Wood's metal and distilled water to study heat transfer on the liquid-liquid interface between molten fuel pool and coolant under severe accident conditions. In the steady state experiment, boiling curve was measured over the range from natural convection region to film boiling region. The boiling behavior was observed using a high-speed video camera. In the transient experiment, distilled water was poured onto the hot molten metal surface, and the boiling curve was obtained in the cooling process. Comparing the measured boiling curve with existing correlations and experimental data for solid-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the following conclusions were drawn: (a) When the interface surge is negligible and oxide layer is formed on the interface, the boiling curve at the liquid-liquid surface could be approximately reproduced by the heat transfer correlations for nucleate boiling and film boiling regions and the critical heat flux correlation for a liquid-solid system. (b) When no oxide layer is formed on the interface, the boiling curve at the liquid-liquid surface moved towards higher wall superheat than that at the liquid-solid surface, as Novakovic et al. observed in their experiment using mercury. (c) Transient heat transfer coefficient for film boiling at the liquid-liquid surface was about 100% higher than that predicted by the heat transfer correlation for a solid-liquid system. (author)

  19. Critical heat flux evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banner, D.

    1995-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is of importance for nuclear safety and represents the major limiting factors for reactor cores. Critical heat flux is caused by a sharp reduction in the heat transfer coefficient located at the outer surface of fuel rods. Safety requires that this phenomenon also called the boiling crisis should be precluded under nominal or incidental conditions (Class I and II events). CHF evaluation in reactor cores is basically a two-step approach. Fuel assemblies are first tested in experimental loops in order to determine CHF limits under various flow conditions. Then, core thermal-hydraulic calculations are performed for safety evaluation. The paper will go into more details about the boiling crisis in order to pinpoint complexity and lack of fundamental understanding in many areas. Experimental test sections needed to collect data over wide thermal-hydraulic and geometric ranges are described CHF safety margin evaluation in reactors cores is discussed by presenting how uncertainties are mentioned. From basic considerations to current concerns, the following topics are discussed; knowledge of the boiling crisis, CHF predictors, and advances thermal-hydraulic codes. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs

  20. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir OSHA-NIOSH ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  1. Molten core material holding device in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobuo; Takahashi, Katsuro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of cooling to hold molten core materials in a molten core material holding device. Constitution: Plenum structures are formed into a pan-like configuration, in which liners made of metal having high melting point and relatively high heat conductivity such as tantalum, tungsten, rhenium or alloys thereof are integrally appended to hold and directly cool the molten reactor core materials. Further, a plurality of heat pipes, passing through the plenum structures, facing the cooling portion thereof to the coolants at the outer side and immersing the heating portion into the molten core materials fallen to deposit in the inner liners are disposed radially. Furthermore, heat pipes embodded in the plenum structure are disposed in the same manner below the liners. Thus, the plenum structures and the molten reactor core materials can be cooled at a high efficiency. (Seki, T.)

  2. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  3. Development of Structural Core Components for Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    Core structural materials: • The desire is to have only fuel in the core, structural material form 25% of the total core: – To support and to retain the fuel in position; – Provide necessary ducts to make coolant flow through & transfer/remove heat. • For 500 MWe FBR with Oxide fuel (Peak Linear Power 450 W/cm), total fuel pins required in the core are of the order 39277 pins (both inner & outer core Fuel SA); • Considering 217 pins/Fuel SA there are 181 Fuel SA wrapper tubes • These structural materials see hostile core with max temperature and neutron flux

  4. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  5. Preliminary model for core/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murfin, W.B.

    1977-08-01

    A preliminary model is described for computing the rate of penetration of concrete by a molten LWR core. Among the phenomena included are convective stirring of the melt by evolved gases, admixture of concrete decomposition products to the melt, chemical reactions, radiative heat loss, and variation of heat transfer coefficients with local pressure. The model is most applicable to a two-phase melt (metallic plus oxidic) having a fairly high metallic content

  6. A uranium core for the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouat, S.

    2003-01-01

    According to the theory of M. Herndon, a US independent geophysicist, the center of the Earth's core should be made of a uranium sphere of about 8 km of diameter. This natural reactor, or 'geo-reactor', should be at the origin of the internal heat and of the magnetic field of the Earth. M. Herndon has extended his theory to the other planets of the solar system. This theory contradicts the one adopted since the 1940's by the community of geophysicists and which involves a crystallized iron and nickel internal core inside a liquid iron external core. Herndon's theory can explain also the geomagnetic field reversals. (J.S.)

  7. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  8. Heat pipe dynamic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issacci, F.; Roche, G. L.; Klein, D. B.; Catton, I.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor flow in a heat pipe was mathematically modeled and the equations governing the transient behavior of the core were solved numerically. The modeled vapor flow is transient, axisymmetric (or two-dimensional) compressible viscous flow in a closed chamber. The two methods of solution are described. The more promising method failed (a mixed Galerkin finite difference method) whereas a more common finite difference method was successful. Preliminary results are presented showing that multi-dimensional flows need to be treated. A model of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe was developed. The model is intended to be coupled to a vapor phase model for the complete solution of the heat pipe problem. The mathematical equations are formulated consistent with physical processes while allowing a computationally efficient solution. The model simulates time dependent characteristics of concern to the liquid phase including input phase change, output heat fluxes, liquid temperatures, container temperatures, liquid velocities, and liquid pressure. Preliminary results were obtained for two heat pipe startup cases. The heat pipe studied used lithium as the working fluid and an annular wick configuration. Recommendations for implementation based on the results obtained are presented. Experimental studies were initiated using a rectangular heat pipe. Both twin beam laser holography and laser Doppler anemometry were investigated. Preliminary experiments were completed and results are reported.

  9. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency.

  10. After-heat removing system in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Yukio.

    1990-01-01

    The after-heat removing system of the present invention removes the after heat generated in a reactor core without using dynamic equipments such as pumps or blowers. There are disposed a first heat exchanger for heating a heat medium by the heat in a reactor container and a second heat exchanger situated above the first heat exchanger for spontaneously air-cooling the heat medium. Recycling pipeways connect the first and the second heat exchangers to form a recycling path for the heat medium. Then, since the second heat exchanger for spontaneously air-cooling the heat medium is disposed above the first heat exchanger and they are connected by the recycling pipeways, the heat medium can be circulated spontaneously. Accordingly, dynamic equipments such as pumps or blowers are no more necessary. As a result, the after-heat removing system of the FBR type reactor of excellent safety and reliability can be obtained. (I.S.)

  11. Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koening, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MWth to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat-pipe temperature of 1675 K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum/lithium-vapor heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO2 pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber, and a BeO reflector containing boron-loaded control drums.

  12. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  13. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  14. Droplet generation during core reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section

  15. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  16. Advance of core design method for ATR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Seiichirou; Ihara, Toshiteru; Iijima, Takashi; Seino, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Tetsurou; Takeuchi, Michio; Sugawara, Satoru; Matsumoto, Mitsuo.

    1995-01-01

    Core characteristics of ATR demonstration plant has been revised such as increasing the fuel burnup and the channel power, which is achieved by changing the number of fuel rod per fuel assembly from 28 to 36. The research and development concerning the core design method for ATR have been continued. The calculational errors of core analysis code have been evaluated using the operational data of FUGEN and the full scale simulated test results in DCA (Deuterium Critical Assembly) and HTL (Heat Transfer Loop) at O-arai engineering center. It is confirmed that the calculational error of power distribution is smaller than the design value of ATR demonstration plant. Critical heat flux correlation curve for 36 fuel rod cluster has been developed and the probability evaluation method based on its curve, which is more rational to evaluate the fuel dryout, has been adopted. (author)

  17. Core catcher concepts future PWR-Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Werle, H.

    1994-01-01

    Light water reactors of the next generation should have still greater passive safety, even in the most serious accidents. This includes the long term safe inclusion of the core inventory in the case of core meltdown accidents. The three concepts for cooling the liquefied core outside the reactor pressure vessel examined by KfK should remove the post-shutdown heat by direct contact of the melt with water. The geometric distribution of the melt increases its surface area, so that favourable conditions for heat removal from the poorly thermally-conducting melt are created and complete quick solidification occurs. The experiments examine both the relocation and distribution mechanisms of the melt and the reactions occurring when water enters. As strong interaction is possible on direct contact of the melt with water, an important aim is experimental determination and limitation of any resulting mechanical stresses. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Reactor core for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hisao; Kasai, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Tsugio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi.

    1996-01-01

    In a gas-sealed assembly for a FBR type reactor, two or more kinds of assemblies having different eigen frequency and a structure for suppressing oscillation of liquid surface are disposed in a reactor core. Coolant introduction channels for introducing coolants from inside and outside are disposed in the inside of structural members of an upper shielding member to form a shielding member-cooling structure in the reactor core. A structure for promoting heat conduction between a sealed gas in the assembly and coolants at the inner side or the outside of the assembly is disposed in the reactor core. A material which generates heat by neutron irradiation is disposed in the assembly to heat the sealed gases positively by radiation heat from the heat generation member also upon occurrence of power elevation-type event to cause temperature expansion. Namely, the coolants flown out from or into the gas sealed-assemblies cause differential fluctuation on the liquid surface, and the change of the capacity of a gas region is also different on every gas-sealed assemblies thereby enabling to suppress fluctuation of the reactor power. Pressure loss is increased by a baffle plate or the like to lower the liquid surface of the sodium coolants or decrease the elevating speed thereof thereby suppressing fluctuation of the reactor power. (N.H.)

  19. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  20. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangyue, E-mail: wangxiangyue1986@163.com [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores. - Highlights: • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores were prepared with low core loss. • Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the core loss. • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores exhibited a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. • The softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  1. JOYO MK-II core characteristics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2003-04-01

    The 'JOYO' MK-II core characteristics database was compiled and published in 1998. Comments and requests from many users led to the creation of a revised edition. The revisions include changes to the MAGI calculation code system to use the 70 group JFS-3-J3.2 constant set processed from the JENDL-3.2 library. Total control rod worth, reactor kinetic parameters and the MK-II core performance test results were included per user's requests. The core characteristics obtained from the 32 nd to 35 th operational cycles, which were conducted in the MK-III transition core, were newly added in this revised version. The MK-II core management data and core characteristics data were recorded to CD-ROM for user convenience. The Configuration Data' include the core arrangement and refueling record for each operational cycle. The 'Subassembly Library Data' include the atomic number density, neutron fluence, burn-up, integral power of 362 driver fuel subassemblies and 69 irradiation test subassemblies. The 'Output Data' contain the calculated neutron flux, gamma flux, power density, linear heat rate, coolant and fuel temperature distribution of all the fuel subassemblies at the beginning and end of each operational cycle. The 'Core Characteristics Data' include the measured excess reactivity, control rod worth calibration curve, and reactivity coefficients of temperature, power and burn-up. (author)

  2. Heat Transfer in Metal Foam Heat Exchangers at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Pakeeza

    Heat transfer though open-cell metal foam is experimentally studied for heat exchanger and heat shield applications at high temperatures (˜750°C). Nickel foam sheets with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per linear inch (PPI), have been used to make the heat exchangers and heat shields by using thermal spray coating to deposit an Inconel skin on a foam core. Heat transfer measurements were performed on a test rig capable of generating hot gas up to 1000°C. The heat exchangers were tested by exposing their outer surface to combustion gases at a temperature of 550°C and 750°C while being cooled by air flowing through them at room temperature at velocities up to 5 m/s. The temperature rise of the air, the surface temperature of the heat exchangers and the air temperature inside the heat exchanger were measured. The volumetric heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number were calculated for different velocities. The heat transfer performance of the 40PPI sample brazed with the foil is found to be the most efficient. Pressure drop measurements were also performed for 10 and 40PPI metal foam. Thermographic measurements were done on 40PPI foam heat exchangers using a high temperature infrared camera. A high power electric heater was used to produce hot air at 300°C that passed over the foam heat exchanger while the cooling air was blown through it. Heat shields were made by depositing porous skins on metal foam and it was observed that a small amount of coolant leaking through the pores notably reduces the heat transfer from the hot gases. An analytical model was developed based assuming local thermal non-equilibrium that accounts for the temperature difference between solid and fluid phase. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the predicted values of the model.

  3. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  4. Heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  5. Facility with a nuclear district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1988-01-01

    The district heating reactor has a pressure vessel which contains the reactor core and at least one coolant conducting primary heat carrier surrounded by a heat sink. The pressure vessel has two walls with a space between them. This space is connected with a container which contains air as heat isolating medium and water as heat conducting medium. During the normal reactor operation the space is filled by air from the container with the aid of a blower, whereas in the case of a break-down of the cooling system it is filled by water which flows out of the container by gravity after the blower has been switched off. The after-heat, generated in the reactor core during cooling break-down, is removed into the heat sink surrounding the pressure vessel in a safe and simple way. 6 figs

  6. Seismic core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Mullooly, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A core shroud is provided, comprising: a coolant boundary, following the shape of the core boundary, for channeling the coolant through the fuel assemblies; a cylindrical band positioned inside the core barrel and surrounding the coolant boundary; and support members extending from the coolant boundary to the band, for transferring load from the coolant boundary to the band. The shroud may be assembled in parts using automated welding techniques, and it may be adjusted to fit the reactor core easily

  7. Iron snow in the Martian core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher J.; Pommier, Anne

    2018-01-01

    The decline of Mars' global magnetic field some 3.8-4.1 billion years ago is thought to reflect the demise of the dynamo that operated in its liquid core. The dynamo was probably powered by planetary cooling and so its termination is intimately tied to the thermochemical evolution and present-day physical state of the Martian core. Bottom-up growth of a solid inner core, the crystallization regime for Earth's core, has been found to produce a long-lived dynamo leading to the suggestion that the Martian core remains entirely liquid to this day. Motivated by the experimentally-determined increase in the Fe-S liquidus temperature with decreasing pressure at Martian core conditions, we investigate whether Mars' core could crystallize from the top down. We focus on the "iron snow" regime, where newly-formed solid consists of pure Fe and is therefore heavier than the liquid. We derive global energy and entropy equations that describe the long-timescale thermal and magnetic history of the core from a general theory for two-phase, two-component liquid mixtures, assuming that the snow zone is in phase equilibrium and that all solid falls out of the layer and remelts at each timestep. Formation of snow zones occurs for a wide range of interior and thermal properties and depends critically on the initial sulfur concentration, ξ0. Release of gravitational energy and latent heat during growth of the snow zone do not generate sufficient entropy to restart the dynamo unless the snow zone occupies at least 400 km of the core. Snow zones can be 1.5-2 Gyrs old, though thermal stratification of the uppermost core, not included in our model, likely delays onset. Models that match the available magnetic and geodetic constraints have ξ0 ≈ 10% and snow zones that occupy approximately the top 100 km of the present-day Martian core.

  8. Comparison of hot ductility and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of heat affected zone among type 304, type 316 and type 347 austenitic stainless steels for BWR core shroud and recirculation line piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yoshihiko; Kayano, Rinzo; Azuma, Tukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Ishio, Kotaro; Sasaki, Tomo; Suzuki, Komei

    2005-01-01

    The present paper proposes the weld structure shroud made by the integrated type forging. The proposed structure can minimize the occurrence of SCC in the joint weld portion in the shroud. Furthermore, based on the measurement on EPR (Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation) ratio of simulated HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) which was made by giving double thermal cycles and plastic deformation to the material, the requirement of carbon content of less than 0.04 % is proposed for type 316 steel. The requirement proposed is the same restriction as that of KTA regel

  9. Modelling guidelines for core exit temperature simulations with system codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J., E-mail: jordi.freixa-terradas@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain); Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Martínez-Quiroga, V., E-mail: victor.martinez@nortuen.com [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain); Zerkak, O., E-mail: omar.zerkak@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Reventós, F., E-mail: francesc.reventos@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Core exit temperature is used in PWRs as an indication of core heat up. • Modelling guidelines of CET response with system codes. • Modelling of heat transfer processes in the core and UP regions. - Abstract: Core exit temperature (CET) measurements play an important role in the sequence of actions under accidental conditions in pressurized water reactors (PWR). Given the difficulties in placing measurements in the core region, CET readings are used as criterion for the initiation of accident management (AM) procedures because they can indicate a core heat up scenario. However, the CET responses have some limitation in detecting inadequate core cooling and core uncovery simply because the measurement is not placed inside the core. Therefore, it is of main importance in the field of nuclear safety for PWR power plants to assess the capabilities of system codes for simulating the relation between the CET and the peak cladding temperature (PCT). The work presented in this paper intends to address this open question by making use of experimental work at integral test facilities (ITF) where experiments related to the evolution of the CET and the PCT during transient conditions have been carried out. In particular, simulations of two experiments performed at the ROSA/LSTF and PKL facilities are presented. The two experiments are part of a counterpart exercise between the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 and OECD/NEA PKL-2 projects. The simulations are used to derive guidelines in how to correctly reproduce the CET response during a core heat up scenario. Three aspects have been identified to be of main importance: (1) the need for a 3-dimensional representation of the core and Upper Plenum (UP) regions in order to model the heterogeneity of the power zones and axial areas, (2) the detailed representation of the active and passive heat structures, and (3) the use of simulated thermocouples instead of steam temperatures to represent the CET readings.

  10. Study on HANARO core conversion using U-Mo fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Lee, C.S.; Seo, C.G.; Park, S.J.; Kim, H.; Kim, C.K.

    2002-01-01

    Two types of fuel rods with different fuel meat diameter and uranium density are considered for HANARO core conversion with high density U-Mo fuel. Arranging standard fuels of 5.0 g U/cc and 6.35 mm in diameter at the inner ring of an assembly and reduced fuels of 4.3 g U/cc and 5.49 mm in diameter at the outer ring of an assembly flattens the assembly power distribution and avoids the increase of linear heat generation rate due to using higher uranium density and less number of fuel rods. The maximum linear heat generation rate is similar with the current reference core and four fuel sites at the outer core in the reflector tank is converted to the irradiation sites to suit more demand on fuel tests and radioisotope production at outer core sites. This new core has 32% longer fuel cycle than the current reference core. (author)

  11. Core Values | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core Values Core Values NREL's core values are rooted in a safe and supportive work environment guide our everyday actions and efforts: Safe and supportive work environment Respect for the rights physical and social environment Integrity Maintain the highest standard of ethics, honesty, and integrity

  12. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  13. Heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggs, G.W.; Lightowlers, R.J.; Robinson, D.; Rice, G.

    1986-01-01

    A heat pipe for use in stabilising a specimen container for irradiation of specimens at substantially constant temperature within a liquid metal cooled fast reactor, comprises an evaporator section, a condenser section, an adiabatic section therebetween, and a gas reservoir, and contains a vapourisable substance such as sodium. The heat pipe further includes a three layer wick structure comprising an outer relatively fine mesh layer, a coarse intermediate layer and a fine mesh inner layer for promoting unimpeded return of condensate to the evaporation section of the heat pipe while enhancing heat transfer with the heat pipe wall and reducing entrainment of the condensate by the upwardly rising vapour. (author)

  14. Application of heat pipes in nuclear reactors for passive heat removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Z.; Yetisir, M., E-mail: haquez@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a number of potential heat pipe applications in passive (i.e., not requiring external power) nuclear reactor heat removal. Heat pipes are particularly suitable for small reactors as the demand for heat removal is significantly less than commercial nuclear power plants, and passive and reliable heat removal is required. The use of heat pipes has been proposed in many small reactor designs for passive heat removal from the reactor core. This paper presents the application of heat pipes in AECL's Nuclear Battery design, a small reactor concept developed by AECL. Other potential applications of heat pipes include transferring excess heat from containment to the atmosphere by integrating low-temperature heat pipes into the containment building (to ensure long-term cooling following a station blackout), and passively cooling spent fuel bays. (author)

  15. Core level shifts in group IV semiconductors and semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, S.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-08-01

    We calculate the core level binding energy shift from the isolated atom to the crystalline solid, for group IV elemental semiconductors. This is done by simple extension of Johansson and Martensson's scheme for metals. We show that the core level energy in a nonmetal must be measured by the photo absorption (''core exciton'') threshold rather than by photo emission. As a byproduct, a simple scheme is also devised to evaluate impurity heats of solutions in semiconductors. (author)

  16. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  17. Design Requirements of an Advanced HANARO Reactor Core Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Chul; Ryu, Jeong Soo

    2007-12-01

    An advanced HANARO Reactor (AHR) is an open-tank-type and generates thermal power of 20 MW and is under conceptual design phase for developing it. The thermal power is including a core fission heat, a temporary stored fuel heat in the pool, a pump heat and a neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor. In order to remove the heat load, the reactor core cooling system is composed of a primary cooling system, a primary cooling water purification system and a reflector cooling system. The primary cooling system must remove the heat load including the core fission heat, the temporary stored fuel heat in the pool and the pump heat. The purification system must maintain the quality of the primary cooling water. And the reflector cooling system must remove the neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor and maintain the quality of the reflector. In this study, the design requirement of each system has been carried out using a design methodology of the HANARO within a permissible range of safety. And those requirements are written by english intend to use design data for exporting the research reactor

  18. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  19. Conceptual design study of LMFBR core with carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, H.; Hojuyama, T.; Osada, H.; Ishii, T.; Hattori, S.; Nishimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    Carbide fuel is a hopeful candidate for demonstration FBR(DFBR) fuel from the plant cost reduction point of view. High thermal conductivity and high heavy metal content of carbide fuel lead to high linear heat rate and high breeding ratio. We have analyzed carbide fuel core characteristics and have clarified the concept of carbide fuel core. By survey calculation, we have obtained a correlation map between core parameters and core characteristics. From the map, we have selected a high efficiency core whose features are better than those of an oxide core, and have obtained reactivity coefficients. The core volume and the reactor fuel inventory are approximately 20% smaller, and the burn-up reactivity loss is 50% smaller compared with the oxide fuel core. These results will reduce the capital cost. The core reactivity coefficients are similar to the conventional oxide DFBR's. Therefore the carbide fuel core is regarded as safe as the oxide core. Except neutron fluence, the carbide fuel core has better nuclear features than the oxide core

  20. Thermal-hydraulic studies on molten core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses studies carried out in connection with light water power reactor accidents. Recent assessments have indicated that the consequences of molten-core concrete interactions dominate the considerations of severe accidents. The two areas of interest that have been investigated are interlayer heat and mass transfer and liquid-liquid boiling. Interlayer heat and mass transfer refers to processes that occur within a core melt between the stratified, immiscible phases of core oxides and metals. Liquid-liquid boiling refers to processes that occur at the melt-concrete on melt-coolant interface

  1. Plasma edge cooling during RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A new approach to prevent the influx of high-Z impurities into the core of a tokamak discharge by using RF power to modify the edge plasma temperature profile is presented. This concept is based on spectroscopic measurements on PLT during ohmic heating and ATC during RF heating. A one dimensional impurity transport model is used to interpret the ATC results

  2. Experimental investigation on Heat Transfer Performance of Annular Flow Path Heat Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Mochizuki et al. was suggested the passive cooling system to spent nuclear fuel pool. Detail analysis of various heat pipe design cases was studied to determine the heat pipes cooling performance. Wang et al. suggested the concept PRHRS of MSR using sodium heat pipes, and the transient performance of high temperature sodium heat pipe was numerically simulated in the case of MSR accident. The meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants alarmed to the dangers of station blackout (SBO) accident. After the SBO accident, passive decay heat removal systems have been investigated to prevent the severe accidents. Mochizuki et al. suggested the heat pipes cooling system using loop heat pipes for decay heat removal cooling and analysis of heat pipe thermal resistance for boiling water reactor (BWR). The decay heat removal systems for pressurized water reactor (PWR) were suggested using natural convection mechanisms and modification of PWR design. Our group suggested the concept of a hybrid heat pipe with control rod as Passive IN-core Cooling System (PINCs) for decay heat removal for advanced nuclear power plant. Hybrid heat pipe is the combination of the heat pipe and control rod. In the present research, the main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure to the heat transfer performance of heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, B 4 C. The main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure in heat pipe to the heat transfer performance with annular flow path. ABS pellet was used instead of B 4 C pellet as cylindrical structures. The thermal performances of each heat pipes were measured experimentally. Among them, concentric heat pipe showed the best performance compared with others. 1. Annular evaporation section heat pipe and annular flow path heat pipe showed heat transfer degradation. 2. AHP also had annular vapor space and contact cooling surface per unit volume of vapor was increased. Heat transfer coefficient of

  3. Effect analysis of core barrel openings under CEFR normal condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yabo; Yang Hongyi

    2008-01-01

    Openings on the bottom of core barrel are important part of the decay heat removal system of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR), which are designed to discharge the decay heat from reactor under accident condition. This paper analyses the effect of the openings design on the normal operation condition using the famouse CFD code CFX. The result indicates that the decay heat can be discharged safely and at the same time the effect of core barrel openings on the normal operation condition is acceptable. (authors)

  4. Post-accident heat removal ''information exchange''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plein, H.G.; Carlson, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The in-core molten pool experiments are designed to produce a pool of fission heated temperature and flow patterns of such pools, and evaluate the barrier melt-through potential of the molten UO 2 . The first experiments, to be conducted this fiscal year in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor, will be uncomplicated and multiply-contained to prove containment design and to provide initial information on fission heated molten pool characteristics. Concurrent with the in-core experiments, high temperature ultrasonic techniques are being developed to measure UO 2 temperatures up to and above the melting point for use in later more definitive experiments scheduled for FY77

  5. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  6. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  7. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  8. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY OF CORES WITHIN INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, E. T.; Jackson, J. M.; Rathborne, J. M.; Simon, R.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) contain compact cores which probably host the early stages of high-mass star formation. Many of these cores contain regions of extended, enhanced 4.5 μm emission, the so-called 'green fuzzies', which indicate shocked gas. Many cores also contain 24 μm emission, presumably from heated dust which indicates embedded protostars. Because 'green fuzzies' and 24 μm point sources both indicate star formation, we have developed an algorithm to identify star-forming cores within IRDCs by searching for the simultaneous presence of these two distinct indicators. We employ this algorithm on a sample of 190 cores found toward IRDCs, and classify the cores as 'active' if they contain a green fuzzy coincident with an embedded 24 μm source, and as 'quiescent' if they contain neither IR signature. We hypothesize that the 'quiescent' cores represent the earliest 'preprotostellar' (starless) core phase, before the development of a warm protostar, and that the 'active' cores represent a later phase, after the development of a protostar. We test this idea by comparing the sizes, densities, and maser activity of the 'active' and 'quiescent' cores. We find that, on average, 'active' cores have smaller sizes, higher densities, and more pronounced water and methanol maser activity than the 'quiescent' cores. This is expected if the 'quiescent' cores are in an earlier evolutionary state than the 'active' cores. The masses of 'active' cores suggest that they may be forming high-mass stars. The highest mass 'quiescent' cores are excellent candidates for the elusive high-mass starless cores.

  9. Heat transfer in a one-dimensional mixed convection loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Joon; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Jong Man; Nam, Ho Yun

    1999-01-01

    Effects of non-uniform heating in the core and additional forced circulation during decay heat removal operation are studied with a simplified mixed convection loop. The heat transfer coefficient is calculated analytically and measured experimentally. The analytic solution obtained from a one-dimensional heat equation is found to agree well with the experimental results. The effects of the non-uniform heating and the forced circulation are discussed

  10. Hydraulic behaviour of a partially uncovered core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Hafner, W.

    1989-10-01

    A critical review of experimental data and theoretical models relevant to the thermohydraulic processes in a partially uncovered core has been performed. Presently available optimized thermohydraulic codes should be able to predict swell level elevations within an error band of ± 0.5 m. Rod temperature rising velocities could be predicted within an error bandwidth of ± 10%, provided the correct rod heat capacity is given. A general statement about the accuracy of predicted rod temperatures is not possible because the errors increase with simulation time. Highest errors are expected for long transients with low heating rates and low steam velocities. As a result, three areas for additional research are suggested: - a high-pressure test at 120 bar to complete the void correlation data base, - a low steam flow - low power experiment to improve heat transfer correlations, - a numerical investigation of three-dimensional effects in the reactor core with unequally heated rod bundles. For the present state of 1-dimensional experiments and models, suggestions for a satisfactory modeling have been derived. The suggested further work could improve the modelling capabilities and the code reliability for some limiting cases like high pressure boil-off, low-power long-term steam cooling, and unequal heating of neighbouring bundles considerably

  11. Direct Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P J

    1990-01-01

    Potential resources and applications of earth heat in the form of geothermal energy are large. United States direct uses amount to 2,100 MWt thermal and worldwide 8,850 MWt above a reference temperature of 35 degrees Celsius. Space and district heating are the major direct uses of geothermal energy. Equipment employed in direct use projects is of standard manufacture and includes downhole and circulation pumps, transmission and distribution pipelines, heat exchangers and convectors, heat pumps and chillers. Direct uses of earth heat discussed are space and district heating, greenhouse heating and fish farming, process and industrial applications. The economic feasibility of direct use projects is governed by site specific factors such as location of user and resource, resource quality, system load factor and load density, as well as financing. Examples are presented of district heating in Klamath Falls, and Elko. Further developments of direct uses of geothermal energy will depend on matching user needs to the resource, and improving load factors and load density.

  12. Plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, R.

    1989-01-01

    Successful plasma heating is essential in present fusion experiments, for the demonstration of DpT burn in future devices and finally for the fusion reactor itself. This paper discusses the common heating systems with respect to their present performance and their applicability to future fusion devices. The comparative discussion is oriented to the various function of heating, which are: - plasma heating to fusion-relevant parameters and to ignition in future machines, -non-inductive, steady-pstate current drive, - plasma profile control, -neutral gas breakdown and plasma build-up. In view of these different functions, the potential of neutral beam injection (NBI) and the various schemes of wave heating (ECRH, LH, ICRH and Alven wave heating) is analyzed in more detail. The analysis includes assessments of the present physical and technical state of these heating methods, and makes suggestions for future developments and about outstanding problems. Specific attention is given to the still critical problem of efficient current drive, especially with respect to further extrapolation towards an economically operating tokamak reactor. Remarks on issues such as reliability, maintenance and economy conclude this comparative overview on plasma heating systems. (author). 43 refs.; 13 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  14. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat......Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...

  15. Deposition of corrosion products in-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1994-11-01

    Data on corrosion product deposits on fuel sheaths are presented for a variety of operating conditions and water chemistries: boiling and non-boiling water; surface heat flux; pH, dissolved hydrogen concentration. Corrosion product behaviour in-core may be interpreted in terms of the solubility of magnetite and how it changes with water chemistry and temperature. A hypothesis of the deposition and release mechanisms was proposed in the 1970s in which particles deposited onto the sheath and subsequently dissolved in the heated water while being irradiated. Some of the deposition data may be interpreted using a model of these mechanisms. (author). 5 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs

  16. Features of an emergency heat-conducting path in reactors about lead-bismuth and lead heat-carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Bokova, T.A.; Molodtsov, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor emergency heat removal systems should transfer heat from the surface of reactor core fuel element claddings to the primary circuit followed by heat transfer to the environment. One suggests three design approaches for emergency heat removal systems in lead-bismuth and lead cooled reactor circuits that take account of the peculiar nature of their features. Application of the discussed systems for emergency heat removal improves safety of lead-bismuth and lead cooled reactor plants [ru

  17. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation

  18. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  19. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  20. Replaceable LMFBR core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding material and component performance in the high temperature, fast neutron environment of the LMFBR. Current data have provided strong assurance that the initial core component lifetime objectives of FFTF and CRBR can be met. At the same time, this knowledge translates directly into the need for improved core designs that utilize improved materials and advanced fuels required to meet objectives of low doubling times and extended core component lifetimes. An industrial base for the manufacture of quality core components has been developed in the US, and all procurements for the first two core equivalents for FFTF will be completed this year. However, the problem of fabricating recycled plutonium while dramatically reducing fabrication costs, minimizing personnel exposure, and protecting public health and safety must be addressed

  1. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  2. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  3. A report on core 5 of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, F.R.; Cameron, I.R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Reed, D.L.; Wilson, D.J.

    1964-06-01

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, flux fine structure, temperature coefficients, differential spectra and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fifth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contained 32.6 Kgm of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 1072, and formed the least moderated of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  4. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1994-01-01

    It is approximately 10 years since the Third Edition of Heat Pipes was published and the text is now established as the standard work on the subject. This new edition has been extensively updated, with revisions to most chapters. The introduction of new working fluids and extended life test data have been taken into account in chapter 3. A number of new types of heat pipes have become popular, and others have proved less effective. This is reflected in the contents of chapter 5. Heat pipes are employed in a wide range of applications, including electronics cooling, diecasting and injection mo

  5. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  6. First order study for an iron core OH system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Schultz, J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple comparison has been made between an air core and an iron core ohmic heating system for a particular device, and it was shown that the peak power requirements can be substantially reduced by the use of an iron core to power levels handled by industry today. It was also shown that for an ohmic heating system initiated plasma that the cost of the iron core ohmic heating power system (iron core, dual rectifier, and DC switch) is less than the cost for a subset of the power system for an air core system (dual rectifier and DC switch). There is considerable work being done on other methods of initiating the plasma none of which seem to be incompatible with the use of an iron core system

  7. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of double flat core HCLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1989-02-01

    A thermal-hydraulic characteristics of double flat core high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR) is described. The concept of flat core proposed by Ishiguro et al. is to achieve negative void reactivity coefficient in tight lattice core, and at the same time, high conversion ratio and high burnup can be obtainable. The proposed double flat core HCLWR, based on these physical advantages and the consideration of safety assurance, aims at efficient use of the pressure vessel space to produce comparable thermal output as current 3-loop PWRs. The present work revealed the following items concerning the thermalhydraulic feasibility of the double flat core HCLWR: (1) Main thermal-hydraulic parameters of the plant can be almost the same as current PWRs, showing the use of PWR standard components without major modifications except in core region. (2) Heat removal from the fuel rod in a steady operational condition has enough margin to the critical heat flux (CHF) limit, which is evaluated with the existing CHF correlations. (3) The calculation by REFLA code shows that the maximum cladding temperature in LOCA-reflood is estimated to be far lower than the licensing criteria. It is therefore considered that the proposed double flat core HCLWR is feasible from the point of thermal-hydraulics. Since the available data base has certain applicational limit to the very short core as the present double flat core HCLWR, further detailed assessment is required. (author)

  8. Study on diverse passive decay heat removal approach and principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qian; Si Shengyi

    2012-01-01

    Decay heat removal in post-accident is one of the most important aspects concerned in the reactor safety analysis. Passive decay heat removal approach is used to enhance nuclear safety. In advanced reactors, decay heat is removed by multiple passive heat removal paths through core to ultimate heat sink by passive residual heat removal system, passive injection system, passive containment cooling system and so on. Various passive decay heat removal approaches are summarized in this paper, the common features and differences of their heat removal paths are analyzed, and the design principle of passive systems for decay heat removal is discussed. It is found that. these decay heat removal paths is combined by some basic heat transfer processes, by the combination of these basic processes, diverse passive decay heat removal approach or system design scheme can be drawn. (authors)

  9. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity (ω/k perpendicular ∼ V Ti much-lt V α ) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion α-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k perpendicular ρ i ∼ 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research

  10. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  11. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  12. Emergency core cooling system for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, Toyomi; Fukutomi, Shigeki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable elimination of decay heat in an LMFBR type reactor by securing natural cycling force in any state and securing reactor core cooling capacity even when both an external power supply and an emergency power supply are failed in emergency case. Method: Heat insulating material portion for surrounding a descent tube of a steam drum provided at high position for obtaining necessary flow rate for flowing resistance is removed from heat transmitting surface of a recycling type steam generator to provide a heat sink. That is, when both an external power supply and an emergency power supply are failed in emergency, the heat insulator at part of a steam generator recycling loop is removed to produce natural cycling force between it and the heat transmitting portion of the steam generator as a heat source for the heat sink so as to secure the flow rate of the recycling loop. When the power supply is failed in emergency, the heat removing capacity of the steam generator is secured so as to remove the decay heat produced in the reactor core. (Yoshihara, H.)

  13. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  14. Windscale pile core surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.; Mathews, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The two Windscale Piles were closed down, defueled as far as possible and mothballed for thirty years following a fire in the core of Pile 1 in 1957 resulting from the spontaneous release of stored Wigner energy in the graphite moderator. Decommissioning of the reactors commenced in 1987 and has reached the stage where the condition of both cores needs to be determined. To this end, non-intrusive and intrusive surveys and sampling of the cores have been planned and partly implemented. The objectives for each Pile differ slightly. The location and quantity of fuel remaining in the damaged core of Pile 1 needed to be established, whereas the removal of all fuel from Pile 2 needed to be confirmed. In Pile 1, the possible existence of a void in the core is to be explored and in Pile 2, the level of Wigner energy remaining required to be quantified. Levels of radioactivity in both cores needed to be measured. The planning of the surveys is described including strategy, design, safety case preparation and the remote handling and viewing equipment required to carry out the inspection, sampling and monitoring work. The results from the completed non-intrusive survey of Pile 2 are summarised. They confirm that the core is empty and the graphite is in good condition. The survey of Pile 1 has just started. (UK)

  15. Manufacturing development for the SAFE 100 kW core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Robert; Roman, Jose; Salvail, Pat

    2002-01-01

    In stark contrast to what is sometimes considered the norm in traditional manufacturing processes, engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) arc in the practice of altering the standard in an effort to realize other potential methods in core manufacturing. While remaining within the bounds of the materials database, we are researching into core manufacturing techniques that may have been overlooked in the past due to funding and/or time constraints. To augment proven core fabrication capabilities we are pursuing plating processes as another possible method for core build-up and assembly. Although brazing and a proprietary HIP cycle are used for module assembly (proven track record for stability and endurance), it is prudent to pursue secondary or backup methods of module and core assembly. For this reason heat tube manufacture and module assembly by means of plating is being investigated. Potentially, the plating processes will give engineers the ability to manufacture replacement modules for any module that might fail to perform nominally, and to assemble/disassemble a complete core in much less time than would be required for the conventional Braze-HIP process. Another area of improvement in core manufacturing capabilities is the installation of a sodium and lithium liquid metal heat pipe fill machine. This, along with the ability to Electron Beam Weld heat pipe seals and wet-in the pipes in the necessary vacuum atmosphere, will eliminate the need to ship potentially hazardous components outside for processing. In addition to developing core manufacturing techniques, the SAFE manufacturing team has been evaluating the thermal heat transfer characteristics, and manufacturability of several heat exchanger design concepts

  16. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The environmental risks and uncertainties of a high-energy future are disturbing and give rise to several reservations concerning the use of fossil fuels. A number of technologies will help to reduce atmospheric pollution. In Denmark special importance is attached to the following: Energy conservation. Efficient energy conversion. Renewable energy sources. District heating, combined production of heat and power. Many agree that district heating (DH), produced by the traditional heat-only plant, and combined heat and power (CHP) have enormous potential when considering thermal efficiency and lowered environmental impacts: The basic technology of each is proven, it would be relatively simple to satisfy a substantial part of the energy demand, and their high efficiencies mean reduced pollution including greenhouse gas emissions. This is especially important in high population density areas - the obviously preferred sites for such energy generation. Compared with individual heating DH can provide a community with an operationally efficient and most often also an economically competitive heat supply. This is particularly true under the circumstances where the DH system is supplied from CHP plants. Their use results in very substantial improvements in overall efficiency. Further environmental improvements arise from the reduced air pollution obtainable in reasonably large CHP plants equipped with flue gas cleaning to remove particles, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen acids. As a consequence of these considerations, DH plays an important role in fulfilling the space and water heating demand in many countries. This is especially the case in Denmark where this technology is utilised to a very great extent. Indeed, DH is one of the reasons why Denmark has relatively good air quality in the cities. (au)

  17. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  18. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  19. GNPS 18-months fuel cycles core thermal hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changwen; Zhou Zhou

    2002-01-01

    GNPS begins to implement the 18-month fuel cycles from the initial annual reload at cycle 9, thus the initial core thermal hydraulic design is not valid any more. The new critical heat flux (CHF) correlation, FC, which is developed by Framatome, is used in the design, and the generalized statistical methodology (GSM) instead of the initial deterministic methodology is used to determine the DNBR design limit. As the AFA 2G and AFA 3G are mixed loaded in the transition cycle, it will result that the minimum DNBR in the mixed core is less than that of AFA 3G homogenous core, the envelop mixed core DNBR penalty is given. Consequently the core physical limit for mixed core and equilibrium cycles, and the new over temperature ΔT overpower ΔT are determined

  20. Evaluation of BEACON-COLSS Core Monitoring System Benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Young Ho; Morita, Toshio; Book, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    In Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant COLSS (Core Operating Limit Supervisory System) is used to monitor the DNBR Power Operating Limit (DNBRPOL) and Linear Heat Rate POL (KWPFPOL). Westinghouse and KNFC have developed an upgraded core monitoring system by combining the BEACON TM core monitoring system 1 (Best Estimate Analyzer for Core Operation . Nuclear) and COLSS into an integrated product that is called BEACON-COLSS. BEACON-COLSS generates the 3-D power distribution corrected by the in-core detectors measurements. The 3-D core power distribution methodology in BEACON-COLSS is significantly better than the synthesis methodology in COLSS. BEACONCOLSS uses the CETOP-D 2 thermal hydraulic code instead of CETOP-1. CETOP-D is a multi-channel thermal hydraulics code that will provide more accurate DNBR calculations than the DNBR calculators currently used in COLSS

  1. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  2. THE ENIGMATIC CORE L1451-mm: A FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE? OR A HIDDEN VeLLO?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bourke, Tyler; Foster, Jonathan B.; Robitaille, Thomas; Kauffmann, Jens [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Arce, Hector G.; Tanner, Joel [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Schnee, Scott [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Tafalla, Mario [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Anglada, Guillem, E-mail: jaime.pineda@manchester.ac.uk [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apartado 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2011-12-20

    We present the detection of a dust continuum source at 3 mm (CARMA) and 1.3 mm (Submillimeter Array, SMA), and {sup 12}CO (2-1) emission (SMA) toward the L1451-mm dense core. These detections suggest a compact object and an outflow where no point source at mid-infrared wavelengths is detected using Spitzer. An upper limit for the dense core bolometric luminosity of 0.05 L{sub Sun} is obtained. By modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution and the continuum interferometric visibilities simultaneously, we confirm that a central source of heating is needed to explain the observations. This modeling also shows that the data can be well fitted by a dense core with a young stellar object (YSO) and a disk, or by a dense core with a central first hydrostatic core (FHSC). Unfortunately, we are not able to decide between these two models, which produce similar fits. We also detect {sup 12}CO (2-1) emission with redshifted and blueshifted emission suggesting the presence of a slow and poorly collimated outflow, in opposition to what is usually found toward YSOs but in agreement with prediction from simulations of an FHSC. This presents the best candidate, so far, for an FHSC, an object that has been identified in simulations of collapsing dense cores. Whatever the true nature of the central object in L1451-mm, this core presents an excellent laboratory to study the earliest phases of low-mass star formation.

  3. THE ENIGMATIC CORE L1451-mm: A FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE? OR A HIDDEN VeLLO?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bourke, Tyler; Foster, Jonathan B.; Robitaille, Thomas; Kauffmann, Jens; Arce, Héctor G.; Tanner, Joel; Schnee, Scott; Tafalla, Mario; Caselli, Paola; Anglada, Guillem

    2011-01-01

    We present the detection of a dust continuum source at 3 mm (CARMA) and 1.3 mm (Submillimeter Array, SMA), and 12 CO (2-1) emission (SMA) toward the L1451-mm dense core. These detections suggest a compact object and an outflow where no point source at mid-infrared wavelengths is detected using Spitzer. An upper limit for the dense core bolometric luminosity of 0.05 L ☉ is obtained. By modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution and the continuum interferometric visibilities simultaneously, we confirm that a central source of heating is needed to explain the observations. This modeling also shows that the data can be well fitted by a dense core with a young stellar object (YSO) and a disk, or by a dense core with a central first hydrostatic core (FHSC). Unfortunately, we are not able to decide between these two models, which produce similar fits. We also detect 12 CO (2-1) emission with redshifted and blueshifted emission suggesting the presence of a slow and poorly collimated outflow, in opposition to what is usually found toward YSOs but in agreement with prediction from simulations of an FHSC. This presents the best candidate, so far, for an FHSC, an object that has been identified in simulations of collapsing dense cores. Whatever the true nature of the central object in L1451-mm, this core presents an excellent laboratory to study the earliest phases of low-mass star formation.

  4. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  5. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  6. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  7. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  8. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  9. Improved core electron confinement on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.; Baranov, Y.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of core regions with reduced electron transport is reported in regimes with current profile shaping at JET. The electron heat diffusivity (Χ c ) is reduced down to 0.5 m 2 /s in the region of low magnetic shear with an ICRH power of 1 MW with no indication of a threshold. In the high performance optimised shear regime, obtained in scenarios dominated by ion heating, internal transport barriers on the ion temperature profiles are simultaneously accompanied by a significant reduction of the electron heat diffusivity at two-third of the plasma radius. In this regime, recent results and measurements obtained with the new gas-box divertor configuration are reported together with their transport analyses. The results indicate that Χ c is reduced by one order of magnitude in a spatially localised region. (authors)

  10. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directly restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements. (Official Gazette)

  11. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  12. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  13. Review: heat pipe heat exchangers at IROST

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2012-01-01

    The use of the heat pipe as a component in a heat recovery device has gained worldwide acceptance. Heat pipes are passive, highly reliable and offer high heat transfer rates. This study summarizes the investigation of different types of heat pipe heat recovery systems (HPHRSs). The studies are classified on the basis of the type of the HPHRS. This research is based on 30 years of experience on heat pipe and heat recovery systems that are presented in this study. Copyright , Oxford University ...

  14. Heat pipes and heat pipe exchangers for heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, L L; Grakovich, L P; Kiselev, V G; Kurustalev, D K; Matveev, Yu

    1984-01-01

    Heat pipes and heat pipe exchangers are of great importance in power engineering as a means of recovering waste heat of industrial enterprises, solar energy, geothermal waters and deep soil. Heat pipes are highly effective heat transfer units for transferring thermal energy over large distance (tens of meters) with low temperature drops. Their heat transfer characteristics and reliable working for more than 10-15 yr permit the design of new systems with higher heat engineering parameters.

  15. Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than 57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was 28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  16. Edge and core dynamics in harness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.

    2007-01-01

    Resistive kink oscillations in tokamak plasmas are usually treated as core localized events, yet there there are several mechanisms by which they may interact with the edge dynamics. This suggests that we may regulate edge oscillatory behaviour, or ELMs, by harnessing the natural or contrived sawtooth period and amplitude. In this work I investigate core-edge oscillatory entrainment through direct propagation of heat pulses, inductive coupling, and global higher order resonance effects. In the core of auxiliary heated tokamak plasmas the ineluctable rhythm of slow buildup and rapid conversion of potential energy governs electron and heat radial transport. The growth phase of the sawtooth is accompanied by significant reconnection, then during the collapse the temperature and density in the core fall dramatically. There is evidence from experiments in reversed field pinch devices that ensuing energy fluxes can affect flow shear and confinement at the edge. The basis for this study is the dynamical (BDS) model for edge plasma behavior that was derived from electrostatic resistive MHD equations. The BDS model reflects the major qualitative features of edge dynamics that have been observed, such as L-H transitions and associated ELMs, hysteresis, and spontaneous reversal of poloidal shear flow. Under poorly dissipative conditions the transient behavior of the model can exhibit period-doubling, blue-sky, homoclinic, and other exotic bifurcations. Thus we might ask questions such as: Is it possible to mode-lock the edge dynamics to the core sawteeth? Can we induce, or prevent, a change in direction of shear flow? What about MHD effects? Is core-edge communication one way or is there some feedback? In the simplest prototype for coupled core-edge dynamics I model the sawtooth crash as a periodic power input to the edge potential energy reservoir. This is effected by coupling the BDS model to the dynamical system u = u(1 - u 2 - x 2 ) - ω s x, x = x(1-u 2 -x 2 ) + ω s u

  17. Some concept for the TRIGA core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko

    1994-01-01

    There is the research reactor called TRIGA Mark-2 of 100 kW in Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology. Recently, while the various calculations on the core were carried out, the author became aware of that this TRIGA core was designed at that time with excellent consideration. The reason for that is, although fuel is arranged in simple concentric circular state at a glance, it was known that in reality, this is the modification of the hexagonal core of triangular lattice. In the examination of square lattice fuel arrangement, the reactivity was calculated by using the gap between fuel rods as the parameter and by using ENDF/B-4 library and Monte Carlo code Keno-5. It is known that the design of the lattice with maximum reactivity cannot be done by the square lattice. The similar examination was carried out on triangular lattice, and it was found that the gap between fuel rods of 4 mm is the optimal design. The average neutron energy spectra in the fuel rods of the TRIGA Mark-2 core agreed considerably well with the energy spectra at 4.16 cm fuel rod pitch in triangular hexagonal core. In the reactor of about 100 kW, even if the gap between fuel rods is less than 4 mm, heat removal is sufficiently possible. (K.I.)

  18. Core/corona modeling of diode-imploded annular loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, R. E.; Guillory, J. U.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of a tenuous exterior plasma corona with anomalous resistivity on the compression and heating of a hollow, collisional aluminum z-pinch plasma are predicted by a one-dimensional code. As the interior ("core") plasma is imploded by its axial current, the energy exchange between core and corona determines the current partition. Under the conditions of rapid core heating and compression, the increase in coronal current provides a trade-off between radial acceleration and compression, which reduces the implosion forces and softens the pitch. Combined with a heuristic account of energy and momentum transport in the strongly coupled core plasma and an approximate radiative loss calculation including Al line, recombination and Bremsstrahlung emission, the current model can provide a reasonably accurate description of imploding annular plasma loads that remain azimuthally symmetric. The implications for optimization of generator load coupling are examined.

  19. Station blackout core damage frequency in an advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Luiz Sergio de

    2004-01-01

    Even though nuclear reactors are provided with protection systems so that they can be automatically shut down in the event of a station blackout, the consequences of this event can be severe. This is because many safety systems that are needed for removing residual heat from the core and for maintaining containment integrity, in the majority of the nuclear power plants, are AC dependent. In order to minimize core damage frequency, advanced reactor concepts are being developed with safety systems that use natural forces. This work shows an improvement in the safety of a small nuclear power reactor provided by a passive core residual heat removal system. Station blackout core melt frequencies, with and without this system, are both calculated. The results are also compared with available data in the literature. (author)

  20. Monopole heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Upper bounds on the flux of monopoles incident on the Earth with velocity -5 c(10 16 GeV m -1 ) and on the flux of monopoles incident on Jupiter with velocity -3 c(10 16 GeV m -1 ), are derived. Monopoles moving this slowly lose sufficient energy to be stopped, and then catalyse nucleon decay, releasing heat. The limits are obtained by requiring the rate of energy release from nucleon decay to be less than the measured amount of heat flowing out from the surface of the planet. (U.K.)

  1. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections

  2. Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Latif M.

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the follow ing ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters.

  3. Reflood behavior at low initial clad temperature in Slab Core Test Facility Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Sobajima, Makoto; Abe, Yutaka; Iwamura, Takamichi; Ohnuki, Akira; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1990-07-01

    In order to study the reflood behavior with low initial clad temperature, a reflood test was performed using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) with initial clad temperature of 573 K. The test conditions of the test are identical with those of SCTF base case test S2-SH1 (initial clad temperature 1073 K) except the initial clad temperature. Through the comparison of results from these two tests, the following conclusions were obtained. (1) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low differential pressures through the primary loops due to smaller steam generation in the core. (2) The low initial clad temperature caused the accumulated mass in the core to be increased and the accumulated mass in the downcomer to be decreased in the period of the lower plenum injection with accumulator (before 50s). In the later period of the cold leg injection with LPCI (after 100s), the water accumulation rates in the core and the downcomer were almost the same between both tests. (3) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the increase of the core inlet mass flow rate in the lower plenum injection period. However, the core inlet mass flow rate was almost the same regardless of the initial clad temperature in the later period of the cold leg injection period. (4) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low turnaround temperature, high temperature rise and fast bottom quench front propagation. (5) In the region apart from the quench front, low initial clad temperature resulted in the lower heat transfer. In the region near the quench front, almost the same heat transfer coefficient was observed between both tests. (6) No flow oscillation with a long period was observed in the SCTF test with low initial clad temperature of 573 K, while it was remarkable in the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) test which was performed with the same initial clad temperature. (J.P.N.)

  4. Constraints on the coupled thermal evolution of the Earth's core and mantle, the age of the inner core, and the origin of the 186Os/188Os “core signal” in plume-derived lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, J. C.

    2006-10-01

    The possibility that some mantle plumes may carry a geochemical signature of core/mantle interaction has rightly generated considerable interest and attention in recent years. Correlated 186Os- 187Os enrichments in some plume-derived lavas (Hawaii, Gorgona, Kostomuksha) have been interpreted as deriving from an outer core with elevated Pt/Os and Re/Os ratios due to the solidification of the Earth's inner core (c.f., [A.D. Brandon, R.J. Walker, The debate over core-mantle interaction, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 232 (2005) 211-225.] and references therein). Conclusive identification of a "core signal" in plume-derived lavas would profoundly influence our understanding of mantle convection and evolution. This paper reevaluates the Os-isotope evidence for core/mantle interaction by examining other geochemical constraints on core/mantle interaction, geophysical constraints on the thermal evolution of the outer core, and geochemical and cosmochemical constraints on the abundance of heat-producing elements in the core. Additional study of metal/silicate and sulfide/silicate partitioning of K, Pb, and other trace elements is needed to more tightly constrain the likely starting composition of the Earth's core. However, available data suggest that the observed 186Os enrichments in Hawaiian and other plume-derived lavas are unlikely to derive from core/mantle interaction. 1) Core/mantle interaction sufficient to produce the observed 186Os enrichments would likely have significant effects on other tracers such as Pb- and W-isotopes that are not observed. 2) Significant partitioning of K or other heat-producing elements into the core would produce a "core depletion" pattern in the Silicate Earth very different from that observed. 3) In the absence of heat-producing elements in the core, core/mantle heat flow of ˜ 6-15 TW estimated from several independent geophysical constraints suggests an inner core age (< ˜ 2.5 Ga) too young for the outer core to have developed a significant

  5. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  6. Magnetic core mounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    A mounting apparatus for an electromagnetic device such as a transformer of inductor includes a generally planar metallic plate as a first heat sink, and a metallic mounting cup as a second heat sink. The mounting cup includes a cavity configured to receive the electromagnetic device, the cavity being defined by a base, and an axially-extending annular sidewall extending from the base to a flange portion of the mounting cup. The mounting cup includes first and second passages for allowing the leads of first and second windings of the electromagnetic device to be routed out of the cavity. The cavity is filled with a polyurethane potting resin, and the mounting cup, including the potted electromagnetic device, is mounted to the plate heat sink using fasteners. The mounting cup, which surrounds the electromagnetic device, in combination with the potting resin provides improved thermal transfer to the plate heat sink, as well as providing resistance to vibration and shocks.

  7. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  8. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  9. Heat and mass transfer in building services design

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Building design is increasingly geared towards low energy consumption. Understanding the fundamentals of heat transfer and the behaviour of air and water movements is more important than ever before. Heat and Mass Transfer in Building Services Design provides an essential underpinning knowledge for the technology subjects of space heating, water services, ventilation and air conditioning. This new text: *provides core understanding of heat transfer and fluid flow from a building services perspective *complements a range of courses in building services engineering *

  10. Heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  11. Heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The tubes of a heat exchanger tube bank have a portion thereof formed in the shape of a helix, of effective radius equal to the tube radius and the space between two adjacent tubes, to tangentially contact the straight sections of the tubes immediately adjacent thereto and thereby provide support, maintain the spacing and account for differential thermal expansion thereof

  12. Heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, F; Yanagida, T; Fujie, K; Futawatari, H

    1975-04-30

    The purpose of this construction is the improvement of heat transfer in finned tube heat exchangers, and therefore the improvement of its efficiency or its output per unit volume. This is achieved by preventing the formation of flow boundary layers in gaseous fluid. This effect always occurs on flow of smooth adjacent laminae, and especially if these have pipes carrying liquid passing through them; it worsens the heat transfer of such a boundary layer considerably compared to that in the turbulent range. The fins, which have several rows of heat exchange tubes passing through them, are fixed at a small spacing on theses tubes. The fins have slots cut in them by pressing or punching, where the pressed-out material remains as a web, which runs parallel to the level of the fin and at a small distance from it. These webs and slots are arranged radially around every tube hole, e.g. 6 in number. For a suitable small tube spacing, two adjacent tubes opposite each other have one common slot. Many variants of such slot arrangements are illustrated.

  13. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowodiuk, W.

    1976-01-01

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type is described in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration

  14. Experimental investigation of natural convection in a core of a marine reactor in rolling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Michiyuki

    2000-01-01

    A series of single-phase natural circulation experiments in a simulated marine reactor mounted on a rolling bed was performed and the average Nusselt number in the core was evaluated in order to investigate effects of the rolling motion on the heat transfer in the core. Heat transfer with an upright attitude is well correlated with the Rayleigh number and is slightly lower than El-Genk's correlation. Heat transfer in the core is not affected by the inclination angle because the inclination of the present experiment is not large enough to cause any remarkable changes in the flow pattern of the core. Heat transfer in the core is enhanced by the rolling motion which is thought to cause internal flow in the core. Heat transfer during the rolling motion is correlated with the Richardson number for rolling motion, Ri R , and is classified into three regimes: (1) region A (0.05 R ≤0.3) where heat transfer is dominated by the inertial force due to the rolling motion; (2) region B (0.3 R ≤2) where heat transfer is affected by the combined effect of the inertial force and natural convection; and (3) region C (Ri R >2) where heat transfer is affected only by the natural convection. (author)

  15. Heat transfer characteristics and operation limit of pressurized hybrid heat pipe for small modular reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performances and operation limits of hybrid heat pipe were experimentally studied. • Models for predicting the operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe was developed. • Non-condensable gas affected heat transfer characteristics of the hybrid heat pipe. - Abstract: In this paper, a hybrid heat pipe is proposed for use in advanced nuclear power plants as a passive heat transfer device. The hybrid heat pipe combines the functions of a heat pipe and a control rod to simultaneously remove the decay heat generated from the core and shutdown the reactor under accident conditions. Thus, the hybrid heat pipe contains a neutron absorber in the evaporator section, which corresponds to the core of the reactor pressure vessel. The presence of the neutron absorber material leads to differences in the heated diameter and hydraulic diameter of the heat pipe. The cross-sectional areas of the vapor paths through the evaporator, adiabatic, and condenser sections are also different. The hybrid heat pipe must operate in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment to remove the decay heat. In other words, the operating pressure must be higher than those of the commercially available thermosyphons. Hence, the thermal performances, including operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe, were experimentally studied in the operating pressure range of 0.2–20 bar. The operating pressure of the hybrid heat pipe was controlled by charging the non-condensable gas which is unused method to achieve the high saturation pressure in conventional thermosyphons. The effect of operating pressure on evaporation heat transfer was negligible, while condensation heat transfer was affected by the amount of non-condensable gas in the test section. The operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe increased with the operating pressure. Maximum heat removal capacity of the hybrid heat pipe was up to 6 kW which is meaningful value as a passive decay heat removal device in the nuclear power

  16. Application of microwaves for incinerating waste shell moulds and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Granat

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, investigation results of microwave heating application for incinerating waste shell moulds and cores made of moulding sands with thermosetting resins are presented. It was found that waste shell cores or shell moulds left after casting, separated from moulding sand, can be effectively incinerated. It was evidenced that microwave heating allows effective control of this process and its results. Incineration of waste moulds and cores made of commercial grades of resin-coated moulding sand using microwave heating was found to be an effective way of their utilisation. It was determined that the optimum burning time of these wastes (except those insufficiently disintegrated and not mixed with an activating agent is maximum 240 s at the used magnetron power of 650 W. It was noticed that proper disintegration of the wastes and use of suitable additives to intensify the microwave heating process guarantee significant reduction of the process time and its full stabilisation. Application of microwave heating for incinerating waste shell moulds and cores ensure substantial and measurable economic profits due to shorter process time and lower energy consumption.

  17. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  18. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Human Core Temperature Prediction for Heat-Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro , Brazil, and the B.B.A. degree in business administration from Rio ... de Janeiro Federal Univer- sity, Rio de Janeiro , in 1980 and 1985, respectively, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engi- neering from the...predictions [13]. Importantly, we found that because AR models only de - pend on the frequency of the underlying time-series data, and because the

  20. Preventing Heat Injuries by Predicting Individualized Human Core Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-14

    model Kalman filter Error feedback Real-time TC estimate • Activity • Heart rate • Skin temperature Non-invasive measurements • Ambient temperature ...model and 2) a Kalman filter [13]. First, the mathematical model uses the measured AC and environmental variables TA and RH to estimate the state...variables HR, TS, and TC. Then, the Kalman filter considers the error between the measured and model- estimated HR and TS to correct the state variables

  1. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  2. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  3. LMFBR core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Yang, J.C.; Yoh, K.C.; Suk, S.D.; Soh, D.S.; Kim, Y.M.

    1980-01-01

    The design parameters of a commercial-scale fast breeder reactor which is currently under construction by regeneration of these data is preliminary analyzed. The analysis of nuclear and thermal characteristics as well as safety features of this reactor is emphasized. And the evaluation of the initial core mentioned in the system description is carried out in the areas of its kinetics and control system, and, at the same time, the flow distribution of sodium and temperature distribution of the initial FBR core system are calculated. (KAERI INIS Section)

  4. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  5. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  6. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  7. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  8. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  9. Heat pipe heat exchangers in heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stulc, P; Vasiliev, L L; Kiseljev, V G; Matvejev, Ju N

    1985-01-01

    The results of combined research and development activities of the National Research Institute for Machine Design, Prague, C.S.S.R. and the Institute for Heat and Mass Transfer, Minsk, U.S.S.R. concerning intensification heat pipes used in heat pipe heat exchangers are presented. This sort of research has been occasioned by increased interest in heat power economy trying to utilise waste heat produced by various technological processes. The developed heat pipes are deployed in construction of air-air, gas-air or gas-gas heat recovery exchangers in the field of air-engineering and air-conditioning. (author).

  10. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  11. Cooling of Accretion-Heated Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Degenaar, Nathalie; Page, Dany

    2017-09-01

    We present a brief, observational review about the study of the cooling behaviour of accretion-heated neutron stars and the inferences about the neutron-star crust and core that have been obtained from these studies. Accretion of matter during outbursts can heat the crust out of thermal equilibrium with the core and after the accretion episodes are over, the crust will cool down until crust-core equilibrium is restored. We discuss the observed properties of the crust cooling sources and what has been learned about the physics of neutron-star crusts. We also briefly discuss those systems that have been observed long after their outbursts were over, i.e, during times when the crust and core are expected to be in thermal equilibrium. The surface temperature is then a direct probe for the core temperature. By comparing the expected temperatures based on estimates of the accretion history of the targets with the observed ones, the physics of neutron-star cores can be investigated. Finally, we discuss similar studies performed for strongly magnetized neutron stars in which the magnetic field might play an important role in the heating and cooling of the neutron stars.

  12. Nuclear and geothermal energy as a direct heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    After some remarks on economic aspects, the swimming pool reactor simplified for the purpose of heat generation is described, the core of which supplies heat of 100-120 0 C for district heating. In this context, ways of storing waste heat are discussed. The alternative is pointed out that energy may be transferred by means of hydrogen. In conclusion, it is demonstrated on a French plant how geothermal water can be used directly via heat exchangers for district heating. (UA/LN) [de

  13. Study on diverse passive decay heat removal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qian; Si Shengyi

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important principles for nuclear safety is the decay heat removal in accidents. Passive decay heat removal systems are extremely helpful to enhance the safety. In currently design of many advanced nuclear reactors, kinds of passive systems are proposed or developed, such as the passive residual heat removal system, passive injection system, passive containment cooling system. These systems provide entire passive heat removal paths from core to ultimate heat sink. Various kinds of passive systems for decay heat removal are summarized; their common features or differences on heat removal paths and design principle are analyzed. It is found that, these passive decay heat removal paths are similarly common on and connected by several basic heat transfer modes and steps. By the combinations or connections of basic modes and steps, new passive decay heat removal approach or diverse system can be proposed. (authors)

  14. Developing and modelling of ohmic heating for solid food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Frosch, Stina

    Heating of solid foods using the conventional technologies is time-consuming due to the fact that heat transfer is limited by internal conduction within the product. This is a big challenge to food manufactures who wish to heat the product faster to the desired core temperature and to ensure more...... uniform quality across the product. Ohmic heating is one of the novel technologies potentially solving this problem by allowing volumetric heating of the product and thereby reducing or eliminating temperature gradients within the product. However, the application of ohmic heating for solid food products...... such as meat and seafood is not industrially utilized yet. Therefore, the aim of the current work is to model and develop the ohmic heating technology for heating of solid meat and seafood. A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat transfer and electric field during ohmic heating of meat products has been...

  15. MHTGR inherent heat transfer capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkoe, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the Commercial Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) which achieves improved reactor safety performance and reliability by utilizing a completely passive natural convection cooling system called the RCCS to remove decay heat in the event that all active cooling systems fail to operate. For the highly improbable condition that the RCCS were to become non-functional following a reactor depressurization event, the plant would be forced to rely upon its inherent thermo-physical characteristics to reject decay heat to the surrounding earth and ambient environment. A computational heat transfer model was created to simulate such a scenario. Plant component temperature histories were computed over a period of 20 days into the event. The results clearly demonstrate the capability of the MHTGR to maintain core integrity and provide substantial lead time for taking corrective measures

  16. Reactor Core Design and Analysis for a Micronuclear Power Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vehicle is designed to ensure the security of country sea boundary, providing harsh requirements for its power system design. Conventional power sources, such as battery and Stirling engine, are featured with low power and short lifetime. Micronuclear reactor power source featured with higher power density and longer lifetime would strongly meet the demands of unmanned underwater vehicle power system. In this paper, a 2.4 MWt lithium heat pipe cooled reactor core is designed for micronuclear power source, which can be applied for underwater vehicles. The core features with small volume, high power density, long lifetime, and low noise level. Uranium nitride fuel with 70% enrichment and lithium heat pipes are adopted in the core. The reactivity is controlled by six control drums with B4C neutron absorber. Monte Carlo code MCNP is used for calculating the power distribution, characteristics of reactivity feedback, and core criticality safety. A code MCORE coupling MCNP and ORIGEN is used to analyze the burnup characteristics of the designed core. The results show that the core life is 14 years, and the core parameters satisfy the safety requirements. This work provides reference to the design and application of the micronuclear power source.

  17. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    A heat exchanger such as forms, for example, part of a power steam boiler is made up of a number of tubes that may be arranged in many different ways, and it is necessary that the tubes be properly supported. The means by which the tubes are secured must be as simple as possible so as to facilitate construction and must be able to continue to function effectively under the varying operating conditions to which the heat exchanger is subject. The arrangement described is designed to meet these requirements, in an improved way. The tubes are secured to a member extending past several tubes and abutment means are provided. At least some of the abutment means comprise two abutment pieces and a wedge secured to the supporting member, that acts on these pieces to maintain the engagement. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  19. The Uncommon Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will…

  20. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  1. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  2. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  3. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  4. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  5. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  6. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  7. Analysis of decay heat removal following loss of RHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Ward, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recent plant experience has included many events occurring during outages at pressurized water reactors. A recent example is the loss of residual heat removal system event that occurred March 20, 1990 at the Vogtle-1 plant following refueling. Plant conditions during outages differ markedly from those prevailing at normal full-power operation on which most past research has concentrated. Specifically, during outages the core power is low, the coolant system may be in a drained state with air or nitrogen present, and various reactor coolant system closures may be unsecured. With the residual heat removal system operating, the core decay heat is readily removed. However, if the residual heat removal system capability is lost and alternative heat removal means cannot be established, heat up of the coolant could lead to core coolant boil-off, fuel rod heat up, and core damage. A study was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to identify what information was needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that might be used, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain into the reactor coolant system, core water boil-off, and reflux condensation cooling processes

  8. Advances in technologies for decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Berkovich, V.; Bianchi, A.; Chen B.; Meseth, J.; Vecchiarelli, J.; Vidard, M.

    1999-01-01

    The various decay heat removal concepts that have been used for the evolutionary water reactor plant designs developed worldwide are examined and common features identified. Although interesting new features of the 'classical' plants are mentioned, the emphasis is on passive core and containment decay heat removal systems. The various systems are classified according to the function they have to accomplish; they often share common characteristics and similar equipment. (author)

  9. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  10. Experimental study on single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble bed channels with internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianke; Sun Zhongning; Zhou Ping; Xu Guangzhan

    2012-01-01

    The water-cooled pebble bed reactor core is the porous channels stacked with spherical fuel elements, having evident effect on enhancing heat transfer. Owing to the variability and randomness characteristics of it's interstice, pebble bed channels have a very complex heat transfer situation and have little correlative research. In order to research the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat source, electromagnetic induction heating method was adopted for overall heating the pebble bed which was composed of 8 mm diameter steel balls, and the internal heat transfer characteristics were researched. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, the rule of power distribution and heat transfer coefficient with heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re were got. According to the experimental data fitting, the dimensionless average heat transfer coefficient correlation criteria was got. The fitting results are good agreement with the experimental results within 12% difference. (authors)

  11. Economic and safety aspects of using moderator heat for feed water heating in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwegar, I.A.; Dutta, Anu; Chaki, S.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the proposed advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR), coolant and moderator are separated by the coolant channel. The coolant absorbs most of the fission heat produced in the reactor core. However, the moderator absorbs about 5 to 6 % of the fission heat. In a reactor producing 750 MW(th) power, this moderator heat is about 40 MW. In the present Indian PHWR (pressurized heavy water reactor) systems, this moderator heat is lost to a sink through the moderator heat exchangers, which are cooled by process water. This paper presents the results of the steam cycle analysis carried out for AHWR using moderator heat exchangers as part of the feed heating system. The present study is an attempt to determine the gain in electrical output (MW) if moderator heat is utilized for feed water heating. The operational and safety aspects of using moderator heat are also discussed in the paper

  12. CORE annual report 2006; CORE Jahresbericht 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A

    2007-04-15

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed.

  13. Gas core reactors for coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of using a gas core reactor to produce hydrogen directly from coal and water is presented. It is shown that the chemical equilibrium of the process is strongly in favor of the production of H 2 and CO in the reactor cavity, indicating a 98 percent conversion of water and coal at only 1500 0 K. At lower temperatures in the moderator-reflector cooling channels the equilibrium strongly favors the conversion of CO and additional H 2 O to CO 2 and H 2 . Furthermore, it is shown the H 2 obtained per pound of carbon has 23 percent greater heating value than the carbon so that some nuclear energy is also fixed. Finally, a gas core reactor plant floating in the ocean is conceptualized which produces H 2 , fresh water and sea salts from coal

  14. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly

  15. Process heat supply requirements on HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Since it has been claimed that the MHTGR is competitive with coal in producing electricity, the MHTGR must be competitive in producing process heat. There is a huge process heat market and there are quite a number of processes where the industrial MHTGR = HTRI could supply the necessary process heat and energy. However, to enhance its introduction on the market and to conquer a reasonable share of the market, the HTRI should fulfill the following major requirements: Unlimited constant and flexible heat supply, no secondary heat transport system at higher temperatures and low radioactive contamination level of the primary helium. Unlimited constant and flexible heat supply could be achieved with smaller HTRIs having heat generation capacities below 100 MW-th. The process heat generated by smaller HTRIs need not be more expensive since the installed necessary heat supply redundancy is smaller and the excess power density lower. The process heat at elevated temperatures generated by a HTRI with a secondary heat transfer system is much more expensive due to the additional investment and operating cost as well as the reduced helium temperature span available. For some processes, the HTRI is not able to cover the total process heat requirement while other processes can consume only part of the heat offered. These limitations could be reduced by using higher core outlet and inlet temperatures or both. Due to the considerably lower heat transfer rates and the resulting larger heat transfer areas in process plants, the diffusion of nuclear activity at elevated temperatures may increase so that a more efficient helium cleaning system may be required. (author). 5 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Energy integration into core businesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styan, G. [Tolko Industries Ltd., Castlegar, BC (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    An outline of Tolko Industries was presented with reference to their recent focus on biomass energy conversion. Tolko Industries has doubled its size twice over the last 10 year period, and now owns co-generation facilities and electrical generation contracts, along with significant capital investments. Current energy assets of the company are focused on process steam/heat energy with 3 small co-generation facilities. It was suggested that projects displacing natural gas have had the highest potential energy payback in Tolko facilities. A residuals summary for hog fuel, chips, and sawdust and shavings was presented. The company's core business focus is on sawmills, OSB, veneer, plywood and kraft paper. The company also has access to a large volume of biomass. Details of the Tolko's Nexterra Biomass Gasification Project were presented, along with details of the working scale pilot and phased in proposal plans. It was noted that Nexterra now produces enough biomass on site to be self-sufficient throughout its entire operational process. Tolko's expanded use of biomass technology to address emission abatement has resulted in funding from Enercan. Details of greenhouse gas (GHG) offsets were provided. It was concluded that efficient energy use and cost of supply creates a competitive advantage in the manufacturing industry. The Kyoto Protocol has provided advantages for biomass fuel development. tabs., figs.

  17. Ice cores and palaeoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogh Andersen, K.; Ditlevsen, P.; Steffensen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Ice cores from Greenland give testimony of a highly variable climate during the last glacial period. Dramatic climate warmings of 15 to 25 deg. C for the annual average temperature in less than a human lifetime have been documented. Several questions arise: Why is the Holocene so stable? Is climatic instability only a property of glacial periods? What is the mechanism behind the sudden climate changes? Are the increased temperatures in the past century man-made? And what happens in the future? The ice core community tries to attack some of these problems. The NGRIP ice core currently being drilled is analysed in very high detail, allowing for a very precise dating of climate events. It will be possible to study some of the fast changes on a year by year basis and from this we expect to find clues to the sequence of events during rapid changes. New techniques are hoped to allow for detection of annual layers as far back as 100,000 years and thus a much improved time scale over past climate changes. It is also hoped to find ice from the Eemian period. If the Eemian layers confirm the GRIP sequence, the Eemian was actually climatically unstable just as the glacial period. This would mean that the stability of the Holocene is unique. It would also mean, that if human made global warming indeed occurs, we could jeopardize the Holocene stability and create an unstable 'Eemian situation' which ultimately could start an ice age. Currenlty mankind is changing the composition of the atmosphere. Ice cores document significant increases in greenhouse gases, and due to increased emissions of sulfuric and nitric acid from fossil fuel burning, combustion engines and agriculture, modern Greenland snow is 3 - 5 times more acidic than pre-industrial snow (Mayewski et al., 1986). However, the magnitude and abruptness of the temperature changes of the past century do not exceed the magnitude of natural variability. It is from the ice core perspective thus not possible to attribute the

  18. Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaivads, A.; Retinò, A.; Souček, Jan; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Valentini, F.; Escoubet, C. P.; Alexandrova, O.; André, M.; Bale, S. D.; Balikhin, M.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.; Caprioli, D.; Chen, C. H. K.; Clacey, E.; Cully, C. M.; Keyser de, J.; Eastwood, J. P.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Eriksson, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Graham, D. B.; Haaland, S.; Hoshino, M.; Ji, H.; Karimabadi, H.; Kucharek, H.; Lavraud, B.; Marcucci, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Moore, T. E.; Nakamura, R.; Narita, Y.; Němeček, Z.; Norgren, C.; Opgenoorth, H.; Palmroth, M.; Perrone, D.; Pinçon, J.-L.; Rathsman, P.; Rothkaehl, H.; Sahraoui, F.; Servidio, S.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Vainio, L.; Vörös, Z.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 5 (2016), 905820501/1-905820501/16 ISSN 0022-3778 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : plasma heating * plasma properties * space plasma physics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.160, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-plasma-physics/article/div-classtitleturbulence-heating-observer-satellite-mission-proposaldiv/01BB69B09206CE04C48BEDA8F24ED33C/core-reader

  19. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F. (FOM-Instituut voor Atoom-en Molecuulfysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author).

  20. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C.; Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F.

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author)

  1. Heating networks and domestic central heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamler, W; Wasilewski, W

    1976-08-01

    This is a comprehensive survey of the 26 contributions from 8 European countries submitted to the 3rd International District Heating Conference in Warsaw held on the subject 'Heating Networks and Domestic Central Heating Systems'. The contributions are grouped according to 8 groups of subjects: (1) heat carriers and their parameters; (2) system of heating networks; (3) calculation and optimization of heating networks; (4) construction of heating networks; (5) operation control and automation; (6) operational problems; (7) corrosion problems; and (8) methods of heat accounting.

  2. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  3. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  4. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  5. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  6. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  7. Containment heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, G.E.; Barbanti, G.; Gou, P.F.; Rao, A.S.; Hsu, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear system of a type including a containment having a nuclear reactor therein, the nuclear reactor including a pressure vessel and a core in the pressure vessel, the system. It comprises a gravity pool of coolant disposed at an elevation sufficient to permit a flow of coolant into the nuclear reactor pressure vessel against a predetermined pressure within the nuclear reactor pressure vessel; means for reducing a pressure of steam in the nuclear reactor pressure vessel to a value less than the predetermined pressure in the event of a nuclear accident, the means including a depressurization valve connected to the pressure vessel, the means further including steam heat dissipating means such dissipating means including a suppression pool; a supply of water in the suppression pool, there being a headspace in the suppression pool above the water supply; a substantial amount of air in the head space; means for feeding pressurized steam from the nuclear reactor pressure vessel to a location under a surface of the supply of water, the supply of water being effective to absorb heat sufficient to reduce steam pressure below the predetermined pressure; and a check valve for communicating the headspace with the containment, the check valve being oriented to vent air in the headspace to the containment when a pressure in the headspace exceeds a pressure in the containment by a predetermined pressure differential

  8. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of the theory, design and manufacture of heat pipes and their applications. This latest edition has been thoroughly revised, up-dated and expanded to give an in-depth coverage of the new developments in the field. Significant new material has been added to all the chapters and the applications section has been totally rewritten to ensure that topical and important applications are appropriately emphasised. The bibliography has been considerably enlarged to incorporate much valuable new information. Thus readers of the previous edition, which has established

  9. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostatni, A.W.; Dostatni, Michel.

    1976-01-01

    In the main patent, a description was given of a heat exchanger with an exchange surface in preformed sheet metal designed for the high pressure and temperature service particularly encountered in nuclear pressurized water reactors and which is characterised by the fact that it is composed of at least one exchanger bundle sealed in a containment, the said bundle or bundles being composed of numerous juxtaposed individual compartments whose exchange faces are built of preformed sheet metal. The present addendun certificate concerns shapes of bundles and their positioning methods in the exchanger containment enabling its compactness to be increased [fr

  10. Experimental evidence of body centered cubic iron in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, R.; Meng, Y.; Shen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is mainly composed of iron. While seismic evidence has shown a liquid outer core and a solid inner core, the crystalline nature of the solid iron at the core condition remains debated, largely due to the difficulties in experimental determination of exact polymorphs at corresponding pressure-temperature conditions. We have examined crystal structures of iron up to 220 GPa and 6000 K with x-ray diffraction using a double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. The iron sample is confined in a small chamber surrounded by single crystal MgO. The laser power can be modulated together with temperature measurements. The modulated heating of iron in an MgO single crystal matrix allows for microstructure analysis during heating and after the sample is quenched. We present experimental evidence of a body-centered-cubic (BCC) iron from about 100 GPa and 3000 K to at least 220 GPa and 4000 K. The observed BCC phase may be consistent with a theoretically predicted BCC phase that is dynamically stable in similar pressure-temperature conditions [1]. We will discuss the stability region of the BCC phase and the melting curve of iron and their implications in the nature of the Earth's inner core. References: A. B. Belonoshko et al., Nat. Geosci., 1-6 (2017).

  11. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  12. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems a...... and points at remaining challenges. Its analyses are based on distinctions between microevolution and macroevolution, between economic evolution and socioeconomic coevolution, and between Schumpeter’s three major evolutionary models (called Mark I, Mark II and Mark III)....

  13. Penetration of a heated pool into a melting miscible substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, G.; Werle, H.

    1986-01-01

    Core-catchers have been proposed, which, after a core disruptive accident in a nuclear reactor, prevent containment failure caused by contact of the molten debris with the underlying ex-vessel structural materials. Most of these core-catchers are provided with sacrificial layers which on melting consume some fraction of the decay heat and dilute the heat sources and the fissionable material as the core masses are dissolved by the molten sacrificial material. Dilution of the core masses results in relatively low heat fluxes and temperatures at the wall of the core-catcher and, in addition, reduces the probability of recriticality. An experimental study was conducted on melting systems consisting of a liquid over-lying a solid substrate, which after melting of the solid, are mutually miscible. To initiate melting, the liquid was heated either by a planar heater from above or internally by an ac current. The density of the liquid was varied systematically, and it was found that downward heat transfer increases strongly with this parameter. In addition to heat transfer, mass transfer was studied by measuring the local concentration of the molten material in the liquid. A few experiments were performed in which sideward melting and two-dimensional pool growth were investigated

  14. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  15. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  17. Low temperature nuclear heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotakorpi, J.; Tarjanne, R. [comps.

    1977-08-01

    The meeting was concerned with the use of low grade nuclear heat for district heating, desalination, process heat, and agriculture and aquaculture. The sessions covered applications and demand, heat sources, and economics.

  18. Radiofrequency plasma heating: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The conference proceedings include sessions on Alfven Wave Heating, ICRF Heating and Current Drive, Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive, and ECRF Heating. Questions of confinement, diagnostics, instabilities and technology are considered. Individual papers are cataloged separately

  19. Study on minimum heat-flux point during boiling heat transfer on horizontal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Shigefumi

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of boiling heat transfer are usually shown by the boiling curve of N-shape having the maximum and minimum points. As for the limiting heat flux point, that is, the maximum point, there have been many reports so far, as it is related to the physical burn of heat flux-controlling type heating surfaces. But though the minimum heat flux point is related to the quench point as the problems in steel heat treatment, the core safety of LWRs, the operational stability of superconducting magnets, the start-up characteristics of low temperature machinery, the condition of vapor explosion occurrence and so on, the systematic information has been limited. In this study, the effects of transient property and the heat conductivity of heating surfaces on the minimum heat flux condition in the pool boiling on horizontal planes were experimentally examined by using liquid nitrogen. The experimental apparatuses for steady boiling, for unsteady boiling with a copper heating surface, and for unsteady boiling with a heating surface other than copper were employed. The boiling curves obtained with these apparatuses and the minimum heat flux point condition are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  20. Heat transfer in a magnet C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sircilli Neto, F.; Passaro, A.; Borges, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The cooling systems of nuclear reactors for spacial applications include direct current electromagnetic pumps, which are used to circulate the coolant fluid thru the reactor core. In this work, the transfer of the heat generated by the electrical current in a magnet C excitation coils, which is used in a prototype pump, was evaluated. Considering the processes of heat transfer by conduction, natural convection and radiation, the results of simulation with the codes HEATING5 and AUTHEATS indicate the utilization of the 180 sup(0)C thermal class conductor for a working Joule power of 4 10 sup(4) W/m sup(3) in each magnet coil. (author)

  1. Pulmonary artery and intestinal temperatures during heat stress and cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearson, James; Ganio, Matthew S; Seifert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In humans, whole body heating and cooling are used to address physiological questions where core temperature is central to the investigated hypotheses. Core temperature can be measured in various locations throughout the human body. The measurement of intestinal temperature is increasingly used...

  2. Control of the ASTRA decay heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedelik, A.

    1982-11-01

    To ensure a minimum of core cooling even under severest accident conditions (loss of reactor pool water) a core spray system for decay heat removal has been installed at the ASTRA-reactor. The automatic and manual control of the system, its power supply and test procedures are shortly described. (Author)

  3. Improvement of core degradation model in ISAAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Park, Soo Yong

    2004-02-01

    If water inventory in the fuel channels depletes and fuel rods are exposed to steam after uncover in the pressure tube, the decay heat generated from fuel rods is transferred to the pressure tube and to the calandria tube by radiation, and finally to the moderator in the calandria tank by conduction. During this process, the cladding will be heated first and ballooned when the fuel gap internal pressure exceeds the primary system pressure. The pressure tube will be also ballooned and will touch the calandria tube, increasing heat transfer rate to the moderator. Although these situation is not desirable, the fuel channel is expected to maintain its integrity as long as the calandria tube is submerged in the moderator, because the decay heat could be removed to the moderator through radiation and conduction. Therefore, loss of coolant and moderator inside and outside the channel may cause severe core damage including horizontal fuel channel sagging and finally loss of channel integrity. The sagged channels contact with the channels located below and lose their heat transfer area to the moderator. As the accident goes further, the disintegrated fuel channels will be heated up and relocated onto the bottom of the calandria tank. If the temperature of these relocated materials is high enough to attack the calandria tank, the calandria tank would fail and molten material would contact with the calandria vault water. Steam explosion and/or rapid steam generation from this interaction may threaten containment integrity. Though a detailed model is required to simulate the severe accident at CANDU plants, complexity of phenomena itself and inner structures as well as lack of experimental data forces to choose a simple but reasonable model as the first step. ISAAC 1.0 was developed to model the basic physicochemical phenomena during the severe accident progression. At present, ISAAC 2.0 is being developed for accident management guide development and strategy evaluation. In

  4. OMR type process heat reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzetti, Franco.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of an OMR type reactor for heat generation. It includes a vessel the upper part of which is shut by a plug. The lower part of the vessel includes a core of fuel elements and is filled with an organic liquid. Over this there is a middle area filled with an inert gas. The plug includes an upper part forming a closure and resting around its edge on the vessel, and a lower part fixed under the closure and composed of a hollow cylindrical tank fitted with a bottom and filled with another organic liquid. The height of the cylindrical tank is such that, increased by the height of the first organic liquid in the lower area and above the core, it provides biological protection. The cooling system includes a heat exchanger and a pump to move the liquid from the lower part of the core and to inject some as spray into that part of the vessel filled with the inert gas. When loading and unloading, after the reactor is shut down, the clear organic liquid contained in the plug is discharged into the reactor vessel in such a way that it does not mix with the opaque organic liquid already contained in the vessel, and in that the opaque organic liquid is emptied out [fr

  5. The Westinghouse BEACON on-line core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechel, Robert J.; Boyd, William A.; Casadei, Alberto L.

    1995-01-01

    BEACON (Best Estimate Analysis of Core Operations - Nuclear), a core monitoring and operational support package developed by Westinghouse, has been installed at many operating PWRs worldwide. The BEACON system is a real-time monitoring system which can be used in plants with both fixed and movable incore detector systems and utilizes an on-line nodal model combined with core instrumentation data to provide continuous core power distribution monitoring. In addition, accurate core-predictive capabilities utilizing a full core nodal model updated according to plant operating history can be made to provide operational support. Core history information is kept and displayed to help operators anticipate core behavior and take pro-active control actions. The BEACON system has been licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for direct, continuous monitoring of DNBR and peak linear heat rate. This allows BEACON to be integrated into the plant technical specifications to permit significant relaxation of operating limitations defined by conventional technical specifications. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  6. Development of JOYO MK-II core characteristics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Shiro; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The MK-II core of the experimental fast reactor JOYO served as the irradiation bed for testing fuels and materials for FBR development since 1982 for 15 years. During the MK-II operation, extensive data were accumulated from the core management calculations and characteristics tests conducted in thirty-one duty operations and thirteen special test operations. These core management data and core characteristics data were compiled into a database recorded on CD-ROM for user convenience. The calculated core management data are the text style data. The 'Configuration Data' include the history of the fuel exchange and core arrangement for each cycle. The Subassembly Library Data' include the atomic number density, neutron fluence, burn-up, integral power of about 300 fuel subassemblies, and 60 irradiation subassemblies. The 'Output Data' include the neutron fluxes, gamma fluxes, power density, linear heat rates, coolant and fuel temperature distributions of each core position at the beginning and end of each cycle. The measured core characteristics data, such as the excess reactivity, control rod worths, temperature coefficient, power coefficient, and burn-up coefficient are also included along with the measurement conditions. (J.P.N.)

  7. Single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble-bed channels with internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianke; Sun Zhongning; Xu Guangzhan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The core of the water-cooled pebble bed reactor is the porous channels which stacked with spherical fuel elements. The gaps between the adjacent fuel elements are complex because they are stochastic and often shift. We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, we get the rule of power distribution and the rule of heat transfer coefficient with particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re number. Highlights: ► We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed to be the internal heat source. ► The ball diameter is smaller, the effect of the heat transfer is better. ► With Re number increasing, heat transfer coefficient is also increasing and eventually tends to stabilize. ► The changing of heat power makes little effect on the heat transfer coefficient of pebble bed channels. - Abstract: The reactor core of a water-cooled pebble bed reactor includes porous channels that are formed by spherical fuel elements. This structure has notably improved heat transfer. Due to the variability and randomness of the interstices in pebble bed channels, heat transfer is complex, and there are few studies regarding this topic. To study the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat sources, oxidized stainless steel spheres with diameters of 3 and 8 mm and carbon steel spheres with 8 mm diameters are used in a stacked pebble bed. Distilled water is used as a refrigerant for the experiments, and the electromagnetic induction heating method is used to heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental results, we obtain the governing rules for the power distribution and the heat transfer coefficient with respect to particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid Re number. From fitting of the experimental data, we obtain the dimensionless average

  8. Application of mass-predictions to isotope-abundances in breeder-reactor cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, G

    1981-01-01

    The decay-heat and isotope composition of breeder reactor-cores is calculated at normal shut-down, and a core disintegration event. Using the ORIGEN-code, the influence of the most neutron-rich fission-yield nuclei is studied. Their abundances depend on the assumption about the nuclear data (mass and half-lives). The total decay-heat is not changed from any technical viewpoint. (15 refs).

  9. Natural convection cooling of LEU cores for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Bokhari, I.H.; Akhtar, K.M.

    1991-08-01

    The first high power and equilibrium LEU cores of PARR-1 have been analysed to assess the maximum operating power based on natural convection cooling, need for forced cooling to remove the decay heat and to estimate safety margins that commensurate with the predetermined power limit. Computer code NATCON and standard correlations have been used for the analysis. The parameters studied includes coolant velocity, temperature distribution in the core, heat fluxes at onset of nucleate boiling, pulsed boiling and burnup. (author)

  10. The effects of radiation on aluminium alloys in the core of energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrossian, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    One of the attractive directions in the worldwide practice of nuclear installations is the replacement of expensive zirconium alloy with more cheap materials, particularly aluminium allo. For Heat Supply Nuclear Plants (HSNP) with approximately 473 K core temperatures, the use of heat-resistant aluminium alloys seems to be reasonable. The present work is concerned with the studies on radiation effects on aluminium alloy, and interaction between the alloy and coolant in the reactor core. (author). 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Tank 101-SY Window E core sample: Interpretation of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    A full depth core sample was taken for tank 241-SY-101 in December 1991 during a time period called ''Window E.'' This was the second full depth core sample from this tank during the year. The core had two major portions that are known as the convective zone and the nonconvective zone. A crust was on the top of tank but as poorly sampled. The analysis of the Window E core sample stressed segment composite chemical analysis instead of segment by segment as in Window C. Adiabatic calorimetry on samples from both cores showed a slow self heating reaction above 150 degrees C on dried samples. The exothermic events were milder than similar synthetic samples. The chemical and physical properties complemented the information from Window C. The Window E material from the convective zone was more viscous than the Window C convective zone material. The nonconvective zone viscosities were similar for both cores. Heating and dilution tests were made to test mitigation concepts

  12. Tank 101-SY Window E core sample: Interpretation of results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    A full depth core sample was taken for tank 241-SY-101 in December 1991 during a time period called ``Window E.`` This was the second full depth core sample from this tank during the year. The core had two major portions that are known as the convective zone and the nonconvective zone. A crust was on the top of tank but as poorly sampled. The analysis of the Window E core sample stressed segment composite chemical analysis instead of segment by segment as in Window C. Adiabatic calorimetry on samples from both cores showed a slow self heating reaction above 150{degrees}C on dried samples. The exothermic events were milder than similar synthetic samples. The chemical and physical properties complemented the information from Window C. The Window E material from the convective zone was more viscous than the Window C convective zone material. The nonconvective zone viscosities were similar for both cores. Heating and dilution tests were made to test mitigation concepts.

  13. In-core melt progression for the MAAP 4 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.-D.; Paik, Chan Y.; Henry, Robert E.; Ply, Martin G.

    2004-01-01

    The MAAP 4 core melt progression model contains provisions for the formation of a molten debris pool surrounded by a crust during late phase core degradation. A predominantly oxidic molten pool with a predominantly metallic lower crust may naturally develop through a combination of models for real material phase diagrams, mechanistic relocation, and rules to recognize extremely low porosity and the liquid fractions of adjacent highly degraded nodes. Pool size and shape thus becomes relatively independent of core nodalization (which only governs the coarseness of the crust location). An upper pool crust is mechanistically allowed during consideration of radiative and convective heat losses from the pool top surface to surrounding core nodes, the core barrel, and upper internals. Circulation within the pool causes mass and energy exchange between participating pool nodes, and determines the heat fluxes to the boundary crusts. Side and bottom node failure is predicted based on the time, temperature, and stress. Calculations demonstrate that this concept allows simulation of the degraded core geometry observed during the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  14. Warming rays in cluster cool cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Marchegiani, P.

    2008-06-01

    Context: Cosmic rays are confined in the atmospheres of galaxy clusters and, therefore, they can play a crucial role in the heating of their cool cores. Aims: We discuss here the thermal and non-thermal features of a model of cosmic ray heating of cluster cores that can provide a solution to the cooling-flow problems. To this aim, we generalize a model originally proposed by Colafrancesco, Dar & DeRujula (2004) and we show that our model predicts specific correlations between the thermal and non-thermal properties of galaxy clusters and enables various observational tests. Methods: The model reproduces the observed temperature distribution in clusters by using an energy balance condition in which the X-ray energy emitted by clusters is supplied, in a quasi-steady state, by the hadronic cosmic rays, which act as “warming rays” (WRs). The temperature profile of the intracluster (IC) gas is strictly correlated with the pressure distribution of the WRs and, consequently, with the non-thermal emission (radio, hard X-ray and gamma-ray) induced by the interaction of the WRs with the IC gas and the IC magnetic field. Results: The temperature distribution of the IC gas in both cool-core and non cool-core clusters is successfully predicted from the measured IC plasma density distribution. Under this contraint, the WR model is also able to reproduce the thermal and non-thermal pressure distribution in clusters, as well as their radial entropy distribution, as shown by the analysis of three clusters studied in detail: Perseus, A2199 and Hydra. The WR model provides other observable features of galaxy clusters: a correlation of the pressure ratio (WRs to thermal IC gas) with the inner cluster temperature (P_WR/P_th) ˜ (kT_inner)-2/3, a correlation of the gamma-ray luminosity with the inner cluster temperature Lγ ˜ (kT_inner)4/3, a substantial number of cool-core clusters observable with the GLAST-LAT experiment, a surface brightness of radio halos in cool-core clusters

  15. Core disruptive accident and recriticality analysis with FX2-POOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    The current state of development of FX2-POOL, a two-dimensional hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and neutronic scoping model for Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident analysis is described. Checkout comparisons to VENUS for prompt burst conditions were good. Use of FX2-POOL to examine the importance of fuel to steel heat transfer during a prompt burst indicates that heat transfer plays no important role on that time scale. Scoping studies of material thermohydrodynamics for about 20 to 30 milliseconds following the prompt burst indicate that heat transfer is important on the time scale necessary for the CDA bubble to grow to the size of the original core. Preliminary results are presented for energetics of boiling fuel steel pools which are forced recritical by local surface pressurization

  16. Split heat pipe heat recovery system

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of a split heat pipe heat recovery system. The analysis is based on an Effectiveness-NTU approach to deduce its heat transfer characteristics. In this study the variation of overall effectiveness of heat recovery with the number of transfer units are presented. Copyright , Manchester University Press.

  17. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  18. Dual source heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  19. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  20. WNP-2 core model upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, C.E.; Ravindranath, T.K.; Belblidia, L.A.; O'Farrell, D.; Andersen, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the core model upgrade of the WNP-2 training simulator and the reasons for the upgrade. The core model as well as the interface with the rest of the simulator are briefly described . The paper also describes the procedure that will be used by WNP-2 to update the simulator core data after future core reloads. Results from the fully integrated simulator are presented. (author)