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Sample records for heated crevice environments

  1. Proceedings of the USNRC/EPRI/ANL heated crevice seminar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. Y.; Fruzzetti, K.; Muscara, J.; Diercks, D. R.; Energy Technology; EPRI; USNRC

    2003-08-31

    An international Heated Crevice Seminar, sponsored by the Division of Engineering Technology, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Electric Power Research Institute, was held at Argonne National Laboratory on October 7-11, 2002. The objective of the seminar was to provide a working forum for the exchange of information by contributing experts on current issues related to corrosion in heated crevices, particularly as it relates to the integrity of PWR steam generator tubes. Forty-five persons from six countries attended the seminar, including representatives from government agencies, private industry and consultants, government research laboratories, nuclear vendors, and electrical utilities. The seminar opened with keynote talks on secondary-side crevice environments associated with IGA and IGSCC of mill-annealed Alloy 600 steam generator tubes and the submodes of corrosion in heat transfer crevices. This was followed by technical sessions on (1) Corrosion in Crevice Geometries, (2) Experimental Methods, (3) Results from Experimental Studies, and (4) Modeling. The seminar concluded with a panel discussion on the present understanding of corrosive processes in heated crevices and future research needs.

  2. A mathematical model for localized corrosion in steam generator crevices under heat transfer conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, G.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Sikora, J.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model has been developed to describe the localized corrosion in steam generators. The model recognizes that the internal and external environment are coupled by the need to conserve charge in the system. Thus, solution of Laplace's equation for the external environment (outside the crevice) provides the boundary condition for the electric potential at the crevice mouth, which is needed for solving the system of mass transfer equations for the internal environment (inside the crevice). Mass transfer by diffusion, ion migration, and convection was considered. Heat and momentum transfer equations are solved simultaneously, with the mass balance equation for each species and the condition of electroneutrality inside the cavity being considered. The model takes into account the porosity and tortuosity in the corrosion product deposit in the crevice. The homogeneous chemical reactions (hydrolysis of the products of the anodic reaction and the autoprotolysis of water) are included in the model. The model, in this preliminary form predicts the solution chemistry, potential drop, and temperature distribution inside the crevice. An order of magnitude estimate of the crevice corrosion rate also obtained. At this point, the model predicts only the steady state solution, but it is recognized that a steady state may not exist under normal conditions

  3. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments - Topical Report Phase I 8/18/1999 - 8/31/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsden, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    approach uses an instrumented heated crevice, which is a replica of a PWR steam generator T/TSP crevice. While the system is operating at simulated steam generator thermal conditions, measurements can be made of the chemical, electrochemical, and thermal conditions in the crevice. Damage to the tube due to IGA/SCC and other corrosion processes will be monitored using electrochemical noise

  4. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments - Topical Report Phase I 8/18/1999 - 8/31/2000; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Jesse Lumsden

    2000-01-01

    approach uses an instrumented heated crevice, which is a replica of a PWR steam generator T/TSP crevice. While the system is operating at simulated steam generator thermal conditions, measurements can be made of the chemical, electrochemical, and thermal conditions in the crevice. Damage to the tube due to IGA/SCC and other corrosion processes will be monitored using electrochemical noise

  5. High temperature crevice corrosion of heat-resistant Ni-base alloy in the simulated HTR helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1980-03-01

    Interaction between a Ni-base heat-resistant alloy and the simulated HTR primary coolant environment was examined with emphasis on the reactions inside narrow crevice gaps. A new method using Mo crevice cells was developed to obtain reproducible quantitative results. The test environment was characterized by the low oxidizing species as trace gaseous impurities. Series of sequential phenomena were observed: i.e. the preferential consumptions of oxidizing species in the outer part of the crevice, followed by the lack of oxide film and the resultant extensive carburization further inside the crevice. A model on the possible phenomena occurring at tips of the cracks formed during creep or fatigue tests and low flow rate portions in the reactor primary circuit as well. The feasibility of the interpretation was checked referring to the existing numerical formula and using the experimental results obtained parameters. Calculations reproduced penetration curves of the Cr- oxidation with reasonable accuracy. (author)

  6. Importance of crevices formed between tubes and tube plate for the operational behaviour of heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achten, N.; Herbsleb, G.; Wieling, N.

    1986-01-01

    It must be guaranteed by construction and manufacture of heat exchangers that primary and secondary medium are completely separated from each other. When this requirement is fullfilled, the operational use of heat exchangers can be impaired by corrosion reactions within the crevice formed between tube and tube plate which may result in corrosion damage. The various techniques which are in use to connect tubes and tube plate and which are described in the present report, must be valued with respect to the tightness of the connection as well as to the formation of crevices between tubes and tube plate. Corrosion resistant copperbase alloys and stainless steels are the most important materials which are in use for the construction of heat exchangers. The mechanisms of crevice corrosion with unalloyed and low alloy carbon steels, stainless steels, and mixed connections between tube and tube plate with these materials are described in detail. Crevice corrosion may be caused also by the formation of galvanic cells between materials of differing electrochemical response. Furthermore, the concentration of aggressive media in crevices between tubes and tube plate can lead to corrosion damage of heat exchanger tubes. For the service operation of heat exchangers without any hazard of corrosion damage in crevices between tubes and tube plate, such crevices must be avoided by proper construction and manufacture. As a model for suitable measures to avoid crevices, the manufacture of steam generators for PWR's is described. (orig.) [de

  7. Fatigue cracking of alloy 600 in simulated steam generator crevice environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundele, G.; Lepik, O.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to generate fatigue life (S-N) and near-threshold fatigue crack propagation (da/dN) data to determine the environmental influence on fatigue behavior for Alloy 600 in air, deionized water and in simulated Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A' crevice environments under appropriate loading conditions. In the low cycle fatigue regime, the simulated crevice environment did not affect the fatigue life of Alloy 600 under the applied loading conditions. The near-threshold fatigue crack growth rates of Alloy 600 in the simulated crevice environment were significantly lower compared to either pure water or air environments and is believed to be the result of higher crack closure in the crevice environment. (author)

  8. Effect of crevice environment PH on corrosion damage of horizontal steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozova, A.; Burda, J.; Splichal, K.

    2002-01-01

    In support of a project on lifetime calculation experiments were carried out to evaluate the resistance to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of steam generator tubes during operation. Estimations of the incubation period for crack initiation and the threshold K value, K Iscc , and the crack growth rate were made to predict evolution of damage in tube walls. The paper summarizes results of experiments of C ring specimen for the initiation testing and results of SENT (single edge notch tensile) specimen for the crack growth rate (CGR) testing. The specimens were exposed to concentrated environments at elevated temperatures simulating crevice environments in secondary side crevices in horizontal steam generators. The results show that the material of SG tubes is sensitive to transgranular environmentally assisted cracking in the three basic concentrated environments used, alkaline, neutral and acid. The most corrosive medium was the acid environment. The crack initiated practically immediately after acid environment exposure. The initiation process takes a long time in neutral and alkaline environments. The K Iscc values for environmentally assisted crack growth rate in alkaline and neutral concentrated environment were essentially the same. The crack growth rate was slightly higher for the neutral environment than for the alkaline one. Fracture patterns for the both environments were similar. (author)

  9. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Nuclear Waste Container Materials in Repository Environment Paper Number 02529

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, F.; Sarver, J.; Mohn, W.

    2001-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) have been proposed as the corrosion resistant materials for fabricating the waste package outer barrier and the drip shield, respectively for the proposed nuclear waste repository Yucca Mountain Project. In this work, the susceptibility of welded and annealed Alloy 22 (N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) to crevice corrosion was studied by the Multiple Crevice Assembly (ASTM G78) method combined with surface morphological observation after four and eight weeks of exposure to the Basic Saturated Water (BSW-12) in a temperature range from 60 to 105 C. The susceptibility of the materials to crevice corrosion was evaluated based on the appearance of crevice attack underneath the crevice formers and the weight loss data. The results showed that, after exposed to BSW-12 for four and eight weeks, no obvious crevice attack was observed on these materials. The descaled weight loss increased with the increase in temperature for all materials. The weight loss, however, is believed to be caused by general corrosion, rather than crevice corrosion. There was no significant difference between the annealed and welded materials either. On the other hand, to conclude that these materials are immune to crevice corrosion in BSW-12 will require longer term testing

  10. Effect of lead and silicon on localized corrosion of Alloy 800 in steam generator crevice environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.C.; Wright, M.D.; Cleland, R.D.

    2001-09-01

    The Alloy 800 tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have not experienced significant corrosion damage to date, which may be attributed to successful water chemistry control strategies. However, it is known that Alloy 800, like other steam generator (SG) tubing materials, is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under some plausible but off-specification operating scenarios. Electrochemical measurements provide information on corrosion susceptibility and rate, which are known to be a function of water chemistry. Using laboratory data in combination with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software it is possible to assess the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). In this context, this paper discusses the results of electrochemical measurements made to elucidate the corrosion behaviour of Alloy 800 SG tubes under conditions simulating those plausible in SG crevices. In addition to crevice pH, the influence of PbO, acting alone or in combination with SiO 2 , on localized corrosion such as pitting or stress corrosion-cracking (SCC) was determined. Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified from the data analysis. Of equal significance, the results also support the position that under normal, near neutral pH and low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting and cracking of Alloy 800 steam generator tubing will not be initiated. (author)

  11. Predicting steam generator crevice chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.; Strati, G.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' Corrosion of steam cycle components produces insoluble material, mostly iron oxides, that are transported to the steam generator (SG) via the feedwater and deposited on internal surfaces such as the tubes, tube support plates and the tubesheet. The build up of these corrosion products over time can lead to regions of restricted flow with water chemistry that may be significantly different, and potentially more corrosive to SG tube material, than the bulk steam generator water chemistry. The aim of the present work is to predict SG crevice chemistry using experimentation and modelling as part of AECL's overall strategy for steam generator life management. Hideout-return experiments are performed under CANDU steam generator conditions to assess the accumulation of impurities in hideout, and return from, model crevices. The results are used to validate the ChemSolv model that predicts steam generator crevice impurity concentrations, and high temperature pH, based on process parameters (e.g., heat flux, primary side temperature) and blowdown water chemistry. The model has been incorporated into ChemAND, AECL's system health monitoring software for chemistry monitoring, analysis and diagnostics that has been installed at two domestic and one international CANDU station. ChemAND provides the station chemists with the only method to predict SG crevice chemistry. In one recent application, the software has been used to evaluate the crevice chemistry based on the elevated, but balanced, SG bulk water impurity concentrations present during reactor startup, in order to reduce hold times. The present paper will describe recent hideout-return experiments that are used for the validation of the ChemSolv model, station experience using the software, and improvements to predict the crevice electrochemical potential that will permit station staff to ensure that the SG tubes are in the 'safe operating zone' predicted by Lu (AECL). (author)

  12. Modeling of the propagation of crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousson, Jean-Louis; Vuillemin, Bruno; Oltra, Roland; Crusset, Didier; Santarini, Gerard; Combrade, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Models of crevice corrosion can be divided into two categories: the first one is aimed to define the time necessary to reach a Critical Crevice Solution susceptible to initiate a stable crevice propagation whereas the second one is focused on the chemical composition and potential in the crevice during its steady propagation. In this second category the geometry of the crevice is kept constant which is a very rough approximation since a real crevice never reaches a steady state mainly because of its shape evolution. Such an approach necessitates the determination of the most important input parameters (external solution composition, applied potential, shape of the crevice, etc.) in the stabilization of a crevice providing a stability criterion is defined, taking into account the occurrence of precipitation or of gas evolution. The objective of this study was to determine under which conditions of pH and potential a crevice was susceptible to re-passivate. For doing this we used commercial code, since existing ones are mostly home-made, keeping in mind that it had to be as a modular as possible. This code was developed using the Chemical Engineering Module of FEMLAB, which is a MATLAB-based tool for finite element methods. In a first part of this study the ability of this software to be used for crevice corrosion on iron will be presented. As function of the environment (bulk composition and applied potential), calculations were performed in order to determine the occurrence of solid precipitation like FeCl 2 and Fe(OH) 2 or H 2 gas bubbles generation inside the occluded cavity. (authors)

  13. Influence of surface treatment on the crevice corrosion of super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, H.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to try and discover if changes i surface condition, derived through various methods could influence the resistance to crevice corrosion of super duplex stainless teel (SDS). Such data could then be employed to elucidate the main factors controlling crevice corrosion. Through the manipulation of these parameters it was envisaged that the crevice corrosion temperature of this material may be further advanced and to increase its application within harsher industrial environments. For this reason a series of crevice tests were performed on SDSS heat exchanger tubing both in the as received condition and after various surface treatments. Such modification was carried out by; shot blasting, passivation, pickling and combinations of annealing, shot blasting, pickling and passivation. Results have indicated that the main factor controlling the resistance to crevice corrosion is the level of Cr depletion within a few microns of the steel surface. Although various treatments such as shot blasting and pickling reduce Cr depletion by removal of surface material, the nature of the surface finish itself was not found to affect the corrosion resistance. An increase in Cr content from 20 to 25% within 2 microns of the surface of the tubing was able to increase the crevice corrosion temperature by 20 sub deg. C. (author)

  14. Evaluation of amine inhibitors for suitability as crevice buffering agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaweera, P.; Hettiarachchi, S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the results of a research effort to evaluate the suitability of some selected amines and amino acids as a crevice-buffering agents in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators. The amines may be useful for buffering acid crevices, and the amino acids, because they contain both acidic and basic groups, may be useful for acidic and caustic crevices. Five commercially available amines and two amino acids were studied during this research. The study involved (1) the hydrolysis of these commercially available amines and amino acids, including measurement of their kinetics of decomposition, in simulated steam generator bulk water at 290 C, and (2) determination of their thermal stability in a simulated crevice environment. The study showed that, although the high-molecular-weight amines undergo hydrothermal decomposition, they have a better buffering capacity than their low-molecular-weight counterparts at 290 C. The amines provide effective crevice buffering by increasing the pH of the crevice solution by as much as 2.84 and to 4.24 units in the experimental setup used in this program. It was concluded that polyamines provide excellent buffering of the simulated crevice environment at 290 C and morpholine remains the best low-molecular-weight amine investigated. However, detailed volatility studies of the amines were not considered in this work. Such data would be needed before in-plant testing to ensure that the amines can concentrate in steam generator crevices to the levels assumed in this study

  15. Technique for characterizing crevice corrosion under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, H.; Ahn, T.M.; Soo, P.

    1983-01-01

    The current/potential results show that the crevice corrosion incubation period for a Grade-12 titanium crevice formed between two Teflon plates is about two days at 150 0 C. Optical and SEM observations show that the corrosion starts as isolated pitting which spreads along the surface as shallow pits. The corrosion conditions change significantly as the TiO 2 corrosion product fills the crevice, and the rate of corrosion may be greatly reduced after several days. The rate of crevice corrosion of commercial purity (Grade-2) titanium under similar consitions is approximately three orders of magnitude higher. In this case, active dissolution of metal starts during the initial heating of the autoclave and the incubation period is negligible

  16. Electrochemical measurements in PWR steam generators to follow crevice chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.

    1991-01-01

    In PWR steam generator crevices, the evolution of chemistry is important for the understanding of corrosion phenomena. Electrochemical measurements have been performed in high temperature simulated crevice environments in order to follow hideout processes and remedial actions (on-line addition of boric acid). Reported tests have been conducted with model boilers of AJAX facilities. Eccentric and concentric tube support plate crevices have been instrumented with platinum electrodes. Electrochemical measurements have been collected when model boiler was under nominal conditions (primary temperature: 335 deg C, secondary temperature: 280 deg C). They include Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and potential measurements: with EIS, sodium and boric acid hideouts have been detected and followed. Potential measurements have been performed in an attempt to measure crevice PH evolution

  17. Effect of the Crevice Former on the Corrosion Behavior of 316L Stainless Steel in Chloride-Containing Synthetic Tap Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon-Hong; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Woo-Cheol

    2018-05-01

    To restrain the failure of the plate heat exchanger (PHE) in customer boiler working fluid, the effect of crevice former type on the corrosion behavior of the 316L stainless steel plate was investigated using electrochemical methods and surface analyses in chloride-containing synthetic tap water (60 °C). The localized corrosion under metal-metal crevice condition was initiated more easily than that under the metal-gasket crevice condition due to the restricted mass transport at the gasket crevice mouth. However, the anodic current under the metal-metal crevice condition was lower than that under metal-gasket crevice condition at a higher anodic potential, indicating that that the metal dissolution under EPDM crevice would be higher than that under metal crevice under the accelerated corrosion condition. Because narrow crevice gap that was formed under gasket accelerated the anodic dissolution at the crevice mouth, the perforation tendency under metal-gasket crevice condition is much higher than that under metal-metal crevice condition. As a result, the crevice geometry, especially the crevice gap, mainly affected the corrosion behavior of PHE material.

  18. A mathematical model of crevice and pitting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharland, S.M.; Tasker, P.W.

    1985-09-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model incorporating the electrochemical, chemical and ionic migration processes characterising crevice and pitting corrosion is described. The model predicts full details of the steady-state solution chemistry and electrode kinetics (and hence metal penetration rates) within the corrosion cavities as functions of the many parameters on which these depend such as external electrode potential and crevice dimensions. The crevice is modelled as a parallel-sided slot filled with a dilute sodium chloride solution. Corrosion in both one and two directions is considered. The model includes a solid hydroxide precipitation reaction and assesses the effect on the corrosion rates of consequent changes in the chemical and physical environment within the crevice. A time stepping method is developed for the study of the progression of the corrosion with a precipitation reaction included and is applied to a restricted range of parameters. The applicability of this method is justified in relation to the physical and mathematical approximations made during the construction of the model. (author)

  19. Crevice Corrosion on Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Jakupi; D. Zagidulin; J.J. Noel; D.W. Shoesmith

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys were developed for their exceptional corrosion resistance in a variety of extreme corrosive environments. An alloy from this series, Alloy-22, has been selected as the reference material for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository located in Nevada (US). A possible localized corrosion process under the anticipated conditions at this location is crevice corrosion. therefore, it is necessary to assess how this process may, or may not, propagate if the use of this alloy is to be justified. Consequently, the primary objective is the development of a crevice corrosion damage function that can be used to assess the evolution of material penetration rates. They have been using various electrochemical methods such as potentiostatic, galvanostatic and galvanic coupling techniques. Corrosion damage patterns have been investigated using surface analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. All crevice corrosion experiments were performed at 120 C in 5M NaCl solution. Initiating crevice corrosion on these alloys has proven to be difficult; therefore, they have forced it to occur under either potentiostatic or galvanostatic conditions

  20. Study crevice corrosion alloys C-22 and 625 by electrochemical noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungaro, María L.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2013-01-01

    C-22 and 625 alloys are two of the Ni –Cr-Mo alloys considered as candidate materials to form the corrosion resistance engineered barriers for nuclear waste repositories. The corrosion resistance of these alloys is remarkable in a wide variety of environments. Despite of their resistance these alloys are susceptible to crevice corrosion in a certain aggressive environments. This work presents the use of electrochemical noise technique to study crevice corrosion susceptibility of alloys C-22 and 625 in 1M NaCl acidic solutions at 60ºC and 90ºC. Asymmetrical electrodes and a complementary platinum electrode were used to assess the influence of cathodic reaction in crevice process. The obtained records were analyzed directly and through statistical parameters. The potential drop and the simultaneous increment of the current records indicated the occurrence of crevice corrosion. The alternative use of a platinum electrode resulted in higher currents and higher potentials and reduced the induction time to crevice formation. The reason for this behavior is that platinum surface allows faster cathodic reactions than C-22 and 625 alloys. The standard deviation of the current records was responsive to the crevice corrosion intensity. C-22 alloy had better crevice corrosion performance than 625 alloy. (author)

  1. Impurity concentration behaviors in a boiling tubesheet crevice Part II. Packed crevice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Oh, Si Hyoung; Park, Byung Gi; Hwang, Il Soon; Rhee, In Hyoung; Kim, Uh Chul; Na, Jung Won

    2003-01-01

    The impurity concentration behavior of a boiling crevice packed with magnetite particles was investigated with thermocouples and electrodes for the measurement of temperature and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), respectively, in order to understand chemical change in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator (SG) crevice. A secondary solution composed of 50 ppm Na and 200 ppb hydrogen was supplied at a flow rate of about 4 l/h. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration process in the crevice and the resultant boiling point elevation behavior were characterized with temperature and ECP data. The temperature in the packed crevice was about 2-3 deg. C higher than that for the open crevice. In the same conditions, the magnetite-packed crevice showed a greater amount of boiling point elevation with a longer time to reach a steady state compared with the case of an open crevice. It was found that the bottom region of the crevice was initially filled with steam, and then the concentrated liquid region initially located at the middle of crevice expanded to both the crevice bottom and the upper region. To analytically estimate the wetted length, a closed form model was introduced. The model results estimated the initial wetted length shorter as compared with the measurement results. Measured ECP results of packed crevice showed similar behaviors as compared with calculated results by using Nernst equation. ECP results reasonably coincided with the boiling point elevation estimated from the temperature data except one unusual case

  2. A probabilistic approach to controlling crevice chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.; Brobst, G.E.; Riddle, J.

    1995-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that the corrosion of steam generator tubing could be reduced if the local pH in regions where impurities concentrate could be controlled. The practice of molar ratio control is based on this assumption. Unfortunately, due to the complexity of the crevice concentration process, efforts to model the crevice chemistry based on bulk water conditions are quite uncertain. In-situ monitoring of the crevice chemistry is desirable, but may not be achievable in the near future. The current methodology for assessing the crevice chemistry is to monitor the hideout return chemistry when the plant shuts down. This approach also has its shortcomings, but may provide sufficient data to evaluate whether the crevice pH is in a desirable range. In this paper, an approach to controlling the crevice chemistry based on a target molar ratio indicator is introduced. The molar ratio indicator is based on what is believed to be the most reliable hideout return data. Probabilistic arguments are then used to show that the crevice pH will most likely be in a desirable range when the target molar ratio is achieved

  3. Heat disposal in water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harleman, D.R.F.

    1975-01-01

    The need for continuing development of techniques for predicting temperature distributions due to waste heat discharges into lakes, rivers, estuaries, and the oceans is presented. Diffusion of buoyant jets is examined, including heated surface jets and multiple jets issuing from a submerged multiport diffuser. In the near-field analysis of surface jets the important problems are related to the lateral spreading caused by buoyancy. Comparison of theoretical predictions with laboratory and field observations is given. The mechanics of multiport diffusers for heated discharges in shallow receiving waters are explained in contrast to sewage diffusers. The important problem is the degree to which stratification can be maintained in order to minimize local reintrainment and reduction of dilution capacity. Criteria for stable and unstable flow regimes are provided. A mathematical model for temperature distribution, with or without waste heat addition, in unsteady flows under time-varying meteorological conditions is given. (auth)

  4. Quantitative evaluation of safety use limit for crevice corrosion in Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Akashi, Masatsune; Sasaki, Hidetsugu; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    The most important problem with corrosion-resistant alloys such as stainless steels is localized corrosion. Crevice corrosion, which is a typical localized corrosion, occurs under the mildest environmental conditions. Consequently, whether crevice corrosion occurs or not is an important issue in structural material selection. This study investigated highly corrosion-resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloys whose resistance for crevice corrosion is difficult to evaluate with the JIS G 0592 standard for common strainless steels. The optimized procedures for determining the critical potential and temperature for crevice corrosion of the alloys were developed based on the JIS method. The limits of safety usage of various Ni-Cr-Mo alloys were evaluated quantitatively in chloride solution environments. (author)

  5. Pattern recognition model to estimate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at crevices and pit sites of 304 SS in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna [Penn State University, 212 Earth-Engineering Science Building, University Park, PA 16801 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Many publications have shown that crack growth rates (CGR) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metals is dependent on many parameters related to the manufacturing process of the steel and the environment to which the steel is exposed. Those parameters include, but are not restricted to, the concentration of chloride, fluoride, nitrates, and sulfates, pH, fluid velocity, electrochemical potential (ECP), electrolyte conductivity, stress and sensitization applied to the steel during its production and use. It is not well established how combinations of each of these parameters impact the CGR. Many different models and beliefs have been published, resulting in predictions that sometimes disagree with experimental observations. To some extent, the models are the closest to the nature of IGSCC, however, there is not a model that fully describes the entire range of observations, due to the difficulty of the problem. Among the models, the Fracture Environment Model, developed by Macdonald et al., is the most physico-chemical model, accounting for experimental observations in a wide range of environments or ECPs. In this work, we collected experimental data on BWR environments and designed a data mining pattern recognition model to learn from that data. The model was used to generate CGR estimations as a function of ECP on a BWR environment. The results of the predictive model were compared to the Fracture Environment Model predictions. The results from those two models are very close to the experimental observations of the area corresponding to creep and IGSCC controlled by diffusion. At more negative ECPs than the potential corresponding to creep, the pattern recognition predicts an increase of CGR with decreasing ECP, while the Fracture Environment Model predicts the opposite. The results of this comparison confirm that the pattern recognition model covers 3 phenomena: hydrogen embrittlement at very negative ECP, creep at intermediate ECP, and IGSCC

  6. Pattern recognition model to estimate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at crevices and pit sites of 304 SS in BWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    2004-01-01

    Many publications have shown that crack growth rates (CGR) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metals is dependent on many parameters related to the manufacturing process of the steel and the environment to which the steel is exposed. Those parameters include, but are not restricted to, the concentration of chloride, fluoride, nitrates, and sulfates, pH, fluid velocity, electrochemical potential (ECP), electrolyte conductivity, stress and sensitization applied to the steel during its production and use. It is not well established how combinations of each of these parameters impact the CGR. Many different models and beliefs have been published, resulting in predictions that sometimes disagree with experimental observations. To some extent, the models are the closest to the nature of IGSCC, however, there is not a model that fully describes the entire range of observations, due to the difficulty of the problem. Among the models, the Fracture Environment Model, developed by Macdonald et al., is the most physico-chemical model, accounting for experimental observations in a wide range of environments or ECPs. In this work, we collected experimental data on BWR environments and designed a data mining pattern recognition model to learn from that data. The model was used to generate CGR estimations as a function of ECP on a BWR environment. The results of the predictive model were compared to the Fracture Environment Model predictions. The results from those two models are very close to the experimental observations of the area corresponding to creep and IGSCC controlled by diffusion. At more negative ECPs than the potential corresponding to creep, the pattern recognition predicts an increase of CGR with decreasing ECP, while the Fracture Environment Model predicts the opposite. The results of this comparison confirm that the pattern recognition model covers 3 phenomena: hydrogen embrittlement at very negative ECP, creep at intermediate ECP, and IGSCC

  7. Fluid composition in the tube sheet crevices of a nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1985-10-01

    A useful understanding has been gained of the conditions needed for a crevice liquid to exist and what determines how alkaline this liquid will be. We believe that corrosive agents other than hydroxides, silica and organic salts must play a role in crevice corrosion. The presence of organic anions and silica in the condensate argues against a strongly alkaline crevice environment. In many cases, there may be insufficient caustic in the crevice fluid to account for the corrosion observed, and another explanation must be sought. Among the organic compounds, only acetate, formate, and lactate are quantitatively important, and acetate is innocuous. Formate decomposes to produce carbonate, which is corrosive. If formate is an important ion in the condensate or carbonates are found in the crevice, remedial measures should focus on eliminating formate and bicarbonate from the condensate. Hydrazine and other AVT compounds should be screened for ability to reduce carbonate to formate and selected accordingly. The possible corrosiveness of decomposition products of lactate also deserves some attention. In principle, acetic acid or silica might be added to the condensate in order to decrease the alkalinity of the crevice liquid, but this benefit must be balanced against possible harmful effects elsewhere in the system. Adding boric acid to the condensate will cause a sodium borate liquid to form in the crevices, likewise reducing alkalinity but with less likelihood of harmful side effects. The activity of NaOH in a sodium acetate liquid will be controlled by the sodium silicate buffer system in many cases. Therefore, adding silica will always enable the alkalinity of a sodium acetate liquid to be reduced to that of the sodium disilicate - quartz buffer. In the absence of acetate, adding silica will cause the crevice fluid to dry up completely. 8 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Fluid composition in the tube sheet crevices of a nuclear steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1985-10-01

    A useful understanding has been gained of the conditions needed for a crevice liquid to exist and what determines how alkaline this liquid will be. We believe that corrosive agents other than hydroxides, silica and organic salts must play a role in crevice corrosion. The presence of organic anions and silica in the condensate argues against a strongly alkaline crevice environment. In many cases, there may be insufficient caustic in the crevice fluid to account for the corrosion observed, and another explanation must be sought. Among the organic compounds, only acetate, formate, and lactate are quantitatively important, and acetate is innocuous. Formate decomposes to produce carbonate, which is corrosive. If formate is an important ion in the condensate or carbonates are found in the crevice, remedial measures should focus on eliminating formate and bicarbonate from the condensate. Hydrazine and other AVT compounds should be screened for ability to reduce carbonate to formate and selected accordingly. The possible corrosiveness of decomposition products of lactate also deserves some attention. In principle, acetic acid or silica might be added to the condensate in order to decrease the alkalinity of the crevice liquid, but this benefit must be balanced against possible harmful effects elsewhere in the system. Adding boric acid to the condensate will cause a sodium borate liquid to form in the crevices, likewise reducing alkalinity but with less likelihood of harmful side effects. The activity of NaOH in a sodium acetate liquid will be controlled by the sodium silicate buffer system in many cases. Therefore, adding silica will always enable the alkalinity of a sodium acetate liquid to be reduced to that of the sodium disilicate - quartz buffer. In the absence of acetate, adding silica will cause the crevice fluid to dry up completely. 8 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Heat transfer studies in pool fire environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsche, F.

    1993-01-01

    A Type B package has to withstand severe thermal accident conditions. To calculate the temperature behaviour of such a package in a real fire environment, heat transfer parameters simulating the effect of the fire are needed. For studying such heat transfer parameters, a systematic programme of experimental and theoretical investigations was performed which was part of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme (Nitsche and Weib 1990). The studies were done by means of small, unfinned and finned, steel model containers of simplified design in hydrocarbon fuel open fire tests. By using various methods, flame and container temperatures were measured and also container surface absorptivity before and after the test to study the effect of sooting and surface painting on heat transfer. Based on all these experimental data and comparative calculations, simplified, effective heat transfer parameters could be derived, simulating the effect of the real fire on the model containers. (J.P.N.)

  10. Corrosion and cleaning aspects of sodium side crevices in components of LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirer, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    Although the presence of crevices is excluded in critical areas of sodium components by design, their occurrence in other areas cannot be eliminated completely. During the lifetime of a component high concentrations of sodium compounds, such as caustics, may be formed in crevices. These compounds can remain within the crevices for some time. In this respect the following situations are recognized: - Reaction products from initial contaminants such as oxide scales. The component with crevices containing oxide scale either from the manufacturing process or insufficient cleaning after water pressure testing is exposed to sodium during actual operation. - Reaction products formed during or after cleaning. Sodium in the crevices of a drained component reacts with water vapour or water during cleaning or during subsequent storing or handling under non-perfect conditions. Before refilling with sodium the component is heated to preheat temperature. Same situation as above, however the component is exposed to sodium at operating temperature. These cycles can be repeated several times. - Products from a small sodium-water reaction. Caustic products from a small sodium-water reaction may be present in crevices or dead ends of a component which is exposed to high temperature during sodium operation or during vacuum distillation. The aims of the investigations are: determination of the corrosive aspects of high concentration of caustic reaction products of sodium in crevices on the structural materials of the component; comparison of the effectiveness of different cleaning procedures in respect to removal of sodium from crevices, e.g. water, steam, alcohol cleaning, vacuum distillation. Concerning the first item, in particular the possibility of the occurrence of intercrystalline corrosion and stress corrosion cracking is investigated. Materials investigated are the Cr-Mo steels 2 1/4Cr1Mo stabilized with Nb, 9Cr1Mo, 12Cr1Mo and the austenitic stainless steal AISI 304. The

  11. Investigating the effect of crevice flow on internal combustion engines using a new simple crevice model implemented in a CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Kosmadakis, G.M.; Dimaratos, A.M.; Pariotis, E.G.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is conducted to examine the way the crevice regions affect the mean cylinder pressure, the in-cylinder temperature, and the velocity field of internal combustion engines running at motoring conditions. For the calculation of the wall heat flux, a wall heat transfer formulation developed by the authors is used, while for the simulation of the crevices and the blow-by a newly developed simplified simulation model is presented herein. These sub-models are incorporated into an in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. The main advantage of the new crevice model is that it can be applied in cases where no detailed information of the ring-pack configuration is available, which is important as this information is rarely known or may have been altered during the engine's life. Thus, an adequate estimation of the blow-by effect on the cylinder pressure can be drawn. To validate the new model, the measured in-cylinder pressure traces of a diesel engine, located at the authors' laboratory, running under motoring conditions at four engine speeds were used as reference, together with measured velocity profiles and turbulence data of a motored spark-ignition engine. Comparing the predicted and measured cylinder pressure traces of the diesel engine for all cases examined, it is observed that by incorporating the new crevice sub-model into the in-house CFD code, significant improvements on the predictive accuracy of the model is obtained. The calculated cylinder pressure traces almost coincide with the measured ones, thus avoiding the use of any calibration constants as would have been the case with the crevice effect omitted. Concerning the radial and swirl velocity profiles and the turbulent kinetic energy measured in the spark-ignition engine, the validation process revealed that the developed crevice model has a minor influence on the aforementioned parameters. The theoretical study has been extended by investigating in the same spark

  12. On-line monitoring of boiling crevice chemistry evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, C.B.; Oh, S.; Park, B.G.; Hwang, I.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, I.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Soonchunhyang Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Kim, U.C.; Na, J.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    In a locally restricted geometry on the secondary side of steam generator (SG) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), impurities in bulk water can be concentrated by boiling process to extreme pH that may then accelerate the corrosion of tubing and adjacent materials. To simulate a real SG tubesheet crevice, a high temperature/high pressure (HT/HP) crevice simulation system was constructed. Primary water was pumped at a high flow rate through a 3/4'' outer-diameter tubing and a crevice section was made on the outer diameter (OD) side of the tubing. The simulated crevice area was monitored with thermocouples and electrodes for the measurement of temperature and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), respectively, in the crevice as well as free span. A secondary solution composed of 50 ppm Na and 200 ppb hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was supplied at a flow rate of about 4 L/hr. In an open tubesheet crevice with 0.15 mm radial gap and 40 mm depth, axial distributions of temperature and ECP were measured as a function of time and available superheat. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration process in the crevice and the resultant evolution of crevice boiling regions were characterized from temperature and ECP data. Measured data for an open crevice showed a similar behavior to predictions by a thermodynamic equilibrium code. Magnetite-packed crevice had much longer time to reach a steady state than open crevice. (authors)

  13. Hideout of sodium salts in tubesheet crevices: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.P.; Campon, J.L.

    1987-07-01

    The hideout of sodium hydroxide and sodium chloride in tubesheet crevices was studied in single tube model boilers at CADARACHE. Radioactive Na 24 was used for the measurements. Crevices of 0.2 mm width were empty or packed. A hydraulically expanded crevice and a rolled crevice were also studied. The concentration rate depends on the bulk water concentration but the equilibrium concentration appears to be related only to thermal conditions. The equilibrium value of 25 moles per liter in the crevice was extrapolated, the sodium concentration in the bulk water being in the range of 5 to 50 ppM. This equilibrium will be obtained with an ''integrated pollution'' of 5000 to 10,000 ppM x hours. Flushing produced by the boiler depressurization was shown to be an effective way to remove salt from the crevice. Sodium hydroxide was shown to concentrate even in a residual crevice of few μm width

  14. Cockroaches traverse crevices, crawl rapidly in confined spaces, and inspire a soft, legged robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Kaushik; Full, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Jointed exoskeletons permit rapid appendage-driven locomotion but retain the soft-bodied, shape-changing ability to explore confined environments. We challenged cockroaches with horizontal crevices smaller than a quarter of their standing body height. Cockroaches rapidly traversed crevices in 300–800 ms by compressing their body 40–60%. High-speed videography revealed crevice negotiation to be a complex, discontinuous maneuver. After traversing horizontal crevices to enter a vertically confined space, cockroaches crawled at velocities approaching 60 cm⋅s−1, despite body compression and postural changes. Running velocity, stride length, and stride period only decreased at the smallest crevice height (4 mm), whereas slipping and the probability of zigzag paths increased. To explain confined-space running performance limits, we altered ceiling and ground friction. Increased ceiling friction decreased velocity by decreasing stride length and increasing slipping. Increased ground friction resulted in velocity and stride length attaining a maximum at intermediate friction levels. These data support a model of an unexplored mode of locomotion—“body-friction legged crawling” with body drag, friction-dominated leg thrust, but no media flow as in air, water, or sand. To define the limits of body compression in confined spaces, we conducted dynamic compressive cycle tests on living animals. Exoskeletal strength allowed cockroaches to withstand forces 300 times body weight when traversing the smallest crevices and up to nearly 900 times body weight without injury. Cockroach exoskeletons provided biological inspiration for the manufacture of an origami-style, soft, legged robot that can locomote rapidly in both open and confined spaces. PMID:26858443

  15. Coupling crevice chemistry with a corrosion model in laboratory: A first application to the analysis of secondary side corrosion in service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavageau, E.M.; Vaillant, D.; Dimpre, S.; Bouchacourt, M.; Millet, L.

    2002-01-01

    Secondary side corrosion of tubes in Alloy 600 develops in flow-restricted areas between tubes and tubesheet or tube support plates since pollutants of the secondary water can concentrate under heat flux. So EDF has undertaken an important effort of modeling the degradation (intergranular attack IGA and intergranular stress corrosion cracking IGSCC). Three models of corrosion are available or under development depending on the type of crevice environment that could be deduced from the analysis of secondary water and from pulled tube examinations: the first one in strongly alkaline environments (sodium hydroxide environments), the second one in sulfate environments, sulfate being one of the main species analyzed in water after hideout return, the third one in complex environments that could duplicate the deposits, films and degradation observed on pulled tubes. The crevice chemistry during operation was first evaluated using analyses of secondary water after hideout return and the MULTEQ code. The local chemical conditions were introduced into the corrosion model generated in laboratory and gave results which were compared to field experience. Encouraging results were found with the sodium hydroxide model for some of the old French plant units in the early period of operation. A similar approach is under investigation with the sulfate corrosion model for the entire time of operation and for the other plant units. (authors)

  16. Crevice corrosion kinetics of nickel alloys bearing chromium and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorozne, N.S.; Giordano, C.M.; Rodríguez, M.A.; Carranza, R.M.; Rebak, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The crevice corrosion resistance of the tested alloys increased with PREN, which is mainly affected by their Mo content. ► Crevice corrosion kinetics was controlled by ohmic drop only in the more dilute chloride solutions. ► Charge transfer control was observed in concentrated chloride solutions. ► A critical ohmic drop was not necessary for crevice corrosion to occur. ► Ohmic drop was a consequence of the crevice corrosion process in certain conditions. - Abstract: The crevice corrosion kinetics of alloys C-22, C-22HS and HYBRID-BC1 was studied in several chloride solutions at 90 °C. The crevice corrosion resistance of the alloys increased with PREN (Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number), which is mainly affected by the Mo content in the alloys. The crevice corrosion kinetics of the three alloys was analyzed at potentials slightly higher than the repassivation potential. Crevice propagation was controlled by ohmic drop in the more dilute chloride solutions, and by charge transfer in the more concentrated chloride solutions. Ohmic drop was not a necessary condition for crevice corrosion to occur.

  17. Distribution of Electrochemical Reaction Components in Crevice Corrosion Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniusz Kurgan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper numerical model of the crevice corrosion is developed. The model considers electrochemical reactions for the iron on the metal electrolyte boundary and chemical reactions which take place in the crevice electrolyte. Mass transfer of ionic species is describes ny Nerst-Plank equation and is solved with the finite element method in two dimensions. On the problem boundary adequate boundary conditions are defined. Distribution of all chemical speciaes, potential and current density in the crevice and on the crevice wall are computed. In mass balance for particular chemical species the speed of the chemical reactions is taken into account. At the end some illustrative example is given.

  18. Cation-anion imbalance: Effect on PWR steam generator crevice pH - an acidic case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange resins remove cations more efficiently than anions from feedwater to nuclear steam generators. The resulting imbalance is made up in the feedwater train by ammonia additions. In the steam generator, the ammonia is quickly flashed off leaving acid ions for an ionic balance. The almost pure water concentrates by boiling in heated crevices, in theory, to levels permitted by the available superheat (difference between primary and secondary temperatures). The concentrations may reach an ionic strength of greater than 20 molal on the hot leg, depending on bulk water concentration, time of steady state operation, fouling of crevice locations, and solubilities of the various salts, i.e., kinetic as well as thermodynamic considerations. While some of the acid species distill out of the crevices, more may be trapped by corrosive reactions. In the paper, theoretical crevice pH is calculated by MULTEQ. An attempt is made to relate pH to steady state operation time and crevice fouling. The data are normalized to be independent of bulk water concentration. Neutralization of the acid is explored

  19. The Role of Thiosulfate Ions in the Initiation of Crevice Corrosion of 316 Stainless Steel in Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, M.M.A.; El-Sayed, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques have been applied to study the crevice corrosion behavior of 316 L stainless steel in both 0.5 and 2 M NaCl solution with and without thiosulfate additions. In this investigation, the crevice corrosion of the tested material was studied in both bulk solution environment (0.5 M NaCl) as well as in chloride solutions simulating those formed inside crevices of stainless steels. A metal to nonmetal assembly, in which disc type specimens were faced to a PTFE crevice former, is used for bulk solution tests. Crevice- free specimens of cylindrical shape were used for the determination of the composition of solutions formed inside crevices (known as CCS). Potentiodynamic runs in extremely low ph solution (2 M NaCl solution with and without 0.01 M Na 2 SO 3 addition) were conducted to determine the ph at which the passive film breaks down (d ph). The d ph value was found to be a function of both chloride and thiosulfate ions. Cyclic potentiodynamic technique was used in evaluating the electrochemical corrosion performance of the tested alloy in bulk 0.5 M NaCl solution with and without 0.01 M Na 2 SO 3 addition. Results indicated that the presence of thiosulfate, combined with chloride ions led to a notable decrease in the corrosion resistance of the tested material. The deleterious effect of thiosulfates was discussed in terms of passivity breakdown and formation of reduced sulfur species within active crevices leading to the formation of H 2 S, which enhances the anodic dissolution of iron

  20. The crevice corrosion behaviour of stainless steel in sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qian; Zhang Guoan; Qiu Yubin; Guo Xingpeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There are three stages in crevice corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution. → The decrease of crevice thickness shortens the incubation period of crevice corrosion. → The incubation period of crevice corrosion prolongs as the increase of the area ratio. → Corrosion develops preferentially at crevice bottom and hydrogen reduction occurs inside the crevice. → Crevice corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution follows the passive dissolution mechanism. - Abstract: The crevice corrosion behaviour of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution was investigated mainly by electrochemical noise measurements, considering the influences of the crevice opening dimension (a) and the area ratio of the electrode outside the crevice to the one inside the crevice (r). Results show that the increase of r value prolongs the incubation period of crevice corrosion, but crevice corrosion develops rapidly once the crevice corrosion occurs. The crevice corrosion develops preferentially at the crevice bottom and then spreads to the whole electrode surface. Proton could reduce on the uncorroded area and hydrogen bubbles form inside the crevice.

  1. Corrosion resistance of high performance stainless steels in cooling water and other refinery environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, C.W.; Redmerski, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The recent successful introduction of high performance stainless steels as tubing for seawater cooled electric utility condensers suggests that these alloys can also provide useful service in refinery heat exchanger applications. Since many of these applications involve higher temperature exposure than steam condensers, a study was conducted to evaluate crevice corrsion resistance over a range of cooling water temperature and chloride concentrations, and also to evaluate general corrosion resistance in some strong chemical and refinery environments. These stainless steels display excellent crevice corrosion resistance as well as good resistance to a variety of chemical environments that may be encountered in refinery, petrochemical and chemical plant service

  2. Inorganic coatings on stainless steel for protection against crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, Sture

    1989-12-01

    In order to create protection against crevice corrosion stainless steel test specimens of type 316 steel with various inorganic coatings applied on crevice surfaces were tested for 3-50 months at 25 and 30 degree C in natural seawater containing 0.2-1.5 ppm free chlorine. Various metallic coatings, Ni base alloys with Cr and Mo, Ni with W, pure Ag and pure Mo, as well as ceramic coatings - Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - were studied. All the coatings tested, except pure Molybdenum applied by plasma spraying in a max 0.1 mm thick layer were found to promote crevice corrosion of the stainless steel. A significant reduction of the crevice corrosion susceptibility was obtained with Molybdenum. The result is considered promising enough to justify full scale tests in seawater on flange joints of pipes, valves or pumps. (author)

  3. Prediction of long term crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement behavior of ASTM grade-12 titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.; Jain, H.

    1984-01-01

    Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are potential failure modes of Grade-12 titanium high-level nuclear waste containers emplaced in rock salt repositories. A method is presented to estimate the environment domains for which immunity to these failure modes will exist for periods of hundreds of years. The estimation is based on the identification and quantification of mechanisms involved. Macroscopic concentration cell formation is responsible for crevice corrosion. The cell formation is accompanied by oxygen depletion, potential drop, anion accumulation and acidification inside the crevice. This process is quantified by simple mass balance equations which show that the immunity domain is a function of the time the container is exposed to the corrosion environment. Strain induced hydride formation is responsible for hydrogen assisted crack initiation. A simple model for slow crack growth is developed using data on growth rates measured at various temperatures. The parameters obtained in the model are used to estimate the threshold stress intensity and hydrogen solubility limit in the alloy at infinite container service time. This value gives a crack size below which container failure will not occur for a given applied stress and hydrogen concentration, and a hydrogen concentration limit at a given stress intensity. 37 references, 5 figures, 4 tables

  4. Crevice corrosion of titanium under nuclear fuel waste conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Bailey, M.G.; Clarke, C.F.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes our experimental program to investigate the localized corrosion of ASTM Grade-2 titanium. In particular, it describes the study of the crevice corrosion of titanium, the process most likely to lead to the failure of nuclear waste containers constructed from this material. The basic mechanisms of crevice corrosion are discussed in detail. This is followed by a description of our laboratory program and the various immersion tests being performed under irradiated conditions. Experiments and tests were performed in NaCl solutions (generally 1.6 wt.%) and in simulated groundwater at 100 or 150 degrees C. A mechanism for crevice corrosion of titanium is presented and justified experimentally using an electrochemical approach. During the initiation stage, the crevice reaction is controlled by the kinetics of the anodic process. As oxygen is consumed in the propagation step, control switches to the cathodic step. Crevice corrosion eventually stops when the oxygen concentration falls to a low value. Propagation of the crevice can be restarted by the addition of oxygen. Our preliminary results on the effect of varying the iron content of the titanium are presented. An increase in iron content from 0.02 wt.% to 0.13 wt.% leads to passivation, as opposed to propagation, of the crevice. The effects of γ-irradiation, temperature, and oxygen concentration are also briefly discussed. Although our conclusions must be considered tentative, the effects of γ-irradiation appear to be beneficial. some crevice corrosion rates from longer-term immersion tests are also presented. Generally the rates are very low

  5. Effect of temperature on the crevice corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys as engineered barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornus, Edgard C.; Rodríguez, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys offer an outstanding corrosion resistance in a wide variety of highly corrosive environments. Alloys 625, C-22, C-22HS and Hybrid-BC1 are considered among candidates as engineered barriers of nuclear repositories. The objective of the present work was to assess the effect of temperature on the crevice corrosion resistance of these alloys. The crevice corrosion re-passivation potential (E CO ) of the tested alloys was determined by the Potentiodynamic-Galvanostatic-Potentiodynamic (PD-GS-PD) method. Alloy Hybrid-BC1 was the most resistant to chloride-induced crevice corrosion, followed by alloys C-22HS, C-22 and 625. E CO showed a linear decrease with temperature. There is a temperature above which E CO does not decrease anymore, reaching a minimum value. This E CO value is a strong parameter for assessing the localized corrosion susceptibility of a material in a long term timescale, since it is independent of temperature, chloride concentration and geometrical variables such as crevicing mechanism, crevice gap and type of crevice formers. (author) [es

  6. Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The present report presents the findings of SIMRAC project GAP 045 entitled ‘Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments’. It is intended as a reference to develop guidelines which, in turn would assist mine management in establishing safe...

  7. HEAT Sensor: Harsh Environment Adaptable Thermionic Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limb, Scott J. [Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This document is the final report for the “HARSH ENVIRONMENT ADAPTABLE THERMIONIC SENSOR” project under NETL’s Crosscutting contract DE-FE0013062. This report addresses sensors that can be made with thermionic thin films along with the required high temperature hermetic packaging process. These sensors can be placed in harsh high temperature environments and potentially be wireless and self-powered.

  8. SLOWPOKE: heating reactors in the urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilborn, J.W.; Lynch, G.F.

    1988-06-01

    Since global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years, nuclear heating could become as important as nuclear electricity generation. To fill that need, AECL has designed a 10 MW nuclear heating plant for large buildings. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees Celsius, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on the successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba, and the design of a 10 MW commercial unit is well advanced. With capital costs in the range $5 million to $7 million, unit energy costs could be as low as $0.02 per kWh, for a unit operating at 50% load factor over a 25-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees Celsius, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe, nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  9. An experimental study of crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel in artificial seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Baoping [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China); Liu Yonghong, E-mail: liuyhupc@126.co [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China); Tian Xiaojie; Wang Fei; Li Hang; Ji Renjie [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The effects of applied torque on corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Three kinds of crevices (316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric and 316L-to-316L) were tested in artificial seawater at 50 {sup o}C. Corroded surface morphology was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate similar trends in crevice corrosion susceptibility with increasing applied torque. Among the three crevices, the 316L stainless steel specimen, coupled to the 316L stainless steel crevice former, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion.

  10. An experimental study of crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel in artificial seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Baoping; Liu Yonghong; Tian Xiaojie; Wang Fei; Li Hang; Ji Renjie

    2010-01-01

    The effects of applied torque on corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Three kinds of crevices (316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric and 316L-to-316L) were tested in artificial seawater at 50 o C. Corroded surface morphology was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate similar trends in crevice corrosion susceptibility with increasing applied torque. Among the three crevices, the 316L stainless steel specimen, coupled to the 316L stainless steel crevice former, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion.

  11. Developing a crevice chemistry control target from uncertain data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that the corrosion of steam generator tubing could be reduced if the local pH in regions where impurities concentrate could be controlled. The practice of molar ratio control is based on this assumption. Direct measurement of the crevice chemistry is not possible at this time. Deterministic models based on bulk water conditions are quite uncertain, due to both the variability of crevices in the steam generator and the level of impurities in the bulk water which are often below or at the level of detection. The current methodology for assessing the crevice chemistry is to monitor the hideout return chemistry when the plant shuts down. This approach also has its shortcomings, but may provide sufficient data to evaluate whether the crevice pH is in a desirable range. In this paper, an approach for establishing a target crevice chemistry based on the plant data which is believed to be the most certain or reliable is presented

  12. Modeling local chemistry in PWR steam generator crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past two decades steam generator corrosion damage has been a major cost impact to PWR owners. Crevices and occluded regions create thermal-hydraulic conditions where aggressive impurities can become highly concentrated, promoting localized corrosion of the tubing and support structure materials. The type of corrosion varies depending on the local conditions, with stress corrosion cracking being the phenomenon of most current concern. A major goal of the EPRI research in this area has been to develop models of the concentration process and resulting crevice chemistry conditions. These models may then be used to predict crevice chemistry based on knowledge of bulk chemistry, thereby allowing the operator to control corrosion damage. Rigorous deterministic models have not yet been developed; however, empirical approaches have shown promise and are reflected in current versions of the industry-developed secondary water chemistry guidelines

  13. Crevice corrosion propagation on alloy 625 and alloy C276 in natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCafferty, E.; Bogar, F.D.; Thomas, E.D. II; Creegan, C.A.; Lucas, K.E.; Kaznoff, A.I.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical composition of the aqueous solution within crevices on two different Ni-Cr-Mo-Fe alloys immersed in natural seawater was determined using a semiquantitative thin-layer chromatographic method. Active crevices were found to contain concentrated amounts of dissolved Ni 2+ , Cr 3+ , Mo 3+ , and Fe 2+ ions. Propagation of crevice corrosion for the two alloys was determined from anodic polarization curves in model crevice solutions based upon stoichiometric dissolution or selective dissolution of alloy components. Both alloys 625 (UNS N06625) and C276 (UNS N10276) underwent crevice corrosion in the model crevice electrolytes. For the model crevice solution based upon selective dissolution of alloy constituents, the anodic dissolution rate for alloy 625 was higher than that for alloy C276. This trend was reversed for the model crevice solution based upon uniform dissolution of alloy constituents

  14. Chemical enhancement of crevice flushing: Volume 2, Data documentation: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, A.J.; Prestegiacomo, J.B.

    1987-06-01

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the effect of various chemical additives on enhancing the hideout return produced during tubesheet crevice flushing operations in PWR steam generators. Secondary objectives included determining if flushing was an effective means of introducing a corrosion inhibitor into deep tubesheet crevices, and evaluating the effects of different degrees of crevice restriction, different initial crevice chemistries, and different flushing processes. Testing was unable to identify a single additive formulation which increased the flushing effectiveness for all degrees of crevice restriction considered. Testing did reveal that a combination of surfactant (Surfynol 104) and boric acid enhances the flushing effectiveness in tests with moderately restricted crevices. Although cleaning agents were found to increase the flushing effectiveness in tests with extensively restricted crevices, potential corrosion concerns and relatively high contaminant (sodium) levels could discourage their use. However, the testing demonstrated that flushing was an effective means of accumulating a corrosion inhibitor, such as boric acid, in deep tubesheet crevices. Companion testing also indicated that boric acid which accumulated in a tubesheet crevice during crevice flushing was likely to remain in the crevice during subsequent power operation. Consequently, use of boric acid as an additive in tubesheet crevice flushing operations is strongly recommended

  15. Survey of heat-pipe application under nuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuyuzaki, Noriyoshi; Saito, Takashi; Okamoto, Yoshizo; Hishida, Makoto; Negishi, Kanji.

    1986-11-01

    Heat pipes today are employed in a wide variety of special heat transfer applications including nuclear reactor. In this nuclear technology area in Japan, A headway speed of the heat pipe application technique is not so high because of safety confirmation and investigation under each developing step. Especially, the outline of space craft is a tendency to increase the size. Therefore, the power supply is also tendency to increase the outlet power and keep the long life. Under SP-100 project, the development of nuclear power supply system which power is 1400 - 1600 KW thermal and 100 KW electric power is steadily in progress. Many heat pipes are adopted for thermionic conversion and coolant system in order to construct more safety and light weight system for the project. This paper describes the survey of the heat pipe applications under the present and future condition for nuclear environment. (author)

  16. Human thermal physiological and psychological responses under different heating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Ning, Haoran; Ji, Yuchen; Hou, Juan; He, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that many residents of severely cold areas of China who use floor heating (FH) systems feel warmer but drier compared to those using radiant heating (RH) systems. However, this phenomenon has not been verified experimentally. In order to validate the empirical hypothesis, and research the differences of human physiological and psychological responses in these two asymmetrical heating environments, an experiment was designed to mimic FH and RH systems. The subjects participating in the experiment were volunteer college-students. During the experiment, the indoor air temperature, air speed, relative humidity, globe temperature, and inner surface temperatures were measured, and subjects' heart rate, blood pressure and skin temperatures were recorded. The subjects were required to fill in questionnaires about their thermal responses during testing. The results showed that the subjects' skin temperatures, heart rate and blood pressure were significantly affected by the type of heating environment. Ankle temperature had greatest impact on overall thermal comfort relative to other body parts, and a slightly cool FH condition was the most pleasurable environment for sedentary subjects. The overall thermal sensation, comfort and acceptability of FH were higher than that of RH. However, the subjects of FH felt drier than that of RH, although the relative humidity in FH environments was higher than that of the RH environment. In future environmental design, the thermal comfort of the ankles should be scrutinized, and a FH cool condition is recommended as the most comfortable thermal environment for office workers. Consequently, large amounts of heating energy could be saved in this area in the winter. The results of this study may lead to more efficient energy use for office or home heating systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Standard test methods for pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and related alloys by use of ferric Chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the determination of the resistance of stainless steels and related alloys to pitting and crevice corrosion (see Terminology G 15) when exposed to oxidizing chloride environments. Six procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, C, D, E, and F. 1.1.1 Method A—Ferric chloride pitting test. 1.1.2 Method B—Ferric chloride crevice test. 1.1.3 Method C—Critical pitting temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.4 Method D—Critical crevice temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.5 Method E—Critical pitting temperature test for stainless steels. 1.1.6 Method F—Critical crevice temperature test for stainless steels. 1.2 Method A is designed to determine the relative pitting resistance of stainless steels and nickel-base, chromium-bearing alloys, whereas Method B can be used for determining both the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of these alloys. Methods C, D, E and F allow for a rankin...

  18. Corrosion of similar and dissimilar metal crevices in the engineered barrier system of a potential nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.; Dunn, D.S.; Csontos, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Crevice corrosion is considered possible if the corrosion potential (E corr ) exceeds the repassivation potential for crevice corrosion (E rcrev ). In this study, potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic hold were used to determine the E rcrev of similar and dissimilar metal crevices in the engineered barrier system of the potential Yucca Mountain repository in 0.5 M NaCl, 4 M NaCl, and 4 M MgCl 2 solutions at 95 deg. C. The results were compared with data previously obtained using crevices formed between Alloy 22 and polytetrafluoroethylene. It was observed that, except for Type 316L stainless steel, all other metal-to-metal crevices were less susceptible to crevice corrosion than the corresponding metal-to-polytetrafluoroethylene crevices. Measurements of galvanic coupling were used to evaluate the crevice corrosion propagation behavior in 5 M NaCl solution at 95 deg. C. The crevice specimens were coupled to either an Alloy 22 or a Titanium Grade 7 plate using metal or polytetrafluoroethylene crevice washers. Crevice corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel propagated without repassivation. For all the tests using a polytetrafluoroethylene crevice washer, crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 was initiated at open circuit potential by the addition of CuCl 2 as an oxidant, whereas no crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 was initiated for all the tests using Alloy 22 or Titanium Grade 7 metals as crevice washer. However, crevice corrosion propagation was found to be very limited under such test conditions

  19. Experimental simulation of Na and Cl hideout in steam generator crevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Chi Bum, E-mail: bahn@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kasza, Ken E.; Park, Jangyul; Shack, William J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration of Na and Cl in crevices of steam generator was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A radial pH gradient was initially observed in the magnetite-packed crevice due to the volatility effect of Cl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As time progresses, the crevice pH becomes neutralized due to delayed preferential Cl concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During one fuel cycle, the crevice chemistry would be in a transient condition rather than a steady state. - Abstract: Some types of corrosion of steam generator tubes involve impurity concentration in a gap ('crevice') between the tubes and supporting structures or sludge piles. The purpose of this work is to characterize the concentration of sodium and chlorine in the crevices using a crevice simulator in a model boiler. Magnetite-packed crevices with lower permeability and thermal conductivity are more appropriate for the simulation of actual SG crevices than diamond-packed crevices. A radial pH gradient was observed in the magnetite-packed crevice that was also reported by earlier work (). The crevice pH near the tube wall appears to be alkaline initially due to the volatility effect of Cl. As time progresses, the crevice pH becomes neutralized and even acidic because of delayed preferential Cl concentration. This is enabled by a reduced boiling rate near the tube wall due to the presence of a Na-rich liquid film. During one fuel cycle, the crevice chemistry would be in a transient condition rather than a steady state because of the low impurity exposure ({approx}10 ppm h) unless some impurities remain after each fuel cycle.

  20. Acid/base titrations of simulated PWR crevice environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, J.; Macdonald, D.D.; Millett, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The construction and operation of a titration system that is capable of exploring the acid/base properties of aqueous systems at temperatures solution is measured using YSZ sensors of the type Hg/HgO/ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 )/Solution in conjunction with a suitable reference electrode. The use of the system for measuring the pH of the titrated solutions (NaOH/H 2 SO 4 ) is discussed, and we show that the YSZ pH sensor is capable of consistent and precise pH measurements at elevated temperature (275-325 degrees C) and pressures (100-150 bars). However, the accuracy of the measured pH depends critically on the performance of the reference electrode. In the present work, we ensure the viability of the reference electrode. In the present work, we ensure the viability of the reference electrode by periodically calibrating it in situ using the pH sensor and a standard solution of known pH versus temperature characteristics. The titration data obtained in this study are compared with predictions from EPRI's MULTEQ code, and are found to be in satisfactory agreement in the alkaline pH region. Observed discrepancies in the acidic pH region between the two sets of data are attributed to corrosion of the alloys used to fabricate the titration system

  1. CHLORPYRIFOS ACCUMULATION PATTERNS FOR CHILD ACCESSIBLE SURFACES AND OBJECTIVES AND URINARY METABOLITE EXCRETION BY CHILDREN FOR TWO-WEEKS AFTER CRACK-AND-CREVICE APPLICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Children's-Post-Pesticide-Application-Exposure-Study (CPPAES) was conducted to look at the distribution of chlorpyrifos within a home environment for a 2-week period following a routine professional crack-and-crevice application, and to determine the amount of the chlorpyrifo...

  2. Local chemistry in top of the tubesheet crevices and sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this breakout group was to define the requirements and information needed to produce a model which could predict local chemistry in the top of the tubesheet crevice and sludge. The issue is of concern because of TTS circumferential cracking. It was concluded that the increased variability of chemistry and stress in this region compared to the TSPs could result in this mode of attack being more variable and more difficult to predict. A conceptual model to predict the chemistry at the tube wall in the TTS crevice and sludge from bulk water chemistry was developed. The model is considerably simpler than the model under development for TSPs. The information and methods to produce the actual model are readily available

  3. Earthquakes Promote Bacterial Genetic Exchange in Serpentinite Crevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoto, Yoshida; Fujiura, Nori

    2009-04-01

    We report the results of our efforts to study the effects of seismic shaking on simulated biofilms within serpentinite fissures. A colloidal solution consisting of recipient bacterial cells (Pseudomonas sp. or Bacillus subtilis), donor plasmid DNA encoded for antibiotic resistance, and chrysotile (an acicular clay mineral that forms in crevices of serpentinite layers) were placed onto an elastic body made from gellan gum, which acted as the biofilm matrix. Silica beads, as rock analogues (i.e., chemically inert mechanical serpentinite), were placed on the gellan surface, which was coated with the colloidal solution. A rolling vibration similar to vibrations generated by earthquakes was applied, and the silica beads moved randomly across the surface of the gellan. This resulted in the recipient cells' acquiring plasmid DNA and thus becoming genetically transformed to demonstrate marked antibiotic resistance. Neither Pseudomonas sp. nor B. subtilis were transformed by plasmid DNA when chrysotile was substituted for by kaolinite or bentonite in the colloidal solution. Tough gellan (1.0%) promoted the introduction of plasmid DNA into Pseudomonas sp., but soft gellan (0.3%) had no such effect. Genetic transformation of bacteria on the surface of gellan by exposure to exogenous plasmid DNA required seismic shaking and exposure to the acicular clay mineral chrysotile. These experimental results suggest that bacterial genetic exchange readily occurs when biofilms that form in crevices of serpentinite are exposed to seismic shaking. Seismic activity may be a key factor in bacterial evolution along with the formation of biofilms within crevices of serpentinite.

  4. Modelling of crevice corrosion induced failure of nuclear waste containers. Abstract 389

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heppner, K.L.; Evitts, R.W.; Postlethwaite, J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)]. E-mail: klh117@mail.usask.ca; rwe380@engr.usask.ca; jack@dvinci.usask.ca

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' Alloys which are used for nuclear waste containment applications are selected based upon their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, alloys which are resistant to uniform corrosion, such as titanium alloys, are susceptible to crevice corrosion when exposed to geochemical brines. Passive metals, such as Grade-2 titanium alloy, form a tenacious oxide surface film that protects the metal from corrosion. For a crevice with a very small opening, oxygen reduction inside the crevice may occur faster than oxygen diffusion into the crevice, a condition that leads to crevice solution deoxygenation. Crevice deoxygenation causes oxygen reduction to occur only outside the crevice. Thus, the anode and cathode are physically separated and this causes an acid chloride crevice solution to form by two mechanisms. First, the separated anode and cathode forms an electrical potential gradient. The potential gradient drives the migration of chloride ions into the crevice. Second, metal ions released by dissolution are hydrolyzed to produce metal hydroxides and hydrogen ions. The pH of the crevice solution drops because oxygen reduction, which produces hydroxide ions to neutralize the acidity, no longer occurs inside the crevice. If a solution of sufficiently low pH and sufficiently high chloride ion concentration develops, the protective passive film is dissolved. The time at which this occurs is the incubation period. In this work, a moderately dilute electrolyte mass transport model is coupled with Pitzer's Equations to predict the chemical composition of a Grade-2 titanium alloy crevice solution immersed in a Na-K-Cl brine. The results indicate that the incubation period is highly dependent upon the size of the crevice opening and the temperature of the brine. (author)

  5. Prevention of Crevice Corrosion of STS 304 Stainless Steel by a Mg-alloy Galvanic Anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, U. J.; Yun, B. D.; Kim, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of crevice corrosion was studied for STS 304 stainless steel using a Mg-alloy galvanic anode in solutions with various specific resistivity. The crevice corrosion and corrosion protection characteristics of the steel was investigated by the electrochemical polarization and galvanic corrosion tests. Experimental results show that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel does not occur in solutions of high specific resistivity, but it occurs in solutions of low specific resistivity like in solutions with resistivities of 30, 60 and 115 Ω · m. With decreasing specific resistivity of the solution, the electrode potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice is lowered. The potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice after coupling is cathodically polarized more by decreasing specific resistivity indicating that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel is prevented by the Mg-alloy galvanic anode

  6. Investigating the Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Coated Stainless Steel in Seawater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kain, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... austenitic stainless steel. Testing in natural seawater has demonstrated that coatings can protect susceptible stainless steel from barnacle related crevice corrosion and localized corrosion at weldments...

  7. Crevice corrosion resistance of high alloyed materials in 3.5 % NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alar, Vesna; Stojanovic, Ivan; Simunovic, Vinko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of applied torque on the corrosion behaviour of W.-Nr. 1.4404 and 1.4462 stainless steels and W.-Nr. 2.4605 and 2.4858 nickel alloys with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Crevice corrosion (material-to-polytetrafluoroethylene) was tested in 3.5 % NaCl solution at 22 C. The corroded surface was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate similar trends in susceptibility to crevice corrosion with increasing torque. Among the four specimens, the W.-Nr. 1.4404 is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion. (orig.)

  8. Mapping the concentration changes during the dynamic processes of crevice corrosion by digital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HENGLEI JIA

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic process of crevice corrosion during anodic dissolution of a crevice electrode in a 5.0 mmol dm-3 NaCl solution has been studied by digital holographic reconstruction. Digital holographic reconstruction has been proved to be an effective and in situ technique to detect the changes in the solution concentration because useful and direct information can be obtained from the three-dimensional images. It provides a valuable method for a better understanding of the mechanism of crevice corrosion by studying the dynamic processes of changes in the solution concentration at the interface of crevice corrosion.

  9. Urban environment and vegetation: comfort and urban heat island mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Magliocco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the outcomes of an experimental simulation on the microclimatic effects and on thermal comfort of vegetation in urban environment, conducted by means of a three-dimensional microclimate model, ENVI- met 3.1. The simulation considers a wide range of hypothetical cases of typical city areas with different characteristics related to: building density, building height, vegetation type and density. The results of the study show how different combinations of amount and type of vegetation, density and height of buildings affect the urban heat island phenomenon in Mediterranean climate.

  10. Electrochemical tests for pitting and crevice corrosion susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1983-01-01

    Passive metals are being considered as container materials for the disposal of nuclear waste by deep burial. Localized corrosion is a potential problem and electrochemical techniques have an important role in the assessment of the susceptibility of these container materials to crevice and pitting corrosion. This paper critically reviews both the theoretical background and the experimental details of the electrochemical test methods presently used in both industrial and scientific studies of localized corrosion in both halide and non-halide solutions and identifies those areas where theory and experimental behaviour are in agreement and those areas for which there is neither well established theory nor an experimental test method

  11. Orion EFT-1 Cavity Heating Tile Experiments and Environment Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Oliver, Brandon; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Developing aerothermodynamic environments for deep cavities, such as those produced by micrometeoroids and orbital debris impacts, poses a great challenge for engineers. In order to assess existing cavity heating models, two one-inch diameter cavities were flown on the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). These cavities were manufactured with depths of 1.0 in and 1.4 in, and they were both instrumented. Instrumentation included surface thermocouples upstream, downstream and within the cavities, and additional thermocouples at the TPS-structure interface. This paper will present the data obtained, and comparisons with computational predictions will be shown. Additionally, the development of a 3D material thermal model will be described, which will be used to account for the three-dimensionality of the problem when interpreting the data. Furthermore, using a multi-dimensional inverse heat conduction approach, a reconstruction of a time- and space-dependent flight heating distribution during EFT1 will be presented. Additional discussions will focus on instrumentation challenges and calibration techniques specific to these experiments. The analysis shown will highlight the accuracies and/or deficiencies of current computational techniques to model cavity flows during hypersonic re-entry.

  12. Droplet Impact on a Heated Surface under a Depressurized Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Behavior of a water droplet of the diameter 1-3mm impacting on a heated surface under depressurized environment (100kPa -1kPa) has been studied. A syringe pump for droplet generation and a heated plate are set into a transparent acrylic vacuum chamber. The internal pressure of the chamber is automatically controlled at a target pressure with a rotary pump, a pressure transducer, and an electrical valve. A silicon wafer of the thickness 0.28 mm is mounted on the heater plate, whose temperature is directly measured by attaching a thermocouple on the backside. The droplet behavior is captured using a high-speed camera in a direction perpendicular to droplet velocity. Some unique behaviors of droplet are observed by decreasing the environmental pressure, which are considered to be due to two basic elements: Enhancement of evaporation due to the lowered saturation temperature, and shortage of pneumatic spring effect between the droplet and heated wall due to the lowered pressure of the air.

  13. Estimating the lifetimes of titanium containers for nuclear fuel waste: A damage function for the crevice corrosion of grade-2 titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.; Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J.; Kolar, M.

    1995-06-01

    The assumptions upon which the lifetime failure model used in the postclosure assessment is based are reevaluated. In particular, the conservations involved in assuming that crevice initiation would occur, and that sufficient oxygen would be present to maintain crevice propagation to failure, are discussed. Unless the period required to saturate the environment around the container can be specified with some certainty, it remains necessary to assume corrosion would initiate rapidly on all containers. A modified version of the container lifetime model has been developed which avoids the need to use averaged temperature profiles. In this model, these profiles are converted to propagation rate profiles using an experimental activation energy and then numerically integrated to predict container failure times. A damage function is developed relating the maximum depth of penetration by crevice corrosion to either the time since emplacement in the vault or the total amount of oxygen consumed. This function is used to estimate the maximum penetration depth expected if all the oxygen available in a borehole is consumed in crevice corrosion and to determine the impact on container lifetimes of various repassivation criteria. The factors likely to cause repassivation are summarized, and a number of engineering approaches to extending container lifetimes suggested. (author). 22 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs

  14. The assessment of the impurities concentration into CANDU steam generator crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucan, D.; Fulger, M.; Florea, S.; Jinescu, Ghe.; Woinaroschy, Al.

    2001-01-01

    Crevice corrosion involves a number of simultaneous and interacting operations, including mass transfer processes, production of metal ions within the crevice and hydrolysis reactions, resulting in a very aggressive solution from the point of view of corrosion. These intermediary corrosion processes are in a complex interdependence and they imply a number of important parameters, including both the crevice gap and depth. The major goal of this paper was development of a mathematical model for the calculation of the concentrations of impurities (Na + , Cl - , Fe 2+ ) into crevices and experimental research related to this process. There were identified the important experimental parameters that require further experimental research. This model considers all the processes that interfere in the impurities concentration mechanism achieved into the crevice but it also makes some assumptions for the easy solving of mathematical equations. Because the measurement of the impurities concentration into the steam generator and/or deposition in the crevices solutions is not achievable, one cannot estimate the corrosion intensity inside these locations. The mathematical model presented in this paper may predict the impurities concentration in the crevices. Based on the results obtained in the study of corrosion one can appreciate the corrosion intensity in the materials with crevices or conceive an experimental program, which could lead to results. The predictive quality of the model may contribute to the choice of new design solutions, development of new alloys and criteria of material selection. (authors)

  15. Development of the experimental evaluation method for crevice chemistry in steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, In Hyoung [Soonchunghyang Univ., Cheonan (Korea); Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lim, Jung Yeon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Oh, Young Jin; Han, Byung Chan; Oh, Si Hyoung [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Steam generator tube degradation problems is very sensitive to water chemistry. But even if the secondary water chemistry is well controlled, it is needed. Tubesheet crevice has three boiling regimes with depth: liquid penetration and discharge(or wet) region, liquid drop scattering(or dry and wet) region, and dryout region. This results showed a good agreement with earlier works. High temperature, high pressure tubesheet crevice simulation system was constructed. As {delta}T increased, the temperature gradient in crevice and time constant for concentration increased. When the experimental results were compared with MULTEQ calculation results, a similar behavior was shown, packed crevice have longer time constant for Na concentration and showed heavier concentration that open crevice. The verification experiment for Molar Ratio Control and advanced Molar Ration Control test were conducted. To check the applicability of boric acid as pH neutralizer another experiment was conducted. 40 refs., 102 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  16. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at {approx}90{sup o}C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces

  17. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at ∼90 o C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces. The

  18. Influence of heat cost allocation on occupants' control of indoor environment in 56 apartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Andersen, Rune Korsholm; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    -structured interviews showed a strong influence of the heat cost allocation plan on the occupants' control strategies. Occupants whose heating bills were based on floor area focused on a healthy and comfortable indoor environment. Occupants whose heating bills were based on meter readings focused on energy conservation...... of this paper was to study the indoor environment in buildings with collective and individual heat cost allocation plans, to investigate how the heat cost allocation influenced occupant behaviour and how occupants controlled the indoor environment. The effects of the heat cost allocation type were studied...

  19. Phase relations and fluid compositions in steam generator crevices: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to infer chemical conditions inside the steam generator crevices of a nuclear power plant, particularly the composition and alkalinity of the crevice liquid. The water vapor pressure of very concentrated salt solutions and salt mixtures was measured at 317 0 C. It was demonstrated that sodium acetate and other salts of organic acids can form superheated crevice liquids and that the activity of NaOH in these liquids will usually be buffered by silicate minerals in the crevice deposits. Different minerals may fix NaOH at different values, depending on the ion ratios inside the crevice. Values of NaOH that correspond to two buffering reactions involving quartz and sodium silicates were determined experimentally, and values for a variety of other buffering reactions were calculated using thermodynamic data. A thermodynamic model of superheated crevice liquids has been developed that allows us to calculate the activity of NaOH and other compounds in the crevice liquid. Experiments established that many organic materials that may be present in the secondary water will decompose at high temperature to produce acetate and other organic anions

  20. Relationships between boiling regimes and chemical concentration processes in tube support plate crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, A.

    2002-01-01

    The results of a test inter-relating crevice boiling regimes and chemical concentration in tube support plate crevices are presented. Testing of highly soluble, non-volatile autoclave chemistries produced characteristic crevice pH and impedance distributions during nucleate boiling, initiation of dryout, steady-state operation, and following shutdown. However, the patterns changed as a function of the solubility and volatility of the autoclave chemistry, the solute concentration, and the presence of residual solutes from previous testing. The changes were related to variations in the rates of concentrated solution formation, transport, volatilization, and precipitation. (authors)

  1. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''

  2. Investigation on thermal environment improvement by waste heat recovery in the underground station in Qingdao metro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianwei; Liu, Jiaquan; Wang, Fengyin; Wang, Cuiping

    2018-03-01

    The thermal environment parameters, like the temperature and air velocity, are measured to investigate the heat comfort status of metro staff working area in winter in Qingdao. The temperature is affected obviously by the piston wind from the train and waiting hall in the lower Hall, and the temperature is not satisfied with the least heat comfort temperature of 16 °C. At the same time, the heat produced by the electrical and control equipments is brought by the cooling air to atmosphere for the equipment safety. Utilizing the water-circulating heat pump, it is feasible to transfer the emission heat to the staff working area to improve the thermal environment. Analyzed the feasibility from the technique and economy when using the heat pump, the water-circulating heat pump could be the best way to realize the waste heat recovery and to help the heat comfort of staff working area in winter in the underground metro station in north China.

  3. Rainbow fringes around crevice corrosion formed on stainless steel AISI 316 after ennoblement in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Zhang, X. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Wang, J. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Shenyang (China)

    2009-10-15

    The crevice corrosion occurrence probability of stainless steel (SS) AISI 316 was increased under ennoblement condition due to chemically added H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into seawater. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was used to simulate the important factor causing ennoblement in natural marine biofilm. Morphology of the crevice corrosion was observed using an incident-light source microscopy. Some interesting ''rainbow'' fringes were observed around micro-crevices. The mechanism was discussed from the ions diffusion and potential distribution during the crevice formation. This result shows that under ennoblement condition the colored fringe is a distinct characteristic of the morphology of localized corrosion for stainless steel. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Effect of Surface Precipitate on the Crevice Corrosion in HYBRID and Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Jung, J. Y.; Won, H. J.; Kim, S. B.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Park, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the characteristics of the crevice corrosion for Inconel-600 and 304SS in OA solution according to the change in pH. The evaluation of the crevice corrosion with the chemical thermodynamic analysis identified the effect of the residual chemicals such as iron-oxalate and nickeloxalate to the crevice corrosion behavior. Test results were compared with those of HYBRID (HYdrizine Base Reductive metal Ion Decontamination). The crevice corrosion properties of 304 SS and Inconel-600 in HYBRID and oxalic acid solution were evaluated. In case of oxalic acid solution, the corrosion rate on 304SS was rapidly increased with a pH decrease of around 2, but there was no increase in the corrosion rate on Inconel-600

  5. Computational study of platinum nanoparticle deposition on the surfaces of crevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, H.F., E-mail: guhaifeng@hrbeu.edu.cn [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Niceno, B. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Grundler, P.V. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sharabi, M. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Veleva, L. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hot Laboratory Division, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ritter, S. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Nano-particle deposition on the surface of crevices is studied using RANS simulation. • Model results are validated by comparing with experimental data. • Behaviours and mechanisms of particle deposition in different crevices are analyzed. • RANS models with Lagrangian particle tracking method are evaluated and discussed. - Abstract: A well-known issue in boiling water reactors (BWR), which can threaten their structural integrity, is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of reactor internals and recirculation pipes due to the accumulation of oxidizing radiolysis products of water. Currently, many operators of BWRs use combined platinum particle and hydrogen injection into the reactor water to mitigate SCC by lowering the electrochemical corrosion potential. It is essential for efficient mitigation that Pt particles reach all water-wetted surfaces, including crevices and cracks, which are also reached by the oxidizing species. In this study, a set of crevices with different widths and orientations with respect to the fluid flow are investigated using numerical simulation tools and compared against experimental findings. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes models are used to compute the mean turbulent flow quantities in three-dimensional crevices, and the discrete random walk model is used to evaluate the effect of velocity fluctuations on particle movement. The Lagrangian particle tracking analysis is performed and the average concentration of deposited particles on the surface of crevices is evaluated and compared with experimental results. The results show that Reynolds stress model combined with enhanced wall treatment provides a more accurate prediction of particle concentration and distribution on the surface of crevices than SST k–ω turbulence model, which was expected, owing to the anisotropic nature of the Reynolds stress model. Furthermore, analyses on the particle deposition shows that three different mechanisms play important roles in

  6. Technologies and Materials for Recovering Waste Heat in Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thekdi, Arvind [E3M, Inc. North Potomac, MD (United States); Rogers, Benjamin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kafka, Orion L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wenning, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A large amount (7,204 TBtu/year) of energy is used for process heating by the manufacturing sector in the United States (US). This energy is in the form of fuels mostly natural gas with some coal or other fuels and steam generated using fuels such as natural gas, coal, by-product fuels, and some others. Combustion of these fuels results in the release of heat, which is used for process heating, and in the generation of combustion products that are discharged from the heating system. All major US industries use heating equipment such as furnaces, ovens, heaters, kilns, and dryers. The hot exhaust gases from this equipment, after providing the necessary process heat, are discharged into the atmosphere through stacks. This report deals with identification of industries and industrial heating processes in which the exhaust gases are at high temperature (>1200 F), contain all of the types of reactive constituents described, and can be considered as harsh or contaminated. It also identifies specific issues related to WHR for each of these processes or waste heat streams.

  7. Repassivation potentials determination of crevice corrosion of alloy in Chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon Ortiz, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) belongs to the Ni-Cr-Mo family and it is highly resistant to general and localized corrosion, but it may suffer crevice corrosion in aggressive environmental conditions, such as high chloride concentration, high applied potential and high temperature. Alloy 22 is one of the candidates to be considered for the outer corrosion-resistant shell of high-level nuclear waste containers. It is assumed that localized corrosion will only occur when the corrosion potential (E CORR ) is equal or higher than the crevice corrosion repassivation potential (E R,CREV ). This parameter is obtained by different electrochemical techniques using artificially creviced specimens. These techniques include cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) curves, Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu electrochemical (THE) method or other non-standardized methods. Recently, as a variation of THE method, the PD-GS-PD technique was introduced. The aim of the present work was to determine reliable critical potentials for crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in pure chloride solutions at 90 C degrees. Conservative methodologies (which include extended potentiostatic steps) were applied for determining protection potentials below which crevice corrosion cannot initiate and propagate. Results from PD-GS-PD technique were compared with those from these methodologies in order to assess their reliability. Results from the CPP and the THE methods were also considered for comparison. The repassivation potentials from the PD-GS-PD technique were conservative and reproducible, and they did not depend on the amount of previous crevice corrosion propagation in the studied conditions. (author)

  8. Effect of heating system using a geothermal heat pump on the production performance and housing environment of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H C; Salim, H M; Akter, N; Na, J C; Kang, H K; Kim, M J; Kim, D W; Bang, H T; Chae, H S; Suh, O S

    2012-02-01

    A geothermal heat pump (GHP) is a potential heat source for the economic heating of broiler houses with optimum production performance. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of a heating system using a GHP on production performance and housing environment of broiler chickens. A comparative analysis was also performed between the GHP system and a conventional heating system that used diesel for fuel. In total, 34,000 one-day-old straight run broiler chicks were assigned to 2 broiler houses with 5 replicates in each (3,400 birds/replicate pen) for 35 d. Oxygen(,) CO(2), and NH(3) concentrations in the broiler house, energy consumption and cost of heating, and production performance of broilers were evaluated. Results showed that the final BW gain significantly (P heating system did not affect the mortality of chicks during the first 4 wk of the experimental period, but the mortality markedly increased in the conventional broiler house during the last wk of the experiment. Oxygen content in the broiler house during the experimental period was not affected by the heating system, but the CO(2) and NH(3) contents significantly increased (P heating the GHP house was significantly lower (P heating system for broiler chickens.

  9. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Michael [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Oh, Sang-Hyun [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  10. A technical basis to relax the dew point specification for the environment in the vapor space in DWPF canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    This memorandum establishes the technical basis to conclude that relaxing, from 0 C to 20 C, the dew point specification for the atmosphere in the vapor space (free volume) of a DWPF canister will not provide an environment that will cause significant amounts of corrosion induced degradation of the canister wall. The conclusion is based on engineering analysis, experience and review of the corrosion literature. The basic assumptions underlying the conclusion are: (1) the canister was fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel; (2) the corrosion behavior of the canister material, including base metal, fusion zones and heat effected zones, is typified by literature data for, and industrial experience with, 300 series austenitic stainless steels; and (3) the glass-metal crevices created during the pouring operation will not alter the basic corrosion resistance of the steel although such crevices might serve as sites for the initiation of minor amounts of corrosion on the canister wall

  11. Chemistry conditions in crevices of carbon steel and stainless steel: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpalata, R.; Veena, S.; Chandran, Sinu; Mohan, T.V.K.; Rangarajan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence of crevice corrosion in the steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants may lead to transport of radioactivity to the secondary side. It is expected that effect of crevice corrosion will be more pronounced in a passive material like stainless steel (SS) as compared to carbon steel (CS). Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of crevice chemistry calls for experimental data with respect to various water chemistry parameters like pH, conductivity and concentrations of the ionic species in typical crevices of different geometry (aspect ratio of length and width). This paper presents the experimental results obtained with crevices in CS -106 B, SS-304 (nano grain) and SS 316 blocks (varying dimensions) exposed to a medium containing 1 ppm of lithium and chloride ion each for 10 days in static autoclave at 245 deg C. The bulk solution pH showed a reduction in alkalinity and slight increase in conductivity. In case of CS about 58 times increase in Cl - was observed in the smaller crevice of dimension 1 mm (width) x 25 mm (depth) whereas it was only ∼ 12 times in the bigger crevice (2 mm x 39 mm). Other anionic impurities like SO 4 2- and Br - present as impurities in NaCI were also found to be concentrated in the crevices whereas not much increase in cationic impurities was observed. In a similar experiment with SS blocks with crevice dimension comparable to diffusion layer thickness, appreciable increase in chloride concentration was observed. Electrochemical experiments were also carried out in deaerated NaCI (3.5%) solution at 25 deg C with CS, SS-304 (nano grain) and SS-316 (normal-grain) coupons. The OCP was -297 mV for SS-316 whereas for SS-304 coupon the OCP was -339 mV. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization curve showed a passive behavior up to 0.0V and then a sudden increase in anodic current. On nano-grained SS, a yellowish film on the surface was observed with a large number of pits whereas severe general corrosion was observed in the normal

  12. Crevice corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys as engineered barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornus, E. C.; Carranza, R. M.; Giordano, C. M.; Rodríguez, M. A.; Rebak, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    The crevice corrosion re passivation potential was determined by the Potentiodynamic- Galvanostatic-Potentiodynamic (PD-GS-PD) method. Alloys 625, C-22, C-22HS and HYBRID-BC1 were used. Specimens contained 24 artificially creviced spots formed by a ceramic washer (crevice former) wrapped with a PTFE tape. Crevice corrosion tests were performed in 0,1 mol/L and 1 mol/L NaCl solutions at temperatures between 20 and 90ºC, and CaCl2 5 mol/L solution at temperatures between 20 and 117°C. The crevice corrosion resistance of the alloys increased in the following order: 625 < C-22 < C-22HS < HYBRID-BC1. The repassivation potential (ECO) showed the following relationship with temperature (T) and chloride concentration ([Cl-]) ECO = (A + B T) log [Cl-] + C T + D; where A, B, C and D are constants. At temperatures above 90°C, ECO for alloy 625 stabilized at a minimum value of -0.26 VSCE (author)

  13. Effects of iron content on microstructure and crevice corrosion of titanium Grade-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.; Noel, J.J.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of iron content on microstructure and crevice corrosion of titanium Grade-2 (Ti-2) were studied using a galvanic coupling technique combined with optical microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging. The study reveals that iron content has a significant effect on the microstructure and crevice corrosion behavior of Ti-2. The grain size decreases significantly with the increasing iron content. For Ti-2 material of medium iron content, crevice corrosion was readily initiated and exhibited extensive intergranular attack which could be associated with the more reactive iron-stabilized β-phase within the α-phase matrix as revealed by SIMS imaging. By contrast, Ti-2 materials with low and high iron content showed suppressed crevice attack. The small surface area of available grain boundaries in Ti-2 of low iron content accounted for this limited attack. For the material with high iron content, SIMS imaging suggest that some Ti x Fe intermetallic particles were formed. These particles may act as proton reduction catalysts and enhance crevice corrosion resistance. (author)

  14. Crevice corrosion of alloy 22 in fluoride and chloride containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.

    2005-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to localized corrosion. Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in pure chloride (Cl - ) solutions under aggressive environmental conditions. The effect of the fluoride (F - ) on the susceptibility to crevice corrosion induced by chloride ions is still not well established. The objective of the present work was to explore the crevice corrosion resistance of this alloy to different mixtures of fluorides and chlorides. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) tests were conducted in deaerated aqueous solutions of pure halide ions and also in different mixtures of chloride and fluoride at 90 C degrees and pH 6. The range of chloride concentration [Cl - ] was 0.001 M ≤ [Cl - ] ≤ 1 M and the range of molar fluoride to chloride ratio [F - ]/[Cl - ] was 0.1≤ [F - ]/[Cl - ] ≤ 10. Results showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion in all the pure chloride solutions but not in the pure fluoride solutions. A molar ratio [F - ]/[Cl - ] ranging from 5 to 10 was required for the inhibition of crevice corrosion to be complete in the halide mixtures. A moderate or nil inhibitive effect was observed for molar ratios [F - ]/[Cl - ] [es

  15. Heat Transfer between an Individual Carbon Nanotube and Gas Environment in a Wide Knudsen Number Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Dong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of carbon nanotube (CNT and graphene in thermal management have recently attracted significant attention. However, the lack of efficient prediction formula for heat transfer coefficient between nanomaterials and gas environment limits the further development of this technique. In this work, a kinetic model has been established to predict the heat transfer coefficient of an individual CNT in gas environment. The heat dissipation around the CNT is governed by molecular collisions, and outside the collision layer, the heat conduction is dominant. At nanoscales, the natural convection can be neglected. In order to describe the intermolecular collisions around the CNT quantitatively, a correction factor 1/24 is introduced and agrees well with the experimental observation. The prediction of the present model is in good agreement with our experimental results in free molecular regime. Further, a maximum heat transfer coefficient occurs at a critical diameter of several nanometers, providing guidelines on the practical design of CNT-based heat spreaders.

  16. Influence of heating rate on corrosion behavior of Ni-base heat resistant alloys in simulated VHTR helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1985-04-01

    The influence of heating rate on corrosion and carbon transfer was studied for Ni-base heat resistant alloys exposed to simulated VHTR(very high temperature reactor) coolant environment. Special attention was focused to relationship between oxidation and carburization at early stage of exposure. Tests were conducted on two heats of Hastelloy XR with different boron(B) content and the developmental alloys, 113MA and KSN. Two kinds of heating rates, i.e. 80 0 C/min and 2 0 C/min, were employed. Corrosion tests were carried out at 900 0 C up to 500 h in JAERI Type B helium, one of the simulated VHTR primary coolant specifications. Under higher heating rate, oxidation resistance of both heats of Hastelloy XR(2.8 ppmB and 40 ppmB) were equivalent and among the best, then KSN and 113MA followed in the order. Under lower heating rate only alloy, i.e. Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB, showed some deteriorated oxidation resistance while all others being unaffected by the heating rate. On the other hand the carbon transfer behavior showed strong dependence on the heating rate. In case of higher heating rate, significant carburization occured at early stage of exposure and thereafter the progress of carburization was slow in all the alloys. On the other hand only slow carburization was the case throughout the exposure in case of lower heating rate. The carburization in VHTR helium environment was interpreted as to be affected by oxide film formation in the early stage of exposure. The carbon pick-up was largest in Hastelloy XR with 40 ppmB and it was followed by Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB. 113MA and KSN were carburized only slightly. The observed difference of carbon pick-up among the alloys tested was interpreted to be attributed mainly to the difference of the carbon activity, the carbide precipitation characteristics among the alloys tested. (author)

  17. Thin film heat flux sensor for Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine environment stresses engine components to their design limits and beyond. The extremely high temperatures and rapid temperature cycling can easily cause parts to fail if they are not properly designed. Thin film heat flux sensors can provide heat loading information with almost no disturbance of gas flows or of the blade. These sensors can provide steady state and transient heat flux information. A thin film heat flux sensor is described which makes it easier to measure small temperature differences across very thin insulating layers.

  18. The effect of ion implantation on the resistance of 316L stainless steel to crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombara, G.; Cavallini, M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the influence of aluminium, titanium and scandium implantation on the electrochemical and chemical crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel are presented and discussed. Ion implantation, in addition to improving markedly the protective quality of the passive film at the free corrosion potential, greatly increases the resistance of 316L stainless steel to crevice corrosion in both neutral NaCl and acidic FeCl 3 solutions. A moderate decrease in pitting resistance is possibly due to coverage effect of implanted species on the surface molybdenum constituent. (Auth.)

  19. Tree-crown-resolving large-eddy simulation for evaluating greenery effects on urban heat environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, K.; Onishi, R.; Takahashi, K.

    2017-12-01

    Urban high temperatures due to the combined influence of global warming and urban heat islands increase the risk of heat stroke. Greenery is one of possible countermeasures for mitigating the heat environments since the transpiration and shading effect of trees can reduce the air temperature and the radiative heat flux. In order to formulate effective measures, it is important to estimate the influence of the greenery on the heat stroke risk. In this study, we have developed a tree-crown-resolving large-eddy simulation (LES) model that is coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer (3DRT) model. The Multi-Scale Simulator for the Geoenvironment (MSSG) is used for performing building- and tree-crown-resolving LES. The 3DRT model is implemented in the MSSG so that the 3DRT is calculated repeatedly during the time integration of the LES. We have confirmed that the computational time for the 3DRT model is negligibly small compared with that for the LES and the accuracy of the 3DRT model is sufficiently high to evaluate the radiative heat flux at the pedestrian level. The present model is applied to the analysis of the heat environment in an actual urban area around the Tokyo Bay area, covering 8 km × 8 km with 5-m grid mesh, in order to confirm its feasibility. The results show that the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT), which is an indicator of the heat stroke risk, is predicted in a sufficiently high accuracy to evaluate the influence of tree crowns on the heat environment. In addition, by comparing with a case without the greenery in the Tokyo Bay area, we have confirmed that the greenery increases the low WBGT areas in major pedestrian spaces by a factor of 3.4. This indicates that the present model can predict the greenery effect on the urban heat environment quantitatively.

  20. Crevice-corrosion kinetics on titanium and a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy in chloride solutions at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of an electrochemical investigation of the crevice-corrosion kinetics on titanium and a dilute Ti-Ni-Mo alloy (0.8% Ni, 0.3% Mo), in concentrated chloride solutions at 150 0 C, are presented. The current-time transients, obtained on creviced electrodes under both potentiostatic and galvanic (coupling to a large area of uncreviced titanium) conditions, are interpreted in terms of crevice acidification leading to the formation of an active-passive cell, maintained by iR gradient in the electrolyte. The passivating effect of the Ni and Mo additions on the crevice corrosion of titanium are described, together with the results of an electrochemical study, carried out in bulk acid chloride solutions, that were used to substantiate a proposed mechanism of crevice passivation. (author)

  1. Design of a thermochemical heat storage system for tap water heating in the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaeini, M.; de Jong, E.C.J.; Zondag, H.A.; Rindt, C.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Replacing the use of fossil fuel by solar energy, as one of the most promising sustainable energy sources, is of high interest, because of climate change and depletion of fossil resources. However, to reach high solar fractions and to overcome the mismatch between supply and demand of solar heat,

  2. The effects of heat treatment and environment on corrosion fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.; Elliott, C.K.

    1993-05-01

    Alloy X-750 is a nickel-base alloy used extensively in Light Water Reactor (LWR) nuclear power systems due to its excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature strength. In spite of alloy X-750's exceptional high temperature properties, it has been found to be susceptible to environmentally assisted fatigue and stress corrosion cracking in relatively low temperature aqueous environments such as those that exist in LWR systems. In order to develop a better understanding of the role that microstructure plays in the fatigue behavior of alloy X-750, three thermal treatments were studied. The treatments used were as hot worked + : (1) 24 h at 885 degree C + 20 h at 704 degree C (AH), (2) lh at 982 degree C + 20 h at 704 degree C (BH), and (3) 1 h at 1093 degree C + 20 h at 704 degree C (HTH). Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted at frequencies of 0.1 and 10 Hz in the following aqueous environments: (1) high purity, air saturated water (8 ppM O 2 ) at 93 degree C and 288 degree C, (2) high purity, deoxygenated water (5 ppb O 2 ) at 93 degree C, and (3) simulated BWR water chemistry with hydrogen additions at 288 degree C. Crack growth rate data was collected at constant values of stress intensity factor range (ΔK). The results show that crack growth rates and morphology are a function of ΔK, frequency, thermal treatment and environment. Frequency effects were most significant for the AH material. Crack growth rates generally decrease, for a given value of ΔK, in the BH and HTH materials with the HTH material showing the lowest growth rate

  3. Human thermal sensation and comfort in a non-uniform environment with personalized heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qihong; Wang, Runhuai; Li, Yuguo; Miao, Yufeng; Zhao, Jinping

    2017-02-01

    Thermal comfort in traditionally uniform environment is apparent and can be improved by increasing energy expenses. To save energy, non-uniform environment implemented by personalized conditioning system attracts considerable attention, but human response in such environment is unclear. To investigate regional- and whole-body thermal sensation and comfort in a cool environment with personalized heating. In total 36 subjects (17 males and 19 females) including children, adults and the elderly, were involved in our experiment. Each subject was first asked to sit on a seat in an 18°C chamber (uniform environment) for 40min and then sit on a heating seat in a 16°C chamber (non-uniform environment) for another 40min after 10min break. Subjects' regional- and whole-body thermal sensation and comfort were surveyed by questionnaire and their skin temperatures were measured by wireless sensors. We statistically analyzed subjects' thermal sensation and comfort and their skin temperatures in different age and gender groups and compared them between the uniform and non-uniform environments. Overall thermal sensation and comfort votes were respectively neutral and just comfortable in 16°C chamber with personalized heating, which were significantly higher than those in 18°C chamber without heating (pthermal sensation and comfort was consistent in subjects of different age and gender. However, adults and the females were more sensitive to the effect of personalized heating and felt cooler and less comfort than children/elderly and the males respectively. Variations of the regional thermal sensation/comfort across human body were consistent with those of skin temperature. Personalized heating significantly improved human thermal sensation and comfort in non-uniform cooler environment, probably due to the fact that it increased skin temperature. However, the link between thermal sensation/comfort and variations of skin temperature is rather complex and warrant further

  4. The Evaluation of Crevice Corrosion of Inconel-600 and 304 Stainless Steel in Reductive Decontamination Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Junyoung; Park, Sangyoon; Won, Huijun; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon; Park, Sojin

    2014-01-01

    In this sturdy, we investigated the characteristics of corrosion to Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel which are mainly used for the steam generator and primary system of PWR reactor respectively. We conducted the corrosion test for the HYBRID (HYdrazine Based metal Ion Reductive decontamination) which was developed in KAERI, Citrox and Oxalic acid solutions used in reductive decontamination of the inner surface of PWR. Since Citrox and oxalic acid solution were well-known conventional decontamination solutions, it is meaningful to compare the corrosion result of HYBRID with those solutions to confirm the corrosion compatibility. In order to obtain visible results in a limited time, we conducted the crevice corrosion tests under harsh condition. According to the results of crevice corrosion tests, we can conclude that metals such as type 304 stainless steel and Inconel-600 in HYBRID are very stable against crevice corrosion. On the other hand, those metals in Citrox and oxalic acid solutions were very susceptible to the crevice corrosion. Especially when using the oxalic acid solution, severe corrosion was observed not only Inconel-600 but also 304 stainless steel. The degree of corrosion can be expressed as; HYBRID << Citrox < OA. Conclusively, our results support that the HYBRID is more stable to the corrosion of structural materials in primary system than other Citrox and oxalic acid solutions. This finding will appoint the HYBRID solution as a candidate to solve the corrosion problem which is often issued by existing chemical decontamination processes

  5. Role of heat tint on pitting corrosion of 304 austenitic stainless steel in chloride environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshawesh, F.; Elhoud, A. [Petroleum Research Center, P. O. Box 6431, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    2004-07-01

    The effect of simulated heat tint produced by air oxidation at a wide range of temperatures 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1050 deg. C on pitting potential of 304 austenitic stainless steel was studied in environment of different chloride concentration. It was found that the heat tint effect depends on the heating temperature. The most effective heat tint was that produced at the high temperature up to 1050 deg. C and hence less pitting potential and low corrosion resistance. In order to improve the surface pitting corrosion resistance, acid pickling of hydrochloric acid was applied at different time and temperatures of 15 and 60 min, room temperature and 60 deg. C, respectively. Improvement in pitting potential was achieved as the pickling time and temperature increase. This is can be attributed to the removal of depleted chromium oxide film produced during the heat tint. (authors)

  6. Orion Exploration Flight Test Reaction Control System Jet Interaction Heating Environment from Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Molly E.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Reaction Control System (RCS) is critical to guide the vehicle along the desired trajectory during re-­-entry. However, this system has a significant impact on the convective heating environment to the spacecraft. Heating augmentation from the jet interaction (JI) drives thermal protection system (TPS) material selection and thickness requirements for the spacecraft. This paper describes the heating environment from the RCS on the afterbody of the Orion MPCV during Orion's first flight test, Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1). These jet plumes interact with the wake of the crew capsule and cause an increase in the convective heating environment. Not only is there widespread influence from the jet banks, there may also be very localized effects. The firing history during EFT-1 will be summarized to assess which jet bank interaction was measured during flight. Heating augmentation factors derived from the reconstructed flight data will be presented. Furthermore, flight instrumentation across the afterbody provides the highest spatial resolution of the region of influence of the individual jet banks of any spacecraft yet flown. This distribution of heating augmentation across the afterbody will be derived from the flight data. Additionally, trends with possible correlating parameters will be investigated to assist future designs and ground testing programs. Finally, the challenges of measuring JI, applying this data to future flights and lessons learned will be discussed.

  7. Human Thermal Comfort and Heat Stress in an Outdoor Urban Arid Environment: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abdel-Ghany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To protect humans from heat stress risks, thermal comfort and heat stress potential were evaluated under arid environment, which had never been made for such climate. The thermal indices THI, WBGT, PET, and UTCI were used to evaluate thermal comfort and heat stress. RayMan software model was used to estimate the PET, and the UTCI calculator was used for UTCI. Dry and wet bulb temperatures (Td, Tw, natural wet bulb temperature (Tnw, and globe temperature (Tg were measured in a summer day to be used in the calculation. The results showed the following. (i The thermal sensation and heat stress levels can be evaluated by either the PET or UTCI scales, and both are valid for extremely high temperature in the arid environment. (ii In the comfort zone, around 75% of individuals would be satisfied with the surrounding environment and feel comfortable during the whole day. (iii Persons are exposed to strong heat stress and would feel uncomfortable most of the daytime in summer. (iv Heat fatigue is expected with prolonged exposure to sun light and activity. (v During the daytime, humans should schedule their activities according to the highest permissible values of the WBGT to avoid thermal shock.

  8. Waste heat discharges in the aquatic environment -- impact and monitoring 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Studies on ecological impacts, on fishes in particular, of waste heat discharges in the aquatic environment are briefly reviewed. These studies cover the susceptibility of fishes to disease and predation, population biology, parasite proliferation and its impact on fishes, synergistic effects due to heat and other stresses such as chemicals, pollutant, lowering of saturation limit of dissolved oxygen at elevated temperature and radioactivity. Experiences of monitoring waste heat discharges at the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) and the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) are presented. Entrainment losses and impingement losses are also reviewed. Requirements for thermal monitoring are mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  9. Water Recovery with the Heat Melt Compactor in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Goo, Jonathan; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The Heat Melt Compactor is a proposed utility that will compact astronaut trash, extract the water for eventual re-use, and form dry square tiles that can be used as additional ionizing radiation shields for future human deep space missions. The Heat Melt Compactor has been under development by a consortium of NASA centers. The downstream portion of the device is planned to recover a small amount of water while in a microgravity environment. Drop tower low gravity testing was performed to assess the effect of small particles on a capillary-based water/air separation device proposed for the water recovery portion of the Heat Melt Compactor.

  10. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of grades-2 and -12 titanium under Canadian nuclear waste vault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Bailey, M.G.; Clarke, C.F.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Results on the corrosion of titanium grades 2 and 12 under the saline conditions anticipated in Canadian nuclear waste vaults are presented. The experimental approach included short-term electrochemical experiments to determine corrosion mechanisms, the susceptibility of titanium to crevice corrosion under a variety of conditions, and the extent of hydrogen uptake under controlled conditions; medium-term corrosion tests lasting a few weeks to a few months; and long-term immersion tests to provide rates for uniform corrosion, crevice corrosion, and hydrogen pickup. Results indicated that propagation, not initiation, is important in establishing susceptibility to crevice corrosion. Increasing the iron content of Ti-2 to 0.13 weight percent prevents crevice corrosion by causing repassivation. Crevice corrosion initiates on Ti-12, but repassivation is rapid. The supply of oxidant is essential to maintain crevice propagation. Hydrogen embrittlement is unlikely unless oxide film breakdown occurs. Film breakdown occurs under crevice conditions, and hydrogen pickup is to be expected. Film breakdown could occur if the strain or creep rate is fast enough to compete with repassivation reactions, a highly unlikely situation

  11. Investigation of the Indoor Environment in a Passive House Apartment Building Heated by Ventilation Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysholt Hansen, MathiasYoung Bok; Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2014-01-01

    comfort and the performance of the air heating system and solar shading. Thermal comfort category B according to ISO 7730 was obtained in the building during field measurements, indicating that the air heating system was able to maintain comfort conditions in winter, when the outdoor temperature had been...... building project finished medio 2012. The design challenge was met with a concept of air heating that is individually controlled in every room. It also applies external solar shading. This study used indoor climate measurements and dynamic simulations in one of these apartment buildings to evaluate thermal...... unusual low for a longer period. The dynamic simulations also indicated that air heating during winter can provide a comfortable thermal environment. Dynamic simulations also demonstrated that during summer, apartments with automatic external solar screens had no serious overheating, whereas in apartments...

  12. Coupled heat transfer model and experiment study of semitransparent barrier materials in aerothermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Lin; Qi, Hong

    Semi-transparent materials (such as IR optical windows) are widely used for heat protection or transfer, temperature and image measurement, and safety in energy , space, military, and information technology applications. They are used, for instance, ceramic coatings for thermal barriers of spacecrafts or gas turbine blades, and thermal image observation under extreme or some dangerous environments. In this paper, the coupled conduction and radiation heat transfer model is established to describe temperature distribution of semitransparent thermal barrier medium within the aerothermal environment. In order to investigate this numerical model, one semi-transparent sample with black coating was considered, and photothermal properties were measured. At last, Finite Volume Method (FVM) was used to solve the coupled model, and the temperature responses from the sample surfaces were obtained. In addition, experiment study was also taken into account. In the present experiment, aerodynamic heat flux was simulated by one electrical heater, and two experiment cases were designed in terms of the duration of aerodynamic heating. One case is that the heater irradiates one surface of the sample continually until the other surface temperature up to constant, and the other case is that the heater works only 130 s. The surface temperature responses of these two cases were recorded. Finally, FVM model of the coupling conduction-radiation heat transfer was validated based on the experiment study with relative error less than 5%.

  13. Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, J.; Kehler, B.; Iloybare, G.O.; Scully, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is concerned with the corrosion resistance of candidate engineered waste package materials. A variety of waste package designs have been proposed for US and Canadian High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A common feature of each design is the possibility of utilizing a corrosion resistant material such as a nickel-based super alloy or titanium-based alloy. A suitable corrosion resistant material may provide (a) kinetic immunity if the combination of repository environmental conditions and alloy resistance assure both: (i) a passive condition with negligible chance of localized corrosion stabilization, as well as (ii) low enough passive dissolution rates to insure conventional corrosion allowance over geological times, (b) a second form of ''corrosion allowance,'' if it can be scientifically demonstrated that a mechanism for stifling (i.e., death) of localized corrosion propagation occurs well before waste canisters are penetrated, or (c) such a low probability of initiation and continued propagation that a tolerably low degree of penetration occurs. Unfortunately, a large database on the crevice corrosion properties of alloy 22 does not exist in comparison to alloy 625. Alloy screening tests in oxidizing acids containing FeCl3 indicate that alloy 22 is more resistant to crevice corrosion than 625 as indicated by critical pit and crevice temperatures. Differences in alloying element compositions as expressed by pitting resistance equivalency number calculations support these findings. However, these data only provide the relative ranking of these alloys in terms of crevice corrosion and do not answer the critical questions proposed above

  14. Hydrogeological, hydrochemical and isotope-hydrological investigations of surface and crevice waters in the Grimsel area (Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, A.

    1995-12-01

    The Grimsel rock laboratory (Hasli valley, Berner Oberland, Switzerland) has been used since 1984 by NAGRA (Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle, Wettingen, Switzerland). It is about 450 metres deep under the Juchli ridge in the crystalline rock basement of the Aar massif. Within the framework of an international cooperation, a great many research topics in connection with the underground storage of radioactive waste are being studied at this location. Their focus is, inter alia, on the following: hydrogeological investigations of crevice water movement, investigations of geophysical structures and rock tension measurements, migration of radionuclides in an individual crevice. So far, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conditions have only been studied as far as they related to the needs of individual investigations, and systematic information on global waterways in the Juchli basement was scarce. By contrast, this work aimed at the chemical characterization of surface and spring waters in the catchment area of the rock laboratory as well as the crevice waters in the day-drift system, the description of the chemical development of the waters during their passage through the crevice system, and the assessment of the mean underground retention time of crevice waters by means of different stable and radioactive isotopes. In addition, hydrogeological mapping of the system of waters above ground and crevice water accesses underground was carried out. (orig./SR) [de

  15. Computerized simulation study of the influence of the different parameters inducing crevice corrosion propagation of passivable alloys in chloride medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Proust, A.; Combrade, P.; Vuillemin, B.; Oltra, R.

    2006-01-01

    The most frequent case of crevice corrosion concerns passivable alloys, and particularly stainless steels in oxidizing chloride media. In order to be sure that its propagation is not possible, the corrosion potential has to be inferior to a critical value called 're-passivation potential'. An easy and flexible computerized simulation of the propagation of an active crevice in chloride medium has been developed to give a parametric study of the local medium and of the re-passivation conditions. This modeling allows to establish the stability domains of the solid and gaseous phases inside the crevice and to assess the influence of the potential of the free surfaces, of the amount of chloride in the exterior medium and the geometry on the local chemistry. It appears that the deepest crevices are not necessarily the strongest. The introduction, in crevice tip, of an easy re-passivation criteria shows the existence of a re-passivation potential depending of the crevice geometry. (O.M.)

  16. Effect of dissolved oxygen, hydrazine and pH outside the crevice on the galvanic corrosion of support plate alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKubre, M.C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A study has been performed of the initial corrosion of support structure alloys in crevices of various geometries, when galvanically coupled to alloy 600. Corrosion rates were monitored continuously by measuring the galvanic current flowing in each couple, transduced by a zero impedance ammeter. Experiments were performed in a single-pass flowing electrolyte system, with AVT water pumped through alloy 600 tubing past the orifice of each crevice. Fourteen crevices were studied simultaneously in two parallel flow arms containing seven specimens each. The steady state AVT water pH/hydrazine/oxygen concentrations were controlled by microcomputer, allowing the effect of secondary water chemistry on the corrosion rate to be studied easily. Control of the crevice electrolyte composition was achieved by separately pumping electrolyte, at a low rate, directly into the crevices of the seven specimens in the lower flow arm. In addition, a high pressure syringe was used to introduce chemicals directly into the secondary or crevice electrolyte flow streams, in order to rapidly evaluate the influence of potential corrodent or corrosion control agents on the galvanic corrosion rates. Specimens were studied in the five basic geometries

  17. Microstructure, tensile deformation mode and crevice corrosion resistance in Ti-10Mo-xFe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, X.H.; Emura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Tsuzaki, K.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure, the tensile deformation mode at ambient temperature and the crevice corrosion resistance at a high temperature of 373 K were investigated in the Ti-10Mo-xFe (x = 0, 1, 3, 5) alloys. The stability of the β phase increased, and the formation of the α'' martensite and the athermal ω phase was suppressed by the increase in the Fe content. EPMA examinations indicated that the existence of the α'' martensite in the Ti-10Mo alloy was caused by the solidification segregation of Mo atoms. EBSD observations showed that the deformation mode changed from a {3 3 2} twinning to a slip by an increase in the Fe content, which coincided with the prediction by the electron/atom (e/a) ratio. The Ti-10Mo-3Fe alloy showed the highest yield strength of 935 MPa among all the alloys, while the Ti-10Mo-1Fe alloy showed the lowest value of 563 MPa due to the change in the deformation mode. On the other hand, all the alloys exhibited a high crevice corrosion resistance in a high chloride and high acidic solution at the high temperature, although the corrosion resistance decreased with an increase in the Fe content. The decrease in the corrosion resistance can be explained by the bond order (Bo). A good combination of tensile properties and crevice corrosion resistance may be obtainable through a further optimization of the Fe content by the e/a ratio and the Bo.

  18. Clonality of bacterial consortia in root canals and subjacent gingival crevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahitiyawa, Nipuna B; Chu, Frederick C S; Leung, Wai K; Yam, Wing C; Jin, Li Jian; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2015-02-01

    No oral niche can be considered to be segregated from the subjacent milieu because of the complex community behavior and nature of the oral biofilms. The aim of this study was to address the paucity of information on how these species are clonally related to the subjacent gingival crevice bacteria. We utilized a metagenomic approach of amplifying 16S rDNA from genomic DNA, cloning, sequencing and analysis using LIBSHUFF software to assess the genetic homogeneity of the bacterial species from two infected root canals and subjacent gingival crevices. The four niches studied yielded 186 clones representing 54 phylotypes. Clone library comparisons using LIBSHUFF software indicated that each niche was inhabited by a unique flora. Further, 42% of the clones were of hitherto unknown phylotypes indicating the extent of bacterial diversity, especially in infected root canals and subjacent gingival crevices. We believe data generated through this novel analytical tool shed new light on understanding oral microbial ecosystems. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Reshaping the Built Environment to Reduce Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Summertime Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, J. E.; Bakewell, K.

    2005-12-01

    Many American cities are experiencing two types of warming trends in their local climate that due to global environmental change, and that due to local environmental change. Over the next five decades, urban areas within temperate regions may warm disproportionately compared to tropical and subtropical zones according to the IPCC Special Report on The Regional Impacts of Climate Change, and the frequency of very hot days in these climates is expected to approximately double for an increase of 2-3°C in the average summer temperature. As well, due to urbanized land-cover, air temperatures in cities can register 2 to 10 degrees F higher than in surrounding rural areas, resulting in a hotter environment, higher energy demand, and accelerated smog formation due to the urban heat island effect. Our previous research analyzed the temperature differences over time between NY Central Park (NYCP) station and 23 metropolitan regional weather stations classified according to distance and level of urbanization, and showed a heat island effect existing in NYC, with mean temperatures in the NYCP Station generally higher than the surrounding stations, ranging from 1.20 C to 3.02 C. A difference of at least 1 C already existed at the beginning of the 20th century between the mean temperature in NYC and its surrounding rural areas, and this difference increased over the twentieth century. Summertime heat can create heat stress and other health consequences for urban residents. In cities around the world, summer heat can lead to elevated mortality and morbidity rates, especially during extreme events. The epidemiological literature has identified factors in the built environment and demographic characteristics that can increase the risk of heat-related mortality. The elderly and people with pre-existing illnesses are especially vulnerable; also, being bedridden, living alone, and having poor access to public transportation or air-conditioned places. During the Chicago 1995 heat wave

  20. Adaptation measures for climate change and the urban heat island in Japan's built environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Climate change scenarios are discussed for Japan with clear implications drawn for the built environment in terms of increased temperatures of 4-5 o C, rising sea levels and subterranean water tables. Research on the impacts and adaptation measures for global warming in Japan is reviewed. One of the most significant impacts of climate change in Japan will exacerbate the existing heat island phenomenon in cities by absorbing increased solar radiation. This will lead to further increases in temperatures in an urban microclimate with negative implications for energy and water consumption, human health and discomfort, and local ecosystems. The current urban heat island phenomenon and its impacts are described. The relationships between climate change and urban heat island impacts are discussed. Potential adaptation measures to those impacts are also discussed and proposed. (author)

  1. High temperature corrosion in the service environments of a nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear process heat plant the heat-exchanging components fabricated from nickel- and Fe-Ni-based alloys are subjected to corrosive service environments at temperatures up to 950 0 C for service lives of up to 140 000 h. In this paper the corrosion behaviour of the high temperature alloys in the different service environments will be described. It is shown that the degree of protection provided by Cr 2 O 3 -based surface oxide scales against carburization and decarburization of the alloys is primarily determined not by the oxidation potential of the atmospheres but by a dynamic process involving, on the one hand, the oxidizing gas species and the metal and, on the other hand, the carbon in the alloy and the oxide scale. (orig.)

  2. SRB thermal protection systems materials test results in an arc-heated nitrogen environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    The external surface of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) will experience imposed thermal and shear environments due to aerodynamic heating and radiation heating during launch, staging and reentry. This report is concerned with the performance of the various TPS materials during the staging maneuver. During staging, the wash from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) exhust plumes impose severe, short duration, thermal environments on the SRB. Five different SRB TPS materials were tested in the 1 MW Arc Plasma Generator (APG) facility. The maximum simulated heating rate obtained in the APG facility was 248 Btu/sq ft./sec, however, the test duration was such that the total heat was more than simulated. Similarly, some local high shear stress levels of 0.04 psia were not simulated. Most of the SSME plume impingement area on the SRB experiences shear stress levels of 0.02 psia and lower. The shear stress levels on the test specimens were between 0.021 and 0.008 psia. The SSME plume stagnation conditions were also simulated.

  3. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  4. An analytical model for particulate deposition on vertical heat transfer surfaces in a boiling environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefer, R.H.; Rider, J.L.; Waldman, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    A frequent problem in heat exchange equipment is the deposition of particulates entrained in the working fluid onto heat transfer surfaces. These deposits increase the overall heat transfer resistance and can significantly degrade the performance of the heat exchanger. Accurate prediction of the deposition rate is necessary to ensure that the design and specified operating conditions of the heat exchanger adequately address the effects of this deposit layer. Although the deposition process has been studied in considerable detail, much of the work has focused on investigating individual aspects of the deposition process. This paper consolidates this previous research into a mechanistically based analytical prediction model for particulate deposition from a boiling liquid onto vertical heat transfer surfaces. Consistent with the well known Kern-Seaton approach, the model postulates net particulate accumulation to depend on the relative contributions of deposition and reentrainment processes. Mechanisms for deposition include boiling, momentum, and diffusion effects. Reentrainment is presumed to occur via an intermittent erosion process, with the energy for particle removal being supplied by turbulent flow instabilities. The contributions of these individual mechanisms are integrated to obtain a single equation for the deposit thickness versus time. The validity of the resulting model is demonstrated by comparison with data published in the open literature. Model estimates show good agreement with data obtained over a range of thermal-hydraulic conditions in both flow and pool boiling environments. The utility of the model in performing parametric studies (e.g. to determine the effect of flow velocity on net deposition) is also demonstrated. The initial success of the model suggests that it could prove useful in establishing a range of heat exchanger. operating conditions to minimize deposition

  5. Chemical and structural analyses of subsurface crevices formed during spontaneous deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Daimon K, E-mail: dkheller@mmm.com; Fahrenholtz, William G., E-mail: billf@mst.edu; O' Keefe, Matthew J., E-mail: mjokeefe@mst.edu

    2011-11-15

    Subsurface crevices formed during the deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings were analyzed in cross-section to assess the effect of deposition and post-treatment on the structure and chemistry of phases present. An Al-O containing phase, believed to be amorphous Al(OH){sub 3}, was formed in crevices during coating deposition. Analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of up to 1.6 at.% chlorine within the Al-O phase, which was likely a product of soluble chlorides that were present in the coating solution. Cerium was not detected within crevices. After post-treatment in an 85 deg. C aqueous phosphate solution, the chloride concentration was reduced to {<=} 0.30 at.% and electron diffraction of the Al-O phase produced ring patterns, indicating it had crystallized. Some diffraction patterns could be indexed to gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), but others are believed to be a combination of hydrated aluminum hydroxides and/or oxides. Aluminum phosphate was not identified. Separately from its effect on cerium-based conversion coatings, phosphate post-treatment improved the corrosion resistance of Al 2024-T3 substrates by acting to crystallize Al(OH){sub 3} present on interior surfaces of crevices and by reducing the chloride concentration in this phase. - Highlights: {yields} Analysis of subsurface crevices formed during deposition of Ce-based conversion coatings. {yields} Phosphate post-treatment improved corrosion protection in salt spray testing. {yields} Post-treatment affected the composition and structure of regions within crevices. {yields} Crystallized Al(OH){sub 3} within crevices acted as a more effective barrier to chloride ions.

  6. Simulating extreme environments: Ergonomic evaluation of Chinese pilot performance and heat stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Tian, Yinsheng; Ding, Li; Zou, Huijuan; Ren, Zhaosheng; Shi, Liyong; Feathers, David; Wang, Ning

    2015-06-05

    High-temperatures in the cockpit environment can adversely influence pilot behavior and performance. To investigate the impact of high thermal environments on Chinese pilot performance in a simulated cockpit environment. Ten subjects volunteered to participate in the tests under 40°C and 45°C high-temperature simulations in an environmentally controlled chamber. Measures such as grip strength, perception, dexterity, somatic sense reaction, and analytical reasoning were taken. The results were compared to the Combined Index of Heat Stress (CIHS). CIHS exceeded the heat stress safety limit after 45 min under 40°C, grip strength decreased by 12% and somatic perception became 2.89 times larger than the initial value. In the case of 45°C, CIHS exceeded the safety limit after only 20 min, while the grip strength decreased just by 3.2% and somatic perception increased to 4.36 times larger than the initial value. Reaction and finger dexterity were not statistically different from baseline measurements, but the error rate of analytical reasoning test rose remarkably. Somatic perception was the most sensitive index to high-temperature, followed by grip strength. Results of this paper may help to improve environmental control design of new fighter cockpit and for pilot physiology and cockpit environment ergonomics research for Chinese pilots.

  7. Change of water environment in the inner bay in consideration of heat balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Miyaike, Katsuto

    1983-01-01

    The study on the effect of warm water discharged from large capacity thermal and nuclear power stations on the local climate around the power stations is necessary for promoting the development of power resources in harmony with natural environment. In this study, Mikawa Bay was selected as the object of research, and the simulation analysis of water temperature was carried out by the water column model, based on the result of analysis of the local weather and sea observation data. Thus, the amount of heat exchange between the atmosphere and sea water in natural sea area was grasped, and how the change in the amount of heat exchange when the thermal load due to warm water discharge was imposed is ranked in natural sea environment was examined. The variation of surface water temperature in Mikawa Bay tended to be large in summer and small in winter. It was clarified that the factor controlling the water temperature in the bay was the variation of climatic factors. In the sea area where the effect of open sea water was relatively small, the variation of water temperature was able to be expressed by the water column model. The change in the amount of heat exchange in the range of warm water diffusion with 2 deg C temperature rise was determined. (Kato, I.)

  8. Simultaneous visualization of pH and Cl"− distributions inside the crevice of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Masashi; Ogawa, Junichiro; Muto, Izumi; Sugawara, Yu; Hara, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A pH and Cl"− sensing plate was fabricated. • The pH and Cl"− distributions inside the crevice of stainless steel was visualized. • The initial morphology of crevice corrosion of stainless steel was pitting. • Gradual acidification and Cl"− accumulation occurred before pit initiation. • The generation of pit caused a sharp decrease in pH and an increase in Cl"− concentration. - Abstract: A sensing plate for the simultaneous measurements of pH and Cl"− concentration was fabricated. Terbium–dipicolinic acid complex (Tb–DPA) and quinine sulphate were used to measure the pH and Cl"− concentration, respectively. In the incubation period of the crevice corrosion, the pH inside the crevice gradually decreased from 3.0 to ca. 2.0, and the Cl"− concentration increases from 0.01 to ca. 0.18 M. The generation of the micro-pit led to a sharp decrease in pH to below 0.5 and an increase in the Cl"− concentration to above 4 M. This situation allowed the crevice corrosion to proceed without spontaneously stopping.

  9. Crevice corrosion ampersand pitting of high-level waste containers: integration of deterministic ampersand probabilistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel 400. An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in the CRM-CAM crevice on the initiation and propagation of pits through the CRM

  10. CREVICE CORROSION and PITTING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAINERS: INTEGRATION OF DETERMINISTIC and PROBABILISTIC MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOSEPH C. FARMER AND R. DANIEL MCCRIGHT

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel 400. An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in the CRM-CAM crevice on the initiation and propagation of pits through the CRM

  11. Heat and Moisture Transport and Storage Parameters of Bricks Affected by the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Jerman, Miloš; Keppert, Martin; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2018-05-01

    The effect of external environment on heat and moisture transport and storage properties of the traditional fired clay brick, sand-lime brick and highly perforated ceramic block commonly used in the Czech Republic and on their hygrothermal performance in building envelopes is analyzed by a combination of experimental and computational techniques. The experimental measurements of thermal, hygric and basic physical parameters are carried out in the reference state and after a 3-year exposure of the bricks to real climatic conditions of the city of Prague. The obtained results showed that after 3 years of weathering the porosity of the analyzed bricks increased up to five percentage points which led to an increase in liquid and gaseous moisture transport parameters and a decrease in thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of hygrothermal performance of building envelopes made of the studied bricks was done using both reference and weather-affected data. The simulated results indicated an improvement in the annual energy balances and a decrease in the time-of-wetness functions as a result of the use of data obtained after the 3-year exposure to the environment. The effects of weathering on both heat and moisture transport and storage parameters of the analyzed bricks and on their hygrothermal performance were found significant despite the occurrence of warm winters in the time period of 2012-2015 when the brick specimens were exposed to the environment.

  12. Aircraft Thermal Management Using Loop Heat Pipes: Experimental Simulation of High Acceleration Environments Using the Centrifuge Table Test Bed (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fleming, Andrew J; Leland, Quinn H; Yerkes, Kirk L; Elston, Levi J; Thomas, Scott K

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the design of an experiment that will examine the effects of elevated acceleration environments on a high-temperature, titanium-water loop heat pipe for actuator cooling...

  13. Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Ellerby, Don; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Heat shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) Project is a NASA STMD and SMD co-funded effort. The goal is to develop and mission infuse a new ablative Thermal Protection System that can withstand extreme entry. It is targeted to support NASA's high priority missions, as defined in the latest decadal survey, to destinations such as Venus and Saturn in-situ robotic science missions. Entry into these planetary atmospheres results in extreme heating. The entry peak heat-flux and associated pressure are estimated to be between one and two orders of magnitude higher than those experienced by Mars Science Laboratory or Lunar return missions. In the recent New Frontiers community announcement NASA has indicated that it is considering providing an increase to the PI managed mission cost (PIMMC) for investigations utilizing the Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) and in addition, NASA is considering limiting the risk assessment to only their accommodation on the spacecraft and the mission environment. The HEEET ablative TPS utilizes 3D weaving technology to manufacture a dual layer material architecture. The 3-D weaving allows for flat panels to be woven. The dual layer consists of a top layer designed to withstand the extreme external environment while the inner or insulating layer by design, is designed to achieve low thermal conductivity, and it keeps the heat from conducting towards the structure underneath. Both arc jet testing combined with material properties have been used to develop thermal response models that allows for comparison of performance with heritage carbon phenolic. A 50% mass efficiency is achieved by the dual layer construct compared to carbon phenolic for a broad range of missions both to Saturn and Venus. The 3-D woven flat preforms are molded to achieve the shape as they are compliant and then resin infusion with curing forms a rigid panels. These panels are then bonded on to the aeroshell structure. Gaps

  14. The destabilizing influence of heat flow on the geological environment during underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politikov, M.I.; Kamberov, I.M.; Krivchenko, V.F.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Solodukhin, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    The study has determined the fact that the processes of gas-radioactive ectoplasm intrusion from nuclear cavities in the geological environment bring the significant contribution in bosom destabilizing besides the mechanical rock destruction as affected by underground nuclear explosions. Not only heat field forming that reduces the rock resistance and increases its porosity is related to it, but also the forming, on the way, of man-caused contamination aureoles of the geological environment, including the underground water bearing horizon. Unfortunately, this problem is hardly studied, mainly for the lack of reliable apparatus and methods. Judging by the results of information search, the best way to solve the problem is not yet known. (author)

  15. Colony mapping: A new technique for monitoring crevice-nesting seabirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, H.M.; Renner, M.; Reynolds, J.H.; Harping, A.M.A.; Jones, I.L.; Irons, D.B.; Byrd, G.V.

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring populations of auklets and other crevice-nesting seabirds remains problematic, although numerous methods have been attempted since the mid-1960s. Anecdotal evidence suggests several large auklet colonies have recently decreased in both abundance and extent, concurrently with vegetation encroachment and succession. Quantifying changes in the geographical extent of auklet colonies may be a useful alternative to monitoring population size directly. We propose a standardized method for colony mapping using a randomized systematic grid survey with two components: a simple presence/absence survey and an auklet evidence density survey. A quantitative auklet evidence density index was derived from the frequency of droppings and feathers. This new method was used to map the colony on St. George Island in the southeastern Bering Sea and results were compared to previous colony mapping efforts. Auklet presence was detected in 62 of 201 grid cells (each grid cell = 2500 m2) by sampling a randomly placed 16 m2 plot in each cell; estimated colony area = 155 000 m2. The auklet evidence density index varied by two orders of magnitude across the colony and was strongly correlated with means of replicated counts of birds socializing on the colony surface. Quantitatively mapping all large auklet colonies is logistically feasible using this method and would provide an important baseline for monitoring colony status. Regularly monitoring select colonies using this method may be the best means of detecting changes in distribution and population size of crevice-nesting seabirds. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  16. Laser surface modification of medical grade alloys for reduced heating in a magnetic resonance imaging environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benafan, O., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu; Vaidyanathan, R., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Chen, S.-Y.; Kar, A. [Laser-Advanced Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers (CREOL), College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Nanoscale surface modification of medical grade metallic alloys was conducted using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-based dopant diffusion technique. The objective of this approach was to minimize the induction heating by reducing the absorbed radio frequency field. Such an approach is advantageous in that the dopant is diffused into the alloy and is not susceptible to detachment or spallation as would an externally applied coating, and is expected to not deteriorate the mechanical and electrical properties of the base alloy or device. Experiments were conducted using a controlled environment laser system with the ability to control laser properties (i.e., laser power, spot size, and irradiation time) and dopant characteristics (i.e., temperature, concentration, and pressure). The reflective and transmissive properties of both the doped and untreated samples were measured in a radio frequency (63.86 MHz) magnetic field using a system comprising a high power signal generator, a localized magnetic field source and sensor, and a signal analyzer. The results indicate an increase in the reflectivity of the laser-treated samples compared to untreated samples. The effect of reflectivity on the heating of the alloys is investigated through a mathematical model incorporating Maxwell’s equations and heat conduction.

  17. Novel polymer derived ceramic-high temperature heat flux sensor for gas turbine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaiah, N R; Kapat, J S; An, L; Chow, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to prove the feasibility of a novel High Temperature Heat Flux (HTHF) sensor for gas turbine environment. Based on the latest improvement in a new type of Polymer-Derived Ceramic (PDC) material, the authors present the design and development of a HTHF sensor based on PDC material, and show that such a sensor is indeed feasible. The PDC-HTHF sensor is fabricated using newly developed polymer derived SiCN, whose conductivity is controlled by proper composition and treatment condition. Direct measurements and characterization of the relevant material properties are presented. Electrical conductivity can be varied from 0 (insulator) to 100 (ohm.cm) -1 ; in addition a value of 4000 ppm/ 0 C (at 600 K) is obtained for temperature coefficient of resistance. This novel sensor is found to perform quite satisfactorily at about 1400 0 C for long term as compared to conventional heat flux sensors available commercially. This type of PDC-HTHF sensor can be used in harsh environments due to its high temperature resistance and resistance to oxidation. This paper also discusses lithography as a microfabrication technique to manufacture the proposed PDC-HTHF sensor. In our current design, the sensor dimensions are 2.5mm in diameter and 250 μm thickness

  18. Interaction of 238PuO2 heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.H.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators used in space missions are designed with a great factor of safety to ensure that they will withstand reentry from orbit and impact with the earth, and safely contain the nuclear fuel until it is recovered. Existing designs, utilizing 238 PuO 2 fuel, have proved more than adequately safe. More data about the interaction of this material with terrestrial and aquatic environments is continually being sought to predict the behavior of these heat sources in the extremely unlikely contact of these materials with the land or ocean. Terrestrial environments are simulated with large environmental chambers that permit control of temperature, humidity, and rainfall using different kinds of soils. Rain falling on thermally hot chunks of 238 PuO 2 causes the spallation of the surface of the fuel into extremely fine particles, as small as 50 nm, that are later transported downward through the soil. Some of the plutonia particles become agglomerated with soil particles. Plutonium transport is more significant during winter than during summer because evaporation losses from the soil are less in winter. Aquatic environments are simulated with large aquaria that provide temperature and aeration control. Earlier fuel designs that employed a plutonia-molybdenum cermet showed plutonium release rates of about 10 μCi/m 2 - s, referred to the total surface area of the cermet. Present advanced fuels, employing pure plutonium oxide, show release rates of about 20 nCi/m 2 - s in seawater and about 150 nCi/m 2 - s in freshwater. The temperature of these more advanced heat sources does not seem to affect the release rate in seawater. (auth)

  19. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle S.; Seaford, C. Mark; Dufrene, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle is composed of four RS-25 liquid oxygen- hydrogen rocket engines in the core-stage and two 5-segment solid rocket boosters and as a result six hot supersonic plumes interact within the aft section of the vehicle during ight. Due to the complex nature of rocket plume-induced ows within the launch vehicle base during ascent and a new vehicle con guration, sub-scale wind tunnel testing is required to reduce SLS base convective environment uncertainty and design risk levels. This hot- re test program was conducted at the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock (LENS) II short-duration test facility to simulate ight from altitudes of 50 kft to 210 kft. The test program is a challenging and innovative e ort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle. This presentation discusses the various trends of base convective heat ux and pressure as a function of altitude at various locations within the core-stage and booster base regions of the two-percent SLS wind tunnel model. In-depth understanding of the base ow physics is presented using the test data, infrared high-speed imaging and theory. The normalized test design environments are compared to various NASA semi- empirical numerical models to determine exceedance and conservatism of the ight scaled test-derived base design environments. Brief discussion of thermal impact to the launch vehicle base components is also presented.

  20. Estimated work ability in warm outdoor environments depends on the chosen heat stress assessment metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröde, Peter; Fiala, Dusan; Lemke, Bruno; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2018-03-01

    With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively. In addition, we considered the effects of adaptive strategies like shielding against solar radiation and different work-rest schedules assuming an acclimated person wearing light work clothes (0.6 clo). We assessed WA according to Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) by means of an empirical relation of worker performance from field studies (Hothaps), and as allowed work hours using safety threshold limits proposed by the corresponding standards. Using the physiological models Predicted Heat Strain (PHS) and Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI)-Fiala, we calculated WA as the percentage of working hours with body core temperature and cumulated sweat loss below standard limits (38 °C and 7.5% of body weight, respectively) recommended by ISO 7933 and below conservative (38 °C; 3%) and liberal (38.2 °C; 7.5%) limits in comparison. ANOVA results showed that the different metrics, workload, time of day and climate type determined the largest part of WA variance. WBGT-based metrics were highly correlated and indicated slightly more constrained WA for moderate workload, but were less restrictive with high workload and for afternoon work hours compared to PHS and UTCI-Fiala. Though PHS showed unrealistic dynamic responses to rest from work compared to UTCI-Fiala, differences in WA assessed by the physiological models largely depended on the applied limit criteria. In conclusion, our study showed that the choice of the heat stress assessment metric impacts notably on the estimated WA. Whereas PHS and UTCI-Fiala can account for

  1. Estimated work ability in warm outdoor environments depends on the chosen heat stress assessment metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröde, Peter; Fiala, Dusan; Lemke, Bruno; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2018-03-01

    With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively. In addition, we considered the effects of adaptive strategies like shielding against solar radiation and different work-rest schedules assuming an acclimated person wearing light work clothes (0.6 clo). We assessed WA according to Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) by means of an empirical relation of worker performance from field studies (Hothaps), and as allowed work hours using safety threshold limits proposed by the corresponding standards. Using the physiological models Predicted Heat Strain (PHS) and Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI)-Fiala, we calculated WA as the percentage of working hours with body core temperature and cumulated sweat loss below standard limits (38 °C and 7.5% of body weight, respectively) recommended by ISO 7933 and below conservative (38 °C; 3%) and liberal (38.2 °C; 7.5%) limits in comparison. ANOVA results showed that the different metrics, workload, time of day and climate type determined the largest part of WA variance. WBGT-based metrics were highly correlated and indicated slightly more constrained WA for moderate workload, but were less restrictive with high workload and for afternoon work hours compared to PHS and UTCI-Fiala. Though PHS showed unrealistic dynamic responses to rest from work compared to UTCI-Fiala, differences in WA assessed by the physiological models largely depended on the applied limit criteria. In conclusion, our study showed that the choice of the heat stress assessment metric impacts notably on the estimated WA. Whereas PHS and UTCI-Fiala can account for

  2. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  3. Study of corrosion processes on Al-AA 6061 crevices immersed in high purity water and sodium citrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Sebastian A.; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana A.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental approach has been developed to study the corrosion behavior of artificial crevices manufactured with high purity aluminum and AA 6061 alloy, immersed in dematerialised water and sodium citrate solution (96,5 μS/cm). Alkaline attack was found on the surrounding of iron rich particles in the external zone of the crevice, as a result of localized oxygen reduction reaction on these sites. This attack was not observed in the zone inside the crevice. Study of the phase Mg 2 Si by EDS allowed establishing that there is not preferential dissolution inside the crevice. The formation of a stable and non-soluble complex between Al and citrate anion inhibited the production of Al(OH) 3 precipitate, which was observed on the surface of specimens immersed in pure water. Investigations of the aluminum oxide evolution on AA 6061 surfaces in water showed that it was composed by two layers: an internal one made of Bohemite and an external one in direct contact with the water, with a Bayerite structure. The surface analysis was accomplished using XR, OM and SEM techniques. (author) [es

  4. Crevice corrosion of biomedical alloys: a novel method of assessing the effects of bone cement and its chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael; Hu, Xinming; Farrar, Richard; Brummitt, Ken; Freeman, Robert; Neville, Anne

    2013-07-01

    In this study, five commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA bone cements were tested to investigate the effects of antibiotics on the severity of crevice corrosion. Bone cements with varying chemistry were also tested. A test method was developed in part reference to ASTM F746-04. Cylindrical specimens were fitted with a bone cement tapered collar, creating consistent crevice conditions. Crevice corrosion was then studied using potentiodynamic polarization techniques in 0.9% NaCl solution (pH7.4) at 37°C. Surface analyses using a light microscope and scanning electron microscopy were also conducted to investigate the surface morphology after accelerated electrochemical testing. Initial testing of commercially available bone cements indicated that different PMMA bone cements can affect the initiation and propagation mechanism of crevice corrosion. Further studies, utilising electrochemical and mass spectroscopy techniques, have identified that the addition of radiopaque agent and antibiotics affect the initiation mechanisms of 316L stainless steel, whilst significantly increasing the extent of propagation in CoCrMo alloys. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and the influence of city parks within the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, W.; Shandas, V.; Voelkel, J.; Espinoza, D.

    2016-12-01

    Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and the influence of city parks within the urban environment.As cities grow outward and their populations increase the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomena becomes an ever more important topic to reducing environmental stressors. When UHI combines with human sensitivities such as pre-existing health conditions, and other vulnerabilities, finding an effective way to cool our cities is a matter of life and death. One way to cool an area is to introduce vegetation; which is abundant is in city parks. This study measures the cooling effect and temperature gradient of city parks; characterizing the relationship between the cooling effects within parks and surrounding neighborhoods. Past studies of the UHI are largely based on satellite images and, more recently, car traverses across that describe the ambient temperatures. The present project aims to understand the effects of parks on the UHI by asking two research questions: (1) how do the physical characteristics and designs of city parks impact the variation in ambient temperatures? And (2) what effect does the park have on cooling the surrounding neighborhoods? We address these questions by using a bicycle mounted with a temperature probe, and a series of geospatial analytics. The bicycle collects temperature data every one second, and the traverse intervals are an hour long to prevent normal fluctuations of daily temperature. Preliminary analysis shows that there is a temperature gradient within the parks (Figure 1). Further, the average temperature of the urban park could cool the surrounding area by upwards of 2°C, depending on the physical characteristics of then park and neighborhood. Our results suggest that the role of smaller parks and their design can reduce heat stress particularly among the vulnerable populations. These results can help urban planners make informed decisions when developing future city infrastructure.

  6. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n') gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC 2 -2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations

  7. Cooling energy efficiency and classroom air environment of a school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Fu-Yun; Kuckelkorn, Jens; Liu, Di; Liu, Li-Qun; Pan, Xiao-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    The recently-built school buildings have adopted novel heat recovery ventilator and air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification and indoor air quality indicated by the CO 2 concentration have been numerically modeled concerning the effects of delivering ventilation flow rate and supplying air temperature. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of mechanical ventilation rate can simultaneously boost the dilution of indoor air pollutants and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal and pollutant distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of supplying air. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented. - Highlights: • Low energy school buildings and classroom environment. • Heat recovery facility operating with an air conditioning unit. • Displacement ventilation influenced by the heat recovery efficiency. • Energy conservation of cooling and ventilation through heat recovery. • Enhancement of classroom environment with reduction of school building energy

  8. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  9. Heat strain evaluation of overt and covert body armour in a hot and humid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, Andrew J; Costello, Joseph T; Stewart, Ian B

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the thermophysiological effects of wearing lightweight non-military overt and covert personal body armour (PBA) in a hot and humid environment. Eight healthy males walked on a treadmill for 120 min at 22% of their heart rate reserve in a climate chamber simulating 31 °C (60%RH) wearing either no armour (control), overt or covert PBA in addition to a security guard uniform, in a randomised controlled crossover design. No significant difference between conditions at the end of each trial was observed in core temperature, heart rate or skin temperature (P > 0.05). Covert PBA produced a significantly greater amount of body mass change (-1.81 ± 0.44%) compared to control (-1.07 ± 0.38%, P = 0.009) and overt conditions (-1.27 ± 0.44%, P = 0.025). Although a greater change in body mass was observed after the covert PBA trial; based on the physiological outcome measures recorded, the heat strain encountered while wearing lightweight, non-military overt or covert PBA was negligible compared to no PBA. The wearing of bullet proof vests or body armour is a requirement of personnel engaged in a wide range of occupations including police, security, customs and even journalists in theatres of war. This randomised controlled crossover study is the first to examine the thermophysiological effects of wearing lightweight non-military overt and covert personal body armour (PBA) in a hot and humid environment. We conclude that the heat strain encountered while wearing both overt and covert lightweight, non-military PBA was negligible compared to no PBA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization of the method for determining the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Akashi, Masatsune; Sasaki, Hidetsugu; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the resistance of a candidate overpack material for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste to the crevice corrosion, the optimized test method for determining the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential, E R,CREV , of a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (Alloy 22) was developed based on that of stainless steels (JIS G0592). It was found that two restrictions shall be satisfied for determining the valid value of E R,CREV for Alloy 22. Restriction (a) was to avoid transpassive dissolution, and (b) was to obtain a penetration depth of 65 μm or more in creviced areas. The recommended procedure in JIS G 0592 at the corrosion-crevice initiation stage, which involved the potentiodynamic anodic polarization at a scan rate of 30 mV min -1 , could not satisfy the restriction (a). Consequently, we adopted the potentiostatic holding at the potential below the critical potential for transpassive dissolution. The recommended procedure in JIS G 0592 at the corrosion-crevice propagation stage, which involved the galvanostatic holding at an applied current of 200 μA for 2 hours, could not always satisfy the restriction (b), and the applied current of 1600 μA or more could not satisfy the restriction (a). Therefore, we adopted the galvanostatic holding at a current of 800 μA for 2 hours. The limits of safety usage of Alloy 22 were evaluated by values of E R,CREV which were measured with the optimized procedure in 0.1 to 4 mol dm -3 sodium chloride solutions at 90degC. (author)

  11. General and crevice corrosion study of the in-wall shielding materials for ITER vacuum vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K. S.; Pathak, H. A.; Dayal, R. K.; Bafna, V. K.; Kimihiro, Ioki; Barabash, V.

    2012-11-01

    Vacuum vessel In-Wall Shield (IWS) will be inserted between the inner and outer shells of the ITER vacuum vessel. The behaviour of IWS in the vacuum vessel especially concerning the susceptibility to crevice of shielding block assemblies could cause rapid and extensive corrosion attacks. Even galvanic corrosion may be due to different metals in same electrolyte. IWS blocks are not accessible until life of the machine after closing of vacuum vessel. Hence, it is necessary to study the susceptibility of IWS materials to general corrosion and crevice corrosion under operations of ITER vacuum vessel. Corrosion properties of IWS materials were studied by using (i) Immersion technique and (ii) Electro-chemical Polarization techniques. All the sample materials were subjected to a series of examinations before and after immersion test, like Loss/Gain weight measurement, SEM analysis, and Optical stereo microscopy, measurement of surface profile and hardness of materials. After immersion test, SS 304B4 and SS 304B7 showed slight weight gain which indicate oxide layer formation on the surface of coupons. The SS 430 material showed negligible weight loss which indicates mild general corrosion effect. On visual observation with SEM and Metallography, all material showed pitting corrosion attack. All sample materials were subjected to series of measurements like Open Circuit potential, Cyclic polarization, Pitting potential, protection potential, Critical anodic current and SEM examination. All materials show pitting loop in OC2 operating condition. However, its absence in OC1 operating condition clearly indicates the activity of chloride ion to penetrate oxide layer on the sample surface, at higher temperature. The critical pitting temperature of all samples remains between 100° and 200°C.

  12. Development of a micro liquid-level sensor for harsh environments using a periodic heating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jonggan; Kim, Dongsik; Chang, Young Soo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a novel micro thermal sensor for point sensing of lubrication oil level in industrial compressors. The results reported in this work can be applied to various harsh environments that feature high temperature/pressure, limited space and flow/vibration. The sensor employs an ac (alternating current) thermal technique with a single heating/sensing element. As the sensing scheme is based on the so-called three-omega method, the sensing signal is noise-resistant and hardly affected by flow in the liquid being measured. Experiments with DI water, ethanol and ethylene glycol confirm that the sensor performance is satisfactory under atmospheric pressure. Also, to mimic harsh conditions as in an industrial compressor, tests are performed in a pressure vessel containing R410A gas and polyvinylether lubrication oil under high temperatures and pressures. The results indicate that the sensitivity and response time of the developed sensor are appropriate for practical usage in harsh environments. As the sensor can be easily mass-produced at low cost using photolithography, it has strong potential for industrial applications

  13. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-01-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ''isolated'' bubbles, ''coalesced'' bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined

  14. Holocene seasonal variability inferred from multiple proxy records from Crevice Lake, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Cathy; Dean, Walter E.; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Stevens, Lora R.; Stone, Jeffery R.; Power, Mitchell J.; Rosenbaum, Joseph R.; Pierce, Kenneth L.; Bracht-Flyr, Brandi B.

    2012-01-01

    A 9400-yr-old record from Crevice Lake, a semi-closed alkaline lake in northern Yellowstone National Park, was analyzed for pollen, charcoal, geochemistry, mineralogy, diatoms, and stable isotopes to develop a nuanced understanding of Holocene environmental history in a region of northern Rocky Mountains that receives both summer and winter precipitation. The limited surface area, conical bathymetry, and deep water (> 31 m) of Crevice Lake create oxygen-deficient conditions in the hypolimnion and preserve annually laminated sediment (varves) for much of the record. Pollen data indicate that the watershed supported a closed Pinus-dominated forest and low fire frequency prior to 8200 cal yr BP, followed by open parkland until 2600 cal yr BP, and open mixed-conifer forest thereafter. Fire activity shifted from infrequent stand-replacing fires initially to frequent surface fires in the middle Holocene and stand-replacing events in recent centuries. Low values of δ18O suggest high winter precipitation in the early Holocene, followed by steadily drier conditions after 8500 cal yr BP. Carbonate-rich sediments before 5000 cal yr BP imply warmer summer conditions than after 5000 cal yr BP. High values of molybdenum (Mo), uranium (U), and sulfur (S) indicate anoxic bottom-waters before 8000 cal yr BP, between 4400 and 3900 cal yr BP, and after 2400 cal yr BP. The diatom record indicates extensive water-column mixing in spring and early summer through much of the Holocene, but a period between 2200 and 800 cal yr BP had strong summer stratification, phosphate limitation, and oxygen-deficient bottom waters. Together, the proxy data suggest wet winters, protracted springs, and warm effectively wet summers in the early Holocene and less snowpack, cool springs, warm dry summers in the middle Holocene. In the late Holocene, the region and lake experienced extreme changes in winter, spring, and summer conditions, with particularly short springs and dry summers and winters during

  15. The effect of sulphite on crevice corrosion and pitting on various steels in 0.5 M sodium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, L.V.; Maahn, E.

    1992-01-01

    A carbon steel, st 37, and two stainless steels, AISI 304 SS and AISI 316 SS were exposed to 0.5 M NaCl with 10 mM sulphite under anaerobic conditions. The sulphite ions may, under these conditions, be reduced to sulphide ions, and cause pitting or crevice corrosion. Electrochemical and bottle-test experiments were done to determine the effect of the sulphite addition. These effects were highly dependant on the pH

  16. Disruption of a hydrogen bond network in human versus spider monkey cytochrome c affects heme crevice stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldes, Matthew E; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E; McClelland, Levi J; Mou, Tung-Chung; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-01

    The hypothesis that the recent rapid evolution of primate cytochromes c, which primarily involves residues in the least stable Ω-loop (Ω-loop C, residues 40-57), stabilizes the heme crevice of cytochrome c relative to other mammals, is tested. To accomplish this goal, we have compared the properties of human and spider monkey cytochrome c and a set of four variants produced in the process of converting human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability of all variants has been measured by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation. The stability of the heme crevice has been assessed with the alkaline conformational transition. Structural insight into the effects of the five amino acid substitutions needed to convert human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c is provided by a 1.15Å resolution structure of spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability for all variants is near 9.0kcal/mol at 25°C and pH7, which is higher than that observed for other mammalian cytochromes c. The heme crevice stability is more sensitive to the substitutions required to produce spider monkey cytochrome c with decreases of up to 0.5 units in the apparent pKa of the alkaline conformational transition relative to human cytochrome c. The structure of spider monkey cytochrome c indicates that the Y46F substitution destabilizes the heme crevice by disrupting an extensive hydrogen bond network that connects three surface loops including Ω-loop D (residues 70-85), which contains the Met80 heme ligand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Too Much of a Good Thing ? Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology and `Waste' Heat in the Titan Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph

    Unlike most solar system surface environments, Titan has an atmosphere that is both cold and dense. This means heat transfer to and from a vehicle is determined by convection, rather than by radiation which dominates on Earth and Mars. With surface temperatures near 94K, batteries and systems require heating to operate. Solar power is impractical, so a spacecraft intended to operate for longer than a few hours on Titan must have a radioisotope power source (RPS). Such sources convert heat from Plutonium decay into electricity, with an efficiency that varies from about 5% for thermoelectric systems to 20% for engine cycles such as Stirling. For vehicles with 100-200W electrical power, the 500-4000 W ‘waste’ heat in the Titan environment can be valuable in that it can be exploited to maintain thermal conditions inside the vehicle. The generally benign Titan environment, and the outstanding scientific and popular interest in its exploration, has attracted a number of mission concepts including a lander for Titan’s equatorial dunefields, light gas and hot air (‘Montgolfière’) balloons, airplanes, and capsules that float on its polar seas (e.g. the proposed Titan Mare Explorer.) However, the choice of conversion technology is key to the success of these different platforms. Waste heat can perturb meteorological measurements in several ways. First by creating a warm air plume (an effect observed on Viking and Curiosity.) Second, rain or seaspray falling onto hot radiator surfaces can evaporate causing a local enhancement of methane humidity. Third, sufficiently strong heating could perturb local winds. Similar effects, and the potential generation of effervescence or even fog, may result for capsules floating in liquid hydrocarbons. For landers and drifting buoys, these perturbations may significantly degrade environmental measurements, or at least demand tall meteorology masts, for the higher waste heat output of thermoelectric systems, and a Stirling system

  18. Comparison of indoor air distribution and thermal environment for different combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2018-01-01

    A hybrid system with a radiant heating system and a mechanical ventilation system, which is regarded as an advanced heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, has been applied in many modern buildings worldwide. To date, almost no studies focused on comparative analysis of the indoor...... air distribution and the thermal environment for all combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems. Therefore, in this article, the indoor air distribution and the thermal environment were comparatively analyzed in a room with floor heating (FH) or ceiling heating (CH......) and mixing ventilation (MV) or displacement ventilation (DV) when the supply air temperature ranged from 15.0°C to 19.0°C. The results showed that the temperature effectiveness values were 1.05–1.16 and 0.95–1.02 for MV+ FH and MV+ CH, respectively, and they were 0.78–0.91 and 0.51–0.67 for DV + FH and DV...

  19. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mon, K.

    2001-01-01

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified

  20. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Mon

    2001-08-29

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified.

  1. Propagation of crevices in stainless steel AISI304L in conditions of hydrogen chemistry (HWC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.; Fuentes C, P.; Merino C, F.; Castano M, V.

    2006-01-01

    Crevice growth velocities in samples of AISI 304L stainless steel thermally welded and sensitized were obtained by the Rising displacement method or of growing displacement. It was used a recirculation circuit in where the operation conditions of a BWR type reactor were simulated (temperature of 288 C and a pressure of 8 MPa) with the chemistry modified by the addition of hydrogen with and without the addition of impurities of a powerful oxidizer like the Cu ++ ion. CT pre cracked specimens were used and each rehearsal stayed to one constant displacement velocity of 1 x 10 -9 m/s (3.6 μm/hr), making a continuous pursuit of the advance of the crack by the electric potential drop technique. To the end of the rehearsal it was carried out the fractographic analysis of the propagation surfaces. The values of the growth velocities obtained by this methodology went similar to the opposing ones under normal conditions of operation; while the fractographic analysis show the cracks propagation in trans and intergranular ways, evidencing the complexity of the regulator mechanisms of the one IGSCC even under controlled ambient conditions or with mitigation methodologies like the alternative hydrogen chemistry. (Author)

  2. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  3. Startup of a frozen heat pipe in one-g and micro-g environments - A proposed shuttle flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to determine how a heat pipe freezes under various low load and/or no load conditions in both one-g and micro-g environments. Also of interest are the mechanisms that can be used to restart the heat pipe after freezing has occurred. Particular attention is given to step function power reductions and the resulting distribution of the working fluid after freezing has occurred and the effect of noncondensible gases on the frozen configuration and the restart characteristics.

  4. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir OSHA-NIOSH ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  5. Alloying effects on dissolution rate of crevice corrosion for austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl solution at 80 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Shinohara, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been a problem for austenitic stainless steel in aqueous environments containing chlorides. Studies have found that SCC initiates only from a dissolving surface and under the condition that the crack growth rate is higher than the dissolution rate of the dissolving surface. Research conducted to improve the resistance to SCC for Type 304 steels (UNS S30400) have revealed that while molybdenum and phosphorus are unfavored, the combined alloying of 3% aluminum with 2% copper can almost nullify their detrimental effect. Based on the mentioned criteria, this study was dedicated to clarify the mechanism behind these alloying effects by examining the relationship between the measured enhancements on SCC resistance and the dissolution rate observed via the moire technique. It was found that the addition of both molybdenum and phosphorus reduces the dissolution rate and therefore impaired SCC resistance; the addition of copper increases the dissolution rate of steady growth stage where crevice corrosion proceeds at a constant rate. Moreover this dissolution rate could further be increased when combined with the alloying of aluminum. These observed results correspond well to that of the measured behavior of the SCC critical temperature, T c , suggesting that the SCC susceptibility is influenced by anodic dissolution

  6. Observations of the thermal environment on Red Sea platform reefs: a heat budget analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, K. A.; Lentz, S. J.; Pineda, J.; Farrar, J. T.; Starczak, V. R.; Churchill, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrographic measurements were collected on nine offshore reef platforms in the eastern Red Sea shelf region, north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The data were analyzed for spatial and temporal patterns of temperature variation, and a simple heat budget

  7. Pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion of an advanced chromium-based stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alloy 33 is a (wt. %) 33 Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6CU-0.4N austenitic stainless steel combining high yield strength of min. 380 N/mm 2 (55 KSI) with high resistance to local corrosion and superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Ranking the material according to its PRE (pitting resistance equivalent) value, the new alloy fits in between the advanced 6% Mo superaustenitics and the nickel-base Alloy 625 but due to the balanced chemical composition the alloy shows a lot less sensitivity to segregation in the base material as well as in welded structures. It is recommended to weld the material with matching filler. The critical pitting temperature of such joints in the 10% FeCl 3 · 6H 2 O solution is reduced by only 10 C in comparison to the base material. Corrosion tests in artificial seawater (20 g/l Cl - ) with additions of chloride up to 37 g/l as well as in a NaCl-CaCl 2 , solution with 62 g/l Cl - --revealed that the critical pitting temperature does not differentiate from the 6% Mo austenitic steel Alloy 926. With respect to crevice corrosion the depassivation pH value has been determined in 1 M NaCl solution according to Crolet and again there was no difference between Alloy 33 and Alloy 926. SCC tests performed on Alloy 33 in the solution annealed condition as well as after heavy cold work up to R PO,2 ∼ 1,100--1,200 N/mm 2 (160--174 KSI) indicate the high resistance to stress corrosion cracking in hot sodium chloride solutions

  8. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands ( P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  9. Enhancement of heat transfer from a continuously moving porous fin exposed in convective–radiative environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanja, Dipankar; Kundu, Balaram; Aziz, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Analytical model for thermal analysis of moving porous fins. • Heat transfer from the fin surface due to convection and radiation. • For practical design aspects, optimization analysis was carried out. • Comparative study was made between the solid and porous moving fins. • Porous moving fin has more heat transfer ability than the stationary fin. - Abstract: In the present article, an exercise has been devoted to establish an analytical model for the determination of temperature distribution, fin efficiency and optimum design parameters of a porous moving fin which is losing heat by simultaneous convection and radiation to its surroundings. For the adaptation of this consideration, the governing equation becomes highly nonlinear. An analytical technique called Adomian decomposition method (ADM) is proposed for the solution methodology. The accuracy of the analytic solution is validated by using a numeric scheme called finite difference method. The results indicate that the numerical data and analytical approach are in agreement with each other. As the present study is an analytic, it is extended to the analysis for determination of optimum dimensions of said fin by satisfying either the maximization of rate of heat transfer for a given fin volume or by the minimization of fin volume for a desired heat transfer rate. The study is further extended to the porous fin in stationary condition and it is found that porous fin in moving condition transfers more heat than stationary condition. Investigation has also been made on solid moving fin to compare the outcomes of these parameters

  10. Analysis of human factors on urban heat island and simulation of urban thermal environment in Lanzhou city, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinghu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effect is a global phenomenon caused by urbanization. Because of the number and complexity of factors contributing to the urban thermal environment, traditional statistical methods are insufficient for acquiring data and analyzing the impact of human activities on the thermal environment, especially for identifying which factors are dominant. The UHI elements were extracted using thermal infrared remote sensing data to retrieve the land surface temperatures of Lanzhou city, and then adopting an object-oriented fractal net evolution approach to create an image segmentation of the land surface temperature (LST). The effects of urban expansion on the urban thermal environment were quantitatively analyzed. A comprehensive evaluation system of the urban thermal environment was constructed, the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou was assessed, and principal influencing factors were identified using spatial principal component analysis (SPCA) and multisource spatial data. We found that in the last 20 years, the UHI effect in Lanzhou city has been strengthened, as the UHI ratio index has increased from 0.385 in 1993 to 0.579 in 2001 and to 0.653 in 2011. The UHI expansion had a spatiotemporal consistency with the urban expansion. The four major factors that affect the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou can be ranked in the following order: landscape configuration, anthropogenic heat release, urban construction, and gradient from man-made to natural land cover. These four together accounted for 91.27% of the variance. A linear model was thus successfully constructed, implying that SPCA is helpful in identifying major contributors to UHI. Regression analysis indicated that the instantaneous LST and the simulated thermal environment have a good linear relationship, the correlation coefficient between the two reached 0.8011, highly significant at a confidence level of 0.001.

  11. Material Research on Salt Hydrates for Seasonal Heat Storage Application in a Residential Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferchaud, C.J.; Zondag, H.A.; De Boer, R. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Water vapor sorption in salt hydrates is a promising method to realize seasonal solar heat storage in the residential sector. Several materials already showed promising performance for this application. However, the stability of these materials needs to be improved for long-term (30 year) application in seasonal solar heat storages. The purpose of this article is to identify the influence of the material properties of the salt hydrates on the performance and the reaction kinetics of the sorption process. The experimental investigation presented in this article shows that the two salt hydrates Li2SO4.H2O and CuSO4.5H2O can store and release heat under the operating conditions of a seasonal solar heat storage in a fully reversible way. However, these two materials show differences in terms of energy density and reaction kinetics. Li2SO4.H2O can release heat with an energy density of around 0.80 GJ/m{sup 3} within 4 hours of rehydration at 25C, while CuSO4.5H2O needs around 130 hours at the same temperature to be fully rehydrated and reaches an energy density of 1.85 GJ/m{sup 3}. Since the two salts are dehydrated and hydrated under the same conditions, this difference in behavior is directly related to the intrinsic properties of the materials.

  12. Turbulent circulation above the surface heat source in a stably stratified environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the numerical modeling of turbulent structure of the penetrating convection above the urban heat island with a small aspect ratio in a stably stratified medium at rest are presented. The gradient diffusion representations for turbulent momentum and heat fluxes are used, which depend on three parameters — the turbulence kinetic energy, the velocity of its spectral expenditure, and the dispersion of temperature fluctuations. These parameters are found from the closed differential equations of balance in the RANS approach of turbulence description. The distributions of averaged velocity and temperature fields as well as turbulent characteristics agree well with measurement data.

  13. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-01-01

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking

  14. The Next-Generation Goddard Convective-Stratiform Heating Algorithm: New Model Simulations for Tropical and Continental Summertime Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S. E.; Tao, W. K.; Wu, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Goddard Convective-Stratiform Heating (or CSH) algorithm is used to retrieve estimates of cloud heating over the global Tropics using TRMM rainfall data and a set of look-up-tables (LUTs) derived from a series of multi-week cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (or GCE). These simulations link satellite observables (i.e., surface rainfall and stratiform fraction) with cloud heating profiles, which are not directly observable. The strength of the algorithm relies in part on the representativeness of the simulations; more realistic simulations provide a stronger link between the observables and simulated heating profiles. The current "TRMM" version of the CSH algorithm relies on 2D GCE simulations using an improved version of the Goddard 3-class ice scheme (3ICE), a moderate-sized domain, and 1-km horizontal resolution. Updating the LUTs, which are suitable for tropical and continental summertime environments requires new, more realistic GCE simulations. New simulations are performed using a new, improved 4-class ice scheme, which has been shown to outperform the 3ICE scheme, especially for intense convection. Additional grid configurations are also tested and evaluated to find the best overall setup to for re-deriving and updating the CSH tropical/summertime LUTs.

  15. Time-dependent mixed convection heat transfer from a sphere in a micro-gravity environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommel, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem of interest for crystal growth in micro-gravity applications involves the mixed convection heat transfer from a sphere in a uniform flow of fluid at a differing temperature. Under the combined influence of the imposed free stream as well as an induced buoyancy force due to thermal expansion of the fluid, the heat transfer from the sphere will be different from that of either the pure forced convection flow or the pure free convection flow. For the present study, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is applied to the laminar flow problem of an impulsively heated, impulsively started sphere in an originally quiescent fluid. Time series expansions are developed for the dependent variables by acknowledging the existence of two district regions: one, an inner region, near the sphere, in which viscous effects are significant; and two, an outer region in which the fluid may be treated as inviscid. The time series expansions are developed in terms of the Reynolds number and Richardson number (Buoyancy Parameter), and the relevant heat transfer and drag coefficients are calculated and plotted

  16. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shit, G.C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field

  17. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  18. The economics of heat utilization for controlled environment production of agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.W.; Teeter, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    As interest and experimental work on the use of ''low grade heat'' increases, an evaluation of the factors and problems involved becomes necessary. This paper describes some of the major features of the industry, illustrates a number of problems confronting the industry, reviews related research and comments upon the direction of future research. (author)

  19. The urban physical environment: temperature and urban heat islands. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon M. Heisler; Anthony J. Brazel

    2010-01-01

    The term urban heat island (UHI) describes the phenomenon in which cities are generally warmer than adjacent rural areas. The UHI effect is strongest with skies free of clouds and with low wind speeds. In moist temperate climates, the UHI effect causes cities to be slightly warmer in midday than rural areas, whereas in dry climates, irrigation of vegetation in cites...

  20. Hypertension is associated with greater heat exchange during exercise recovery in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, S F; Teles, M C; Ribeiro, V G C; Magalhães, F C; Mendonça, V A; Peixoto, M F D; Leite, L H R; Coimbra, C C; Lacerda, A C R

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with systemic arterial hypertension have a higher risk of heat-related complications. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the thermoregulatory responses of hypertensive subjects during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise performed in the heat. A total of eight essential hypertensive (H) and eight normotensive (N) male subjects (age=46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years, body mass index=25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure=98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively) rested for 30 min, performed 1 h of treadmill exercise at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption, and rested for 1 h after exercise in an environmental chamber at 38°C and 60% relative humidity. Skin and core temperatures were measured to calculate heat exchange parameters. Mean arterial pressure was higher in the hypertensive than in the normotensive subjects throughout the experiment (Phypertensive subjects stored less heat (H=-24.23±3.99 W·m-2vs N=-13.63±2.24 W·m-2, P=0.03, unpaired t-test), experienced greater variations in body temperature (H=-0.62±0.05°C vsN=-0.35±0.12°C, P=0.03, unpaired t-test), and had more evaporated sweat (H=-106.1±4.59 W·m-2vs N=-91.15±3.24 W·m-2, P=0.01, unpaired t-test) than the normotensive subjects during the period of recovery from exercise. In conclusion, essential hypertensive subjects showed greater sweat evaporation and increased heat dissipation and body cooling relative to normotensive subjects during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise performed in hot conditions.

  1. Observations of the thermal environment on Red Sea platform reefs: a heat budget analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, K. A.

    2011-03-11

    Hydrographic measurements were collected on nine offshore reef platforms in the eastern Red Sea shelf region, north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The data were analyzed for spatial and temporal patterns of temperature variation, and a simple heat budget analysis was performed with the goal of advancing our understanding of the physical processes that control temperature variability on the reef. In 2009 and 2010, temperature variability on Red Sea reef platforms was dominated by diurnal variability. The daily temperature range on the reefs, at times, exceeded 5°C-as large as the annual range of water temperature on the shelf. Additionally, our observations reveal the proximity of distinct thermal microclimates within the bounds of one reef platform. Circulation on the reef flat is largely wave driven. The greatest diurnal variation in water temperature occurs in the center of larger reef flats and on reefs protected from direct wave forcing, while smaller knolls or sites on the edges of the reef flat tend to experience less diurnal temperature variability. We found that both the temporal and spatial variability in water temperature on the reef platforms is well predicted by a heat budget model that includes the transfer of heat at the air-water interface and the advection of heat by currents flowing over the reef. Using this simple model, we predicted the temperature across three different reefs to within 0.4°C on the outer shelf using only information about bathymetry, surface heat flux, and offshore wave conditions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Environment Humidity Effect on the Weight of Carbonized Na-Al-Si Glass Fabrics Recovery after Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentjuss, E; Lusis, A; Gabrusenoks, J; Bajars, G

    2015-01-01

    Na-Al-Si glass fabrics fibres contain Na + ions that diffuse to its surface and along with CO 2 and H 2 O from atmosphere create here the shell of carbonate hydrates. The heating of fabric leads to weight loss by evolving these substances. In this work the results of weight recovery study at room relative humidity (20% – 50%) and elevated humidity (near 70%) of fabrics after its heating at different temperatures (70°C – 150°C) are compared. The experiments shoved the different weight recovery kinetics. The initial exponential stages up to 0.3 h – 0.5 h of the both recoveries are associated with water absorption and differ by its levels. In a case of lower environment humidity the later weight increase are restricted by its value, but at an elevated humidity has a maximum and followed weight increase. The reasons of observed differences are discussed

  3. Research on seasonal indoor thermal environment and residents' control behavior of cooling and heating systems in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Chihye; Chun, Chungyoon [Department of Housing and Interior Design, College of Human Ecology, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    Indoor thermal environments and residents' control behavior of cooling and heating systems were investigated in Seoul, Korea and compared with the results of previous studies. Twenty-four houses in summer, six houses in autumn and 36 houses in winter were used in this study. The measurement of temperature, humidity and air conditioner usage behavior was carried out. The clo-value, thermal comfort, sensation and basic data of the houses were also investigated. The indoor thermal environment in the summer had a high temperature and a high humidity ratio compare to standard comfort zone. Most of the indoor thermal environments at the time of starting the air conditioner in the summer were out of the comfort zone. Some of the data recorded while the air conditioner was stopped were in the comfort zone, but in many cases the temperature was relatively higher than comfort zone. Most indoor climate distributions in the winter were in the comfort zone and the indoor climate in autumn coincided well with the criteria of the comfort zone. Compared with results of previous studies in these 25 years, indoor ambient average temperature in winter has increased and the comfort temperature has increased in the heating period and decreased in the cooling period. This result indicates that the development of an HVAC system has created an expectation of comfort for residents and has shifted their thermal comfort zone warmer in winter and cooler in summer. (author)

  4. Heat in the built environment. Sources and systems; Warmte in de woonomgeving. Bronnen en systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedel, P. [Energy Matters, Driebergen (Netherlands); Oostendorp, P. [HR Advies, Beekbergen (Netherlands); Wagener, P. [Business Development Holland, Harderwijk (Netherlands); Holwerda, B. (ed.); Buijs, A. (ed.); Ensing, H. (ed.); Overdiep, H. (ed.) [Gasterra, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    This fifth part in a series about the world of natural gas provides an overview of the techniques currently available for efficient heating of houses. The focus is on those techniques that are more efficient than average. Also a brief overview is given of the enormous changes that have taken place in the field of domestic heating over the last 50 years in the Netherlands. [Dutch] Dit 5e deel in een serie over de wereld van het aardgas biedt een overzicht van de technieken die momenteel beschikbaar zijn voor het efficient verwarmen van woonhuizen. De focus ligt daarbij op die technieken die meer dan gemiddeld efficient zijn. Ook wordt een beeld gegeven van de enorme veranderingen die zich de laatste 50 jaar in Nederland hebben voltrokken op het gebied van woningverwarming.

  5. Nuclear-heat deposition for a fusion-like neutron environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Hegberg, D.E.; Wilcox, A.D.

    1981-10-01

    Calculated nuclear heat deposition profiles within the thermal shield of the FMIT facility are sensitive to the cross-section data base - particularly an energy balance consistency between gamma production cross-sections and neutron KERMA factors. Infinite medium calculations were made with the Monte Carlo code to provide integral validations of energy balances relevant to this aspect of the data base. Inconsistencies were found and corrected. There was also concern about the adequacy of the high energy cross sections (10 MeV < E < 30 MeV) for the moderation and transport of the (d,Li) source neutrons. A preliminary analysis of a measurement with a (d,Li) source in the center of an iron block has improved our confidence in the high energy cross section - data base for this application. Monte Carlo calculations have been utilized to calculate three-dimensional profiles of nuclear heat deposition. Representative profiles were displayed for two walls of the FMIT test cell

  6. Physiological characteristics under the influence of heat stress working in the hot environment, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaka, Akihiko; Yoshino, Kenji; Takano, Ken-ichi

    1987-01-01

    There is a possibility that physical and mental stress appears under hot environmental condition for the cause of wearing protection suits on reactor maintenance work. It is important to reduce heat stress rapidly and effectively. This paper mentioned following about the results of static state and simulation work done by testees with or without protection suits under 25 kinds of temperatures and wind velocities in a artificial climate chamber. (1) the correlation between ambient temperatures or wind velocities and subjective symptoms without protection suits. (2) the correlation between ambient temperatures or wind velocities and skin temperatures without protection suits. (3) investigation of the parts of body affecting subjective symptoms. (4) the correlation between ambient temperatures or wind velocities and skin temperatures at working with protection suits. (5) working out countermeasures of recovery from heat stress with the index of skin temperatures and subjective symptoms. (author)

  7. Physical robustness of canopy temperature models for crop heat stress simulation across environments and production conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webber, Heidi; White, Jeffrey W; Kimball, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    to simulate Tc. Model performance in predicting Tc was evaluated for two experiments in continental North America with various water, nitrogen and CO2 treatments. An empirical model fit to one dataset had the best performance, followed by the EBSC models. Stability conditions explained much of the differences...... between modeling approaches. More accurate simulation of heat stress will likely require use of energy balance approaches that consider atmospheric stability conditions....

  8. Effect of summer heat environment on body temperature, estrous cycles and blood antioxidant levels in Japanese Black cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Miki; Balboula, Ahmed Z; Yamanaka, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masashi

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of summer heat environment on estrous cycles and blood antioxidant levels in Japanese Black cows. A total of 13 non-lactating Japanese Black cows (summer: 9, winter: 4) were examined. Body temperature was measured rectally and intravaginally using a thermometer and data logger, respectively. Estrous behavior was monitored using a radiotelemetric pedometer that recorded walking activity. Rectal temperatures were higher during summer than winter (Pstress, and also reduces signs of estrus in Japanese Black cows. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  9. A new finding on the in-vivo crevice corrosion damage in a CoCrMo hip implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouei, Reza H; Barati, Mohammad Reza; Farhoudi, Hamidreza; Taylor, Mark; Solomon, Lucian Bogdan

    2017-10-01

    A detailed investigation was performed to characterize the fretting wear and corrosion damage to the neck component of a CoCrMo stem from a metal-on-polyethylene implant retrieved after 99months. The stem was a low-carbon (0.07wt%) wrought Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy with no secondary carbide phases in the matrix (γ-phase). The original design of the neck surface contained an intentionally fabricated knurled profile with a valley-to-peak range of approximately 11μm. Roughness measurements indicated that the tip of the knurled profile was significantly damaged, especially in the distal medial region of the neck, with up to a 22% reduction in the mean peak-to-valley height (R a ) compared to the original profile. As a new finding, the channels between the peaks of the profile created an additional crevice site in the presence of stagnant body fluid within the head-neck taper junction. These channels were observed to contain the most severe corroded areas and surface oxide layers with micro-cracks. SEM/EDS, XRD and XPS evaluations identified the formation of Cr 2 O 3 as a corrosion product. Also, decobaltification was found to occur in these corroded areas. The findings of this work indicate the important role of the knurled profile in inducing additional crevice corrosion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Planar LIF observation of unburned fuel escaping the upper ring-land crevice in an SI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.M.; Cloutman, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    PLIF has been used to observe the in-cylinder transport of unburned fuel that, while trapped in the ring-land and ring-groove crevices, survives combustion in the propagating flame. Away from the top-ring gap, we detect a wall-jet comprised of unburned charge exiting the top ring-land crevice opening. At the location of the top-ring gap, we observed unburned fuel lying in the cool boundary layer along the cylinder wall during the later stages of the expansion stroke. This layer is scraped into the roll-up vortex during the exhaust stroke. These data lead us to conclude that away from the end gap, unburned, high pressure charge, trapped between the two compression rings escapes as a wall jet after ring-reversal near the bottom center. Conversely, at the ring gap, when the cylinder pressure drops below the pressure between the compression rings, the trapped charge escapes through the gap and forms a thin layer on the cylinder wall.

  11. High temperature solution-nitriding and low-temperature nitriding of AISI 316: Effect on pitting potential and crevice corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2018-01-01

    in a 0.1M NaCl solution and crevice corrosion immersion tests in 3wt% FeCl3 solution were studied before and after the bulk and surface treatments.Nitrogen addition in the bulk proved to have a beneficial effect on the pitting resistance of the alloy. The formation of a zone of expanded austenite...... at the material surface through low-temperature nitriding resulted in a considerable improvement of the pitting potential and the crevice corrosion performance of the steels....

  12. Nuclear Co-Generating Plants for Powering and Heating to Cleaning the Warsaw's Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baurski, J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the Polish Government made a decision to introduce nuclear power to Poland. Two nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be constructed nearly at the same time - the first unit should start operation in 2020, and by 2030 there should be about 6000 MWe added to the national electrical grid. The Commissioner of the Government was nominated to introduce the Polish Nuclear Power Program (PNPP). One of the four vertically integrated - the biggest energy company (PGE - the Polish Energy Group with headquarters in Warsaw) was appointed to prepare investments. These activities are planned in four stages: I. up to 31.12.2010 - The PNPP will be prepared and the program must then be accepted by the Government. II. 2011 - 2013 - Sites will be determined, and the contract for construction of the first NPP will be closed. III. 2014 - 2015 - Technical specifications will be prepared and accepted according the law. IV. 2016 - 2020 - The first NPP in Poland will be constructed. At present, the Government is receiving proposals from some regions of Poland asking that they be chosen for the NPP. One of the obvious locations for the NPP is a 40-kilometer vicinity of Warsaw (1.8 mln inhabitants). The need for both electric power and heat is increasing because of the rapidly growing town. It gives the extremely valuable chance for a very high thermodynamic efficiency of 80% in co-generation instead of 33% (max 36% for EPR-1600) for NPP generated electric power only. The Warsaw heating system has a capacity of 3950 MWt and is the biggest among EU countries. It is the third biggest in the world. Two NPPs, each of 2 x 1000 MWe could be built on the Vistula River up and down the town. In 2005, UE calculated losses caused by gas emissions at 24 mld eur, and the span of human lives was six months shorter in western countries and 8 months shorter in Poland. Warsaw's atmosphere is very polluted also because there are four heat and power generating plants: three coal and one oil -fired. In these

  13. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  14. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  15. Management of waste heat at nuclear power plants: Its potential impact on the environment and its possible economic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.H.

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of the disposal of waste heat from nuclear power plants by means of once-through and closed-cycle cooling systems is examined in the context of the physical aspects of water quality standards and guidelines for thermal discharges. Typical thermal standards for each of the four classes of water bodies (rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters) are identified. Examples of thermal standards established for once-through cooling on open coastal waters are presented. The design and general layout of various types of cooling systems are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the cooling systems are presented, with particular emphasis on the discussion of potential environmental impacts. Modeling techniques available for impact assessment are presented. Proper selection and application of the models depend on the availability of site characteristics and understanding of the modeling techniques. Guidelines for choosing an appropriate model are presented. Various methods have been developed for the beneficial use of waste heat largely dissipated to the environment. Examples and associated problems of waste-heat utilization are discussed for agricultural, industrial, aquacultural, and residential uses

  16. Metabolic heat production and thermal conductance are mass-independent adaptations to thermal environment in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristoe, Trevor S; Burger, Joseph R; Balk, Meghan A; Khaliq, Imran; Hof, Christian; Brown, James H

    2015-12-29

    The extent to which different kinds of organisms have adapted to environmental temperature regimes is central to understanding how they respond to climate change. The Scholander-Irving (S-I) model of heat transfer lays the foundation for explaining how endothermic birds and mammals maintain their high, relatively constant body temperatures in the face of wide variation in environmental temperature. The S-I model shows how body temperature is regulated by balancing the rates of heat production and heat loss. Both rates scale with body size, suggesting that larger animals should be better adapted to cold environments than smaller animals, and vice versa. However, the global distributions of ∼9,000 species of terrestrial birds and mammals show that the entire range of body sizes occurs in nearly all climatic regimes. Using physiological and environmental temperature data for 211 bird and 178 mammal species, we test for mass-independent adaptive changes in two key parameters of the S-I model: basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermal conductance. We derive an axis of thermal adaptation that is independent of body size, extends the S-I model, and highlights interactions among physiological and morphological traits that allow endotherms to persist in a wide range of temperatures. Our macrophysiological and macroecological analyses support our predictions that shifts in BMR and thermal conductance confer important adaptations to environmental temperature in both birds and mammals.

  17. Rotating Arc Jet Test Model: Time-Accurate Trajectory Heat Flux Replication in a Ground Test Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Bernard; Grinstead, Jay; Dyakonov, Artem; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2011-01-01

    Though arc jet testing has been the proven method employed for development testing and certification of TPS and TPS instrumentation, the operational aspects of arc jets limit testing to selected, but constant, conditions. Flight, on the other hand, produces timevarying entry conditions in which the heat flux increases, peaks, and recedes as a vehicle descends through an atmosphere. As a result, we are unable to "test as we fly." Attempts to replicate the time-dependent aerothermal environment of atmospheric entry by varying the arc jet facility operating conditions during a test have proven to be difficult, expensive, and only partially successful. A promising alternative is to rotate the test model exposed to a constant-condition arc jet flow to yield a time-varying test condition at a point on a test article (Fig. 1). The model shape and rotation rate can be engineered so that the heat flux at a point on the model replicates the predicted profile for a particular point on a flight vehicle. This simple concept will enable, for example, calibration of the TPS sensors on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) aeroshell for anticipated flight environments.

  18. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of a SMSS Subjected to Common Heat Treatment Cycles in an Aggressive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieta, G.; Leite, R.; Kwietniewski, C.; Clarke, T.; Strohaecker, T.

    2010-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) are an alternative to corrosion-prone carbon steels and expensive duplex stainless steels in offshore tubing applications for the oil and gas industry. Due to their differentiated alloying, SMSS exhibit superior toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability properties when compared with another viable option, conventional martensitic stainless steels. However, when cathodically protected in a seawater environment they can be susceptible to embrittlement due to hydrogen charging. In the present study, SMSS samples were removed from deep water pipelines and their fracture toughness in the as-received condition and with different heat treatments was evaluated. Tests were carried out in air and in harsh environmental and loading conditions, which were ensured by subjecting specimens to cathodic overprotection, simulating effects seen in structures with complex geometries, and to incremental step loads in a synthetic seawater environment, thus favoring hydrogen diffusion to the precrack tip. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were analyzed in order to identify hydrogen-induced embrittlement and fracture toughness values of specimens tested in air were compared to values obtained in environment-assisted experiments. The influence of microstructure was evaluated by control of the retained austenite and δ-ferrite contents of the specimens. The results show a significant drop in the fracture toughness of steel in the studied environment, with a fracture mode which is clearly more brittle and dependent on microstructural characteristics of the samples.

  19. Hybrid heating systems optimization of residential environment to have thermal comfort conditions by numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahantigh, Nabi; Keshavarz, Ali; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine optimum hybrid heating systems parameters, such as temperature, surface area of a radiant heater and vent area to have thermal comfort conditions. DOE, Factorial design method is used to determine the optimum values for input parameters. A 3D model of a virtual standing thermal manikin with real dimensions is considered in this study. Continuity, momentum, energy, species equations for turbulent flow and physiological equation for thermal comfort are numerically solved to study heat, moisture and flow field. K - ɛRNG Model is used for turbulence modeling and DO method is used for radiation effects. Numerical results have a good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. The effect of various combinations of inlet parameters on thermal comfort is considered. According to Pareto graph, some of these combinations that have significant effect on the thermal comfort require no more energy can be used as useful tools. A better symmetrical velocity distribution around the manikin is also presented in the hybrid system.

  20. Heat exchanger technologies for the global environment. PWR-Vol. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    This is the Committee's largest compilation of papers in the fourteen years that ASME has sponsored one or more sessions at the Joint Power Generation Conference. In addition to the twenty-two papers offered at the conference, one session contained a panel discussion during which five industry specialists related their experiences and interpretations. Many of the presentations of the past few years have been made by authors from foreign lands as the conference has expanded to an international forum. This years' theme of global impact is included in the heat exchanger presentations from the USA and abroad. In addition, ASME has encouraged authors to make the subjects of their presentations more apropos to current concerns. New concepts and designs, particularly with PC programs in mind, is one specific area that is addressed. Other topics such as materials selection, coatings to extend performance life, minimizing the effects of microbiologically influenced corrosion, zebra mussel control and new approaches to heat transfer design are some of the subjects covered at the conference and in this volume. Nineteen papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  1. Effects of the Solid Solution Heat Treatment on the Corrosion Resistance Property of SSC13 Cast Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin [Hi-Sten Co., Ltd., Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Su Gun [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Pak, S. J. [Gachon BioNano Research Institute, Gachon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Recently, Stainless steels have been increasingly selected as the fitting or the valve materials of water pipes as the human health issue is getting higher and higher. Therefore, the connectors attached at pipes to deliver water are exposed to more severe environments than the pipes because crevice or galvanic corrosion is apt to occur at the fittings or the valves. Effects of the solid solution annealing, cooling rate after this heat treatment, and passivation on the corrosion properties of the shell mold casted SSC13 (STS304 alloy equivalent) were studied. The heating and quenching treatment more or less reduced hardness but effectively improved corrosion resistance. It was explained by the reduction of delta ferrite contents. Independent of heat treatment, the chemical passivation treatment also lowered corrosion rate but the improvement of corrosion resistance depended on temperature and time for passivation treatment indicating that the optimum conditions for passivation treatment were the bath temperature of 34 .deg. C and operating time of 10 minutes. Therefore it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of SSC13 can be effectively improved with the heat treatment, where SSC13 is heated for 10 minutes at 1120 °C and quenched and passivation treatment, where SSC13 is passivated for at least 10 seconds at 34 °C nitric acid solution.

  2. Effects of body-mapping-designed clothing on heat stress and running performance in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiao; Li, Yi; Yao, Lei; Chen, Yajun; Guo, Yueping; Wong, Stephen H S; Ng, Frency S F; Hu, Junyan

    2017-10-01

    To investigate clothing-induced differences in human thermal response and running performance, eight male athletes participated in a repeated-measure study by wearing three sets of clothing (CloA, CloB, and CloC). CloA and CloB were body-mapping-designed with 11% and 7% increased capacity of heat dissipation respectively than CloC, the commonly used running clothing. The experiments were conducted by using steady-state running followed by an all-out performance running in a controlled hot environment. Participants' thermal responses such as core temperature (T c ), mean skin temperature ([Formula: see text]), heat storage (S), and the performance running time were measured. CloA resulted in shorter performance time than CloC (323.1 ± 10.4 s vs. 353.6 ± 13.2 s, p = 0.01), and induced the lowest [Formula: see text], smallest ΔT c , and smallest S in the resting and running phases. This study indicated that clothing made with different heat dissipation capacities affects athlete thermal responses and running performance in a hot environment. Practitioner Summary: A protocol that simulated the real situation in running competitions was used to investigate the effects of body-mapping-designed clothing on athletes' thermal responses and running performance. The findings confirmed the effects of optimised clothing with body-mapping design and advanced fabrics, and ensured the practical advantage of developed clothing on exercise performance.

  3. Heat transfer in fish: are short excursions between habitats a thermoregulatory behaviour to exploit resources in an unfavourable thermal environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépino, Marc; Goyer, Katerine; Magnan, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Temperature is the primary environmental factor affecting physiological processes in ectotherms. Heat-transfer models describe how the fish's internal temperature responds to a fluctuating thermal environment. Specifically, the rate coefficient (k), defined as the instantaneous rate of change in body temperature in relation to the difference between ambient and body temperature, summarizes the combined effects of direct thermal conduction through body mass, passive convection (intracellular and intercellular fluids) and forced convective heat transfer (cardiovascular system). The k-coefficient is widely used in fish ecology to understand how body temperature responds to changes in water temperature. The main objective of this study was to estimate the k-coefficient of brook charr equipped with internal temperature-sensitive transmitters in controlled laboratory experiments. Fish were first transferred from acclimation tanks (10°C) to tanks at 14, 19 or 23°C (warming experiments) and were then returned to the acclimation tanks (10°C; cooling experiments), thus producing six step changes in ambient temperature. We used non-linear mixed models to estimate the k-coefficient. Model comparisons indicated that the model incorporating the k-coefficient as a function of absolute temperature difference (dT: 4, 9 and 13°C) best described body temperature change. By simulating body temperature in a heterogeneous thermal environment, we provide theoretical predictions of maximum excursion duration between feeding and resting areas. Our simulations suggest that short (i.e. behaviour adopted by cold freshwater fish species to sustain body temperature below a critical temperature threshold, enabling them to exploit resources in an unfavourable thermal environment. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS FOLLOWING A CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATION IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY RESEARCH HOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in the U.S. EPA Indoor Air Quality Research House to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of chlorpyrifos following a professional crack and crevice application in the kitchen. Following the application, measurements were made in the kitchen, de...

  5. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS FOLLOWING A CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATION IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in the U.S. EPA Indoor Air Quality Test House to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of chlorpyrifos following a professional crack and crevice application in the kitchen. Following the application, measurements were made in the kitchen, den a...

  6. Heat dissipation in controlled environment enclosures through the application of water screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrington, I.J.; Halligan, E.A.; Ruby, L.C.; McNaughton, K.G. [Horticulture and Food Research Institute of New Zealand Ltd., Palmerston North (New Zealand)

    1994-12-31

    The use of plate glass-water thermal barriers in controlled environment facilities effectively reduces the thermal load within the plant growth chamber. This allows high PPFs to be provided for plant growth and development studies, adequate simulation of daily light integrals, and simulation of peak PPFs. Further, substantial amounts of incandescent lamp supplementation can be used to achieve simulation of daylight R:FR ratios which are needed to ensure adequate stem development in some species. While the focus in this paper has been on the use of entire thermal barriers which separate the lighting enclosure from the plant growth chamber, the same principles apply to the use of water jackets for cooling individual lamps (such as can occur with xenon-arc lamps). In this instance, the barrier separating the lamps from the plant chamber can be much simpler (e.g., plexiglas) as the main function of the barrier is to separate the air ventilation of the lamp enclosure from the air system within the plant growth chamber. The main advantage of water as a thermal barrier is the negligible absorption of radiation in the photosynthetically-active and near infra-red wavebands. Consequently, plate glass-water barriers typically allow transmission of approximately 90% of radiation in these regions. While ventilated double and triple glazing systems appear to be attractive alternative to water barriers from an operating standpoint, their significant absorption in the biologically-important wavebands (7 - 12 %) with each glass layer and longer-wave cut-offs (typically 2500 - 4000 nm) makes them a much less attractive alternative. The data presented demonstrate clearly that measurement of PPF alone is not an adequate representation of the radiation environment being used in a controlled environment study.

  7. The impact of population growth on environment: the debate heats up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R P

    1992-02-01

    A proposed framework, which was introduced at the 1989 meetings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, included political constraints as well as population growth as a proximate cause with potentially important impacts on the environment in Paul and Ann Ehrlich's well-known PAT equation. PAT limitations are identified as the 1.2 billion people caught in the debt-poverty trap, less developed countries' balance of payments deficits, and "distortionary factors" that undermined economic incentives and contributed to mismanagement of resources. Such factors could be keeping farm prices low and have an impact on deterring use of environmentally sound traditional agricultural practices. Mismanagement of public lands occurs when large commercial enterprises or large scale mechanization displace population onto marginal or less productive lands. Intergroup warfare is a new form impacting on the environment. In Burma loggers are authorized to clear cut large tracts of teak forests in order to ferret out Karen guerrillas. Over 15 million refugees were thus displaced and forced to live in encampments that require trees for shelter, firewood for survival, and overgrazing of livestock. Social and economic environments are also undermined by "dependency" factors such as trade protectionism, brain drain, and limited foreign aid. The Group of 77 Non-Aligned Developing Countries proposed that discussions of the links between population and the environment be omitted from the agenda of the 1994 UN Conference on Population and Development. Basic clarifications are needed to distinguish ultimate versus proximate factors and current versus future concerns. The debate ignores distribution patterns, migration, or changing age structures. The debate blames unjustifiably rapid population growth as the ultimate cause of global environmental degradation and links population growth to a host of other social problems such as famine and refugees, while ignoring civil unrest

  8. Climate Variability and Industrial-Suburban Heat Environment in a Mediterranean Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina A. Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomenon prevalently concerns industrialized countries. It consists of a significant increase in temperatures, especially in industrialized and urbanized areas, in particular, during extreme warm periods like summer. This paper explores the climate variability of temperatures in two stations located in Matera city (Southern Italy, evaluating the increase in temperatures from 1988 to 2015. Moreover, the Corine Land Covers (1990–2000–2006–2012 were used in order to investigate the effect of land use on temperatures. The results obtained confirm the prevalence of UHI phenomena for industrialized areas, highlighting the proposal that the spreading of settlements may further drive these effects on the microclimate. In particular, the presence of industrial structures, even in rural areas, shows a clear increase in summer maximum temperatures. This does not occur in the period before 2000, probably due to the absence of the industrial settlement. On the contrary, from 2000 to 2015, changes are not relevant, but the maximum temperatures have always been higher than in the suburban area (station localized in green zone during daylight hours.

  9. Heated submicron particle fluxes using an optical particle counter in urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M.; Johansson, C.; Mårtensson, M.; Struthers, H.; Ahlm, L.; Nilsson, D.

    2013-03-01

    From May 2008 to March 2009 aerosol emissions were measured using the eddy covariance method covering the size range 0.25 to 2.5 μm diameter (Dp) from a 105 m tower, in central Stockholm, Sweden. Supporting chemical aerosol data were collected at roof and street level. Results show that the inorganic fraction of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and sea salt accounts for approximately 15% of the total aerosol mass removed at 0.6 μm Dp. Further heating to 300 °C caused very little additional losses road traffic (as inferred from the ratio of the incremental concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and BC measured on a densely trafficked street) and the fluxes of non-volatile material at tower level are in close agreement, suggesting a traffic source of BC. We have estimated the emission factors (EFs) for non-volatile particles <0.6 μm Dp to be 2.4 ± 1.4 mg veh-1 km-1 based on either CO2 fluxes or traffic activity data. Light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) EFs were estimated using multiple linear regression and reveal that for non-volatile particulate matter in the 0.25 to 0.6 μm Dp range, the EFHDV is approximately twice as high as the EFLDV, the difference not being statistically significant.

  10. A study on the analysis of urban heat environment pattern and construction of mesh data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.G.; Hong, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reported on a study in which wind flow was analyzed to determine its influence on air quality in urban areas. Wind flow changes depending on fixed factors such as shapes of the buildings and postings, as well as on flexible factors like weather. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind flow analysis method was used to quantitatively measure wind effect and air flow in terms of impacts on ventilation, air quality and walking in the street. Two case studies were presented in which land development planning was used to achieve a better urban environment. The studies showed that air quality is usually degraded when wind speed is low, while pedestrians feel discomforts when wind speed is high. Pedestrian comfort was found to be closely related to air circulation. Reduced ventilation and air contamination were shown to be affected by density and height of building. However, in these particular case studies, the height of the buildings was shown to have the greatest influence on the urban environment. 7 refs., 5 figs

  11. Environment-friendly heat supply with natural refrigerants. Large heat pumps use industrial waste heat and waste water; Umweltschonende Waermeversorgung mit natuerlichen Kaeltemitteln. Grosswaermepumpen nutzen industrielle Abwaerme und Abwaesser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-01-15

    Everywhere, where industrial processes occur or coldness is produced, simultaneously heat is produced. While many private houses use geothermal energy or ambient air for the production of heat, waste water and waste heat prove to be optimal energy sources for the industrial need due to higher output temperatures. By means of large heat pumps the residual heat is used for heating or the supply of hot water for example in local heat supply grids and makes an important contribution to climate protection.

  12. Effect of boric acid on intergranular corrosion and on hideout return efficiency of sodium in the tube support plate crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.; Campan, J.L.; Brunet, J.P.; Schindler, P.; Stutzmann, A.

    1995-01-01

    Sodium hydroxide is one of the main causes of intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) of alloy 600 steam generator (S.G.) tubes. Boric acid appears to be one of the possible remedies for intergranular corrosion process inhibition. In order to obtain data on boric acid injection efficiency, an experimental program was performed on previously corroded tubes. To prevent premature tube wall cracking, samples were sleeved on alloy 690 tubes. The objective of the tests was to evaluate, on a statistically valid number of samples, the effectiveness of boric acid and tube sleeving as possible remedies for IGA/SCC extension. Another independent experimental program was initiated to determine the hideout return efficiency in the tube support plate (TSP) and tubesheet (TS) crevices after a significant duration (≤ 180 hours) of sodium hideout. The main objective of the first tests being a statistical evaluation of the efficiency of boric acid treatment, was not achieved. The tests did demonstrate that sleeving effectively reduces IGA/SCC growth. In an additional program, cracks were obtained on highly susceptible tubes when specimens were not sleeved. The companion tests performed in the same conditions but with an addition of boric acid did not show any IGA or cracks. These results seem to demonstrate the possible effect of boric acid in preventing the corrosion process. Results of the second tests did not demonstrate any difference in the amount of sodium piled up in the crevices before and after boric acid injection. They however showed an increase of the hideout return efficiency at the tube support plate level from 78 % without boric acid to 95 % when boric acid is present in the feed water

  13. Sulphation reactions of oxidic dust particles in waste heat boiler environment. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranki, T.

    1999-09-01

    Sulphation of metal oxides has an important role in many industrial processes. In different applications sulphation reactions have different aims and characteristics. In the flash smelting process sulphation of oxidic flue dust is a spontaneous and inevitable phenomena, which takes place in the waste heat boiler (WHB) when cooling down hot dust laden off-gases from sulphide smelters. Oxidic dust particles (size 0 - 50 {mu}m) react with O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3} in a certain temperature range (500 - 800 deg C). Sulphation reactions are highly exothermic releasing large amount of heat, which affects the gas cooling and thermal performance of the boiler. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the system have to be known to improve the process and WHB operation. The rate of sulphation is affected by the prevailing conditions (temperature, gas composition) and particle size and microstructure (porosity, surface area). Some metal oxides (CuO) can react readily with SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and act as self-catalysts, but others (NiO) require the presence of an external catalyst to enhance the SO{sub 3} formation and sulphation to proceed. Some oxides (NiO) sulphate directly, some (CuO) may form first intermediate phases (basic sulphates) depending on the reaction conditions. Thus, the reaction mechanisms are very complex. The aim of this report was to search information about the factors affecting the dust sulphation reactions and suggested reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Many investigators have studied sulphation thermodynamics and reaction kinetics and mechanisms of macroscopical metal oxide pieces, but only few articles have been published about sulphation of microscopical particles, like dust. All the found microscale studies dealt with sulphation reactions of calcium oxide, which is not present in the flash smelting process, but used as an SO{sub 2} absorbent in the combustion processes. However, also these investigations may give some hints about the sulphation

  14. Regional energy-environment system analysis and the role of low-temperature nuclear heat in North China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yingyun

    1984-01-01

    The consumption of commercial energy in China in 1980 amounted to 603 million tonnes of coal equivalent (tce). By the end of this century, according to preliminary forecasting, it will reach some 1200 million tce at least, but there may still be some gaps in the energy supply. Within the structure of China's current energy supply, coal is the dominating fuel, most of which is burned directly, thus causing serious air pollution particularly in urban areas during the winter season. To take into consideration the environmental impacts in formulating appropriate energy policies and carrying out rational energy planning, a practical regional energy system model in connection with environment impacts has been developed. It is essentially a linear programme model. The model has already been used to evaluate the role of alternative energies and technologies including the nuclear option in North China's future urban energy system. The preliminary results thus obtained have shown that nuclear energy, particularly low-temperature nuclear heat, must be introduced to reduce air pollution and fill the gaps in the energy supply. Since small- or medium-sized heat-only reactors have already been reported to be economical, safe and non-polluting, that will be developed in urban areas in North China to a certain extent by the end of this century. (author)

  15. Mechanical Testing of PMCs under Simulated Rapid Heat-Up Propulsion Environments. II; In-Plane Compressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Eric H.; Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber thermoset polymer matrix composites (PMC) with high temperature polyimide based in-situ polymerized monomer reactant (PMR) resin has been used for some time in applications which can see temperatures up to 550 F. Currently, graphite fiber PMR based composites are used in several aircraft engine components including the outer bypass duct for the GE F-404, exit flaps for the P&W F-100-229, and the core cowl for the GE/Snecma CF6-80A3. Newer formulations, including PMR-II-50 are being investigated as potential weight reduction replacements of various metallic components in next generation high performance propulsion rocket engines that can see temperatures which exceed 550 F. Extensive FEM thermal modeling indicates that these components are exposed to rapid heat-up rates (up to -200 F/sec) and to a maximum temperature of around 600 F. Even though the predicted maximum part temperatures were within the capability of PW-II-50, the rapid heat-up causes significant through-thickness thermal gradients in the composite part and even more unstable states when combined with moisture. Designing composite parts for such extreme service environments will require accurate measurement of intrinsic and transient mechanical properties and the hygrothermal performance of these materials under more realistic use conditions. The mechanical properties of polymers degrade when exposed to elevated temperatures even in the absence of gaseous oxygen. Accurate mechanical characterization of the material is necessary in order to reduce system weight while providing sufficient factors of safety. Historically, the testing of PMCs at elevated temperatures has been plagued by the antagonism between two factors. First, moisture has been shown to profoundly affect the mechanical response of these materials at temperatures above their glass transition temperature while concurrently lowering the material's Tg. Moisture phenomena is due to one or a combination of three effects, i

  16. Effects of dissolved calcium and magnesium ions on lead-induced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of nuclear steam generator tubing alloy in high temperature crevice solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, B.T.; Tian, L.P.; Zhu, R.K.; Luo, J.L.; Lu, Y.C.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ions on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of UNS N08800 are investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 300 o C in simulated crevice chemistries. The presence of lead contamination in the crevice chemistries increases significantly the SCC susceptibility of the alloy. The lead-assisted SCC (PbSCC) susceptibility is reduced markedly by the addition of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ions into the solution and this mitigating effect is enhanced by increasing the total concentration of Ca 2+ + Mg 2+ . The CERT test results are consistent with the types of fracture surfaces shown by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). There is a reasonable correlation between the SCC susceptibility and the donor densities in the anodic films in accord with the role of lead-induced passivity degradation in PbSCC.

  17. Standard test method for determining the crevice repassivation potential of corrosion-resistant alloys using a potentiodynamic-galvanostatic-potentiostatic technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for conducting anodic polarization studies to determine the crevice repassivation potential for corrosion–resistant alloys. The concept of the repassivation potential is similar to that of the protection potential given in Reference Test Method G 5. 1.2 The test method consists in applying successively potentiodynamic, galvanostatic, and potentiostatic treatments for the initial formation and afterward repassivation of crevice corrosion. 1.3 This test method is a complement to Test Method G 61. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. The Solar Reflectance Index as a Tool to Forecast the Heat Released to the Urban Environment: Potentiality and Assessment Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Muscio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Overheating of buildings and urban areas is a more and more severe issue in view of global warming combined with increasing urbanization. The thermal behavior of urban surfaces in the hot seasons is the result of a complex balance of construction and environmental parameters such as insulation level, thermal mass, shielding, and solar reflective capability on one side, and ambient conditions on the other side. Regulations makers and the construction industry have favored the use of parameters that allow the forecasting of the interaction between different material properties without the need for complex analyses. Among these, the solar reflectance index (SRI takes into account solar reflectance and thermal emittance to predict the thermal behavior of a surface subjected to solar radiation through a physically rigorous mathematical procedure that considers assigned air and sky temperatures, peak solar irradiance, and wind velocity. The correlation of SRI with the heat released to the urban environment is analyzed in this paper, as well as the sensitivity of its calculation procedure to variation of the input parameters, as possibly induced by the measurement methods used or by the material ageing.

  19. THEODORE, a two-step heating system for the EC/OC determination of radiocarbon (14C) in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szidat, S.; Jenk, T.M.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Synal, H.-A.; Hajdas, I.; Bonani, G.; Saurer, M.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of 14 C in the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) fractions, respectively, of fine aerosol particles bear the potential to apportion anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources. For this purpose, the system THEODORE (two-step heating system for the EC/OC determination of radiocarbon in the environment) was developed. In this device, OC and EC are transformed into carbon dioxide in a stream of oxygen at 340 and 650 deg. C, respectively, and reduced to filamentous carbon. This is the target material for subsequent accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14 C measurements, which were performed on sub-milligram carbon samples at the PSI/ETH compact 500 kV AMS system. Quality assurance measurements of SRM 1649a, Urban Dust, yielded a fraction of modern f M in total carbon (TC) of 0.522 ± 0.018 (n=5, 95% confidence level) in agreement with reported values. The results for OC and EC are 0.70 ± 0.05 (n=3) and 0.066 ± 0.020 (n=4), respectively

  20. Option-4 algorithm for Florida pocket depth probe: reduction in the variance of site-specific probeable crevice depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, H J; Rogers, P; Johnson, N W; Slaney, R

    1999-08-01

    Clinical periodontal measurement is plagued by many sources of error which result in aberrant values (outliers). This study sets out to compare probeable crevice depth measurements (PCD) selected by the option-4 algorithm against those recorded with a conventional double-pass method and to quantify any reduction in site-specific PCD variances. A single clinician recorded full-mouth PCD at 1 visit in 32 subjects (mean age 45.5 years) with moderately advanced chronic adult periodontitis. PCD was recorded over 2 passes at 6 sites per tooth with the Florida Pocket Depth Probes, a 3rd generation probe. The option-4 algorithm compared the 1st pass site-specific PCD value (PCD1) to the 2nd pass site-specific PCD value (PCD2) and, if the difference between these values was >1.00 mm, allowed the recording of a maximum of 2 further measurements (3rd and 4th pass measurements PCD3 and PCD4): 4 site-specific measure-meets were considered to be the maximum subject and tissue tolerance. The algorithm selected the 1st 2 measurements whose difference was difference Y) (Y=[(A-B)/A]X 100) and a 75% reduction in the median site-specific variance of PCD1/PCD2.

  1. Towards a more sustainable heat supply for the built environment in 2050; Naar een duurzamere warmtevoorziening van de gebouwde omgeving in 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Wijngaart, R.A.; Folkert, R.J.M.; Elzenga, H.E.

    2012-04-15

    To curb the CO2 emission of the built environment, a combination of building and environment oriented measures is most efficient. Together, they can reduce the CO2 emission with 15 to 30 per cent. This has financial benefits and leads to larger CO2 reduction in 2050 compared to measures focusing on buildings alone such as insulation or more efficient heating or on environment oriented measures (such as waste heat, geothermal or thermal energy storage) [Dutch] Om de CO2-uitstoot van de gebouwde omgeving te beperken, is een combinatie van gebouw- en gebiedsmaatregelen het meest efficient. Samen kunnen ze voor 15 tot 30 procent minder CO2-uitstoot zorgen. Het is financieel voordelig en levert in 2050 een grotere CO2-reductie op dan het nemen van alleen gebouwmaatregelen zoals isolatie of efficientere verwarmingsinstallaties of alleen gebiedsmaatregelen (zoals restwarmte, geothermie of warmte-koudeopslag)

  2. Energy efficient and environment-friendly air-air heat pumps; Lucht-luchtwarmtepompen zeer zuinig en milieuvriendelijk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautwein, M. [Stulz, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    In many buildings often two different systems are applied: a gas installation for heating and an airconditioning system for cooling. However, an air conditioner can also be used for heating. This can save on the gas installation and/or the central heating system [Dutch] In veel gebouwen worden vaak twee verschillende installaties gebruikt: een gasinstallatie voor verwarming en een airconditioninginstallatie voor koeling. Echter, met airconditioners kan men ook prima verwarmen. Daarmee kan worden bespaard op gasaansluiting en CV-installatie.

  3. Effect of boric acid on intergranular corrosion in tube support plate crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.P.; Campan, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Intergranular attack on steam generator tubing is one important phenomenon involved in availability of Pressurized Water Reactors. Boric acid appears to be a possible candidate for inhibiting the corrosion process. The program performed in Cadarache was supposed to give statistical informations on the boric acid effect. It was based on a large number of samples initially attacked during a program performed by BABCOCK ampersand WILCOX. These samples were sleeved onto Alloy 690 tubes, in order to prevent premature cracking. Unfortunately it was not possible to find chemical conditions able to produce significant additional corrosion; we postulated mainly due to a drastic reduction of the thermal flux resulting from the increase of the tube wall thickness under the tube support plates (TSP). The tests demonstrate that such sleeve could be a possible remedy of the corrosion when introduced under the TSP. The tests show indications of a possible beneficial effect of the boric acid, a large variability of the heats sensitivity to the IGA and a predominant effect of Na 2 CO 3 on IGA production

  4. Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, A.D.; Turnbull, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the hydrocarbon resources of the North Sea has resulted in both offshore and onshore environmental repercussions, involving the existing physical attributes of the sea and seabed, the coastline and adjoining land. The social and economic repercussions of the industry were equally widespread. The dramatic and speedy impact of the exploration and exploitation of the northern North Sea resources in the early 1970s, on the physical resources of Scotland was quickly realised together with the concern that any environmental and social damage to the physical and social fabric should be kept to a minimum. To this end, a wide range of research and other activities by central and local government, and other interested agencies was undertaken to extend existing knowledge on the marine and terrestrial environments that might be affected by the oil and gas industry. The outcome of these activities is summarized in this paper. The topics covered include a survey of the marine ecosystems of the North Sea, the fishing industry, the impact of oil pollution on seabirds and fish stocks, the ecology of the Scottish coastline and the impact of the petroleum industry on a selection of particular sites. (author)

  5. Steady state heat transfer experimental studies of LHC superconducting cables operating in cryogenic environment of superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Santandrea, Dario; Tuccillo, Raffaele; Granieri, Pier Paolo

    The heat management is a basic and fundamental aspect of the superconducting magnets used in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Indeed, the coil temperature must be kept below the critical value, despite the heat which can be generated or deposited in the magnet during the normal operations. Therefore, this thesis work aims at determining the heating power which can be extracted from the superconducting cables of the LHC, specially through their electrical insulation which represents the main thermal barrier. An experimental measurement campaign in superfluid helium bath was performed on several samples reproducting the main LHC magnets. The heating power was generated in the sample by Joule heating and the temperature increase was measured by means of Cernox bare chip and thermocouples. An innovative instrumentation technique which also includes the in-situ calibration of the thermocouples was developed. A thorough uncertainty analysis on the overall measurement chain concluded the experimental setup. The prese...

  6. A seed preferential heat shock transcription factor from wheat provides abiotic stress tolerance and yield enhancement in transgenic Arabidopsis under heat stress environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Chauhan

    Full Text Available Reduction in crop yield and quality due to various abiotic stresses is a worldwide phenomenon. In the present investigation, a heat shock factor (HSF gene expressing preferentially in developing seed tissues of wheat grown under high temperatures was cloned. This newly identified heat shock factor possesses the characteristic domains of class A type plant HSFs and shows high similarity to rice OsHsfA2d, hence named as TaHsfA2d. The transcription factor activity of TaHsfA2d was confirmed through transactivation assay in yeast. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaHsfA2d not only possess higher tolerance towards high temperature but also showed considerable tolerance to salinity and drought stresses, they also showed higher yield and biomass accumulation under constant heat stress conditions. Analysis of putative target genes of AtHSFA2 through quantitative RT-PCR showed higher and constitutive expression of several abiotic stress responsive genes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing TaHsfA2d. Under stress conditions, TaHsfA2d can also functionally complement the T-DNA insertion mutants of AtHsfA2, although partially. These observations suggest that TaHsfA2d may be useful in molecular breeding of crop plants, especially wheat, to improve yield under abiotic stress conditions.

  7. Water and sediment temperature dynamics in shallow tidal environments: The role of the heat flux at the sediment-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivato, M.; Carniello, L.; Gardner, J.; Silvestri, S.; Marani, M.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, we investigate the energy flux at the sediment-water interface and the relevance of the heat exchanged between water and sediment for the water temperature dynamics in shallow coastal environments. Water and sediment temperature data collected in the Venice lagoon show that, in shallow, temperate lagoons, temperature is uniform within the water column, and enabled us to estimate the net heat flux at the sediment-water interface. We modeled this flux as the sum of a conductive component and of the solar radiation reaching the bottom, finding the latter being negligible. We developed a "point" model to describe the temperature dynamics of the sediment-water continuum driven by vertical energy transfer. We applied the model considering conditions characterized by negligible advection, obtaining satisfactory results. We found that the heat exchange between water and sediment is crucial for describing sediment temperature but plays a minor role on the water temperature.

  8. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  9. Experimental evaluation on energy performance of innovative clean air heat pump for indoor environment control in summer and winter seasons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nie, Jinzhe; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the air purification capacity of regenerative silica gel rotor, an innovative clean air heat pump (CAHP) was designed, developed and investigated through experimental studies. The CAHP integrated air purification, dehumidification and heating/cooling in one unit. A prototype of the CAHP...... was developed. Laboratory experimental studies were conducted to investigate its energy performance under different outdoor climates including cold, mild-cold, mild-hot and extremely hot and humid climates. The energy performance of the CAHP was then evaluated by comparing with a conventional air source heat...... pump. The results showed that to keep same indoor air quality, the CAHP could save substantial amount of energy. For example, compared to the conventional air source heat pump, the CAHP could save up to 59%, 40%, 30% of electricity for ventilation and air conditioning in a test room in summer...

  10. Numerical prediction of heat-flux to massive calorimeters engulfed in regulatory fires with the cask analysis fire environment (CAFE) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, Jorman A.; Suo-Antitla, Ahti; Kramer M, Alex; Greiner, Miles

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations show that the thermal boundary conditions within large-scale fires are significantly affected by the presence of thermally massive objects. These objects cool the soot and gas near their surfaces, and these effects reduce the incoming radiant heat-flux to values lower than the levels expected from simple σT fire 4 models. They also affect the flow and temperature fields in the fire far from their surfaces. The Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to provide an enhanced fire boundary condition for the design of radioactive material packages. CAFE is a set of computer subroutines that use computational fluid mechanics methods to predict convective heat transfer and mixing. It also includes models for fuel and oxygen transport, chemical reaction, and participating-media radiation heat transfer. This code uses two-dimensional computational models so that it has reasonably short turnaround times on standard workstations and is well suited for design and risk studies. In this paper, CAFE is coupled with a commercial finite-element program to model a large cylindrical calorimeter fully engulfed in a pool fire. The time-dependent heat-flux to the calorimeter and the calorimeter surface temperature are determined for several locations around the calorimeter circumference. The variation of heat-flux with location is determined for calorimeters with different diameters and wall thickness, and the observed effects discussed

  11. Random regression models to account for the effect of genotype by environment interaction due to heat stress on the milk yield of Holstein cows under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mário L; Bignardi, Annaiza Braga; Pereira, Rodrigo Junqueira; Menéndez-Buxadera, Alberto; El Faro, Lenira

    2016-02-01

    The present study had the following objectives: to compare random regression models (RRM) considering the time-dependent (days in milk, DIM) and/or temperature × humidity-dependent (THI) covariate for genetic evaluation; to identify the effect of genotype by environment interaction (G×E) due to heat stress on milk yield; and to quantify the loss of milk yield due to heat stress across lactation of cows under tropical conditions. A total of 937,771 test-day records from 3603 first lactations of Brazilian Holstein cows obtained between 2007 and 2013 were analyzed. An important reduction in milk yield due to heat stress was observed for THI values above 66 (-0.23 kg/day/THI). Three phases of milk yield loss were identified during lactation, the most damaging one at the end of lactation (-0.27 kg/day/THI). Using the most complex RRM, the additive genetic variance could be altered simultaneously as a function of both DIM and THI values. This model could be recommended for the genetic evaluation taking into account the effect of G×E. The response to selection in the comfort zone (THI ≤ 66) is expected to be higher than that obtained in the heat stress zone (THI > 66) of the animals. The genetic correlations between milk yield in the comfort and heat stress zones were less than unity at opposite extremes of the environmental gradient. Thus, the best animals for milk yield in the comfort zone are not necessarily the best in the zone of heat stress and, therefore, G×E due to heat stress should not be neglected in the genetic evaluation.

  12. Prediction of heat-illness symptoms with the prediction of human vascular response in hot environment under resting condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Yogender; Karan, Bhuwan Mohan; Das, Barsa Nand; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2008-04-01

    The thermoregulatory control of human skin blood flow is vital to maintain the body heat storage during challenges of thermal homeostasis under heat stress. Whenever thermal homeostasis disturbed, the heat load exceeds heat dissipation capacity, which alters the cutaneous vascular responses along with other body physiological variables. Whole body skin blood flow has been calculated from the forearm blood flow. Present model has been designed using electronics circuit simulator (Multisim 8.0, National Instruments, USA), is to execute a series of predictive equations for early prediction of physiological parameters of young nude subjects during resting condition at various level of dry heat stress under almost still air to avoid causalities associated with hot environmental. The users can execute the model by changing the environmental temperature in degrees C and exposure time in minutes. The model would be able to predict and detect the changes in human vascular responses along with other physiological parameters and from this predicted values heat related-illness symptoms can be inferred.

  13. The A-chain of insulin contacts the insert domain of the insulin receptor. Photo-cross-linking and mutagenesis of a diabetes-related crevice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Chan, Shu Jin; Hua, Qing-xin; Chu, Ying-Chi; Wang, Run-ying; Klaproth, Birgit; Jia, Wenhua; Whittaker, Jonathan; De Meyts, Pierre; Nakagawa, Satoe H; Steiner, Donald F; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G; Weiss, Michael A

    2007-11-30

    The contribution of the insulin A-chain to receptor binding is investigated by photo-cross-linking and nonstandard mutagenesis. Studies focus on the role of Val(A3), which projects within a crevice between the A- and B-chains. Engineered receptor alpha-subunits containing specific protease sites ("midi-receptors") are employed to map the site of photo-cross-linking by an analog containing a photoactivable A3 side chain (para-azido-Phe (Pap)). The probe cross-links to a C-terminal peptide (residues 703-719 of the receptor A isoform, KTFEDYLHNVVFVPRPS) containing side chains critical for hormone binding (underlined); the corresponding segment of the holoreceptor was shown previously to cross-link to a Pap(B25)-insulin analog. Because Pap is larger than Val and so may protrude beyond the A3-associated crevice, we investigated analogs containing A3 substitutions comparable in size to Val as follows: Thr, allo-Thr, and alpha-aminobutyric acid (Aba). Substitutions were introduced within an engineered monomer. Whereas previous studies of smaller substitutions (Gly(A3) and Ser(A3)) encountered nonlocal conformational perturbations, NMR structures of the present analogs are similar to wild-type insulin; the variant side chains are accommodated within a native-like crevice with minimal distortion. Receptor binding activities of Aba(A3) and allo-Thr(A3) analogs are reduced at least 10-fold; the activity of Thr(A3)-DKP-insulin is reduced 5-fold. The hormone-receptor interface is presumably destabilized either by a packing defect (Aba(A3)) or by altered polarity (allo-Thr(A3) and Thr(A3)). Our results provide evidence that Val(A3), a site of mutation causing diabetes mellitus, contacts the insert domain-derived tail of the alpha-subunit in a hormone-receptor complex.

  14. Modelling the heat dynamics of a monitored Test Reference Environment for Building Integrated Photovoltaic systems using stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodi, C.; Bacher, Peder; Cipriano, J.

    2012-01-01

    reduce the ventilation thermal losses of the building by pre-heating the fresh air. Furthermore, by decreasing PV module temperature, the ventilation air heat extraction can simultaneously increase electrical and thermal energy production of the building. A correct prediction of the PV module temperature...... and heat transfer coefficients is fundamental in order to improve the thermo-electrical production.The considered grey-box models are composed of a set of continuous time stochastic differential equations, holding the physical description of the system, combined with a set of discrete time measurement......This paper deals with grey-box modelling of the energy transfer of a double skin Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) system. Grey-box models are based on a combination of prior physical knowledge and statistics, which enable identification of the unknown parameters in the system and accurate...

  15. Corrosion behavior of dissimilar weld joint of 316L and alloy 182 filler metal with different post-weld heat treatments in saline environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Joao H.N.; Santos, Neice F.; Esteves, Luiza; Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: joao.garcia@cdtn.br, E-mail: nfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: luiza.esteves@cdtn.br, E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SEIES/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serviço de Integridade Estrutural

    2017-11-01

    Austenitic stainless steel and nickel alloys are widely used in nuclear reactors components and other plants of energy generation, chemical and petrochemical industries, due to their high corrosion resistance. These metals require post weld heat treatment (PWHT) to relieve stresses from the welding processes, although it can lead to a degradation of the weld microstructure. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of different PWHT on corrosion behavior of a dissimilar weld joint of two AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel plates with nickel alloy as filler material in saline environments. The material was submitted to heat treatments for three hours at 600, 700 and 800 °C. The weld joint was examined by optical microscopy to determine the effects of PWHT in the microstructure. The corrosion behavior of the samples before and after heat treatment was evaluated using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) in sodium chloride solutions (19% v/v) and pH 4.0 at room temperature. Metallographic analyses showed that delta ferrite dissolute with PWHT temperature increase. CPP curves demonstrated an increase of pitting corrosion resistance as the PWHT temperature increases, although the pit size has been increased. The heat treated weld joint at 600 °C showed corrosion resistance close to the as welded material. (author)

  16. Standard Test Method for Measuring Extreme Heat-Transfer Rates from High-Energy Environments Using a Transient, Null-Point Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of the heat-transfer rate or the heat flux to the surface of a solid body (test sample) using the measured transient temperature rise of a thermocouple located at the null point of a calorimeter that is installed in the body and is configured to simulate a semi-infinite solid. By definition the null point is a unique position on the axial centerline of a disturbed body which experiences the same transient temperature history as that on the surface of a solid body in the absence of the physical disturbance (hole) for the same heat-flux input. 1.2 Null-point calorimeters have been used to measure high convective or radiant heat-transfer rates to bodies immersed in both flowing and static environments of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, and mixtures of these and other gases. Flow velocities have ranged from zero (static) through subsonic to hypersonic, total flow enthalpies from 1.16 to greater than 4.65 × 101 MJ/kg (5 × 102 to greater than 2 × 104 ...

  17. Sporulation environment of emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus strains determines spore size, heat resistance and germination capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Heat resistance, germination and outgrowth capacity of Bacillus cereus spores in processed foods are major factors in causing the emetic type of gastrointestinal disease. In this study, we aim to identify the impact of different sporulation conditions on spore properties of emetic

  18. Development of a unit suitable for corrosion monitoring in district heating systems. Experiences with the LOCOR-cell test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asbjørn; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    A by-pass unit suitable for placement of a number of different probes for corrosion monitoring has been designed. Also measurements of water parameters are allowed in a side stream from the unit. The project is a part of the Nordic Innovation Fund project KORMOF. The by-pass unit has been installed...... in 6 pressurised circulating heating systems and in one cooling system. 7 different corrosion monitoring methods have been used to study corrosion rates and types in dependency of water chemistry. This paper describes the design of the by-pass unit including water analysis methods. It also describes...... the purpose, background and gained results of one of the used monitoring techniques, the crevice corrosion measurements obtained by the LOCOR-Cell„§. The crevice corrosion cell was developed by FORCE Technology in a previous district heating project financed by Nordic Industrial Fund (1)(2). Results from...

  19. An insight into the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of eggshells hatching broiler chicks and its effects to the hatcher environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanini, C E B; Exadaktylos, V; Hong, S W; Tong, Q; McGonnell, I; Demmers, T G M; Bergoug, H; Guinebretière, M; Eterradossi, N; Roulston, N; Verhelst, R; Bahr, C; Berckmans, D

    2015-02-01

    Thermodynamic study of incubated eggs is an important component in the optimisation of incubation processes. However, research on the interaction of heat and moisture transfer mechanisms in eggs is rather limited and does not focus on the hatching stage of incubation. During hatch, both the recently hatched chick and the broken eggshell add extra heat and moisture contents to the hatcher environment. In this study, we have proposed a novel way to estimate thermodynamically the amount of water evaporated from a broken eggshell during hatch. The hypothesis of this study considers that previously reported drops in eggshell temperature during hatching of chicks is the result remaining water content evaporating from the eggshell, released on the inner membrane by the recently hatched wet chick, just before hatch. To reproduce this process, water was sprayed on eggshells to mimic the water-fluid from the wet body of a chick. For each sample of eggshell, the shell geometry and weight, surface area and eggshell temperature were measured. Water evaporation losses and convection coefficient were calculated using a novel model approach considering the simultaneous heat and mass transfer profiles in an eggshell. The calculated average convective coefficient was 23.9 ± 7.5 W/m(2) °C, similar to previously reported coefficients in literature as a function of 0.5-1m/s air speed range. Comparison between measured and calculated values for the water evaporation showed 68% probability accuracy, associated to the use of an experimentally derived single heat transfer coefficient. The results support our proposed modelling approach of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, by estimating the amount of evaporated water in an eggshell post-hatch, air humidity levels inside the hatcher can be optimised to ensure wet chicks dry properly while not dehydrating early hatching chicks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Next-Generation Goddard Convective-Stratiform Heating Algorithm: New Retrievals for Tropical and Extra-tropical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S. E.; Tao, W. K.; Iguchi, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Goddard Convective-Stratiform Heating (or CSH) algorithm has been used to estimate cloud heating over the global Tropics using TRMM rainfall data and a set of look-up-tables (LUTs) derived from a series of multi-week cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE). These simulations link satellite observables (i.e., surface rainfall and stratiform fraction) with cloud heating profiles, which are not directly observable. However, with the launch of GPM in 2014, the range over which such algorithms can be applied has been extended from the Tropics into higher latitudes, including cold season and synoptic weather systems. In response, the CSH algorithm and its LUTs have been revised both to improve the retrievals in the Tropics as well as expand retrievals to higher latitudes. For the Tropics, the GCE simulations used to build the LUTs were upgraded using larger 2D model domains (512 vs 256 km) and a new, improved Goddard 4-ice scheme as well as expanded with additional cases (4 land and 6 ocean in total). The new tropical LUTs are also re-built using additional metrics. Besides surface type, conditional rain intensity and stratiform fraction, the new LUTs incorporate echo top heights and low-level (0-2 km) vertical reflectivity gradients. CSH retrievals in the Tropics based on the new LUTs show significant differences from previous iterations using TRMM data or the old LUT metrics. For the Extra-tropics, 6 NU-WRF simulations of synoptic events (3 East Coast and 3 West Coast), including snow, were used to build new extra-tropical CSH LUTs. The LUT metrics for the extra-tropics are based on radar characteristics and freezing level height. The extra-tropical retrievals are evaluated with a self-consistency check approach using the model heating as `truth,' and freezing level height is used to transition CSH retrievals from the Tropics to Extra-tropics. Retrieved zonal average heating structures in the Extra-tropics are

  1. Impact of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on electroosmotic transport of third-order fluids in a magnetic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, J. C.; Mallick, B.; Sinha, A.; Roy Chowdhury, A.

    2018-05-01

    In the case of steady flow of a fluid under the combined influence of external electric and magnetic fields, the fluid moves forward by forming an axial momentum boundary layer. With this end in view a study has been performed here to investigate the problem of entropy generation during electroosmotically modulated flow of a third-order electrically conducting fluid flowing on a microchannel bounded by silicon-made parallel plates under the influence of a magnetic field, by paying due consideration to the steric effect. The associated mechanism of heat transfer has also been duly taken care of, by considering Cattaneo-Christov heat flux. A suitable finite difference scheme has been developed for the numerical procedure. A detailed study of the velocity and temperature distributions has been made by considering their variations with respect to different physical parameters involved in the problem. The results of numerical computation have been displayed graphically. The computational work has been carried out by considering blood as the working fluid, with the motivation of exploring some interesting phenomena in the context of hemodynamical flow in micro-vessels. Among other variables, parametric variations of the important physical variables, viz. i) skin friction and ii) Nusselt number have been investigated. The study confirms that the random motion of the fluid particles can be controlled by a suitable adjustment of the intensity of an externally applied magnetic field in the transverse direction. It is further revealed that the Nusselt number diminishes, as the Prandtl number gradually increases; however, a steady increase in the Nusselt number occurs with increase in thermal relaxation. Entropy generation is also found to be enhanced with increase in Joule heating. The results of the present study have also been validated in a proper manner.

  2. Evaluation of heat stress effects on production traits and somatic cell score of Holsteins in a temperate environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, H; Bormann, J; M'hamdi, N; Montaldo, H H; Gengler, N

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the degree of thermal stress exhibited by Holsteins under a continental temperate climate. Milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count test-day records collected between 2000 and 2011 from 23,963 cows in 604 herds were combined with meteorological data from 14 public weather stations in Luxembourg. Daily values of 6 different thermal indices (TI) weighted in term of temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed were calculated by averaging hourly TI over 24h. Heat stress thresholds were first identified by a broken-line regression model. Regression models were thereafter applied to quantify milk production losses due to heat stress. The tipping points at which milk and protein yields declined were effectively identified. For fat yield, no valid threshold was identified for any of the studied TI. Daily fat yields tended to decrease steadily with increasing values of TI. Daily somatic cell score patterns were marked by increased values at both lowest and highest TI ranges, with a more pronounced reaction to cold stress for apparent temperature indices. Thresholds differed between TI and traits. For production traits, they ranged from 62 (TI(1)) to 80 (TI(3)) for temperature-humidity indices (THI) and from 16 (TI(5)) to 20 (TI(6)) for apparent temperature indices. Corresponding somatic cell score thresholds were higher and ranged from 66 (TI(1)) to 82 (TI(3)) and from 20 (TI(5)) to 23 (TI(6)), respectively. The largest milk decline per unit of mild, moderate, and extreme heat stress levels of 0.164, 0.356, and 0.955 kg, respectively, was observed when using the conventional THI (TI(1)). The highest yearly milk, fat, and protein losses of 54, 5.7, and 4.2 kg, respectively, were detected by TI(2), the THI index that is adjusted for wind speed and solar radiation. The latter index could be considered as the best indicator of heat stress to be used for forecast and herd management in a first step in temperate regions under

  3. Environmental and radiological safety studies. Interaction of 238PuO2 heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterbury, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The containers for 238 PuO 2 heat sources in radioisotope thermoelectric generators are designed with large safety factors to ensure that they will withstand reentry from orbit and impact with the earth and safely contain the nuclear fuel until it is recovered. Existing designs have proved more than adequately safe, but the Space and Terrestrial Division of the Department of Energy Office of Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects continually seeks more information about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work discussed here includes studies of the effects on the heat source of terrestrial and aquatic environments to obtain data for design of even safer systems. The data obtained in several ongoing experiments are presented; these data tables will be updated quarterly. Discussions of experimental details are minimized and largely repetitive in succeeding reports. Compilations of usable data generated in each experiment are emphasized. These compilations include data from environmental chamber experiments that simulate terrestrial conditions, experiments to measure PuO 2 dissolution rates, soil column experiments to measure sorption of plutonium by soils, and several aquatic experiments

  4. Effect of carburizing helium environment on creep behavior of Ni-base heat-resistant alloys for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Ogawa, Yutaka; Nakajima, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted on Ni-base heat-resistant alloys Hastelloy XR and XR-II, i.e. versions of Hastelloy X modified for nuclear applications, at 950degC using four types of helium environment with different impurity compositions, and mainly the effect of carburization was examined. For all the materials tested, the values of creep rupture time obtained under the carburizing conditions were similar to or longer than those in the commonly used, standard test environment (JAERI Type B helium). The difference among the results was interpreted by the counterbalancing effects of the strengthening due to carburization and possible weakening caused under very low oxidizing potential. In the corrosion monitoring specimens pronounced carbon pick-up was observed in the environment with high carbon activity and very low oxidizing potential. Based on the results obtained in the present and the previous works, it is suggested that a moderate control of the impurity chemistry is important rather than simple purification of the coolant in protecting the material from the environment-enhanced degradation. Either condition with high or low extremes in the oxidizing and carburizing potentials may cause enhanced degradation and thus are desirable to be avoided at the elevated temperatures. (author)

  5. Optimal thermionic energy conversion with established electrodes for high-temperature topping and process heating. [coal combustion product environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Applied research-and-technology (ART) work reveals that optimal thermionic energy conversion (TEC) with approximately 1000 K to approximately 1100 K collectors is possible using well established tungsten electrodes. Such TEC with 1800 K emitters could approach 26.6% efficiency at 27.4 W/sq cm with approximately 1000 K collectors and 21.7% at 22.6 W/sq cm with approximately 1100 K collectors. These performances require 1.5 and 1.7 eV collector work functions (not the 1 eV ultimate) with nearly negligible interelectrode losses. Such collectors correspond to tungsten electrode systems in approximately 0.9 to approximately 6 torr cesium pressures with 1600 K to 1900 K emitters. Because higher heat-rejection temperatures for TEC allow greater collector work functions, interelectrode loss reduction becomes an increasingly important target for applications aimed at elevated temperatures. Studies of intragap modifications and new electrodes that will allow better electron emission and collection with lower cesium pressures are among the TEC-ART approaches to reduced interelectrode losses. These solutions will provide very effective TEC to serve directly in coal-combustion products for high-temperature topping and process heating. In turn this will help to use coal and to use it well.

  6. Qualification of stainless steel for OTEC heat exchanger tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaQue, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    The history of the AL-6X alloy is reviewed and its credentials as a candidate for use as tubing in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers are examined. Qualification is based on results of accelerated tests using ferric chloride for resistance to crevice corrosion and pitting, long-time crevice corrosion and pitting tests in natural sea water and anticipated resistance to attack by ammonia and mixtures of ammonia and sea water. Since the alloy has no natural resistance to fouling by marine organisms, it must be able to accomodate action to prevent fouling by chlorination or to remove it by mechanical cleaning techniques or appropriate chemical cleaning methods. The satisfactory behavior indicated by the various accelerated and long-time corrosion tests has been confirmed by excellent performance of several million feet of tubing in condensers in coastal power plants. Early evaluation tests demonstrated the need for proper heat treatment to avoid the presence of a sigma phase, which promoted severe pitting of some, but not all, specimens in tests in natural sea water. The available data qualify the AL-6X alloy as being a satisfactory alternate to titanium for tubes in OTEC heat exchangers.

  7. Performance and efficiency evaluation and heat release study of a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Lee, C. M.; Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation which models engine performance of the Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engines was used to study the effect of variations in engine design and operating parameters on engine performance and efficiency of an Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC) experimental rotary combustion engine. Engine pressure data were used in a heat release analysis to study the effects of heat transfer, leakage, and crevice flows. Predicted engine data were compared with experimental test data over a range of engine speeds and loads. An examination of methods to improve the performance of the rotary engine using advanced heat engine concepts such as faster combustion, reduced leakage, and turbocharging is also presented.

  8. Mites (Acari, Mesostigmata from rock cracks and crevices in rock labirynths in the Stołowe Mountains National Park (SW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMCZYC JACEK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to recognize the species composition of soil mites of the order Mesostigmata in the soil/litter collected from rock cracks and crevices in Szczeliniec Wielki and Błędne Skały rock labirynths in the area of the Stołowe Mountains National Park (part of the Sudetes in SW Poland. Overall, 27 species were identified from 41 samples collected between September 2001 and August 2002. The most numerous species in this study were Veigaia nemorensis, Leptogamasus cristulifer, and Gamasellus montanus. Our study has also confirmed the occurrence or rare mite species, such as Veigaia mollis and Paragamasus insertus. Additionally, 5 mite species were recorded as new to the fauna of this Park: Vulgarogamasus remberti, Macrocheles tardus, Pachylaelaps vexillifer, Iphidosoma physogastris, and Dendrolaelaps (Punctodendrolaelaps eichhorni.

  9. Mathematical prediction of core body temperature from environment, activity, and clothing: The heat strain decision aid (HSDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Adam W; Blanchard, Laurie A; Friedl, Karl E; Cadarette, Bruce S; Hoyt, Reed W

    2017-02-01

    Physiological models provide useful summaries of complex interrelated regulatory functions. These can often be reduced to simple input requirements and simple predictions for pragmatic applications. This paper demonstrates this modeling efficiency by tracing the development of one such simple model, the Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA), originally developed to address Army needs. The HSDA, which derives from the Givoni-Goldman equilibrium body core temperature prediction model, uses 16 inputs from four elements: individual characteristics, physical activity, clothing biophysics, and environmental conditions. These inputs are used to mathematically predict core temperature (T c ) rise over time and can estimate water turnover from sweat loss. Based on a history of military applications such as derivation of training and mission planning tools, we conclude that the HSDA model is a robust integration of physiological rules that can guide a variety of useful predictions. The HSDA model is limited to generalized predictions of thermal strain and does not provide individualized predictions that could be obtained from physiological sensor data-driven predictive models. This fully transparent physiological model should be improved and extended with new findings and new challenging scenarios. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Report on survey for environment harmonizing type energy community project for Chubu International Airport. District heat supply facilities using large-scale cogeneration systems; Chubu kokusai kuko kankyo chowagata energy community jigyo chosa hokokusho. Daikibo cogeneration chiiki netsu kyokyu shisetsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The Chubu International Airport is positioned as a hub airport scheduled to start its use in the early part of the 21st century, to which introduction of large-scale cogeneration systems was discussed. Structuring an energy supply system conscious of the 21st century is intended, that is friendly to the environment, is attached with importance on the economy, and has high reliability and safety. The systems have cogeneration capacity from 4,500 to 6,000 kW, and utilize high-pressure waste heat from the cogeneration system as the heat source. The system uses the high pressure waste heat, stored heat, and gas at the same time to achieve high economic performance brought about by heat storage and the best energy source mix, while attempting cascade utilization of the heat. Considerations were given to suppress the environmental and energy load on the district as low as possible for the coexistence with the district, and to build framework and coordination to return the merits to the district. Subsidy introduction also has a great effect to assure the economic performance. The optimal specific construction of the system was found in combining the utilization of energy generated from temperature difference in sea water as a heat source system, the topping system utilizing the high pressure waste heat available in the system, high-efficiency heat pumps, and the heat storing system utilizing electric power available at late night. (NEDO)

  11. The heat is on: Australia's greenhouse future. Report to the Senate Environment, Communications, Information Technology and the Art References Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    On 11 August 1999, the Senate referred matters pertaining to global warming to the Environment, Communications, Information Technology and the Art References Committee for inquiring. The Committee is reporting on the progress and adequacy of Australian policies to reduce global warming, in light of Australia's commitments under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. It also critically evaluates the effectiveness Australian Government programs and policies, both state and Federal, in particular those aiming to provide for the development of emerging renewable energies, energy efficiency industries and the more efficient use of energy sources and the extent to which the Government's relations with industry under the Greenhouse Challenge Program are accountable and transparent. Projected effect of climate change on Australia's ecosystems and the potential introduction of national system of emissions trading within Australia are also examined

  12. Effects of heat stress on the physiological parameters and productivity of hair sheep in tropical and coastal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gesualdi Júnior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out with sheep during the finishing phase in a partial confinement system to evaluate the following physiological parameters: rectal temperature (RT, respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR, productive performance and carcass characteristics. Fourteen uncastrated sheep with an average initial age of 90 days belonging to two genetic groups were used. There were seven Santa Inês animals, whose average initial live weight (ILW was 23.65 kg, and seven F1 Dorper × St. Inês animals, with an ILW of 20.02 kg. The treatments were the two genetic groups and two times for the collection of the physiological parameters, at 09.00 h and 15.00 h. Evaluation took place once a week, in a shared stall, always following a 20-min grazing activity. The animals had daily access to a Megathyrsus maximus(Jacquin pasture, cultivar Masai, from 08.00 h to 17.00 h and their feed was placed in a trough, at a forage:concentrate ratio of 51:49 in the total dry matter. The concentrate consisted of 900 g/kg of ground corn and 100 g/kg of soybean meal, and the roughage supplied was alfalfa hay. There was no interaction between treatments for the studied variables. The physiological parameters were affected only by the time of day. The variables RR and RT were higher at 15.00 h, while the highest HR values were observed at 09.00 h. Neither of the two genetic groups differed for performance and carcass characteristics. Hair sheep belonging to close genetic groups show no differences in performance, carcass characteristics and physiological responses when subjected to heat stress.

  13. Yeast culture increased plasma niacin concentration, evaporative heat loss, and feed efficiency of dairy cows in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Julia D L; Silva, Rayana B; Fernandes, Tatiane; Barbosa, Eugenio F; Graças, Larissa E C; Araujo, Rafael C; Pereira, Renata A N; Pereira, Marcos N

    2018-04-04

    The supplementation of dairy cows with yeast culture may increase diet digestibility, plasma niacin concentration, heat dissipation, and lactation performance. Our objective was to evaluate the response of Holstein cows in late lactation (234 ± 131 d in milk) to dead yeast culture (YC, 15 g/d, Factor SC, GRASP, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) during Brazilian summer (temperature-humidity index >68 for 92.2% of the time). Thirty-two cows were individually fed a standard total mixed ration for 14 d and control (CTL) or YC treatments for 35 d, in a covariate adjusted complete randomized block design. Response was evaluated in wk 5 or as repeated measures over time. Cows were milked 3 times per day and treatments (YC or placebo) were orally dosed to each cow before each milking. Plasma niacin was 1.50 for CTL and 1.66 µg/mL for YC. The YC reduced rectal temperature, respiration rate, and skin temperature, whereas it tended to increase sweating rate. The proportion of cows with rectal temperature ≥39.2°C on CTL and YC was, respectively, 8 and 0% at 0730 h, 52 and 25% at 1500 h, and 35 and 26% at 2200 h. Plasma glucose was increased by YC. The total-tract apparent digestibility of nutrients, plasma urea N concentration, molar proportion of ruminal VFA, and urinary allantoin excretion were not affected by YC. Cows fed YC were less selective against feed particles >19 mm in the morning, in the afternoon were more selective against long feed particles and in favor of particles loss, and feed efficiency of late lactation dairy cows by reducing intake at similar milk yield. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Past and Future Trends of Heat Stress Based On Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index in Outdoor Environment of Tehran City, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Mohraz, Majid; Ghahri, Asghar; Karimi, Mehrdad; Golbabaei, Farideh

    2016-06-01

    The workers who are working in the open and warm environments are at risk of health effects of climate and heat changes. It is expected that the risk is increase with global warming. This study aimed to investigate the changes of Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index in the past and to predict their trend of future changes in Tehran, capital of Iran. The meteorological data recorded in Tehran, Iran during the statistical period between 1961 and 2009 were obtained from the Iran Meteorological Organization and based on them, WBGT index was calculated and processed using Man-Kendall correlation test. The results of Man-Kendall correlation test showed that the trend of changes of annual mean WBGT during the statistical period under study (1961-2009) has been significantly increasing. In addition, the result of proposed predictive model estimated that an increase of about 1.55 degree in WBGT index will be seen over 40 years from 2009 to 2050 in Tehran. Climate change in Tehran has had an effect on person's exposure to heat stresses consistent with global warming.

  15. Corrosion resistance of Mo-Fe-Ti alloy for overpack in simulating underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu, E-mail: NISHIMURA.Toshiyasu@nims.go.jp [Structural metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aging heat-treated Mo-Fe-Ti alloy showed lower corrosion resistance than solution treated one, but much higher than pure Ti in EIS measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As {alpha}-phases showed lower Mo content by TEM, they were preferentially dissolved from base metal in the corrosion test. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As Fe was involved in {beta} (b)-phase with Mo which increased the corrosion resistance, the addition of Fe did not decrease the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In order to examine the application of Mo-Fe-Ti alloy for overpak, the corrosion resistance of heat-treated its alloys was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sample subjected to solution heat treatment (ST) had a single {beta} phase and samples subjected to aging heat treatment at 600-700 Degree-Sign C had {alpha} phase precipitation in {beta} phase. EIS results showed that the corrosion resistance of the aging heat-treated samples was lower than that of the ST sample, but much higher than that of pure Ti in 10% NaCl solution of pH 0.5 at 97 Degree-Sign C which simulating the crevice solution. Laser micrographs of the aging heat-treated samples indicated that {alpha} phase was caused selective dissolution in test solution. The TEM combined with EDAX (energy dispersive X-ray) analyses showed that {beta} phase matrix composed of 2.7 wt.% Mo and 4.8 wt.% Fe, and {alpha} phase composed of 0.7 wt.% Mo and 0.1 wt.% Fe in sample aged at 600 Degree-Sign C. Thus, Mo-poor {alpha} phase was selectively dissolved in a test solution. In EIS, the ST sample of only {beta} phase showed the highest resistance, and aging heat-treated samples containing {alpha} phase (0.7 wt.% Mo) showed higher values than pure Ti in the corrosion test. As Fe was involved in {beta} phase with Mo which increased remarkably the corrosion resistance, the addition of Fe did not decrease the corrosion resistance

  16. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, Adam D.

    2010-12-28

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  17. Study of thermal threshold and counter-measures for human body in oceanic working environment. 1st Report. Heat balance model and heat storage index; Shonetsu kankyoka no kaiyo sagyo ni okeru netsuteki genkai to onnetsu taisaku ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Netsu shushi model to onnetsu shisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuchi, N. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakamura, M. [Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, M.

    1996-12-31

    Identification was intended on effects of such thermal factors as metabolic amount, environmental temperature and humidity, and clothing resistance on human body temperatures during works under hot environments. Therefore, measurements were carried out on human skin temperatures, rectum temperatures and humidity inside clothing, while amount of motion, environmental temperature, and clothing are changed in a constant temperature room and under a sun irradiation environment. Furthermore, a heat balance model was prepared, which divides the objects into an outer shell layer whose temperature changes depending on the result of this experiment and into a core having constant temperature characteristics. An equation to derive skin temperatures was introduced from the model. The equation formulated a calculation formula for heat accumulation in human body, which can be used as a hot heat index. Relationship between thermal factors and heat storage amount was investigated to consider a thermal limit for a physical work. An equation to derive skin temperatures was confirmed capable of expressing general change in skin temperatures, being proved by comparison with experiments. Calculation formulas for amount of heat stored in human body were shown capable of expressing influence of different thermal factors, the expression being useful as a hot heat index. Calculating the human body heat storage is very largely affected by effect of sweat to dissipate heat, hence it is necessary to improve the accuracy including that for body temperature adjusting reactions. 17 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Study of thermal threshold and counter-measures for human body in oceanic working environment. 1st Report. Heat balance model and heat storage index; Shonetsu kankyoka no kaiyo sagyo ni okeru netsuteki genkai to onnetsu taisaku ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Netsu shushi model to onnetsu shisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuchi, N [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakamura, M [Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, M

    1997-12-31

    Identification was intended on effects of such thermal factors as metabolic amount, environmental temperature and humidity, and clothing resistance on human body temperatures during works under hot environments. Therefore, measurements were carried out on human skin temperatures, rectum temperatures and humidity inside clothing, while amount of motion, environmental temperature, and clothing are changed in a constant temperature room and under a sun irradiation environment. Furthermore, a heat balance model was prepared, which divides the objects into an outer shell layer whose temperature changes depending on the result of this experiment and into a core having constant temperature characteristics. An equation to derive skin temperatures was introduced from the model. The equation formulated a calculation formula for heat accumulation in human body, which can be used as a hot heat index. Relationship between thermal factors and heat storage amount was investigated to consider a thermal limit for a physical work. An equation to derive skin temperatures was confirmed capable of expressing general change in skin temperatures, being proved by comparison with experiments. Calculation formulas for amount of heat stored in human body were shown capable of expressing influence of different thermal factors, the expression being useful as a hot heat index. Calculating the human body heat storage is very largely affected by effect of sweat to dissipate heat, hence it is necessary to improve the accuracy including that for body temperature adjusting reactions. 17 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Encapsulated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, Tom M.; Daanen, Hein A M; Cheung, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  20. Encapsulated Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, T.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Cheung, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  1. Modeling interactive effects of Pb contamination, Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ on passivity of alloy 800 in simulated crevice chemistries at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Baotong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The capability of Pb impurity degrading the passivity of alloy 800 in high temperature water is much stronger than those of dissolved Ca/Mg salts. • The interactive effects of Pb-impurities and Ca/Mg salts on the passivity are likely a result competitive adsorption. • A phenomenological model to interpret the interactive effect of Pb-impurities and Ca/Mg salts on the passivity. - Abstract: A phenomenological model is postulated to interpret the interactive impacts of dissolved Pb contamination, Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ on passivity of Alloy 800 in simulated crevice chemistries at 300 °C. Passivity degradation is characterized by the retarded dehydration during passivation and increased donor density in passive film. Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ can cause the passivity degradation in the Pb-free chemistries but, if the Pb-contamination concentration exceeds a critical value, would reduce the detrimental effect of Pb-contamination. This behavior may be related to the extremely strong adsorption capacity of Pb contamination. Finally, the applications in the water management strategy of nuclear power plants are discussed.

  2. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  3. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  4. Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than 57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was 28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  5. A review of electrochemistry of relevance to environment-assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.; Psaila-Dombrowski, M.

    1992-01-01

    The electrochemistry of relevance to environment-assisted cracking in high temperature, low conductivity water is critically reviewed. The review covers corrosion potential and electrochemical polarisation measurements, thermodynamics, and also experimental measurements and mathematical modelling of the electrochemistry in cracks and crevices. There is a lack of critical data in relation to the electrode kinetics of relevant cathodic reduction reactions, namely H + , H 2 O, O 2 , H 2 O 2 and steady-state anodic reaction data are limited. Transient anodic current measurements, associated with initially film-free metal, have been made for a range of conditions but there is uncertainty regarding the role of fluid flow and transport processes on the current decay characteristics. A number of experimental measurements of potential and pH in crevices and cracks have been made but the experiments are difficult to carry out reliably and hence the range of data of relevance to practical conditions is very limited. Recent developments in mathematical modelling have significantly enhanced the qualitative understanding of the processes controlling the local electrochemistry in cracks and crevices but the reliability of the quantitative predictions is limited by the paucity of reliable input data. (Author)

  6. Comparative skull anatomy of terrestrial and crevice-dwelling Trachylepis skinks (Squamata: Scincidae) with a survey of resources in scincid cranial osteology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Aaron M.

    2017-01-01

    Skinks account for more than 25% of all lizard species; however, representatives of fewer than a quarter of all species have been characterized osteologically. All but a few of the available cranial descriptions concentrate solely on characters that can be seen externally on the intact skull. Mabuyid skinks of the genus Trachylepis are the dominant, fully limbed skinks in Sub-Saharan Africa, and nearly all species have the same generalized body plan. Although a few rock crevice-dwelling species possess slight body depression, extreme dorsoventral depression is observed only in Trachylepis laevis. We investigated the detailed skull anatomy of three Trachylepis skinks (T. laevis, T. sulcata, and T. gonwouoi, a recently described species allied to T. affinis) using high-resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography. Our goals were to review the scincid cranial osteology literature in a phylogenetic context, provide a detailed anatomical atlas for the mabuyid lineage, and investigate the morphological adaptations of the highly modified T. laevis. Our results demonstrate that there is significant morphological variation between these three taxa, including the loss and fusion of structures, as well as changes in the shape, scale, and relationship between individual elements. Trachylepis laevis possesses several osteological modifications that have produced a reducton in head depth that are likely functional consequences of extreme rupicolous habits, including a flat skull roof, many strongly recumbent elements, and a depressed neurocranium.We hypothesize these modifications may correspond to descreased bite force and increased capabilities of cranial kinesis. Our study is the first element-by-element description of a skink using computed tomography technology. PMID:28902864

  7. Sensitivity analysis for maximum heat removal from debris in the lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Suh, Kune Y.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the maximum heat removal capability from the debris and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall through the gap that may be formed during a core melt relocation accident. Cases studied included four different nuclear power plant (TMI-2,KORI-2,YGN 3and4 and KNGR) per the thermal opower output. Results of the analysis show that the heat removal through gap cooling relative to flooding is efficacious as much as about 40% of the core material accumulated in the lower plenum in case of the TMI-2 reactor. In excess of 40%, however, the gap cooling alone was found not to be enough for heat removal from the core debris. There being uncertaainties aoboout the assumptions made in the present study,the analyses yield consistent results. If different cooling effects are considered, heat removal may be greatly enhanced. The LAVA experiements were performed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) using al 2 O 3 /Fe thermite melt relocating down to the scaled vessel of a reactor lower head filled with preheated water. Test results indicated a cooling effect of water ingression through the debris-to-vessel gap and the intra-debris pores and crevices. If the cooling capacity of the intra-debris pores and crevices is comparable to debris-to-vessel heat removal capability, heat removal from the debris will be greatly augmented than heat removal by the gap cooling alone. The three nuclear reactor (KORI-2, YGN 3and4 and KNGR) calculation results for heat removal through the debris-to-vessel gap size of about 1mm were compared with the TMI-2 reactor calculation results for the case of gap cooling alone. (author)

  8. Heat pumps: heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pielke, R

    1976-01-01

    The author firstly explains in a general manner the functioning of the heat pump. Following a brief look at the future heat demand and the possibilities of covering it, the various methods of obtaining energy (making use of solar energy, ground heat, and others) and the practical applications (office heating, swimming pool heating etc.) are explained. The author still sees considerable difficulties in using the heat pump at present on a large scale. Firstly there is not enough maintenance personnel available, secondly the electricity supply undertakings cannot provide the necessary electricity on a wide basis without considerable investments. Other possibilities to save energy or to use waste energy are at present easier and more economical to realize. Recuperative and regenerative systems are described.

  9. Cleft, crevice, or the inner thigh: 'another place' for the establishment of the invasive barnacle Austrominius modestus (Darwin, 1854.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A Bracewell

    Full Text Available The proliferation of anthropogenic infrastructure in the marine environment has aided the establishment and spread of invasive species. These structures can create novel habitats in areas normally characterised as void of suitable settlement sites. The habitat requirements of the invasive acorn barnacle Austrominius modestus (Darwin, 1854 were assessed using a novel sampling site at Crosby Beach, Liverpool. Austrominius modestus has spread rapidly around the UK since its initial introduction, becoming locally dominant in many estuarine areas including the Antony Gormley art installation, 'Another Place', at Crosby Beach. The installation consists of 100 replicate solid cast-iron life-size human figures, located at a range of heights on the shore. We recorded the distribution and abundance of A. modestus present on all of the statues at various positions during the summer of 2006. The positions varied in location, exposure, direction, and rugosity. Although parameters such as rugosity and exposure did influence patterns of recruitment, they were less important than interactions between shore height and direction, and specific location on the beach. The addition of a suitable substrate to a sheltered and estuarine region of Liverpool Bay has facilitated the establishment of A. modestus. Understanding the habitat requirements of invasive species is important if we are to make predictions about their spread and the likelihood of invasion success. Austrominius modestus has already become locally dominant in some regions of the UK and, with projections of favourable warming conditions and the global expansion of artificial structures, the continued spread of this species can be expected. The implications of this on the balance between native and invasive species dominance should be considered.

  10. The secure heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pind, C.

    1987-01-01

    The SECURE heating reactor was designed by ASEA-ATOM as a realistic alternative for district heating in urban areas and for supplying heat to process industries. SECURE has unique safety characteristics, that are based on fundamental laws of physics. The safety does not depend on active components or operator intervention for shutdown and cooling of the reactor. The inherent safety characteristics of the plant cannot be affected by operator errors. Due to its very low environment impact, it can be sited close to heat consumers. The SECURE heating reactor has been shown to be competitive in comparison with other alternatives for heating Helsinki and Seoul. The SECURE heating reactor forms a basis for the power-producing SECURE-P reactor known as PIUS (Process Inherent Ultimate Safety), which is based on the same inherent safety principles. The thermohydraulic function and transient response have been demonstrated in a large electrically heated loop at the ASEA-ATOM laboratories

  11. Prinsip Umum Penatalaksanaan Cedera Olahraga Heat Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ade Tobing, Saharun Iso

    2016-01-01

    Exercises that are conducted in an extreme heat environment can cause heat injury. Heatinjury is associated with disturbance to temperature regulation and cardiovascular systems. Heatstroke is the most severe type of heat injury. Heat stroke is associated with high morbidity andmortality numbers, particularly if therapy treatment is delayed. In general, heat stroke is caused bytwo things, namely increase in heat production and decrease in heat loss.Heat stroke signs include: (1) rectal temper...

  12. Heat pipe heat storage performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, A; Pasquetti, R [Univ. de Provence, Marseille (FR). Inst. Universitaire des Systemes; Grakovich, L P; Vasiliev, L L [A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst. of the BSSR, Academy of Sciences, Minsk (BY)

    1989-01-01

    Heat storage offers essential thermal energy saving for heating. A ground heat store equipped with heat pipes connecting it with a heat source and to the user is considered in this paper. It has been shown that such a heat exchanging system along with a batch energy source meets, to a considerable extent, house heating requirements. (author).

  13. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  14. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  15. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  16. Advances in heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer is the exchange of heat energy between a system and its surrounding environment, which results from a temperature difference and takes place by means of a process of thermal conduction, mechanical convection, or electromagnetic radiation. Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university-level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than is allowable in either journals or texts.

  17. Um modelo para a determinação do equilíbrio térmico de bovinos em ambientes tropicais A heat balance model for cattle in tropical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gomes da Silva

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Uma equação com base na teoria da transferência térmica foi apresentada para estimativa da termólise em bovinos expostos a um ambiente tropical especificado por temperatura e umidade do ar, radiação solar e vento. As variáveis do animal (taxa de sudação, temperatura retal, frequência respiratória, temperatura da superfície cutânea, coloração do pelame e peso corporal foram consideradas em conjunto com as variáveis ambientais (temperatura do ar e umidade, radiação solar, velocidade do vento e temperatura do globo. A equação permite a predição de: (1 o nível de termogênese metabólica necessária para equilibrar as perdas térmicas sob condições ambientais especificadas; (2 a combinação de fatores ambientais que proporcionam determinado fluxo de calor entre um dado animal e o seu ambiente.An equation based on heat transfer theory was presented to estimate the rate of heat loss from cattle exposed to a tropical environment, specified by the air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed. The animals' variables (sweating rate, rectal temperature, respiratory rate, surface temperature, haircoat color, and body weight were considered together with environmental variables (air temperature and humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, and globe temperature. The equation allows the prediction of (a the metabolic heat production level necessary to balance heat losses under specified environmental conditions; (b the combination of environmental factors that provide a determined heat flux between a given animal and its environment.

  18. Effect of heat treatment conditions on the passivation behavior of WE43C Mg–Y–Nd alloy in chloride containing alkaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakraphan Ninlachart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mg–Y–Nd alloy (WE43C or Elektron 43 is a heat treatable magnesium wrought alloy that can be used up to 250 °C for aerospace application. This alloy has excellent mechanical properties (UTS: up to 345 MPa at room temperature and improved corrosion resistance. Electrochemical passivation studies were conducted on this alloy under different heat treatment conditions in 0.1 M NaOH solution with the addition of chloride from 0 to 1000 ppm. The passive potential range typically extended to more than 1.5 VAg/AgCl. The transpassive potential was not dependent on the heat treatment condition of the alloy when the chloride concentration increased up to 500 ppm. However, pitting protection potential varied with the heat treatment condition when the chloride addition was 500 ppm or more. The specimen surface was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Raman spectroscopy to understand the passivation behavior of this alloy. The passivated surface of the WE43C specimens indicated that the surface layer consisted of MgO, Mg(OH2, and rare earth oxide phases, and the heat treatment conditions did not significantly affect the composition of the surface film.

  19. Estimation of efficiency of the heat supply system based on a boiler house and a wind turbine in the northern environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhan, A. V.; Minin, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a methodological approach to defining indoor air temperature in buildings heated by a power supply unit consisting of a boiler house and a wind-driven power plant (WDPP). We discuss a heating option for a residential building in the windy conditions of Murmansk city. We proved that, during the periods of strong wind, a WDPP can partially or fully satisfy the heat demand and sometimes even create a surplus of energy. During low wind weather, almost all loads are handled by the boiler house. We considered a possibility to accumulate the surplus energy obtained from a WDPP during strong wind by increasing the temperature in the whole building up to 25°C and further using the accumulated heat during the lowwind period when indoor air temperature may fall below 20°C. This allows saving organic fuel in the boiler house. We demonstrated how indoor air temperature in the building may change throughout the year when using the surplus energy from the WDPP due to thermal storage capacitance of the building. We also provided the results of study, showing favorable energy-related effects of using a WDPP along with the boiler house. It was determined that engaging a WDPP in fulfilling the diagram of heating loads promotes the decrease in the boiler house's contribution to heat supply by 30 to 50%, and using the surplus energy from the WDPP and thermal storage capacitance of the building allows reducing the contribution of the boiler house by 5-15% more in certain months.

  20. Heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E L; Eisenmann, G; Hahne, E [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik

    1976-04-01

    A survey is presented on publications on design, heat transfer, form factors, free convection, evaporation processes, cooling towers, condensation, annular gap, cross-flowed cylinders, axial flow through a bundle of tubes, roughnesses, convective heat transfer, loss of pressure, radiative heat transfer, finned surfaces, spiral heat exchangers, curved pipes, regeneraters, heat pipes, heat carriers, scaling, heat recovery systems, materials selection, strength calculation, control, instabilities, automation of circuits, operational problems and optimization.

  1. Office buildings and energy from the environment. Cooling and heating using near-surface geothermal energy; Buerogebaeude und Umweltenergie. Kuehlen und Heizen mit oberflaechennaher Geothermie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohne, Dirk; Harhausen, Gunnar; Wohlfahrt, Matthias [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Entwerfen und Konstruieren

    2009-07-01

    Increasing energy prices, uncertainties relating to imported energy and the first signs of an impending global climate change have enhanced interest in renewable energy sources, whose wide-spread use is receiving much public interest. Three scientists of the Institute of Design and Construction of Leibniz University Hanover investigated the application of near-surface geothermal energy for heating and cooling of buildings. (orig.)

  2. Quantifying Subsurface Water and Heat Distribution and its Linkage with Landscape Properties in Terrestrial Environment using Hydro-Thermal-Geophysical Monitoring and Coupled Inverse Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Tran, A. P.; Wainwright, H. M.; Hubbard, S. S.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying water and heat fluxes in the subsurface is crucial for managing water resources and for understanding the terrestrial ecosystem where hydrological properties drive a variety of biogeochemical processes across a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Here, we present the development of an advanced monitoring strategy where hydro-thermal-geophysical datasets are continuously acquired and further involved in a novel inverse modeling framework to estimate the hydraulic and thermal parameter that control heat and water dynamics in the subsurface and further influence surface processes such as evapotranspiration and vegetation growth. The measured and estimated soil properties are also used to investigate co-interaction between subsurface and surface dynamics by using above-ground aerial imaging. The value of this approach is demonstrated at two different sites, one in the polygonal shaped Arctic tundra where water and heat dynamics have a strong impact on freeze-thaw processes, vegetation and biogeochemical processes, and one in a floodplain along the Colorado River where hydrological fluxes between compartments of the system (surface, vadose zone and groundwater) drive biogeochemical transformations. Results show that the developed strategy using geophysical, point-scale and aerial measurements is successful to delineate the spatial distribution of hydrostratigraphic units having distinct physicochemical properties, to monitor and quantify in high resolution water and heat distribution and its linkage with vegetation, geomorphology and weather conditions, and to estimate hydraulic and thermal parameters for enhanced predictions of water and heat fluxes as well as evapotranspiration. Further, in the Colorado floodplain, results document the potential presence of only periodic infiltration pulses as a key hot moment controlling soil hydro and biogeochemical functioning. In the arctic, results show the strong linkage between soil water content, thermal

  3. β-Adrenergic blockade does not impair the skin blood flow sensitivity to local heating in burned and nonburned skin under neutral and hot environments in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; McEntire, Serina J; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Suman, Oscar E

    2017-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that propranolol, a drug given to burn patients to reduce hypermetabolism/cardiac stress, may inhibit heat dissipation by changing the sensitivity of skin blood flow (SkBF) to local heating under neutral and hot conditions. In a randomized double-blind study, a placebo was given to eight burned children, while propranolol was given to 13 burned children with similar characteristics (mean±SD: 11.9±3 years, 147±20 cm, 45±23 kg, 56±12% Total body surface area burned). Nonburned children (n=13, 11.4±3 years, 152±15 cm, 52±13 kg) served as healthy controls. A progressive local heating protocol characterized SkBF responses in burned and unburned skin and nonburned control skin under the two environmental conditions (23 and 34°C) via laser Doppler flowmetry. Resting SkBF was greater in burned and unburned skin compared to the nonburned control (main effect: skin, Pburned; 38±36 unburned vs 9±8 control %SkBF max ). No difference was found for maximal SkBF capacity to local heating between groups. Additionally, dose-response curves for the sensitivity of SkBF to local heating were not different among burned or unburned skin, and nonburned control skin (EC 50 , P>.05) under either condition. Therapeutic propranolol does not negatively affect SkBF under neutral or hot environmental conditions and further compromise temperature regulation in burned children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Projecting phase terminated, implementation coming soon. Environment-friendly heat supply at Ruhpolding sports center; Projekt ausgereift - Betreiber gesucht.. Oekologische Waermeversorgung des Ruhpoldinger Sport- und Freizeitzentrums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-02-01

    When the public indoor swimming pool at Ruhpolding was modernized, the community took the chance to convert the whole sports and recreation center (indoor and outdoor swimming pools, skating rink and multi-purpose hall) as well as the school buildings to district heat supply from a biomass-fuelled heating power station. Apart from the financial savings, this solution also reduces exhaust emissions and makes this recreation area mor attractive. [German] Mit der Sanierung und Erweiterung des Wellenhallenbades bietet sich der Gemeinde Ruhpolding die Gelegenheit, die Waermeversorgung des Sport- und Freizeitzentrums (Wellenhallenbad, Freibad, Eissporthalle und Mehrzweckhalle) und der Schulgebaeude von der Einzelversorgung mit Oelkesseln auf die Nahwaermeversorgung mittels Biomasse-Heizwerk umzustellen. Das bringt der Gemeinde nicht nur finanzielle Vorteile, sondern entlastet das Kurgebiet erheblich von schaedlichen Abgasen und erhoeht damit die Attraktivitaet des Erholungsortes. (orig.)

  5. Canopy temperature for simulation of heat stress in irrigated wheat in a semi-arid environment: A multi-model comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webber, Heidi; Martre, Pierre; Asseng, Senthold

    2017-01-01

    Even brief periods of high temperatures occurring around flowering and during grain filling can severely reduce grain yield in cereals. Recently, ecophysiological and crop models have begun to represent such phenomena. Most models use air temperature (Tair) in their heat stress responses despite...... evidence that crop canopy temperature (Tc) better explains grain yield losses. Tc can deviate significantly from Tair based on climatic factors and the crop water status. The broad objective of this study was to evaluate whether simulation of Tc improves the ability of crop models to simulate heat stress...... impacts on wheat under irrigated conditions. Nine process-based models, each using one of three broad approaches (empirical, EMP; energy balance assuming neutral atmospheric stability, EBN; and energy balance correcting for the atmospheric stability conditions, EBSC) to simulate Tc, simulated grain yield...

  6. Characterization of simultaneous heat and mass transfer phenomena for water vapour condensation on a solid surface in an abiotic environment--application to bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Akhilesh; Kondjoyan, Alain; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of heat and mass transfer by condensation of water vapour from humid air involves several key concepts in aerobic bioreactors. The high performance of bioreactors results from optimised interactions between biological processes and multiphase heat and mass transfer. Indeed in various processes such as submerged fermenters and solid-state fermenters, gas/liquid transfer need to be well controlled, as it is involved at the microorganism interface and for the control of the global process. For the theoretical prediction of such phenomena, mathematical models require heat and mass transfer coefficients. To date, very few data have been validated concerning mass transfer coefficients from humid air inflows relevant to those bioprocesses. Our study focussed on the condensation process of water vapour and developed an experimental set-up and protocol to study the velocity profiles and the mass flux on a small size horizontal flat plate in controlled environmental conditions. A closed circuit wind tunnel facility was used to control the temperature, hygrometry and hydrodynamics of the flow. The temperature of the active surface was controlled and kept isothermal below the dew point to induce condensation, by the use of thermoelectricity. The experiments were performed at ambient temperature for a relative humidity between 35-65% and for a velocity of 1.0 ms⁻¹. The obtained data are analysed and compared to available theoretical calculations on condensation mass flux.

  7. Development of heat resistant concrete and its application to concrete casks. Improvement of neutron shielding performance of concrete in high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owaki, Eiji; Hata, Akihito; Sugihara, Yutaka; Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Mantani, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete with hydrogen, which is able to shield neutron at more than 100degC, was developed. Using this new type concrete, a safety concrete cask having the same concept of metal casks was designed and produced. The new type cask omitted the inhalation and exhaust vent of the conventional type concrete casks. The new concrete consists of Portland cement added calcium hydroxide, iron powder and iron fiber. It showed 2.17 g/cm 3 density, 10.8 mass% water content, 1.4 W/(m·K) thermal conductivity at 150degC. Increasing of heat resistance made possible to produce the perfect sealing type structure, which had high shielding performance of radiation no consideration for streaming of radiation. Moreover, a monitor of sealing can be set. General view of concrete casks, outer view of 1/3 scaled model, cask storage system in the world, properties of new developed heat resistant concrete, results of shielding calculation are contained. (S.Y.)

  8. PREDICTION OF AEROSOL HAZARDS ARISING FROM THE OPENING OF AN ANTHRAX-TAINTED LETTER IN AN OPEN OFFICE ENVIRONMENT USING COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FUE-SANG LIEN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Early experimental work, conducted at Defence R&D Canada–Suffield, measured and characterized the personal and environmental contamination associated with simulated anthrax-tainted letters under a number of different scenarios in order to obtain a better understanding of the physical and biological processes for detecting, assessing, and formulating potential mitigation strategies for managing the risks associated with opening an anthrax-tainted letter. These experimental investigations have been extended in the present study to simulate numerically the contamination from the opening of anthrax-tainted letters in an open office environment using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. A quantity of 0.1 g of Bacillus atropheus (formerly referred to as Bacillus subtilis var globigii (BG spores in dry powder form, which was used here as a surrogate species for Bacillus anthracis (anthrax, was released from an opened letter in the experiment. The accuracy of the model for prediction of the spatial distribution of BG spores in the office from the opened letter is assessed qualitatively (and to the extent possible, quantitatively by detailed comparison with measured BG concentrations obtained under a number of different scenarios, some involving people moving within the office. The observed discrepancy between the numerical predictions and experimental measurements of concentration was probably the result of a number of physical processes which were not accounted for in the numerical simulation. These include air flow leakage from cracks and crevices of the building shell; the dispersion of BG spores in the Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC system; and, the effect of deposition and re-suspension of BG spores from various surfaces in the office environment.

  9. Development of technique to apply induction heating stress improvement to recirculation inlet nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Kunihiko; Nihei, Kenichi; Ootaka, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been found in the primary loop recirculation (PLR) systems of boiling water reactors (BWR). Residual stress in welding heat-affected zone is one of the factors of SCC, and the residual stress improvement is one of the most effective methods to prevent SCC. Induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) is one of the techniques to improve reduce residual stress. However, it is difficult to apply IHSI to the place such as the recirculation inlet nozzle where the flow stagnates. In this present study, the technique to apply IHSI to the recirculation inlet nozzle was developed using water jet which blowed into the crevice between the nozzle safe end and the thermal sleeve. (author)

  10. Features of heat stress control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Heat stress is caused by hot environments and physical demands of work. It is further complicated by protective clothing requirements commonly found in the nuclear power industry. The resulting physiological strain is reflected in increased sweating, heart rate and body temperature. Uncontrolled exposures to heat stress will lead to decreased personnel performance and increased risk of accidents and heat disorders. The article describes major heat disorders, a method of heat stress evaluation, and some basic interventions to reduce the stress and strain of working in the heat

  11. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  12. Experimental measurement of nuclear heating in a graphite-cantered assembly in deuterium-tritium neutron environment for the validation of data and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Youssef, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of the ITER Task T-218 entitled 'Shielding Blanket Neutronics Experiments', nuclear heating measurements were conducted jointly by the USA and Japan using a micro calorimetric technique in a graphite-cantered assembly. An accelerator-based D-T neutron source at JAERI was used to provide a mixed neutron and photon field. The first measurements related to direct micro calorimetric measurements in individual graphite probes along the axis. In the second set, the first graphite probe was replaced, one by one, by single probes of beryllium, aluminum, silicon, silicon carbide, titanium, vanadium, chromium, iron, stainless steel 316, nickel, copper, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten. Analysis of the measurements has been carried out using Monte Carlo code MCNP with FENDL-1, ENDF/B-VI and MCPLIB nuclear data libraries. A comparison of calculations (C) and experiments (E) shows a C/E ratio lying in a C/E band extending from 0.9 to 1.2 for beryllium, graphite, copper, chromium, iron, nickel, 316 stainless steel, titanium, vanadium, molybdenum, niobium and tungsten. However, larger deviations from unity are seen for C/E values for silicon, zirconium, and aluminum. Though FENDL-1 and ENDF/B-VI libraries provide very close nuclear heating rates for most of the probe materials, significant divergences are seen for silicon, silicon carbide, aluminum, titanium, zirconium, niobium, and molybdenum. The divergences are traceable to differences in neutron kerma factors as well as gamma production cross-sections of these materials. (orig.)

  13. Developing a model for effects of climate change on human health and health-environment interactions: Heat stress in Austin, Texas presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods In December, 2010, a consortium of EPA, Centers for Disease Control, and state and local health officials convened in Austin, Texas for a “participatory modeling workshop” on climate change effects on human health and health-environment int...

  14. Developing a model for effects of climate change on human health and health-environment interactions: Heat stress in Austin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods In December, 2010, a consortium of EPA, Centers for Disease Control, and state and local health officials convened in Austin, Texas for a “participatory modeling workshop” on climate change effects on human health and health-environment interactions. ...

  15. Explosive plugging of nuclear heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, B.; Bahrani, A.S.; Townsley, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    Explosive welding is a well established process for cladding one metal on another or for welding tubes to tubeplates or lap welding, etc. Recently, the process has been adapted to plugging of heat exchangers in conventional and nuclear power plant, where it has already been accepted especially in situations where the access is difficult and remote from the site of plugging. The paper describes the explosive plugging techniques developed in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering of The Queen's University of Belfast for the reheater and superheater of the PFR, and for the reheater of the AGR. For the PFR a point charge system has been used which causes a spherical expansion of the plug, which gives two zones of welding. Initially for the much larger plug required for the AGR it was proposed to use a parallel stand-off welding set-up, but it proved difficult or impossible to avoid a crevice. Consequently, a rim charge set-up has been developed which gives a circular ring expansion of the plug with two zones of welding. Besides the problem of the design of the plug and explosive charge geometry it has also been necessary to consider the distortion of holes adjoining the hole in which a plug is welded. Bunging of adjoining holes in order to reduce the distortion has also been investigated

  16. Asthma, allergy and eczema among adults in multifamily houses in Stockholm (3-HE study)--associations with building characteristics, home environment and energy use for heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Lampa, Erik; Engvall, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings) were invited (one subject/dwelling) and 7,554 participated (73%). Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74) and mould odour (OR = 1.79). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45) and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48) and mould odour (OR = 2.35). Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75) and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76) and mould odour (OR = 2.36). Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07) and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85) and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47), humid air (OR = 1.73) and mould odour (OR = 2.01). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.82). Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.11). In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness. Energy saving may have consequences for allergy and eczema. More

  17. Asthma, Allergy and Eczema among Adults in Multifamily Houses in Stockholm (3-HE Study) - Associations with Building Characteristics, Home Environment and Energy Use for Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Lampa, Erik; Engvall, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings) were invited (one subject/dwelling) and 7,554 participated (73%). Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74) and mould odour (OR = 1.79). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45) and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48) and mould odour (OR = 2.35). Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75) and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76) and mould odour (OR = 2.36). Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07) and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85) and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47), humid air (OR = 1.73) and mould odour (OR = 2.01). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29–0.82). Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51–0.88). Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06–2.11). In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness

  18. Asthma, allergy and eczema among adults in multifamily houses in Stockholm (3-HE study--associations with building characteristics, home environment and energy use for heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Norbäck

    Full Text Available Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings were invited (one subject/dwelling and 7,554 participated (73%. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74 and mould odour (OR = 1.79. Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45 and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48 and mould odour (OR = 2.35. Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75 and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76 and mould odour (OR = 2.36. Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07 and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85 and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47, humid air (OR = 1.73 and mould odour (OR = 2.01. Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.82. Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88. Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.11. In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness. Energy saving may have consequences for allergy and eczema. More

  19. 环境风对直接空冷岛换热的影响%The Effects of Environment Wind on Heat Transfer of Direct Air Cooled Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁振宇; 陈巍; 田永兴; 李学智

    2011-01-01

    以国内蒙达电厂600MW直接空冷机组为例,针对当前直接空冷机组运行中的突出问题--环境风的不利影响,利用CFD数值模拟软件Fluent,对空冷岛外部流场进行数值模拟.发现炉后来风、热风回流、倒灌是造成空冷岛换热效率下降的主要因素,分析了炉后来风、热风回流、倒灌等对空冷岛外部流场和换热性能的影响机理,并得到环境风速与热风回流和倒灌的关系.%Taking Mengda 600MW direct air-cooled units ii our country into consideration,in view of serious hurdles of air-cooled units available-the unfavorable influences of Ambient Wind,we tentatively proceeds to making numerical simulation research on external flow field of direct air-cooled island by using CFD software Fluent. Found that the wind generating from the boiler house afterwards,hot air re-circulation and air inverse flow are the main factors of decline in the efficiency of air-cooled island heat. This paper proposed the mechanism of ambient wind impacts,and the analysis on such effects of the wind generating from the boiler house afterwards,hot air re-circulation and air inverse flow on external flow field and heat exchange efficiency of air-cooled island was thus been within reach, found out hot air re-circulation and air inverse flow relationship between the wind speed.

  20. Heat transfer analysis of short helical borehole heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrella, Angelo; De Carli, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vertical ground heat exchanger with a helical shaped pipe is analyzed. ► The model considers the interaction between the ground and the environment. ► The results of the model are in good agreement with the experimental values. ► The weather conditions considerably affect the fluid heat carrier temperature. ► The pitch between the turns does not affect the behaviour of the heat exchanger. -- Abstract: In this paper a numerical model to analyze the thermal behaviour of vertical ground heat exchangers with a helical shaped pipe is presented. This type of configuration can be a suitable alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers, especially when the heating and cooling loads of the building are very low. The model describes the heat transfer problem by means of a network of interconnected thermal resistances and capacitances. Moreover, as the investigated ground heat exchanger is usually installed in shallow depth, the model takes into account the interaction between the ground and the ambient environment which affects the fluid heat carrier temperature into the heat exchanger and, as a consequence, the energy efficiency of the heat pump. After a sensitivity analysis on the mesh parameters, the presented model is compared with experimental data and the simulation results show good agreement with the measurements. Finally, analyses to investigate the influence of the weather conditions, of the axial heat transfer and of the pitch between the turns of the helical pipe for two types of ground are carried out.

  1. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  2. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  3. Heat Transfer Characteristics of SiC-coated Heat Pipe for Passive Decay Heat Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The main concern with the Fukushima accident was the failure of active and passive core cooling systems. The main function of existing passive decay heat removal systems is feeding additional coolant to the reactor core. Thus, an established emergency core cooling system (ECCS) cannot operate properly because of impossible depressurization under the station blackout (SBO) condition. Therefore, a new concept for passive decay heat removal system is required. In this study, an innovative hybrid control rod concept is considered for passive in-core decay heat removal that differs from the existing direct vessel injection core cooling system and passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections occurs by phase change of the working fluid and capillary action induced by wick structures installed on the inner wall of the heat pipe. In this study, a hybrid control rod is developed to take the roles of both neutron absorption and heat removal by combining the functions of a heat pipe and control rod. Previous studies on enhancing the heat removal capacity of heat pipes used nanofluids, self-rewetting fluids, various wick structures and condensers. Many studies have examined the thermal performances of heat pipes using various nanofluids. They concluded that the enhanced thermal performance of the heat pipe using nanofluids is due to nanoparticle deposition on the wick structures. Thus, the wick structure of heat pipes has been modified by nanoparticle deposition to enhance the heat removal capacity. However, previous studies used relatively small heat pipes and narrow ranges of heat loads. The environment of a nuclear reactor is very specific, and the decay heat produced by fission products after shutdown is relatively large. Thus, this study tested a large-scale heat pipe over a wide range of power. The concept of a hybrid heat pipe for an advanced in-core decay heat removal system was introduced for complete

  4. Heat Transfer Characteristics of SiC-coated Heat Pipe for Passive Decay Heat Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main concern with the Fukushima accident was the failure of active and passive core cooling systems. The main function of existing passive decay heat removal systems is feeding additional coolant to the reactor core. Thus, an established emergency core cooling system (ECCS) cannot operate properly because of impossible depressurization under the station blackout (SBO) condition. Therefore, a new concept for passive decay heat removal system is required. In this study, an innovative hybrid control rod concept is considered for passive in-core decay heat removal that differs from the existing direct vessel injection core cooling system and passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections occurs by phase change of the working fluid and capillary action induced by wick structures installed on the inner wall of the heat pipe. In this study, a hybrid control rod is developed to take the roles of both neutron absorption and heat removal by combining the functions of a heat pipe and control rod. Previous studies on enhancing the heat removal capacity of heat pipes used nanofluids, self-rewetting fluids, various wick structures and condensers. Many studies have examined the thermal performances of heat pipes using various nanofluids. They concluded that the enhanced thermal performance of the heat pipe using nanofluids is due to nanoparticle deposition on the wick structures. Thus, the wick structure of heat pipes has been modified by nanoparticle deposition to enhance the heat removal capacity. However, previous studies used relatively small heat pipes and narrow ranges of heat loads. The environment of a nuclear reactor is very specific, and the decay heat produced by fission products after shutdown is relatively large. Thus, this study tested a large-scale heat pipe over a wide range of power. The concept of a hybrid heat pipe for an advanced in-core decay heat removal system was introduced for complete

  5. Effect of different heat transfer models on HCCI engine simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshat, Elaheh; Saray, Rahim Khoshbakhti

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new multi zone model is developed for HCCI combustion modeling. • New heat transfer model is used for prediction of heat transfer in HCCI engines. • Model can predict engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics well. • Appropriate mass and heat transfer models cause to accurate prediction of CO, UHC and NOx. - Abstract: Heat transfer from engine walls has an important role on engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics. The main focus of this study is offering a new relation for calculation of convective heat transfer from in-cylinder charge to combustion chamber walls of HCCI engines and providing the ability of new model in comparison with the previous models. Therefore, a multi zone model is developed for homogeneous charge compression ignition engine simulation. Model consists of four different types of zones including core zone, boundary layer zone, outer zones, which are between core and boundary layer, and crevice zone. Conductive heat transfer and mass transfer are considered between neighboring zones. For accurate calculation of initial conditions at inlet valve closing, multi zone model is coupled with a single zone model, which simulates gas exchange process. Various correlations are used as convective heat transfer correlations. Woschni, modified Woschni, Hohenberg and Annand correlations are used as convective heat transfer models. The new convection model, developed by authors, is used, too. Comparative analyses are done to recognize the accurate correlation for prediction of engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics in a wide range of operating conditions. The results indicate that utilization of various heat transfer models, except for new convective heat transfer model, leads to significant differences in prediction of in-cylinder pressure and exhaust emissions. Using Woschni, Chang and new model, convective heat transfer coefficient increases near top dead center, sharply

  6. Heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  7. A review of biological studies sponsored by the Department of the Environment to assist feasibility studies of the disposal of heat generating radioactive waste in the deep ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.A.; Gale, G.

    1985-04-01

    The report review recent biological studies on the organisms of the deep sea and takes into account the physical and chemical parameters that influence them. Particular attention is devoted to studies funded by the Department of the Environment to determine the technical feasibility of disposing of high level radioactive wastes in the deep sea. Such quantitative information that exists concerning the input and output of organic material into the abyss is given. This information is related to the diversity, growth, size, and reproductive biology of the abyssal infauna and epifauna and to the organisms within the water column above. Life processes, under the influence of high pressure are discussed and related to the uptake by and release from organisms of radiochemicals. Gaps in our present knowledge of the total ecosystem are identified and recommendations for future studies made. (author)

  8. Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

    1995-07-01

    A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ' Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys

  9. Heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggs, G.W.; Lightowlers, R.J.; Robinson, D.; Rice, G.

    1986-01-01

    A heat pipe for use in stabilising a specimen container for irradiation of specimens at substantially constant temperature within a liquid metal cooled fast reactor, comprises an evaporator section, a condenser section, an adiabatic section therebetween, and a gas reservoir, and contains a vapourisable substance such as sodium. The heat pipe further includes a three layer wick structure comprising an outer relatively fine mesh layer, a coarse intermediate layer and a fine mesh inner layer for promoting unimpeded return of condensate to the evaporation section of the heat pipe while enhancing heat transfer with the heat pipe wall and reducing entrainment of the condensate by the upwardly rising vapour. (author)

  10. The Challenge of Urban Heat Exposure under Climate Change: An Analysis of Cities in the Sustainable Healthy Urban Environments (SHUE Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Milner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The so far largely unabated emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs are expected to increase global temperatures substantially over this century. We quantify the patterns of increases for 246 globally-representative cities in the Sustainable Healthy Urban Environments (SHUE database. We used an ensemble of 18 global climate models (GCMs run under a low (RCP2.6 and high (RCP8.5 emissions scenario to estimate the increase in monthly mean temperatures by 2050 and 2100 based on 30-year averages. Model simulations were from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5. Annual mean temperature increases were 0.93 degrees Celsius by 2050 and 1.10 degrees Celsius by 2100 under RCP2.6, and 1.27 and 4.15 degrees Celsius under RCP8.5, but with substantial city-to-city variation. By 2100, under RCP2.6 no city exceeds an increase in Tmean > 2 degrees Celsius (relative to a 2017 baseline, while all do under RCP8.5, some with increases in Tmean close to, or even greater than, 7 degrees Celsius. The increases were greatest in cities of mid to high latitude, in humid temperate and dry climate regions, and with large seasonal variation in temperature. Cities are likely to experience large increases in hottest month mean temperatures under high GHG emissions trajectories, which will often present substantial challenges to adaptation and health protection.

  11. Compact seasonal PCM heat storage for solar heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark

    Space heating of buildings and preparation of domestic hot water accounts for a large part of the society’s energy consumption. Solar radiation is an abundant and renewable energy source which can be harvested by solar collectors and used to cover heating demands in the built environment....... The seasonal availability of solar energy does however not match with the heating demands in buildings which typically are large in winter periods when limited solar energy is available. Heat can be stored over a few days in water stores but continuous heat losses limits the storage periods. The possibility...... of storing heat from summer where solar energy is widely available to winter periods where the heating demands are large, allows for implementing more renewable energy in our energy system. The phase change material (PCM) sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) melts at 58 °C. The melting process requires...

  12. Heat Stress Effects on Growing-Finishing Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the factors that create heat stress, the response of the animals while under heat stress, and the signs of heat-stressed swine are essential to making rational decisions for the selection, design, and management of their environments. Heat stressors include combinations of environment...

  13. District heating versus local heating - Social supportability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matei, Magdalena; Enescu, Diana; Varjoghie, Elena; Radu, Florin; Matei, Lucian

    2004-01-01

    business practices can be improved in district heating?; - Benefits and objectives of competition and privatization. A large number of DH systems in Romania face serious financial, marketing or technical problems. Uncompetitive tariffs and inadequate cost recovery have significantly damaged DH systems. This has a deeply negative impact on municipal budgets and on the viability of DH systems. 20% from the consumers disconnected from the DH systems for various reasons. The national reference tariff do not take into consideration the real economic performances of the DH systems. The lack of consumption control and consumption-based billing drive towards increasing the DH systems crisis. The consumers have to pay the technical, commercial and economic loses of the existing DH systems, so their supportability has continuously decreased. The Government offered every year important subsidies for DH companies, as well as social helps for the heating of the low income families. The real problem is to not spend the public founds covering the losses of some not viable DH systems, managed by state own companies/authorities instead of use this money to help the low income family to pay their contribution for the rehabilitation/construction of an efficient heating system. Gas versus district heating tariffs represents a key factor for everyone's decision to prefer district heating or local heating. The Government has the responsibility to inform the population regarding the future evolution on long term power, heat and gas tariffs in order to help the population to decide what is the most sustainable heating system. Systematic restructuring and investment in efficient technologies are essential for the actual DH systems. This could be made only by a legal/institutional reform which will create the environment for a commercial operations .There is necessary to create the framework for private sector participation stimulation. Only by improving the ownership/management structures could

  14. Phase change heat transfer and bubble behavior observed on twisted wire heater geometries in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, Troy R.; Koeln, Justin P.; Fassmann, Andrew W.; Barnett, Robert J.; Ban, Heng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Subcooled water boiled in microgravity on twists of thin wires. • Wire twisting creates heat transfer enhancements because of high local temperatures. • A preliminary version of a new bubble dynamics method is discussed. • A critical distance that fluid must be superheated for boiling onset is presented. - Abstract: Phase change is an effective method of transferring heat, yet its application in microgravity thermal management systems requires greater understanding of bubble behavior. To further this knowledge base, a microgravity boiling experiment was performed (floating) onboard an aircraft flying in a parabolic trajectory to study the effect of surface geometry and heat flux on phase change heat transfer in a pool of subcooled water. A special emphasis was the investigation of heat transfer enhancement caused by modifying the surface geometry through the use of a twist of three wires and a twist of four wires. A new method for bubble behavior analysis was developed to quantify bubble growth characteristics, which allows a quantitative comparison of bubble dynamics between different data sets. It was found that the surface geometry of the three-wire twist enhanced heat transfer by reducing the heat flux needed for bubble incipience and the average wire temperature in microgravity. Simulation results indicated that increased local superheating in wire crevices may be responsible for the change of bubble behavior seen as the wire geometry configuration was varied. The convective heat transfer rate, in comparison to ground experiments, was lower for microgravity at low heating rates, and higher at high heating rates. This study provides insights into the role of surface geometry on superheating behavior and presents an initial version of a new bubble behavior analysis method. Further research on these topics could lead to new designs of heater surface geometries using phase change heat transfer in microgravity applications

  15. Corrosion of titanium: Part 1: aggressive environments and main forms of degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, Davide; Brenna, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Beretta, Silvia; Bolzoni, Fabio; Ormellese, Marco; Pedeferri, MariaPia

    2017-11-11

    Titanium has outstanding corrosion resistance due to the external natural oxide protective layer formed when it is exposed to an aerated environment. Despite this, titanium may suffer different forms of corrosion in severe environments: uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, stress-corrosion cracking, fretting corrosion and erosion. In this first review, forms of corrosion affecting titanium are analyzed based on a wide literature review. For each form of corrosion, the mechanism and most severe environment are reported according to the current understanding.In the second part, this review will address the possible surface treatments that can increase corrosion resistance on commercially pure titanium: Electrochemical anodizing, thermal oxidation, chemical oxidation and bulk treatments such as alloying will be considered, highlighting the advantages of each technique.

  16. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  17. Optimum heat storage design for heat integrated multipurpose batch plants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stamp, J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available procedure is presented tha journal homepage: www All rights reserved. ajozi T, Optimum heat storage grated multipurpose batch plants , South Africa y usage in multipurpose batch plants has been in published literature most present methods, time... � 2pL?u?kins ? 1 h3A3?u?cu?U (36) The internal area for heat loss by convection from the heat transfer medium is given by Constraint (37) and the area for convective heat transfer losses to the environment is given in Constraint (38). A1?u? ? 2...

  18. Comparison of the impact of six heat-load management strategies on thermal responses and milk production of feed-pad and pasture fed dairy cows in a subtropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, T. M.; Jonsson, N. N.; Mayer, D. G.; Gaughan, J. B.; Ehrlich, W. K.; McGowan, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to hot environments affects milk yield (MY) and milk composition of pasture and feed-pad fed dairy cows in subtropical regions. This study was undertaken during summer to compare MY and physiology of cows exposed to six heat-load management treatments. Seventy-eight Holstein-Friesian cows were blocked by season of calving, parity, milk yield, BW, and milk protein (%) and milk fat (%) measured in 2 weeks prior to the start of the study. Within blocks, cows were randomly allocated to one of the following treatments: open-sided iron roofed day pen adjacent to dairy (CID) + sprinklers (SP); CID only; non-shaded pen adjacent to dairy + SP (NSD + SP); open-sided shade cloth roofed day pen adjacent to dairy (SCD); NSD + sprinkler (sprinkler on for 45 min at 1100 h if mean respiration rate >80 breaths per minute (NSD + WSP) ); open-sided shade cloth roofed structure over feed bunk in paddock + 1 km walk to and from the dairy (SCP + WLK). Sprinklers for CID + SP and NSD + SP cycled 2 min on, 12 min off when ambient temperature >26°C. The highest milk yields were in the CID + SP and CID treatments (23.9 L cow-1 day-1), intermediate for NSD + SP, SCD and SCP + WLK (22.4 L cow-1 day-1), and lowest for NSD + WSP (21.3 L cow-1 day-1) ( P cows in CID + SP showed no decline in MY out to a THI break point value of 83.2, whereas the pooled MY of the other treatments declined when THI >80.7. A combination of iron roof shade plus water sprinkling throughout the day provided the most effective control of heat load.

  19. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The arrangement described relates particularly to heat exchangers for use in fast reactor power plants, in which heat is extracted from the reactor core by primary liquid metal coolant and is then transferred to secondary liquid metal coolant by means of intermediate heat exchangers. One of the main requirements of such a system, if used in a pool type fast reactor, is that the pressure drop on the primary coolant side must be kept to a minimum consistent with the maintenance of a limited dynamic head in the pool vessel. The intermediate heat exchanger must also be compact enough to be accommodated in the reactor vessel, and the heat exchanger tubes must be available for inspection and the detection and plugging of leaks. If, however, the heat exchanger is located outside the reactor vessel, as in the case of a loop system reactor, a higher pressure drop on the primary coolant side is acceptable, and space restriction is less severe. An object of the arrangement described is to provide a method of heat exchange and a heat exchanger to meet these problems. A further object is to provide a method that ensures that excessive temperature variations are not imposed on welded tube joints by sudden changes in the primary coolant flow path. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  20. Direct Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P J

    1990-01-01

    Potential resources and applications of earth heat in the form of geothermal energy are large. United States direct uses amount to 2,100 MWt thermal and worldwide 8,850 MWt above a reference temperature of 35 degrees Celsius. Space and district heating are the major direct uses of geothermal energy. Equipment employed in direct use projects is of standard manufacture and includes downhole and circulation pumps, transmission and distribution pipelines, heat exchangers and convectors, heat pumps and chillers. Direct uses of earth heat discussed are space and district heating, greenhouse heating and fish farming, process and industrial applications. The economic feasibility of direct use projects is governed by site specific factors such as location of user and resource, resource quality, system load factor and load density, as well as financing. Examples are presented of district heating in Klamath Falls, and Elko. Further developments of direct uses of geothermal energy will depend on matching user needs to the resource, and improving load factors and load density.

  1. Plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, R.

    1989-01-01

    Successful plasma heating is essential in present fusion experiments, for the demonstration of DpT burn in future devices and finally for the fusion reactor itself. This paper discusses the common heating systems with respect to their present performance and their applicability to future fusion devices. The comparative discussion is oriented to the various function of heating, which are: - plasma heating to fusion-relevant parameters and to ignition in future machines, -non-inductive, steady-pstate current drive, - plasma profile control, -neutral gas breakdown and plasma build-up. In view of these different functions, the potential of neutral beam injection (NBI) and the various schemes of wave heating (ECRH, LH, ICRH and Alven wave heating) is analyzed in more detail. The analysis includes assessments of the present physical and technical state of these heating methods, and makes suggestions for future developments and about outstanding problems. Specific attention is given to the still critical problem of efficient current drive, especially with respect to further extrapolation towards an economically operating tokamak reactor. Remarks on issues such as reliability, maintenance and economy conclude this comparative overview on plasma heating systems. (author). 43 refs.; 13 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat......Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...

  3. Propagation of crevices in stainless steel AISI304L in conditions of hydrogen chemistry (HWC); Propagacion de grietas en acero inoxidable AISI304L en condiciones de quimica de hidrogeno (HWC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz S, A.; Fuentes C, P.; Merino C, F. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Castano M, V. [IFA-UNAM, Juriquilla, Queretaro (Mexico)]. e-mail: ads@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    Crevice growth velocities in samples of AISI 304L stainless steel thermally welded and sensitized were obtained by the Rising displacement method or of growing displacement. It was used a recirculation circuit in where the operation conditions of a BWR type reactor were simulated (temperature of 288 C and a pressure of 8 MPa) with the chemistry modified by the addition of hydrogen with and without the addition of impurities of a powerful oxidizer like the Cu{sup ++} ion. CT pre cracked specimens were used and each rehearsal stayed to one constant displacement velocity of 1 x 10{sup -9} m/s (3.6 {mu}m/hr), making a continuous pursuit of the advance of the crack by the electric potential drop technique. To the end of the rehearsal it was carried out the fractographic analysis of the propagation surfaces. The values of the growth velocities obtained by this methodology went similar to the opposing ones under normal conditions of operation; while the fractographic analysis show the cracks propagation in trans and intergranular ways, evidencing the complexity of the regulator mechanisms of the one IGSCC even under controlled ambient conditions or with mitigation methodologies like the alternative hydrogen chemistry. (Author)

  4. Pollutant dispersion in built environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ming, Tingzhen; Gong, Tingrui; Li, Zhengtong

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses energy transfer, fluid flow and pollution in built environments. It provides a comprehensive overview of the highly detailed fundamental theories as well as the technologies used and the application of heat and mass transfer and fluid flow in built environments, with a focus on the mathematical models and computational and experimental methods. It is a valuable resource for researchers in the fields of buildings and environment, heat transfer and global warming.

  5. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  6. Monitoring early biofilm formation in cooling water systems using electrochemical probes made of AISI Type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, R.P.; Muraleedharan, P.; Dayal, R.K.; Khatak, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms in natural waters often adhere onto material surfaces in cooling water systems; they secrete slime, trap nutrients and reproduce, resulting in a complex biofilm that hampers the property of the condenser material. Biofilm formation on titanium material (commercial y pure, CP), used as condenser material, reduces heat-transfer efficiency. Experience worldwide has shown that routine water treatment programmes cannot remain effective under varying environmental, design and operation factors. Thus, the need of the hour is a means to continuously monitor the effectiveness of the control programmes and facilities to modify it as per need. In our laboratory we are involved in developing a probe based on electrochemical techniques to monitor early biofilm formation. Our earlier experience has shown that changes in some electrochemical parameters like open circuit potential (OCP) ennoblement, increase in passive current density and active repassivation potential would indicate crevice-stabilization tendencies of a heterogeneous biofilm on stainless steel materials. Literature further explains that there is a distinct time lag between crevice initiation and crevice propagation. Hence, it was hypothesized that if we can provide necessary conditions of crevice initiations artificially by intermittent polarization, electrochemical signals generated during crevice initiation can diagnose the causative agent of the crevice, that is, biofilm. However, care should be taken to avoid crevice propagation. Thus, attempts were made to distinguish the response of current to temporary application of a potential difference between two similar stainless steels (AISI Type 304, 316) and titanium electrodes in the biofilm forming environment. (author)

  7. Heat Pipes Reduce Engine-Exhaust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Increased fuel vaporization raises engine efficiency. Heat-pipe technology increased efficiency of heat transfer beyond that obtained by metallic conduction. Resulted in both improved engine operation and reduction in fuel consumption. Raw material conservation through reduced dependence on strategic materials also benefit from this type of heat-pipe technology. Applications result in improved engine performance and cleaner environment.

  8. Stable-isotope geochemistry of the Pierina high-sulfidation Au-Ag deposit, Peru: Influence of hydrodynamics on SO42--H2S sulfur isotopic exchange in magmatic-steam and steam-heated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifarek, R.H.; Rye, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    environment was unusually slow, which provided sufficient time for the uptake of groundwater and partial to complete SO42--H2S isotopic exchange. The slow steam velocities were likely related to the dispersal of the steam column as it entered the tuffs and possibly to intermediate exsolution rates from magmatic brine. The low ??D values may also partly reflect continuous degassing of the mineralizing magma. Similarly, data for steam-heated alunite (??34S=12.3??? to 27.2???; ??18OSO4=11.7??? to 13.0???; ??18OOH=6.6??? to 9.4???; ??D=-59??? to -42???) are unusual and indicate a strong magmatic influence, relatively high temperatures (140 to 180 ??C, based on ??18 OSO4-OH fractionations), and partial to complete sulfur isotopic exchange between steam-heated sulfate and H2S. Restricted lithologically controlled fluid flow in the host tuffs allowed magmatic condensate to supplant meteoric groundwater at the water table and create the high-temperature low-pH conditions that permitted unusually rapid SO42--H2S isotopic equilibration (50-300 days) and (or) long sulfate residence times for this environment. Late void-filling barite (??34S=7.4??? to 29.7???; ??18OSO4=-0.4??? to 15.1???) and later void-filling goethite (??18O=-11.8??? to 0.2???) document a transition from magmatic condensate to dominantly meteoric water in steam-heated fluids during cooling and collapse of the hydrothermal system. These steam-heated fluids oxidized the top ???300 m of the deposit by leaching sulfides, redistributing metals, and precipitating barite??acanthite??gold and goethite-hematite ??gold. Steam-heated oxidation, rather than weathering, was critical to forming the orebody in that it not only released encapsulated gold but likely enriched the deposit to ore-grade Au concentrations. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1994-01-01

    It is approximately 10 years since the Third Edition of Heat Pipes was published and the text is now established as the standard work on the subject. This new edition has been extensively updated, with revisions to most chapters. The introduction of new working fluids and extended life test data have been taken into account in chapter 3. A number of new types of heat pipes have become popular, and others have proved less effective. This is reflected in the contents of chapter 5. Heat pipes are employed in a wide range of applications, including electronics cooling, diecasting and injection mo

  10. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  11. Urban Heat Wave Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Jedlovec, Gary; Meyer, Paul J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Crane, Dakota L.

    2016-01-01

    Heat waves are the largest cause of environment-related deaths globally. On average, over 6,000 people in the United States alone are hospitalized each summer due to excessive heat. Key elements leading to these disasters are elevated humidity and the urban heat island effect, which act together to increase apparent temperature and amplify the effects of a heat wave. Urban demographics and socioeconomic factors also play a role in determining individual risk. Currently, advisories of impending heat waves are often too generalized, with limited or no spatial variability over urban regions. This frequently contributes to a lack of specific response on behalf of the population. A goal of this project is to develop a product that has the potential to provide more specific heat wave guidance invoking greater awareness and action.

  12. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The environmental risks and uncertainties of a high-energy future are disturbing and give rise to several reservations concerning the use of fossil fuels. A number of technologies will help to reduce atmospheric pollution. In Denmark special importance is attached to the following: Energy conservation. Efficient energy conversion. Renewable energy sources. District heating, combined production of heat and power. Many agree that district heating (DH), produced by the traditional heat-only plant, and combined heat and power (CHP) have enormous potential when considering thermal efficiency and lowered environmental impacts: The basic technology of each is proven, it would be relatively simple to satisfy a substantial part of the energy demand, and their high efficiencies mean reduced pollution including greenhouse gas emissions. This is especially important in high population density areas - the obviously preferred sites for such energy generation. Compared with individual heating DH can provide a community with an operationally efficient and most often also an economically competitive heat supply. This is particularly true under the circumstances where the DH system is supplied from CHP plants. Their use results in very substantial improvements in overall efficiency. Further environmental improvements arise from the reduced air pollution obtainable in reasonably large CHP plants equipped with flue gas cleaning to remove particles, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen acids. As a consequence of these considerations, DH plays an important role in fulfilling the space and water heating demand in many countries. This is especially the case in Denmark where this technology is utilised to a very great extent. Indeed, DH is one of the reasons why Denmark has relatively good air quality in the cities. (au)

  13. Behaviour of steels in natural environments: focus on stainless steels in natural sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion behaviour of steels and alloys in natural environments is not only dependent to material parameters and environmental chemistry, but also to micro-organisms which may be there. The global approach used to investigate the behaviour of alloys in natural environments is illustrated by the work done on stainless steels in seawater. In aerated seawater, studies led to the proposal of an 'enzymatic model' based on the enzymatic catalyze of the cathodic reaction and which allows reproducing the electrochemical behaviour of stainless steels in natural seawater and the crevice corrosion phenomena observed in natural sea waters. Coupling areas under aerobic and anaerobic conditions leads to the worst situation for stainless steel behaviour: the catalysis of the cathodic reaction on aerobic exposed surfaces and the decrease of the corrosion resistance of anaerobic surfaces due to sulphides. These results lead to the concept of electro-active bio-films. (author)

  14. Industrial waste heat utilization for low temperature district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hao; Xia, Jianjun; Zhu, Kan; Su, Yingbo; Jiang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large quantities of low grade waste heat are discharged into the environment, mostly via water evaporation, during industrial processes. Putting this industrial waste heat to productive use can reduce fossil fuel usage as well as CO 2 emissions and water dissipation. The purpose of this paper is to propose a holistic approach to the integrated and efficient utilization of low-grade industrial waste heat. Recovering industrial waste heat for use in district heating (DH) can increase the efficiency of the industrial sector and the DH system, in a cost-efficient way defined by the index of investment vs. carbon reduction (ICR). Furthermore, low temperature DH network greatly benefits the recovery rate of industrial waste heat. Based on data analysis and in-situ investigations, this paper discusses the potential for the implementation of such an approach in northern China, where conventional heat sources for DH are insufficient. The universal design approach to industrial-waste-heat based DH is proposed. Through a demonstration project, this approach is introduced in detail. This study finds three advantages to this approach: (1) improvement of the thermal energy efficiency of industrial factories; (2) more cost-efficient than the traditional heating mode; and (3) CO 2 and pollutant emission reduction as well as water conservation. -- Highlights: •We review situation of industrial waste heat recovery with a global perspective. •We present a way to analyze the potential to utilize industrial waste heat for DH. •Northern China has huge potential for using low-grade industrial waste heat for DH. •A demonstration project is introduced using the universal approach we propose. •It proves huge benefits for factories, heat-supply companies and the society

  15. Fuzzy comprehensive evaluation of district heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Bing; Wang Songling; Li Li

    2010-01-01

    Selecting the optimal type of district heating (DH) system is of great importance because different heating systems have different levels of efficiency, which will impact the system economics, environment and energy use. In this study, seven DH systems were analysed and evaluated by the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method. The dimensionless number-goodness was introduced into the calculation, the economics, environment and energy technology factors were considered synthetically, and the final goodness values were obtained. The results show that if only one of the economics, environment or energy technology factors are considered, different heating systems have different goodness values. When all three factors were taken into account, the final ranking of goodness values was: combined heating and power>gas-fired boiler>water-source heat pump>coal-fired boiler>ground-source heat pump>solar-energy heat pump>oil-fired boiler. The combined heating and power system is the best choice from all seven systems; the gas-fired boiler system is the best of the three boiler systems for heating purpose; and the water-source heat pump is the best of the three heat pump systems for heating and cooling.

  16. Review: heat pipe heat exchangers at IROST

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2012-01-01

    The use of the heat pipe as a component in a heat recovery device has gained worldwide acceptance. Heat pipes are passive, highly reliable and offer high heat transfer rates. This study summarizes the investigation of different types of heat pipe heat recovery systems (HPHRSs). The studies are classified on the basis of the type of the HPHRS. This research is based on 30 years of experience on heat pipe and heat recovery systems that are presented in this study. Copyright , Oxford University ...

  17. Heat pipes and heat pipe exchangers for heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, L L; Grakovich, L P; Kiselev, V G; Kurustalev, D K; Matveev, Yu

    1984-01-01

    Heat pipes and heat pipe exchangers are of great importance in power engineering as a means of recovering waste heat of industrial enterprises, solar energy, geothermal waters and deep soil. Heat pipes are highly effective heat transfer units for transferring thermal energy over large distance (tens of meters) with low temperature drops. Their heat transfer characteristics and reliable working for more than 10-15 yr permit the design of new systems with higher heat engineering parameters.

  18. Unwanted heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka, M.

    2006-01-01

    The number of small heating plants using biomass is growing. According to TREND's information, Hrinovska energeticka, is the only one that controls the whole supplier chain in cooperation with its parent company in Bratislava. Starting with the collection and processing of wood chips by burning, heat production and heat distribution to the end user. This gives the company better control over costs and consequently its own prices. Last year, the engineering company, Hrinovske storjarne, decided to focus only on its core business and sold its heating plant, Hrinovske tepelne hospodarstvo, to Intech Slovakia and changed the company name to Hrinovska energeticka. Local companies and inhabitants were concerned that the new owner would increase prices. But the company publicly declared and kept promises that the heat price for households would remain at 500 Slovak crowns/gigajoule (13.33 EUR/gigajoule ), one of the lowest prices in Slovakia. This year the prices increased slightly to 570 Slovak crowns (15.2 EUR). 'We needed - even at the cost of lower profit - to satisfy our customers so that we would not lose them. We used this time for transition to biomass. This will allow us to freeze our prices in the coming years,' explained the statutory representative of the company, Ivan Dudak. (authors)

  19. Effects of Symmetrically Arranged Heat Sources on the Heat Release Performance of Extruded-Type Heat Sinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, Min Ye [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this study we investigated the effects of symmetrically arranged heat sources on the heat release performances of extruded-type heat sinks through experiments and thermal fluid simulations. Also, based on the results we suggested a high-efficiency and cost-effective heat sink for a solar inverter cooling system. In this parametric study, the temperatures between heaters on the base plate and the heat release rates were investigated with respect to the arrangements of heat sources and amounts of heat input. Based on the results we believe that the use of both sides of the heat sink is the preferred method for releasing the heat from the heat source to the ambient environment rather than the use of a single side of the heat sink. Also from the results, it is believed that the symmetric arrangement of the heat sources is recommended to achieve a higher rate of heat transfer. From the results of the thermal fluid simulation, it was possible to confirm the qualitative agreement with the experimental results. Finally, quantitative comparison with respect to mass flow rates, heat inputs, and arrangements of the heat source was also performed.

  20. Individually Controlled Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and inhaled air quality in buildings to which occupants are exposed has an effect on their health, comfort, performance and productivity. Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform environment. However, large...... individual differences in physiological and psychological response, clothing insulation, activity, preference for air temperature and movement, etc., exist between people. Environmental conditions acceptable for most of the occupants in buildings may be achieved by providing each occupant...

  1. Elephant logging and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Aung-Hla

    1995-01-01

    The natural environment comprises non-biological elements such as air, water, light, heat and biological elements of animal and plant life; all interact with each other to create an ecosystem. Human activities like over-exploitation of forest results in deforestation and desertification. This consequently changes ecological balance. Topics on: (1) history of elephants utilization; (2) elephant logging; (3) classification of elephants; (4) dragging gear; (5) elephant power; (6) elephant logging and environment, are discussed

  2. Monopole heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Upper bounds on the flux of monopoles incident on the Earth with velocity -5 c(10 16 GeV m -1 ) and on the flux of monopoles incident on Jupiter with velocity -3 c(10 16 GeV m -1 ), are derived. Monopoles moving this slowly lose sufficient energy to be stopped, and then catalyse nucleon decay, releasing heat. The limits are obtained by requiring the rate of energy release from nucleon decay to be less than the measured amount of heat flowing out from the surface of the planet. (U.K.)

  3. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections

  4. Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Latif M.

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the follow ing ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters.

  5. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  6. Effect of boron control of environment on corrosion and resistance to low-cycle corrosion fatigue in structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babej, Yu.I.; Zhitkov, V.V.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.; Liskevich, I.Yu.; Nazarov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests of the specimens on total, contact and crevice corrosion, corrosion cracking and low-cycle fatigue are conducted for determination of corrosion and corrosion-fatigue characteristics in the 15Kh3NMFA, 10N3MFA, 10Kh16N4B, 05Kh13N6M2 structural steels, used in energetics. The environment is subjected to boron control and contacting with atmosphere for simulation of stop and operation modes of the facility. The experiments are carried out in the distilled water with 12g/l H 3 BO 3 and 10 mg/l Cl' at 25, 60, 100 deg C under contacting with atmosphere. It is established, that the pearlitic steels 15Kh3NMFA, 10N3MFA, as well as transition and martensitic 05Kh13N6M2 and 10Kh16N4B steels are highly stable to total, crevice and contact corrosion at the high parameters of aqueous boron-containing medium. Steel resistance to low-cycle fracture decreases slightly under the conditions similar to the operation ones, in the water with 12 g/l H 3 BO 3 . Durability of the pearlitic steels at the simulation of stop conditions decreases more noticeably, crack formation as a rule, initiating from corrosion spots

  7. Current and future employment of the heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassitto, L.

    2001-01-01

    Heat pumps, mainly the compression type, grant high energy savings together with environment protection because of the free low temperature energy from environment or wasted heat they use. Their large employment depends on the appreciation of the above properties that are will be done. To grant economic savings on using heat pumps, electric energy and natural gas should have fixed and predictable prices [it

  8. Heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  9. Heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The tubes of a heat exchanger tube bank have a portion thereof formed in the shape of a helix, of effective radius equal to the tube radius and the space between two adjacent tubes, to tangentially contact the straight sections of the tubes immediately adjacent thereto and thereby provide support, maintain the spacing and account for differential thermal expansion thereof

  10. Heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, F; Yanagida, T; Fujie, K; Futawatari, H

    1975-04-30

    The purpose of this construction is the improvement of heat transfer in finned tube heat exchangers, and therefore the improvement of its efficiency or its output per unit volume. This is achieved by preventing the formation of flow boundary layers in gaseous fluid. This effect always occurs on flow of smooth adjacent laminae, and especially if these have pipes carrying liquid passing through them; it worsens the heat transfer of such a boundary layer considerably compared to that in the turbulent range. The fins, which have several rows of heat exchange tubes passing through them, are fixed at a small spacing on theses tubes. The fins have slots cut in them by pressing or punching, where the pressed-out material remains as a web, which runs parallel to the level of the fin and at a small distance from it. These webs and slots are arranged radially around every tube hole, e.g. 6 in number. For a suitable small tube spacing, two adjacent tubes opposite each other have one common slot. Many variants of such slot arrangements are illustrated.

  11. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowodiuk, W.

    1976-01-01

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type is described in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration

  12. The Thermos process heat reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    The THERMOS process heat reactor was born from the following idea: the hot water energy vector is widely used for heating purposes in cities, so why not save on traditional fossil fuels by simply substituting a nuclear boiler of comparable power for the classical boiler installed in the same place. The French Atomic Energy Commission has techniques for heating in the big French cities which provide better guarantees for national independence and for the environment. This THERMOS technique would result in a saving of 40,000 to 80,000 tons of oil per year [fr

  13. Advanced boron soaking procedure for steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, T.; Tsuge, A.; Kawanishi, K.; Ochi, T.; Kadokami, E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study on boric acid penetration into tube to tube-support-plate crevices and Inter-Granular-Attack (hereinafter called 'IGA') cracks in crevices has been performed to obtain the optimum boric acid soaking procedure in operating steam generators with IGA. The penetration rate into the crevice is closely related to various parameters such as heat flux, crevice gap, and porosity of the sludge deposited in crevices. Two experimental crevice models were set up. One was of the packed crevice type; crevice gap is completely packed by sludge, and the other was of the open crevice type; crevice gap is not packed, but reduced by sludge. The porosity of the crevice varied from 100% open porosity to the highly sludge packed porosity of 10∼20%. The relation between heat flux and boric acid penetration rate of the packed crevice type was investigated. For the open crevice type, from the viewpoint that boric acid penetration into the dryout region produces no effects, tube wall superheat in the crevice was measured in order to obtain the dryout heat flux. And it was investigated the boron in IGA cracks using Ion Micro Analysis in order to confirm existence of an anticorrosive film in IGA propagation. The optimum reactor power for effective boric acid penetration onto the tube surface and into the IGA cracks within the tube to tube-support-plate crevice was found to be about a 5% and 30% power level, which are applicable to both the packed and open crevice type. (author)

  14. Thermal contact resistance in carbon nanotube enhanced heat storage materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Nedea, S.V.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-liquid phase change is one of the most favorable means of compact and economical heat storage in the built environment. In such storage systems, the vast available solar heat is stored as latent heat in the storage materials. Recent studies suggest using sugar alcohols as seasonal heat storage

  15. Simulation of coupled electromagnetic and heat dissipation problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H.H.J.M.; Maten, ter E.J.W.; Houwelingen, van D.

    1994-01-01

    A description is given of an integrated simulation environment for the solution of coupled electromagnetic and heat dissipation problems in two dimensions, in particular for the field of induction heating, dielectric heating, and hysteresis heating. The equations are coupled because the most

  16. A New Correlation to Predict Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Vertical Annuli with Closed Bottoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie

    2012-01-01

    It is important to find a way of enhancing heat transfer coefficients if the space for heat exchanger installation is limited, as it is in advanced light water reactors. One of the effective methods to increase heat transfer coefficients ( h b ) of pool boiling is to consider a confined space. It is well known from the literature that the confined boiling is an effective technique to enhance heat transfer. Once the flow inlet at the tube bottom is closed, a very rapid increase in heat transfer coefficient is observed at low heat fluxes ( q ' ). The similar tendency is observed regardless of the geometric shape. Yao and Chang and Kang investigated a vertical annulus while Rops et al. investigated a confined plate. Fujita et al., in other wise, used parallel plates with side and bottom inflow is restricted. Around the upper region of the annulus with closed bottoms the downward liquid interrupts the upward movement of the bubble slugs. Thereafter, bubbles are coalescing into much bigger bubbles while fluctuating up and down in the annular space. As the heat flux increases (1) the isolate bubble region, (2) the coalesced big size bubble region, and (3) the dryout region is observed in series. The major causes of the heat transfer enhancement are related with the liquid film evaporation and active liquid agitation. Literature review on the previous studies about crevice effects on pool boiling denotes that heat transfer is highly dependent on the geometric parameters. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify the effect of each geometric parameter to estimate heat transfer coefficients accurately. Although some correlations were developed to predict pool boiling heat transfer in confined spaces based on open bottoms, the application of them to a confined space with closed bottoms could result in much error. To overcome the limits of the published correlations, Kang developed a correlation to predict pool boiling heat transfer in annuli with closed bottoms. However, the

  17. High resolution heat atlases for demand and supply mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Möller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Significant reductions of heat demand, low-carbon and renewable energy sources, and district heating are key elements in 100% renewable energy systems. Appraisal of district heating along with energy efficient buildings and individual heat supply requires a geographical representation of heat demand, energy efficiency and energy supply. The present paper describes a Heat Atlas built around a spatial database using geographical information systems (GIS. The present atlas allows for per-building calculations of potentials and costs of energy savings, connectivity to existing district heat, and current heat supply and demand. For the entire building mass a conclusive link is established between the built environment and its heat supply. The expansion of district heating; the interconnection of distributed district heating systems; or the question whether to invest in ultra-efficient buildings with individual supply, or in collective heating using renewable energy for heating the current building stock, can be based on improved data.

  18. Heat pipe heat exchangers in heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stulc, P; Vasiliev, L L; Kiseljev, V G; Matvejev, Ju N

    1985-01-01

    The results of combined research and development activities of the National Research Institute for Machine Design, Prague, C.S.S.R. and the Institute for Heat and Mass Transfer, Minsk, U.S.S.R. concerning intensification heat pipes used in heat pipe heat exchangers are presented. This sort of research has been occasioned by increased interest in heat power economy trying to utilise waste heat produced by various technological processes. The developed heat pipes are deployed in construction of air-air, gas-air or gas-gas heat recovery exchangers in the field of air-engineering and air-conditioning. (author).

  19. Result of comparative experiment on environmental comfort in room using hot heat environment testing unit. Onnetsu kankyo shiken unit ni yoru shitsunai kankyo no kaitekisa no hikaku jikken kekka ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T; Kawashima, K [The Hokkaido Electric Power Co. Inc., Sapporo (Japan)

    1991-11-20

    Measurements were carried out on three buildings having different heat insulation, airtightness and heat capacity for testing the hot heast enviroments (having a room size of about 4.6 m{times}3.7m{times}2.3 m) as to the temperature differences between the upper and lower parts of the room and the MRT (mean radiation temperature, representing the temperature of radiation from the wall face). These are compared according to types of heating appliance. The result is summarize as follows: The temperature difference in the upper and lower parts is affected largely by the airtightness of the building, the difference being capable of getting reduced by rasing the airtightness even in a buildings low in heat insulation. In a building with low airtightness, type of heating appliance and its installation location affect the temperature difference. The MRT is determined determined nearly completely by the heat insulation of the wall face in a room, but it tends to be affected easily by the specification and area of windows. A floor heating system increases the MRT and generates very little difference in temperatures in the upper and lower parts of the room. A comparison using a PMV (one of the indexes for enviromental comfort in a room) was also conducted. 12 figs., 7tabs.

  20. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    A heat exchanger such as forms, for example, part of a power steam boiler is made up of a number of tubes that may be arranged in many different ways, and it is necessary that the tubes be properly supported. The means by which the tubes are secured must be as simple as possible so as to facilitate construction and must be able to continue to function effectively under the varying operating conditions to which the heat exchanger is subject. The arrangement described is designed to meet these requirements, in an improved way. The tubes are secured to a member extending past several tubes and abutment means are provided. At least some of the abutment means comprise two abutment pieces and a wedge secured to the supporting member, that acts on these pieces to maintain the engagement. (U.K.)

  1. Urban Heat Wave Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Jedlovec, G.; Crane, D. L.; Meyer, P. J.; LaFontaine, F.

    2016-12-01

    Heat waves are one of the largest causes of environmentally-related deaths globally and are likely to become more numerous as a result of climate change. The intensification of heat waves by the urban heat island effect and elevated humidity, combined with urban demographics, are key elements leading to these disasters. Better warning of the potential hazards may help lower risks associated with heat waves. Moderate resolution thermal data from NASA satellites is used to derive high spatial resolution estimates of apparent temperature (heat index) over urban regions. These data, combined with demographic data, are used to produce a daily heat hazard/risk map for selected cities. MODIS data are used to derive daily composite maximum and minimum land surface temperature (LST) fields to represent the amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle and identify extreme heat days. Compositing routines are used to generate representative daily maximum and minimum LSTs for the urban environment. The limited effect of relative humidity on the apparent temperature (typically 10-15%) allows for the use of modeled moisture fields to convert LST to apparent temperature without loss of spatial variability. The daily max/min apparent temperature fields are used to identify abnormally extreme heat days relative to climatological values in order to produce a heat wave hazard map. Reference to climatological values normalizes the hazard for a particular region (e.g., the impact of an extreme heat day). A heat wave hazard map has been produced for several case study periods and then computed on a quasi-operational basis during the summer of 2016 for Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, St. Louis, MO, and Huntsville, AL. A hazard does not become a risk until someone or something is exposed to that hazard at a level that might do harm. Demographic information is used to assess the urban risk associated with the heat wave hazard. Collectively, the heat wave hazard product can warn people in urban

  2. Corrosion characteristics of DMR-1700 steel and comparison with different steels in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurrappa, I.; Malakondaiah, G.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, a systematic corrosion study has been carried out on DMR-1700 steel to understand the protective nature of oxide scale that forms on its surface under marine environmental conditions. Further, the studies related to oxide scales as well as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of both stainless steels and widely used low alloy steel EN24 in marine environment have been studied for comparison purpose. The surface morphologies of corroded steels have been observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to understand the nature of corrosion. A high performance protective coating that has been developed for protection of low alloy steels DMR-1700 and EN24 against corrosion is presented after stressing the importance of surface engineering in enhancing the life of steels. Based on the studies with different techniques, DMR-1700 steel has been recommended for manufacture of components used in aerospace systems in association with appropriate protective coating for improving their efficiency

  3. Electrochemical and corrosion properties of carbon steel in simulated geological disposal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews electrochemical and corrosion studies on the application of carbon steel to an overpack container, which is used for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Deaerated alkaline Na 2 SO 4 -NaHCO 3 - NaCl solutions and bentonite soaked with the solutions are used as simulated geological disposal environments. Electrochemical studies show the corrosion of the steel in an early stage is the activation control. Corrosion rates are controlled by the composition of the solutions, alloying elements, and the structure of the steel. The rates decrease with time due to the formation of FeCO 3 (siderite) film on the steel. Immersion corrosion tests show general corrosion morphology. Average corrosion rates of long duration have been evaluated. Clear proofs of the initiation of localized corrosion, such as pitting, crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking, have not been reported. (author)

  4. Heating networks and domestic central heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamler, W; Wasilewski, W

    1976-08-01

    This is a comprehensive survey of the 26 contributions from 8 European countries submitted to the 3rd International District Heating Conference in Warsaw held on the subject 'Heating Networks and Domestic Central Heating Systems'. The contributions are grouped according to 8 groups of subjects: (1) heat carriers and their parameters; (2) system of heating networks; (3) calculation and optimization of heating networks; (4) construction of heating networks; (5) operation control and automation; (6) operational problems; (7) corrosion problems; and (8) methods of heat accounting.

  5. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  6. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  7. A simplified method of calculating heat flow through a two-phase heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohanis, Y.G. [Thermal Systems Engineering Group, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, Co Antrim, BT37 0QB Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: yg.yohanis@ulster.ac.uk; Popel, O.S. [Non-traditional Renewable Energy Sources, Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya str., IVTAN, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Frid, S.E. [Non-traditional Renewable Energy Sources, Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya str., IVTAN, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-01

    A simplified method of calculating the heat flow through a heat exchanger in which one or both heat carrying media are undergoing a phase change is proposed. It is based on enthalpies of the heat carrying media rather than their temperatures. The method enables the determination of the maximum rate of heat flow provided the thermodynamic properties of both heat-carrying media are known. There will be no requirement to separately simulate each part of the system or introduce boundaries within the heat exchanger if one or both heat-carrying media undergo a phase change. The model can be used at the pre-design stage, when the parameters of the heat exchangers may not be known, i.e., to carry out an assessment of a complex energy scheme such as a steam power plant. One such application of this model is in thermal simulation exercises within the TRNSYS modeling environment.

  8. A simplified method of calculating heat flow through a two-phase heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohanis, Y.G.; Popel, O.S.; Frid, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    A simplified method of calculating the heat flow through a heat exchanger in which one or both heat carrying media are undergoing a phase change is proposed. It is based on enthalpies of the heat carrying media rather than their temperatures. The method enables the determination of the maximum rate of heat flow provided the thermodynamic properties of both heat-carrying media are known. There will be no requirement to separately simulate each part of the system or introduce boundaries within the heat exchanger if one or both heat-carrying media undergo a phase change. The model can be used at the pre-design stage, when the parameters of the heat exchangers may not be known, i.e., to carry out an assessment of a complex energy scheme such as a steam power plant. One such application of this model is in thermal simulation exercises within the TRNSYS modeling environment

  9. Low grade waste heat recovery using heat pumps and power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.M. van de; Infante Ferreira, C.A.; Kiss, Anton A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal energy represents a large part of the global energy usage and about 43% of this energy is used for industrial applications. Large amounts are lost via exhaust gases, liquid streams and cooling water while the share of low temperature waste heat is the largest. Heat pumps upgrading waste heat to process heat and cooling and power cycles converting waste heat to electricity can make a strong impact in the related industries. The potential of several alternative technologies, either for the upgrading of low temperature waste heat such as compression-resorption, vapor compression and trans-critical heat pumps, or for the conversion of this waste heat by using organic Rankine, Kalina and trilateral cycle engines, are investigated with regards to energetic and economic performance by making use of thermodynamic models. This study focuses on temperature levels of 45–60 °C as at this temperature range large amounts of heat are rejected to the environment but also investigates the temperature levels for which power cycles become competitive. The heat pumps deliver 2.5–11 times more energy value than the power cycles in this low temperature range at equal waste heat input. Heat engines become competitive with heat pumps at waste heat temperatures at 100 °C and above. - Highlights: • Application of heat pump technology for heating and cooling. • Compression resorption heat pumps operating with large glides approaching 100 K. • Compression-resorption heat pumps with wet compression. • Potential to convert Industrial waste heat to power or high grade heat. • Comparison between low temperature power cycles and heat pumps

  10. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of the theory, design and manufacture of heat pipes and their applications. This latest edition has been thoroughly revised, up-dated and expanded to give an in-depth coverage of the new developments in the field. Significant new material has been added to all the chapters and the applications section has been totally rewritten to ensure that topical and important applications are appropriately emphasised. The bibliography has been considerably enlarged to incorporate much valuable new information. Thus readers of the previous edition, which has established

  11. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostatni, A.W.; Dostatni, Michel.

    1976-01-01

    In the main patent, a description was given of a heat exchanger with an exchange surface in preformed sheet metal designed for the high pressure and temperature service particularly encountered in nuclear pressurized water reactors and which is characterised by the fact that it is composed of at least one exchanger bundle sealed in a containment, the said bundle or bundles being composed of numerous juxtaposed individual compartments whose exchange faces are built of preformed sheet metal. The present addendun certificate concerns shapes of bundles and their positioning methods in the exchanger containment enabling its compactness to be increased [fr

  12. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  13. Low temperature nuclear heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotakorpi, J.; Tarjanne, R. [comps.

    1977-08-01

    The meeting was concerned with the use of low grade nuclear heat for district heating, desalination, process heat, and agriculture and aquaculture. The sessions covered applications and demand, heat sources, and economics.

  14. Radiofrequency plasma heating: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The conference proceedings include sessions on Alfven Wave Heating, ICRF Heating and Current Drive, Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive, and ECRF Heating. Questions of confinement, diagnostics, instabilities and technology are considered. Individual papers are cataloged separately

  15. Experimental study on heat pipe assisted heat exchanger used for industrial waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Hongting; Yin, Lihui; Shen, Xiaopeng; Lu, Wenqian; Sun, Yuexia; Zhang, Yufeng; Deng, Na

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) was used to recycle the waste heat in a slag cooling process of steel industry. • An specially designed on-line cleaning device was construed and used to enhance the heat transfer of HPHE. • The performance characteristics of a HPHE has been assessed by integrating the first and second law of thermodynamics. • The optimum operation conditions was determined by integrating the first and the second law of thermodynamics. - Abstract: Steel industry plays an important role economically in China. A great amount of hot waste liquids and gases are discharged into environment during many steelmaking processes. These waste liquids and gases have crucial energy saving potential, especially for steel slag cooling process. It could be possible to provide energy saving by employing a waste heat recovery system (WHRS). The optimum operation condition was assessed by integrating the first and the second law of thermodynamics for a water–water heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) for a slag cooling process in steel industry. The performance characteristics of a HPHE has been investigated experimentally by analyzing heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient, effectiveness, exergy efficiency and number of heat transfer units (NTU). A specially designed on-line cleaning device was used to clean the heat exchange tubes and enhance heat transfer. The results indicated that the exergy efficiency increased with the increment of waste water mass flow rate at constant fresh water mass flow rate, while the effectiveness decreased at the same operation condition. As the waste water mass flow rate varied from 0.83 m"3/h to 1.87 m"3/h, the effectiveness and exergy efficiency varied from 0.19 to 0.09 and from 34% to 41%, respectively. In the present work, the optimal flow rates of waste water and fresh water were 1.20 m"3/h and 3.00 m"3/h, respectively. The on-line cleaning device had an obvious effect on the heat transfer, by performing

  16. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  17. Standard monitoring system for domestic heat pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, C.P.J.M.; Oostendorp, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the years to come many domestic heat pump systems are to be installed in the Netherlands. The Dutch agency for energy and environment, NOVEM, and the association of energy utility companies, EnergieNed, give high priority to the monitoring of heat pump systems. The results of the projects,

  18. Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems. Part two

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Kwan Woo; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    Control of the heating and cooling system needs to be able to maintain the indoor temperatures within the comfort range under the varying internal loads and external climates. To maintain a stable thermal environment, the control system needs to maintain the balance between the heat gain...

  19. MODELING THE CORROSION OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAINERS CAM-CRM INTERFACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOSEPH C. FARMER, PETER J. BEDROSSIAN, R. DANIEL MCCRIGHT

    1998-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel400. Initially, the containers will be hot and dry due to the heat generated by radioactive decay. However, the temperature will eventually drop to levels where both humid air and aqueous phase corrosion will be possible. As the outer barrier is penetrated, uniform corrosion of the CRM will be possible in exfoliated areas. The possibility for crevice formation between the CAM and CRM will also exist. In the case of either Alloy 625 or C-22, a crevice will have to form before significant penetration of the CRM can occur. Crevice corrosion of the CRMs has been well documented. Lillard and Scully have induced crevice corrosion in Alloy 625 during exposure to artificial sea water. Jones and Wilde have prepared simulated crevice solutions of FeCl 2 , NiCl 2 and CrCl 3 , and measured substantial pH suppression. Asphahani measured the dissolution rates of Alloys 625 and C-22 in such artificial crevice solutions at various temperatures. Others have observed no significant localized attack in less severe environments

  20. Features of an emergency heat-conducting path in reactors about lead-bismuth and lead heat-carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Bokova, T.A.; Molodtsov, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor emergency heat removal systems should transfer heat from the surface of reactor core fuel element claddings to the primary circuit followed by heat transfer to the environment. One suggests three design approaches for emergency heat removal systems in lead-bismuth and lead cooled reactor circuits that take account of the peculiar nature of their features. Application of the discussed systems for emergency heat removal improves safety of lead-bismuth and lead cooled reactor plants [ru

  1. Split heat pipe heat recovery system

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of a split heat pipe heat recovery system. The analysis is based on an Effectiveness-NTU approach to deduce its heat transfer characteristics. In this study the variation of overall effectiveness of heat recovery with the number of transfer units are presented. Copyright , Manchester University Press.

  2. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  3. Dual source heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  4. Proposal for a district heat supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alefeld, G.

    1976-01-01

    A district heating scheme is proposed which makes it possible to use the waste heat from power stations for the supply of households and industry. The heat is stored by evaporation of ammonia salts or liquids with dissolved salts. Both substances are transported on existing rail- or waterways to heating stations near the consumers, and the heat recovered by reaction of the two components. Then the product of reaction is transported back to the power stations, and reactivated by heat again. Based on a cost estimation, it can be shown that the proposed heat transport with heat trains or ships, at distances up to 100 km, results in heat costs which are to-day already below that of heat from fuel oil. The investment required for the heat transport system is unusually low due to the use of transport ways which already exist. The district heating system is not only favourable in respect of the environment, but actually reduces its present strain, both at the consumer and at the power stations. The technical advantages of the suggested concept, especially the possibility of introducing it in stages, are discussed. The consequences for the national economy regarding the safety of supply and the trade balance, as well as for the public transport undertakings, are obvious, and therefore not included in the paper. (orig.) [de

  5. Heat stress and strain in exercise and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherhood, John R

    2008-01-01

    Heat stress arising from the thermal environment is of concern to sports medicine and to sports administration because of the perceived risk of heat casualties, in particular heat stroke. Many sports organizations recommend environmental indices such as the WBGT for assessing risk and setting environmental limits for training and competition. But the limits are not justified by evidence. This article describes the nature of heat stress in sport and how it may be assessed objectively. Heat stress and the principal human responses to exercise heat stress are reviewed briefly. Metabolic heat production and the thermal environment provoke separate and largely independent physiological strains. Metabolic heat production drives body core temperature, and the thermal environment drives skin temperature; the combined stresses are integrated to drive sweat rate. Control of core temperature depends on adequate sweat production and the capacity of the environment to evaporate the sweat. The nature of exercise heat stress is demonstrated by rational analysis of the physical heat exchanges between the body and the environment. The principles of this analysis are applied to critical review of current practice in the assessment of heat stress in sport. The article concludes with discussion of research to establish methods for objective sport-specific assessment of heat stress.

  6. Heat pipes in modern heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Leonard L.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are very flexible systems with regard to effective thermal control. They can easily be implemented as heat exchangers inside sorption and vapour-compression heat pumps, refrigerators and other types of heat transfer devices. Their heat transfer coefficient in the evaporator and condenser zones is 10 3 -10 5 W/m 2 K, heat pipe thermal resistance is 0.01-0.03 K/W, therefore leading to smaller area and mass of heat exchangers. Miniature and micro heat pipes are welcomed for electronic components cooling and space two-phase thermal control systems. Loop heat pipes, pulsating heat pipes and sorption heat pipes are the novelty for modern heat exchangers. Heat pipe air preheaters are used in thermal power plants to preheat the secondary-primary air required for combustion of fuel in the boiler using the energy available in exhaust gases. Heat pipe solar collectors are promising for domestic use. This paper reviews mainly heat pipe developments in the Former Soviet Union Countries. Some new results obtained in USA and Europe are also included

  7. High resolution heat atlases for demand and supply mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd; Nielsen, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Significant reductions of heat demand, low-carbon and renewable energy sources, and district heating are key elements in 100% renewable energy systems. Appraisal of district heating along with energy efficient buildings and individual heat supply requires a geographical representation of heat...... demand, energy efficiency and energy supply. The present paper describes a Heat Atlas built around a spatial database using geographical information systems (GIS). The present atlas allows for per-building calculations of potentials and costs of energy savings, connectivity to existing district heat......, and current heat supply and demand. For the entire building mass a conclusive link is established between the built environment and its heat supply. The expansion of district heating; the interconnection of distributed district heating systems; or the question whether to invest in ultra-efficient buildings...

  8. Critical heat flux, post dry-out and their augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A.

    1999-01-01

    The report shows the state of art review on the critical heat flux and the post-dryout heat transfer. The work, which is a merge of original researches carried out at the Institute of Thermal Fluid Dynamic of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) and a thorough review of the recent literature, is divided in four chapters: critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling; critical heat flux in saturated flow boiling; post-dryout heat transfer; enhancement of critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer [it

  9. β-adrenergic blockade does not impair the skin blood flow sensitivity to local heating in burned and non-burned skin under neutral and hot environments in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; McEntire, Serina J.; Herndon, David N.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Tested the hypothesis that propranolol, a drug given to burn patients to reduce hypermetabolism/cardiac stress, may inhibit heat dissipation by changing the sensitivity of skin blood flow (SkBF) to local heating under neutral and hot conditions. Methods In a randomized double-blind study, a placebo was given to 8 burned children while propranolol was given to 13 burned children with similar characteristics (mean ± SD: 11.9±3y, 147±20cm, 45±23kg, 56±12% TBSA). Non-burned children (n=13, 11.4±3y, 152±15cm, 52±13kg) served as healthy controls. A progressive local heating protocol characterized SkBF responses in burned and unburned skin and non-burned control skin under the two environmental conditions (23°C and 34°C) via laser-Doppler flowmetry. Results Resting SkBF was greater in burned and unburned skin compared to the non-burned control (main effect: skin, Pburned; 38±36 unburned vs 9±8 control %SkBFmax). No difference was found for maximal SkBF capacity to local heating between groups. Additionally, dose response curves for the sensitivity of SkBF to local heating were not different among burned or unburned skin, and non-burned control skin (EC50, P>0.05) under either condition. Conclusion Therapeutic propranolol does not negatively affect SkBF under neutral or hot environmental conditions and further compromise temperature regulation in burned children. PMID:28071840

  10. HEATING-7, Multidimensional Finite-Difference Heat Conduction Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HEATING 7.2i and 7.3 are the most recent developments in a series of heat-transfer codes and obsolete all previous versions distributed by RSICC as SCA-1/HEATING5 and PSR-199/HEATING 6. Note that Unix and PC versions of HEATING7 are available in the CCC-545/SCALE 4.4 package. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat- generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a run-time memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. In June 1997 HEATING 7.3 was added to the HEATING 7.2i packages, and the Unix and PC versions of both 7.2i and 7.3 were merged into one package. HEATING 7.3 is being released as a beta-test version; therefore, it does not entirely replace HEATING 7.2i. There is no published documentation for HEATING 7.3; but a listing of input specifications, which reflects changes for 7.3, is included in the PSR-199 documentation. For 3-D

  11. Development of a nonazeotropic heat pump for crew hygiene water heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David H.; Deming, Glenn I.

    1991-01-01

    A heat pump system is currently under development to produce hot water for crew hygiene on future manned space missions. The heat pump uses waste heat sources and a nonazeotropic working fluid in a highly efficient cycle. The potential benefits include a reduction in peak power draw from 2 to 5 kW for electric cartridge heaters to just more than 100 W for the heat pump. As part of the heat pump development project, a unique high efficiency compressor was developed to maintain lubrication in a zero-gravity environment.

  12. Research status and evaluation system of heat source evaluation method for central heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutong; Qi, Junfeng; Cao, Yi

    2018-02-01

    The central heating boiler room is a regional heat source heating center. It is also a kind of the urban environment pollution, it is an important section of building energy efficiency. This article through to the evaluation method of central heating boiler room and overviews of the researches during domestic and overseas, summarized the main influence factors affecting energy consumption of industrial boiler under the condition of stable operation. According to the principle of establishing evaluation index system. We can find that is great significance in energy saving and environmental protection for the content of the evaluation index system of the centralized heating system.

  13. Heat pipe heat exchanger for heat recovery in air conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Baky, Mostafa A.; Mohamed, Mousa M. [Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Minufiya University, Shebin El-Kom (Egypt)

    2007-03-15

    The heat pipe heat exchangers are used in heat recovery applications to cool the incoming fresh air in air conditioning applications. Two streams of fresh and return air have been connected with heat pipe heat exchanger to investigate the thermal performance and effectiveness of heat recovery system. Ratios of mass flow rate between return and fresh air of 1, 1.5 and 2.3 have been adapted to validate the heat transfer and the temperature change of fresh air. Fresh air inlet temperature of 32-40{sup o}C has been controlled, while the inlet return air temperature is kept constant at about 26{sup o}C. The results showed that the temperature changes of fresh and return air are increased with the increase of inlet temperature of fresh air. The effectiveness and heat transfer for both evaporator and condenser sections are also increased to about 48%, when the inlet fresh air temperature is increased to 40{sup o}C. The effect of mass flow rate ratio on effectiveness is positive for evaporator side and negative for condenser side. The enthalpy ratio between the heat recovery and conventional air mixing is increased to about 85% with increasing fresh air inlet temperature. The optimum effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger is estimated and compared with the present experimental data. The results showed that the effectiveness is close to the optimum effectiveness at fresh air inlet temperature near the fluid operating temperature of heat pipes. (author)

  14. Nonazeotropic Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealker, David H.; Deming, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    Heat pump collects heat from water circulating in heat-rejection loop, raises temperature of collected heat, and transfers collected heat to water in separate pipe. Includes sealed motor/compressor with cooling coils, evaporator, and condenser, all mounted in outer housing. Gradients of temperature in evaporator and condenser increase heat-transfer efficiency of vapor-compression cycle. Intended to recover relatively-low-temperature waste heat and use it to make hot water.

  15. Heat transfer: Pittsburgh 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: Process Heat Transfer; Thermal Hydraulics and Phase Change Phenomena; Analysis of Multicomponent Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer in Advanced Reactors; General Heat Transfer in Solar Energy; Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; High Temperature Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer Aspects of Severe Reactor Accidents; Hazardous Waste On-Site Disposal; and General Papers

  16. Industrial waste heat for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitner, K.L.; Brooks, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    Presents 2 bounding evaluations of industrial waste heat availability. Surveys waste heat from 29 major industry groups at the 2-digit level in Standard Industrial Codes (SIC). Explains that waste heat availability in each industry was related to regional product sales, in order to estimate regional waste heat availability. Evaluates 4 selected industries at the 4-digit SIC level. Finds that industrial waste heat represents a significant energy resource in several urban areas, including Chicago and Los Angeles, where it could supply all of these areas residential heating and cooling load. Points out that there is a strong need to evaluate the available waste heat for more industries at the 4-digit level. Urges further studies to identify other useful industrial waste heat sources as well as potential waste heat users

  17. Automation of heating system with heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdin, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Because of high prices of energy, we are upgrading our heating systems with newer, more fuel efficient heating devices. Each new device has its own control system, which operates independently from other devices in a heating system. With a relatively low investment costs in automation, we can group devices in one central control system and increase the energy efficiency of a heating system. In this project, we show how to connect an oil furnace, a sanitary heat pump, solar panels and a heat p...

  18. Intermittent heating of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohonen, K

    1983-02-01

    Conditions for intermittent heating of buildings are considered both theoretically and experimentally. Thermal behaviour of buildings adn rooms in intermittent heating is simulated by a program based on the convective heat balance equation and by simplified RC-models. The preheat times and the heating energy savings compared with continuous heating are presented for typical lightweight, mediumweight and heavyweight classroom and office modules. Formulaes for estimating the oversizing of the radiator network, the maximum heat output of heat exchangers in district heating and the efficiency of heating boilers in intermittent heating are presented. The preheat times and heating energy savings with different heating control systems are determined also experimentally in eight existing buildings. In addition some principles for the planning and application of intermittent heating systems are suggested.

  19. Heat pump technology

    CERN Document Server

    Von Cube, Hans Ludwig; Goodall, E G A

    2013-01-01

    Heat Pump Technology discusses the history, underlying concepts, usage, and advancements in the use of heat pumps. The book covers topics such as the applications and types of heat pumps; thermodynamic principles involved in heat pumps such as internal energy, enthalpy, and exergy; and natural heat sources and energy storage. Also discussed are topics such as the importance of the heat pump in the energy industry; heat pump designs and systems; the development of heat pumps over time; and examples of practical everyday uses of heat pumps. The text is recommended for those who would like to kno

  20. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  1. Future heat supply of our cities. Heating by waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachetti, H E [Stadtwerke Hannover A.G. (Germany, F.R.); Technische Univ. Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1976-08-01

    The energy-price crisis resulted in structural changes of the complete energy supply and reactivated the question of energy management with respect to the optimum solution of meeting the energy requirements for space heating. Condensation power plants are increasingly replaced by thermal stations, the waste heat of which is used as so-called district heat. Thermal power stations must be situated close to urban areas. The problem of emission of harmful materials can partly be overcome by high-level emission. The main subject of the article, however, is the problem of conducting and distributing the heat. The building costs of heat pipeline systems and the requirements to be met by heat pipelines such as strength, heat insulation and protection against humidity and ground water are investigated.

  2. Development of a pencil-type single shield graphite quasi-adiabatic calorimeter and comparison of its performance with a double-shield graphite calorimeter for the measurement of nuclear heat deposition rate in a fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneja, O.P.; Rosselet, M.; Ligou, J.; Gardel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, heat deposition rate measurements were reported that used a quasi-adiabatic double-shield graphite calorimeter. It was found that for a better understanding of nuclear heating due to incident radiation, having a calorimeter that could be conveniently moved axially and radially inside large material blocks would be advisable. Here, a simpler design, based on three elements, i.e., core, jacket, and shield is conceived. The fabrication and testing details are presented, and the performance of the current calorimeter is compared with a double-shield calorimeter under similar conditions. Such a system is found to be extremely sensitive and can be employed successfully at the LOTUS facility for future nuclear heat deposition rate measurements in large blocks of materials. The current design paves the way for the convenient testing of a large amount of kerma factor data required for constructing future fusion machines. The same configuration with minor changes can be extended to most of the fusion materials of interest. The core of the new calorimeter measures 11 mm in diameter and height and has overall dimensions of 24 mm in diameter and 180 mm in height. The response of the calorimeter is measured by placing it in front of the Haefely neutron generator. 12 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Heat-Related Illnesses Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at ... about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the ...

  4. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Heat-Related Illnesses Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at ... about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the ...

  5. Heat exposure on farmers in northeast Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Kwasi; Van Etten E J, Eddie; Oosthuzien, Jacques; Fannam Nunfam, Victor

    2017-03-01

    Environmental health hazards faced by farmers, such as exposure to extreme heat stress, are a growing concern due to global climate change, particularly in tropical developing countries. In such environments, farmers are considered to be a population at risk of environmental heat exposure. The situation is exacerbated due to their farming methods that involve the use of primitive equipment and hard manual labour conducted in full sunshine under hot and humid conditions. However, there is inadequate information about the extent of heat exposure to such farmers, both at the household and farm levels. This paper presents results from a study assessing environmental heat exposure on rural smallholder farmers in Bawku East, Northern Ghana. From January to December 2013, Lascar USB temperature and humidity sensors and a calibrated Questemp heat stress monitor were deployed to farms and homes of rural farmers at Pusiga in Bawku East to capture farmers' exposure to heat stress in both their living and working environments as they executed regular farming routines. The Lascar sensors have the capability to frequently, accurately and securely measure temperature and humidity over long periods. The Questemp heat stress monitor was placed in the same vicinity and showed strong correlations to Lascar sensors in terms of derived values of wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). The WBGT in the working environment of farmers peaked at 33.0 to 38.1 °C during the middle of the day in the rainy season from March to October and dropped to 14.0-23.7 °C in the early morning during this season. A maximum hourly WBGT of 28.9-37.5 °C (March-October) was recorded in the living environment of farmers, demonstrating little relief from heat exposure during the day. With these levels of heat stress, exposed farmers conducting physically demanding outdoor work risk suffering serious health consequences. The sustainability of manual farming practices is also under threat by such high levels of

  6. A high molybdenum stainless steel and its resistance to chloride environments in the welded condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppolecchia, V.D.; Jasner, M.; Rockel, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels, such as 1925 hMo UNS N08925 with 6 percent molybdenum, are finding widespread use in high chloride cooling water and process environments. This alloy has good general corrosion resistance to a variety of chloride environments but it's main attraction is excellent resistance to all forms of localized corrosion. In aggressive chloride environments weldments are generally the area of concern with regard to localized corrosion. Temperature-time-sensitization diagrams are presented that demonstrate the resistance of 1925 hMo weldments to intergranular attack. Immersion tests in 10% ferric chloride substantiate that autogenous tube welds, also have excellent pitting resistance. Various filler metals are compared both electrochemically and in immersion tests. These comparisons reveal that an overalloyed filler metal is required to achieve pitting and crevice corrosion resistance equal or better than that of the base metal. Alloy 625 (UNS NO6625) has been selected. Constant extension rate tests in boiling 62% calcium chloride reveal that 1925 hMo weldments are immune to stress corrosion cracking in this environment which virtually guarantees absence of SCC in seawater regardless of temperature as well as in most commercial chemical environments

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  8. Heat Related Illnesses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carter, R; Cheuvront, S. N; Sawka, M. N

    2006-01-01

    .... The risk of serious heat illness can be markedly reduced by implementing a variety of countermeasures, including becoming acclimated to the heat, managing heat stress exposure, and maintaining hydration...

  9. Heat Roadmap Europe 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2012-01-01

    Heat Roadmap Europe (Pre-study 1) investigates the role of district heating in the EU27 energy system by mapping local conditions across Europe, identifying the potential for district heating expansion, and subsequently simulating the potential resource in an hourly model of the EU27 energy system....... In 2010, approximately 12% of the space heating demand in Europe is met by district heating, but in this study four alternative scenarios are considered for the EU27 energy system: 1. 2010 with 30% district heating 2. 2010 with 50% district heating 3. 2030 with 30% district heating 4. 2050 with 50......% district heating These scenarios are investigated in two steps. Firstly, district heating replaces individual boilers by converting condensing power plants to combined heat and power plants (CHP) to illustrate how district heating improves the overall efficiency of the energy system. In the second step...

  10. Multidimensional Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of multidimensional heat conduction. General heat conduction equation in three dimensions. Steay state, analytical solutions. The Laplace equation. Method of separation of variables. Principle of superposition. Shape factors. Transient, multidimensional heat conduction....

  11. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  12. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.; Mazzitelli, G.

    1984-01-01

    The article is a rather detailed report on the highlights in the area of the ''Heating in toroidal plasmas'', as derived from the presentations and discussions at the international symposium with the same name, held in Rome, March 1984. The symposium covered both the physics (experiments and theory) and technology of toroidal fusion plasma heating. Both large fusion devices (either already in operation or near completion) requiring auxiliary heating systems at the level of tens of megawatts, as well as physics of their heating processes and their induced side effects (as studied on smaller devices), received attention. Substantial progress was reported on the broad front of auxiliary plasma heating and Ohmic heating. The presentation of the main conclusions of the symposium is divided under the following topics: neutral-beam heating, Alfven wave heating, ion cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating, RF current drive, electron cyclotron heating, Ohmic heating and special contributions

  13. MHTGR inherent heat transfer capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkoe, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the Commercial Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) which achieves improved reactor safety performance and reliability by utilizing a completely passive natural convection cooling system called the RCCS to remove decay heat in the event that all active cooling systems fail to operate. For the highly improbable condition that the RCCS were to become non-functional following a reactor depressurization event, the plant would be forced to rely upon its inherent thermo-physical characteristics to reject decay heat to the surrounding earth and ambient environment. A computational heat transfer model was created to simulate such a scenario. Plant component temperature histories were computed over a period of 20 days into the event. The results clearly demonstrate the capability of the MHTGR to maintain core integrity and provide substantial lead time for taking corrective measures

  14. Rail assembly for use in a radioactive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    An improved rail assembly and method of construction thereof is disclosed herein that is particularly adapted for use with a crane trolley in a hot cell environment which is exposed to airborne and liquidborne radioactive contaminants. The rail assembly is generally comprised of a support wall having an elongated, rail-housing recess having a floor, side wall and ceiling. The floor of the recess is defined at least in party by the load-bearing surface of a rail, and is substantially flat, level and crevice-free to facilitate the drainage of liquids out of the recess. The ceiling of the recess overhangs and thereby captures trolley wheels within the recess to prevent them from becoming dislodged from the recess during a seismic disturbance. Finally, the interior of the recess includes a power track having a slot for receiving a sliding electrical connector from the crane trolley. The power track is mounted in an upper corner of the recess with its connector-receiving groove oriented downwardly to facilitate the drainage of liquidborne contaminants and to discourage the collection of airborne contaminants within the track

  15. Impact of heat treatment on surface chemistry of Al-coated Eurofer for application as anti-corrosion and T-permeation barriers in a flowing Pb-15.7Li environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konys, J., E-mail: juergen.konys@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Krauss, W.; Holstein, N.; Lorenz, J.; Wulf, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bhanumurthy, K. [Scientific Information Resource Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electro-chemical Al deposition is industrially relevant for barrier formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al scales have to be converted into protective layers by heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology of scales depend on deposition parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid state diffusion step at 640 Degree-Sign C avoids critical Al melting and activates steel surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} protective scales detected. - Abstract: The compatibility testing of Eurofer steel in flowing Pb-15.7Li has shown that corrosion attack is a serious concern at least under view of precipitate formation from dissolved steel components in cooler system sections, leading to a high risk of tube blockages. Additionally, the T-permeation from the liquid breeder through the steel structure into the He-cooling system is an important safety issue. Both topics may be reduced by the application of barriers. Hot dip aluminization (HDA) showed that Al scales exhibit such ability but claimed also the development of improved coating technologies. Thus, two electro-chemically-based deposition processes, which exhibit industrial relevance and adjustable layer thickness of deposited Al, were developed, tested and characterized. Both are working with water-free electrolytes of toluene or ionic liquid (IL) base near room temperature (RT). The successfully deposited homogeneous layers need a heat treatment to establish the required protective/functional properties. During this stage, the Al reacts with the steel and forms an Al-enriched zone with a thin protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface scale. However, the topology is rough and pores are visible. Thus, for optimization of surface structure and scale quality, investigations concerning the required heat treatment were performed including effects coming from the applied coating technology.

  16. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  17. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Andrei; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Averfalk, Helge

    2017-01-01

    The Heat Roadmap Europe (HRE) studies estimated a potential increase of the district heating (DH) share to 50% of the entire heat demand by 2050, with approximately 25–30% of it being supplied using large-scale electric heat pumps. This study builds on this potential and aims to document that suc......The Heat Roadmap Europe (HRE) studies estimated a potential increase of the district heating (DH) share to 50% of the entire heat demand by 2050, with approximately 25–30% of it being supplied using large-scale electric heat pumps. This study builds on this potential and aims to document...

  18. Heat transfer characteristics and operation limit of pressurized hybrid heat pipe for small modular reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performances and operation limits of hybrid heat pipe were experimentally studied. • Models for predicting the operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe was developed. • Non-condensable gas affected heat transfer characteristics of the hybrid heat pipe. - Abstract: In this paper, a hybrid heat pipe is proposed for use in advanced nuclear power plants as a passive heat transfer device. The hybrid heat pipe combines the functions of a heat pipe and a control rod to simultaneously remove the decay heat generated from the core and shutdown the reactor under accident conditions. Thus, the hybrid heat pipe contains a neutron absorber in the evaporator section, which corresponds to the core of the reactor pressure vessel. The presence of the neutron absorber material leads to differences in the heated diameter and hydraulic diameter of the heat pipe. The cross-sectional areas of the vapor paths through the evaporator, adiabatic, and condenser sections are also different. The hybrid heat pipe must operate in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment to remove the decay heat. In other words, the operating pressure must be higher than those of the commercially available thermosyphons. Hence, the thermal performances, including operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe, were experimentally studied in the operating pressure range of 0.2–20 bar. The operating pressure of the hybrid heat pipe was controlled by charging the non-condensable gas which is unused method to achieve the high saturation pressure in conventional thermosyphons. The effect of operating pressure on evaporation heat transfer was negligible, while condensation heat transfer was affected by the amount of non-condensable gas in the test section. The operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe increased with the operating pressure. Maximum heat removal capacity of the hybrid heat pipe was up to 6 kW which is meaningful value as a passive decay heat removal device in the nuclear power

  19. Development of novel protective high temperature coatings on heat exchanger steels and their corrosion resistance in simulated coal firing environment; Developpement de revetements pour les aciers d'echangeurs thermiques et amelioration de leur resistance a la corrosion en environnement simulant les fumees de combustion et de charbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohr, V.

    2005-10-15

    Improving the efficiencies of thermal power plants requires an increase of the operating temperatures and thus of the corrosion resistance of heat exchanger materials. Therefore, the present study aimed at developing protective coatings using the pack cementation process. Two types of heat exchanger steels were investigated: a 17% Cr-13% Ni austenitic steel and three ferritic-martensitic steels with 9 (P91 and P92) and 12% Cr (HCM12A). The austenitic steel was successfully aluminized at 950 C. For the ferritic-martensitic steels, the pack cementation temperature was decreased down to 650 C, in order to maintain their initial microstructure. Two types of aluminides, made of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl, were developed. A mechanism of the coating formation at low temperature is proposed. Furthermore, combining the pack cementation with the conventional heat treatment of P91 allowed to take benefit of higher temperatures for the deposition of a two-step Cr+Al coating. The corrosion resistance of coated and uncoated steels is compared in simulated coal firing environment for durations up to 2000 h between 650 and 700 C. It is shown that the coatings offer a significant corrosion protection and, thus, an increase of the component lifetime. Finally, the performance of coated 9-12% Cr steels is no longer limited by corrosion but by interdiffusion between the coating and the substrate. (author)

  20. Heat pumps in district heating networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Wiebke Brix; Elmegaard, Brian

    constraints limit the power plants. Efficient heat pumps can be used to decouple the constraints of electricity and heat production, while maintaining the high energy efficiency needed to match the politically agreed carbon emission goals. The requirements in terms of COP, location, capacity and economy...... and strategic planning in the energy sector. The paper presents a case study of optimal implementation of heat pumps in the present energy system of the Copenhagen area. By introduction of the correct capacity of heat pumps, a 1,6 % reduction in fuel consumption for electricity and heat production can...

  1. Corrosion of well casings in compressed air energy storage environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, R.P.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine corrosive effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) environments on several well casing materials to aid in material selections. A literature search on corrosion behavior of well casing material in similar environments revealed that corrosion rates of 0.20 to 0.25 mm/y might be expected. This information was employed in designing the laboratory study. Unstressed electrically isolate samples of various carbon steels were autoclaved at varying humidities, temperatures, and exposure durations to simulate anticipated environments in the well bore during CAES operation. All compressed air tests were run at 12.1 MPa. Temperatures varied from 323/sup 0/K to 573/sup 0/K, and humidity varied from 100% to completely dry air. The effects of salts in the humidified air were also studied. Results indicated that typical well casings of carbon steel as used in oil, gas, and water production wells adequately withstand the anticipated CAES reservoir environment. An acceptable corrosion rate arrived at by these laboratory simulations was between 0.0015 and 0.15 mm/y. Corrosion was caused by metal oxidation that formed a protective scale of iron oxide. Higher temperatures, humidity rates, or salinity content of the humid air increased corrosion. Corrosion also increased on a metal coupon in contact with a sandstone sample, possibly due to crevice corrosion. For each of these factors either singularly or collectively, the increased corrosion rates were still acceptable with the maximum measured at 0.15 mm/y. When coupons were reused in an identical test, the corrosion rates increased beyond the anticipated values that had been determined by extrapolation from one-time runs. Fine cracking of the protective scale probably occurred due to thermal variations, resulting in increased corrosion rates and a greater potential for particulates, which could plug the reservoir.

  2. Solar heat storages in district heating networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellehauge, K. (Ellehauge og Kildemoes, AArhus (DK)); Engberg Pedersen, T. (COWI A/S, Kgs. Lyngby (DK))

    2007-07-15

    This report gives information on the work carried out and the results obtained in Denmark on storages for large solar heating plants in district heating networks. Especially in Denmark the share of district heating has increased to a large percentage. In 1981 around 33% of all dwellings in DK were connected to a district heating network, while the percentage in 2006 was about 60% (in total 1.5 mio. dwellings). In the report storage types for short term storage and long term storages are described. Short term storages are done as steel tanks and is well established technology widely used in district heating networks. Long term storages are experimental and used in connection with solar heating. A number of solar heating plants have been established with either short term or long term storages showing economy competitive with normal energy sources. Since, in the majority of the Danish district heating networks the heat is produced in co-generation plants, i.e. plants producing both electricity and heat for the network, special attention has been put on the use of solar energy in combination with co-generation. Part of this report describes that in the liberalized electricity market central solar heating plants can also be advantageous in combination with co-generation plants. (au)

  3. Heat pipes for ground heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, L L

    1988-01-01

    Different versions of heat pipe ground heating and cooling devices are considered. Solar energy, biomass, ground stored energy, recovered heat of industrial enterprises and ambient cold air are used as energy and cold sources. Heat pipe utilization of air in winter makes it possible to design accumulators of cold and ensures deep freezing of ground in order to increase its mechanical strength when building roadways through the swamps and ponds in Siberia. Long-term underground heat storage systems are considered, in which the solar and biomass energy is accumulated and then transferred to heat dwellings and greenhouses, as well as to remove snow from roadways with the help of heat pipes and solar collectors.

  4. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Lund, Henrik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2014-01-01

    compared to 1990 levels. None of these scenarios involve the large-scale implementation of district heating, but instead they focus on the electrification of the heating sector (primarily using heat pumps) and/or the large-scale implementation of electricity and heat savings. In this paper, the potential...... for district heating in the EU between now and 2050 is identified, based on extensive and detailed mapping of the EU heat demand and various supply options. Subsequently, a new ‘district heating plus heat savings’ scenario is technically and economically assessed from an energy systems perspective. The results...... indicate that with district heating, the EU energy system will be able to achieve the same reductions in primary energy supply and carbon dioxide emissions as the existing alternatives proposed. However, with district heating these goals can be achieved at a lower cost, with heating and cooling costs...

  5. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kenneth; Connolly, David; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The cost of heat savings in buildings increase as more heat savings are achieved due to the state of the building stock and hence, alternatives other than savings typically become more economically feasible at a certain level of heat reductions. It is important to identify when the cost of heat...... savings become more expensive than the cost of sustainable heat supply, so society does not overinvest in heat saving measures. This study first investigates the heat saving potentials for different countries in Europe, along with their associated costs, followed by a comparison with alternative ways...... of supplying sustainable heating. Different heat production options are included in terms of individual and community heating systems. Furthermore, the levelised cost of supplying sustainable heat is estimated for both a single technology and from an energy system perspective. The results are analysed...

  6. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This document is a summary of the key technical inputs for the modelling of the heat strategy for Europe outlined in the latest Heat Roadmap Europe studies [1, 2]. These studies quantify the impact of alternative heating strategies for Europe in 2030 and 2050. The study is based on geographical...... information systems (GIS) and energy system analyses. In this report, the inputs for other modelling tools such as PRIMES are presented, in order to enable other researches to generate similar heating scenarios for Europe. Although Heat Roadmap Europe presents a complete heat strategy for Europe, which...... includes energy efficiency, individual heating units (such as boilers and heat pumps), and heat networks, the recommendations here are primarily relating to the potential and modelling of district heating. Although other solutions will play a significant role in decarbonising the heating and cooling sector...

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of waste heat power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jiangfeng; Xu, Mingtian; Cheng, Lin

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, a waste heat power generation system is analyzed based on the criteria with and without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment. For the criteria without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment, the first- and second-law efficiencies display different tendencies with the variations of some system parameters. When the heat/exergy loss to the environment is taken into consideration, the first and second law efficiencies display the same tendency. Thus, choosing the appropriate expressions for the performance criteria is crucial for the optimization design of the waste heat power generation system. It is found that there are two approaches to improving the system performance: one is to improve the heat/exergy input; the other is to enhance the heat-work conversion ability of the system. The former would deteriorate the environment if the heat-work conversion ability of the system remains unchanged; the latter could reduce the environmental impact but it's restricted by the heat/exergy input. Therefore, the optimal operation condition should be achieved at the trade-off between the heat/exergy input and the heat-work conversion ability of the system.

  8. Biofuelled heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliksson, Hans; Wennerstaal, L.; Zethraeus, B.; Johansson, Bert-Aake

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to serve as a basis to enable establishment and operation of small and medium-sized bio-fuel plants, district heating plants and local district heating plants. Furthermore, the purpose of this report is to serve as a guideline and basis when realizing projects, from the first concept to established plant. Taking into account all the phases, from selection of heating system, fuel type, selection of technical solutions, authorization request or application to operate a plant, planning, construction and buying, inspection, performance test, take-over and control system of the plant. Another purpose of the report is to make sure that best available technology is used and to contribute to continuous development of the technology. The report deals mainly with bio-fuelled plants in the effect range 0.3 to10 MW. The term 'plant' refers to combined power and heating plants as well as 'simpler' district heating plants. The last-mentioned is also often referred to as 'local heating plant'. In this context, the term bio fuel refers to a wide range of fuel types. The term bio fuel includes processed fractions like powders, pellets, and briquettes along with unprocessed fractions, such as by-products from the forest industry; chips and bark. Bio fuels also include straw, energy crops and cereal waste products, but these have not been expressly studied in this report. The report is structured with appendixes regarding the various phases of the projects, with the purpose of serving as a helping handbook, or manual for new establishment, helping out with technical and administrative advice and environmental requirements. Plants of this size are already expanding considerably, and the need for guiding principles for design/technology and environmental requirements is great. These guiding principles should comply with the environmental legislation requirements, and must contain advice and recommendations for bio fuel plants in this effect range, also in

  9. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  10. Transient Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of transient heat conduction.Fourier's law. General heat conducation equation. Thermal diffusivity. Biot and Fourier numbers. Lumped analysis and time constant. Semi-infinite body: fixed surface temperature, convective heat transfer at the surface, or constant surface heat flux...

  11. Measurements of air quality in Skogn and Levanger, October 1997 - September 1998, in connection with evaluations of consequences for the environment of NOx emissions from a power heating plant at the Fiborgtangen, Skogn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Leif Otto

    1999-01-01

    As basis for studying the effects of emissions to air from a power heating plant at the Fiborgtangen in Skogn on the environmental conditions Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) has made measurements of air and precipitation quality and meteorological conditions in the area. The registrations show that the car traffic is the main source of nitrogen oxides in the area. The concentrations of SO 2 are very low. The average concentrations and wet deposition of main components and heavy metals in precipitation were higher than at the background stations in the area but at the same time lower than at background stations in south and west of Norway. Most of the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority (Statens forurensningstilsyn) air quality criteria for O 3 were exceeded but concentrations were somewhat lower than at the background stations

  12. Thulium-170 heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Carl E.; Van Konynenburg, Richard; VanSant, James H.

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  13. District heating in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, F.

    1991-01-01

    District heating has been used in Switzerland for more than 50 years. Its share of the heat market is less than 3% today. An analysis of the use of district heating in various European countries shows that a high share of district heating in the heat market is always dependent on ideal conditions for its use. Market prospects and possible future developments in the use of district heating in Switzerland are described in this paper. The main Swiss producers and distributors of district heating are members of the Association of District Heating Producers and Distributors. This association supports the installation of district heating facilities where ecological, energetical and economic aspects indicate that district heating would be a good solution. (author) 2 tabs., 6 refs

  14. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  15. Analysis of Heat Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book deals with analysis of heat transfer which includes nonlinear analysis examples, radiation heat transfer, analysis of heat transfer in ANSYS, verification of analysis result, analysis of heat transfer of transition with automatic time stepping and open control, analysis of heat transfer using arrangement of ANSYS, resistance of thermal contact, coupled field analysis such as of thermal-structural interaction, cases of coupled field analysis, and phase change.

  16. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on the 2nd Joint Grenoble-Varenna International Symposium on Heating in Toroidal Plasmas, held at Como, Italy, from the 3-12 September 1980. Important problems in relation to the different existing processes of heating. The plasma were identified and discussed. Among others, the main processes discussed were: a) neutral beam heating, b) ion-(electron)-cyclotron resonance heating, c) hybrid resonance and low frequency heating

  17. Introduction to heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    SUNDÉN, B

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the basic mechanisms for transfer of heat, Introduction to Heat Transfer gives a deeper and more comprehensive view than existing titles on the subject. Derivation and presentation of analytical and empirical methods are provided for calculation of heat transfer rates and temperature fields as well as pressure drop. The book covers thermal conduction, forced and natural laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer, thermal radiation including participating media, condensation, evaporation and heat exchangers.

  18. Heat exchange apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, G.C.; McDaniels, J.D.; Gertsch, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention relates to heat exchangers used for transferring heat from the gas cooled core of a nuclear reactor to a secondary medium during standby and emergency conditions. The construction of the heat exchanger described is such that there is a minimum of welds exposed to the reactor coolant, the parasitic heat loss during normal operation of the reactor is minimized and the welds and heat transfer tubes are easily inspectable. (UK)

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Carbon Steel under Different Iron Oxide Deposits in the District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sang Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of pipeline steel covered by iron oxides (α-FeOOH; Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 was investigated in simulated district heating water. In potentiodynamic polarization tests; the corrosion rate of pipeline steel is increased under the iron oxide but the increaseing rate is different due to the differnet chemical reactions of the covered iron oxides. Pitting corrosion was only observed on the α-FeOOH-covered specimen; which is caused by the crevice corrosion under the α-FeOOH. From Mott-Schottky and X-ray diffraction results; the surface reaction and oxide layer were dependent on the kind of iron oxides. The iron oxides deposit increases the failure risk of the pipeline and localized corrosion can be occurred under the α-FeOOH-covered region of the pipeline. Thus, prevention methods for the iron oxide deposit in the district pipeline system such as filtering or periodic chemical cleaning are needed.

  20. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  1. Advances in the optimisation of apparel heating products: A numerical approach to study heat transport through a blanket with an embedded smart heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, S.F.; Couto, S.; Campos, J.B.L.M.; Mayor, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation of the performance of products with smart/active functionalities (e. g. in protective clothing, home textiles products, automotive seats, etc.) is still a challenge for manufacturers and developers. The aim of this study was to optimise the thermal performance of a heating product by a numerical approach, by analysing several opposing requirements and defining solutions for the identified limitations, before the construction of the first prototype. A transfer model was developed to investigate the transport of heat from the skin to the environment, across a heating blanket with an embedded smart heating system. Several parameters of the textile material and of the heating system were studied, in order to optimise the thermal performance of the heating blanket. Focus was put on the effects of thickness and thermal conductivity of each layer, and on parameters associated with the heating elements, e.g. position of the heating wires relative to the skin, distance between heating wires, applied heating power, and temperature range for operation of the heating system. Furthermore, several configurations of the blanket (and corresponding heating powers) were analysed in order to minimise the heat loss from the body to the environment, and the temperature distribution along the skin. The results show that, to ensure an optimal compromise between the thermal performance of the product and the temperature oscillation along its surface, the distance between the wires should be small (and not bigger than 50 mm), and each layer of the heating blanket should have a specific thermal resistance, based on the expected external conditions during use and the requirements of the heating system (i.e. requirements regarding energy consumption/efficiency and capacity to effectively regulate body exchanges with surrounding environment). The heating system should operate in an ON/OFF mode based on the body heating needs and within a temperature range specified based on

  2. Heat transfer from internally heated hemispherical pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Ellsion, P.G.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on heat transfer from internally heated ZnSO 4 -H 2 O pools to the walls of hemispherical containers. This experimental technique provides data for a heat transfer system that has to date been only theoretically treated. Three different sizes of copper hemispherical containers were used: 240, 280, 320 mm in diameter. The pool container served both as a heat transfer surface and as an electrode. The opposing electrode was a copper disk, 50 mm in diameter located at the top of the pool in the center. The top surface of the pool was open to the atmosphere

  3. Heat recovery from a cement plant with a Marnoch Heat Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saneipoor, P.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat from within a typical cement plant. Two MHE units with compressed air as the working fluid are installed to recover the waste heat. The first unit on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. This unit operates with three pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The recovered heat is converted to electricity through the MHE system and used internally within the cement plant. A predictive model and results are presented and discussed. The results show the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant. The new heat recovery system increases the efficiency of the cement plant and lowers the CO 2 emissions from the clinker production process. Moreover, it reduces the amount of waste heat to the environment and lowers the temperature of the exhaust gases. - Highlights: → This paper examines the thermodynamic performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat to produce electricity and improve the operating efficiency of a typical cement plant. → The first unit of the MHE on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers and the second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. → Both predicted and experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant.

  4. Business models of heat entrepreneurship in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, Lasse [North Karelia University of Applied Sciences, Yliopistokatu 6, FI-80100 Joensuu (Finland); Suhonen, Niko [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Law, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents the business models of small-scale heat energy production in Finland. Firstly, the development of heat entrepreneurship in the country is presented, including the remarkable growth of small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) in the last 15 years. Secondly, the concept of business model (business architecture of product/service flows and earning logics) is modified to the framework of wood heat production. The business model concept, and its sub-concepts, is applied in a brief review of current heat energy businesses in Finland. We arrive at a business model of heat entrepreneurships that are public companies/utilities, public-private partnerships, private companies and cooperatives, Energy Saving Company (ESCO), network model of large enterprise and franchising. Descriptive cases of these models are presented. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion on the applicability of the business models in different operational environments and geographical contexts. (author)

  5. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  6. Business models of heat entrepreneurship in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okkonen, Lasse; Suhonen, Niko

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the business models of small-scale heat energy production in Finland. Firstly, the development of heat entrepreneurship in the country is presented, including the remarkable growth of small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) in the last 15 years. Secondly, the concept of business model (business architecture of product/service flows and earning logics) is modified to the framework of wood heat production. The business model concept, and its sub-concepts, is applied in a brief review of current heat energy businesses in Finland. We arrive at a business model of heat entrepreneurships that are public companies/utilities, public-private partnerships, private companies and cooperatives, Energy Saving Company (ESCO), network model of large enterprise and franchising. Descriptive cases of these models are presented. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion on the applicability of the business models in different operational environments and geographical contexts.

  7. Heat pump augmentation of nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutz, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    A system is described for increasing the temperature of a working fluid heated by a nuclear reactor. The system consists of: a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor having a core and a primary cooling loop through which a coolant is circulated so as to undergo an increase in temperature, a closed secondary loop having a working fluid therein, the cooling and secondary loops having cooperative association with an intermediate heat exchanger adapted to effect transfer of heat from the coolant to the working fluid as the working fluid passes through the intermediate heat exchanger, a heat pump connected in the secondary loop and including a turbine and a compressor through which the working fluid passes so that the working fluid undergoes an increase in temperature as it passes through the compressor, a process loop including a process chamber adapted to receive a process fluid therein, the process chamber being connected in circuit with the secondary loop so as to receive the working fluid from the compressor and transfer heat from the working fluid to the process fluid, a heat exchanger for heating the working fluid connected to the process loop for receiving heat therefrom and for transferring heat to the secondary loop prior to the working fluid passing through the compressor, the secondary loop being operative to pass the working fluid from the process chamber to the turbine so as to effect driving relation thereof, a steam generator operatively associated with the secondary loop so as to receive the working fluid from the turbine, and a steam loop having a feedwater supply and connected in circuit with the steam generator so that feedwater passing through the steam loop is heated by the steam generator, the steam loop being connected in circuit with the process chamber and adapted to pass steam to the process chamber with the process fluid

  8. Firewood boiler operators and heat exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilson Bernardo Stollmeier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of heat exposure work in boiler industry wood from a company in the industrial sector, focusing on the analysis of the environmental burden of the activity. Therefore, the methodological procedures consisted of document analysis, interviews, filming, evaluation problems of the effects of the hot environment and its prevention. The results show that the fuel to the boiler operators are exposed to heat and need guidance on their daily activities with prevention of diseases affected by excessive heat. Are also suggested training in technical and health to improve working conditions and the operator's health.

  9. Heat stress management in hot mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available consequences of excessive levels of occupational heat stress were recognized by the South African gold mining industry when the first death from heat stroke occurred in 1924 (1). Steps to combat the heat stress hazard were taken almost immediately... currently used in the South African mining industry. In South African mines, work environments having a wet-bulb temperature in excess of 27.4 °C are considered to be ‘hot’ and necessitate the introduction of practices to safeguard miners...

  10. Heat recovery in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimle, F; Paul, J [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-05-01

    The waste heat of industrial furnaces and other heat-consuming installations can be utilized by recuperative processes in the furnace and by energy cascades. Economy and the need for an external supply of energy are closely connected. Straight cascades can hardly be realized and if the required temperature gradient is too great such heat should be utilized repeatedly if possible by recycling through heat pumps. The possibilities depend on the relevant temperature since the technology available for this differs in its state of development. The low-temperature waste heat from the final stage can be used for space-heating and water heating by heat exchangers and heat pumps and thus be put to a useful purpose.

  11. Drivers and barriers to heat stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani-Kovacs, Gertrud; Belusko, Martin; Skinner, Natalie; Pockett, John; Boland, John

    2016-11-15

    Heatwaves are the most dangerous natural hazard to health in Australia. The frequency and intensity of heatwaves will increase due to climate change and urban heat island effects in cities, aggravating the negative impacts of heatwaves. Two approaches exist to develop population heat stress resilience. Firstly, the most vulnerable social groups can be identified and public health services can prepare for the increased morbidity. Secondly, the population level of adaptation and the heat stress resistance of the built environment can be increased. The evaluation of these measures and their efficiencies has been fragmented across research disciplines. This study explored the relationships between the elements of heat stress resilience and their potential demographic and housing drivers and barriers. The responses of a representative online survey (N=393) about heat stress resilience at home and work from Adelaide, South Australia were analysed. The empirical findings demonstrate that heat stress resistant buildings increased adaptation capacity and decreased the number of health problems. Air-conditioning increased dependence upon it, limited passive adaptation and only people living in homes with whole-house air-conditioning had less health problems during heatwaves. Tenants and respondents with pre-existing health conditions were the most vulnerable, particularly as those with health conditions were not aware of their vulnerability. The introduction of an Energy Performance Certificate is proposed and discussed as an effective incentive to increase the heat stress resistance of and the general knowledge about the built environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Heat Tolerance Testing in Recovery and Return to Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    CV diseases Hyperthyroidism Pheochromocytoma Infectious diseases Diabetes mellitus Psychiatric illness Parkinsonism Congenital abnormalities: CF...environments. To assess the heat tolerance status of prior heat stroke patient. Heat tolerance test (HTT) “HTT was effective in evaluating the heat tolerance

  13. New nuclear heat sources for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    1975-01-01

    The means by which urban oil heating may be taken over by new energy sources, especially nuclear, are discussed. Several possibilities exist: pressurized water reactors for high powers, and low-temperature swimming-pool-type process-heat reactors for lower powers. Both these cases are discussed [fr

  14. Robotic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic architectural environments to be implemented and tested in the last decade in virtual and physical prototypes. These prototypes are incorporating sensing-actuating

  15. Performative Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo Stjerne

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores how performative architecture can act as a collective environment localizing urban flows and establishing public domains through the integration of pervasive computing and animation techniques. The NoRA project introduces the concept of ‘performative environments,' focusing on ...... of local interactions and network behaviour, building becomes social infrastructure and prompts an understanding of architectural structures as quasiobjects, which can retain both variation and recognisability in changing social constellations.......The paper explores how performative architecture can act as a collective environment localizing urban flows and establishing public domains through the integration of pervasive computing and animation techniques. The NoRA project introduces the concept of ‘performative environments,' focusing...

  16. Heat transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  17. Basic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D H

    2013-01-01

    Basic Heat Transfer aims to help readers use a computer to solve heat transfer problems and to promote greater understanding by changing data values and observing the effects, which are necessary in design and optimization calculations.The book is concerned with applications including insulation and heating in buildings and pipes, temperature distributions in solids for steady state and transient conditions, the determination of surface heat transfer coefficients for convection in various situations, radiation heat transfer in grey body problems, the use of finned surfaces, and simple heat exc

  18. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  19. Environment-oriented private house of Mr.K in Kyushu. Self-sufficing concept of the entire house demands for heating and cooling by natural energy, including the sewage disposal; Kyushu ni tatsu kankyo kyoseigata jutaku (K tei). Danbo/ryobo/seikatsu haisui no subete wo teinai deno shizen energy wo mochiite jusoku/shorisuru konseputo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, O. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-09-30

    A case study for a natural energy system serving for a private house is reported with the outline of the system and the measurement results of the temperature and heat environments both in summer and winter. A 2-story house with an area of 141m{sup 2} and a total floor area of 186m{sup 2} is introduced including the site where it stands. Then, it is described on a floor heating system by circulating warm water through pipings embedded in the structural bodies, made of reinforced concrete from a solar heat collector consisted of 20 galvanized steel pipes of 100mm in diameter and 7m in length, a wall and ceiling cooling system with well water that gushes out at a rate of about 2 tons/min, and also the use of 20 amorphous solar cell panels as the source of electric power generation of about 17W capacity for these 2 systems, a house sewage disposal after the first stage treatment into the soil of kicken garden and so forth. Upon these system installed, 50 measurement items such as temperatures of outdoor and each room, humidity, quantity of sunshine and so on were measured for 1 year, and the instrumentation data were collected. From various analytical results, it was revealed that the highest temperature of warm water pipings in winter was 32{degree}C, while the lowest temperature of 17{degree}C was recorded in the morning and the surface temperature in the structural bodies of a room located at the south-east corner remained stable in summer more or less at 27{degree}C and so forth. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Heat transfer enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasatani, Masanobu; Itaya, Yoshinori

    1985-01-01

    In order to develop energy-saving techniques and new energy techniques, and also most advanced techniques by making industrial equipment with high performance, heat transfer performance frequently becomes an important problem. In addition, the improvement of conventional heat transfer techniques and the device of new heat transfer techniques are often required. It is most proper that chemical engineers engage in the research and development for enhancing heat transfer. The research and development for enhancing heat transfer are important to heighten heat exchange efficiency or to cool equipment for preventing overheat in high temperature heat transfer system. In this paper, the techniques of enhancing radiative heat transfer and the improvement of radiative heat transfer characteristics are reported. Radiative heat transfer is proportional to fourth power of absolute temperature, and it does not require any heat transfer medium, but efficient heat-radiation converters are necessary. As the techniques of enhancing radiative heat transfer, the increase of emission and absorption areas, the installation of emissive structures and the improvement of radiative characteristics are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  1. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  2. Effective geothermal heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelsen, Atle

    2006-01-01

    Scandinavia's currently largest geothermal heating project: the New Ahus hospital, is briefly presented. 300-400 wells on a field outside the hospital are constructed to store energy for both heating and cooling purposes

  3. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Be Prepared Safe Citizen Day Organize Important Medical Information ER Checklists Preparing for Emergencies Be ready to ... anyone can be affected. Here you will find information about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. ...

  4. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  5. Design and Modeling of a Variable Heat Rejection Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Berisford, Daniel F.; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Variable Heat Rejection Radiator technology needed for future NASA human rated & robotic missions Primary objective is to enable a single loop architecture for human-rated missions (1) Radiators are typically sized for maximum heat load in the warmest continuous environment resulting in a large panel area (2) Large radiator area results in fluid being susceptible to freezing at low load in cold environment and typically results in a two-loop system (3) Dual loop architecture is approximately 18% heavier than single loop architecture (based on Orion thermal control system mass) (4) Single loop architecture requires adaptability to varying environments and heat loads

  6. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  7. Regenerative heat sources for heating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huenges, Ernst; Sperber, Evelyn; Eggers, Jan-Bleicke; Noll, Florian; Kallert, Anna Maria; Reuss, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The ambitious goal, the German Federal Government has set itself, to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases by 80% to 95% by the year 2050. As there are currently more than half of German energy consumption for the production of heat is required, big contributions to climate protection can be expected from this area if more renewable heat sources are used. Renewable heat sources such as bioenergy, solar thermal and geothermal energy in particular can be provided as compared to fossil fuels with significantly lower specific CO 2 emissions. Objectives in the heating market and scenarios for the transformation of the heat sector have been elaborated in the BMU Lead Study 2011. The main pillar of this scenario is the reduction of final energy consumption for heat by the energy-efficient renovation of existing buildings and further increasing demands on the energetic quality of new buildings. To cover the remaining energy demand, a focus is on the expansion of heating networks based on renewable energies. [de

  8. Heat recovery from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safa, H.

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic efficiency of a standard Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is around 33%. Therefore, about two third of the heat generated by the nuclear fuel is literally wasted in the environment. Given the fact that the steam coming out from the high pressure turbine is superheated, it could be advantageously used for non electrical applications, particularly for district heating. Considering the technological improvements achieved these last years in heat piping insulation, it is now perfectly feasible to envisage heat transport over quite long distances, exceeding 200 km, with affordable losses. Therefore, it could be energetically wise to revise the modifications required on present reactors to perform heat extraction without impeding the NPP operation. In this paper, the case of a French reactor is studied showing that a large fraction of the wasted nuclear heat can be actually recovered and transported to be injected in the heat distribution network of a large city. Some technical and economical aspects of nuclear district heating application are also discussed. (author)

  9. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating of plasmas in tokamak and EBT configurations has been studied using 1-2/2 and 2-1/2 dimensional fully self-consistent electromagnetic particle codes. We have tested two major antenna configurations; we have also compared heating efficiencies for one and two ion species plasmas. We model a tokamak plasma with a uniform poloidal field and 1/R toroidal field on a particular q surface. Ion cyclotron waves are excited on the low field side by antennas parallel either to the poloidal direction or to the toroidal direction with different phase velocities. In 2D, minority ion heating (vsub(perpendicular)) and electron heating (vsub(parallel),vsub(perpendicular)) are observed. The exponential electron heating seems due to the decay instability. The minority heating is consistent with mode conversion of fast Alfven waves and heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron modes. Minority heating is stronger with a poloidal antenna. The strong electron heating is accompanied by toroidal current generation. In 1D, no thermal instability was observed and only strong minority heating resulted. For an EBT plasma we model it by a multiple mirror. We have tested heating efficiency with various minority concentrations, temperatures, mirror ratios, and phase velocities. In this geometry we have beach or inverse beach heating associated with the mode conversion layer perpendicular to the toroidal field. No appreciable electron heating is observed. Heating of ions is linear in time. For both tokamak and EBT slight majority heating above the collisional rate is observed due to the second harmonic heating. (author)

  11. Decomposition of some amines and amino acids in steam generator environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaweera, P.; Hettiarachchi, S.; Millett, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrothermal decomposition rate constants and high temperature pH values of some selected high-molecular weight amines and amino acids were measured under simulated steam generator conditions. These amines and amino acids were evaluated as potential crevice buffering agents for steam generator applications in pressurized water reactors. The study showed that, although the high molecular weight amines undergo hydrothermal decomposition, they have a better buffer capacity than their low molecular weight counterparts at 290 C. The amines provide effective crevice buffering by increasing the pH of the simulated crevice solution by as much as 2.84 to 4.24 units. However, volatility data for the amines and amino acids are needed before in-plant testing to ensure that amines can concentrate sufficiently in steam generator crevices to provide effective buffering

  12. High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.; Critchley, E.

    1993-01-01

    Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented

  13. Heat roadmap China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Weiming; Wang, Yu; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2015-01-01

    District heating is regarded as a key element of energy saving actions in the Chinese national energy strategy, while space heating in China is currently still dominated by coal boilers. However, there is no existing quantitative study to analyse the future heat strategy for China. Therefore...

  14. Heat Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Ball Metal's design of ducting and controls for series of roof top heat exchangers was inspired by Tech Briefs. Heat exchangers are installed on eight press and coating lines used to decorate sheet metal. The heat recovery system provides an estimated energy savings of more than $250,000 per year.

  15. Microwave processing heats up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microwaves are a common appliance in many households. In the United States microwave heating is the third most popular domestic heating method food foods. Microwave heating is also a commercial food processing technology that has been applied for cooking, drying, and tempering foods. It's use in ...

  16. Solar heating pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinson-Rider, G.

    1977-10-04

    A fluid carrying pipe is described having an integral transparent portion formed into a longitudinally extending cylindrical lens that focuses solar heat rays to a focal axis within the volume of the pipe. The pipe on the side opposite the lens has a heat ray absorbent coating for absorbing heat from light rays that pass through the focal axis.

  17. Champagne Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  18. Designing heat exchangers for process heat reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    A brief account is given of the IAEA specialist meeting on process heat applications technology held in Julich, November 1979. The main emphasis was on high temperature heat exchange. Papers were presented covering design requirements, design construction and prefabrication testing, and selected problems. Primary discussion centered around mechanical design, materials requirements, and structural analysis methods and limits. It appears that high temperature heat exchanges design to nuclear standards, is under extensive development but will require a lengthy concerted effort before becoming a commercial reality. (author)

  19. Enacting Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Enacting Environments is an ethnography of the midst of the encounter between corporations, sustainable development and climate change. At this intersection 'environmental management' and 'carbon accounting' are put into practice. Purportedly, these practices green capitalism. Drawing on fieldwork...... of day-to-day practices of corporate environmental accountants and managers, Ingmar Lippert reconstructs their work as achieving to produce a reality of environment that is simultaneously stable and flexible enough for a particular corporate project: to stage the company, and in consequence capitalism......, as in control over its relations to an antecedent environment. Not confined to mere texts or meetings between shiny stakeholders co-governing the corporation – among them some of the world's biggest auditing firms, an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) and standards – control is found...

  20. Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX): a ''proof-of-principle'' evaluation of the use of electron beam heating to simulate the thermal mechanical environment anticipated for the first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, P.E.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    The results of a ''proof-of-principle'' Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX), designed to simulate the thermal mechanical response of insulator-metal composite first walls anticipated for pulsed high-density fusion reactors, are given. A programmable 10-kV, 1.0-A electron beam was used to pulse repeatedly (0.30-mm)Al 2 O 3 /(1.0-mm) Nb-1Zr composite samples 200 to 300 K, relative to a base-line temperature of 1000 K. The experimental goals of TSEX were established relative to the first-wall environment anticipated for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR). A detailed description of the TSEX ''proof-of-principle'' apparatus, experimental procedure, and diagnostics is given. The results of extensive thermal analyses are given, which are used to estimate the thermal stresses generated. Although little or no control was exercised over the sample fabrication and thermal history, one sample experienced in excess of 800 thermal cycles of approximately 250 K at approximately 1000 K, and the results of optical and SEM examination of this specimen are presented. The resistance of this sample to macroscopic failure was truly impressive. Recommendations for the construction of an apparatus dedicated to extensive testing of first-wall composites are given on the basis of these ''proof-of-principle'' TSEX results

  1. Heuristic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Giunta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the identification of a paradigm which fixes the basic concepts and the type of logical relationships between them, whereby direct, govern and evaluate choises on new technologies. The contribution is based on the assumption that the complexity of knowledge is correlated with the complexity of the learning environment. From the existence of this correlation will descend a series of consequences that contribute to the definition of a theoretical construct in which the logical categories of learning become the guiding criteria on which to design learning environments and, consequently, also the indicators on by which to evaluate its effectiveness.

  2. About the possible options for models of convective heat transfer in closed volumes with local heating source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in air area surrounded on all sides enclosing structures, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the media are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The process of convective heat transfer is calculated using the models of turbulence Prandtl and Prandtl-Reichard. Takes into account the processes of heat exchange region considered with the environment. Is carried out the analysis of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient at interfaces “air – enclosures”. The distributions average along the gas temperature range are obtained.

  3. Compact Ceramic Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinsohn, Charles [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The objective of the proposed work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a step change in power plant efficiency at a commercially viable cost, by obtaining performance data for prototype, compact, ceramic microchannel heat exchangers. By performing the tasks described in the initial proposal, all of the milestones were met. The work performed will advance the technology from Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3) to Technology Readiness Level 4 (TRL 4) and validate the potential of using these heat exchangers for enabling high efficiency solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or high-temperature turbine-based power plants. The attached report will describe how this objective was met. In collaboration with The Colorado School of Mines (CSM), specifications were developed for a high temperature heat exchanger for three commercial microturbines. Microturbines were selected because they are a more mature commercial technology than SOFC, they are a low-volume and high-value target for market entry of high-temperature heat exchangers, and they are essentially scaled-down versions of turbines used in utility-scale power plants. Using these specifications, microchannel dimensions were selected to meet the performance requirements. Ceramic plates were fabricated with microchannels of these dimensions. The plates were tested at room temperature and elevated temperature. Plates were joined together to make modular, heat exchanger stacks that were tested at a variety of temperatures and flow rates. Although gas flow rates equivalent to those in microturbines could not be achieved in the laboratory environment, the results showed expected efficiencies, robust operation under significant temperature gradients at high temperature, and the ability to cycle the stacks. Details of the methods and results are presented in this final report.

  4. Condensation heat transfer in plate heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchal, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    An Alfa-Laval plate heat exchanger, previously tested as an evaporator, was retested as a condenser. Two series of tests with different chevron-angle plates were carried out using ammonia as a working fluid. The overall heat-transfer coefficient and pressure drop were measured, and the effects of operating parameters were determined. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions. In the analysis, a gravity-controlled condensation process was modeled theoretically, and the overall performance was calculated. The analysis shows that the overall heat-transfer coefficient can be predicted with an average uncertainty of about 10%. It is, however, important to consider the interfacial shear stress, because the effective friction factor is high for flow in plate heat exchangers

  5. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta......SP, of theelectrode reaction. eta is the overvoltage at the electrode. This equation is appliedto a high temperature carbonate fuel cell. It is shown that the Peltier entropyterm by far exceeds the heat production due to the irreversible losses, and thatthe main part of heat evolved at the cathode is reabsorbed...

  6. Introduction to heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Heat may be defined as that form of energy which spontaneously flows between two bodies, or two regions of a body, by virtue of a temperature difference. The second law of thermodynamics tells us that we cannot have heat flow from a low temperature to high temperature without doing work. Heat flows spontaneously from a high temperature to a low temperature region. Thermodynamics, which is concerned with equilibrium states, cannot tell us anything about the rate of heat flow in the presence of a finite temperature difference. It is to the discipline of heat transfer to which we must turn for this answer

  7. Liquid metal heat transfer issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, H.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    An alkali liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor coupled with an alkali metal Rankine cycle provides a practicable option for space systems/missions requiring power in the 1 to 100 MW(e) range. Thermal issues relative to the use of alkali liquid metals for this purpose are identified as these result from the nature of the alkali metal fluid itself, from uncertainties in the available heat transfer correlations, and from design and performance requirements for system components operating in the earth orbital microgravity environment. It is noted that, while these issues require further attention to achieve optimum system performance, none are of such magnitude as to invalidate this particular space power concept

  8. African Environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental Studies and Regional Planning Bulletin African Environment is published in French and English, and for some issues, in Arabic. (only the issue below has been received by AJOL). Vol 10, No 3 (1999). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of ...

  9. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  10. Heat Roadmap Europe 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    Many strategies have already been proposed for the decarbonisation of the EU energy system by the year 2050. These typically focus on the expansion of renewable energy in the electricity sector and subsequently, electrifying both the heat and transport sectors as much as possible. In these strate......Many strategies have already been proposed for the decarbonisation of the EU energy system by the year 2050. These typically focus on the expansion of renewable energy in the electricity sector and subsequently, electrifying both the heat and transport sectors as much as possible....... In these strategies, the role of district heating has never been fully explored system, nor have the benefits of district heating been quantified at the EU level. This study combines the mapping of local heat demands and local heat supplies across the EU27. Using this local knowledge, new district heating potentials...... are identified and then, the EU27 energy system is modelled to investigate the impact of district heating. The results indicate that a combination of heat savings, district heating in urban areas, and individual heat pumps in rural areas will enable the EU27 to reach its greenhouse gas emission targets by 2050...

  11. Nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.; Hohn, H.; Schad, M.; Schwarz, D.; Singh, J.

    1993-01-01

    In a system for the application of high temperature heat from the HTR one must distinguish between the current generation and the use of process heat. In this respect it is important that the current can be generated by dual purpose power plants. The process heat is used as sensible heat, vaporisation heat and as chemical energy at the chemical conversion for the conversion of raw materials, the refinement of fossil primary energy carriers and finally circuit processes for the fission of water. These processes supply the market for heat, fuels, motor fuels and basic materials. Fifteen examples of HTR heat processes from various projects and programmes are presented in form of energy balances, however in a rather short way. (orig./DG) [de

  12. Space Heating Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance evaluation of space heating equipment for a geothermal application is generally considered from either of two perspectives: (a) selecting equipment for installation in new construction, or (b) evaluating the performance and retrofit requirements of an existing system. With regard to new construction, the procedure is relatively straightforward. Once the heating requirements are determined, the process need only involve the selection of appropriately sized hot water heating equipment based on the available water temperature. It is important to remember that space heating equipment for geothermal applications is the same equipment used in non-geothermal applications. What makes geothermal applications unique is that the equipment is generally applied at temperatures and flow rates that depart significantly from traditional heating system design. This chapter presents general considerations for the performance of heating equipment at non-standard temperature and flow conditions, retrofit of existing systems, and aspects of domestic hot water heating.

  13. FTR europia gamma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.T. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated and experimental gamma heating rates of europia in the Engineering Mockup Critical Assembly (EMC) were correlated. A calculated to experimental (C/E) ratio of 1.086 was established in validating the theoretical approach and computational technique applied in the calculations. Gamma heat deposition rates in the FTR with Eu 2 O 3 control absorbers were determined from three-dimensional calculations. Maximum gamma heating was found to occur near the tip of a half-inserted row 5 control rod assembly--12.8 watts/gm of europia. Gamma heating profiles were established for a single half-inserted europia absorber assembly. Local heat peaking was found not to alter significantly heating rates computed in the FTR core model, where larger mesh interval sizes precluded examination of spatially-limited heating gradients. These computations provide the basis for thermal-hydraulic analyses to ascertain temperature profiles in the FTR under europia control

  14. Miniature Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to Thermacore Inc. have fostered the company work on devices tagged "heat pipes" for space application. To control the extreme temperature ranges in space, heat pipes are important to spacecraft. The problem was to maintain an 8-watt central processing unit (CPU) at less than 90 C in a notebook computer using no power, with very little space available and without using forced convection. Thermacore's answer was in the design of a powder metal wick that transfers CPU heat from a tightly confined spot to an area near available air flow. The heat pipe technology permits a notebook computer to be operated in any position without loss of performance. Miniature heat pipe technology has successfully been applied, such as in Pentium Processor notebook computers. The company expects its heat pipes to accommodate desktop computers as well. Cellular phones, camcorders, and other hand-held electronics are forsible applications for heat pipes.

  15. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper compares the electricity, heating, and cooling sectors at national level for various European countries. Annual energy demands are compared for all 28 EU countries, while peak hourly demands are compared for four countries that vary significantly. The results indicate that the heat...... demand is currently the largest of the three demand types considered in terms of both annual and peak demands: it is the largest annual demand in 25 of the 28 EU countries, and it represents the largest peak demand in all four countries analysed. Electricity, heating, and cooling demands are all likely...... that the demand for electricity could double compared to today, depending on how these changes occur. Considering the scale of additional electricity required to electrify future heating and cooling demands, heat pumps should be prioritised over electric heating and other alternatives, such as district heating...

  16. Microbiology of aquatic environments: Characterizations of the microbiotas of municipal water supplies, the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System's heat transport fluid, and US Space Shuttle drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, James Nicholas, III

    An understanding of the microbiota within life support systems is essential for the prolonged presence of humans in space. This is because microbes may cause disease or induce biofouling and/or corrosion within spacecraft water systems. It is imperative that we develop effective high-throughput technologies for characterizing microbial populations that can eventually be used in the space environment. This dissertation describes testing and development of such methodologies, targeting both bacteria and viruses in water, and examines the bacterial and viral diversity within two spacecraft life support systems. The bacterial community of the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) was examined using conventional culture-based and advanced molecular techniques including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assays, direct microscopic examination, and analyses of 16S rRNA gene libraries from the community metagenome. The cultivable heterotrophs of the IATCS fluids ranged from below detection limit to 1.1x10 5/100 ml, and viable cells, measured by ATP, ranged from 1.4x10 3/100 ml to 7.7x105/100 ml. DNA extraction, cloning, sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis of the clones from 16S RNA gene libraries showed members of the firmicutes, alpha, beta, and gamma-proteobacteria to be present in the fluids. This persistent microbial bioburden and the presence of probable metal reducers, biofilm formers, and opportunistic pathogens illustrate the need for better characterization of bacterial communities present within spacecraft fluids. A new methodology was developed for detection of viruses in water using microarrays. Samples were concentrated by lyophilization, resuspended and filtered (0.22microm). Viral nucleic acids were then extracted, amplified, fluorescently labeled and hybridized onto a custom microarray with probes for ˜1000 known viruses. Numerous virus signatures were observed. Human Adenovirus C and

  17. Cooling urban heat islands with sustainable landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson

    1994-01-01

    This paper is directed to the policy-makers who are responsible for urban design and its climatological consequences. It summarizes our current knowledge on the structure, energetics, and mitigation of the urban heat island. Special attention is given to physical features of the environment that can be easily manipulated, particularly vegetation. Prototypical designs...

  18. Heat-accelerated radioinactivation of attenuated poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, V.L.; Trujillo, R.

    1975-01-01

    Attenuated poliovirus is inactivated in a synergistic manner when exposed simultaneously to heat and ionizing radiation. The synergistic response is observed in both the thermally labile and stable forms of the virus. A three-term kinetic model may be used to describe the inactivation response of the virus in a thermal and/or ionizing radiation environment. (orig.) [de

  19. Higher-order Modes and Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzer, B J [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    This chapter gives a basic introduction to the problem of wake fields created in the beam-surrounding environment and the resulting heating effects of machine components. The concepts are introduced and scaling rules derived that are exemplified by several observations from operation of the LHC and other machines.

  20. Optimizing a Small Ammonia Heat Pump with Accumulator Tank for Space and Hot Tap Water Heating

    OpenAIRE

    Lalovs, Arturs

    2015-01-01

    The heat pump market offers a wide variety of different residential heat pumps where most of them utilize refrigerant R-410A which has high global warming potential. Considering the fact that global policy starts to focus on issues related to energy efficiency and harmful impact to the environment, it is necessary to investigate over new refrigerants. As an alternative solution is to utilize natural refrigerants, such as ammonia, which has almost zero glob...